WorldWideScience

Sample records for blast injuries

  1. BOMB BLAST: PATTERN AND NATURE OF INJURIES

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmaji Master; Chandra Sekhar; Rangaiah

    2015-01-01

    Bomb blast cause injury on large groups of people by multiple mechanisms. Bomb blast injuries differ from the conventional description of trauma complexity. Primary injuries are caused by blast wave and over pressure. Secondary injuries are caused by flyin g debris and cause shrapnel wounds. Tertiary injuries are caused by blast wind due to forceful impact and quaternary injuries are caused by other vectors like heat, radiation etc. Combined injuries, especially blast and...

  2. BOMB BLAST: PATTERN AND NATURE OF INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmaji Master

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bomb blast cause injury on large groups of people by multiple mechanisms. Bomb blast injuries differ from the conventional description of trauma complexity. Primary injuries are caused by blast wave and over pressure. Secondary injuries are caused by flyin g debris and cause shrapnel wounds. Tertiary injuries are caused by blast wind due to forceful impact and quaternary injuries are caused by other vectors like heat, radiation etc. Combined injuries, especially blast and burn injury or blast and crush injur y, are common during an explosive event. Knowledge about nature of injuries is essential for medicolegal and postmortem reports.

  3. Underwater blast injury: a review of standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Rachel M; Bass, Cameron R

    2015-09-01

    The first cases of underwater blast injury appeared in the scientific literature in 1917, and thousands of service members and civilians were injured or killed by underwater blast during WWII. The prevalence of underwater blast injuries and occupational blasting needs led to the development of many safety standards to prevent injury or death. Most of these standards were not supported by experimental data or testing. In this review, we describe existing standards, discuss their origins, and we comprehensively compare their prescriptions across standards. Surprisingly, we found that most safety standards had little or no scientific basis, and prescriptions across standards often varied by at least an order of magnitude. Many published standards traced back to a US Navy 500 psi guideline, which was intended to provide a peak pressure at which injuries were likely to occur. This standard itself seems to have been based upon a completely unfounded assertion that has propagated throughout the literature in subsequent years. Based on the limitations of the standards discussed, we outline future directions for underwater blast injury research, such as the compilation of epidemiological data to examine actual injury risk by human beings subjected to underwater blasts. PMID:26415071

  4. Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Abid; Wani Rauf A; Sheikh Tariq; Parray Fazal Q; Wani Imtiaz; Gul Imran; Nazir Mir

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for ...

  5. Blast Injuries: What Clinicians Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-11-05

    In this podcast, Dr. Richard C. Hunt, Director of the CDC’s Division of Injury Response, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control provides a brief overview for health care providers on how to respond and care for persons injured by an explosion or blast event.  Created: 11/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Division of Injury Response (DIR).   Date Released: 11/6/2008.

  6. Blast Injuries: From Improvised Explosive Device Blasts to the Boston Marathon Bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Ditkofsky, Noah G; York, John D; Abujudeh, Hani H; Avery, Laura A; Brunner, John F; Sodickson, Aaron D; Lev, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    Although most trauma centers have experience with the imaging and management of gunshot wounds, in most regions blast wounds such as the ones encountered in terrorist attacks with the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) are infrequently encountered outside the battlefield. As global terrorism becomes a greater concern, it is important that radiologists, particularly those working in urban trauma centers, be aware of the mechanisms of injury and the spectrum of primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injury patterns. Primary blast injuries are caused by barotrauma from the initial increased pressure of the explosive detonation and the rarefaction of the atmosphere immediately afterward. Secondary blast injuries are caused by debris carried by the blast wind and most often result in penetrating trauma from small shrapnel. Tertiary blast injuries are caused by the physical displacement of the victim and the wide variety of blunt or penetrating trauma sustained as a result of the patient impacting immovable objects such as surrounding cars, walls, or fences. Quaternary blast injuries include all other injuries, such as burns, crush injuries, and inhalational injuries. Radiography is considered the initial imaging modality for assessment of shrapnel and fractures. Computed tomography is the optimal test to assess penetrating chest, abdominal, and head trauma. The mechanism of blast injuries and the imaging experience of the victims of the Boston Marathon bombing are detailed, as well as musculoskeletal, neurologic, gastrointestinal, and pulmonary injury patterns from blast injuries. PMID:26761543

  7. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GregoryAElder

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  8. Spectrum of abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Abid

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Abdominal organ injury in a primary blast type is always challenging for diagnosis. Air containing abdominal viscera is most vulnerable to effects of primary blast injury. In any patient exposed to a primary blast wave who presents with an acute abdomen, an abdominal organ injury is to be kept in a clinical suspicion. Aim Study various abdominal organ injuries occurring in a primary type of blast injury. Material and methods: All those who had exploratory laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries after a primary blast injury for a period of 10 years from January 1998 - January 2008 were included in this retrospective study. Results Total 154 patients had laparotomy for abdominal organ injuries with a primary blast type of injury. Small intestine was damaged in 48 patients (31.1% followed by spleen in 22.7% cases. 54 patients (35.06% had more than one organ injured. Liver laceration was present in 30 patients (19.48%. Multiple small gut perforations were present in 37 patients (77.08%. Negative laparotomy was found in 5 patients (3.24% whereas 3 (1.94% had re-exploration. Mortality was present in 6 patients (3.89%. Conclusions Primary blast injury causes varied abdominal organ injuries. Single or multiple organ damage can be there. Small intestine is commonest viscera injured. Laparotomy gives final diagnosis.

  9. Investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Paul A.; Ludwigsen, John S.; Ford, Corey C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Many troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan have sustained blast-related, closed-head injuries from being within non-lethal distance of detonated explosive devices. Little is known, however, about the mechanisms associated with blast exposure that give rise to traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study attempts to identify the precise conditions of focused stress wave energy within the brain, resulting from blast exposure, which will correlate with a threshold for persistent brain in...

  10. Translational Research for Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury: Injury Mechanism to Development of Medical Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, A.; Ohtani, K.; Arafune, T.; Washio, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Endo, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Kumabe, T.; Takayama, K.; Tominaga, T.

    1. Investigation of shock wave-induced phenomenon: blast-induced traumatic brain injury Blast wave (BW) is generated by explosion and is comprised of lead shock wave (SE) followed by subsequent supersonic flow.

  11. Low Level Primary Blast Injury in Rodent Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Pun, Pamela B. L.; Kan, Enci Mary; Salim, Agus; Li, Zhaohui; Ng, Kian Chye; Moochhala, Shabbir M; Ling, Eng-Ang; Tan, Mui Hong; Lu, Jia

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure (BOP) exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross...

  12. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    OpenAIRE

    GregoryAElder; MiguelA.Gama Sosa; RitaDe Gasperi; MichaelCShaughness; StevenTDeKosky; SamGandy; MadhusoodanaPNambiar; JohnWSteele

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in ...

  13. Low level primary blast injury in rodent brain

    OpenAIRE

    Enci MaryKan; AgusSalim; Zhao HuiLi; Eng-AngLing

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi) or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi) to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histo...

  14. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    OpenAIRE

    De Gasperi, Rita; Gama Sosa, Miguel A; Kim, Soong Ho; Steele, John W.; Shaughness, Michael C; Maudlin-Jeronimo, Eric; Hall, Aaron A.; DeKosky, Steven T.; McCarron, Richard M; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P.; Gandy, Sam; Ahlers, Stephen T.; Elder, Gregory A.

    2012-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI). The β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in exper...

  15. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kobeissy, Firas; Mondello, Stefania; Tümer, Nihal; Toklu, Hale Z.; Whidden, Melissa A; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Zhang, Zhiqun; Prima, Victor; Yassin, Walid; Anagli, John; Chandra, Namas; Svetlov, Stan; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, maj...

  16. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Firas H Kobeissy; Stefania eMondello; Nihal eTumer; Toklu, Hale Z.; Whidden, Melissa A; Nataliya eKirichenko; Zhiqun eZhang; Victor ePrima; Walid eYassin; Chandra eNamas; John eAnagli; Stanislav eSvetlov; Wang, Kevin K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP), blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be sever...

  17. Blast From the Past: A Retrospective Analysis of Blast-induced Head Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kristin E; Murphy, Justin M; Tsao, Jack W

    2016-03-01

    Because of the sharp increase in the number of military personnel exposed to explosive blasts in combat, research has been dedicated toward understanding the impact of explosions on the brain. It is important to consider that potential injuries that military personnel sustain may be both in the form of physical injury as well as "invisible" neuronal and psychological damage. Since the inception of the study of blast science in the Medieval and Renaissance eras, significant improvements have been made in the historical record keeping and biomedical analysis of blast injuries. This editorial comments on the evolution of blast science and the recognition of neurological sequelae from both the historical and scientific perspectives. PMID:26926849

  18. Simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul Allen; Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-01

    U.S. soldiers are surviving blast and impacts due to effective body armor, trauma evacuation and care. Blast injuries are the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in military personnel returning from combat. Understanding of Primary Blast Injury may be needed to develop better means of blast mitigation strategies. The objective of this paper is to investigate the effects of blast direction and strength on the resulting mechanical stress and wave energy distributions generated in the brain.

  19. Low level primary blast injury in rodent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enci MaryKan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of blast attacks and resulting traumatic brain injuries has been on the rise in recent years. Primary blast is one of the mechanisms in which the blast wave can cause injury to the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a single sub-lethal blast over pressure exposure of either 48.9 kPa (7.1 psi or 77.3 kPa (11.3 psi to rodents in an open-field setting. Brain tissue from these rats was harvested for microarray and histopathological analyses. Gross histopathology of the brains showed that cortical neurons were ‘darkened’ and shrunken with narrowed vasculature in the cerebral cortex day 1 after blast with signs of recovery at day 4 and day 7 after blast. TUNEL-positive cells were predominant in the white matter of the brain at day 1 after blast and double-labeling of brain tissue showed that these DNA-damaged cells were both oligodendrocytes and astrocytes but were mainly not apoptotic due to the low caspase-3 immunopositivity. There was also an increase in amyloid precursor protein immunoreactive cells in the white matter which suggests acute axonal damage. In contrast, Iba-1 staining for macrophages or microglia was not different from control post-blast. Blast exposure altered the expression of over 5786 genes in the brain which occurred mostly at day 1 and day 4 post-blast. These genes were narrowed down to 10 overlapping genes after time-course evaluation and functional analyses. These genes pointed towards signs of repair at day 4 and 7 post-blast. Our findings suggest that the blast over pressure levels in the study resulted in mild cellular injury to the brain as evidenced by acute neuronal, cerebrovascular and white matter perturbations that showed signs of resolution. It is unclear whether these perturbations exist at a milder level or normalize completely and will need more investigation. Specific changes in gene expression may be further evaluated to understand the mechanism of blast

  20. Histologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in human blast lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsokos, Michael; Paulsen, Friedrich; Petri, Susan; Madea, Burkhard; Puschel, Klaus; Turk, Elisabeth E

    2003-09-01

    The objective of this autopsy-based study was to investigate the pathology of human blast lung injury using histology, Fat Red 7B staining, immunohistochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy on lung specimens from eight medicolegal autopsy cases of fatal close-range detonations of chemical explosives. The micromorphologic equivalents of human blast lung injury can be summarized as follows: diffuse alveolar overdistension, circumscribed interstitial hemorrhages showing a cufflike pattern around pulmonary vessels, venous air embolism, bone marrow embolism, and pulmonary fat embolism. Hemorrhages within the lung parenchyma that were present in this study in blast victims without coexisting blunt or penetrating chest trauma must be regarded as potentially life-threatening intrapulmonary bleeding sites in survivors. In addition, the potential clinical importance of the presence of massive pulmonary fat embolism, which has, to the best of our knowledge, not been described previously in human blast lung injury, must be emphasized because pulmonary fat embolism may be a leading cause of the rapid respiratory deterioration with progressive hypoxia and development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in blast victims who survive. Furthermore, this study provides evidence that air embolism presenting in blast victims is not a mere ventilation-induced artifact. PMID:12842857

  1. Synaptic Mechanisms of Blast-Induced Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przekwas, Andrzej; Somayaji, Mahadevabharath R; Gupta, Raj K

    2016-01-01

    Blast wave-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most common injuries to military personnel. Brain tissue compression/tension due to blast-induced cranial deformations and shear waves due to head rotation may generate diffuse micro-damage to neuro-axonal structures and trigger a cascade of neurobiological events culminating in cognitive and neurodegenerative disorders. Although diffuse axonal injury is regarded as a signature wound of mild TBI (mTBI), blast loads may also cause synaptic injury wherein neuronal synapses are stretched and sheared. This synaptic injury may result in temporary disconnect of the neural circuitry and transient loss in neuronal communication. We hypothesize that mTBI symptoms such as loss of consciousness or dizziness, which start immediately after the insult, could be attributed to synaptic injury. Although empirical evidence is beginning to emerge; the detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic injury are still elusive. Coordinated in vitro-in vivo experiments and mathematical modeling studies can shed light into the synaptic injury mechanisms and their role in the potentiation of mTBI symptoms. PMID:26834697

  2. A Multiscale Approach to Blast Neurotrauma Modeling: Part II: Methodology for Inducing Blast Injury to in vitro Models

    OpenAIRE

    Effgen, Gwen B.; Hue, Christopher D.; Vogel, Edward; Panzer, Matthew B.; Meaney, David F.; Bass, Cameron R.; Morrison, Barclay

    2012-01-01

    Due to the prominent role of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) in wounding patterns of U.S. war-fighters in Iraq and Afghanistan, blast injury has risen to a new level of importance and is recognized to be a major cause of injuries to the brain. However, an injury risk-function for microscopic, macroscopic, behavioral, and neurological deficits has yet to be defined. While operational blast injuries can be very complex and thus difficult to analyze, a simplified blast injury model would fac...

  3. Distinguishing Realistic Military Blasts from Firecrackers in Mitigation Studies of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2011-01-21

    In their Contributed Article, Nyein et al. (1,2) present numerical simulations of blast waves interacting with a helmeted head and conclude that a face shield may significantly mitigate blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI). A face shield may indeed be important for future military helmets, but the authors derive their conclusions from a much smaller explosion than typically experienced on the battlefield. The blast from the 3.16 gm TNT charge of (1) has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 10 atm, 0.25 ms, and 3.9 psi-ms at the front of the head (14 cm from charge), and 1.4 atm, 0.32 ms, and 1.7 psi-ms at the back of a typical 20 cm head (34 cm from charge). The peak pressure of the wave decreases by a factor of 7 as it traverses the head. The blast conditions are at the threshold for injury at the front of the head, but well below threshold at the back of the head (4). The blast traverses the head in 0.3 ms, roughly equal to the positive phase duration of the blast. Therefore, when the blast reaches the back of the head, near ambient conditions exist at the front. Because the headform is so close to the charge, it experiences a wave with significant curvature. By contrast, a realistic blast from a 2.2 kg TNT charge ({approx} an uncased 105 mm artillery round) is fatal at an overpressure of 10 atm (4). For an injury level (4) similar to (1), a 2.2 kg charge has the following approximate peak overpressures, positive phase durations, and incident impulses (3): 2.1 atm, 2.3 ms, and 18 psi-ms at the front of the head (250 cm from charge), and 1.8 atm, 2.5 ms, and 16.8 psi-ms at the back of the head (270 cm from charge). The peak pressure decreases by only a factor of 1.2 as it traverses the head. Because the 0.36 ms traversal time is much smaller than the positive phase duration, pressures on the head become relatively uniform when the blast reaches the back of the head. The larger standoff implies

  4. [Fatal explosion injuries from blasting a cigarette machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Ridwan, Hani; Längin, Volker; Doberentz, Elke

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, a growing number of cases have been reported in Germany in which vending machines have been blasted by criminals to get at the money. Thus, it was only a question of time for the first fatalities to occur as a consequence of such careless explosions. We report on the death of a 16-year-old boy who died after triggering an explosion by spraying a deodorant into the coin slot of a cigarette machine. Death was caused by severe craniocerebral trauma due to tertiary blast-related injuries when the front plate of the machine hit the victim's cerebral and facial skull. PMID:27120900

  5. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating b...

  6. Blast overpressure induced axonal injury changes in rat brainstem and spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasu Kallakuri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast induced neurotrauma has been the signature wound in returning soldiers from the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Of importance is understanding the pathomechansim(s of blast overpressure (OP induced axonal injury. Although several recent animal models of blast injury indicate the neuronal and axonal injury in various brain regions, animal studies related to axonal injury in the white matter (WM tracts of cervical spinal cord are limited. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of axonal injury in WM tracts of cervical spinal cord in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to a single insult of blast OP. Materials and Methods: Sagittal brainstem sections and horizontal cervical spinal cord sections from blast and sham animals were stained by neurofilament light (NF-L chain and beta amyloid precursor protein immunocytochemistry and observed for axonal injury changes. Results: Observations from this preliminary study demonstrate axonal injury changes in the form of prominent swellings, retraction bulbs, and putative signs of membrane disruptions in the brainstem and cervical spinal cord WM tracts of rats subjected to blast OP. Conclusions: Prominent axonal injury changes following the blast OP exposure in brainstem and cervical spinal WM tracts underscores the need for careful evaluation of blast induced injury changes and associated symptoms. NF-L immunocytochemistry can be considered as an additional tool to assess the blast OP induced axonal injury.

  7. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wav...

  8. Reproduction of an animal model of landmine blast injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen ZHANG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To reproduce an animal model of landmine blast injuries for studying its mechanism and characteristics. Methods Fifteen healthy New Zealand white rabbits (body weight 1.9-2.4 kg were prepared as experimental animals. Punctiform burster was used to simulate the landmine, and it was electrically detonated far away to produce landmine blast injuries on unilateral hind limb of rabbits in upright state. The vital signs before and 5min, 15min, 30min, 45min, 1h, 2h, 3h, 6h, 9h and 12h after injuries were recorded. Autopsy of dead animals was performed immediately and the survivors were sacrificed for pathological examination 6h and 12h after the injury. Macroscopic and microscopic changes in the injured limb and distant organs were observed. Fifteen random adult body weights were generated by random number table, and the explosive energy of M14 landmine (about 29g TNT explosive energy was simulated, to compare the ratio of explosive force equivalent to weight calculated between experimental animals and randomly selected adults. Results No significant change in blood pressure was observed at different time points before and after injuries. A broom-like change was found in the injured limb by the general observation. The subareas and pathological changes of injured limb coincided with the typical limb injuries produced by landmine explosion. Damage in different degrees was found in distant organs, and the wound characteristics and injury of major organs were in accordance with the reports of relevant literature. The ratio of explosive equivalent to weight of experimental animals (0.50±0.04g TNT/kg was similar to that of randomly selected adults (0.51±0.05g TNT/kg. Conclusion The present animal model could simulate the landmine explosive injuries, and may be used in research of landmine explosive injuries. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.01.14

  9. Lower extremity injury criteria for evaluating military vehicle occupant injury in underbelly blast events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Brian J; Bir, Cynthia A

    2009-11-01

    Anti-vehicular (AV) landmines and improvised explosive devices (IED) have accounted for more than half of the United States military hostile casualties and wounded in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) (Department of Defense Personnel & Procurement Statistics, 2009). The lower extremity is the predominantly injured body region following an AV mine or IED blast accounting for 26 percent of all combat injuries in OIF (Owens et al., 2007). Detonations occurring under the vehicle transmit high amplitude and short duration axial loads onto the foot-ankle-tibia region of the occupant causing injuries to the lower leg. The current effort was initiated to develop lower extremity injury criteria for occupants involved in underbelly blast impacts. Eighteen lower extremity post mortem human specimens (PMHS) were instrumented with an implantable load cell and strain gages and impacted at one of three incrementally severe AV axial loading conditions. Twelve of the 18 PMHS specimens sustained fractures of the calcaneus, talus, fibula and/or tibia. The initiation of skeletal injury was precisely detected by strain gages and corresponded with local peak axial tibia force. Survival analysis identified peak axial tibia force and impactor velocity as the two best predictors of incapacitating injury. A tibia axial force of 5,931 N and impactor velocity of 10.8 m/s corresponds with a 50 percent risk of an incapacitating injury. The criteria may be utilized to predict the probability of lower extremity incapacitating injury in underbelly blast impacts. PMID:20058557

  10. A Multi-Mode Shock Tube for Investigation of Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Reneer, Dexter V.; Hisel, Richard D.; Hoffman, Joshua M.; Kryscio, Richard J.; Lusk, Braden T.; Geddes, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the diff...

  11. Assessing neuro-systemic & behavioral components in the pathophysiology of blast-related brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobeissy, Firas; Mondello, Stefania; Tümer, Nihal; Toklu, Hale Z; Whidden, Melissa A; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Zhang, Zhiqun; Prima, Victor; Yassin, Walid; Anagli, John; Chandra, Namas; Svetlov, Stan; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-01-01

    Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI). A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal, and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction, and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the "distinct" but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved. PMID:24312074

  12. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI. A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the distinct but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  13. Diffusion Tensor Imaging Reveals White Matter Injury in a Rat Model of Repetitive Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Calabrese, Evan; Du, Fu; Garman, Robert H.; Johnson, G. Allan; Riccio, Cory; Tong, Lawrence C.; Joseph B. Long

    2014-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is one of the most common combat-related injuries seen in U.S. military personnel, yet relatively little is known about the underlying mechanisms of injury. In particular, the effects of the primary blast pressure wave are poorly understood. Animal models have proven invaluable for the study of primary bTBI, because it rarely occurs in isolation in human subjects. Even less is known about the effects of repeated primary blast wave exposure, but exis...

  14. Working toward exposure thresholds for blast-induced traumatic brain injury: thoracic and acceleration mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2010.05.025

    2011-01-01

    Research in blast-induced lung injury resulted in exposure thresholds that are useful in understanding and protecting humans from such injury. Because traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to blast exposure has become a prominent medical and military problem, similar thresholds should be identified that can put available research results in context and guide future research toward protecting warfighters as well as diagnosis and treatment. At least three mechanical mechanisms by which the blast wave may result in brain injury have been proposed - a thoracic mechanism, head acceleration and direct cranial transmission. These mechanisms need not be mutually exclusive. In this study, likely regions of interest for the first two mechanisms based on blast characteristics (positive pulse duration and peak effective overpressure) are developed using available data from blast experiments and related studies, including behind-armor blunt trauma and ballistic pressure wave studies. These related studies are appropriate to in...

  15. An animal-to-human scaling law for blast-induced traumatic brain injury risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Jean, Aurélie; Nyein, Michelle K.; Zheng, James Q.; Moore, David F.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Radovitzky, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    A physics-based animal-to-human scaling law for the effects of a blast wave on brain tissue is proposed. This scaling law, or transfer function, enables the translation of animal-based assessments of injury to the human, thus effectively enabling the derivation of human injury criteria based on animal tests. This is critical both in the diagnosis of traumatic brain injury as well as in the design of blast-protective helmets.

  16. A multi-mode shock tube for investigation of blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneer, Dexter V; Hisel, Richard D; Hoffman, Joshua M; Kryscio, Richard J; Lusk, Braden T; Geddes, James W

    2011-01-01

    Blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has become increasingly common in recent military conflicts. The mechanisms by which non-impact blast exposure results in bTBI are incompletely understood. Current small animal bTBI models predominantly utilize compressed air-driven membrane rupture as their blast wave source, while large animal models use chemical explosives. The pressure-time signature of each blast mode is unique, making it difficult to evaluate the contributions of the different components of the blast wave to bTBI when using a single blast source. We utilized a multi-mode shock tube, the McMillan blast device, capable of utilizing compressed air- and compressed helium-driven membrane rupture, and the explosives oxyhydrogen and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX, the primary component of C-4 plastic explosives) as the driving source. At similar maximal blast overpressures, the positive pressure phase of compressed air-driven blasts was longer, and the positive impulse was greater, than those observed for shockwaves produced by other driving sources. Helium-driven shockwaves more closely resembled RDX blasts, but by displacing air created a hypoxic environment within the shock tube. Pressure-time traces from oxyhydrogen-driven shockwaves were very similar those produced by RDX, although they resulted in elevated carbon monoxide levels due to combustion of the polyethylene bag used to contain the gases within the shock tube prior to detonation. Rats exposed to compressed air-driven blasts had more pronounced vascular damage than those exposed to oxyhydrogen-driven blasts of the same peak overpressure, indicating that differences in blast wave characteristics other than peak overpressure may influence the extent of bTBI. Use of this multi-mode shock tube in small animal models will enable comparison of the extent of brain injury with the pressure-time signature produced using each blast mode, facilitating evaluation of the blast wave components

  17. Blast injury in a civilian trauma setting is associated with a delay in diagnosis of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, Grant V; Lumpkins, Kimberly; O'Connor, James; Simard, Marc; Schaub, Stacey; Conway, Anne; Bochicchio, Kelly; Scalea, Thomas M

    2008-03-01

    High-pressure waves (blast) account for the majority of combat injuries and are becoming increasingly common in terrorist attacks. To our knowledge, there are no data evaluating the epidemiology of blast injury in a domestic nonterrorist setting. Data were analyzed retrospectively on patients admitted with any type of blast injury over a 10-year period at a busy urban trauma center. Injuries were classified by etiology of explosion and anatomical location. Eighty-nine cases of blast injury were identified in 57,392 patients (0.2%) treated over the study period. The majority of patients were male (78%) with a mean age of 40 +/- 17 years. The mean Injury Severity Score was 13 +/- 11 with an admission Trauma and Injury Severity Score of 0.9 +/- 0.2 and Revised Trauma Score of 7.5 +/- 0.8. The mean intensive care unit and hospital length of stay was 2 +/- 7 days and 4.6 +/- 10 days, respectively, with an overall mortality rate of 4.5 per cent. Private dwelling explosion [n = 31 (35%)] was the most common etiology followed by industrial pressure blast [n = 20 (22%)], industrial gas explosion [n = 16 (18%)], military training-related explosion [n = 15 (17%)], home explosive device [n = 8 (9%)], and fireworks explosion [n = 1 (1%)]. Maxillofacial injuries were the most common injury (n = 78) followed by upper extremity orthopedic (n = 29), head injury (n = 32), abdominal (n = 30), lower extremity orthopedic (n = 29), and thoracic (n = 19). The majority of patients with head injury [28 of 32 (88%)] presented with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15. CT scans on admission were initially positive for brain injury in 14 of 28 patients (50%). Seven patients (25%) who did not have a CT scan on admission had a CT performed later in their hospital course as a result of mental status change and were positive for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Three patients (11%) had a negative admission CT with a subsequently positive CT for TBI over the next 48 hours. The remaining four patients (14

  18. A multiscale approach to blast neurotrauma modeling:Part II: Methodology for inducing blast injury to in vitro models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GwenB.Effgen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent role of improvised explosive devices (IEDs in wounding patterns of U.S. war-fighters in Iraq and Afghanistan, blast injury has risen to a new level of importance and is recognized to be a major cause of injuries to the brain. However, an injury risk-function for microscopic, macroscopic, behavioral, and neurological deficits has yet to be defined. While operational blast injuries can be very complex and thus difficult to analyze, a simplified blast injury model would facilitate studies correlating biological outcomes with blast biomechanics to define tolerance criteria. Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI results from the translation of a shock wave in air, such as that produced by an IED, into a pressure wave within the skull-brain complex. Our blast injury methodology recapitulates this phenomenon in vitro, allowing for control of the injury biomechanics via a compressed-gas shock tube used in conjunction with a custom-designed, fluid-filled receiver that contains the living culture. The receiver converts the air shock wave into a fast-rising pressure transient with minimal reflections, mimicking the intracranial pressure history in blast. We have developed an organotypic hippocampal slice culture model that exhibits cell death when exposed to a 530  17.7 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.026 ± 0.017 ms duration and 190 ± 10.7 kPa-ms impulse in-air. We have also injured a simplified in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, which exhibits disrupted integrity immediately following exposure to 581  10.0 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.067 ms ± 0.006 ms duration and 222 ± 6.9 kPa-ms impulse in-air. To better prevent and treat bTBI, both the initiating biomechanics and the ensuing pathobiology must be understood in greater detail. A well-characterized, in vitro model of bTBI, in conjunction with animal models, will be a powerful tool for developing strategies to mitigate the risks of bTBI.

  19. Application of Silver Sulfadiazine Cream With Early Surgical Intervention in Patients Suffering From Combined Burn-Blast Injury Facial Tattoos

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined burn-blast injury is a great challenge to surgical teams due to its high mortality. It also results in unsightly traumatic tattoos. The aims of these case reports were to clarify the clinical characteristic of the dynamite explosion burn-blast facial injuries and discuss appropriate management of these patients. We report two patients suffering from facial burn-blast injury following dynamite explosion in which after primary stabilization, silver sulfadiazine cream was applied...

  20. Changes of serum Tau, GFAP, TNF-α and malonaldehyde after blast-related traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the changes of serum Tau protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and malonaldehyde (MDA) in rats after blast-related traumatic brain injury (BTBI) and to provide relative information for further studies on BTBI mechanism and seek specifi c biomarkers for BTBI. Methods: Ninety male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into three groups: control group, moderate blast injury group, and severe blast injury group ...

  1. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-30

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well-researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

  2. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A New Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, William C; Blackman, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become the signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI on society are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various mechanisms, including impacts caused by the blast, have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. Through the use of hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. This mechanism has implications for the diagnosis of TBI in soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  3. Bryostatin-1 Restores Blood Brain Barrier Integrity following Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Logsdon, Aric F; Smith, Kelly E; Turner, Ryan C; Alkon, Daniel L; Tan, Zhenjun; Naser, Zachary J; Knotts, Chelsea M; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2015-12-01

    Recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have accounted for an estimated 270,000 blast exposures among military personnel. Blast traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the 'signature injury' of modern warfare. Blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption following blast TBI can lead to long-term and diffuse neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigate for the first time the role of bryostatin-1, a specific protein kinase C (PKC) modulator, in ameliorating BBB breakdown. Thirty seven Sprague-Dawley rats were used for this study. We utilized a clinically relevant and validated blast model to expose animals to moderate blast exposure. Groups included: control, single blast exposure, and single blast exposure + bryostatin-1. Bryostatin-1 was administered i.p. 2.5 mg/kg after blast exposure. Evan's blue, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis were performed to assess injury. Evan's blue binds to albumin and is a marker for BBB disruption. The single blast exposure caused an increase in permeability compared to control (t = 4.808, p < 0.05), and a reduction back toward control levels when bryostatin-1 was administered (t = 5.113, p < 0.01). Three important PKC isozymes, PKCα, PKCδ, and PKCε, were co-localized primarily with endothelial cells but not astrocytes. Bryostatin-1 administration reduced toxic PKCα levels back toward control levels (t = 4.559, p < 0.01) and increased the neuroprotective isozyme PKCε (t = 6.102, p < 0.01). Bryostatin-1 caused a significant increase in the tight junction proteins VE-cadherin, ZO-1, and occludin through modulation of PKC activity. Bryostatin-1 ultimately decreased BBB breakdown potentially due to modulation of PKC isozymes. Future work will examine the role of bryostatin-1 in preventing chronic neurodegeneration following repetitive neurotrauma. PMID:25301233

  4. Response to Goal Management Training in Veterans with blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    J. Kay Waid-Ebbs, PhD, BCBA-D; Janis Daly, PhD; Samuel S. Wu, PhD; W. Keith Berg, PhD; Russell M. Bauer, PhD; William M. Perlstein, PhD; Bruce Crosson, PhD

    2015-01-01

    Veterans with blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience cognitive deficits that interfere with functional activities. Goal Management Training (GMT), which is a metacognitive intervention, offers an executive function rehabilitation approach that draws upon theories concerning goal processing and sustained attention. GMT has received empirical support in studies of patients with TBI but has not been tested in Veterans with blast-related mild TBI. GMT was modified from 7 weekl...

  5. Viscoelastic Materials Study for the Mitigation of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartyczak, Susan; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    2011-06-01

    Recent preliminary research into the causes of blast-related brain injury indicates that exposure to blast pressures, such as from IED detonation or multiple firings of a weapon, causes damage to brain tissue resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current combat helmets are not sufficient to protect the warfighter from this danger and the effects are debilitating, costly, and long-lasting. Commercially available viscoelastic materials, designed to dampen vibration caused by shock waves, might be useful as helmet liners to dampen blast waves. The objective of this research is to develop an experimental technique to test these commercially available materials when subject to blast waves and evaluate their blast mitigating behavior. A 40-mm-bore gas gun is being used as a shock tube to generate blast waves (ranging from 1 to 500 psi) in a test fixture at the gun muzzle. A fast opening valve is used to release nitrogen gas from the breech to impact instrumented targets. The targets consist of aluminum/ viscoelastic polymer/ aluminum materials. Blast attenuation is determined through the measurement of pressure and accelerometer data in front of and behind the target. The experimental technique, calibration and checkout procedures, and results will be presented.

  6. Comparative study on effects of burn-blast combined injury and burn-firearm combined injury complicated with seawater immersion on vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong; LAI Xi-nan; GE Heng-jiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To comparatively study the effects and mechanisms of burn-blast combined injury and burn-firearm combined injury complicated with seawater immersion on vascular endothelial cells. Methods: A total of 40 healthy adult hybrid dogs of both sexes, weighing 12-15 kg, were used in this study. Randomly-selected 20 dogs were established as models of burn-blast combined injury (the burn-blast injury group) and the other 20 dogs as models of burn-firearm combined injury (the burn-firearm injury group). Then the wounds of all the dogs were immediately immersed in seawater for 4 hours, and then they were taken out from the seawater. Blood samples were withdrawn from the central vein of the dogs before injury, and at 4, 7, 10, 20, and 28 hours after injury to measure the circulating endothelial cells and the von Willebrand factor. Results: Circulating endothelial cells increased significantly at 4 hours after injury in all the dogs. But they reached peak at 7 hours after injury in the burn-blast injury group and at 28 hours after injury in the burn-firearm injury group. The changes of circulating endothelial cells in the burn-blast injury group were significantly different from those in the burn-firearm injury group at 4, 7, 20, and 28 hours after injury (P<0.01). The von Willebrand factor reached peak at 4 hours after injury in the burn-blast injury group and at 28 hours in the burn-firearm injury group. The changes of von Willebrand factor in the burn-blast injury group were significantly different from those in the burn-firearm injury group at 4, 20, and 28 hours after injury (P<0.01).Conclusions: In burn-blast injury combined with seawater immersion, the vascular endothelial cells changed most significantly at 4 hours or 7 hours after injury, while burn-firearm injury combined with seawater immersion have the same at 20 hours or 28 hours after injury.

  7. A Thoracic Mechanism of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Due to Blast Pressure Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Amy; 10.1016/j.mehy.2008.08.015

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms by which blast pressure waves cause mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are an open question. Possibilities include acceleration of the head, direct passage of the blast wave via the cranium, and propagation of the blast wave to the brain via a thoracic mechanism. The hypothesis that the blast pressure wave reaches the brain via a thoracic mechanism is considered in light of ballistic and blast pressure wave research. Ballistic pressure waves, caused by penetrating ballistic projectiles or ballistic impacts to body armor, can only reach the brain via an internal mechanism and have been shown to cause cerebral effects. Similar effects have been documented when a blast pressure wave has been applied to the whole body or focused on the thorax in animal models. While vagotomy reduces apnea and bradycardia due to ballistic or blast pressure waves, it does not eliminate neural damage in the brain, suggesting that the pressure wave directly affects the brain cells via a thoracic mechanism. ...

  8. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  9. Skull flexure from blast waves: a mechanism for brain injury with implications for helmet design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-14

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts. The debilitating effects of TBI are long-lasting and costly. Although the mechanisms by which impacts cause TBI have been well researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. Various possibilities have been investigated, but blast-induced deformation of the skull has been neglected. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that nonlethal blasts can induce sufficient flexure of the skull to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even if no impact occurs. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for the diagnosis of soldiers and the design of protective equipment such as helmets.

  10. Development of an Animal Model for Burn-Blast Combined Injury and Cardiopulmonary System Changes in the Early Shock Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Quan; Chai, Jiake; Hu, Sen; Fan, Jun; Wang, Hong-Wei; Ma, Li; Duan, Hong-Jie; Liu, Lingying; Yang, Hongming; Li, Bai-Ling; Wang, Yi-He

    2015-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to establish an animal model for burn-blast combined injury research and elaborate cardiopulmonary system changes in the early shock stage. In this study, royal demolition explosive or RDX (hexagon, ring trimethylene nitramine) was used as an explosive source, and the injury conditions of the canine test subjects at various distances to the explosion (30, 50, and 70 cm) were observed by gross anatomy and pathology to determine a larger animal model of moderate blast injury. The canines were then subjected to a 35 % total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame injury using napalm, which completed the development of a burn-blast combined injury model. Based on this model, the hemodynamic changes and arterial blood gas analysis after the burn-blast combined injury were measured to identify the cardiopulmonary system characteristics. In this research, RDX explosion and flame injury were used to develop a severe burn-blast injury animal model that was stable, close to reality, and easily controllable. The hemodynamic and arterial blood gas changes in the canine subjects after burn-blast injury changed distinctly from the burn and blast injuries. Blood pressure and cardiac output fluctuated, and the preload was significantly reduced, whereas the afterload significantly increased. Meanwhile, the oxygen saturation (SO2) decreased markedly with carbon dioxide partial pressure (PCO2), and lactic acid (Lac) rose, and oxygen partial pressure (PO2) reduced. These changes suggested that immediate clinical treatment is important during burn-blast injury both to stabilize cardiac function and supply blood volume and to reduce the vascular permeability, thereby preventing acute pneumonedema or other complications. PMID:27011494

  11. Experimental study of blast-induced traumatic brain injury using a physical head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiangyue; Pintar, Frank A; Yoganandan, Narayan; Gennarelli, Thomas A; Son, Steven F

    2009-11-01

    This study was conducted to quantify intracranial biomechanical responses and external blast overpressures using physical head model to understand the biomechanics of blast traumatic brain injury and to provide experimental data for computer simulation of blast-induced brain trauma. Ellipsoidal-shaped physical head models, made from 3-mm polycarbonate shell filled with Sylgard 527 silicon gel, were used. Six blast tests were conducted in frontal, side, and 45 degrees oblique orientations. External blast overpressures and internal pressures were quantified with ballistic pressure sensors. Blast overpressures, ranging from 129.5 kPa to 769.3 kPa, were generated using a rigid cannon and 1.3 to 3.0 grams of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) plastic sheet explosive (explosive yield of 13.24 kJ and TNT equivalent mass of 2.87 grams for 3 grams of material). The PETN plastic sheet explosive consisted of 63% PETN powder, 29% plasticizer, and 8% nitrocellulose with a density of 1.48 g/cm3 and detonation velocity of 6.8 km/s. Propagation and reflection of the shockwave was captured using a shadowgraph technique. Shockwave speeds ranging from 423.3 m/s to 680.3 m/s were recorded. The model demonstrated a two-stage response: a pressure dominant (overpressure) stage followed by kinematic dominant (blast wind) stage. Positive pressures in the brain simulant ranged from 75.1 kPa to 1095 kPa, and negative pressures ranged from -43.6 kPa to -646.0 kPa. High- and normal-speed videos did not reveal observable deformations in the brain simulant from the neutral density markers embedded in the midsagittal plane of the head model. Amplitudes of the internal positive and negative pressures were found to linearly correlate with external overpressure. Results from the current study suggested a pressure-dominant brain injury mechanism instead of strain injury mechanism under the blast severity of the current study. These quantitative results also served as the validation and calibration

  12. Chronic visual dysfunction after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    M. Teresa Magone, MD; Ellen Kwon, OD; Soo Y. Shin, MD

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term visual dysfunction in patients after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) using a retrospective case series of 31 patients with mbTBI (>12 mo prior) without eye injuries. Time since mbTBI was 50.5 +/– 19.8 mo. Age at the time of injury was 30.0 +/– 8.3 yr. Mean corrected visual acuity was 20/20. Of the patients, 71% (n = 22) experienced loss of consciousness; 68% (n = 15) of patients in this subgroup were dismounted durin...

  13. Disruption of caudate working memory activation in chronic blast-related traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Newsome

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI due to blast exposure is frequently diagnosed in veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, it is unclear whether neural damage resulting from blast TBI differs from that found in TBI due to blunt-force trauma (e.g., falls and motor vehicle crashes. Little is also known about the effects of blast TBI on neural networks, particularly over the long term. Because impairment in working memory has been linked to blunt-force TBI, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study sought to investigate whether brain activation in response to a working memory task would discriminate blunt-force from blast TBI. Twenty-five veterans (mean age = 29.8 years, standard deviation = 6.01 years, 1 female who incurred TBI due to blast an average of 4.2 years prior to enrollment and 25 civilians (mean age = 27.4 years, standard deviation = 6.68 years, 4 females with TBI due to blunt-force trauma performed the Sternberg Item Recognition Task while undergoing fMRI. The task involved encoding 1, 3, or 5 items in working memory. A group of 25 veterans (mean age = 29.9 years, standard deviation = 5.53 years, 0 females and a group of 25 civilians (mean age = 27.3 years, standard deviation = 5.81 years, 0 females without history of TBI underwent identical imaging procedures and served as controls. Results indicated that the civilian TBI group and both control groups demonstrated a monotonic relationship between working memory set size and activation in the right caudate during encoding, whereas the blast TBI group did not (p < 0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons using False Discovery Rate. Blast TBI was also associated with worse performance on the Sternberg Item Recognition Task relative to the other groups, although no other group differences were found on neuropsychological measures of episodic memory, inhibition, and general processing speed. These results

  14. Post Mortem Human Surrogate Injury Response of the Pelvis and Lower Extremities to Simulated Underbody Blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ann M; Christopher, John J; Brozoski, Frederick; Salzar, Robert S

    2015-08-01

    Military vehicle underbody blast (UBB) is the cause of many serious injuries in theatre today; however, the effects of these chaotic events on the human body are not well understood. The purpose of this research was to replicate both UBB loading conditions and investigate occupant response in a controlled laboratory setting. In addition to better understanding the response of the human to high rate vertical loading, this test series also aimed to identify high rate injury thresholds. Ten whole body post mortem human surrogate (PMHS) tests were completed using the University of Virginia's ODYSSEY simulated blast rig under a range of loading conditions. Seat pan accelerations ranged from 291 to 738 g's over 3 ms of positive phase duration, and foot pan accelerations from 234 to 858 g's over 3 ms of positive phase duration. Post-test computed tomography (CT) scans and necropsies were performed to determine injuries, and revealed a combination of pelvic, lumbar, thoracic, and lower extremity injuries. The research in this paper discusses pelvis and lower extremity injuries under high rate vertical loads. PMID:25503737

  15. Chronic visual dysfunction after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Magone, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term visual dysfunction in patients after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mbTBI using a retrospective case series of 31 patients with mbTBI (>12 mo prior without eye injuries. Time since mbTBI was 50.5 +/– 19.8 mo. Age at the time of injury was 30.0 +/– 8.3 yr. Mean corrected visual acuity was 20/20. Of the patients, 71% (n = 22 experienced loss of consciousness; 68% (n = 15 of patients in this subgroup were dismounted during the blast injury. Overall, 68% (n = 21 of patients had visual complaints. The most common complaints were photophobia (55% and difficulty with reading (32%. Of all patients, 25% were diagnosed with convergence insufficiency and 23% had accommodative insufficiency. Patients with more than one mbTBI had a higher rate of visual complaints (87.5%. Asymptomatic patients had a significantly longer time (62.5 +/– 6.2 mo since the mbTBI than symptomatic patients (42.0 +/– 16.4 mo, p < 0.004. Long-term visual dysfunction after mbTBI is common even years after injury despite excellent distance visual acuity and is more frequent if more than one incidence of mbTBI occurred. We recommend obtaining a careful medical history, evaluation of symptoms, and binocular vision assessment during routine eye examinations in this prepresbyopic patient population.

  16. Chronic visual dysfunction after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magone, M Teresa; Kwon, Ellen; Shin, Soo Y

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the long-term visual dysfunction in patients after blast-induced mild traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) using a retrospective case series of 31 patients with mbTBI (>12 mo prior) without eye injuries. Time since mbTBI was 50.5 +/- 19.8 mo. Age at the time of injury was 30.0 +/- 8.3 yr. Mean corrected visual acuity was 20/20. Of the patients, 71% (n = 22) experienced loss of consciousness; 68% (n = 15) of patients in this subgroup were dismounted during the blast injury. Overall, 68% (n = 21) of patients had visual complaints. The most common complaints were photophobia (55%) and difficulty with reading (32%). Of all patients, 25% were diagnosed with convergence insufficiency and 23% had accommodative insufficiency. Patients with more than one mbTBI had a higher rate of visual complaints (87.5%). Asymptomatic patients had a significantly longer time (62.5 +/- 6.2 mo) since the mbTBI than symptomatic patients (42.0 +/- 16.4 mo, p < 0.004). Long-term visual dysfunction after mbTBI is common even years after injury despite excellent distance visual acuity and is more frequent if more than one incidence of mbTBI occurred. We recommend obtaining a careful medical history, evaluation of symptoms, and binocular vision assessment during routine eye examinations in this prepresbyopic patient population. PMID:24805895

  17. Integrated experimental platforms to study blast injuries: a bottom-up approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, C.; Williams, A.; Rankin, S.; Proud, W. G.; Brown, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    We are developing experimental models of blast injury using data from live biological samples. An integrated research strategy is followed to study material and biological properties of cells, tissues and organs, that are subjected to dynamic and static pressures, relevant to those of battlefield blast. We have developed a confined Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system, which allows cells, either in suspension or as a monolayer, to be subjected to compression waves with pressures on the order of a few MPa and durations of hundreds of microseconds. The chamber design enables recovery of biological samples for cellular and molecular analysis. The SHPB platform, coupled with Quasi-Static experiments, is used to determine stress-strain curves of soft biological tissues under compression at low, medium and high strain rates. Tissue samples are examined, using histological techniques, to study macro- and microscopic changes induced by compression waves. In addition, a shock tube enables application of single or multiple air blasts with pressures on the order of kPa and a few milliseconds duration; this platform was used for initial studies on mesenchymal stem cells responses to blast pressures.

  18. Neuroelectrophysiological mechanism of disabling brain injury resulting from exposure of rat to blast in a tightly closed compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie GAO

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the dynamic changes in disabling brain injury in a closed compartment, and its underlying neuroelectrophysiological mechanism after exposure of rats to blast. Methods Sixty-eight SD rats were randomly divided into control group, OTB group ( blast in an open space, and ECB group (blast in a tightly closed compartment. ECB and OTB groups were exposed to blast in a closed chamber simulating the cabin of an armored vehicle and OT (outside of the cabin with 600-mg detonator electric blasting and 21.5-cm away from the detonating point. The changes of disabled ischemic area of the brain and evoked potential before and 1, 3, 5, 8, 12, 24h and 72h after the blast injury were observed. Results The incapability score of ECB and OTB rats reached the same level (25%. With 3, 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, it was found that the infarct area in OTB group appeared 5h after explosion, reaching the climax at 12h, and disappearing at 72h. In the ECB group, the area of infarct appeared 3h after injury, and still existed till 72h after injury. In ECB group, the N1 latency of sensory evoked potential (SEP and motor evoked potential (MEP was longer than that of control group 5 and 8 hours after explosion respectively, and the changes in sensation appeared earlier than those of motor function. Conclusions The blast wave in EC shows a characteristic of a complex blast wave, and its damage to the brain can be more severe, which is caused more by ECB than by OTB. The size of infarct area and latency of evoked potential might contribute to the brain incapability. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.08.13

  19. Relationship between changes in the cochlear blood flow and disorder of hearing function induced by blast injury in guinea pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Jianmin; Chen, Jing; Chen, Jichuan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    The auditory system is the most susceptible to damages from blast waves. Blast injuries always lead to varying degrees of hearing impairment. Although a disorder of the cochlear blood flow (CoBF) has been considered to be related to many pathological processes of the auditory system and to contribute to various types of hearing loss, changes in the CoBF induced by blast waves and the relationship between such changes and hearing impairment are undefined. To observe the changes in the cochlear...

  20. The nature of white matter abnormalities in blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmeet P. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blast-related traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a common injury among returning troops due to the widespread use of improvised explosive devices in the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. As most of the TBIs sustained are in the mild range, brain changes may not be detected by standard clinical imaging techniques such as CT. Furthermore, the functional significance of these types of injuries is currently being debated. However, accumulating evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is sensitive to subtle white matter abnormalities and may be especially useful in detecting mild TBI (mTBI. The primary aim of this study was to use DTI to characterize the nature of white matter abnormalities following blast-related mTBI, and in particular, examine the extent to which mTBI-related white matter abnormalities are region-specific or spatially heterogeneous. In addition, we examined whether mTBI with loss of consciousness (LOC was associated with more extensive white matter abnormality than mTBI without LOC, as well as the potential moderating effect of number of blast exposures. A second aim was to examine the relationship between white matter integrity and neurocognitive function. Finally, a third aim was to examine the contribution of PTSD symptom severity to observed white matter alterations. One hundred fourteen OEF/OIF veterans underwent DTI and neuropsychological examination and were divided into three groups including a control group, blast-related mTBI without LOC (mTBI - LOC group, and blast-related mTBI with LOC (mTBI + LOC group. Hierarchical regression models were used to examine the extent to which mTBI and PTSD predicted white matter abnormalities using two approaches: 1 a region-specific analysis and 2 a measure of spatial heterogeneity. Neurocognitive composite scores were calculated for executive functions, attention, memory, and psychomotor speed. Results showed that blast-related mTBI + LOC was associated with greater odds of

  1. The complexity of biomechanics causing primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury: a review of potential mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eCourtney

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary blast induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI is a prevalent battlefield injury in recent conflicts, yet biomechanical mechanisms of bTBI remain unclear. Elucidating specific biomechanical mechanisms is essential to developing animal models for testing candidate therapies and for improving protective equipment. Three hypothetical mechanisms of primary bTBI have received the most attention. Because translational and rotational head accelerations are primary contributors to TBI from non-penetrating blunt force head trauma, the acceleration hypothesis suggests that blast-induced head accelerations may cause bTBI. The hypothesis of direct cranial transmission suggests that a pressure transient traverses the skull into the brain and directly injures brain tissue. The thoracic hypothesis of bTBI suggests that some combination of a pressure transient reaching the brain via the thorax and a vagally mediated reflex result in bTBI. These three mechanisms may not be mutually exclusive, and quantifying exposure thresholds (for blasts of a given duration is essential for determining which mechanisms may be contributing for a level of blast exposure. Progress has been hindered by experimental designs which do not effectively expose animal models to a single mechanism and by over-reliance on poorly validated computational models. The path forward should be predictive validation of computational models by quantitative confirmation with blast experiments in animal models, human cadavers, and biofidelic human surrogates over a range of relevant blast magnitudes and durations coupled with experimental designs which isolate a single injury mechanism.

  2. Microcavitation as a Neuronal Damage Mechanism in Blast Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Christian; Estrada, Jonathan

    2015-11-01

    Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of injury in the armed forces. Diffuse axonal injury, the hallmark feature of blunt TBI, has been investigated in direct mechanical loading conditions. However, recent evidence suggests inertial cavitation as a possible bTBI mechanism, particularly in the case of exposure to blasts. Cavitation damage to free surfaces has been well-studied, but bubble interactions within confined 3D environments, in particular their stress and strain signatures are not well understood. The structural damage due to cavitation in living tissues - particularly at the cellular level - are incompletely understood, in part due to the rapid bubble formation and deformation strain rates of up to ~ 105-106 s-1. This project aims to characterize material damage in 2D and 3D cell culture environments by utilizing a novel high-speed red-blue diffraction assisted image correlation method at speeds of up to 106 frames per second. We gratefully acknowledge funding from the Office of Naval Research (POC: Dr. Tim Bentley).

  3. Outcome of tissue sparing surgical intervention in mine blast limb injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the pattern of mine blast limb injuries in civilian population of Kashmir, to evaluate the outcome of tissue sparing surgical intervention in these injuries and to determine the sensitivity of hand-held percutaneous Doppler for tissue viability. One hundred and three patients who sustained mine blast injuries to upper or lower limbs, along side the line of control between the Indian-held Kashmir and Azad Kashmir, regardless of age and gender, were included in this study. Patients who already had amputation after injury at some other place were excluded. All patients were initially managed in emergency and had more than one surgical intervention. Transcutaneous Doppler was used to evaluate the vascularity of the remaining tissue. All patients were operated under spinal or general anaesthesia and had repeated debridements followed by skin cover by split skin graft, full thickness skin graft or rotational flaps. Every patient received at least 5 days course of antibiotics and tetanus prophylaxis. Postoperative rehabilitation and follow-up was conducted for at least 6 months after discharge from the hospital. Mean age of victims in this study was 22 years. Out of 103 patients, 72 (69.9%) received initial wound care in the peripheral primary health care centre but were not amputated while 31 patients (30%) were just dressed and referred for further treatment at tertiary care hospitals. Eighty five patients (82.5%), out of the total, had some sort of traumatic amputation at presentation due to the original injury. That included loss of limb below knee in 19 (18.45%) patients, at distal tibiofibular region in 13 (12.6%), mid tarsal amputations in 39(37.9%), and hemi foot amputation in 15 (14.6%) patients. Nine (8.7%) patients had losses of two or less than two toes, 1 (0.97%) patient had injury at mid palmer region, and 5 (4.9%) patients had 2 fingers traumatic amputation. Eighteen (17.5%) patients had soft tissue ( with or without bony injury) injury only

  4. Modeling and simulation of blast-induced, early-time intracranial wave physics leading to traumatic brain injury.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Corey C. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Taylor, Paul Allen

    2008-02-01

    The objective of this modeling and simulation study was to establish the role of stress wave interactions in the genesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) from exposure to explosive blast. A high resolution (1 mm{sup 3} voxels), 5 material model of the human head was created by segmentation of color cryosections from the Visible Human Female dataset. Tissue material properties were assigned from literature values. The model was inserted into the shock physics wave code, CTH, and subjected to a simulated blast wave of 1.3 MPa (13 bars) peak pressure from anterior, posterior and lateral directions. Three dimensional plots of maximum pressure, volumetric tension, and deviatoric (shear) stress demonstrated significant differences related to the incident blast geometry. In particular, the calculations revealed focal brain regions of elevated pressure and deviatoric (shear) stress within the first 2 milliseconds of blast exposure. Calculated maximum levels of 15 KPa deviatoric, 3.3 MPa pressure, and 0.8 MPa volumetric tension were observed before the onset of significant head accelerations. Over a 2 msec time course, the head model moved only 1 mm in response to the blast loading. Doubling the blast strength changed the resulting intracranial stress magnitudes but not their distribution. We conclude that stress localization, due to early time wave interactions, may contribute to the development of multifocal axonal injury underlying TBI. We propose that a contribution to traumatic brain injury from blast exposure, and most likely blunt impact, can occur on a time scale shorter than previous model predictions and before the onset of linear or rotational accelerations traditionally associated with the development of TBI.

  5. Perspectives on creating clinically relevant blast models for mild traumatic brain injury and post traumatic stress disorder symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa eBrenner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Military personnel are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and reporting non-specific physical (somatic, behavioral, psychological, and cognitive symptoms. Many of these symptoms are frequently associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and/or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Despite significant attention and advances in assessment and intervention for these two conditions, challenges persist. To address this, clinically relevant blast models are essential in the full characterization of this type of injury, as well as in the testing and identification of potential treatment strategies. In this publication, existing diagnostic challenges and current treatment practices for mTBI and/or PTSD will be summarized, along with suggestions regarding how what has been learned from existing models of PTSD and traditional mechanism (e.g., non-blast TBI can be used to facilitate the development of clinically relevant blast models.

  6. Blast-Associated Shock Waves Result in Increased Brain Vascular Leakage and Elevated ROS Levels in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabu, Shushi; Jaffer, Hayder; Petro, Marianne; Dudzinski, Dave; Stewart, Desiree; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Blast-associated shock wave-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) remains a persistent risk for armed forces worldwide, yet its detailed pathophysiology remains to be fully investigated. In this study, we have designed and characterized a laboratory-scale shock tube to develop a rodent model of bTBI. Our blast tube, driven by a mixture of oxygen and acetylene, effectively generates blast overpressures of 20-130 psi, with pressure-time profiles similar to those of free-field blast waves. We tested our shock tube for brain injury response to various blast wave conditions in rats. The results show that blast waves cause diffuse vascular brain damage, as determined using a sensitive optical imaging method based on the fluorescence signal of Evans Blue dye extravasation developed in our laboratory. Vascular leakage increased with increasing blast overpressures and mapping of the brain slices for optical signal intensity indicated nonhomogeneous damage to the cerebral vasculature. We confirmed vascular leakage due to disruption in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity following blast exposure. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the brain also increased with increasing blast pressures and with time post-blast wave exposure. Immunohistochemical analysis of the brain sections analyzed at different time points post blast exposure demonstrated astrocytosis and cell apoptosis, confirming sustained neuronal injury response. The main advantages of our shock-tube design are minimal jet effect and no requirement for specialized equipment or facilities, and effectively generate blast-associated shock waves that are relevant to battle-field conditions. Overall data suggest that increased oxidative stress and BBB disruption could be the crucial factors in the propagation and spread of neuronal degeneration following blast injury. Further studies are required to determine the interplay between increased ROS activity and BBB disruption to develop effective therapeutic strategies

  7. High prevalence of chronic pituitary and target-organ hormone abnormalities after blast-related mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CharlesW.Wilkinson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Studies of traumatic brain injury from all causes have found evidence of chronic hypopituitarism, defined by deficient production of one or more pituitary hormones at least one year after injury, in 25-50% of cases. Most studies found the occurrence of posttraumatic hypopituitarism (PTHP to be unrelated to injury severity. Growth hormone deficiency (GHD and hypogonadism were reported most frequently. Hypopituitarism, and in particular adult GHD, is associated with symptoms that resemble those of PTSD, including fatigue, anxiety, depression, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, cognitive deficiencies, and decreased quality of life. However, the prevalence of PTHP after blast-related mild TBI (mTBI, an extremely common injury in modern military operations, has not been characterized. We measured concentrations of 12 pituitary and target-organ hormones in two groups of male US Veterans of combat in Iraq or Afghanistan. One group consisted of participants with blast-related mTBI whose last blast exposure was at least one year prior to the study. The other consisted of Veterans with similar military deployment histories but without blast exposure. Eleven of 26, or 42% of participants with blast concussions were found to have abnormal hormone levels in one or more pituitary axes, a prevalence similar to that found in other forms of TBI. Five members of the mTBI group were found with markedly low age-adjusted insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I levels indicative of probable GHD, and three had testosterone and gonadotropin concentrations consistent with hypogonadism. If symptoms characteristic of both PTHP and PTSD can be linked to pituitary dysfunction, they may be amenable to treatment with hormone replacement. Routine screening for chronic hypopituitarism after blast concussion shows promise for appropriately directing diagnostic and therapeutic decisions that otherwise may remain unconsidered and for markedly facilitating recovery and

  8. Olfactory impairment and traumatic brain injury in blast-injured combat troops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Lisa P.; Smith, Alice B.; Olsen, Cara H.; Lyon, Dina M.; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether a structured and quantitative assessment of differential olfactory performance—recognized between a blast-injured traumatic brain injury (TBI) group and a demographically comparable blast-injured control group—can serve as a reliable antecedent marker for preclinical detection of intracranial neurotrauma. Methods: We prospectively and consecutively enrolled 231 polytrauma inpatients, acutely injured from explosions during combat operations in either Afghanistan or Iraq and requiring immediate stateside evacuation and sequential admission to our tertiary care medical center over a 2½-year period. This study correlates olfactometric scores with both contemporaneous neuroimaging findings as well as the clinical diagnosis of TBI, tabulates population-specific incidence data, and investigates return of olfactory function. Results: Olfactometric score predicted abnormal neuroimaging significantly better than chance alone (area under the curve = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.70–0.87). Normosmia was present in all troops with mild TBI (i.e., concussion) and all control subjects. Troops with radiographic evidence of frontal lobe injuries were 3 times more likely to have olfactory impairment than troops with injuries to other brain regions (relative risk 3.0, 95% CI 0.98–9.14). Normalization of scores occurred in all anosmic troops available for follow-up testing. Conclusion: Quantitative identification olfactometry has limited sensitivity but high specificity as a marker for detecting acute structural neuropathology from trauma. When considering whether to order advanced neuroimaging, a functional disturbance with central olfactory impairment should be regarded as an important tool to inform the decision process. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that central olfactory dysfunction identifies patients with TBI who have intracranial radiographic abnormalities with a sensitivity of 35% (95% CI 20

  9. Characteristics and Mechanisms of Cardiopulmonary Injury Caused by Mine Blasts in Shoals: A Randomized Controlled Study in a Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gengfen; Wang, Ziming; Wang, Jianmin; Yang, Weixiao; Chen, Jing; Kang, Jianyi; Zhang, Sen; Wang, Aimin; Lai, Xinan

    2013-01-01

    Background Because the characteristics of blast waves in water are different from those in air and because kinetic energy is liberated by a pressure wave at the water-air interface, thoracic injuries from mine blasts in shoals may be serious. The aim of the present study was to investigate the characteristics and mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury caused by mine blasts in shoals. Methods To study the characteristics of cardiopulmonary injury, 56 animals were divided randomly into three experimental groups (12 animals in the sham group, 22 animals in the land group and 22 animals in the shoal group). To examine the biomechanics of injury, 20 animals were divided randomly into the land group and the shoal group. In the experimental model, the water surface was at the level of the rabbit's xiphoid process, and paper electric detonators (600 mg RDX) were used to simulate mines. Electrocardiography and echocardiography were conducted, and arterial blood gases, serum levels of cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase-MB and other physiologic parameters were measured over a 12-hour period after detonation. Pressures in the thorax and abdomen and the acceleration of the thorax were measured. Conclusion The results indicate that severe cardiopulmonary injury and dysfunction occur following exposure to mine blasts in shoals. Therefore, the mechanisms of cardiopulmonary injury may result from shear waves that produce strain at the water-air interface. Another mechanism of injury includes the propagation of the shock wave from the planta to the thorax, which causes a much higher peak overpressure in the abdomen than in the thorax; as a result, the abdominal organs and diaphragm are thrust into the thorax, damaging the lungs and heart. PMID:24358110

  10. Mechanism of Traumatic Brain Injury at Distant Locations After Exposure to Blast Waves: Preliminary Results from Animal and Phantom Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohtani, Kiyonobu; Goda, Keisuke; Kudo, Daisuke; Arafune, Tatsuhiko; Washio, Toshikatsu; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is the least understood of the four phases of blast injury. Distant injury induced by the blast wave, on the opposite side from the wave entry, is not well understood. This study investigated the mechanism of distant injury in bTBI. Materials and Methods Eight 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: group 1 served as the control group and did not receive any shock wave (SW) exposure; group 2 was exposed to SWs (12.5 ± 2.5 MPa). Propagation of SWs within a brain phantom was evaluated by visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation. Results Intracerebral hemorrhage near the ignition site and elongation of the distant nucleus were observed, despite no apparent damage between the two locations in the animal experiment. Visualization, pressure measurement, and numerical simulation indicated the presence of complex wave dynamics accompanying a sudden increase in pressure, followed by negative pressure in the phantom experiment. Conclusion A local increase in pressure above the threshold caused by interference of reflection and rarefaction waves in the vicinity of the brain-skull surface may cause distant injury in bTBI. PMID:27165867

  11. Blast Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other “energy-enhancing” products that might interfere with sleep. Don’t take any medications, including over-the-counter medications, unless their medical provider instructs them to. Avoid sleeping aids and sedatives unless their provider advises them to ...

  12. Development of a new biomechanical indicator for primary blast-induced brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhu; Cliff C.Chou; King H.Yang; Albert I.King

    2015-01-01

    Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) has been observed at the boundary of brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).Such injury can hardly be explained by using the theory of compressive wave propagation,since both the solid and fluid materials have similar compressibility and thus the intracranial pressure (ICP) has a continuous distribution across the boundary.Since they have completely different shear properties,it is hypothesized the injury at the interface is caused by shear wave.In the present study,a preliminary combined numerical and theoretical analysis was conducted based on the theory of shear wave propagation]reflection.Simulation results show that higher lateral acceleration of brain tissue particles is concentrated in the boundary region.Based on this finding,a new biomechanical vector,termed as strain gradient,was suggested for primary bTBI.The subsequent simple theoretical analysis reveals that this parameter is proportional to the value of lateral acceleration.At the boundary of lateral ventricles,high spatial strain gradient implies that the brain tissue in this area (where neuron cells may be contained) undergo significantly different strains and large velocity discontinuity,which may result in mechanical damage of the neuron cells.

  13. Development of a new biomechanical indicator for primary blast-induced brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Feng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI has been observed at the boundary of brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF. Such injury can hardly be explained by using the theory of compressive wave propagation, since both the solid and fluid materials have similar compressibility and thus the intracranial pressure (ICP has a continuous distribution across the boundary. Since they have completely different shear properties, it is hypothesized the injury at the interface is caused by shear wave. In the present study, a preliminary combined numerical and theoretical analysis was conducted based on the theory of shear wave propagation/reflection. Simulation results show that higher lateral acceleration of brain tissue particles is concentrated in the boundary region. Based on this finding, a new biomechanical vector, termed as strain gradient, was suggested for primary bTBI. The subsequent simple theoretical analysis reveals that this parameter is proportional to the value of lateral acceleration. At the boundary of lateral ventricles, high spatial strain gradient implies that the brain tissue in this area (where neuron cells may be contained undergo significantly different strains and large velocity discontinuity, which may result in mechanical damage of the neuron cells.

  14. Blast-Associated Shock Waves Result in Increased Brain Vascular Leakage and Elevated ROS Levels in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Kabu, Shushi; Jaffer, Hayder; Petro, Marianne; Dudzinski, Dave; Stewart, Desiree; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Blast-associated shock wave-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) remains a persistent risk for armed forces worldwide, yet its detailed pathophysiology remains to be fully investigated. In this study, we have designed and characterized a laboratory-scale shock tube to develop a rodent model of bTBI. Our blast tube, driven by a mixture of oxygen and acetylene, effectively generates blast overpressures of 20–130 psi, with pressure-time profiles similar to those of free-field blast waves. We te...

  15. Traumatic brain injury produced by exposure to blasts, a critical problem in current wars: biomarkers, clinical studies, and animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C. Edward

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) resulting from exposure to blast energy released by Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) has been recognized as the "signature injury" of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. Repeated exposure to mild blasts may produce subtle deficits that are difficult to detect and quantify. Several techniques have been used to detect subtle brain dysfunction including neuropsychological assessments, computerized function testing and neuroimaging. Another approach is based on measurement of biologic substances (e.g. proteins) that are released into the body after a TBI. Recent studies measuring biomarkers in CSF and serum from patients with severe TBI have demonstrated the diagnostic, prognostic, and monitoring potential. Advancement of the field will require 1) biochemical mining for new biomarker candidates, 2) clinical validation of utility, 3) technical advances for more sensitive, portable detectors, 4) novel statistical approach to evaluate multiple biomarkers, and 5) commercialization. Animal models have been developed to simulate elements of blast-relevant TBI including gas-driven shock tubes to generate pressure waves similar to those produced by explosives. These models can reproduce hallmark clinical neuropathological responses such as neuronal degeneration and inflammation, as well as behavioral impairments. An important application of these models is to screen novel therapies and conduct proteomic, genomic, and lipodomic studies to mine for new biomarker candidates specific to blast relevant TBI.

  16. A Novel Closed-head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Caused by Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium Produces Sustained Emotional Deficits in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Heldt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional disorders are a common outcome from mild traumatic brain injury (TBI in humans, but their pathophysiological basis is poorly understood. We have developed a mouse model of closed-head blast injury using an air pressure wave delivered to a small area on one side of the cranium, which we have used to create mild TBI. We found that 20-psi blasts in 3-month old C57BL/6 male mice yielded no obvious behavioral or histological evidence of brain injury, while 25-40 psi blasts produced transient anxiety in an open field arena but little histological evidence of brain damage. By contrast, 50-60 psi blasts resulted in anxiety-like behavior in an open field arena that became more evident with time after blast. In additional behavioral tests conducted 2-8 weeks after blast, 50-60 psi mice also demonstrated increased acoustic startle, perseverance of learned fear, and enhanced contextual fear, as well as depression-like behavior and diminished prepulse inhibition. We found no evident cerebral pathology, however, and only scattered axonal degeneration in brain sections from 50-60 psi mice 3-8 weeks after blast. Thus, the TBI caused by single 50-60 psi blasts in mice exhibits the minimal neuronal loss coupled to diffuse axonal injury characteristic of human mild TBI. A reduction in the abundance of a subpopulation of excitatory projection neurons in basolateral amygdala enriched in Thy1 was, however, observed. The reported link of this neuronal population to fear suppression suggests their damage by mild TBI may contribute to the heightened anxiety and fearfulness observed after blast in our mice. Our overpressure air blast model of concussion in mice will enable further studies of the mechanisms underlying the diverse emotional deficits seen after mild TBI.

  17. Acute shortening and angulation for limb salvage in a paediatric patient with a high-energy blast injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikkel, Yoav Yechezkel; Wilson, Jessica Jeanne; Kassis, Shokrey; Lerner, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of an 8-year-old girl casualty of the Syrian conflict who arrived with open fractures of the right tibia and fibula with extensive bone and soft tissue loss as well as an open fracture of the left calcaneus as the result of a high-energy blast injury. She was successfully treated with repeated debridement procedures, external fixation with acute temporary shortening and angulation of the right leg and skin grafting to both lower limbs. PMID:24654251

  18. Perspectives on Creating Clinically Relevant Blast Models for Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa eBrenner; Nazanin eBahraini; Hernández, Theresa D.

    2012-01-01

    Military personnel are returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and reporting non-specific physical (somatic), behavioral, psychological, and cognitive symptoms. Many of these symptoms are frequently associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and/or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite significant attention and advances in assessment and intervention for these two conditions, challenges persist. To address this, clinically relevant blast models are essential in the full character...

  19. Blood brain barrier dysfunction and delayed neurological deficits in mild traumatic brain injury induced by blast shock waves

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) resulting from exposure to blast shock waves (BSWs) is one of the most predominant causes of illnesses among veterans who served in the recent Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Such mTBI can also happen to civilians if exposed to shock waves of bomb attacks by terrorists. While cognitive problems, memory dysfunction, depression, anxiety and diffuse white matter injury have been observed at both early and/or delayed time-points, an initial brain pathology resulting ...

  20. Pedicled Breast Flap for Soft Tissue Coverage of a Forearm Blast Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriarrain, Alexander; Brooks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary: This article presents the case of a 35-year-old woman who sustained a shotgun blast injury to the left forearm and chest wall causing significant soft tissue loss of the extensor compartment. The patient suffered a Gustilo IIIB open radial shaft fracture requiring orthopedic stabilization and plastic surgery intervention. As a result, the patient eventually was reconstructed with the use of a pedicled breast flap. Because of the patient’s macromastia and her large forearm wound and morbid obesity, an individualized approach was developed such that a breast flap was designed because of its proximity to the upper extremity. The advantage of this type of reconstruction is a more natural contour to the forearm with minimal donor site morbidity. Before creation of the flap, the patient expressed interest in a reduction mammaplasty because of her symptomatic macromastia. Overall, this was a 2-step operation whereby first the breast flap was created, and then a few weeks later, once the arm healed, the reduction mammaplasty was performed. Other types of flaps for upper extremity reconstruction include the rectus abdominis myocutaneous, transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous, vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous, groin, and latissumus dorsi. The pedicled breast flap is an innovative approach to upper extremity soft tissue coverage and can be tailored to the specific needs of patients similar to our case presentation. PMID:27104108

  1. A Novel Closed-Head Model of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Focal Primary Overpressure Blast to the Cranium in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guley, Natalie H; Rogers, Joshua T; Del Mar, Nobel A; Deng, Yunping; Islam, Rafiqul M; D'Surney, Lauren; Ferrell, Jessica; Deng, Bowei; Hines-Beard, Jessica; Bu, Wei; Ren, Huiling; Elberger, Andrea J; Marchetta, Jeffrey G; Rex, Tonia S; Honig, Marcia G; Reiner, Anton

    2016-02-15

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) from focal head impact is the most common form of TBI in humans. Animal models, however, typically use direct impact to the exposed dura or skull, or blast to the entire head. We present a detailed characterization of a novel overpressure blast system to create focal closed-head mild TBI in mice. A high-pressure air pulse limited to a 7.5 mm diameter area on the left side of the head overlying the forebrain is delivered to anesthetized mice. The mouse eyes and ears are shielded, and its head and body are cushioned to minimize movement. This approach creates mild TBI by a pressure wave that acts on the brain, with minimal accompanying head acceleration-deceleration. A single 20-psi blast yields no functional deficits or brain injury, while a single 25-40 psi blast yields only slight motor deficits and brain damage. By contrast, a single 50-60 psi blast produces significant visual, motor, and neuropsychiatric impairments and axonal damage and microglial activation in major fiber tracts, but no contusive brain injury. This model thus reproduces the widespread axonal injury and functional impairments characteristic of closed-head mild TBI, without the complications of systemic or ocular blast effects or head acceleration that typically occur in other blast or impact models of closed-skull mild TBI. Accordingly, our model provides a simple way to examine the biomechanics, pathophysiology, and functional deficits that result from TBI and can serve as a reliable platform for testing therapies that reduce brain pathology and deficits. PMID:26414413

  2. A novel rat model of blast-induced traumatic brain injury simulating different damage degree: implications for morphological, neurological, and biomarker changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In current military conflicts and civilian terrorism, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI is the primary cause of neurotrauma. However, the effects and mechanisms of bTBI are poorly understood. Although previous researchers have made significant contributions to establishing animal models for the simulation of bTBI, the precision and controllability of blast-induced injury in animal models must be improved. Therefore, we established a novel rat model to simulate blast-wave injury to the brain. To simulate different extents of bTBI injury, the animals were divided into moderate and severe injury groups. The miniature spherical explosives (PETN used in each group were of different sizes (2.5 mm diameter in the moderate injury group and 3.0 mm diameter in the severe injury group. A specially designed apparatus was able to precisely adjust the positions of the miniature explosives and create eight rats with bTBI simultaneously, using a single electric detonator. Neurological functions, gross pathologies, histopathological changes and the expression levels of various biomarkers were examined after the explosion. Compared with the moderate injury group, there were significantly more neurological dysfunctions, cortical contusions, intraparenchymal hemorrhages, cortical expression of S-100β, MBP, NSE, IL-8, IL-10, iNOS and HIF-1α in the severe injury group. These results demonstrate that we have created a reliable and reproducible bTBI model in rats. This model will be helpful for studying the mechanisms of bTBI and developing strategies for clinical bTBI treatment.

  3. Pattern of injury in those dying from traumatic amputation caused by bomb blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, J B; Bowyer, G W; Cooper, G J; Crane, J

    1994-08-01

    Traumatic amputation of limbs caused by bomb blast carries a high risk of mortality. This paper describes 73 amputations in 34 deaths from bomb blast in Northern Ireland. The principal aim was to determine the sites of traumatic amputation to provide a biophysical basis for the development of protective measures. Few amputations were through joints; nearly all were through the bone shafts. The most common site in the tibia was the upper third. The distribution of femoral sites resulting from car bombs differed from that characterizing other types of explosion. For car bombs the principal site of amputation was the upper third; for other types of device it was the lower third. It is concluded that flailing is not a notable contributor to limb avulsion. The pattern of amputation is consistent with direct local pressure loads leading to bone fracture; the amputation itself is a secondary event arising from the flow of combustion products. PMID:7953338

  4. Targeted stimulation of retinoic acid receptor-γ mitigates the formation of heterotopic ossification in an established blast-related traumatic injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavey, Gabriel J; Qureshi, Ammar T; Tomasino, Allison M; Honnold, Cary L; Bishop, Danett K; Agarwal, Shailesh; Loder, Shawn; Levi, Benjamin; Pacifici, Maurizio; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Potter, Benjamin K; Davis, Thomas A; Forsberg, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) involves formation of endochondral bone at non-skeletal sites, is prevalent in severely wounded service members, and causes significant complications and delayed rehabilitation. As common prophylactic treatments such as anti-inflammatory drugs and irradiation cannot be used after multi-system combat trauma, there is an urgent need for new remedies. Previously, we showed that the retinoic acid receptor γ agonist Palovarotene inhibited subcutaneous and intramuscular HO in mice, but those models do not mimic complex combat injury. Thus, we tested Palovarotene in our validated rat trauma-induced HO model that involves blast-related limb injury, femoral fracture, quadriceps crush injury, amputation and infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from combat wound infections. Palovarotene was given orally for 14days at 1mg/kg/day starting on post-operative day (POD) 1 or POD-5, and HO amount, wound dehiscence and related processes were monitored for up to 84days post injury. Compared to vehicle-control animals, Palovarotene significantly decreased HO by 50 to 60% regardless of when the treatment started and if infection was present. Histological analyses showed that Palovarotene reduced ectopic chondrogenesis, osteogenesis and angiogenesis forming at the injury site over time, while fibrotic tissue was often present in place of ectopic bone. Custom gene array data verified that while expression of key chondrogenic and osteogenic genes was decreased within soft tissues of residual limb in Palovarotene-treated rats, expression of cartilage catabolic genes was increased, including matrix metalloproteinase-9. Importantly, Palovarotene seemed to exert moderate inhibitory effects on wound healing, raising potential safety concerns related to dosing and timing. Our data show for the first time that Palovarotene significantly inhibits HO triggered by blast injury and associated complications, strongly indicating that it may prevent

  5. Assessment of the Effects of Acute and Repeated Exposure to Blast Overpressure in Rodents: Towards a Greater Understanding of Blast and the Potential Ramifications for Injury in Humans Exposed to Blast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Thomas Ahlers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI resulting from exposure to improvised explosive devices (IEDs has fueled a requirement to develop animals models that mirror this condition using exposure to blast overpressure (BOP. En route to developing a model of repeated exposure to BOP we sought to initially characterize the effects of acute BOP exposure in rodents, focusing specifically on the levels of BOP exposure that produced clinical mTBI symptoms. We first measured BOP effects on gross motor function on a balance beam. Separate groups of unanesthetized rats were exposed (in different orientations to 40 kPa, 75 kPa and 120 kPa BOP exposure inside a pneumatically driven shock tube. Results demonstrated that rats exposed to 120 kPa demonstrated transient alterations or loss of consciousness indicated by a transient loss of righting and by increased latencies on the balance beam. The 120 kPa exposure was the threshold for overt pathology for acute BOP exposure with approximately 30% of rats presenting with evidence of subdural hemorrhage and cortical contusions. All animals exposed to 120 kPa BOP manifested evidence of significant pulmonary hemorrhage. Anterograde memory deficits were observed in rats exposed to 75 kPa facing the BOP wave and rats exposed to 120 kPa in the lateral (side orientation. We next assessed repeated exposure to either lateral or frontal 40 kPa BOP in anesthetized rats, once per day for 12 days. Results showed that repeated exposure in the frontal, but not side, orientation to the BOP wave produced a transitory learning deficit on a Morris water maze (MWM task as shown by significantly longer latencies to reach the submerged platform in the second and third blocks of a four block session. Implications of these data are discussed in relation to the manifestation of mTBI in military personnel exposed to IEDs. Finally, we suggest that there are multiple types of brain injury from blast.

  6. Expression of galanin and its receptors are perturbed in a rodent model of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Lizan; Barde, Swapnali; Arborelius, Ulf P; Theodorsson, Elvar; Agoston, Denes; Risling, Mårten; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    The symptomatology, mood and cognitive disturbances seen in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (mbTBI) overlap considerably. However the pathological mechanisms underlying the two conditions are currently unknown. The neuropeptide galanin has been suggested to play a role in the development of stress and mood disorders. Here we applied bio- and histochemical methods with the aim to elucidate the nature of any changes in the expression of galanin and its receptors in a rodent model of mbTBI. In situ hybridization and quantitative polymerase chain reaction studies revealed significant, injury-induced changes, in some cases lasting at least for one week, in the mRNA levels of galanin and/or its three receptors, galanin receptor 1-3 (GalR1-3). Such changes were seen in several forebrain regions, and the locus coeruleus. In the ventral periaqueductal gray GalR1 mRNA levels were increased, while GalR2 were decreased. Analysis of galanin peptide levels using radioimmunoassay demonstrated an increase in several brain regions including the locus coeruleus, dorsal hippocampal formation and amygdala. These findings suggest a role for the galanin system in the endogenous response to mbTBI, and that pharmacological studies of the effects of activation or inhibition of different galanin receptors in combination with functional assays of behavioral recovery may reveal promising targets for new therapeutic strategies in mbTBI. PMID:26928087

  7. Apoptosis-related protein expression in rabbits with blast brain injury following early hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaonian Xu; Jiachuan Liu; Yongming Zhang; Chunlin Wang; Jinbiao Wang; Yanyan Yang; Jian Huo; Wenjiang Sun

    2012-01-01

    We treated detonator-explosion-induced craniocerebral injury in rabbits with hyperbaric oxygen 1-24 hours post-injury. Expression of the apoptosis-regulating protein cytochrome c, the pro-apoptotic protein Bax and the apoptosis marker caspase-3 in the tissues surrounding the area of injury was significantly reduced, while that of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly increased. Our findings indicate that the curative effects of early hyperbaric oxygen on cortical cell apoptosis is associated with suppression of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. This mechanism underlies the observed reduction in Bax expression and upregulation of Bcl-2 expression.

  8. Neuro-glial and systemic mechanisms of pathological responses in rat models of primary blast overpressure compared to ‘composite’ blast.

    OpenAIRE

    VictorPrima; StanislavI.Svetlov; DanielKirk; KennethCurley; VictorSerebruany

    2012-01-01

    A number of experimental models of blast brain injury have been implemented in rodents and larger animals. However, the variety of blast sources and the complexity of blast wave biophysics have made data on injury mechanisms and biomarkers difficult to analyze and compare. Recently, we showed the importance of rat position towards blast generated by an external shock tube. In this study, we further characterized blast producing moderate TBI and defined ‘composite’ blast and primary blast...

  9. Neuro-Glial and Systemic Mechanisms of Pathological Responses in Rat Models of Primary Blast Overpressure Compared to “Composite” Blast

    OpenAIRE

    Svetlov, Stanislav I.; Prima, Victor; Glushakova, Olena; Svetlov, Artem; Kirk, Daniel R.; Gutierrez, Hector; Serebruany, Victor L.; Curley, Kenneth C.; Wang, Kevin K. W.; Hayes, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    A number of experimental models of blast brain injury have been implemented in rodents and larger animals. However, the variety of blast sources and the complexity of blast wave biophysics have made data on injury mechanisms and biomarkers difficult to analyze and compare. Recently, we showed the importance of rat position toward blast generated by an external shock tube. In this study, we further characterized blast producing moderate traumatic brain injury and defined “composite” blast and ...

  10. Amelioration of acute sequelae of blast induced mild traumatic brain injury by N-acetyl cysteine: a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI secondary to blast exposure is the most common battlefield injury in Southwest Asia. There has been little prospective work in the combat setting to test the efficacy of new countermeasures. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC versus placebo on the symptoms associated with blast exposure mTBI in a combat setting. METHODS: This study was a randomized double blind, placebo-controlled study that was conducted on active duty service members at a forward deployed field hospital in Iraq. All symptomatic U.S. service members who were exposed to significant ordnance blast and who met the criteria for mTBI were offered participation in the study and 81 individuals agreed to participate. Individuals underwent a baseline evaluation and then were randomly assigned to receive either N-acetyl cysteine (NAC or placebo for seven days. Each subject was re-evaluated at 3 and 7 days. Outcome measures were the presence of the following sequelae of mTBI: dizziness, hearing loss, headache, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and neurocognitive dysfunction. The resolution of these symptoms seven days after the blast exposure was the main outcome measure in this study. Logistic regression on the outcome of 'no day 7 symptoms' indicated that NAC treatment was significantly better than placebo (OR = 3.6, p = 0.006. Secondary analysis revealed subjects receiving NAC within 24 hours of blast had an 86% chance of symptom resolution with no reported side effects versus 42% for those seen early who received placebo. CONCLUSION: This study, conducted in an active theatre of war, demonstrates that NAC, a safe pharmaceutical countermeasure, has beneficial effects on the severity and resolution of sequelae of blast induced mTBI. This is the first demonstration of an effective short term countermeasure for mTBI. Further work on long term outcomes and the potential use of NAC in civilian m

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in patient with elevated homocystein level and blast injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuljević, Ervin; Redzepi, Gzim; Plestina, Sanja; Vidjak, Vinko; Loncarić, Vlasta; Jakopović, Marko; Samarzija, Miroslav

    2009-03-01

    38-year-old man had chronic deep venous thrombosis (DVT) as a result of multiple injuries caused by an explosion of grenade 12 years ago, with recurrent pulmonary thromboembolisms and pulmonary hypertension which was unrecognized for a decade. Patient was admitted with a progressive dyspnea and exercise intolerance (NYHA II). The diagnosis was established according to clinical symptoms, transthoracic echocardiography, phlebography, lung scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography. Oral anticoagulant therapy was introduced and cava filter indicated to implant. During phlebography a floating thrombus was found in the inferior cava vein underneath renal vein. Implantation was delayed and patient received systemic fibrinolytic therapy with streptokinase (7500 000 UI within 4 days), followed by heparin infusion and warfarin. Post-fibrinolytic phlebography showed clear lumen of inferior vena cava. Fibrinolysis had also affected pulmonary hypertension-systolic pressure in the right ventricle measured by Doppler echocardiography decreased from 90 to 65 mmHg. Permanent intravenous cava filter was implanted. PMID:19408648

  12. Overpressure blast-wave induced brain injury elevates oxidative stress in the hypothalamus and catecholamine biosynthesis in the rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümer, Nihal; Svetlov, Stanislav; Whidden, Melissa; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Prima, Victor; Erdos, Benedek; Sherman, Alexandra; Kobeissy, Firas; Yezierski, Robert; Scarpace, Philip J; Vierck, Charles; Wang, Kevin K W

    2013-06-01

    Explosive overpressure brain injury (OBI) impacts the lives of both military and civilian population. We hypothesize that a single exposure to OBI results in increased hypothalamic expression of oxidative stress and activation of the sympatho-adrenal medullary axis. Since a key component of blast-induced organ injury is the primary overpressure wave, we assessed selective biochemical markers of autonomic function and oxidative stress in male Sprague Dawley rats subjected to head-directed overpressure insult. Rats were subjected to single head-directed OBI with a 358kPa peak overpressure at the target. Control rats were exposed to just noise signal being placed at ~2m distance from the shock tube nozzle. Sympathetic nervous system activation of the adrenal medullae (AM) was evaluated at 6h following blast injury by assessing the expression of catecholamine biosynthesizing enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β hydroxylase (DβH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) along with plasma norepinephrine (NE). TH, DβH and NPY expression increased 20%, 25%, and 91% respectively, following OBI (P<0.05). Plasma NE was also significantly elevated by 23% (P<0.05) following OBI. OBI significantly elevated TH (49%, P<0.05) in the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) of the brain stem while AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase activity, a marker of oxidative stress, was elevated in the hypothalamus following OBI. Collectively, the increased levels of TH, DβH and NPY expression in the rat AM, elevated TH in NTS along with increased plasma NE suggest that single OBI exposure results in increased sympathoexcitation. The mechanism may involve the elevated AT1 receptor expression and NADPH oxidase levels in the hypothalamus. Taken together, such effects may be important factors contributing to pathology of brain injury and autonomic dysfunction associated with the clinical profile of patients following OBI. PMID:23570732

  13. A novel model of blast-related traumatic brain injury in rats%一种新型大鼠颅脑爆炸伤模型建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张弛; 王占江; 朱杰; 刘文博; 张磊; 王远; 惠浩; 费舟

    2013-01-01

    目的 建立一种模拟爆炸性武器原发性冲击波损伤(PBI)的大鼠颅脑爆炸伤(bTBI)模型.方法 60只雄性Sprague-Dawley大鼠随机分为对照组和爆炸伤后6h、12 h、24 h、3d、7d损伤组(n=10).大鼠麻醉后,将2.5 mm直径PETN炸药球放置于大鼠右额叶顶部(人字缝和矢状缝中点右侧3.0 mm)上方2,0 mm,利用电雷管及银质柔性导爆索引爆后,造成颅脑爆炸伤.观察动物伤后存活率及生存质量,于损伤后取大鼠损伤区脑组织行病理检查,并对血清行神经元特异烯醇化酶(NSE)含量测定.结果 损伤组大鼠全部存活,硬膜下血肿和蛛网膜下腔出血明显,HE染色示损伤区神经元大量坏死、皮层微血管破裂出血,脑挫裂伤程度均一.与对照组相比,伤后6h,血清NSE含量开始上升,24h达到高峰(P<0.05),伤后7d仍高表达(P<0.05).结论 2.5 mm直径炸药球在2.0 mm的爆炸距离可模拟冲击波原发效应,损伤确定的同时,致死率低,重复性和稳定性较好,是一种可靠的大鼠颅脑爆炸伤模型.%Objective To establish an animal model of blast-related traumatic brain injury ( bTBI) in rats, which simulates the mechanism of primary blast injury (PBI)of explosive weapons. Methods A total of 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into a control group and 6h, 12 h, 24 h, 3 d, 7 d groups according to time point after injury with 10 rats in each group. After the rats were anesthetized, a spherical exploder with 2.5 mm in diameter ( PETN contained) was placed 2. 0 mm above the right frontal parietal lobe of the rats ( 3 mm right to the center point between bregma and lambda). The explosion was triggered by an electric detonator and a silver blast-guide cable. The survival rate and pathological changes were recorded and the brain tissue was examined by a light microscope after injury. The blood samples were collected for testing the changes of serum neuron specific enolase (NSE) concentration after explosion. Results

  14. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The d...

  15. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  16. UTRASTRUCTURAL ALTERATIONS OF HIPPOCAMPUS AND BRAIN STEM AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH INJURY SEVERITY AFTER BLAST INJURY IN RATS%冲击伤后大鼠海马及脑干组织超微结构改变及其与肺冲击伤伤情的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    比较观察了胸部局部或全身冲击伤后大鼠海马和脑干组织超微结构改变及其与肺冲击伤伤情的关系。采用BST-Ⅰ和BST-Ⅲ型生物激波管分别致全身和胸部局部冲击伤。尸检显示,全身或胸部局部暴露冲击波仅导致明显的肺冲击伤,脑组织无明显的器质性损害。电镜结果显示,胸部局部或全身冲击伤后,海马和脑干神经细胞出现明显的结构改变,肺冲击伤伤情愈重,海马和脑干组织的超微结构改变也愈明显。提示全身或胸部局部冲击伤虽未引起脑组织肉眼上的明显损伤,但可造成海马和脑干组织超微结构的明显改变,并与肺冲击伤有一定的内在联系。%This experiment was to examine ultrastructural alterations in hippocampal and brain stem tissues and their relationship with injury severity after whole body or local chest exposure to blast wave in rats.BST-Ⅰ and BST-Ⅲ bio-shock tubes were used to induce whole body or local chest blast injury.Gross examination revealed that only obvious pulmonary blast injury occurred after whole body or local chest exposure to blast wave,the brain tissue had no marked structural damage.Results from electron microscopy indicated that there were obvious ultrastructural alterations in the hippocampus and brain stem.The more severe the injury severity of pulmonary blast injury was,the more obvious alterations of brain ultrastructures occurred.It suggests that whole body or local pulmonary blast injury,although causing no marked gross alterations in the brain tissue,can inflict obvious ultrastructural damage in the hippocampus and brain stem,and this may be related with pulmonary blast injury.

  17. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Awwad, Hibah O.; Gonzalez, Larry P.; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J.; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000–30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to ...

  18. [Scapular/parascapular double skin-paddle free flap for transfixing blast injuries of the hand. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, T; Pozetto, M; Gibert, N; Dautel, G

    2014-06-01

    Balistic transfixing hand traumas require a complex reconstruction management. Stabilization and reconstruction of the injuried tissues need a double skin-paddle coverage. We present an original case report of a double skin-paddle scapular/parascapular free flap used to cover a through and through gunshot injury of the right hand. A 14-years-old patient presents a severe and extensive wound with full-thickness palmar and dorsal skin defects, dislocation of the carpal bones, median nerve and flexor tendons losses. Distal vascularization is maintained by the deep palmar arch system supplied by the ulnar artery. The radial artery is severed at the level of the first dorsal interosseous space. The measured defect of the dorsal skin was 12×7cm and the palmar one was 6×3cm. After skeletal stabilization, tendinous and nerve preparation, the hand coverage was performed using a double skin-paddle scapular/parascapular free flap. The vascular anastomoses include an end-to-side arterial suture between the circumflex scapular and the radial arteries, and an end-to-end venous suture between the circumflex scapular and the dorsal radial veins. The scapular/parascapular double skin-paddle free flap is a safe and reliable technique to achieve a dorsal and palmar hand coverage in lack of local flaps alternatives. It can be used as a good option prior to bone graft, tendinous and nervous reconstruction. PMID:24268067

  19. Neuro-glial and systemic mechanisms of pathological responses in rat models of primary blast overpressure compared to ‘composite’ blast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VictorPrima

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of experimental models of blast brain injury have been implemented in rodents and larger animals. However, the variety of blast sources and the complexity of blast wave biophysics have made data on injury mechanisms and biomarkers difficult to analyze and compare. Recently, we showed the importance of rat position towards blast generated by an external shock tube. In this study, we further characterized blast producing moderate TBI and defined ‘composite’ blast and primary blast exposure set-ups. Schlieren optics visualized interaction between the head and a shock wave generated by external shock tube, revealing strong head acceleration upon positioning the rat on-axis with the shock tube (composite blast, but negligible skull movement upon peak overpressure exposure off-axis (primary blast. Brain injury signatures of a primary blast hitting the frontal head were assessed and compared to damage produced by composite blast. Low to negligible levels of neurodegeneration were found following primary blast compared to composite blast by silver staining. However, persistent gliosis in hippocampus and accumulation of GFAP/CNPase in circulation was detected after both primary and composite blast. Also, markers of vascular/endothelial inflammation integrin alpha/beta, sICAM, and L-selectin along with neurotrophic factor NGF-beta were increased in serum within 6 hours post-blasts and persisted for 7 days thereafter. In contrast, systemic IL-1, IL-10, fractalkine, neuroendocrine peptide Orexin A, and VEGF receptor Neuropilin-2 (NRP-2 were raised predominantly after primary blast exposure. In conclusion, biomarkers of major pathological pathways were elevated at all blast setups. The most significant and persistent changes in neuro-glial markers were found after composite blast, while primary blast instigated prominent systemic cytokine/chemokine, Orexin A, and Neuropilin-2 release, particularly when primary blast impacted rats with

  20. Blast-Resistant Improvement of Sandwich Armor Structure with Aluminum Foam Composite

    OpenAIRE

    Shu Yang; Chang Qi

    2013-01-01

    Sandwich armor structures with aluminum foam can be utilized to protect a military vehicle from harmful blast load such as a landmine explosion. In this paper, a system-level dynamic finite element model is developed to simulate the blast event and to evaluate the blast-resistant performance of the sandwich armor structure. It is found that a sandwich armor structure with only aluminum foam is capable of mitigating crew injuries under a moderate blast load. However, a severe blast load causes...

  1. Blast Testing Issues and TBI: Experimental Models That Lead to Wrong Conclusions

    OpenAIRE

    Needham, Charles E.; Ritzel, David; Rule, Gregory T.; Wiri, Suthee; Young, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have noticed an increase in the number of blast injury studies published in peer-reviewed biomedical journals that have utilized improperly conceived experiments. Data from these studies will lead to false conclusions and more confusion than advancement in the understanding of blast injury, particularly blast neurotrauma. Computational methods to properly characterize the blast environment have been available for decades. These methods, combined with a basic un...

  2. Blast Wave Exposure Impairs Memory and Decreases Axon Initial Segment Length

    OpenAIRE

    Baalman, Kelli L.; Cotton, R. James; Rasband, S. Neil; Rasband, Matthew N.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to a blast wave has been proposed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), with symptoms including altered cognition, memory, and behavior. This idea, however, remains controversial, and the mechanisms of blast-induced brain injury remain unknown. To begin to resolve these questions, we constructed a simple compressed air shock tube, placed rats inside the tube, and exposed them to a highly reproducible and controlled blast wave. Consistent with the generation of a mild injury, 2...

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of mild brain injury induced by explosive blast wave%爆炸冲击波所致轻度颅脑损伤的诊断与处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段朝霞; 张洁元; 陈魁君; 李冠桦; 李兵仓

    2016-01-01

    爆炸冲击波引起的创伤性颅脑损伤( bTBI)是战场上最常见的损伤,大多数患者是轻度的颅脑创伤( mTBI)。常规的临床影像技术如CT不能检测出mTBI的脑部变化,并且这类损伤的功能意义目前还有争议,最近几年出现的新技术能敏感地检测出脑组织的细微异常,因此在mTBI的诊断中起非常中的作用。笔者主要综述爆炸冲击波所致mTBI诊断的相关进展。%Blast⁃related traumatic brain injury ( bTBI) induced by explosive blast wave is the most common event on the battlefield.Most of the patients are characterized as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The traditional clinical imaging couldn′t detect the pathological changes in the brain. Also, the functional significance of this type of injury remains controversial.In recent years,some new technology can sensitively detect the minimal abnormality in the injured brain tissues.Thus,it is valuable in the diagnosis of mTBI.In this paper,we summarized the new advancement of diagnosis for mTBI induced by explosive blast wave.

  4. Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Needham, Charles E

    2010-01-01

    The primary purpose of this text is to document many of the lessons that have been learned during the author’s more than forty years in the field of blast and shock. The writing therefore takes on an historical perspective, in some sense, because it follows the author’s experience. The book deals with blast waves propagating in fluids or materials that can be treated as fluids. It begins by distinguishing between blast waves and the more general category of shock waves. It then examines several ways of generating blast waves, considering the propagation of blast waves in one, two and three dimensions as well as through the real atmosphere. One section treats the propagation of shocks in layered gases in a more detailed manner. The book also details the interaction of shock waves with structures in particular reflections, progressing from simple to complex geometries, including planar structures, two-dimensional structures such as ramps or wedges, reflections from heights of burst, and three-dimensional st...

  5. Blast Overpressure Waves Induce Transient Anxiety and Regional Changes in Cerebral Glucose Metabolism and Delayed Hyperarousal in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Hibah O; Gonzalez, Larry P; Tompkins, Paul; Lerner, Megan; Brackett, Daniel J; Awasthi, Vibhudutta; Standifer, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    Physiological alterations, anxiety, and cognitive disorders are strongly associated with blast-induced traumatic brain injury (blast TBI), and are common symptoms in service personnel exposed to blasts. Since 2006, 25,000-30,000 new TBI cases are diagnosed annually in U.S. Service members; increasing evidence confirms that primary blast exposure causes diffuse axonal injury and is often accompanied by altered behavioral outcomes. Behavioral and acute metabolic effects resulting from blast to the head in the absence of thoracic contributions from the periphery were examined, following a single blast wave directed to the head of male Sprague-Dawley rats protected by a lead shield over the torso. An 80 psi head blast produced cognitive deficits that were detected in working memory. Blast TBI rats displayed increased anxiety as determined by elevated plus maze at day 9 post-blast compared to sham rats; blast TBI rats spent significantly more time than the sham controls in the closed arms (p blast. Instead, blast TBI rats displayed increased rearing behavior at day 48 post-blast compared to sham rats. Blast TBI rats also exhibited suppressed acoustic startle responses, but similar pre-pulse inhibition at day 15 post-blast compared to sham rats. Acute physiological alterations in cerebral glucose metabolism were determined by positron emission tomography 1 and 9 days post-blast using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG). Global glucose uptake in blast TBI rat brains increased at day 1 post-blast (p blast injury. Markers for reactive astrogliosis and neuronal damage were noted by immunoblotting motor cortex tissue from day 10 post-blast in blast TBI rats compared to sham controls (p < 0.05; n = 5-6). PMID:26136722

  6. Blast Wave Exposure to the Extremities Causes Endothelial Activation and Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Spear, Abigail M.; Davies, Emma M.; Taylor, Christopher; Whiting, Rachel; Macildowie, Sara; Kirkman, Emrys; Midwinter, Mark; Watts, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extremity injury is a significant burden to those injured in explosive incidents and local ischaemia can result in poor functionality in salvaged limbs. This study examined whether blast injury to a limb resulted in a change in endothelial phenotype leading to changes to the surrounding tissue. The hind limbs of terminally anaesthetized rabbits were subjected to one of four blast exposures (high, medium, low, or no blast). Blood samples were analyzed for circulating endothelial cells...

  7. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Zachary S.; Grinter, Michael B.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p processes. We have shown aberrant histone acetylation patterns involved in blast induced astrogliosis and cognitive impairments. Further understanding of their role in the injury progression may lead to novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27551260

  8. Impact of complex blast waves on the human head: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Long Bin; Chew, Fatt Siong; Tse, Kwong Ming; Chye Tan, Vincent Beng; Lee, Heow Pueh

    2014-12-01

    Head injuries due to complex blasts are not well examined because of limited published articles on the subject. Previous studies have analyzed head injuries due to impact from a single planar blast wave. Complex or concomitant blasts refer to impacts usually caused by more than a single blast source, whereby the blast waves may impact the head simultaneously or consecutively, depending on the locations and distances of the blast sources from the subject, their blast intensities, the sequence of detonations, as well as the effect of blast wave reflections from rigid walls. It is expected that such scenarios will result in more serious head injuries as compared to impact from a single blast wave due to the larger effective duration of the blast. In this paper, the utilization of a head-helmet model for blast impact analyses in Abaqus(TM) (Dassault Systemes, Singapore) is demonstrated. The model is validated against studies published in the literature. Results show that the skull is capable of transmitting the blast impact to cause high intracranial pressures (ICPs). In addition, the pressure wave from a frontal blast may enter through the sides of the helmet and wrap around the head to result in a second impact at the rear. This study recommended better protection at the sides and rear of the helmet through the use of foam pads so as to reduce wave entry into the helmet. The consecutive frontal blasts scenario resulted in higher ICPs compared with impact from a single frontal blast. This implied that blast impingement from an immediate subsequent pressure wave would increase severity of brain injury. For the unhelmeted head case, a peak ICP of 330 kPa is registered at the parietal lobe which exceeds the 235 kPa threshold for serious head injuries. The concurrent front and side blasts scenario yielded lower ICPs and skull stresses than the consecutive frontal blasts case. It is also revealed that the additional side blast would only significantly affect ICPs at

  9. A Table-top Blast Driven Shock Tube

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael; 10.1063/1.3518970

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury in conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has motivated laboratory scale experiments on biomedical effects of blast waves and studies of blast wave transmission properties of various materials in hopes of improving armor design to mitigate these injuries. This paper describes the design and performance of a table-top shock tube that is more convenient and widely accessible than traditional compression driven and blast driven shock tubes. The design is simple: it is an explosive driven shock tube employing a rifle primer which explodes when impacted by the firing pin. The firearm barrel acts as the shock tube, and the shock wave emerges from the muzzle. The small size of this shock tube can facilitate localized application of a blast wave to a subject, tissue, or material under test.

  10. Device for Underwater Laboratory Simulation of Unconfined Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes simulate blast waves to study their effects in air under laboratory conditions; however, few experimental models exist for simulating underwater blast waves that are needed for facilitating experiments in underwater blast transmission, determining injury thresholds in marine animals, validating numerical models, and exploring mitigation strategies for explosive well removals. This method incorporates an oxy-acetylene driven underwater blast simulator which creates peak blast pressures of about 1860 kPa. Shot-to-shot consistency was fair, with an average standard deviation near 150 kPa. Results suggest peak blast pressures from 460 kPa to 1860 kPa are available by adjusting the distance from the source.

  11. Effectiveness of eye armor during blast loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-11-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the most common types of combat injuries resulting from the interaction of military personnel with improvised explosive devices. Ocular blast injury mechanisms are complex, and trauma may occur through various injury mechanisms. However, primary blast injuries (PBI) are an important cause of ocular trauma that may go unnoticed and result in significant damage to internal ocular tissues and visual impairment. Further, the effectiveness of commonly employed eye armor, designed for ballistic and laser protection, in lessening the severity of adverse blast overpressures (BOP) is unknown. In this paper, we employed a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction computational model for assessing effectiveness of the eye armor during blast loading on human eyes and validated results against free field blast measurements by Bentz and Grimm (2013). Numerical simulations show that the blast waves focused on the ocular region because of reflections from surrounding facial features and resulted in considerable increase in BOP. We evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading using the computational model. Our results corroborate experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in mitigating BOP loading on the eye. Numerical results confirmed that the goggles significantly reduced blast wave penetration in the space between the armor and the eyes and provided larger clearance space for blast wave expansion after penetration than the spectacles. The spectacles as well as the goggles were more effective in reducing reflected BOP at higher charge mass because of the larger decrease in dynamic pressures after the impact. The goggles provided greater benefit of reducing the peak pressure than the spectacles for lower charge mass. However, the goggles resulted in moderate, sustained elevated pressure loading on the eye, that became 50-100% larger than the pressure loading

  12. [Investigations into the topical problems of forensic-medical expertise of gunshot and blast injuries in the works of V.L. Popov and his disciples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozhchenko, A P; Tolmachev, I A

    2013-01-01

    The professional activity of professor V.L. Popov is considered with special reference to the major achievements of himself and his disciples in the field of forensic medical ballistics. The essence of provisions formulated by V.L. Popov on the mechanisms of formation and extent of gunshot injuries is discussed with regard to their importance for the determination of the large shooting distance. V.L. Popov is the founder of the scientific and pedagogical school that was justifiably regarded as the largest in this country and remains as such. The main achievements of this school have been obtained in studies of gunshot injuries. PMID:23888500

  13. 'Hidden' Brain Injury a Challenge for Military Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159316.html 'Hidden' Brain Injury a Challenge for Military Doctors Potentially fatal ... may suffer from a distinctive pattern of "hidden" brain injury, a small study finds. "Blast-related brain ...

  14. Mechanical and histological characterization of trachea tissue subjected to blast-type pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. J.; Bo, C.; Tucker, A. W.; Jardine, A. P.; Proud, W. G.; Williams, A.; Brown, K. A.

    2014-05-01

    Injuries to the respiratory system can be a component of polytrauma in blast-loading injuries. Tissues located at air-liquid interfaces, including such tissues in the respiratory system, are particularly vulnerable to damage by blast overpressures. There is a lack of information about the mechanical and cellular responses that contribute to the damage of this class of tissues subjected to the high strain rates associated with blast loading. Here, we describe the results of dynamic blast-like pressure loading tests at high strain rates on freshly harvested ex vivo trachea tissue specimens.

  15. Brain Response to Primary Blast Wave Using Validated Finite Element Models of Human Head and Advanced Combat Helmet

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liying; Makwana, Rahul; Sharma, Sumit

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH), a finite element (FE) study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially va...

  16. Mathematical Models of Blast-Induced TBI: Current Status, Challenges, and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Raj K.; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of recent military activities and is the leading cause of death and long-term disability among U.S. soldiers. The current limited understanding of brain injury mechanisms impedes the development of protection, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. We believe mathematical models of blast wave brain injury biomechanics and neurobiology, complemented with in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, will enable a better unders...

  17. Mathematical models of blast induced TBI: current status, challenges and prospects

    OpenAIRE

    AndrzejPrzekwas; RajKGupta

    2013-01-01

    Blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become a signature wound of recent military activities and is the leading cause of death and long-term disability among U.S. soldiers. The current limited understanding of brain injury mechanisms impedes the development of protection, diagnostic and treatment strategies. We believe mathematical models of blast wave brain injury biomechanics and neurobiology, complemented with in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, will enable a better underst...

  18. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Matthew R.; Shelhamer, Mark J.; Schubert, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to on...

  19. Altered Gene Expression in Cultured Microglia in Response to Simulated Blast Overpressure: Possible Role of Pulse Duration

    OpenAIRE

    Kane, Michael J; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti, Dina M.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Briggs, Denise I.; Leung, Lai Yee; VandeVord, Pamela J.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Blast overpressure has long been known to cause barotrauma to air-filled organs such as lung and middle ear. However, experience in Iraq and Afghanistan is revealing that individuals exposed to explosive munitions can also suffer traumatic brain injury (TBI) even in the absence of obvious external injury. The interaction of a blast shock wave with the brain in the intact cranial vault is extremely complex making it difficult to conclude that a blast wave interacts in a direct manner with the ...

  20. Blast wave exposure impairs memory and decreases axon initial segment length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalman, Kelli L; Cotton, R James; Rasband, S Neil; Rasband, Matthew N

    2013-05-01

    Exposure to a blast wave has been proposed to cause mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), with symptoms including altered cognition, memory, and behavior. This idea, however, remains controversial, and the mechanisms of blast-induced brain injury remain unknown. To begin to resolve these questions, we constructed a simple compressed air shock tube, placed rats inside the tube, and exposed them to a highly reproducible and controlled blast wave. Consistent with the generation of a mild injury, 2 weeks after exposure to the blast, we found that motor performance was unaffected, and a panel of common injury markers showed little or no significant changes in expression in the cortex, corpus callosum, or hippocampus. Similarly, we were unable to detect elevated spectrin breakdown products in brains collected from blast-exposed rats. Using an object recognition task, however, we found that rats exposed to a blast wave spent significantly less time exploring a novel object when compared with control rats. Intriguingly, we also observed a significant shortening of the axon initial segment (AIS) in both the cortex and hippocampus of blast-exposed rats, suggesting altered neuronal excitability after exposure to a blast. A computational model showed that shortening the AIS increased both threshold and the interspike interval of repetitively firing neurons. These results support the conclusion that exposure to a single blast wave can lead to mTBI with accompanying cognitive impairment and subcellular changes in the molecular organization of neurons. PMID:23025758

  1. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenzhi Wang

    Full Text Available Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI. To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts.

  2. Computational study of human head response to primary blast waves of five levels from three directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D; Miller, Mark C; Wood, Adam R; Vipperman, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and was subjected to the blast waves of five blast intensities from the anterior, right lateral, and posterior directions at a stand-off distance of one meter from the detonation center. Simulation results show that the blast wave directly transmits into the head and causes a pressure wave propagating through the brain tissue. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is predicted to have the highest magnitude from a posterior blast wave in comparison with a blast wave from any of the other two directions with same blast intensity. The brain model predicts higher positive pressure at the site proximal to blast wave than that at the distal site. The intracranial pressure wave invariably travels into the posterior fossa and vertebral column, causing high pressures in these regions. The severities of cerebral contusions at different cerebral locations are estimated using an ICP based injury criterion. Von Mises stress prevails in the cortex with a much higher magnitude than in the internal parenchyma. According to an axonal injury criterion based on von Mises stress, axonal injury is not predicted to be a cause of primary brain injury from blasts. PMID:25409326

  3. Calculation of driling and blasting parameters in blasting performance

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Karanakova Stefanovska, Radmila; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    In all mining technology drilling and blasting parameters and works are one of the main production processes at each mine. The parameters of drilling and blasting and explosives consumption per ton of blasting mass are define economic indicators of any blasting no matter for what purpose and where mining is performed. The calculation of rock blasting should always have in mind that the methodology of calculation of all drilling and blasting parameters in blasting performance are performed for...

  4. Blast-Resistant Improvement of Sandwich Armor Structure with Aluminum Foam Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich armor structures with aluminum foam can be utilized to protect a military vehicle from harmful blast load such as a landmine explosion. In this paper, a system-level dynamic finite element model is developed to simulate the blast event and to evaluate the blast-resistant performance of the sandwich armor structure. It is found that a sandwich armor structure with only aluminum foam is capable of mitigating crew injuries under a moderate blast load. However, a severe blast load causes force enhancement and results in much worse crew injury. An isolating layer between the aluminum foam and the vehicle floor is introduced to remediate this drawback. The results show that the blast-resistant capability of the innovative sandwich armor structure with the isolating layer increases remarkably.

  5. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005–0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  6. Blast Wave Exposure to the Extremities Causes Endothelial Activation and Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Abigail M; Davies, Emma M; Taylor, Christopher; Whiting, Rachel; Macildowie, Sara; Kirkman, Emrys; Midwinter, Mark; Watts, Sarah A

    2015-11-01

    Extremity injury is a significant burden to those injured in explosive incidents and local ischaemia can result in poor functionality in salvaged limbs. This study examined whether blast injury to a limb resulted in a change in endothelial phenotype leading to changes to the surrounding tissue.The hind limbs of terminally anaesthetized rabbits were subjected to one of four blast exposures (high, medium, low, or no blast). Blood samples were analyzed for circulating endothelial cells pre-injury and at 1, 6, and 11 h postinjury as well as analysis for endothelial activation pre-injury and at 1, 6, and 12  h postinjury. Post-mortem tissue (12  h post-injury) was analysed for both protein and mRNA expression and also for histopathology. The high blast group had significantly elevated levels of circulating endothelial cells 6  h postinjury. This group also had significantly elevated tissue mRNA expression of IL-6, E-selection, TNF-α, HIF-1, thrombomodulin, and PDGF. There was a significant correlation between blast dose and the degree of tissue pathology (hemorrhage, neutrophil infiltrate, and oedema) with the worst scores in the high blast group. This study has demonstrated that blast injury can activate the endothelium and in some cases cause damage that in turn leads to pathological changes in the surrounding tissue. For the casualty injured by an explosion the damaging effects of hemorrhage and shock could be exacerbated by blast injury and vice versa so that even low levels of blast become damaging, all of which could affect tissue functionality and long-term outcomes. PMID:26418548

  7. Effects of Primary Blast Overpressure on Retina and Optic Tract in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMar, James; Sharrow, Keith; Hill, Miya; Berman, Jonathan; Oliver, Thomas; Long, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Blast has been the leading cause of injury, particularly traumatic brain injury and visual system injury, in combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. We determined the effect of shock tube-generated primary blast on retinal electrophysiology and on retinal and brain optic tract histopathology in a rat model. The amplitude of a- and b-waves on the electroretinogram (ERG) for both right and left eyes were measured prior to a battlefield simulation Friedlander-type blast wave and on 1, 7, and 14 days thereafter. Histopathologic findings of the right and left retina and the right and left optic tracts (2.8 mm postoptic chiasm) were evaluated 14 days after the blast. For two experiments in which the right eye was oriented to the blast, the amplitude of ERG a- and b-waves at 7 days post blast on the right side but not on the left side was diminished compared to that of sham animals (P = 0.005-0.01) Histopathologic injury scores at 14 days post blast for the right retina but not the left retina were higher than for sham animals (P = 0.01), and histopathologic injury scores at 14 days for both optic tracts were markedly higher than for shams (P blast wave, comparable to that causing human injury, produced injury to the retina as determined by ERG and histopathology, and to both postchiasmatic optic tracts as determined by histopathology. This model may be useful for analyzing the effect of therapeutic interventions on retinal damage due to primary blast waves. PMID:27199884

  8. Exposure of the Thorax to a Sublethal Blast Wave Causes a Hydrodynamic Pulse That Leads to Perivenular Inflammation in the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Simard, J. Marc; Pampori, Adam; Keledjian, Kaspar; Tosun, Cigdem; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an explosive blast (blast-TBI) is postulated to result, in part, from transvascular transmission to the brain of a hydrodynamic pulse (a.k.a., volumetric blood surge, ballistic pressure wave, hydrostatic shock, or hydraulic shock) induced in major intrathoracic blood vessels. This mechanism of blast-TBI has not been demonstrated directly. We tested the hypothesis that a blast wave impacting the thorax would induce a hydrodynamic pulse that would cause pa...

  9. The importance of systemic response in the pathobiology of blast-induced neurotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    IboljaCernak

    2010-01-01

    Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body, parallel blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure-increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. I...

  10. The Importance of Systemic Response in the Pathobiology of Blast-Induced Neurotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Cernak, Ibolja

    2010-01-01

    Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine–immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. I...

  11. Blasting in underground mining

    OpenAIRE

    Doneva, Nikolinka; Despodov, Zoran; Mirakovski, Dejan; Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Mijalkovski, Stojance

    2015-01-01

    The long history of underground facilities gives us a lot of cognitions that we use in the choice of appropriate drilling and blasting parameters to obtain satisfactory results in underground facility constructions. In this paper are represent parts of those cognitions. Selection of an appropriate blast hole pattern, hole cut type, total quantity of explosives, initiation sequence and to the amount of explosive detonated per delay are crucial for successfully blasting in underground facilitie...

  12. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Gruzinov, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativi...

  13. New gunpowder blasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces gunpowder blasting, which consists of ten chapters. It deals with conception of gunpowder on the history of gunpowder, difference between gunpowder and general materials and classification of gunpowder, reaction of gunpowder, shock wave and detonation, on properties, material velocity and structure, test method on gunpowder and an article processed with heat, gunpowder such as igniter charge, carlit and slurry gunpowder, propellant and an article processed with heat, blasting on basics and Bench cut, blasting operations and security blasting construction and using of gunpowder.

  14. Effects of repetitive low-pressure explosive blast on primary neurons and mixed cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Nicole E; Piehler, Thuvan; Banton, Rohan; Benjamin, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive mild traumatic brain injury represents a considerable health concern, particularly for athletes and military personnel. For blast-induced brain injury, threshold shock-impulse levels required to induce such injuries and cumulative effects with single and/or multiple exposures are not well characterized. Currently, there is no established in vitro experimental model with blast pressure waves generated by live explosives. This study presents results of primary neurons and mixed cultures subjected to our unique in vitro indoor experimental platform that uses real military explosive charges to probe the effects of primary explosive blast at the cellular level. The effects of the blast on membrane permeability, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), uptake of sodium ions, intracellular calcium, and release of glutamate were probed 2 and 24 hr postblast. Significant changes in membrane permeability and sodium uptake among the sham, single-blast-injured, and triple-blast-injured samples were observed. A significant increase in ROS and glutamate release was observed for the triple-blast-injured samples compared with the sham. Changes in intracellular calcium were not significant. These results suggest that blast exposure disrupts the integrity of the plasma membrane, leading to the upset of ion homeostasis, formation of ROS, and glutamate release. Published 2016. †This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27317559

  15. Computational Study of Human Head Response to Primary Blast Waves of Five Levels from Three Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenzhi; Pahk, Jae Bum; Balaban, Carey D.; Miller, Mark C.; Adam R Wood; Jeffrey S Vipperman

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to blast waves without any fragment impacts can still result in primary blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). To investigate the mechanical response of human brain to primary blast waves and to identify the injury mechanisms of bTBI, a three-dimensional finite element head model consisting of the scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, nasal cavity, and brain was developed from the imaging data set of a human female. The finite element head model was partially validated and w...

  16. Mathematical models of blast induced TBI: current status, challenges and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrzejPrzekwas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has become a signature wound of recent military activities and is the leading cause of death and long-term disability among U.S. soldiers. The current limited understanding of brain injury mechanisms impedes the development of protection, diagnostic and treatment strategies. We believe mathematical models of blast wave brain injury biomechanics and neurobiology, complemented with in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, will enable a better understanding of injury mechanisms and accelerate the development of both protective and treatment strategies. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in mathematical and computational modeling of blast induced TBI, identify research gaps and recommend future developments. A brief overview of blast wave physics, injury biomechanics and the neurobiology of brain injury is used as a foundation for a more detailed discussion of multiscale mathematical models of primary biomechanics and secondary injury and repair mechanisms. The paper also presents a discussion of model development strategies, experimental approaches to generate benchmark data for model validation and potential applications of the model for prevention and protection against blast wave TBI.

  17. Reconstruction of improvised explosive device blast loading to personnel in the open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiri, Suthee; Needham, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Significant advances in reconstructing attacks by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other blast events are reported. A high-fidelity three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics tool, called Second-order Hydrodynamic Automatic Mesh Refinement Code, was used for the analysis. Computer-aided design models for subjects or vehicles in the scene accurately represent geometries of objects in the blast field. A wide range of scenario types and blast exposure levels were reconstructed including free field blast, enclosed space of vehicle cabin, IED attack on a vehicle, buried charges, recoilless rifle operation, rocket-propelled grenade attack and missile attack with single subject or multiple subject exposure to pressure levels from ˜ 27.6 kPa (˜ 4 psi) to greater than 690 kPa (> 100 psi). To create a full 3D pressure time-resolved reconstruction of a blast event for injury and blast exposure analysis, a combination of intelligence data and Blast Gauge data can be used to reconstruct an actual in-theatre blast event. The methodology to reconstruct an event and the "lessons learned" from multiple reconstructions in open space are presented. The analysis uses records of blast pressure at discrete points, and the output is a spatial and temporal blast load distribution for all personnel involved.

  18. Reconstruction of improvised explosive device blast loading to personnel in the open

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiri, Suthee; Needham, Charles

    2016-05-01

    Significant advances in reconstructing attacks by improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and other blast events are reported. A high-fidelity three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics tool, called Second-order Hydrodynamic Automatic Mesh Refinement Code, was used for the analysis. Computer-aided design models for subjects or vehicles in the scene accurately represent geometries of objects in the blast field. A wide range of scenario types and blast exposure levels were reconstructed including free field blast, enclosed space of vehicle cabin, IED attack on a vehicle, buried charges, recoilless rifle operation, rocket-propelled grenade attack and missile attack with single subject or multiple subject exposure to pressure levels from ˜ 27.6 kPa (˜ 4 psi) to greater than 690 kPa (>100 psi). To create a full 3D pressure time-resolved reconstruction of a blast event for injury and blast exposure analysis, a combination of intelligence data and Blast Gauge data can be used to reconstruct an actual in-theatre blast event. The methodology to reconstruct an event and the "lessons learned" from multiple reconstructions in open space are presented. The analysis uses records of blast pressure at discrete points, and the output is a spatial and temporal blast load distribution for all personnel involved.

  19. Exposure of the thorax to a sublethal blast wave causes a hydrodynamic pulse that leads to perivenular inflammation in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J Marc; Pampori, Adam; Keledjian, Kaspar; Tosun, Cigdem; Schwartzbauer, Gary; Ivanova, Svetlana; Gerzanich, Volodymyr

    2014-07-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by an explosive blast (blast-TBI) is postulated to result, in part, from transvascular transmission to the brain of a hydrodynamic pulse (a.k.a., volumetric blood surge, ballistic pressure wave, hydrostatic shock, or hydraulic shock) induced in major intrathoracic blood vessels. This mechanism of blast-TBI has not been demonstrated directly. We tested the hypothesis that a blast wave impacting the thorax would induce a hydrodynamic pulse that would cause pathological changes in the brain. We constructed a Thorax-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (TOBIA) and a Jugular-Only Blast Injury Apparatus (JOBIA). TOBIA delivered a collimated blast wave to the right lateral thorax of a rat, precluding direct impact on the cranium. JOBIA delivered a blast wave to the fluid-filled port of an extracorporeal intravenous infusion device whose catheter was inserted retrograde into the jugular vein, precluding lung injury. Long Evans rats were subjected to sublethal injury by TOBIA or JOBIA. Blast injury induced by TOBIA was characterized by apnea and diffuse bilateral hemorrhagic injury to the lungs associated with a transient reduction in pulse oximetry signals. Immunolabeling 24 h after injury by TOBIA showed up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha, ED-1, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1), and glial fibrillary acidic protein in veins or perivenular tissues and microvessels throughout the brain. The perivenular inflammatory effects induced by TOBIA were prevented by ligating the jugular vein and were reproduced using JOBIA. We conclude that blast injury to the thorax leads to perivenular inflammation, Sur1 up-regulation, and reactive astrocytosis resulting from the induction of a hydrodynamic pulse in the vasculature. PMID:24673157

  20. Passive blast pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  1. BLAST+: architecture and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bealer Kevin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence similarity searching is a very important bioinformatics task. While Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST outperforms exact methods through its use of heuristics, the speed of the current BLAST software is suboptimal for very long queries or database sequences. There are also some shortcomings in the user-interface of the current command-line applications. Results We describe features and improvements of rewritten BLAST software and introduce new command-line applications. Long query sequences are broken into chunks for processing, in some cases leading to dramatically shorter run times. For long database sequences, it is possible to retrieve only the relevant parts of the sequence, reducing CPU time and memory usage for searches of short queries against databases of contigs or chromosomes. The program can now retrieve masking information for database sequences from the BLAST databases. A new modular software library can now access subject sequence data from arbitrary data sources. We introduce several new features, including strategy files that allow a user to save and reuse their favorite set of options. The strategy files can be uploaded to and downloaded from the NCBI BLAST web site. Conclusion The new BLAST command-line applications, compared to the current BLAST tools, demonstrate substantial speed improvements for long queries as well as chromosome length database sequences. We have also improved the user interface of the command-line applications.

  2. Effects of low-level blast exposure on the nervous system: Is there really a controversy?

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    Gregory A Elder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure blast waves can cause extensive CNS injury in humans. However, in combat settings such as Iraq and Afghanistan, lower level exposures associated with mild TBI (mTBI or subclinical exposure have been much more common. Yet controversy exists concerning what traits can be attributed to low-level blast, in large part due to the difficulty of distinguishing blast-related mTBI from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We describe how TBI is defined in humans and the problems posed in using current definitions to recognize blast-related mTBI. We next consider the problem of applying definitions of human mTBI to animal models, in particular that TBI severity in humans is defined in relation to alteration of consciousness at the time of injury, which typically cannot be assessed in animals. However, based on outcome assessments a condition of low-level blast exposure can be defined in animals that likely approximates human mTBI or subclinical exposure. We review blast injury modeling in animals noting that inconsistencies in experimental approach have contributed to uncertainty over the effects of low-level blast. Yet animal studies show that low-level blast pressure waves are transmitted to the brain. In brain low-level blast exposures cause behavioral, biochemical, pathological and physiological effects on the nervous system including the induction of PTSD-related behavioral traits in the absence of a psychological stressor. We review the relationship of blast exposure to chronic neurodegenerative diseases noting the paradoxical lowering of Abeta by blast, which along with other observations suggest that blast-related TBI is pathophysiologically distinct from non-blast TBI. Human neuroimaging studies show that blast-related mTBI is associated with a variety of chronic effects that are unlikely to be explained by co-morbid PTSD. We conclude that abundant evidence supports low-level blast as having long-term effects on the nervous system.

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury: A Family Finds Its Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the last few years, tens of thousands of soldiers have suffered traumatic injuries from blasts due to ... to keep it matter-of-fact. Like another child might wear glasses, Nora wears hearing aids because ...

  4. Hippocampal vulnerability and subacute response following varied blast magnitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Ereifej, Evon S; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2014-06-01

    Clinical outcomes from blast neurotrauma are associated with higher order cognitive functions such as memory, problem solving skills and attention. Current literature is limited to a single overpressure exposure or repeated exposures at the same level of overpressure and is focused on the acute response (microglia was observed in the low blast group. In addition, increased astrocytes (GFAP), membrane signal transduction protein (Map2k1) and calcium regulator mechanosensitive protein (Piezo 2) were observed in the moderate blast group. Results from gene expression analysis suggested ongoing neuroprotection, as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and Mn and CuZn superoxide dismutases (SOD) all increased in the low and moderate blast groups. Ongoing neuroprotection was further supported by increased SOD levels observed in the moderate group using immunohistochemistry. The gene expression level of glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) was upregulated in the low, but downregulated in the high blast group, while no changes were found in the moderate group. Overall, the data shown here provides evidence of a diverse neuroprotective and glial response to various levels of blast exposure. This mechanistic role of neuroprotection is vital in understanding ongoing cellular stress, both at the gene and protein levels, in order to develop interventional studies for the prognosis of injury. PMID:24726403

  5. Characterization of Viscoelastic Materials for Low-Magnitude Blast Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartyczak, Susan; Mock, Willis

    2013-06-01

    Recent preliminary research indicates that exposure to low amplitude blast waves, such as from IED detonation or multiple firings of a weapon, causes damage to brain tissue resulting in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Current combat helmets are not sufficiently protecting warfighters from this danger and the effects are debilitating, costly, and long-lasting. The objective of this research is to evaluate the blast mitigating behavior of current helmet materials and new materials designed for blast mitigation using a test fixture recently developed at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division for use with an existing gas gun. A 40-mm-bore gas gun is used as a shock tube to generate blast waves (ranging from 5 to 30 psi) in a test fixture mounted at the gun muzzle. A fast opening valve is used to release helium gas from a breech which forms into a blast wave and impacts instrumented targets in the test fixture. Blast attenuation of selected materials is determined through the measurement of pressure and accelerometer data in front of and behind the target. Materials evaluated in this research include 6061-T6 aluminum, polyurea 1000, Styrofoam, and Sorbothane (durometer 50, shore 00). The experimental technique, calibration and checkout procedures, and results will be presented.

  6. Exacerbation of blast-induced ocular trauma by an immune response

    OpenAIRE

    Bricker-Anthony, Courtney; Hines-Beard, Jessica; D’Surney, Lauren; Rex, Tonia S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Visual prognosis after an open globe injury is typically worse than after a closed globe injury due, in part, to the immune response that ensues following open globe trauma. There is a need for an animal model of open globe injury in order to investigate mechanisms of vision loss and test potential therapeutics. Methods The left eyes of DBA/2 J mice were exposed to an overpressure airwave blast. This strain lacks a fully functional ocular immune privilege, so even though the blast ...

  7. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  8. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment. PMID:27604715

  9. Distance safety in blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Karanakova Stefanovska, Radmila; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    In blasting performance for any purpose and in any location to implement these safeguards is necessary first to determine (calculated) safety distances in terms of the effect of the explosion from some explosive quantity. Calculation of distance safety in blasting performance are refers to: calculation of safety distances from the influence of air - shock waves, calculation of safety distances (zones) of spraying pieces (fragments action) and calculation of safety distances in action of seis...

  10. Curved characteristics behind blast waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporte, O.; Chang, T. S.

    1972-01-01

    The behavior of nonisentropic flow behind a propagating blast wave is theoretically studied. Exact solutions, expressed in closed form in terms of elementary functions, are presented for three sets of curved characteristicseind a self-similar, strong blast wave.

  11. The importance of systemic response in the pathobiology of blast-induced neurotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibolja eCernak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body, parallel blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure-increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as 1 direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and 2 via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body’s fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.

  12. Mild blast events alter anxiety, memory, and neural activity patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kun; Kuang, Hui; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    There is a general interest in understanding of whether and how exposure to emotionally traumatizing events can alter memory function and anxiety behaviors. Here we have developed a novel laboratory-version of mild blast exposure comprised of high decibel bomb explosion sound coupled with strong air blast to mice. This model allows us to isolate the effects of emotionally fearful components from those of traumatic brain injury or bodily injury typical associated with bomb blasts. We demonstrate that this mild blast exposure is capable of impairing object recognition memory, increasing anxiety in elevated O-maze test, and resulting contextual generalization. Our in vivo neural ensemble recording reveal that such mild blast exposures produced diverse firing changes in the anterior cingulate cortex, a region processing emotional memory and inhibitory control. Moreover, we show that these real-time neural ensemble patterns underwent post-event reverberations, indicating rapid consolidation of those fearful experiences. Identification of blast-induced neural activity changes in the frontal brain may allow us to better understand how mild blast experiences result in abnormal changes in memory functions and excessive fear generalization related to post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:23741416

  13. Experimental animal models for studies on the mechanisms of blast induced neurotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MårtenRisling

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A blast injury is a complex type of physical trauma resulting from the detonation of explosive compounds and has become an important issue due to the use of improvised explosive devices (IED in current military conflicts. Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT is a major concern in contemporary military medicine and includes a variety of injuries that range from mild to lethal.” BINT is characterized by extreme forces and their complex propagation. Modern body protection and the development of armored military vehicles can be assumed to have changed the outcome of BINT. Primary blast injuries are caused by overpressure waves whereas secondary, tertiary and quaternary blast injuries can have more varied origins such as the impact of fragments, abnormal movements or heat. The characteristics of the blast wave can be assumed to be significantly different in open field detonations compared to explosions in a confined space, such an armored vehicle. Important parameters include peak pressure, duration and shape of the pulse. Reflections from walls and armor can make the prediction of effects in individual cases very complex. Epidemiological data do not contain information of the relative importance of the different blast mechanisms. It is therefore important to generate data in carefully designed animal models. Such models can be selective reproductions of a primary blast, penetrating injuries from fragments, acceleration movements or combinations of such mechanisms. It is of crucial importance that the physical parameters of the employed models are well characterized so that the experiments can be reproduced in different laboratory settings. Ideally, pressure recordings should be calibrated by using the same equipment in several laboratories. With carefully designed models and thoroughly evaluated animal data it should be possible to achieve a translation of data between animal and clinical data. Imaging and computer simulation represent a possible link

  14. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the quantity of explosive and its distribution within the rock mass. Over the last decade there have been considerable advances in our ability to measure and analyze blasting performance. These can now be combined with the continuing growth in computing power to develop a more effective description of rock fragmentation for use by future blasting practitioners. The paper describes a view of the fragmentation problem by blasting and the need for a new generation of engineering tools to guide the design and implementation of blasting operations.

  15. Programmable Grit-Blasting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Richard K.

    1988-01-01

    In programmable grit-blasting system undergoing design, controller moves blasting head to precise positions to shape or remove welding defects from parts. Controller holds head in position for preset dwell time and moves head to new position along predetermined path. Position of articulated head established by pair of servomotors according to programmed signals from controller. Head similar to video borescope. Used to remove welding defects in blind holes. Suited for repetitive production operations in grit-blast box.

  16. Blasting of broken marble zones

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Stojceski, Igor; Dambov, Ilija

    2015-01-01

    On receipt of marble blocks appear deformed zones with presence of cracks and other deformities and very small cracks with different azimuth in the rocky massif. The fastest and economical way to bring this zone are removed by applying the methods of blasting. Before blasting, these tables - zones are limited by the block, making the cuts with diamond wire because explosive action may cause of surrounding quality marble blocks. Keywords: blasting, crashed zones, cracks, marble ...

  17. Blast effects of external explosions

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    International audience Security considerations for industrial production and storage require characterization of the mechanical effects caused by blast waves resulting from a detonation or deflagration. This paper evaluates current analytical methods to determine the characteristic parameters of a blast wave with respect to the pressure, impulse and duration of the positive phase of the blast. In the case of a detonation, the trinitrotoluene (TNT) equivalent-based method determines the mas...

  18. Chronic caffeine exposure attenuates blast-induced memory deficit in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Lei Ning; Nan Yang; Xing Chen; Zi-Ai Zhao; Xiu-Zhu Zhang; Xing-Yun Chen; Ping Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of three different ways of chronic caffeine administration on blastinduced memory dysfunction and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods:Adult male C57BL/6 mice were used and randomly divided into five groups:control:without blast exposure,con-water:administrated with water continuously before and after blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI),con-caffeine:administrated with caffeine continuously for 1 month before and after bTBI,pre-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine for 1 month before bTBI and withdrawal after bTBI,post-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine after bTBI.After being subjected to moderate intensity of blast injury,mice were recorded for learning and memory performance using Morris water maze (MWM) paradigms at 1,4,and 8 weeks post-blast injury.Neurological deficit scoring,glutamate concentration,proinflammatory cytokines production,and neuropathological changes at 24 h,1,4,and 8 weeks post-bTBI were examined to evaluate the brain injury in early and prolonged stages.Adenosine A1 receptor expression was detected using qPCR.Results:All of the three ways of chronic caffeine exposure ameliorated blast-induced memory deficit,which is correlated with the neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity,inflammation,astrogliosis and neuronal loss at different stages of injury.Continuous caffeine treatment played positive roles in both early and prolonged stages of bTBI;pre-bTBl and post-bTBl treatment of caffeine tended to exert neuroprotective effects at early and prolonged stages of bTBI respectively.Up-regulation of adenosine A1 receptor expression might contribute to the favorable effects of chronic caffeine consumption.Conclusion:Since caffeinated beverages are widely consumed in both civilian and military personnel and are convenient to get,the results may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for blast-induced neurotrauma and the consequent cognitive impairment.

  19. Study of blast event propagation in different media using a novel ultrafast miniature optical pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaotian; Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zhang, Hongtao; Niezrecki, Christopher; Wang, Xingwei

    2011-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called intracranial injury) is a high potential threat to our soldiers. A helmet structural health monitoring system can be effectively used to study the effects of ballistic/blast events on the helmet and human skull to prevent soldiers from TBI. However, one of the biggest challenges lies in that the pressure sensor installed inside the helmet system must be fast enough to capture the blast wave during the transient period. In this paper, an ultrafast optical fiber sensor is presented to measure the blast signal. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Pérot (FP) interferometeric principle. An FP cavity is built between the endface of an etched optical fiber tip and the silica thin diaphragm attached on the end of a multimode optical fiber. The sensor is small enough to be installed in different locations of a helmet to measure blast pressure simultaneously. Several groups of tests regarding multi-layer blast events were conducted to evaluate the sensors' performance. The sensors were mounted in different segments of a shock tube side by side with the reference sensors, to measure a rapidly increasing pressure. The segments of the shock tube were filled with different media. The results demonstrated that our sensors' responses agreed well with those from the electrical reference sensors. In addition, the home-made shock tube could provide a good resource to study the propagation of blast event in different media.

  20. Electromagnetic emissions during rock blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, S. G.; Thiel, D. V.

    1991-05-01

    Radio emissions during quarry blasting have been recorded in the audio frequency band. Three distinct mechanisms are suggested to explain the observed results; rock fracture at the time of the explosion, charged rocks discharging on impact with the pit floor and micro-fracture of the remaining rock wall due to pressure adjustment of the bench behind the blast. The last mechanism was evident by a train of discrete impulses recorded for up to one minute after the blast. It is assumed that during this time the rock behind the blast was subjected to a significant change in pressure. This may be related to ELF observations during earthquakes.

  1. Experimental approach to shape field relevant blast wave profiles in compressed gas-driven shock tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind eSundaramurthy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Detonation of a high explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects even at farther distances, which is termed as primary blast injury, which is the theme of this work. The shock-blast profile is characterized with blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs. These parameters in turn are a function of field factors, such as the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (Chandra et al., 2011;Sundaramurthy et al., 2012;Skotak et al., 2013, the profile not only determines the survival of the animal but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, exact replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. 40 experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68 to 1209.68 mm, measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium. The relationships between SAPs and the resulting shock-blast profiles are characterized. Finally, shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared with the profiles obtained

  2. Innovative design tool for the optimization of blast-enhanced facade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Lori

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In current blast enhancement design strategies, to resist the effects of an accidental explosion, a facade system is commonly designed to behave in-elastically and undergo large deformations. The large deformation of the facade system leads to high blast energy dissipation, subsequently reducing the blast energy transferred to the main structure. In addition to the blast resistance of the facade system, human injuries due to glass fragmentation within the vicinity of the facade system should also be minimized in order to meet the required safety levels. Overall building safety can be optimized by balancing blast energy dissipation and glass fragmentation. Recently, Permasteelisa Group has developed an innovative design tool to optimize blast-enhanced facades using an equivalent MDOF approach. A novel fragmentation tool has been proposed to assist this design procedure. This paper presents various critical parameters considered in blast-enhanced facade analysis, the experimental validation of these parameters and their influence in the design optimization process.  

  3. Damage of vascular endothelial barrier induced by explosive blast and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Wang; Jing Chen

    2016-01-01

    In recent years,injuries induced by explosive blast have got more and more attention owing to weapon development and frequent terrorist activities.Tear.bleeding and edema of tissues and organs are the main manifestations of blast shock wave damage.Vascular endothelial barrier is the main defense of tissues and organs' integrity.This article aims to discuss possible mechanisms of endothelial barrier damage induced by explosive blast and main manifestations of blood brain barrier,blood-air barrier,and intestinal vascular barrier impairments.In addition,the main regulatory factors of vascular permeability are also summarized so as to provide theoretical basis for prevention and cure of vascular endothelial barrier damage resulting from explosive blast.

  4. Microscopic Pattern of Bone Fractures as an Indicator of Blast Trauma: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechníková, Marketa; Mazzarelli, Debora; Poppa, Pasquale; Gibelli, Daniele; Scossa Baggi, Emilio; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of fractures is a key issue in forensic anthropology; however, very few studies deal with the features of fractures due to explosion in comparison with other traumatic injuries. This study focuses on fractures resulting from blast trauma and two types of blunt force trauma (manual compression and running over), applied to corpses of pigs; 163 osteons were examined within forty fractures by the transmission light microscopy. Blast lesions showed a higher percentage of fracture lines through the Haversian canal, whereas in other types of trauma, the fractures went across the inner lamellae. Significant differences between samples hit by blast energy and those runover or manually compressed were observed (p<0.05). The frequency of pattern A is significantly higher in exploded bones than in runover and compressed. Microscopic analysis of the fracture line may provide information about the type of trauma, especially for what concerns blast trauma. PMID:26259072

  5. Performance of blasting caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bement, Laurence J. (Inventor); Schimmel, Morry L. (Inventor); Perry, Ronnie B. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Common blasting caps are made from an aluminum shell in the form of a tube which is closed at both ends. One end, which is called the output end, terminates in a principal side or face, and contains a detonating agent which communicates with a means for igniting the detonating agent. The improvement of the present invention is a flat, steel foil bonded to the face in a position which is aligned perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis of the tube.

  6. Misleading reference to unpublished wound ballistics data regarding distant injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2008-01-01

    An article (J Trauma 29:10-18, 1989) cites unpublished wound ballistics data to support the authors' view that distant injuries are a myth in wound ballistics. The actual data, published in 1990, actually contains a number of detailed examples of distant injuries. (Bellamy RF, Zajtchuk R. The physics and biophysics of wound ballistics. In: Zajtchuk R, ed. Textbook of Military Medicine, Part I: Warfare, Weaponry, and the Casualty, Vol. 5, Conventional Warfare: Ballistic, Blast, and Burn Injuri...

  7. Variability in aggressiveness of rice blast (Magnaporthe oryzae) isolates originating from rice leaves and necks: a case of pathogen specialization?

    OpenAIRE

    Ghatak, Abhijeet; Savary, Serge; Kumar, Jatinder

    2013-01-01

    Rice blast, caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, causes yield losses associated with injuries on leaves and necks, the latter being in general far more important than the former. Many questions remain on the relationships between leaf and neck blast, including questions related to the population biology of the pathogen. Our objective was to test the hypothesis of adaptation of M. oryzae isolates to the type of organ they infect. To that aim, the components of aggressiveness of isolates originating f...

  8. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen muscles Achilles tendon injuries Pain along the shin bone Rotator cuff injuries Fractures Dislocations If you get hurt, stop playing. Continuing ...

  9. 30 CFR 57.6803 - Blasting lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting lines. 57.6803 Section 57.6803 Mineral... and Underground § 57.6803 Blasting lines. Permanent blasting lines shall be properly supported. All blasting lines shall be insulated and kept in good repair. General Requirements—Surface and Underground...

  10. 30 CFR 56.6312 - Secondary blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secondary blasting. 56.6312 Section 56.6312... Secondary blasting. Secondary blasts fired at the same time in the same work area shall be initiated from one source. Electric Blasting...

  11. 30 CFR 56.6803 - Blasting lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting lines. 56.6803 Section 56.6803 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Blasting lines. Permanent blasting lines shall be properly supported. All blasting lines shall be...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.912 - Underwater blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underwater blasting. 1926.912 Section 1926.912 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.912 Underwater blasting. (a) A blaster shall conduct all blasting operations, and no shot shall be fired...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1323 - Blasting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting circuits. 75.1323 Section 75.1323... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1323 Blasting circuits. (a) Blasting circuits shall be protected from sources of stray electric current. (b) Detonators made...

  14. Assessment, development, and testing of glass for blast environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, Sarah Jill

    2003-06-01

    Glass can have lethal effects including fatalities and injuries when it breaks and then flies through the air under blast loading (''the glass problem''). One goal of this program was to assess the glass problem and solutions being pursued to mitigate it. One solution to the problem is the development of new glass technology that allows the strength and fragmentation to be controlled or selected depending on the blast performance specifications. For example the glass could be weak and fail, or it could be strong and survive, but it must perform reliably. Also, once it fails it should produce fragments of a controlled size. Under certain circumstances it may be beneficial to have very small fragments, in others it may be beneficial to have large fragments that stay together. The second goal of this program was to evaluate the performance (strength, reliability, and fragmentation) of Engineered Stress Profile (ESP) glass under different loading conditions. These included pseudo-static strength and pressure tests and free-field blast tests. The ultimate goal was to provide engineers and architects with a glass whose behavior under blast loading is less lethal. A near-term benefit is a new approach for improving the reliability of glass and modifying its fracture behavior.

  15. Implications of blast exposure for central auditory function: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick J. Gallun, PhD

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Auditory system functions, from peripheral sensitivity to central processing capacities, are all at risk from a blast event. Accurate encoding of auditory patterns in time, frequency, and space are required for a clear understanding of speech and accurate localization of sound sources in environments with background noise, multiple sound sources, and/or reverberation. Further work is needed to refine the battery of clinical tests sensitive to the sorts of central auditory dysfunction observed in individuals with blast exposure. Treatment options include low-gain hearing aids, remote-microphone technology, and auditory-training regimens, but clinical evidence does not yet exist for recommending one or more of these options. As this population ages, the natural aging process and other potential brain injuries (such as stroke and blunt trauma may combine with blast-related brain changes to produce a population for which the current clinical diagnostic and treatment tools may prove inadequate. It is important to maintain an updated understanding of the scope of the issues present in this population and to continue to identify those solutions that can provide measurable improvements in the lives of Veterans who have been exposed to high-intensity blasts during the course of their military service.

  16. Rock fragmentation control in opencast blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, P.K.; M P Roy; R.K. Paswan; Md. Sarim; Suraj Kumar; Rakesh Ranjan Jha

    2016-01-01

    The blasting operation plays a pivotal role in the overall economics of opencast mines. The blasting sub-system affects all the other associated sub-systems, i.e. loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Fragmentation control through effective blast design and its effect on productivity are the challenging tasks for practicing blasting engineer due to inadequate knowledge of actual explosive energy released in the borehole, varying initiation practice in blast design and its effec...

  17. Blast-Induced Damage on Millisecond Blasting Model Test with Multicircle Vertical Blastholes

    OpenAIRE

    Qin-yong Ma; Pu Yuan; Jing-shuang Zhang; Rui-qiu Ma; Bo Han

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the blast-induced damage effect on surrounding rock in vertical shaft excavation, 4 kinds of millisecond blasting model tests with three-circle blastholes were designed and carried out with excavation blasting in vertical shaft as the background. The longitudinal wave velocity on the side of concrete model was also measured before and after blasting. Then blast damage factor was then calculated by measuring longitudinal wave velocity before and after blasting. The test results ...

  18. Very early increase in nitric oxide formation and oxidative cell damage associated with the reduction of tissue oxygenation is a trait of blast casualties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žunić Gordana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In our previous experimental studies, we found evidence for the increase of nitric oxide (NO formation immediately after blast injury. In the present study we investigated whether NO overproduction was a trait for the period immediately after blast injury in humans. Concomitant metabolic disturbances were also studied, and compared to the alterations in other traumatized patients. Methods. Blast casualties (group B, n = 13, surgical patients with the hip replacement or fractures, not exposed to blast effects (group S, n = 7 and healthy volunteers as controls (group C, n = 10, were examined. Both arterial and venous blood samples were taken within 6 hours, and 24 hours after blast injuries or surgical procedures, respectively. Plasma levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx, superoxyde anion (O2.-, sulfhydrils (SH, malondialdehyde (MDA as well as acid-base status and other biochemical parameters (glucose, urea, creatinine, total proteins, albumin were measured. Results. Significant, but transient increase in plasma NOx levels occurred only in group B. It was associated with the significant increase of hemoglobin oxygen (sO2 saturation of the venous blood and the concomitant decrease of its arterial - venous difference. In group S the venous sO2 decreased, its arterial - venous difference increased, while NOx levels were within the control limits. In both groups, other parameters of arterial acid-base status were kept within the control limits throughout the examined period. The decrease of SH levels were similar in the examined groups, while the increase of O2 .- was greater in group B. Conclusion. Early NO overproduction was a trait of blast injuries in humans, contributing to the reduction of tissue the oxygenation and intensifying the oxidative cell damage that had to be considered in the therapy of casualties with blast injuries. These alterations were different from those observed in other surgical patients without blast injuries.

  19. The use of computer blast simulations to improve blast quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) as part of a comprehensive program to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel waste disposal deep in crystalline rock formations. Careful blasting methods have been used to minimize damage to the excavation surfaces. Good wall quality is desirable in any excavation. In excavations required for nuclear waste disposal, the objective will be to minimize blast-induced fractures which may complicate the sealing requirements necessary to control subsequent movement of groundwater around a sealed disposal vault. The construction of the URL has provided an opportunity for the development of controlled blasting methods, especially for drilling accuracy and optimization of explosive loads in the perimeter and cushion holes. The work has been assisted by the use of blast simulations with the mathematical model Blaspa. This paper reviews the results of a recent project to develop a controlled method of full-face blasting, and compares the observed field results with the results of a blast simulator called Blaspa. Good agreement is found between the two, and the Blaspa results indicate quantitatively how the blasting may induce damage in the final excavation surface. In particular, the rock in the final wall may be stressed more severely by the cushion holes than by the perimeter holes. Bootleg of the rock between the perimeter and cushion rows occurs when the burst-out velocity imparted to it by the explosive loads in the perimeter holes is inadequate. In practice, these findings indicate that quantitative rock stress and rock burst-out velocity criteria can be established to minimize wall damage and bootleg. Thus, blast simulations become an efficient way to design controlled blasting and to optimize quality of the excavation surface

  20. Suicide bomb attack causing penetrating craniocerebral injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Manzar Hussain; Muhammad Ehsan Bari

    2013-01-01

    Penetrating cerebral injuries caused by foreign bodies are rare in civilian neurosurgical trauma,although there are various reports of blast or gunshot injuries in warfare due to multiple foreign bodies like pellets and nails.In our case,a 30-year-old man presented to neurosurgery clinic with signs and symptoms of right-sided weakness after suicide bomb attack.The skull X-ray showed a single intracranial nail.Small craniotomy was done and the nail was removed with caution to avoid injury to surrounding normal brain tissue.At 6 months' follow-up his right-sided power improved to against gravity.

  1. Radiation injuries in atomic bomb survivors, chapter 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic bombs, for the first time in human history, were dropped on Hiroshima in August 6, and on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. Though the powers of these bombs were small as compared with those of present day nuclear weapons, the atomic bombs claimed many lives instantaneously, damaged human bodies, and destroyed all objects, annihilating the urban areas. Even today, the dreadful consequences of the bombings still remain in both body and mind of the victims. Meanwhile, the experiences of atomic bomb disasters are fading constantly. In order to maintain the vivid information, in Part 2 ''Bodily injuries'', the following matters are described: early bodily injuries such as burns, (blast) external wounds, radiation injuries, and pathology in bodily injuries; later bodily injuries such as keloids, injuries to blood and eyes, injuries in exposed women, injuries in growth, aging and life, injuries in mental/nervous system, malignant tumors, and changes in chromosomes; and genetic effects. (J.P.N.)

  2. 骨髓间充质干细胞移植联合高压氧治疗兔脊髓冲击伤%Therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen on spinal cord blast injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴少保; 方健; 王海峰; 梅厚东; 张迪; 蒋传海

    2011-01-01

    better than the other groups significantly( P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion The therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transplantation combined with hyperbaric oxygen on spinal cord blast injury is clear. Two therapy can play a synergistic effect and result in better treatment.

  3. Blast/fire interaction scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypotheses are formulated of the process of interaction between an airblast and fires supported by liquid fuels and wood cribs. A map of blast weakness versus fire strength is conceived on which the regime of fire extinction by the blast can be delineated from the regime where the fire will sustain the blast. The fire strength is described for liquid fuels primarily by the heat of combustion; and for wood, it is mainly described by the preburn time. The concept is substantiated by the SRI shocktube data

  4. Brain response to primary blast wave using validated finite element models of human head and advanced combat helmet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LiyingZhang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury has emerged as a “signature injury” in combat casualty care. Present combat helmets are designed primarily to protect against ballistic and blunt impacts, but the current issue with helmets is protection concerning blasts. In order to delineate the blast wave attenuating capability of the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH, a finite element (FE study was undertaken to evaluate the head response against blast loadings with and without helmet using a partially validated FE model of the human head and ACH. Four levels of overpressures (0.27-0.66 MPa from the Bowen’s lung iso-damage threshold curves were used to simulate blast insults. Effectiveness of the helmet with respect to head orientation was also investigated. The resulting biomechanical responses of the brain to blast threats were compared for human head with and without the helmet. For all Bowen’s cases, the peak intracranial pressures (ICP in the head ranged from 0.68-1.8 MPa in the coup cortical region. ACH was found to mitigate ICP in the head by 10-35%. Helmeted head resulted in 30% lower average peak brain strains and product of strain and strain rate. Among three blast loading directions with ACH, highest reduction in peak ICP (44% was due to backward blasts whereas the lowest reduction in peak ICP and brain strains was due to forward blast (27%. The biomechanical responses of a human head to primary blast insult exhibited directional sensitivity owing to the different geometry contours and coverage of the helmet construction and asymmetric anatomy of the head. Thus, direction-specific tolerances are needed in helmet design in order to offer omni-directional protection for the human head. The blasts of varying peak overpressures and durations that are believed to produce the same level of lung injury produce different levels of mechanical responses in the brain, and hence "iso-damage" curves for brain injury are likely different than the Bowen

  5. Centrifugal shot blast system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a demonstration of Concrete cleaning, Inc., modified centrifugal shot blast technology to remove the paint coating from concrete flooring. This demonstration is part of the Chicago Pile-5 (CP-5) Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) CP-5 Research Reactor. The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that using innovative and improved decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources can result in significant benefits, such as decreased cost and increased health and safety, as compared with baseline D and D technologies. Potential markets exist for the innovative centrifugal shot blast system at the following sites: Fernald Environmental Management Project, Los Alamos, Nevada, Oak Ridge Y-12 and K-25, Paducah, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion site, and the Savannah River Site. This information is based on a revision to the OST Linkage Tables dated August 4, 1997

  6. Methods and Procedures in the rescue of burn injury patients in the bus rapid transit (BRT) bomb blasts case in Xiamen%厦门公交车纵火案烧伤伤员救治的护理管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄榕; 殷婷婷; 卓龙彩; 夏哲远; 孔悦

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨批量烧伤伤员救治的方法与程序。方法:迅速启动批量伤员救治应急预案,准备各种抢救物资,合理分配人员,高效实施救治,积极应对突发公共卫生事件。结果:18名患者平稳度过休克期,救治工作取得阶段性成果。结论:有效的救护管理体系可以在突发公共卫生事件中发挥重要作用。%Objective:To explore the methods and procedures in the rescue of mass patients with burn injuries. Methods:The emergency preparedness which included the preparation of medical supplies, rational division of nursing staff, and effective treatment were carried out to respond positively to the public health emergencies. Results:Eighteen burn injury patients passed the shock stage smoothly and signiifcant results were achieved. Conclusion:The effective ifrst aid system plays a major role in public health emergencies.

  7. Characteristics of laser-induced shock wave injury to the inner ear of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Niwa, Katsuki; Tamura, Atsushi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Satoh, Yasushi; Sato, Shunichi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the number of blast injuries of the inner ear has increased in the general population. In blast-induced inner ear injury, a shock wave (SW) component in the blast wave is considered to play an important role in sensorineural hearing loss. However, the mechanisms by which an SW affects inner ear tissue remain largely unknown. We aimed to establish a new animal model for SW-induced inner ear injury by using laser-induced SWs (LISWs) on rats. The LISWs were generated by irradiating an elastic laser target with 694-nm nanosecond pulses of a ruby laser. After LISW application to the cochlea through bone conduction, auditory measurements revealed the presence of inner ear dysfunction, the extent of which depended on LISW overpressure. A significantly lower survival rate of hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons, as well as severe oxidative damage, were observed in the inner ear exposed to an LISW. Although considerable differences in the pressure characteristics exist between LISWs and SWs in real blast waves, the functional and morphological changes shown by the present LISW-based model were similar to those observed in real blast-induced injury. Thus, our animal model is expected to be useful for laboratory-based research of blast-induced inner ear injury.

  8. Risk Assessment and Optimisation of Blast Mitigation Strategies for Design and Strengthening of Built Infrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    STEWART Mark G

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic risk assessment procedure is developed which can predict risks of explosive blast damage to built infrastructure,and when combined with life-cycle cost analysis,the procedure can be used to optimise blastmitigation strategies.The paper focuses on window glazing since this is a load-capacity system which,when subjected to blast loading,has caused significant damage and injury to building occupants.Structural reliability techniques are used to derive blast reliability curves for annealed and toughened glazing subjected to explosive blast for a variety of threat scenarios.The probabilistic analyses include the uncertainties associated with blast modelling,glazing response and glazing failure criteria.Damage risks are calculated for an individual window and for windows in the facade of a multi-storey commercial building.The paper shows an illustrative exampie of how this information,when combined with risk-based decision-making criteria,can be used to optimise blast mitigation strategies.

  9. An ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor for blast event measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldiers who are exposed to explosions are at risk of suffering traumatic brain injury (TBI). Since the causal relationship between a blast and TBI is poorly understood, it is critical to have sensors that can accurately quantify the blast dynamics and resulting wave propagation through a helmet and skull that are imparted onto and inside the brain. To help quantify the cause of TBI, it is important to record transient pressure data during a blast event. However, very few sensors feature the capabilities of tracking the dynamic pressure transients due to the rapid change of the pressure during blast events, while not interfering with the physical material layers or wave propagation. In order to measure the pressure transients efficiently, a pressure sensor should have a high resonant frequency and a high spatial resolution. This paper describes an ultra-fast fiber optic pressure sensor based on the Fabry–Perot principle for the application of measuring the rapid pressure changes in a blast event. A shock tube experiment performed in US Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center has demonstrated that the resonant frequency of the sensor is 4.12 MHz, which is relatively close to the designed theoretical value of 4.113 MHz. Moreover, the experiment illustrated that the sensor has a rise time of 120 ns, which demonstrates that the sensor is capable of observing the dynamics of the pressure transient during a blast event. (paper)

  10. Oxy-acetylene driven laboratory scale shock tubes for studying blast wave effects

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Instrumentation is needed to produce realistic blast waves in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the development and characterization of oxy-acetylene driven, laboratory scale shock tubes for use in studying blast injury, candidate armor materials, and material properties at blast loading rates. The pressure-time profiles show a true shock front and exponential decay characteristic of blast waves and have relevant durations. The modular design includes shock tube diameters of 27 mm and 41 mm, and a selection of peak pressures from 204 kPa to 920 kPa can be produced by selection of the driver section diameter and placement of the test sample. Characterization studies of several driver/driven section combinations showed consistent results, with peak pressures having 0.8 - 6.9 percent uncertainty in the mean. This shock tube design provides a more realistic blast profile than current air-driven shock tubes. In addition, operation does not require specialized personnel or facilities like most blast-driven...

  11. A parametric approach to shape field-relevant blast wave profiles in compressed-gas-driven shock tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthy, Aravind; Chandra, Namas

    2014-01-01

    Detonation of a high-explosive produces shock-blast wave, shrapnel, and gaseous products. While direct exposure to blast is a concern near the epicenter, shock-blast can affect subjects, even at farther distances. When a pure shock-blast wave encounters the subject, in the absence of shrapnels, fall, or gaseous products the loading is termed as primary blast loading and is the subject of this paper. The wave profile is characterized by blast overpressure, positive time duration, and impulse and called herein as shock-blast wave parameters (SWPs). These parameters in turn are uniquely determined by the strength of high explosive and the distance of the human subjects from the epicenter. The shape and magnitude of the profile determine the severity of injury to the subjects. As shown in some of our recent works (1-3), the profile not only determines the survival of the subjects (e.g., animals) but also the acute and chronic biomechanical injuries along with the following bio-chemical sequelae. It is extremely important to carefully design and operate the shock tube to produce field-relevant SWPs. Furthermore, it is vital to identify and eliminate the artifacts that are inadvertently introduced in the shock-blast profile that may affect the results. In this work, we examine the relationship between shock tube adjustable parameters (SAPs) and SWPs that can be used to control the blast profile; the results can be easily applied to many of the laboratory shock tubes. Further, replication of shock profile (magnitude and shape) can be related to field explosions and can be a standard in comparing results across different laboratories. Forty experiments are carried out by judiciously varying SAPs such as membrane thickness, breech length (66.68-1209.68 mm), measurement location, and type of driver gas (nitrogen, helium). The effects SAPs have on the resulting shock-blast profiles are shown. Also, the shock-blast profiles of a TNT explosion from ConWep software is compared

  12. CONTROL OF FRAGMENTATION BY BLASTING

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The degree of fragmentation influences the economy of the excavation operations. Characteristics of blasted rock such as fragment size, volume and mass are fundamental variables effecting the economics of a mining operation and are in effect the basis for evaluating the quality of a blast. The properties of fragmentation, such as size and shape, are very important information for the optimization of production. Three factors control the fragment size distribution: the rock structure, the q...

  13. Design of Blast Resistant Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Gautam

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available A shock blast resistant structure designed, developed and experimentally evaluated by the authors is described. We structure, capable of with standing dynamic loading (12 psi and a static pressure of 1.5 m earth cover due to blast or any other explosion, also gives protection against radiation, chemical and thermal hazards. Some results and details of analysis and experimentation are presented.

  14. Stability of Relativistic Blast Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Ogura, Jun; Kojima, Yasufumi

    2000-01-01

    A spherical blast wave with relativistic velocity can be described by a similarity solution, that is used for theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts. We consider the linear stability of such a relativistic blast wave propagating into a medium with density gradient. The perturbation can also be expressed by a self-similar form. We show that the shock front is unstable in general, and we evaluate the growth rate.

  15. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay Safe: ... Tips: Inline Skating Safety Tips: Skateboarding Dealing With Sports Injuries Concussions: What to Do Contact Us Print Resources ...

  16. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  17. Injury Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Consumer Opinion Surveys Home / Research & Statistics Injury Statistics This is the statistic reports page for scientific ... Home Appliances, Maintenance and Construction Injury Statistics Injury Statistics September 30, 2012 Submersions Related to Non-Pool ...

  18. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    The structure of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or ...

  19. Numerical simulation on dynamic response of the chest wall loaded by the blast wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jianyi; Yu, Chunxiang; Li, Huimin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Hai

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element model of the human thorax was constructed using Mimics software and Icem CFD software. This model was loaded with a 100-kPa blast wave and constructed to analyze the dynamic response of the chest wall. The simulation results have shown that a blast wave can cause stress concentration on the ribs and ribs inward movement. The third, fourth, and fifth ribs have the maximum inward moving velocity of 1.6 m / s without any injury for the human body...

  20. 75 FR 56489 - Separation Distances of Ammonium Nitrate and Blasting Agents From Explosives or Blasting Agents...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Ammonium Nitrate and Blasting Agents From Explosives or Blasting Agents (2002R-226P) AGENCY: Bureau of... CFR 555.220 set forth a table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents followed by six explanatory notes. Note three (3) states that the...

  1. DIRECT AIR BLAST EXPOSURE EFFECTS IN ANIMALS, OPERATION UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE, PROJECT 4.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DRAEGER, R.H. (UNITED STATES NAVY - DEPARTMENT OF); LEE, R.H. (UNITED STATES NAVY - DEPARTMENT OF)

    1953-12-31

    Project 4.2 was designed to study direct (primary) air blast injury, in animals, from an atomic weapon in the range of 20 to 50 psi under circumstances affording protection against missiles, thermal and ionizing radiation and to estimate the probable direct air blast hazard in man. The pressure levels at which atomic weapons direct air blast injuries occur will determine, to a large extent, the number of blast casualties likely to be encountered. It is probable that fatal overpressures are not reached until well within the range at which indirect (secondary) blast, thermal and ionizing radiation are practically certain to prove fatal. Only in special situations affording partial protection from other injuries are blast injuries likely to be of practical importance. Two animal species of widely different body weights (700 rats and 56 dogs) were exposed, together with air pressure recorders, in aluminum cylinders, covered by sandbags and dirt but open at both ends, at seven stations distributed within the intended overpressure range of 20 to 50 psi of Shot 10« About 200 rats were likewise exposed in Shot 9. Unfortunately, the destructive effect of the air blast of Shot 10 was much greater than anticipated. Many of the exposure cylinders were displaced and their contents destroyed. Only a partial recovery of the animals was possible due to the excessive radioactive contamination which greatly limited the time in the area. Most of the animals were dead upon recovery. Those living were in a state of severe shock. Autopsy findings showed remarkably few traumatic lesions and lung hemorrhages in spite of the rough treatment and high overpressure to which they were subjected. The rats recovered from Shot 9 were exposed to a recorded pressure of 18 to 2k psi. The autopsy findings showed moderate lung hemorrhage in most of the animals undoubtedly due to direct air blast injury. The findings were typical of those seen following exposure to air blast from HE or in the shock

  2. REINFORCED CONCRETE SILO DEMOLITION BY BLASTING

    OpenAIRE

    Josip Krsnik; Zvonimir Ester; Marin Petrov

    1993-01-01

    This paper represents the demolition of reinforced concrete silo by blasting. The loadbearing structure was blasted so that the weight of the silo itself done most of the felling (the paper is published in Croatian).

  3. Asymmetric propagation of airblast from bench blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Segarra Catasús, Pablo; Sanchidrián Blanco, José Angel; López Sánchez, Lina María; Domingo, Jesús Felix

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the propagation of airblast from quarry blasting. Peak overpressure is calculated as a function of blasting parameters (explosive mass per delay and velocity at which the detonation sequence proceeds along the bench) and polar coordinates of the point of interest (distance to the blast and azimuth with respect to the free face of the blast). The model is in the form of the product of a classical scaled distance attenuation law times a directional correction factor. The...

  4. Service robot for hull-blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Ortiz Zaragoza, Francisco José; Iborra García, Andrés José; Álvarez Torres, María Bárbara; Marín García, Fulgencio; Fernández Meroño, José María

    2001-01-01

    Present grit blasting technology for hull cleaning is very pollutant, environmentally unaffordable, and it is progressively forbidden in the most environmental countries (mainly north of Europe). At the time being, the above methodology has been partially substituted by ultra highpressure water blasting, however they do not show as good performance as the grit blasting systems. This paper describes a service robot for hull blasting. The technology we developed consists of the cleanin...

  5. Rock fragmentation control in opencast blasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Singh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The blasting operation plays a pivotal role in the overall economics of opencast mines. The blasting sub-system affects all the other associated sub-systems, i.e. loading, transport, crushing and milling operations. Fragmentation control through effective blast design and its effect on productivity are the challenging tasks for practicing blasting engineer due to inadequate knowledge of actual explosive energy released in the borehole, varying initiation practice in blast design and its effect on explosive energy release characteristic. This paper describes the result of a systematic study on the impact of blast design parameters on rock fragmentation at three mines in India. The mines use draglines and shovel–dumper combination for removal of overburden. Despite its pivotal role in controlling the overall economics of a mining operation, the expected blasting performance is often judged almost exclusively on the basis of poorly defined parameters such as powder factor and is often qualitative which results in very subjective assessment of blasting performance. Such an approach is very poor substitutes for accurate assessment of explosive and blasting performance. Ninety one blasts were conducted with varying blast designs and charging patterns, and their impacts on the rock fragmentation were documented. A high-speed camera was deployed to record the detonation sequences of the blasts. The efficiency of the loading machines was also correlated with the mean fragment size obtained from the fragmentation analyses.

  6. BLEVE blast by expansion-controlled evaporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, A.C. van den; Voort, M.M. van der; Weerheijm, J.; Versloot, N.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    This report presents a new method to calculate the blast effects originating from an exploding vessel of liquefied gas. Adequate blast calculation requires full knowledge of the blast source characteristics, that is, the release and subsequent evaporation rate of the flashing liquid. Because the con

  7. 30 CFR 57.6312 - Secondary blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Secondary blasting. 57.6312 Section 57.6312... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6312 Secondary blasting. Secondary blasts fired at the same time in the same work area shall be initiated from one source. Electric Blasting—Surface and Underground...

  8. 30 CFR 72.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive blasting. 72.610 Section 72.610... HEALTH STANDARDS FOR COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 72.610 Abrasive blasting. (a) Surface and...

  9. Blast furnace operation analysis by thermic exergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to know the blast furnace thermic state, the thermic exergy can be used, which considers the temperatures level of the process. The magnitude analysis of thermic exergy for blast furnace operation using pulverized coal, natural gas and oxygen injection by tuyeres, shows that natural gas injection is less effective than pulverized coal and enriched blast with oxygen simultaneous injection. (Author) 6 refs

  10. Simulation of Blast Waves with Headwind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Lawrence, Scott W.; Klopfer, Goetz H.; Mathias, Dovan; Onufer, Jeff T.

    2005-01-01

    The blast wave resulting from an explosion was simulated to provide guidance for models estimating risks for human spacecraft flight. Simulations included effects of headwind on blast propagation, Blasts were modelled as an initial value problem with a uniform high energy sphere expanding into an ambient field. Both still air and cases with headwind were calculated.

  11. Cycling injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries.

  12. Back Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, or a sudden jolt such as a car accident. The lower back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains and strains Herniated ...

  13. Fluid/Structure Interaction Computational Investigation of Blast-Wave Mitigation Efficacy of the Advanced Combat Helmet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Bell, W. C.; Pandurangan, B.; Glomski, P. S.

    2011-08-01

    To combat the problem of traumatic brain injury (TBI), a signature injury of the current military conflicts, there is an urgent need to design head protection systems with superior blast/ballistic impact mitigation capabilities. Toward that end, the blast impact mitigation performance of an advanced combat helmet (ACH) head protection system equipped with polyurea suspension pads and subjected to two different blast peak pressure loadings has been investigated computationally. A fairly detailed (Lagrangian) finite-element model of a helmet/skull/brain assembly is first constructed and placed into an Eulerian air domain through which a single planar blast wave propagates. A combined Eulerian/Lagrangian transient nonlinear dynamics computational fluid/solid interaction analysis is next conducted in order to assess the extent of reduction in intra-cranial shock-wave ingress (responsible for TBI). This was done by comparing temporal evolutions of intra-cranial normal and shear stresses for the cases of an unprotected head and the helmet-protected head and by correlating these quantities with the three most common types of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), i.e., axonal damage, contusion, and subdural hemorrhage. The results obtained show that the ACH provides some level of protection against all investigated types of mTBI and that the level of protection increases somewhat with an increase in blast peak pressure. In order to rationalize the aforementioned findings, a shockwave propagation/reflection analysis is carried out for the unprotected head and helmet-protected head cases. The analysis qualitatively corroborated the results pertaining to the blast-mitigation efficacy of an ACH, but also suggested that there are additional shockwave energy dissipation phenomena which play an important role in the mechanical response of the unprotected/protected head to blast impact.

  14. The use of computer blast simulations to improve blast quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An underground research laboratory (URL) has been constructed as part of a comprehensive program to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel waste disposal in deep crystalline rock formations. Careful blasting methods have been used to minimize damage to the excavation surfaces. This paper reviews the results of the program to develop controlled blasting for the full-face method, comparing the field observed results achieved with the simulated theoretical results. The simulated results indicate how the blasting may damage the excavation surface. Results suggest that the rock around the final wall is stressed more severely by the cushion holes than by the perimeter holes and that bootleg of the rock between the perimeter and cushion rows occurs when the burst-out velocity imparted to it by the explosive loads in the perimeter holes is inadequate

  15. Simulating geometrically complex blast scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian G. Cullis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blast waves generated by energetic and non-energetic sources are of continuing interest to the ballistics research community. Modern conflicts are increasingly characterised by asymmetric urban warfare, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs often playing a dominant role on the one hand and an armed forces requirement for minimal collateral effects from their weapons on the other. These problems are characterised by disparate length- and time-scales and may also be governed by complex physics. There is thus an increasing need to be able to rapidly assess and accurately predict the effects of energetic blast in topologically complex scenarios. To this end, this paper presents a new QinetiQ-developed advanced computational package called EAGLE-Blast, which is capable of accurately resolving the generation, propagation and interaction of blast waves around geometrically complex shapes such as vehicles and buildings. After a brief description of the numerical methodology, various blast scenario simulations are described and the results compared with experimental data to demonstrate the validation of the scheme and its ability to describe these complex scenarios accurately and efficiently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the use of the code in supporting the development of algorithms for fast running engineering models.

  16. Simulating geometrically complex blast scenarios

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ian G. CULLIS; Nikos NIKIFORAKIS; Peter FRANKL; Philip BLAKELY; Paul BENNETT; Paul GREENWOOD

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blast waves generated by energetic and non-energetic sources are of continuing interest to the ballistics research community. Modern conflicts are increasingly characterised by asymmetric urban warfare, with improvised explosive devices (IEDs) often playing a dominant role on the one hand and an armed forces requirement for minimal collateral effects from their weapons on the other. These problems are characterised by disparate length-and time-scales and may also be governed by complex physics. There is thus an increasing need to be able to rapidly assess and accurately predict the effects of energetic blast in topologically complex scenarios. To this end, this paper presents a new QinetiQ-developed advanced computational package called EAGLE-Blast, which is capable of accurately resolving the generation, propagation and interaction of blast waves around geometrically complex shapes such as vehicles and buildings. After a brief description of the numerical methodology, various blast scenario simulations are described and the results compared with experimental data to demonstrate the validation of the scheme and its ability to describe these complex scenarios accurately and efficiently. The paper concludes with a brief discussion on the use of the code in supporting the development of algorithms for fast running engineering models.

  17. Syndesmosis injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injuries to the distal tibiofibular syndesmosis commonly result from high-energy ankle injuries. They can occur as isolated ligamentous injuries and can be associated with ankle fractures. Syndesmotic injuries can create a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for musculoskeletal physicians. Recent literature has added considerably to the body of knowledge pertaining to injury mechanics and treatment outcomes, but there remain a number of controversies regarding diagnostic tests, imp...

  18. Domain enhanced lookup time accelerated BLAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boratyn Grzegorz M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BLAST is a commonly-used software package for comparing a query sequence to a database of known sequences; in this study, we focus on protein sequences. Position-specific-iterated BLAST (PSI-BLAST iteratively searches a protein sequence database, using the matches in round i to construct a position-specific score matrix (PSSM for searching the database in round i + 1. Biegert and Söding developed Context-sensitive BLAST (CS-BLAST, which combines information from searching the sequence database with information derived from a library of short protein profiles to achieve better homology detection than PSI-BLAST, which builds its PSSMs from scratch. Results We describe a new method, called domain enhanced lookup time accelerated BLAST (DELTA-BLAST, which searches a database of pre-constructed PSSMs before searching a protein-sequence database, to yield better homology detection. For its PSSMs, DELTA-BLAST employs a subset of NCBI’s Conserved Domain Database (CDD. On a test set derived from ASTRAL, with one round of searching, DELTA-BLAST achieves a ROC5000 of 0.270 vs. 0.116 for CS-BLAST. The performance advantage diminishes in iterated searches, but DELTA-BLAST continues to achieve better ROC scores than CS-BLAST. Conclusions DELTA-BLAST is a useful program for the detection of remote protein homologs. It is available under the “Protein BLAST” link at http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Nick V. Grishin, and Frank Eisenhaber.

  19. Blast wave parameters at diminished ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silnikov, M. V.; Chernyshov, M. V.; Mikhaylin, A. I.

    2015-04-01

    Relation between blast wave parameters resulted from a condensed high explosive (HE) charge detonation and a surrounding gas (air) pressure has been studied. Blast wave pressure and impulse differences at compression and rarefaction phases, which traditionally determine damage explosive effect, has been analyzed. An initial pressure effect on a post-explosion quasi-static component of the blast load has been investigated. The analysis is based on empirical relations between blast parameters and non-dimensional similarity criteria. The results can be directly applied to flying vehicle (aircraft or spacecraft) blast safety analysis.

  20. Imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries from the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay K; Sodickson, Aaron; Abujudeh, Hani

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the imaging findings of abdominal and pelvic injuries in victims of the Boston Marathon bombing. A retrospective review of 87 patients following the Boston Marathon bombing was performed to evaluate for abdominal and pelvic injuries on plain radiography or CT scans of the abdomen and pelvis. Imaging exams were evaluated for shrapnel, soft tissue injury, visceral damage, vascular disruption, and fractures. The injuries were classified as primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary blast injuries. Eleven of the 87 patients had positive findings in the abdomen or pelvis (M:F = 7:4, average age 34.6 years). There were 22 ball bearings, two nails, one screw, and two irregular metal fragments in the 11 patients with secondary blast (shrapnel) injuries. There was no peritoneal penetration or visceral injury seen in any of the patients. One patient had multiple transverse process fractures, representing tertiary blast injury. All but one patient had superficial penetrating abdominal or pelvic injuries secondary to shrapnel. There were no cases of bowel or solid visceral organ injuries due to the lack of peritoneal violation from the relatively low-powered explosions. Absence of peritoneal penetration by shrapnel indicates no need for laparotomy following low-powered explosions. PMID:26445949

  1. 30 CFR 780.13 - Operation plan: Blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation plan: Blasting. 780.13 Section 780.13... Operation plan: Blasting. (a) Blasting plan. Each application shall contain a blasting plan for the proposed... methods to be applied in controlling the adverse effects of blasting operations. (b) Monitoring...

  2. 30 CFR 75.1326 - Examination after blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Examination after blasting. 75.1326 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1326 Examination after blasting. (a) After blasting, the blasting area shall not be entered until it is clear of...

  3. 30 CFR 77.1300 - Explosives and blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting. 77.1300 Section 77... Explosives and Blasting § 77.1300 Explosives and blasting. (a) No explosives, blasting agent, detonator, or any other related blasting device or material shall be stored, transported, carried, handled,...

  4. Lisfranc injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welck, M J; Zinchenko, R; Rudge, B

    2015-04-01

    Lisfranc injuries are commonly asked about in FRCS Orthopaedic trauma vivas. The term "Lisfranc injury" strictly refers to an injury where one or more of the metatarsals are displaced from the tarsus. The term is more commonly used to describe an injury to the midfoot centred on the 2nd tarsometatarsal joint. The injury is named after Jacques Lisfranc de St. Martin (1790-1847), a French surgeon and gynaecologist who first described the injury in 1815. 'Lisfranc injury' encompasses a broad spectrum of injuries, which can be purely ligamentous or involve the osseous and articular structures. They are often difficult to diagnose and treat, but if not detected and appropriately managed they can cause long-term disability. This review outlines the anatomy, epidemiology, classification, investigation and current evidence on management of this injury. PMID:25543185

  5. Numerical study of rock blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation results on fracture of a concrete block due to dynamic explosive loads applied to the walls of a blast hole. Considered in the study is the influence of the pulse shape and rock properties on the pattern of irreversible deformation and cracking. It is found that a fractured zone bounded by a plastically deformed contour always arises around the explosion site. Comparison of elastoplastic deformation and fracture induced in the concrete block by explosion pulses of different durations and amplitudes shows that shorter pulses with higher amplitudes and steeper rise times provide a higher blasting efficiency.

  6. Blast Wave Characteristics and Equivalency

    OpenAIRE

    Sochet, Isabelle; Schneider, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of blast waves generated by detonation of gas clouds are studies theoretically and validated by both small-scale and large-scale experiments with ethylene-air mixtures of different equivalence ratio. The mixtures were confined in hemispherical or spherical balloons made from thin polyethylene foils of 0.75 m³ and 15 m³ in volume. The detonation of gas mixtures was initiated by a solid explosive. The characteristics of the blast wave in terms of overpressure, impulse and du...

  7. Blast waves in rotating media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossner, L. F.

    1972-01-01

    The model investigated involves a cylindrically symmetric blast wave generated by an infinitely long line explosion in a cold and homogeneous gas rotating rigidly in its self-gravitational field. It is found that within the context of rotation in a gravitational field a blast wave will not adopt the one-zone form familiar from similarity solutions but, rather, a two-zone form. The inner compression zone arises as a response to the presence of the restoring force, which drives a rarefaction wave into the outer compression zone.

  8. Blast wave loading pathways in heterogeneous material systems-experimental and numerical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvan, Veera; Ganpule, Shailesh; Kleinschmit, Nick; Chandra, Namas

    2013-06-01

    Blast waves generated in the field explosions impinge on the head-brain complex and induce mechanical pressure pulses in the brain resulting in traumatic brain injury. Severity of the brain injury (mild to moderate to severe) is dependent upon the magnitude and duration of the pressure pulse, which in turn depends on the intensity and duration of the oncoming blast wave. A fluid-filled cylinder is idealized to represent the head-brain complex in its simplest form; the cylinder is experimentally subjected to an air blast of Friedlander type, and the temporal variations of cylinder surface pressures and strains and fluid pressures are measured. Based on these measured data and results from computational simulations, the mechanical loading pathways from the external blast to the pressure field in the fluid are identified; it is hypothesized that the net loading at a given material point in the fluid comprises direct transmissive loads and deflection-induced indirect loads. Parametric studies show that the acoustic impedance mismatches between the cylinder and the contained fluid as well as the flexural rigidity of the cylinder determine the shape/intensity of pressure pulses in the fluid. PMID:23699714

  9. Prediction of globe rupture caused by primary blast: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Lizhen; Wang, Chao; Fan, Jie; Liu, Songyang; Fan, Yubo

    2015-07-01

    Although a human eye comprises less than 0.1% of the frontal body surface area, injuries to the eye are found to be disproportionally common in survivors of explosions. This study aimed to introduce a Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling model to predict globe rupture resulting from primary blast effect. A finite element model of a human eye was created using Lagrangian mesh. An explosive and its surrounding air domain were modelled using Eulerian mesh. Coupling the two models allowed simulating the blast wave generation, propagation and interaction with the eye. The results showed that the peak overpressures caused by blast wave on the corneal apex are 2080, 932.1 and 487.3 kPa for the victim distances of 0.75, 1.0 and 1.25 m, respectively. Higher stress occurred at the limbus, where the peaks for the three victim distances are 25.5, 14.1 and 6.4 MPa. The overpressure threshold of globe rupture was determined as 2000 kPa in a small-scale explosion. The findings would provide insights into the mechanism of primary blast-induced ocular injuries. PMID:24661047

  10. An analysis of the heap construction by long hole blasting for in-situ leaching of blasted ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author establishes specific requirements for heap construction by blasting on the basis of the mechanism for in situ leaching of blasted ore, analyses the feasibility of heap construction by long hole blasting, selection of the blast plan and the relevant technological problems, and gives a case of heap construction by long hole blasting in Renhua uranium mine

  11. Suicide bomb attack causing penetrating craniocerebral injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Manzar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Penetrating cerebral injuries caused by foreign bodies are rare in civilian neurosurgical trauma, al-though there are various reports of blast or gunshot inju-ries in warfare due to multiple foreign bodies like pellets and nails. In our case, a 30-year-old man presented to neurosur-gery clinic with signs and symptoms of right-sided weak-ness after suicide bomb attack. The skull X-ray showed a single intracranial nail. Small craniotomy was done and the nail was removed with caution to avoid injury to surround-ing normal brain tissue. At 6 months’ follow-up his right-sided power improved to against gravity. Key words: Head injury, penetrating; Bombs; Nails

  12. Blast-Induced Damage on Millisecond Blasting Model Test with Multicircle Vertical Blastholes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin-yong Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the blast-induced damage effect on surrounding rock in vertical shaft excavation, 4 kinds of millisecond blasting model tests with three-circle blastholes were designed and carried out with excavation blasting in vertical shaft as the background. The longitudinal wave velocity on the side of concrete model was also measured before and after blasting. Then blast damage factor was then calculated by measuring longitudinal wave velocity before and after blasting. The test results show that the blast-induced damage factor attenuated gradually with the centre of three-circle blastholes as centre. With the threshold value of 0.19 for blast-induced damage factor, blast-induced damage zones for 4 kinds of model tests are described and there is an inverted cone blast-induced damage zone in concrete model. And analyses of cutting effect and blast-induced damage zone indicate that in order to minimize the blast-induced damage effect and ensure the cutting effect the reasonable blasting scheme for three-circle blastholes is the inner two-circle blastholes initiated simultaneously and the outer third circle blastholes initiated in a 25 ms delay.

  13. Injury Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury School sports Injuries can land students in the ER. Text Messaging: Emergency Physicians ... For You American College of Emergency Phycisians Copyright © American College of Emergency ...

  14. Study on ore stacking after blasting for stope leaching uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geology of ore deposits, technical conditions, mining methods and blasting parameters of in-situ leaching uranium after blasting for an outcrop ore body are introduced. Long hole blast is beneficial technique and can bring better economic benefits

  15. 30 CFR 57.20031 - Blasting underground in hazardous areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting underground in hazardous areas. 57... MINES Miscellaneous § 57.20031 Blasting underground in hazardous areas. In underground areas where... removed to safe places before blasting....

  16. Inhalation Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun Araz; Arash Pirat

    2011-01-01

    Despite significant advances in wound care of patients with burn injuries, inhalation injury remains as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, there are limited studies that have focused on the diagnosis, grading, pathophysiology, and therapy of inhalation injury, therefore a widely accepted consensus is lacking on these topics. Inhalation injury is generally defined as the inhalation of thermal or chemical irritants and can be divided into three...

  17. A Novel Blasted and Grooved Low Profile Pedicle Screw Able to Resist High Compression Bending Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Kuh, Sung-Uk; Kim, Young-Sung; Choi, Hong-June; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jeong-Yoon; Jeong, Hyun-Yong; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Yoon, Young-Sul; Lee, Yoon-Chul; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2012-01-01

    Objective Polyaxial pedicle screws are a safe, useful adjunct to transpedicular fixation. However, the large screw head size can cause soft tissue irritation, high rod positioning, and facet joint injury. However, the mechanical resistance provided by small and low profile pedicle screws is very limited. We therefore developed a novel, low profile pedicle screw using grooving and blasting treatment that is able to resist a high compression bending load. Methods We evaluated the compression be...

  18. Blast Valve Design and Related Studies : A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, P. K.; Patel, B. P.; Harbans Lal

    2016-01-01

    The protective structures required for performing critical operations are vulnerable to the blast and shock loads of advanced weapons. A blast valve is an important component of such structures for ventilation during normal conditions and for protection from blast/ shock during explosion. In this paper, various aspects of blast valve design and related studies are briefly reviewed. The concept and effects of blast wave, blast impact, numerical modelling and deformation of circular plate (one ...

  19. Blast loading of masonry infills: testing and simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, João Miguel; Campos, José de; Lourenço, Paulo B.

    2015-01-01

    This work intends to present a newly developed test setup for dynamic out-of-plane loading using underWater Blast Wave Generators (WBWG) as loading source. Underwater blasting operations have been, during the last decades, subject of research and development of maritime blasting operations (including torpedo studies), aquarium tests for the measurement of blasting energy of industrial explosives and confined underwater blast wave generators. WBWG allow a wide range for the produced blast impu...

  20. Facial Firework Injury: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashyap Tadisina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fireworks are used to celebrate a variety of religious, patriotic, and cultural holidays and events around the world. Fireworks are common in the United States, with the most popular holiday for their use being national Independence Day, also known as July Fourth. The use of fireworks within the context of celebrations and holidays presents the ideal environment for accidents that lead to severe and dangerous injuries. Injuries to the face from explosions present a challenging problem in terms of restoring ideal ocular, oral, and facial function. Despite the well documented prevalence of firework use and injury, there is a relatively large deficit in the literature in terms of firework injury that involves the face. We present a unique case series that includes 4 adult male patients all with severe firework injuries to the face that presented at an urban level 1 trauma center. These four patients had an average age of 26.7 years old and presented within 5 hours of each other starting on July Fourth. Two patients died from their injuries and two patients underwent reconstructive surgical management, one of which had two follow up surgeries. We explore in detail their presentation, management, and subsequent outcomes as an attempt to add to the very limited data in the field of facial firework blast injury. In addition, the coincidence of their presentation within the same 5 hours brings into question the availability of the fireworks involved, and the possibility of similar injuries related to this type of firework in the future.

  1. MEASUREMENT IN BLAST HOLE STEM AND INFLUENCE OF STEMING MATERIAL ON BLASTING QUALITY

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Dobrilović; Zvonimir Ester; Branimir Janković

    2005-01-01

    Paper presents results of blast hole stem materials, that were conducted to assert best stem materials for surface blasting in quarry of technical / construction stone. Blasting has been performed with equal explosives and test-minefield parameters (length of the stem, volume of the explosive charge, mine-drill depth, and angle) on various sites / quarry. Results are guidelines in materials to be chosen in surface blasting of quarry works, adding to quality of mining works and reduction of co...

  2. Application of blasting vibration measurement to underground deep-hole blasting of a uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimed at the potential vibration damage to residents' houses on surface after underground deep-hole blasting of a uranium deposit in stope leaching, two real-time blasting vibration measurements were made. The safe distance and safety criterion of maximum charge weight on millisecond delay explosive in large-scale blasting of the uranium deposit were summed up. These data can provide the design basis for future large scale ore stacking by blasting. (authors)

  3. MEASUREMENT IN BLAST HOLE STEM AND INFLUENCE OF STEMING MATERIAL ON BLASTING QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Dobrilović

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents results of blast hole stem materials, that were conducted to assert best stem materials for surface blasting in quarry of technical / construction stone. Blasting has been performed with equal explosives and test-minefield parameters (length of the stem, volume of the explosive charge, mine-drill depth, and angle on various sites / quarry. Results are guidelines in materials to be chosen in surface blasting of quarry works, adding to quality of mining works and reduction of costs.

  4. Head injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hureibi, K A; McLatchie, G R

    2010-05-01

    Head injury is one of the commonest injuries in sport. Most are mild but some can have serious outcomes. Sports medicine doctors should be able to recognise the clinical features and evaluate athletes with head injury. It is necessary during field assessment to recognise signs and symptoms that help in assessing the severity of injury and making a decision to return-to-play. Prevention of primary head injury should be the aim. This includes protective equipment like helmets and possible rule changes. PMID:20533694

  5. Multi-Injury Casualty Stream Simulation in a Shipboard Combat Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Edwin; Wing, Vern; Zouris, James; Vickers, Ross; Lawnick, Mary; Galarneau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Accurate forecasts of casualty streams are essential for estimating personnel and materiel requirements for future naval combat engagements. The scarcity of recent naval combat data makes accurate forecasting difficult. Furthermore, current forecasts are based on single injuries only, even though empirical evidence indicates most battle casualties suffer multiple injuries. These anticipated single-injury casualty streams underestimate the needed medical resources. This article describes a method of simulating realistic multi-injury casualty streams in a maritime environment by combining available shipboard data with ground combat blast data. The simulations, based on the Military Combat Injury Scale, are expected to provide a better tool for medical logistics planning. PMID:26741479

  6. Modeling and simulation of explosion effectiveness as a function of blast and crowd characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Zeeshan-Ul-Hassan

    Suicide bombing has become one of the most lethal and favorite modus operandi of terrorist organizations around the world. On average, there is a suicide bombing attack every six days somewhere in the world. While various attempts have been made to assess the impact of explosions on structures and military personnel, little has been done on modeling the impact of a blast wave on a crowd in civilian settings. The assessment of an explosion's effect on a crowd can lead to better management of disasters, triage of patients, locating blast victims under the debris, development of protective gear, and safe distance recommendations to reduce the casualties. The overall goal of this work is to predict the magnitude of injuries and lethality on humans from a blast-wave with various explosive and crowd characteristics, and to compare, contrast, and analyze the performance of explosive and injury models against the real-life data of suicide bombing incidents. This thesis introduces BlastSim---a physics based stationary multi-agent simulation platform to model and simulate a suicide bombing event. The agents are constrained by the physical characteristics and mechanics of the blast wave. The BlastSim is programmed to test, analyze, and validate the results of different model combinations under various conditions with different sets of parameters, such as the crowd and explosive characteristics, blockage and human shields, fragmentation and the bomber's position, in 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional environments. The suicide bombing event can be re-created for forensic analysis. The proposed model combinations show a significant performance---the Harold Brode explosive model with Catherine Lee injury model using the blockage stands out consistently to be the best with an overall cumulative accuracy of 87.6%. When comparing against actual data, overall, prediction accuracy can be increased by 71% using this model combination. The J. Clutter with Reflection explosive model using

  7. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate e...

  8. PROGRESS IN THERMO-ABRASIVE BLASTING SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    I.A. Gorlach

    2012-01-01

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Quality of surface preparation of components and structures for further painting and/or coating is important in many fields of engineering. One of the most widely used methods of surface preparation is abrasive blasting. In the last few years, a new method for surface preparation has evolved, namely thermo-abrasive blasting. This technique utilises a high enthalpy thermal jet, generated by the thermo-abrasive blasting gun, to propel abrasive particles. Thermo-abrasi...

  9. Disability evaluation in acoustic blast trauma

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesan Raju

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acoustic blast trauma is different from Noise induced hearing loss. Blast trauma can damage the tympanic membrane, ossicles and cochlea singly or in combination. It produces immediate severe hearing loss and may be associated with tinnitus and vestibular symptoms. Hearing loss recovers spontaneously in many cases but may be permanent in 30-55% cases. Thirteen patients working in an explosive manufacturing unit in Andhra Pradesh were exposed to blast trauma at work place. All the...

  10. An Abridged Review of Blast Wave Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Manmohan Dass Goel; Vasant A. Matsagar; Gupta, Anil K.; Steffen Marburg

    2012-01-01

    In case of blast loading on structures, analysis is carried out in two stages, first the blast loading on a particular structure is determined and second, an evaluation is made for the response of the structure to this loading. In this paper, a review of the first part is presented which includes various empirical relations available for computation of blast load in the form of pressure-time function resulting from the explosion in the air. Different empirical techniques available in th...

  11. Alkaline carbonates in blast furnace process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Besta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The production of iron in blast furnaces is a complex of physical, chemical and mechanical processes. The input raw materials contain not only metallic components, but also a number of negative elements. The most important negative elements include alkaline carbonates. They can significantly affect the course of the blast furnace process and thus the overall performance of the furnace. As a result of that, it is essential to accurately monitor the alkali content in the blast furnace raw materials. The article analyzes the alkali content in input and output raw materials and their impact on the blast furnace process.

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Psychological Issues After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury Psychological Health After Spinal Cord Injury The Psychologist's Role After ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities After Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Psychological Realities after Spinal Cord Injury Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Psychology of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation How Psychologists Help ...

  15. HIGH PRODUCTIVITY VACUUM BLASTING SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) needs improved technologies to decontaminate large areas of both concrete and steel surfaces. The technology should have high operational efficiency, minimize exposures to workers, and produce low levels of secondary waste. In order to meet the DOE's needs, an applied research and development project for the improvement of a current decontamination technology, Vacuum Blasting, is proposed. The objective of this project is to improve the productivity and lower the expense of the existing vacuum blasting technology which has been widely used in DOE sites for removing radioactive contamination, PCBs, and lead-based paint. The proposed work would increase the productivity rate and provide safe and cost-effective decontamination of the DOE sites

  16. From blast wave to observation

    OpenAIRE

    Eerten, van, H.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are well described by synchrotron emission originating from the interaction between a relativistic blast wave and the external medium surrounding the GRB progenitor. We introduce a code to reconstruct spectra and light curves from arbitrary fluid configurations, making it especially suited to study the effects of fluid flows beyond those that can be described using analytical approximations. As a check and first application of our code we use it to fit the sca...

  17. Radiation from cosmic blast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the dynamics of blast waves, of their internal structure and of the Bremsstrahlung radiation from the shocked plasma in conditions when the cooling time is longer than the expansion time. Models appropriate for the interpretation of the X-ray sources associated with supernova remnants and with the explosive activity of the radiogalaxies in clusters of galaxies are computed and discussed; the inverse Compton emission from continuously injected relativistic electrons is included. (orig.)

  18. The Next Generation BLAST Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Galitzki, Nicholas; Angilè, Francesco E; Ashton, Peter; Beall, James A; Becker, Dan; Bradford, Kristi J; Che, George; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Devlin, Mark J; Dober, Bradley J; Fissel, Laura M; Fukui, Yasuo; Gao, Jiansong; Groppi, Christopher E; Hillbrand, Seth; Hilton, Gene C; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Klein, Jeffrey; Van Lanen, Jeff; Li, Dale; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lourie, Nathan P; Mani, Hamdi; Martin, Peter G; Mauskopf, Philip; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Novak, Giles; Pappas, David P; Pascale, Enzo; Pisano, Giampaolo; Santos, Fabio P; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Stanchfield, Sara; Tucker, Carole; Ullom, Joel N; Underhill, Matthew; Vissers, Michael R; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2014-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was a suborbital experiment designed to map magnetic fields in order to study their role in star formation processes. BLASTPol made detailed polarization maps of a number of molecular clouds during its successful flights from Antarctica in 2010 and 2012. We present the next-generation BLASTPol instrument (BLAST-TNG) that will build off the success of the previous experiment and continue its role as a unique instrument and a test bed for new technologies. With a 16-fold increase in mapping speed, BLAST-TNG will make larger and deeper maps. Major improvements include a 2.5 m carbon fiber mirror that is 40% wider than the BLASTPol mirror and ~3000 polarization sensitive detectors. BLAST-TNG will observe in three bands at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The telescope will serve as a pathfinder project for microwave kinetic inductance detector (MKID) technology, as applied to feedhorn coupled submillimeter detector arrays. The liquid he...

  19. Detonation safety of blasting caps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢兴华; 彭小圣

    2002-01-01

    By means of researching into sympathetic detonation of blasting detonators in air, the regular patterns are concluded from blasting detonators interaction with the shock loading. The aerial distribution of initiating ability of detonators looks like a butterfly. The initiating ability mainly consists of shock wave, explosive gases and fliers. But fundamental questions remain. When does shock wave take the leading role? When and how does the explosive gases or the fliers take function? For those questions, there is less quantitative research. Through the theoretic deduction of the overpressure, the energy calculation of fliers and the experiment of sympathetic detonation of detonators, we can learn the sympathetic detonation distances of several kinds of detonators and make an inquiry into the lateral initiating regulations of detonators. So, we can provide the base data for the research into no sympathetic detonation of herd blasting detonators and then control the detonation between them. Then we can make full use of detonators and reduce the frequency of accidents caused by detonators.

  20. Inhalation Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coşkun Araz

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in wound care of patients with burn injuries, inhalation injury remains as an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in these patients. Unfortunately, there are limited studies that have focused on the diagnosis, grading, pathophysiology, and therapy of inhalation injury, therefore a widely accepted consensus is lacking on these topics. Inhalation injury is generally defined as the inhalation of thermal or chemical irritants and can be divided into three types of injury: thermal injury, which is mostly restricted to the upper airway; chemical injury, which affects tracheobronchial tree; and systemic toxicity owing to toxic gases such as carbon monoxide. Inhalation injury increases the burn injury associated morbidity and mortality by causing airway problems and respiratory failure during the early phase and by contributing to the development of pneumonia and atelectasis during the late phase. Additionally, systemic effects of toxic gases such as carbon monoxide may also adversely affect the early and long-term outcome in burn victims. The early diagnosis and therapy of these problems plays a key role in improving the outcome of burn patients. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9 Suppl: 37-45

  1. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 as a Serum Neurotrauma Biomarker for Exposure to Occupational Low-Level Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Walter; Yarnell, Angela M.; Ong, Ricardo; Walilko, Timothy; Kamimori, Gary H.; da Silva, Uade; McCarron, Richard M.; LoPresti, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated exposure to low-level blast is a characteristic of a few select occupations and there is concern that such occupational exposures present risk for traumatic brain injury. These occupations include specialized military and law enforcement units that employ controlled detonation of explosive charges for the purpose of tactical entry into secured structures. The concern for negative effects from blast exposure is based on rates of operator self-reported headache, sleep disturbance, working memory impairment, and other concussion-like symptoms. A challenge in research on this topic has been the need for improved assessment tools to empirically evaluate the risk associated with repeated exposure to blast overpressure levels commonly considered to be too low in magnitude to cause acute injury. Evaluation of serum-based neurotrauma biomarkers provides an objective measure that is logistically feasible for use in field training environments. Among candidate biomarkers, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1) has some empirical support and was evaluated in this study. We used daily blood draws to examine acute change in UCH-L1 among 108 healthy military personnel who were exposed to repeated low-level blast across a 2-week period. These research volunteers also wore pressure sensors to record blast exposures, wrist actigraphs to monitor sleep patterns, and completed daily behavioral assessments of symptomology, postural stability, and neurocognitive function. UCH-L1 levels were elevated as a function of participating in the 2-week training with explosives, but the correlation of UCH-L1 elevation and blast magnitude was weak and inconsistent. Also, UCH-L1 elevations did not correlate with deficits in behavioral measures. These results provide some support for including UCH-L1 as a measure of central nervous system effects from exposure to low-level blast. However, the weak relation observed suggests that additional indicators of blast effect are needed

  2. 30 CFR 75.1320 - Multiple-shot blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Multiple-shot blasting. 75.1320 Section 75.1320... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1320 Multiple-shot blasting... periods of 1,000 milliseconds or less shall be used. (d) When blasting in anthracite mines, each...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.910 - Inspection after blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection after blasting. 1926.910 Section 1926.910 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.910 Inspection after blasting. (a) Immediately after the blast has been fired, the firing line shall...

  4. Condition for Contur Blasting use on Openpit Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Krsmanovic, I; Dambov, Risto

    2010-01-01

    For purpose of obtaining a stable final slope in open pit mines practice, the most common approach is the contour blasting method and investigation of possible applications of various primary blasting methods for purpose of gaining the optimal techno-economical effects. This paper presents one of the contour blasting methods, drilling and blasting parameters, construction of explosive charges and method of initiation.

  5. 30 CFR 56.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Isolation of blasting circuits. 56.6605 Section... Extraneous Electricity § 56.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be... sources of stray or static electricity. Blasting circuits shall be protected from any contact...

  6. 30 CFR 77.1304 - Blasting agents; special provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting agents; special provisions. 77.1304... COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 77.1304 Blasting agents; special provisions. (a) Sensitized ammonium nitrate blasting agents, and the components thereof prior to mixing, shall be mixed and stored...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.909 - Firing the blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Blasting and the Use of Explosives § 1926.909 Firing the blast. (a) A code of blasting signals equivalent to Table U-1, shall be posted on one or more... to stop traffic during blasting operations. (d) It shall be the duty of the blaster to fix the...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1910 - Explosives and blasting; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting; general. 77.1910... COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1910 Explosives and blasting; general. (a) Light and power circuits shall be disconnected or removed from the blasting area before charging and blasting. (b)...

  9. 30 CFR 56.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loading, blasting, and security. 56.6306... § 56.6306 Loading, blasting, and security. (a) When explosive materials or initiating systems are... persons or vehicles. (g) Work shall not resume in the blast area until a post-blast examination...

  10. Blast mitigation experimental and numerical studies

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Presents experimental methods of material and structural response to dynamic blast loads Includes computational analysis of material and structural response to dynamic blast loads Offers mitigation measures for structures in various environments Relates lab experiments to larger field tests Features more than 150 illustrations

  11. Refractory Pellet for Hot Blast Stove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jing; Peng Xigao

    2011-01-01

    1 Scope This standard specifies the term,definition,classification,specification,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of refractory pellet for hot blast stove.This standard is applicable to refractory pellet for hot blast stove.

  12. The use of blast furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Václavík

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research that dealt with the substitution of finely ground blast furnace slag for Portland cement in the course of simple concrete manufacturing. Physical and mechanical properties of experimental concrete mixtures based on finely ground blast furnace slag were observed.

  13. 30 CFR 58.610 - Abrasive blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... miners shall use in accordance with 30 CFR 56.5005 or 57.5005 respirators approved for abrasive blasting by NIOSH under 42 CFR part 84, or the operation shall be performed in a totally enclosed device with... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Abrasive blasting. 58.610 Section...

  14. On the Propagation and Interaction of Spherical Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics and the scaling laws of isolated spherical blast waves have been briefly reviewed. Both self-similar solutions and numerical solutions of isolated blast waves are discussed. Blast profiles in the near-field (strong shock region) and the far-field (weak shock region) are examined. Particular attention is directed at the blast overpressure and shock propagating speed. Consideration is also given to the interaction of spherical blast waves. Test data for the propagation and interaction of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure.

  15. Blast shockwaves propagate Ca2+ activity via purinergic astrocyte networks in human central nervous system cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S.; Busse, Brad; Ravin, Nitay; Vira, Shaleen; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Waters, Hang; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lee, Philip R.; Fields, R. Douglas; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study of the pathophysiology of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) the exposure of dissociated, central nervous system (CNS) cells to simulated blast resulted in propagating waves of elevated intracellular Ca2+. Here we show, in dissociated human CNS cultures, that these calcium waves primarily propagate through astrocyte-dependent, purinergic signaling pathways that are blocked by P2 antagonists. Human, compared to rat, astrocytes had an increased calcium response and prolonged calcium wave propagation kinetics, suggesting that in our model system rat CNS cells are less responsive to simulated blast. Furthermore, in response to simulated blast, human CNS cells have increased expressions of a reactive astrocyte marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a protease, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). The conjoint increased expression of GFAP and MMP-9 and a purinergic ATP (P2) receptor antagonist reduction in calcium response identifies both potential mechanisms for sustained changes in brain function following primary bTBI and therapeutic strategies targeting abnormal astrocyte activity. PMID:27162174

  16. Blast shockwaves propagate Ca(2+) activity via purinergic astrocyte networks in human central nervous system cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S; Busse, Brad; Ravin, Nitay; Vira, Shaleen; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Waters, Hang; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lee, Philip R; Fields, R Douglas; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study of the pathophysiology of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) the exposure of dissociated, central nervous system (CNS) cells to simulated blast resulted in propagating waves of elevated intracellular Ca(2+). Here we show, in dissociated human CNS cultures, that these calcium waves primarily propagate through astrocyte-dependent, purinergic signaling pathways that are blocked by P2 antagonists. Human, compared to rat, astrocytes had an increased calcium response and prolonged calcium wave propagation kinetics, suggesting that in our model system rat CNS cells are less responsive to simulated blast. Furthermore, in response to simulated blast, human CNS cells have increased expressions of a reactive astrocyte marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a protease, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). The conjoint increased expression of GFAP and MMP-9 and a purinergic ATP (P2) receptor antagonist reduction in calcium response identifies both potential mechanisms for sustained changes in brain function following primary bTBI and therapeutic strategies targeting abnormal astrocyte activity. PMID:27162174

  17. Physics of IED blast shocktube simulations for mTBI research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JesusMediavilla Varas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Shocktube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull-brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. A shocktube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive devise (IED blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull-brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid-structure interaction (FSI is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations for the air blast, and finite element (FE model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull-brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field.

  18. Pediatric Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ballesteros, M. F., Sleet, D. A. (2008). CDC childhood injury report: patterns of unintentional injuries among 0-19 ... American Academy of Pediatrics. (2008). Management of pediatric trauma. Pediatrics, 121 , 849–854. [top] How many people are ... may slightly increase childhood risk of neurological impairment, NIH study suggests All ...

  19. 27 CFR 555.220 - Table of separation distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Department of Transportation (49 CFR part 173). (5) Earth or sand dikes, or enclosures filled with the... distances of ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. 555.220 Section 555... ammonium nitrate and blasting agents from explosives or blasting agents. Table: Department of...

  20. Wound Ballistics Modeling for Blast Loading Blunt Force Impact and Projectile Penetration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Paul A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, Candice Frances [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burnett, Damon J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Light body armor development for the warfighter is based on trial-and-error testing of prototype designs against ballistic projectiles. Torso armor testing against blast is virtually nonexistent but necessary to ensure adequate protection against injury to the heart and lungs. In this report, we discuss the development of a high-fidelity human torso model, it's merging with the existing Sandia Human Head-Neck Model, and development of the modeling & simulation (M&S) capabilities necessary to simulate wound injury scenarios. Using the new Sandia Human Torso Model, we demonstrate the advantage of virtual simulation in the investigation of wound injury as it relates to the warfighter experience. We present the results of virtual simulations of blast loading and ballistic projectile impact to the tors o with and without notional protective armor. In this manner, we demonstrate the ad vantages of applying a modeling and simulation approach to the investigation of wound injury and relative merit assessments of protective body armor without the need for trial-and-error testing.

  1. Influence Mechanism of Lamella Joints on Tunnel Blasting Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Shiwei Shen; Lei Nie; Shulin Dai; Yan Xu

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the influence mechanism of lamella joints on tunnel blasting effect. During the process of the tunnel blasting construction, primary structural planes make an important role for the effect of smooth blasting. Especially, it is difficult to attain the perfect blasting effect when the lamella joints intersect with the designed contour line. Coupled effect of the explosive stress waves and the explosive gas is deemed to the basic theory, analysis the blasting...

  2. Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wrist Extensor Stretch Additional Content Medical News Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries By Daniel F. Danzl, MD NOTE: This ... Cold Injuries Overview of Cold Injuries Hypothermia Nonfreezing Tissue Injuries Frostbite In nonfreezing tissue injuries, parts of ...

  3. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Repetitive Stress Injuries Print ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  4. Explosive signatures: Pre & post blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Evan Thomas

    Manuscripts 1 and 2 of this dissertation both involve the pre-blast detection of trace explosive material. The first manuscript explores the analysis of human hair as an indicator of exposure to explosives. Field analysis of hair for trace explosives is quick and non-invasive, and could prove to be a powerful linkage to physical evidence in the form of bulk explosive material. Individuals tested were involved in studies which required handling or close proximity to bulk high explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX. The second manuscript reports the results of research in the design and application of canine training aids for non-traditional, peroxide-based explosives. Organic peroxides such as triacetonetriperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylenetriperoxidediamine (HMTD) can be synthesized relatively easily with store-bought ingredients and have become popular improvised explosives with many terrorist groups. Due to the hazards of handling such sensitive compounds, this research established methods for preparing training aids which contained safe quantities of TATP and HMTD for use in imprinting canines with their characteristic odor. Manuscripts 3 and 4 of this dissertation focus on research conducted to characterize pipe bombs during and after an explosion (post-blast). Pipe bombs represent a large percentage of domestic devices encountered by law enforcement. The current project has involved the preparation and controlled explosion of over 90 pipe bombs of different configurations in order to obtain data on fragmentation patterns, fragment velocity, blast overpressure, and fragmentation distance. Physical data recorded from the collected fragments, such as mass, size, and thickness, was correlated with the relative power of the initial device. Manuscript 4 explores the microstructural analysis of select pipe bomb fragments. Shock-loading of the pipe steel led to plastic deformation and work hardening in the steel grain structure as evidenced by optical microscopy and

  5. Relativistic blast waves that accelerate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximate analytical similarity solution is derived for the problem of an ultrarelativistic, adiabatic blast wave which results from a point explosion at the origin of a cold (i.e., nonrelativistic), spherically symmetric gas in which the density decreases fast enough with radius to accelerate the shock wave toward larger radii. This solution includes both the shock propagation law and the details of the postshock flow. It is revelant to models of compact, extragalactic radio sources involving relativistic shock waves, as well as to the supernova shock model for cosmic ray acceleration

  6. LTC vacuum blasting machine (concrete): Baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure during maintenance activities was minimal, but due to mechanical difficulties dust monitoring could not be conducted during operation. Noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each of these exposures is recommended because of the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place. This may cause the results to be inaccurate. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed environment. In addition, other safety and health issues found were ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, lockout/tagout, and arm-hand vibration

  7. Electrical Blast simulator (e-BLAST): design, development and first operational tests

    OpenAIRE

    PERONI MARCO; SOLOMOS George; PEGON Pierre; CAVERZAN ALESSIO

    2015-01-01

    The Electrical Blast Simulator (e-BLAST) activity involves the development of an apparatus capable of reproducing the effects of a blast pressure wave on large-scale structural components (such as columns, walls, etc.) with the objective of improving their strength in such severe loading situations. The work relates to the BUILT-CIP project which deals with the protection and resilience of the built environment (critical buildings, transportation and energy infrastructure etc.) under catastr...

  8. Flyrock risk prevention in open pit blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Slopnicki, Jakub Patryk

    2013-01-01

    Norcem limestone quarry at Bjørntvedt has neighbours and infrastructure close to the quarry. Elimination of the risk of flyrock from blasting is thus of great importance to the operation. For drill hole dimension 3,5? ? as used at Bjørntvedt -the risk zone of flyrock is considered to be between 600 and 700 m from the blast. It is recommended to cover the blast if there are sensitive installations or people inside this radius. If no cover is used, adequate alternative preventive meas...

  9. Partnering and the WCI blast furnace reline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musolf, D.W. [WCI Steel, Inc., Warren, OH (United States)

    1997-11-01

    In 1993, WCI Steel entered into a partnership agreement to perform a blast furnace reline. The reline included a complete rebrick from the tuyere breast to the furnace top including the tapholes. Also included was the replacement of the Paul Wurth top equipment from the receiving hoppers through the gearbox and distribution chute, a skip incline replacement, and installation of tilting runners and a casthouse roof. The bustle pipe and hot blast main were repaired. One stove was also replaced. The reline was accomplished in 36 days, wind to wind, which allowed for 29 days of construction inside the blast furnace proper.

  10. Swift GRBs and the blast wave model

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, P. A.; Horst, van der, C.M.A.M.; Starling, R.L.C.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The complex structure of the light curves of Swift GRBs has made their interpretation and that of the blast wave caused by the burst, more difficult than in the pre-Swift era. We aim to constrain the blast wave parameters: electron energy distribution, p, density profile of the circumburst medium, k, and the continued energy injection index, q. We do so by comparing the observed multi-wavelength light curves and X-ray spectra of a Swift sample to the predictions of the blast wave model. We ca...

  11. Blast Valve Design and Related Studies : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Sharma

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The protective structures required for performing critical operations are vulnerable to the blast and shock loads of advanced weapons. A blast valve is an important component of such structures for ventilation during normal conditions and for protection from blast/ shock during explosion. In this paper, various aspects of blast valve design and related studies are briefly reviewed. The concept and effects of blast wave, blast impact, numerical modelling and deformation of circular plate (one of the critical components of blast valve have been discussed. The merits and demerits of sensing mechanisms viz. remote and direct sensing are discussed. The leakage of blast pressure during finite closing period of the valve (one of the critical problems and the shock tube as a major experimental facility for testing of blast valves are briefly discussed.

  12. Fibrin glue eliminates the need for packing after complex liver injuries.

    OpenAIRE

    Feinstein, A. J.; Varela, J. E.; Cohn, S M; Compton, R. P.; McKenney, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Hemostasis after traumatic liver injury can be extremely difficult to obtain, particularly in coagulopathic patients who have suffered extensive liver damage. We determined the ability of a fibrin glue preparation (FG) to terminate ongoing bleeding using a new, clinically relevant porcine model of complex hepatic injury. Anesthetized swine (n = 6, 18 to 19 kg) received an external blast to the right upper abdomen and were immediately anticoagulated with intravenous heparin (200 u/kg). Uncontr...

  13. Traumatic brain injury: an overview of pathobiology with emphasis on military populations

    OpenAIRE

    Cernak, Ibolja; Linda J Noble-Haeusslein

    2010-01-01

    This review considers the pathobiology of non-impact blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT). The pathobiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been historically studied in experimental models mimicking features seen in the civilian population. These brain injuries are characterized by primary damage to both gray and white matter and subsequent evolution of secondary pathogenic events at the cellular, biochemical, and molecular levels, which collectively mediate widespread neurodegeneration. An e...

  14. Rowing Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Hosea, Timothy M.; Hannafin, Jo A.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Rowing is one of the original modern Olympic sports and was one of the most popular spectator sports in the United States. Its popularity has been increasing since the enactment of Title IX. The injury patterns in this sport are unique because of the stress applied during the rowing stroke. Evidence Acquisition: This review summarizes the existing literature describing the biomechanics of the rowing stroke and rowing-related injury patterns. Data were obtained from previously publish...

  15. Material Systems for Blast-Energy Dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Schondel; Henry S. Chu

    2010-10-01

    Lightweight panels have been designed to protect buildings and vehicles from blast pressures by activating energy dissipation mechanisms under the influence of blast loading. Panels were fabricated which featured a variety of granular materials and hydraulic dissipative deformation mechanisms and the test articles were subjected to full-scale blast loading. The force time-histories transmitted by each technology were measured by a novel method that utilized inexpensive custom-designed force sensors. The array of tests revealed that granular materials can effectively dissipate blast energy if they are employed in a way that they easily crush and rearrange. Similarly, hydraulic dissipation can effectively dissipate energy if the panel features a high fraction of porosity and the panel encasement features low compressive stiffness.

  16. Silica Brick for Hot Blast Stove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the glossary and definition, marking, shape and dimension, technical requirements, test method, quality appraisal procedure, packing, label, transportation, storage and quality certification of silica brick for hot blast stove.

  17. Kaolinite Refractory Bricks for Blast Furnaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ This standard is suitable to the fireclay bricks for blast furnace. 1 Classification, Shape and Dimension 1 According to physical and chemical indexes, the brick can be divided into two trademarks: ZGN-42 and GN-42.

  18. Anhydrous Taphole Mix for Blast Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan

    2010-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the term,definition,brand,label,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of anhydrous taphole mix for blast furnace.

  19. BLAST FURNACE GRANULAR COAL INJECTION SYSTEM; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) requested financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE), for the design, construction and operation of a 2,800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. The demonstration project proposal was selected by the DOE and awarded to Bethlehem in November 1990. The design of the project was completed in December 1993 and construction was completed in January 1995. The equipment startup period continued to November 1995 at which time the operating and testing program began. The blast furnace test program with different injected coals was completed in December 1998

  20. Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — BLAST finds regions of similarity between biological sequences. The program compares nucleotide or protein sequences to sequence databases and calculates the...

  1. Interactions of Blast Waves with Perturbed Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities induce hydrodynamic mixing in many important physical systems such as inertial confinement fusion, supernova collapse, and scramjet combustion. Blast waves interacting with perturbed interfaces are prevelant in such applications and dictate the mixing dynamics. This study increases our understanding of blast-driven hydrodynamic instabilities by providing models for the time-dependent perturbation growth and vorticity production mechanisms. The strength and length of the blast wave determine the different growth regimes and the importance of the Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Our analysis is based on simulations of a 2D planar blast wave, modeled by a shock (instantaneous acceleration) followed by a rarefaction (time-dependent deceleration), interacting with a sinusoidal perturbation at an interface between two fluids. A high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method is used to solve the multifluid Euler equations.

  2. Damage Curves of a Nuclear Reactor Structure exposed to Air Blast Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) radiological hazards due to accidental failure or deliberated attacks are of most concern due to their destructive and global consequences: large area contaminations, injuries, exposure to ionizing radiation (which can cause death or illness, depends on the levels of exposure), loss of lives of both humans and animals, and severe damage to the environment. Prevention of such consequences is of a global importance and it has led to the definition of safety & design guidelines, and regulations by various authorities such as IAEA, U.S. NRC, etc. The guidelines define general requirements for the integrity of a NPP’s physical barriers (such as protective walls) when challenged by external events, for example human induced explosion. A more specific relation to the design of a NPP is that its structures and equipment (reactor building, fuel building, safeguards building, diesel-generator building, pumping station, nuclear auxiliaries building, and effluent treatment building) must function properly: shutdown the reactor, removal of decayed heat, storage of spent fuel, and treatment and containment of radioactive effluents) under external explosion. It requires that the NPP’s structures and equipment resistance to external explosion should be analyzed and verified. The air blast loading created by external explosion, as well as its effects & consequences on different kinds of structures are described in the literature. Structural elements response to the air blast can be analyzed in general by a Single Degree of Freedom (SDOF) system that converts a distributed mass, loads, and resistance to concentrated mass, force, and stiffness located at a representative point of the structure's element where the displacements are the highest one. Proper shielding should be designed if the explosion blast effects are greater than the resistance capacity.External explosion effects should be considered within the Screening Distance Value (SDV) of the NPP

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from ...

  4. Detecting Residues On Grit-Blasted Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, H. L.; Zook, L. M.

    1989-01-01

    Addition of fluorescent or iridescent material to plastic grit particles proposed for detection of grit residues after grit-blast cleaning. Residual films visible by observing grit-blasted surfaces under infrared or ultraviolet light. Plastic grit contains fluorescent or iridescent additive in core and coating. Wherever grit material becomes embedded, additive makes it visible under infrared or ultraviolet light. Applicable to other grit materials, for example fluorescent or iridescent materials added to particles of glass, silicon carbide, aluminum oxide, or zirconium silicate.

  5. Blasting at a Superfund chemical waste site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the summer of 1989, Maine Drilling and Blasting of Gardiner, Maine was contracted by Cayer Corporation of Harvard, Massachusetts to drill and blast an interceptor trench at the Nyanza Chemical Superfund Site in Ashland, Massachusetts. The interceptor trench was to be 1,365 feet long and to be blasted out of granite. The trench was to be 12 feet wide at the bottom with 1/1 slopes, the deepest cut being 30 feet deep. A French drain 12 feet wide by 15 to 35 feet deep was blasted below the main trench on a 2% slope from its center to each end. A French drain is an excavation where the rock is blasted but not dug. The trench would be used as a perimeter road with any ground water flow going through the French drain flowing to both ends of the trench. Being a Superfund project turned a simple blasting project into a regulatory nightmare. The US Environmental Protection Agency performed all the chemical related functions on site. The US Army Corps of Engineers was overseeing all related excavation and construction on site, as was the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Quality Engineering, the local Hazardous Wastes Council, and the local Fire Department. All parties had some input with the blasting and all issues had to be addressed. The paper outlines the project, how it was designed and completed. Also included is an outline of the blast plan to be submitted for approval, an outline of the Safety/Hazardous Waste training and a description of all the problems which arose during the project by various regulatory agencies

  6. The use of blast furnace slag

    OpenAIRE

    Václavík, Vojtěch; Dirner, Vojtech; Dvorský, Tomáš; Daxner, J.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental research that dealt with the substitution of fi nely ground blast furnace slag for Portland cement in the course of simple concrete manufacturing. Physical and mechanical properties of experimental concrete mixtures based on fi nely ground blast furnace slag were observed. Rad predstavlja rezultate eksperimentalnog istraživanja koja se bave mogućnostima primjene fi nozrnate troske iz visoke peći za Portland cement u jednostavnoj proiz...

  7. Fabrication of microstructures by powder blasting

    OpenAIRE

    Wensink, Hendrik

    2002-01-01

    This thesis deals with the use of powder blasting as a micromachining technique to create micro systems. Powder blasting is a technology in which small particles, accelerated by an air jet, are directed towards a brittle target for mechanical material removal. It is especially useful for glass machining due to the limitations of other glass micromachining techniques. Particle jets have been used for many years to test the wear resistance of materials. Chapter 2 gives a literature overview of ...

  8. Coals characterization for blast furnace tuyeres injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of blast furnace operation with pulverized coal injection (PCI) by tuyeres is determined by the composition and properties of the used coals and by the quality of the ferrous burden and coke. A study in thermo balance of coals to be injected by tuyeres is carried out, and the softening and melting temperatures of coals ash are determined. The coal performance and its influence in the blast furnace operation is estimated. (Author) 7 refs

  9. Localized coating removal using plastic media blasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Howard L.; Wyckoff, Michael G.; Zook, Lee M.

    1988-01-01

    Steps taken to qualify the use of plastic media blasting for safely and effectively removing paint and other coatings from solid rocket booster aluminum structures are described. As a result of the effort, an improvement was made in the design of surface finishing equipment for processing flight hardware, in addition to a potentially patentable idea on improved plastic media composition. The general arrangement of the blast equipment and the nozzle configuration are presented.

  10. Feasibility of a blast wave attenuation structure

    OpenAIRE

    Hartmann, Dale Richard

    1997-01-01

    This thesis begins with an overview of bombings in the United States, followed by the introduction of the Rankine Hugoniot equations for blast wave pressure. The subsequent chapters develop the one dimensional and two dimensional Euler equations. These equations are the solved using the MacCormack finite difference algorithm. The basis of the investigation then begins by placing pole, shear plate and wedge obstacles in the path of the blast wave. The results of these simulations are interpret...

  11. Cygnus Loop Supernova Blast Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This is an image of a small portion of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant, which marks the edge of a bubble-like, expanding blast wave from a colossal stellar explosion, occurring about 15,000 years ago. The HST image shows the structure behind the shock waves, allowing astronomers for the first time to directly compare the actual structure of the shock with theoretical model calculations. Besides supernova remnants, these shock models are important in understanding a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, from winds in newly-formed stars to cataclysmic stellar outbursts. The supernova blast is slamming into tenuous clouds of insterstellar gas. This collision heats and compresses the gas, causing it to glow. The shock thus acts as a searchlight revealing the structure of the interstellar medium. The detailed HST image shows the blast wave overrunning dense clumps of gas, which despite HST's high resolution, cannot be resolved. This means that the clumps of gas must be small enough to fit inside our solar system, making them relatively small structures by interstellar standards. A bluish ribbon of light stretching left to right across the picture might be a knot of gas ejected by the supernova; this interstellar 'bullet' traveling over three million miles per hour (5 million kilometres) is just catching up with the shock front, which has slowed down by ploughing into interstellar material. The Cygnus Loop appears as a faint ring of glowing gases about three degrees across (six times the diameter of the full Moon), located in the northern constellation, Cygnus the Swan. The supernova remnant is within the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and is 2,600 light-years away. The photo is a combination of separate images taken in three colors, oxygen atoms (blue) emit light at temperatures of 30,000 to 60,000 degrees Celsius (50,000 to 100,000 degrees Farenheit). Hydrogen atoms (green) arise throughout the region of shocked gas. Sulfur atoms (red) form when the gas cools to

  12. An Abridged Review of Blast Wave Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmohan Dass Goel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In case of blast loading on structures, analysis is carried out in two stages, first the blast loading on a particular structure is determined and second, an evaluation is made for the response of the structure to this loading. In this paper, a review of the first part is presented which includes various empirical relations available for computation of blast load in the form of pressure-time function resulting from the explosion in the air. Different empirical techniques available in the form of charts and equations are reviewed first and then the various blast wave parameters are computed using these equations. This paper is providing various blast computation equations, charts, and references in a concise form at a single place and to serve as base for researchers and designers to understand, compare, and then compute the blast wave parameters. Recommendations are presented to choose the best suitable technique from the available methods to compute the pressure-time function for obtaining structural response.Defence Science Journal, 2012, 62(5, pp.300-306, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.62.1149

  13. Effects of grit blasting on surface properties of steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low carbon steel substrates have been grit blasted using alumina grits of various sizes under varying pressure, time, angle and standoff distances and the corresponding effect on surface roughness and surface residual stress has been studied. The mechanism of material removal in grit blasting has been analyzed. The effect of blasting process parameters on substrate surface residual stress has been studied using a statistically designed experiment. For this purpose the Barkhausen noise analysis (BNA) of the blasted surface has been undertaken. Then the BNA results have been calibrated against and complemented using the residual stress values measured using X-ray diffraction. The correlation between BN signal and the measured residual stress has been studied. The material removal in blasting takes place by microcutting, indentation or by a mixed mode depending on the blasting angle. During blasting the alumina grits themselves also undergo erosion. The analysis of the experimental results shows that the surface roughness increases with grit size, blasting pressure and to an extent with blasting time and blasting angle as well. The compressive residual stress of the surface and subsurface hardness increases with blasting pressure and blasting angle. The Barkhausen noise signal has a strong correlation with the magnitude of the compressive residual stress on the blasted surface.

  14. BLAST-EXPLORER helps you building datasets for phylogenetic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The right sampling of homologous sequences for phylogenetic or molecular evolution analyses is a crucial step, the quality of which can have a significant impact on the final interpretation of the study. There is no single way for constructing datasets suitable for phylogenetic analysis, because this task intimately depends on the scientific question we want to address, Moreover, database mining softwares such as BLAST which are routinely used for searching homologous sequences are not specifically optimized for this task. Results To fill this gap, we designed BLAST-Explorer, an original and friendly web-based application that combines a BLAST search with a suite of tools that allows interactive, phylogenetic-oriented exploration of the BLAST results and flexible selection of homologous sequences among the BLAST hits. Once the selection of the BLAST hits is done using BLAST-Explorer, the corresponding sequence can be imported locally for external analysis or passed to the phylogenetic tree reconstruction pipelines available on the Phylogeny.fr platform. Conclusions BLAST-Explorer provides a simple, intuitive and interactive graphical representation of the BLAST results and allows selection and retrieving of the BLAST hit sequences based a wide range of criterions. Although BLAST-Explorer primarily aims at helping the construction of sequence datasets for further phylogenetic study, it can also be used as a standard BLAST server with enriched output. BLAST-Explorer is available at http://www.phylogeny.fr

  15. Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) - 16270

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NUKEM Technologies was contracted to supply a dry, automated drum belt (tumbling) Abrasive Blasting Unit (ABU) to the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission in Ispra, Italy. The ABU was installed in the centralised radioactive waste management area of the JRC-Ispra site in Italy. The unit is to be employed for the decontamination to clearance levels of slightly contaminated metal components and, where practical, concrete or heavy concrete (density ∼3200 kg/m3) blocks arising from the dismantling of nuclear facilities. The presentation is based on the successful construction and installation of the ABU at the JRC Ispra site. Among the several possibilities of adapting conventional abrasive units to nuclear applications, an automatic tumbling machine was preferred, due to the larger output and (mainly) for the ease of operation, with minimum direct handling of contaminated material by operators, thus satisfying the ALARA principle. Consideration was also given to Belgoprocess' successful experience with a predecessor, similar unit. After adequate size reduction batches of up to about 800 kg of material to be decontaminated are automatically introduced into the blasting chamber. Pieces between 100 mm and 800 mm long, between 100 mm and 500 mm wide and between 5 mm and 300 mm high can be effectively treated in the unit, the maximum weight of a single piece being limited to 100 kg. Short lengths of pipe may be included; the final dimensions of pipe to be decontaminated will be established during the nuclear commissioning tests. Other components with hard-to-reach surfaces may also be included. The content of the chamber is tumbled by two bladed drums, while sharp steel grit is sprayed onto the contaminated components, thus removing the surface layer including any contamination. From experience, 30 minutes of treatment is sufficient to remove contamination to levels below expected clearance levels for most materials. The decontaminated components are removed

  16. Comparison of ATD to PMHS Response in the Under-Body Blast Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danelson, Kerry A; Kemper, Andrew R; Mason, Matthew J; Tegtmeyer, Michael; Swiatkowski, Sean A; Bolte, John H; Hardy, Warren N

    2015-11-01

    A blast buck (Accelerative Loading Fixture, or ALF) was developed for studying underbody blast events in a laboratory-like setting. It was designed to provide a high-magnitude, high-rate, vertical loading environment for cadaver and dummy testing. It consists of a platform with a reinforcing cage that supports adjustable-height rigid seats for two crew positions. The platform has a heavy frame with a deformable floor insert. Fourteen tests were conducted using fourteen PMHS (post mortem human surrogates) and the Hybrid III ATD (Anthropomorphic Test Device). Tests were conducted at two charge levels: enhanced and mild. The surrogates were tested with and without PPE (Personal Protective Equipment), and in two different postures: nominal (knee angle of 90°) and obtuse (knee angle of 120°). The ALF reproduces damage in the PMHS commensurate with injuries experienced in theater, with the most common damage being to the pelvis and ankle. Load is transmitted through the surrogates in a caudal-to-cranial sequential fashion. Damage to the PMHS lower extremities begins within 2 ms after the initiation of foot/floor motion. The Hybrid III cannot assume the posture of the PMHS in rigid seats and exhibits a stiffer overall response compared to the PMHS. The ATD does not mimic the kinematic response of the PMHS lower extremities. Further, the Hybrid III does not have the capability to predict the potential for injury in the high-rate, vertical loading environment. A new ATD dedicated to under-body blast is needed to assist in the effort to mitigate injuries sustained by the mounted soldier. PMID:26660754

  17. Comparison of Some Blast Vibration Predictors for Blasting in Underground Drifts and Some Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Vaibhab Pramod; Dey, Kaushik

    2016-04-01

    Drilling and blasting are the most economical excavation techniques in underground drifts driven through hard rock formation. Burn cut is the most popular drill pattern, used in this case, to achieve longer advance per blast round. The ground vibration generated due to the propagation of blast waves on the detonation of explosive during blasting is the principal cause for structural and rock damage. Thus, ground vibration is a point of concern for the blasting engineers. The ground vibration from a blast is measured using a seismograph placed at the blast monitoring station. The measured vibrations, in terms of peak particle velocity, are related to the maximum charge detonated at one instant and the distance of seismograph from the blast point. The ground vibrations from a number of blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances are monitored. A number of scaling factors of these dependencies (viz. Distance and maximum charge/delay) have been proposed by different researchers, namely, square root, cube root, CMRI, Langefors and Kihlstrom, Ghosh-Daemon, Indian standard etc. Scaling factors of desired type are computed for all the measured blast rounds. Regression analysis is carried out between the scaling factors and peak particle velocities to establish the coefficients of the vibration predictor equation. Then, the developed predictor equation is used for designing the blast henceforth. Director General of Mine Safety, India, specified that ground vibrations from eight to ten blast rounds of varying charge/delay and distances should be monitored to develop a predictor equation; however, there is no guideline about the type of scaling factor to be used. Further to this, from the statistical point of view, a regression analysis on a small sample population cannot be accepted without the testing of hypothesis. To show the importance of the above, in this paper, seven scaling factors are considered for blast data set of a hard-rock underground drift using burn

  18. Trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Paul W

    2003-04-01

    As the popularity of trampolines has increased during the past 10 years, so has the number of injuries sustained using them. Whether there is an actual increase in the risk associated with the use of a trampoline for the same number of exposure hours is not known. The marked increase in emergency room visits related to trampoline injuries might reflect only the increased number of trampolines now available for recreational use or the creative manner in which they are being used. The complex factors related to trampolines, their use, and the possible injuries will be discussed. A liberal use of Internet references will be used because this is where much of the advertising and information available to the public regarding trampolines currently is disseminated. PMID:12671484

  19. Modelling of blast loading on aboveground structures - II. Internal blast and ground shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshara, F. B. A.

    1994-06-01

    Recent studies of the nature and structural effects of confined explosions, contact blast and explosion-induced ground shock are presented. High explosive blast is distinguished from that due to a gaseous deflagration. The effects of confinement and venting are considered in the evaluation of dynamic loads. Maxima for the initial internal blast pressure can be estimated from the scaled blast data or theoretical analyses of normal blast wave reflection from a rigid wall. Semi-empirical relations and prediction methods for gas pressures for many types of internal explosions including high explosives, gas mixtures and dust suspensions are given on the basis of pseudo-static character. The loading of a contact explosion and the associated effects on a concrete target are determined as functions of charge weight, concrete strength and member thickness. In the final part, the evaluation of both airblast-induced ground shock and directly transmitted motion are included in simple form without considering the soil-structure interaction.

  20. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calendar Find an ENT Doctor Near You Facial Sports Injuries Facial Sports Injuries Patient Health Information News media ... should receive immediate medical attention. Prevention Of Facial Sports Injuries The best way to treat facial sports injuries ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition ...

  2. Eye Injuries at Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask an Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Safety Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Work Edited by: Shirley Dang Feb. ...

  3. Preventing Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Preventing Eye Injuries Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. ...

  4. Design and commissioning of a semi-confined blast chamber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.M. SNYMAN; F.J. MOSTERT; W. GRUNDLING

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design, test and analysis of a scaled cylindrical blast chamber. The blast chamber is a one-fifth dimensional size replica of the full-scale blast chamber (Emily). The blast chamber is semi-confined as one end is open. The scaled blast chamber is used to test concepts for closing the open end and allows the gas to vent at the same time. ANSYS AUTODYN calculated the pressure time histories for different closure scenarios. Comparing the results suggested a viable scenario, namely a structure consisting of a circular disc and a frame positioned at the open end of the blast chamber. The structure and cylindrical blast chamber were subjected to scaled blast tests and the pressure results are presented and discussed.

  5. Alkahest NuclearBLAST : a user-friendly BLAST management and analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke Mark

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Sequencing of EST and BAC end datasets is no longer limited to large research groups. Drops in per-base pricing have made high throughput sequencing accessible to individual investigators. However, there are few options available which provide a free and user-friendly solution to the BLAST result storage and data mining needs of biologists. Results - Here we describe NuclearBLAST, a batch BLAST analysis, storage and management system designed for the biologist. It is a wrapper for NCBI BLAST which provides a user-friendly web interface which includes a request wizard and the ability to view and mine the results. All BLAST results are stored in a MySQL database which allows for more advanced data-mining through supplied command-line utilities or direct database access. NuclearBLAST can be installed on a single machine or clustered amongst a number of machines to improve analysis throughput. NuclearBLAST provides a platform which eases data-mining of multiple BLAST results. With the supplied scripts, the program can export data into a spreadsheet-friendly format, automatically assign Gene Ontology terms to sequences and provide bi-directional best hits between two datasets. Users with SQL experience can use the database to ask even more complex questions and extract any subset of data they require. Conclusion - This tool provides a user-friendly interface for requesting, viewing and mining of BLAST results which makes the management and data-mining of large sets of BLAST analyses tractable to biologists.

  6. Numerical modeling of an experimental shock tube for traumatic brain injury studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael; Regele, Jonathan D.

    2015-11-01

    Unfortunately, Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are encountered commonly by both civilians and military soldiers throughout the world. Over a decade of medical history suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result from exposure to the blast waves created by these explosions, even if the person does not experience any immediate injury or lose consciousness. Medical researchers study the exposure of mice and rats to blast waves created in specially designed shock tubes to understand the effect on brain tissue. A newly developed table-top shock tube with a short driver section has been developed for mice experiments to reduce the time necessary to administer the blast radiation and increase the amount of statistical information available. In this study, numerical simulations of this shock tube are performed to assess how the blast wave takes its shape. The pressure profiles obtained from the numerical results are compared with the pressure histories from the experimental pressure transducers. The results show differences in behavior from what was expected, but the blast wave may still be an effective means of studying TBI.

  7. Methodology of Testing Shot Blasting Machines in Industrial Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    R. Wrona; P. Zyzak; E. Ziółkowski; M. Brzeziński

    2012-01-01

    Shot blasting machines are widely used for automated surface treatment and finishing of castings. In shot blasting processes the stream of shots is generated and shaped by blasting turbines, making up a kinetic and dynamic system comprising a separating rotor, an adapting sleeve and a propelling rotor provided with blades. The shot blasting performance- i.e. the quality of shot treated surfaces depends on the actual design and operational parameters of the unit whilst the values of relevant p...

  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Experts \\ Spinal Cord Injury 101 Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... in countries outside the US ? A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed to ...

  9. Investigation on mechanism of action of tissue TXA2 and PGI2 on rabbits' brains after maxillofacial explosive injury%颌面部爆炸伤后组织血栓素A2和前列环素I2对兔脑的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘瑞峰; 刘彦普; 周树夏; 何黎升; 王翔; 马全利

    2002-01-01

    Objective To detect the changes of TXA2 and PGI2 levels and discuss the significance of the level and ratio changes during maxillofacial blast injury.Methods The maxillofacial blast injury model was made by standard spherical blast sources produced by NINT.Measure dynamics of blast wave to skin surface.The metabolites of thromboxane A2( TXA2) and prostacyclin(PGI2),TXB2 and 6 keto PGF1α ,in cortex were examined before and 10min,6h,12h,24h,72h,168h after injury by radioimmunoassay.Results The pressure of central skin of blast injury was 335MPa.TXB2 and 6 keto PGF1 levels and the ratio augmented gradually after injury,and reached the peaks [(216.8± 22.5)pg/g and (102.9± 13.5)pg/g respectively] at the 24th hour,and reduced to the normal levels at the 7th day.Conclusions The blast wave can injure the cortex and vessels,thus TXA2 and PGI2 levels and the ratio increase, which aggravate injury of the cerebral cortex.

  10. Musculoskeletal injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation is about musculoskeletal injuries and the diagnosis of osseous tumors. The use of the radiology, bone scintigraphy, computed tomography and magnetic resonance contribute to detect the localization of the osseous lesions as well as the density (lytic, sclerotic, mixed) and the benign and malignant tumors.

  11. Inhalation Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase mortality 30% to 40% when patients with cutaneous burns and inhalation injury are compared with patients ... nasal hairs • Facial burns • Burns around the mouth • Mineral spirits – 104º F – paint thinner, brush cleaner. • Redness, ...

  12. Artificial induction of blast-resistant mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes studies on the induction of mutations in rice for resistance to blast disease and studies on the induction of changes in pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus. Treatments were done with both radiation and chemical mutagens. Frequencies in blast-resistant mutations and in increase and decrease of pathogenicity of the fungus are reported. (author). 4 refs

  13. 30 CFR 75.1316 - Preparation before blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preparation before blasting. 75.1316 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1316 Preparation before blasting. (a)(1) All nonbattery-powered electric equipment, including cables, located within...

  14. 30 CFR 57.22607 - Blasting on shift (III mines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blasting on shift (III mines). 57.22607 Section... Standards for Methane in Metal and Nonmetal Mines Explosives § 57.22607 Blasting on shift (III mines). When blasting on shift, tests for methane shall be made in the mine atmosphere by a competent person...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1310 - Explosives and blasting equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives and blasting equipment. 75.1310... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Explosives and Blasting § 75.1310 Explosives and blasting equipment. (a) Only permissible explosives, approved sheathed explosive units,...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6306 - Loading, blasting, and security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Loading, blasting, and security. 57.6306... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6306 Loading, blasting, and security. (a) When explosive materials or... blasting operation and the activities of surveying, stemming, sampling of geology, and reopening of...

  17. 30 CFR 56.6300 - Control of blasting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of blasting operations. 56.6300 Section... § 56.6300 Control of blasting operations. (a) Only persons trained and experienced in the handling and use of explosive material shall direct blasting operations and related activities. (b) Trainees...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6605 - Isolation of blasting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Isolation of blasting circuits. 57.6605 Section... Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6605 Isolation of blasting circuits. Lead wires and blasting lines shall be isolated and insulated from power conductors, pipelines, and railroad tracks,...

  19. 30 CFR 816.64 - Use of explosives: Blasting schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: Blasting schedule. 816.64... ACTIVITIES § 816.64 Use of explosives: Blasting schedule. (a) General requirements. (1) The operator shall conduct blasting operations at times approved by the regulatory authority and announced in the...

  20. 30 CFR 57.6300 - Control of blasting operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control of blasting operations. 57.6300 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6300 Control of blasting operations. (a) Only persons trained and experienced in the handling and use of explosive material shall direct blasting operations and...

  1. War, traffic and iatrogenic injuries of D3 duodenal segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Dragan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Injuries of the duodenum at the level of aortomesenteric clamp (segment D3 are with a high incidence of death due to the development of fistula and peritonitis. In three successfully managed cases, we applied the biliary surgery method. Case reports. All three cases were with the injuries of D3 duodenal segment. The first patient suffered from the blast perforation of duodenum at the level of the aortomesenteric clamp which occurred at the 7th day after the injury. The second patient suffered from the duodenal injury caused in a traffic accident. The third patient suffered from an iatrogenic injury at the beginning of D3 duodenal segment inflicted during ureterolithotomy. The described surgical procedure included basically the suture to narrow the site of the injury, then lateroterminal anastomosis with the Roux-en-Y jejunal flexure and, finally, the placement of a silicone prosthesis starting from the duodenum through the site of injury and the Roux-en-Y out. Octreotide and the total parenteral nutrition were administered to the patients postoperatively. Conclusion. The use of the releasing silicone prosthesis in all three patients provided the repair of the site of the injury with anastomosed Reux-en-Y jejunum.

  2. Effects of repetitive low-level blast exposure on visual systems and ocular structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José E. Capó-Aponte, OD, PhD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether repetitive exposure to low-level blasts during military breacher training produces acute and cumulative damage to the ocular tissues or visual system. The effects of low-level blast exposure on high-contrast visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, oculomotor function, color vision, visual field (VF, pupillary light reflex, corneal endothelial cell density (ECD, macular thickness, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and cup-to-disc ratio were assessed using a battery of standard clinical ophthalmic tests administered 10 times over a 2-year period. Data from nine male breacher instructors (Cadre were compared with data from four male breacher engineers (Control. The Cadre group showed higher vertical deviation at near than the Control group over time. The VF mean deviation on the left eye tended to be worse in the Cadre group throughout the study, suggesting a decrease in VF sensitivity (Cadre: –0.20 +/– 0.15 dB; Control: 1.05 +/– 0.15 dB; p = 0.03. The Cadre group had a reduced ECD (right eye: Cadre 2,478 cells/mm2 vs Control 2,808 cells/mm2, p = 0.02; left eye: Cadre 2,562 cells/mm2 vs Control 2,892 cells/mm2, p = 0.03. These results suggest that even low-level primary blast has the potential to produce occult eye injury.

  3. Blast Protection Shelter by Using Hollow Steel Filled with Recycled Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jianchun; HUANG Xin; MA Guowei

    2008-01-01

    Under extreme loading condition, a shelter will provide a safe place to protect people from injury caused by blast wave and fragments.In order to save resource and reuse waste materials, a new design concept for blast protection shelter was explored.The new construction was composed of I-section steel panel or C-channel steel panel filled with recycled concrete aggregate.The compaction process of the recycled concrete aggregate filled in the steel construction was experimentally investigated.A single storey shelter based on the proposed design concept was numerically simulated by using LS-DYNA software.In the 3D numerical model, three walls were designed using I-section steel and one wall using C-channel steel, and all of the four walls were filled with recycled concrete aggregate.The penetration analysis was done by using ConWep.Some penetration tests were also carried out by using a gas gun.It is found that the proposed shelter based on the design concept is effective for blast protection.

  4. Conceptual design and simulation analysis of thermal behaviors of TGR blast furnace and oxygen blast furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Extensive use of carbon based fuel is the main inducement for global warming and more extreme weather.Reducing carbon dioxide emission and enhancing energy use is a common subject in steel industry.In the integrated steel plant,decreasing carbon dioxide emission must consider energy balance in the whole iron and steel works,and secondary energy must be actively utilized.As promising blast-furnaces,top gas recovery blast furnace(TGR-BF) and oxygen blast furnace have been investigated.In this paper,conceptual TGR blast furnace and oxygen blast furnace are proposed.Base on the idea of blast furnace gas de-CO2 circulating as reducing agent and the idea of pure oxygen blast decreasing the thermal reserve zone temperature,process modeling is conducted with ASPEN Plus.It is shown that the developed model reasonably describes the energy balance and mass balance feature of the furnace,and provides basic thermodynamic condition for furnaces.The effects of changes in different operation conditions are studied by sensitivity analysis and reference data from simulation.

  5. Surface mine blasting near pressurized transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siskind, D.E.; Stagg, M.S.; Wiegand, J.E.; Schultz, D.L.

    1994-12-31

    The US Bureau of Mines and the State of Indiana cooperated with AMAX Coal Co. and its consultants to determine the effects of coal mine overburden blasting on nearby pipelines. Five pressurized 76-m pipeline sections were installed on the Minnehaha Mine highwall near Sullivan, IN, for testing to failure. Four 17- to 51-cm-diameter welded steel pipes and one 22-cm PVC pipe were monitored for vibration, strain, and pressure for a period of 6 months while production blasting advanced up to the test pipeline field. In contrast to previous studies of small-scale, close-in blasting for construction, these tests involved overburden blasts of up to 950 kg per delay in 31-cm blastholes. Analyses found low pipe responses, strains, and calculated stresses from even large blasts. Ground vibrations of 120 to 250 mm/s produced worst case strains that were about 25 pcts of the strains resulting from normal pipeline operations and calculated stresses of only about 10 to 18 pct of the ultimate tensile strength. No pressurization failures or permanent strains occurred even at vibration amplitudes of 600 mm/s.

  6. Blast densification trials for oilsands tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Port, A. [Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Martens, S. [Klohn Crippen Berger Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Eaton, T. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The Shell Canada Muskeg River Mine External Tailings Facility (ETF) is an upstream constructed tailings facility located near Fort McMurray, Alberta. Raises have incrementally stepped out over the beach since construction of the starter dam and deposition within standing water has left some parts of the beach in a loose state. In order to assess the effectiveness of blast densification, a blast densification trial program that was conducted in 2006 at the ETF. The primary purpose of the test program was to determine the effectiveness of blast densification in tailings containing layers and zones of bitumen. The paper described the site characterization and explosive compaction trial program, with particular reference to test layout; drilling methodology; and blasting and timing sequence. The paper also described the instrumentation, including the seismographs; high pressure electric piezometers; low pressure electric piezometers; vibrating wire piezometers; inclinometers; settlement gauges; and surveys. Trial observations and post-trial observations were also presented. It was concluded that controlled blasting techniques could be used to safely induce liquefaction in localized areas within the tailings deposit, with a resulting increase in the tailings density. 5 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  7. FastBLAST: homology relationships for millions of proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-versus-all BLAST, which searches for homologous pairs of sequences in a database of proteins, is used to identify potential orthologs, to find new protein families, and to provide rapid access to these homology relationships. As DNA sequencing accelerates and data sets grow, all-versus-all BLAST has become computationally demanding. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present FastBLAST, a heuristic replacement for all-versus-all BLAST that relies on alignments of proteins to known families, obtained from tools such as PSI-BLAST and HMMer. FastBLAST avoids most of the work of all-versus-all BLAST by taking advantage of these alignments and by clustering similar sequences. FastBLAST runs in two stages: the first stage identifies additional families and aligns them, and the second stage quickly identifies the homologs of a query sequence, based on the alignments of the families, before generating pairwise alignments. On 6.53 million proteins from the non-redundant Genbank database ("NR", FastBLAST identifies new families 25 times faster than all-versus-all BLAST. Once the first stage is completed, FastBLAST identifies homologs for the average query in less than 5 seconds (8.6 times faster than BLAST and gives nearly identical results. For hits above 70 bits, FastBLAST identifies 98% of the top 3,250 hits per query. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: FastBLAST enables research groups that do not have supercomputers to analyze large protein sequence data sets. FastBLAST is open source software and is available at http://microbesonline.org/fastblast.

  8. Numerical simulations of the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under blunt impact and blast loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevagan, Gopinath; Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Binhui; Yang, King H

    2013-07-01

    This article presents the results of a finite element simulation on the occupant head response in an infantry vehicle under two separated loading conditions: (1) blunt impact and (2) blast loading conditions. A Hybrid-III dummy body integrated with a previously validated human head model was used as the surrogate. The biomechanical response of the head was studied in terms of head acceleration due to the impact by a projectile on the vehicle and intracranial pressure caused by blast wave. A series of parametric studies were conducted on the numerical model to analyze the effect of some key parameters, such as seat configuration, impact velocity, and boundary conditions. The simulation results indicate that a properly designed seat and internal surface of the infantry vehicle can play a vital role in reducing the risk of head injury in the current scenarios. Comparison of the kinematic responses under the blunt impact and blast loading conditions reveals that under the current loading conditions, the acceleration pulse in the blast scenario has much higher peak values and frequency than blunt impact case, which may reflect different head response characteristics. PMID:23636759

  9. The Quest to Model Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Multiple Model & Injury Paradigm Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Turner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic neurodegeneration following a history of neurotrauma is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric and cognitive symptoms. In order to enhance understanding about the underlying pathophysiology linking neurotrauma to neurodegeneration, a multi-model pre-clinical approach must be established to account for the different injury paradigms and pathophysiologic mechanisms. We investigated the development of tau pathology and behavioral changes using a multi-model and multi-institutional approach, comparing the pre-clinical results to tauopathy patterns seen in post-mortem human samples from athletes diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. We utilized a scaled and validated blast-induced traumatic brain injury model in rats and a modified pneumatic closed-head impact model in mice. Tau hyperphosphorylation was evaluated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Elevated plus maze and Morris water maze were employed to measure impulsive-like behavior and cognitive deficits respectively. Animals exposed to single blast (~50 PSI reflected peak overpressure exhibited elevated AT8 immunoreactivity in the contralateral hippocampus at 1 month compared to controls (q = 3.96, p < 0.05. Animals exposed to repeat blast (6 blasts over 2 weeks had increased AT8 (q = 8.12, p < 0.001 and AT270 (q = 4.03, p < 0.05 in the contralateral hippocampus at 1 month post-injury compared to controls. In the modified controlled closed-head impact mouse model, no significant difference in AT8 was seen at 7 days, however a significant elevation was detected at 1 month following injury in the ipsilateral hippocampus compared to control (q = 4.34, p < 0.05. Elevated plus maze data revealed that rats exposed to single blast (q = 3.53, p < 0.05 and repeat blast (q = 4.21, p < 0.05 spent more time in seconds exploring the open arms compared to controls. Morris water maze testing revealed a significant difference between groups in acquisition times on days 22

  10. Vibration velocity and frequency of underwater short-hole blasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Based on the measuring data of underwater blasting vibrationand the regression analysis results of these data, two formulae usually used of blasting vibration velocity were compared. Factors that canaffect blasting vibration and frequency were summarized and analyzed.It is thought that the effect of the number of freedom face and burden direction on blasting vibration should be considered during blastingdesign. Based on the relevant research results and the regression results of these data, a formula to calculate under water blasting frequency was put forward.

  11. Blast Diffusion by Different Shapes of Domes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Ranjan Sahu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Domes have been used since ancient times in constructions. These are effective structures in supporting loads for large span. Dome has an added advantage of having good looking in structural applications. Many shapes of domes are being used nowadays for residential, commercial, and industrial purposes. Specific purpose domes are also used for nuclear containment. Main threats to structures are from the bomb blast. Hence, domes too are to be designed to withstand effectively the pressure energy generated by the blast. A comparative theoretical study is proposed on the different shapes of domes having same weight and thickness. Various responses are estimated through numerical method after simulating blast and comparing their intensities.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 1, January 2015, pp.77-82, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.6908

  12. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of the ''adiabatic'' assumption in supernova remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast wave model

  13. Isothermal blast wave model of supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solinger, A.; Buff, J.; Rappaport, S.

    1975-01-01

    The validity of the 'adiabatic' assumption in supernova-remnant calculations is examined, and the alternative extreme of an isothermal blast wave is explored. It is concluded that, because of thermal conductivity, the large temperature gradients predicted by the adiabatic model probably are not maintained in nature. Self-similar solutions to the hydrodynamic equations for an isothermal blast wave have been found and studied. These solutions are then used to determine the relationship between X-ray observations and inferred parameters of supernova remnants. A comparison of the present results with those for the adiabatic model indicates differences which are less than present observational uncertainties. It is concluded that most parameters of supernova remnants inferred from X-ray measurements are relatively insensitive to the specifics of the blast-wave model.

  14. Computation of blast wave-obstacle interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champney, J. M.; Chaussee, D. S.; Kutler, P.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the interaction of a planar blast wave with various obstacles are presented. These obstacles are either ground structures or vehicles flying in the atmosphere. For a structure on the ground, the blast wave encounter is side-on, while for the flying vehicles the encounter is either head-on or oblique. Second-order accurate, finite-difference, and shock-capturing procedures are employed to solve the two-dimensional, axisymmetric, and three-dimensional unsteady Euler equations. Results are presented for the flow field consisting of blast wave striking obstacles that are at rest, moving subsonically and moving supersonically. Comparison of the numerical results with experimental data for a configuration at rest substantiates the validity of this approach and its potential as a flow analysis tool.

  15. Stingray injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, R.J.; Davies, R S

    1996-01-01

    A case of stingray injury is reported. Local symptoms and signs include intense pain, oedema around the wound, erythema and petechiae. Systemic symptoms and signs include nausea and vomiting, muscle cramps, diaphoresis, syncope, headache, muscle fasciculations, and cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment aims to reverse local and systemic effects of the venom, alleviate pain, and prevent infection. Antitetanus prophylaxis is important. Treatment for anaphylaxis may be necessary.

  16. Blasting practices in a quarry with karstic cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The blasting practices in a limestone quarry with karstic cavities have been presented. The existence of karstic cavities in the quarry has reduced blasting efficiency significantly. In order to improve blasting efficiency different blasting strategies (loading holes with ANFO in plastic bag, recording cavity location along the holes and charging the holes according to this information, and modifying blasting pattern according to karstic cavities) had been implemented and the results were evaluated on per ton cost basis. It was concluded that efficient blasting in such aquarries requires determining the size and shape of karstic cavities and based on this information, to modify the blast pattern and charge the holes. The suggested method is to record the cavity along the drill hole and to generate 3D model of cavities. By doing this, the production cost in the limestone quarry has decreased from 0.407 $/t to 0.354 $/t.

  17. Nineteen-Foot Diameter Explosively Driven Blast Simulator; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the 19-foot diameter blast tunnel at Sandia National Laboratories. The blast tunnel configuration consists of a 6 foot diameter by 200 foot long shock tube, a 6 foot diameter to 19 foot diameter conical expansion section that is 40 feet long, and a 19 foot diameter test section that is 65 feet long. Therefore, the total blast tunnel length is 305 feet. The development of this 19-foot diameter blast tunnel is presented. The small scale research test results using 4 inch by 8 inch diameter and 2 foot by 6 foot diameter shock tube facilities are included. Analytically predicted parameters are compared to experimentally measured blast tunnel parameters in this report. The blast tunnel parameters include distance, time, static, overpressure, stagnation pressure, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, shock Mach number, flow Mach number, shock velocity, flow velocity, impulse, flow duration, etc. Shadowgraphs of the shock wave are included for the three different size blast tunnels

  18. LTC American's, Inc. vacuum blasting machine: Baseline report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LTC shot blast technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU's evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The LTC 1073 Vacuum Blasting Machine uses a high-capacity, direct-pressure blasting system which incorporates a continuous feed for the blast media. The blast media cleans the surface within the contained brush area of the blast. It incorporates a vacuum system which removes dust and debris from the surface as it is blasted. The safety and health evaluation during the testing focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise

  19. Study of high Mach number laser driven blast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of blast waves produced by intense lasers in gases is motivated by the desire to explore astrophysically relevant hydrodynamic phenomena in the laboratory. A systematic scan of laser produced blast waves was performed and the structure of blast waves was examined over a wide range of drive laser energy. Lasers with energies ranging from 10-1000 J illuminated a pin target in either xenon or nitrogen gas, creating a spherical blast wave. A strongly radiating blast wave in xenon gas is observed while blast waves in nitrogen more closely approximate a pure Taylor-Sedov wave. It is also found that at all laser energies, blast waves traveling through xenon gas had their hydrodynamic evolution significantly affected by the passage of illumination laser

  20. Radiation exposure of sand blasting operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Queensland Department of Health's, Division of Health and Medical Physics initiated, in July, 1985, an investigation into the radiological health impact which involved detailed analyses of an ilmenite product from a mineral sand processor in South East Queensland. Measurements of respirable dust in air concentrations in the breathing zone of sand blasting operators, dust particle sizing and other environmental radiation measurements at a major sand blasting yard using this ilmenite product were carried out. From the data collected, the radiological health impact was assessed and compared with international and national radiological recommendations

  1. The blast wave of Tycho's supernova remnant

    OpenAIRE

    Cassam-Chenai, Gamil; Hughes, John P.; Ballet, Jean; Decourchelle, Anne

    2007-01-01

    We use the Chandra X-ray Observatory to study the region in the Tycho supernova remnant between the blast wave and the shocked ejecta interface or contact discontinuity. This zone contains all the history of the shock-heated gas and cosmic-ray acceleration in the remnant. We present for the first time evidence for significant spatial variations of the X-ray synchrotron emission in the form of spectral steepening from a photon index of 2.6 right at the blast wave to a value of 3.0 several arcs...

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist in ­blast-exposed military personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Walker, MD

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers often extrapolate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD status from PTSD Checklist (PCL data. When doing so, cut points should be based on samples with similar characteristics. This study assessed PCL diagnostic accuracy and postconcussive symptom levels within 106 Iraq/Afghanistan war Veterans and servicemembers with recent blast exposure. Two definitions of PTSD were applied: (1 “strict” Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM, 4th edition (DSM-IV criteria and (2 “relaxed” DSM-IV criteria dropping the A2 criterion as per the DSM, 5th edition. Using a structured interview for PTSD, we found moderate agreement with the PCL. Under strict criteria, PTSD prevalence was 16%, PCL cut point was 66 at peak kappa, and mean Rivermead Postconcussion Questionnaire (RPQ score trended higher for those with PTSD than for those without PTSD (35.5 +/– 11.2 vs 30.5 +/– 10.7, respectively; p = 0.08. Under relaxed criteria, PTSD prevalence was 26.4%, PCL cut point was 58 at peak kappa, and those with PTSD had higher RPQ scores than those without PTSD (36.4 +/– 11.2 vs 29.5 +/– 10.2, respectively; p = 0.003. Participants diagnosed with blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (n = 90 did not differ from those without mild traumatic brain injury (n = 16 in symptom scores. In conclusion, persons with combat-related blast exposure need higher than conventional PCL cut points and those with PTSD have more severe postconcussive-type symptoms than those without PTSD.

  3. Simulation of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological seat damper for vehicle occupant blast protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jin-Hyeong; Murugan, Muthuvel; Wereley, Norman M.

    2013-04-01

    This study investigates a lumped-parameter human body model which includes lower leg in seated posture within a quarter-car model for blast injury assessment simulation. To simulate the shock acceleration of the vehicle, mine blast analysis was conducted on a generic land vehicle crew compartment (sand box) structure. For the purpose of simulating human body dynamics with non-linear parameters, a physical model of a lumped-parameter human body within a quarter car model was implemented using multi-body dynamic simulation software. For implementing the control scheme, a skyhook algorithm was made to work with the multi-body dynamic model by running a co-simulation with the control scheme software plug-in. The injury criteria and tolerance levels for the biomechanical effects are discussed for each of the identified vulnerable body regions, such as the relative head displacement and the neck bending moment. The desired objective of this analytical model development is to study the performance of adaptive semi-active magnetorheological damper that can be used for vehicle-occupant protection technology enhancements to the seat design in a mine-resistant military vehicle.

  4. OsGF14b Positively Regulates Panicle Blast Resistance but Negatively Regulates Leaf Blast Resistance in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Yang, Jianyuan; Zhang, Shaohong; Zhao, Junliang; Feng, Aiqing; Yang, Tifeng; Wang, Xiaofei; Mao, Xinxue; Dong, Jingfang; Zhu, Xiaoyuan; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Although 14-3-3 proteins have been reported to be involved in responses to biotic stresses in plants, their functions in rice blast, the most destructive disease in rice, are largely unknown. Only GF14e has been confirmed to negatively regulate leaf blast. We report that GF14b is highly expressed in seedlings and panicles during blast infection. Rice plants overexpressing GF14b show enhanced resistance to panicle blast but are susceptible to leaf blast. In contrast, GF14b-silenced plants show increased susceptibility to panicle blast but enhanced resistance to leaf blast. Yeast one-hybrid assays demonstrate that WRKY71 binds to the promoter of GF14b and modulates its expression. Overexpression of GF14b induces expression of jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis-related genes but suppresses expression of salicylic acid (SA) synthesis-related genes. In contrast, suppressed GF14b expression causes decreased expression of JA synthesis-related genes but activation of SA synthesis-related genes. These results suggest that GF14b positively regulates panicle blast resistance but negatively regulates leaf blast resistance, and that GF14b-mediated disease resistance is associated with the JA- and SA-dependent pathway. The different functions for 14-3-3 proteins in leaf and panicle blast provide new evidence that leaf and panicle blast resistance are controlled by different mechanisms. PMID:26467468

  5. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D; Hoffer, Michael E; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  6. Efficacy of N-Acetyl Cysteine in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Katharine; Baratz-Goldstein, Renana; Pick, Chiam G.; Zindel, Ofra; Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Lockwood, Megan; Miller, Jonathan; Hoffer, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting [1], to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30–60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man. PMID:24740427

  7. Efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine in traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Eakin

    Full Text Available In this study, using two different injury models in two different species, we found that early post-injury treatment with N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC reversed the behavioral deficits associated with the TBI. These data suggest generalization of a protocol similar to our recent clinical trial with NAC in blast-induced mTBI in a battlefield setting, to mild concussion from blunt trauma. This study used both weight drop in mice and fluid percussion injury in rats. These were chosen to simulate either mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI. For mice, we used novel object recognition and the Y maze. For rats, we used the Morris water maze. NAC was administered beginning 30-60 minutes after injury. Behavioral deficits due to injury in both species were significantly reversed by NAC treatment. We thus conclude NAC produces significant behavioral recovery after injury. Future preclinical studies are needed to define the mechanism of action, perhaps leading to more effective therapies in man.

  8. Masonry infill walls under blast loading using confined underwater blast wave generators (WBWG)

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, João M.; Campos, José de; Lourenço, Paulo B.

    2015-01-01

    The vulnerability of the masonry envelop under blast loading is considered critical due to the risk of loss of lives. The behaviour of masonry infill walls subjected to dynamic out-of-plane loading was experimentally investigated in this work. Using confined underwater blast wave generators (WBWG), applying the extremely high rate conversion of the explosive detonation energy into the kinetic energy of a thick water confinement, allowed a surface area distribution avoiding also the generation...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Coping with a New Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair ... after an injury? What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? What are the ...

  10. Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury in the Preclinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Justin; Mannix, Rebekah; Qiu, Jianhua

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability for people under 45 years of age. Clinical TBI is often the result of disparate forces resulting in heterogeneous injuries. Preclinical modeling of TBI is a vital tool for studying the complex cascade of metabolic, cellular, and molecular post-TBI events collectively termed secondary injury. Preclinical models also provide an important platform for studying therapeutic interventions. However, modeling TBI in the preclinical setting is challenging, and most models replicate only certain aspects of clinical TBI. This chapter details the most widely used models of preclinical TBI, including the controlled cortical impact, fluid percussion, blast, and closed head models. Each of these models replicates particular critical aspects of clinical TBI. Prior to selecting a preclinical TBI model, it is important to address what aspect of human TBI is being sought to evaluate. PMID:27604710

  11. People Interview: Solar physics blasts into space

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    INTERVIEW Solar physics blasts into space Lucie Green's physics and astrophysics degree has taken her to the Crimea to study binary stars and to the Mullard Space Science Laboratory. David Smith talks to her about her career as a solar physicist and her involvement in outreach activities.

  12. Developments in vapour cloud explosion blast modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercx, W.P.M.; Berg, A.C. van den; Hayhurst, C.J.; Robertson, N.J.; Moran, K.C.

    2000-01-01

    TNT Equivalency methods are widely used for vapour cloud explosion blast modeling. Presently, however, other types of models are available which do not have the fundamental objections TNT Equivalency models have. TNO Multi-Energy method is increasingly accepted as a more reasonable alternative to be

  13. Blast waves with cosmic-ray pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of cosmic-ray pressure on the dynamics of self-similar, spherical blast waves and driven waves are investigated on the assumptions that the ratio of relativistic cosmic-ray pressure to total pressure at the shock front is a constant w and the the cosmic rays and thermal gas evolve as independent adiabatic fluids in the postshock flow. For blast waves from a point explosion in a uniform medium, the cosmic rays dominate the pressure near r = 0 if w>0. The solutions show that, if w is small, the ratio of cosmic-ray energy to total energy in the blast wave is several times w. The solutions are used to make specific predictions of the pion-decay γ-ray flux from a blast wave as a function of w. If w is large, the predicted fluxes from supernova remnants are close to the current observational limits. It is also noted that cosmic rays may limit the compression in the radiative shock waves of supernova remnants. The addition of cosmic pressure does not change the geneal nature of the driven wave self-similar solutions. The solutions are used to predict the pion-decay γ-ray flux from a young Type II supernova interacting with circumstellar material. Observations these γ-rays from extragalactic supernovae are not promising, but a galactic supernova could be very bright in γ-rays

  14. Japonica genome blast search result - KOME | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available [ Credits ] BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Contact us KOME Japonica ... genome ... blast search result Data detail Data name Japonica ... genome ... blast search result Description of data contents R ...

  15. Blasting as a method for abandoned mine land reclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasting methods have been proposed for reclaiming abandoned underground coal mine sites having unstable conditions. The objective of blasting is twofold: the permanent stabilization of an area by the collapse of underground workings to prevent any future subsidence, and the use of blasting to close existing sinkholes. This paper presents the results of two research projects funded by the Bureau of Mines Abandoned Mine Land Research Program to investigate the feasibility of blasting to assist in the reclamation of shallow abandoned coal mine sites. Blasting tests were conducted at Beulah, North Dakota and at Scobey, Montana, involving different configurations. The first test was a 10-acre site where blasting was used to collapse regular room and pillar panels for which good mine layout information was available. The second test involved a one acre site containing very irregular workings for which there was little available information. Finally, blasting techniques were used to close 13 individual vertical openings. The depths to the coal seams were 60 feet or less at all sites. When blasting for Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation, material must be cast downward into the abandoned developments or laterally into the sinkhole. Designs based on cratering concepts and spherical charges worked well. The blasting techniques successfully collapsed and stabilized the test areas. Cost of reclamation for the two test sites are presented. Data from blast vibration monitoring are presented because control of vibrations is of concern when mitigation efforts are conducted near homes

  16. Eye Injuries at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD Mar. 01, ... chore is being done. Preventing Eye Injuries at Home Wearing protective eyewear will prevent 90 percent of ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injury? What is the "Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems" program? ... family FacingDisability is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family ...

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Empowering the Patient After Spinal ...

  1. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that people ...

  2. Oil injection into the blast furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongsheng Liao; Mannila, P.; Haerkki, J.

    1997-12-31

    Fuel injection techniques have been extensively used in the commercial blast furnaces, a number of publications concerning the fuels injection have been reported. This present report only summarizes the study achievements of oil injection due to the research need the of authors, it includes the following parts: First, the background and the reasons reducing coke rate of oil injection are analyzed. Reducing coke rate and decreasing the ironmaking costs are the main deriving forces, the contents of C, H and ash are direct reasons reducing coke rate. It was also found that oil injection had great effects on the state of blast furnace, it made operation stable, center gas flow develop fully, pressure drop increase, descent speed of burden materials decrease and generation of thermal stagnation phenomena, the quality of iron was improved. Based on these effects, as an ideal mean, oil injection was often used to adjust the state of blast furnace. Secondly, combustion behavior of oil in the raceway and tuyere are discussed. The distribution of gas content was greatly changed, the location of CO, H{sub 2} generation was near the tuyere; the temperature peak shifts from near the raceway boundary to the tuyere. Oxygen concentration and blast velocity were two important factors, it was found that increasing excess oxygen ratio 0.9 to 1.3, the combustion time of oil decreases 0.5 msec, an increase of the blast velocity results in increasing the flame length. In addition, the nozzle position and oil rate had large effects on the combustion of oil. Based on these results, the limit of oil injection is also discussed, soot formation is the main reason limiting to further increase oil injection rate, it was viewed that there were three types of soot which were generated under blast furnace operating conditions. The reason generating soot is the incomplete conversion of the fuel. Finally, three methods improving combustion of oil in the raceway are given: Improvement of oil

  3. An unusual rugby injury

    OpenAIRE

    Croft, S J; Brenchley, J; Badhe, S P; Cresswell, T. R.

    2006-01-01

    We describe an unusual sports injury in a young man, a combination of obturator hip dislocation with an ipsilateral anterior cruciate ligament injury. Traumatic non‐prosthetic hip dislocations, particularly obturator hip dislocations, are extremely rare sports injuries and have not previously been reported in conjunction with a knee ligament injury. The severe pain and obvious deformity from the hip injury can distract from other injuries, particularly to the ipsilateral knee. This case reinf...

  4. Gas cloud explosions and resulting blast effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of nuclear power plant structures to resist blast effects due to chemical explosions requires the determination of load-time functions of possible blast waves. Results of recent investigations show that in a free cloud with deflagrative ignition (flame,heat wire, sparks) the occurrence of a gas detonation can practically be excluded. Apparently, free gas clouds can only be induced to detonate by a sufficiently strong detonative initiation. Independently of the initiating event in the practice of damage analysis, it has become customary to describe the consequences of an explosion by means of the so-called TNT equivalent. Therefore, it is attempted to specify this equivalent for hydrocarbons by means of energetic considerations including the propagation functions for the case of spherically symmetric detonations. Analogous to the safety distances required in the handling and storage of high explosives, a mass-distance relation of the form R = k(L)sup(1/3) could be considered where L is the mass of spontaneously released hydrocarbon and k varies only with the structural shape of the blast loaded buildings. With the inclusion of an empirical relation which relates the quasi-static design pressure for a building with the normally reflected blast pressure of a blast wave, it is further attempted to establish a relation between the structural capacity of a building - i.e. the pressure resistance of a building structure for detonative dynamic loading and for quasi-static loading - and the unit-mass distance R/L 1/3. (Auth.)

  5. Development of Virulence Test Methods for Neck and Panicle Blast Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Myoung-Hwan Chi; Sook-Young Park

    2015-01-01

    Isolates of the rice blast fungus show a range of tissue-specificities infecting leaves, nodes, neck and panicles. Although neck and panicle blast cause significantly greater yield losses than the leaf blast, virulence tests of the blast isolates have been performed only rice leaves instead of neck and panicles. In this study, we have developed a virulence test method for neck and panicle blast. We selected three representative isolates from each of leaf, neck, and panicle blast. We observed ...

  6. Analysis of the blasting effect on the electric shove loading efficiency of the open pit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Tian-guang; SUN Ying

    2008-01-01

    The connection between blasting cost and comprehensive cost is the main concern. Some blasting effect factors (such as unit explosive consumption, uniformity of blockness, shape and porosity of blasting heap), which had an influence on electric shove loading efficiency, were analyzed. In the end a project to properly increase in blasting cost to decrease the comprehensive cost was put forward. At the same time, the hole-by-hole blasting is effective technology to improve blasting effect.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work ...

  8. Characterizing high-velocity angular vestibulo-ocular reflex function in service members post-blast exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Matthew R; Shelhamer, Mark J; Schubert, Michael C

    2011-02-01

    Blasts (explosions) are the most common mechanism of injury in modern warfare. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and dizziness are common sequelae associated with blasts, and many service members (SMs) report symptoms worsen with activity. The purpose of this study was to measure angular vestibulo-ocular reflex gain (aVOR) of blast-exposed SMs with TBI during head impulse testing. We also assessed their symptoms during exertion. Twenty-four SMs recovering from TBI were prospectively assigned to one of two groups based on the presence or absence of dizziness. Wireless monocular scleral search coil and rate sensor were used to characterize active and passive yaw and pitch head and eye rotations. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used to monitor symptoms during fast walking/running. For active yaw head impulses, aVOR gains were significantly lower in the symptomatic group (0.79 ± 0.15) versus asymptomatic (0.87 ± 0.18), but not for passive head rotation. For pitch head rotation, the symptomatic group had both active (0.915 ± 0.24) and passive (0.878 ± 0.22) aVOR gains lower than the asymptomatic group (active 1.03 ± 0.27, passive 0.97 ± 0.23). Some SMs had elevated aVOR gain. VAS scores for all symptoms were highest during exertion. Our data suggest symptomatic SMs with TBI as a result of blast have varied aVOR gain during high-velocity head impulses and provide compelling evidence of pathology affecting the vestibular system. Potential loci of injury in this population include the following: disruption of pathways relaying vestibular efference signals, differential destruction of type I vestibular hair cells, or selective damage to irregular afferent pathways-any of which may explain the common discrepancy between reports of vestibular-like symptoms and laboratory testing results. Significantly reduced pitch aVOR in symptomatic SMs and peak symptom severity during exertional testing support earlier findings in the chronic blast-exposed active duty SMs. PMID

  9. Proceedings of the eighteenth annual conference on explosives and blasting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This edition of the Proceedings of the Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Techniques is the eighteenth in a series published by the International Society of Explosives Engineers. The papers cover a wide variety of explosives and blasting techniques, including: rock mechanics, rock drilling, perimeter control handling and documenting blasting complaints, blast vibration frequencies, blasting techniques for surface and underground coal mines, explosives for permafrost blasting, lightning detection, use of slow motion video to analyze blasts, tunneling, and close-in blasting control. Papers have been processed individually for inclusion on the data base

  10. Determination of leakage in blast furnaces cooling plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blast furnace walls are cooled by the circulation of water through copper plates inserted into the blast furnace refractory lining. Plates are fed by circular pipelines, called distribution rings, installed at different levels of the reactor. Because of normal corrosion, plates wear away and can eventually perforate, allowing the leakage of cooling water inside the blast furnace. A system has been designed and installed in order to confirm the eventual occurrence of leakages in the cooling plates of a blast furnace refractory lining. The system injects a solution of tritium into the feeding pipeline and determines, by means of liquid scintillation counting, the concentration of tritium in the exhausting gases at the top of the blast furnace. The system was tested under different blast furnace operating conditions, and allowed the detection and determination of leakages greater than 0.5 1/min. Following necessary maintenance, the system also confirmed the satisfactory results of the corrective actions. (author). 48 refs., 13 figs., 29 tabs

  11. Dynamics of adiabatic blast waves in media of finite mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic formulation is developed to describe the mass motion for nonrelativistic, spherically symmetric blast waves. The formulation is quite general in the sense that it applies to blast waves generated by either a strong explosion or a continuous energy injection, and in that it applies to an arbitrary density distribution. A simple method is developed to describe the motion of the shock by modifying the Kompaneets approximation. The formulation is applied to blast waves in specific density distributions, including an exponential medium, a Gaussian medium, and a medium with density distribution which asymptotically approaches a power law. Comparisons with numerical results for spherically symmetric blast waves are made. The one-dimensional formulation is generalized to nonspherically symmetric blast waves by making the assumption that the blast wave expands radially. Comparisons are made with numerical results for an adiabatic supershell in a plane-parallel medium. 32 refs

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruciate ligament injury - anterior; ACL injury; Knee injury - anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ... confirm the diagnosis. It may also show other knee injuries. First aid for an ACL injury may include: ...

  13. Radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation accidents and incidents continue to be of great interest and concern to the public. Issues such as the threat of nuclear war, the Chernobyl reactor accident, or reports of sporadic incidences of accidental radiation exposure keep this interest up and maintain a high level of fear among the public. In this climate of real concern and radiation phobia, physicians should not only be prepared to answer questions about acute or late effects of ionizing radiation, but also be able to participate in the initial assessment and management of individuals who have been exposed to ionizing radiation or contaminated with radioactive material. Some of the key facts about radiation injury and its medical treatment are discussed by the author

  14. Parametric analysis of the biomechanical response of head subjected to the primary blast loading - a data mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Kalra, Anil; Saif, Tal; Yang, Zaihan; Yang, King H; King, Albert I

    2016-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury due to primary blast loading has become a signature injury in recent military conflicts and terrorist activities. Extensive experimental and computational investigations have been conducted to study the interrelationships between intracranial pressure response and intrinsic or 'input' parameters such as the head geometry and loading conditions. However, these relationships are very complicated and are usually implicit and 'hidden' in a large amount of simulation/test data. In this study, a data mining method is proposed to explore such underlying information from the numerical simulation results. The heads of different species are described as a highly simplified two-part (skull and brain) finite element model with varying geometric parameters. The parameters considered include peak incident pressure, skull thickness, brain radius and snout length. Their interrelationship and coupling effect are discovered by developing a decision tree based on the large simulation data-set. The results show that the proposed data-driven method is superior to the conventional linear regression method and is comparable to the nonlinear regression method. Considering its capability of exploring implicit information and the relatively simple relationships between response and input variables, the data mining method is considered to be a good tool for an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms of blast-induced brain injury. As a general method, this approach can also be applied to other nonlinear complex biomechanical systems. PMID:26442779

  15. Injuries in Basketball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIKOLAOS KOSTOPOULOS & DIMITRIOS PHILLIPOU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety players of 8 teams in 2 male team basketball senior divisions were observed prospectively for 1 season to study the injury incidence in relation to exposure in games and practices. Forty-six injuries were recorded. Injury incidence was evaluated at 2.5 injuries per 1000 player-hours, with a significantly higher incidence in game injuries (14.3 injuries per 1000 game-hours compared with practice injuries(0.6 injuries per 1000 practice-hours.Practice injury incidence was higher in the lower performance level group, and game injury incidence was higher in the high-level group. The upper extremity was involved in 37% of the injuries, and the lower extremity in 54%.The knee was the most commonly injured joint, followed by the finger, ankle, and shoulder. Knee injuries were the most severe injuries, and they were more frequent in high-level players. There was an increase in the severity of injury with respect to performance level. The injury mechanism revealed a high number of offensive injuries, one-third of them occurring during a counterattack. The injury pattern showed certain variations with respect to player position and performance level.

  16. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  17. A $55 Shock Tube for Simulated Blast Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Elijah; Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shock tubes are commonly employed to test candidate armor materials, validate numerical models, and conduct simulated blast experiments in animal models. As DoD interests desire to field wearable sensors as blast dosimeters, shock tubes may also serve for calibration and testing of these devices. The high blast pressures needed for experimental testing of candidate armors are unnecessary to test these sensors. An inexpensive, efficient, and easily available way of testing these pressure senso...

  18. Seismic effects on the environmental related to blasting series

    OpenAIRE

    Dambov, Risto; Dambov, Ilija; Nikolic, Miroslav; Cacarov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Blasted series performed on surface and underground mines, cause different effects on the environment in terms of intensity of the shocks, air shocks and pieces of blasted rock mass. These negative effects can cause harmful effects on humans and buildings. For protection from the harmful effects introduced standards, criteria and restrictions on the intensity of these effects, especially the allowable intensity of tremors on the ground to some distance from the blasting series. ...

  19. Non-Linear Behavior of Blasting Noticed on Seismic Signals

    OpenAIRE

    aldas, gulsev uyar

    2010-01-01

    In mining operations, it is necessary to remove the overburden in order to uncover the mineral deposits. When the overburden consists of highly consolidated materials, blasting should be performed to fragment the rocks. Blasting introduces extensive impulsive energy into the  surrounding earth. It is expected that most of the explosive energy is used for rock fragmentation. However, part of this energy is transmitted away from the blasting point as ground vibrations. Mitigation of ground...

  20. EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF MITIGATION MATERIALS FOR BLAST INDUCED TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Laurence Retman; Goel, Rahul; Christou, George Alexander; Son, S F; Alley, M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study is to compare the effects of various materials obstructing the flow of a blast wave and the ability of the given material to reduce the damage caused by the blast. Several methods of energy transfer in blast wave flows are known or expected including: material interfaces with impedance mismatches, density changes in a given material, internal shearing, and particle fracture. The theory applied to this research is that the greatest energy transfer withi...

  1. Prediction of blast wave effects on a developed site

    OpenAIRE

    Benselama, Adel M.; William-Louis, Mame J.-P.; Monnoyer, François

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The guidelines for protecting against and mitigating explosion hazards require knowledge and either the experimental or theoretical evaluation of blast wave parameters. To this end, this article proposes a numerical method for simulating blast wave propagation in complex geometries. This method permits an on-the-ground TNT-like explosion and the subsequent blast wave to be simulated, with the possibility of modifying the ground topology by adding a number of obstacles. The...

  2. Electro- or Turbo-Driven?—Analysis of Different Blast Processes of Blast Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqiang Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There has always been a dispute about the energy efficiency and energy cost of electro-driven and turbo-driven blast furnace (BF blast processes. In order to find where the problem lies, energy efficiency analysis models and energy cost analysis models of electro-driven and turbo-driven blast processes were established, and the differences between the two driving processes in terms of theoretical minimum steam consumption, energy efficiency and energy cost were studied. The results showed that the theoretical minimum steam consumption of a blast process depends on steam thermodynamic properties and is unrelated to drive mode and drive process. A certain overlapped interval between electro-driven and turbo-driven blast processes in terms of energy efficiency exists. The equation for calculating the standard coal coefficient of steam was proposed, and the relationship to judge strengths and weaknesses of the two driving modes in terms of energy efficiency and energy cost was established. Finally, two companies were selected for case study research. The results led to different conclusions because of the differences between energy media in terms of standard coal coefficient and unit price. To select the best driving mode, plant-running conditions and energy prices of the region of operation in addition to other relevant factors should all be taken into account.

  3. Mitigation of blast loadings on structures by an anti-blast plastic water wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 陈力; 方秦; 张亚栋

    2016-01-01

    Seven in-situ tests were carried out in far field to study the blast mitigation effect of a kind of water filled plastic wall. Test results show that the mitigation effect of water filled plastic wall is remarkable. The maximum reduction of peak reflected overpressure reaches up to 94.53%, as well as 36.3% of the minimum peak reflected overpressure reduction in the scaled distance ranging from 1.71 m/kg1/3 to 3.42 m/kg1/3. Parametric studies were also carried out. The effects of the scaled gauge height, water/charge scaled distance (the distance between the explosive charge and the water wall), water wall scaled height and water/structure scaled distance (the distance between the water wall and the structure) were systematically investigated and compared with the usual rigid anti-blast wall. It is concluded that these parameters affect the mitigation effects of plastic water wall on blast loadings significantly, which is basically consistent to the trend of usual rigid anti-blast wall. Some formulae are also derived based on the numerical and test results, providing a simple but reliable prediction model to evaluate the peak overpressure of mitigated blast loadings on the structures.

  4. Behavior of blast wave in nuclear fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on some recent explosion accidents in nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the blast wave propagation in complex path and interactions between blast wave and complex media are ones of the important research topics of the safety. Then, in order to investigate the blast wave propagation in nuclear facility, optical experiment using the micro explosives and pressure measurements are conducted. And, numerical calculation is performed to compare with the experimental results. This paper describes how to conduct the experiments and results are summarized. Finally, behavior of blast wave in complex path will be discussed. (author)

  5. WU-Blast2 server at the European Bioinformatics Institute

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Rodrigo; Silventoinen, Ville; Robinson, Stephen; Kibria, Asif; Gish, Warren

    2003-01-01

    Since 1995, the WU-BLAST programs (http://blast.wustl.edu) have provided a fast, flexible and reliable method for similarity searching of biological sequence databases. The software is in use at many locales and web sites. The European Bioinformatics Institute's WU-Blast2 (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/blast2/) server has been providing free access to these search services since 1997 and today supports many features that both enhance the usability and expand on the scope of the software.

  6. On the Interaction and Coalescence if Spherical Blast Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max; Freeman, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    The scaling and similarity laws concerning the propagation of isolated spherical blast waves are briefly reviewed. Both point source explosions and high pressure gas explosions are considered. Test data on blast overpressure from the interaction and coalescence of spherical blast waves emanating from explosives in the form of shaped charges of different strength placed in the vicinity of a solid propellant stack are presented. These data are discussed with regard to the scaling laws concerning the decay of blast overpressure. The results point out the possibility of detecting source explosions from far-field pressure measurements.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is ...

  8. Managing iatrogenic tracheal injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Goonasekera C

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present three cases of iatrogenic tracheal injury. Two patients suffered acute tracheal injuries during anesthesia/surgery, one was managed surgically and the other conservatively. The third case is a delayed tracheal injury presenting as a fistula. The reasons for surgical vs conservative management of tracheal injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  9. Managing iatrogenic tracheal injuries

    OpenAIRE

    A. Goonasekera C; Esufali S

    2005-01-01

    We present three cases of iatrogenic tracheal injury. Two patients suffered acute tracheal injuries during anesthesia/surgery, one was managed surgically and the other conservatively. The third case is a delayed tracheal injury presenting as a fistula. The reasons for surgical vs conservative management of tracheal injuries and preventive measures are discussed.

  10. Patterns of work injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent Jacob; Rasmussen, Kurt;

    2014-01-01

    To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA).......To compare work injuries treated in an emergency department (ED) and injuries reported to the Danish Working Environment Authority (DWEA)....

  11. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI), is a leading cause of child maltreatment deaths in the United States. Meeting the ... Awareness Additional Prevention Resources Childhood Injuries Concussion in Children and Teens Injuries from Violence Injuries from Motor Vehicle Crashes Teen Driver Safety ...

  12. Prevention of Football Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Every sport has a unique profile of injury and risk of injury. In recent years, there have been numerous attempts at conducting injury prevention trials for specific injuries or for injuries within specific sports to provide evidence useful to the sports medicine and sport community. Football has been a focus of a number of randomized injury prevention trials. Methods MEDLINE was searched with the first order keywords of “injury prevention” and “sport”. This list was restricted to “cl...

  13. Rugby injury survey 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, G S; Stewart, I D

    1981-11-11

    In a prospective study 1085 rugby players and their injuries were recorded in the 1979 playing season. The age, grade, position, fitness and ground conditions did not affect the injury pattern. The majority of injuries were insignificant requiring no hospital follow up. The tackle accounted for 44 percent of all injuries. Set play does not contribute significantly to the number of injuries. The head and neck was the most frequently involved site, followed by the lower limbs. Foul play was implicated in 15 percent of all injuries. More stringent refereeing and coaching of the tackle could aid in reducing the number and severity of rugby injuries. PMID:6950267

  14. Thermodynamic modeling of lead blast furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Peng-fu

    2005-01-01

    A thermodynamic model was developed to predict the distribution behavior of Cu,Fe,S,O,Pb,Zn,As,and the heat balance in a lead blast furnace.The modeling results are validated by the plant data of a lead smelter in Kazakhstan.The model can be used to predict any set of controllable process parameters such as feed composition,smelting temperature,degree of oxygen enrichment and volume of oxygen-enriched air.The effects of the blast air,industrial oxygen,and coke charge on the distribution of Cu,Fe,S,O,Pb,Zn,As,the heat balance,and the lead loss in slag,were presented and discussed.

  15. A Phased Array Approach to Rock Blasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie Gertsch; Jason Baird

    2006-07-01

    A series of laboratory-scale simultaneous two-hole shots was performed in a rock simulant (mortar) to record the shock wave interference patterns produced in the material. The purpose of the project as a whole was to evaluate the usefulness of phased array techniques of blast design, using new high-precision delay technology. Despite high-speed photography, however, we were unable to detect the passage of the shock waves through the samples to determine how well they matched the expected interaction geometry. The follow-up mine-scale tests were therefore not conducted. Nevertheless, pattern analysis of the vectors that would be formed by positive interference of the shockwaves from multiple charges in an ideal continuous, homogeneous, isotropic medium indicate the potential for powerful control of blast design, given precise characterization of the target rock mass.

  16. Blast Dynamics in a Dissipative Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, M; Villamaina, D; Trizac, E

    2015-11-20

    The blast caused by an intense explosion has been extensively studied in conservative fluids, where the Taylor-von Neumann-Sedov hydrodynamic solution is a prototypical example of self-similarity driven by conservation laws. In dissipative media, however, energy conservation is violated, yet a distinctive self-similar solution appears. It hinges on the decoupling of random and coherent motion permitted by a broad class of dissipative mechanisms. This enforces a peculiar layered structure in the shock, for which we derive the full hydrodynamic solution, validated by a microscopic approach based on molecular dynamics simulations. We predict and evidence a succession of temporal regimes, as well as a long-time corrugation instability, also self-similar, which disrupts the blast boundary. These generic results may apply from astrophysical systems to granular gases, and invite further cross-fertilization between microscopic and hydrodynamic approaches of shock waves. PMID:26636851

  17. Blast Dynamics in a Dissipative Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, M.; Villamaina, D.; Trizac, E.

    2015-11-01

    The blast caused by an intense explosion has been extensively studied in conservative fluids, where the Taylor-von Neumann-Sedov hydrodynamic solution is a prototypical example of self-similarity driven by conservation laws. In dissipative media, however, energy conservation is violated, yet a distinctive self-similar solution appears. It hinges on the decoupling of random and coherent motion permitted by a broad class of dissipative mechanisms. This enforces a peculiar layered structure in the shock, for which we derive the full hydrodynamic solution, validated by a microscopic approach based on molecular dynamics simulations. We predict and evidence a succession of temporal regimes, as well as a long-time corrugation instability, also self-similar, which disrupts the blast boundary. These generic results may apply from astrophysical systems to granular gases, and invite further cross-fertilization between microscopic and hydrodynamic approaches of shock waves.

  18. Concerning isothermal self-similar blast waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-dimensional self-similar flow behind a blast wave from a line explosion in a medium whose density varies with distance as rsup(-ω) is investigated with the assumption that the flow is isothermal. If ω ω > 0, no critical points exist and a continuous solution passing through both the origin and the shock is shown to exist. If 16/9 = 2 no physically acceptable solution exists since the mass behind the shock is infinite. The dependence of the solutions which have zero flow velocity at the origin on the parameter ω is analytic for ω > 0 so that interpolation between neighboring values of ω is permitted. The stability of these isothermal blast waves is investigated to two-dimensional but non-self-similar perturbations. (Auth.)

  19. Injuries in professional footballers.

    OpenAIRE

    Muckle, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    The incidence of injuries in footballers is described. Nearly half of footballer's injuries involve the knee, with vertical tearing of the meniscus being common; surgical intervention may be required. Approximately one third of injuries involve the ankle, and will often require immobilisation. Other injuries include muscle damage, spondylosis of L4 or L5, concussion, and dislocations. The importance of prompt and correct treatment of injuries is emphasised.

  20. Injuries in orienteering.

    OpenAIRE

    Linde, F.

    1986-01-01

    In a one-year prospective study of 42 elite orienteers, 73 recent injuries (1.7 per runner per year) were found. Acute injuries totalled 52% and 48% were due to overuse. Ankle sprains made up 37% of acute injuries while the remaining were mainly contusions caused by falls or bumps against branches or rocks. Medial shin pain, Achilles peritendinitis, peroneal tenosynovitis and iliotibial band friction syndrome were the most frequent overuse injuries. All overuse injuries were located in the lo...

  1. Review: Managing posttraumatic stress disorder in combat veterans with comorbid traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Capehart, MD, MBA; Dale Bass, PhD

    2012-01-01

    Military deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq have been associated with elevated prevalence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI) among combat veterans. The diagnosis and management of PTSD when a comorbid TBI may also exist presents a challenge to interdisciplinary care teams at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and civilian medical facilities, particularly when the patient reports a history of blast exposure. Treatment recommendations from VA and Dep...

  2. Links between traumatic brain injury and ballistic pressure waves originating in the thoracic cavity and extremities

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Amy; Courtney, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Identifying patients at risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important because research suggests prophylactic treatments to reduce risk of long-term sequelae. Blast pressure waves can cause TBI without penetrating wounds or blunt force trauma. Similarly, bullet impacts distant from the brain can produce pressure waves sufficient to cause mild to moderate TBI. The fluid percussion model of TBI shows that pressure impulses of 15-30 psi cause mild to moderate TBI in laboratory animals. In pig...

  3. Centrifugal shot blasting. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), the Facilities Closure and Demolition Projects Integrated Remedial Design/Remedial Action (RD/RA) work plan calls for the removal of one inch (1 in) depth of concrete surface in areas where contamination with technetium-99 has been identified. This report describes a comparative demonstration between two concrete removal technologies: an innovative system using Centrifugal Shot Blasting (CSB) and a modified baseline technology called a rotary drum planer

  4. Spalling of concrete walls under blast load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common effect of the detonation of explosives in close proximity of concrete shield walls is the spalling (scabbing) of the back face of the wall. For explosions close-in to the wall, where the reflected blast wave pressures are sufficiently high, multiple spall layers are formed. Successive spall layers are of increasing thickness, at the same time the spall velocities decrease. For a given wall configuration and peak blast wave pressure the spall thickness scales directly with the cube root of the charge weight. The spall velocities on the other hand, which are proportional to the impulse trapped in the spall layer, vary only slightly with charge weight due to minor differences of shock attenuation in the wall. For a given charge weight, the spall thickness increases with stand-off distance from the wall and the spall velocity decreases. For fixed charge stand-off distance the spall thicknesses decrease as the charge weight is increased, at the same time spall velocities increase. This is caused by the steeper pressure decay associated with higher blast wave pressures. Fixing the charge parameters, spall thicknesses increase slightly as the wall thickness is increased. The opposite holds for the spalling velocities. As the angle of incidence for the blast wave increases the spall thicknesses increase also. Again the corresponding spall velocities decrease. Assuming elastic concrete behavior, no spalling will occur for angles of shock wave incidence greater than 450. A phase reversal of the reflection coefficient occurs at this point, thus the longitudinal wave reflected at the free surface becomes a compression wave

  5. Seismic effect of destress rock blasting

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koníček, Petr; Ptáček, Jiří; Przeczek, A.

    Vol. 4/2. Katowice: Glowny Instytut Górnictwa, 2009 - (Lipowcan, A.), s. 110-119. (Prace naukowe GIG. Górnictwo i Śródowisko). ISSN 1643-7608. [Górnicze zagrozenia naturalne 2009. And rzychów (PL), 03.11.2009-06.11.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30860518 Keywords : underground coal mining * rock burst * destress rock blasting Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining

  6. Dynamics of a spark produced blast wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expansion of a spark produced plasma was studied with a simple model and compared to experiments. The model and experiments were performed using a 11.2 nF capacitor bank charged up to 10kV corresponding to a total energy of 0.6 J. The nanosecond shadow pictures revealed detail structure of the shock waves, giving trajectory, speed and blast wave pressure ratios. Conversions of energy into motion and light wave were estimated

  7. Boundary-layer theory for blast waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. B.; Berger, S. A.; Kamel, M. M.; Korobeinikov, V. P.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    It is profitable to consider the blast wave as a flow field consisting of two regions: the outer, which retains the properties of the inviscid solution, and the inner, which is governed by flow equations including terms expressing the effects of heat transfer and, concomitantly, viscosity. The latter region thus plays the role of a boundary layer. Reported here is an analytical method developed for the study of such layers, based on the matched asymptotic expansion technique combined with patched solutions.

  8. Chest injuries associated with head injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfred Chukwuemeka Mezue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there have been significant advances in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. This paper analyses the contribution of chest injuries to the outcome of head injuries in the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH and the Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery (MHN in Enugu, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of the medical records, operative notes, and radiological findings of all patients admitted for head injury who had associated significant chest injuries in the MHN from 2002 to 2009 and the UNTH between 2007 and 2010. Patients with only head injury and other extracranial injury not affecting the chest were excluded. Patients who were inadequately investigated were also excluded. Results: Nineteen patients from the MHN and 11 patients from the UNTH were analyzed. Ages ranged from 9 to 65 years and the male:female ratio was 3:1. Injuries were most common between 30 and 50 years and road traffic accident accounted for 60%. Barotrauma from ventilation was documented in 2 patients. The commonest types of intrathoracic injuries are pneumothorax and hemothorax. Chest wall injuries are more common but carry less morbidity and mortality. Only 20% of patients presented within 48 hours of injury. Management of the associated chest trauma commenced in the referring hospitals only in 26.4% of the patients. All patients with hemo-pneumothorax had tube thoracostomy as did 96% of patients with pneumothorax. 10% of patients with haemothorax needed thoracotomy. Mortality is 43%, which is higher than for patients with only TBI with comparable Glasgow coma scale. Outcome is influenced by the time to admission and the GCS on admission. Conclusion: Associated chest injuries result in higher mortality from head injuries. This association is more likely in the young and more productive. All patients presenting with head and

  9. Studies on induction of blast-resistant mutation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutation frequency of blast resistance in rice and that of increased pathogenicity of blast fungi were examined, using the rice variety, Norin 8, which is susceptible to all races of blast fungi in Japan, and a fungus strain, Ina 168, which carries 6 virulent genes, respectively. Four different inoculation methods were employed for screening blast resistant mutants, i.e., spraying spore suspensions in growth chambers, in a greenhouse and in a field nursery, and injecting spore suspensions into newly developed tillers. The number of lesions and their types were used as the criteria of blast resistance. For screening the fungus mutants with increased pathogenicity, the spore suspensions of the fungi to be tested were sprayed on the seedlings of the blast resistant varieties, and when susceptible-type lesions were formed, single spores were isolated from these lesions, and the change in its pathogenicity was confirmed. When seeds were irradiated with gamma ray and treated with chemicals (EMS or EI), the frequency of the mutants with high resistance to blast was 5/4,575 and 4/5,851 respectively, in the M2 generation. The frequency of dominant blast resistant mutations following gamma-ray irradiation at the pre-embryo stage of growing plants was 3/60,101 in the M1 generation. When the spore suspensions of blast fungi were treated with X-ray, the frequency of the mutants with increased pathogenicity was about 0.5%. Thus, the mutants highly resistant against blast of rice induced by radiation or chemicals would eventually become susceptible varieties because blast fungus mutants occurred more frequently with increased pathogenicity. (Kaihara, S.)

  10. Air-Decking Technique in Bench Blasting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hong-bing; LU Wen-bo; WU Liang

    2006-01-01

    The mechanism and the design parameters of blasting with air-decking are studied. The theory of detonation waves is used to investigate the processes of the one-dimensional plane detonation wave within a borehole. The interaction of the rarefaction wave with an interface and reflection on a rigid wall is also analyzed. The same courses of the shock wave are also investigated. This decides the distribution of the pressure of the explosion products changing with time along the borehole. Based on the above theoretical analysis, two conditions should be met for a reasonable range of values of the air-decking ratio in blasting rock. First, the rarefaction wave from the contact interface between detonation products and air reaches the bottom earlier than that of the reflected shock wave from the end of the stemming. Second,the reflected shock wave reaches the contact interface between the detonation products and air earlier than that of the reflected rarefaction wave from the bottom of the borehole. Finally, the reasonable value of the air-decking ratio must be decided theoretically in air-decking blasting. For different explosives, the reasonable range of air-decking ratio varies from 0.15 to 0.4. This result is well consistent with what was obtained by previous researchers.

  11. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  12. D-BLAST OFDM with Channel Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Jianxuan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO systems formed by multiple transmit and receive antennas can improve performance and increase capacity of wireless communication systems. Diagonal Bell Laboratories Layered Space-Time (D-BLAST structure offers a low-complexity solution for realizing the attractive capacity of MIMO systems. However, for broadband wireless communications, channel is frequency-selective and orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM has to be used with MIMO techniques to reduce system complexity. In this paper, we investigate D-BLAST for MIMO-OFDM systems. We develop a layerwise channel estimation algorithm which is robust to channel variation by exploiting the characteristic of the D-BLAST structure. Further improvement is made by subspace tracking to considerably reduce the error floor. Simulation results show that the layerwise estimators require 1 dB less signal-to-noise ratio (SNR than the traditional blockwise estimator for a word error rate (WER of when Doppler frequency is 40 Hz. Among the layerwise estimators, the subspace-tracking estimator provides a 0.8 dB gain for WER with 200 Hz Doppler frequency compared with the DFT-based estimator.

  13. Self-similar Ultrarelativistic Jetted Blast Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshet, Uri; Kogan, Dani

    2015-12-01

    Following a suggestion that a directed relativistic explosion may have a universal intermediate asymptotic, we derive a self-similar solution for an ultrarelativistic jetted blast wave. The solution involves three distinct regions: an approximately paraboloid head where the Lorentz factor γ exceeds ˜ 1/2 of its maximal, nose value; a geometrically self-similar, expanding envelope slightly narrower than a paraboloid; and an axial core in which the (cylindrically, henceforth) radial flow {{u}} converges inward toward the axis. Most (˜80%) of the energy lies well beyond the leading, head region. Here, a radial cross section shows a maximal γ (separating the core and the envelope), a sign reversal in {{u}}, and a minimal γ, at respectively ˜1/6, ˜1/4, and ˜3/4 of the shock radius. The solution is apparently unique, and approximately agrees with previous simulations, of different initial conditions, that resolved the head. This suggests that unlike a spherical relativistic blast wave, our solution is an attractor, and may thus describe directed blast waves such as in the external shock phase of a γ-ray burst.

  14. Proceedings of the seventeenth annual conference on explosives and blasting technique. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers from this conference dealt with the following topics: surface and underground mine blasting, ground vibrations and blast effects, design for explosive fracturing of rock, sequential timing for blasting control, design for production optimization, use of blasting for abandoned mine reclamation, chemical explosives, lightning warning systems, magazine security, fire safety, and drilling equipment. Papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base

  15. 30 CFR 816.66 - Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings, and access control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.66 Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings, and access control. (a) Blasting signs. Blasting signs shall meet the specifications of § 816.11. The operator shall—...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of blasting circuits from power... NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a) Switches used to connect the power source to a blasting circuit shall...

  17. 30 CFR 817.66 - Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings, and access control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.66 Use of explosives: Blasting signs, warnings, and access control. (a) Blasting signs. Blasting signs shall meet the specifications of § 817.11. The operator...

  18. Development of ringed-blast-cutter and its application in decommission of nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic of blast-cut technique is presented, and the summary of the development and testing of ringed-blast-cutter is given. The application foreground of ringed-blast-cutter in decommissions of nuclear installation, and some researches for improving blast-cut technique in the future are also described

  19. 77 FR 58173 - Proposed Extension of Existing Information Collection; Explosive Materials and Blasting Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... Materials and Blasting Units (Pertains to Metal and Nonmetal Underground Mines Deemed To Be Gassy AGENCY... materials and blasting units as permissible for use in the mining industry. However, since there are no permissible explosives or blasting units available that have adequate blasting capacity for some metal...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6404 - Separation of blasting circuits from power source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of blasting circuits from power... MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6404 Separation of blasting circuits from power source. (a) Switches used to connect the power source to a blasting circuit shall be locked in the open position...

  1. 22 CFR 121.11 - Military demolition blocks and blasting caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Military demolition blocks and blasting caps... blasting caps. Military demolition blocks and blasting caps referred to in Category IV(a) do not include the following articles: (a) Electric squibs. (b) No. 6 and No. 8 blasting caps, including...

  2. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suita...

  3. Selection for blast-resistant mutants in irradiated rice populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newly released rice variety, Tongil, has many desirable agronomic characters and a particularly high resistance to blast disease. However, it may become susceptible in the future, since a resistant variety released for field planting often encounters the creation of new races of blast fungus. This study was undertaken to identify potential blast-resistant mutants from the population of the irradiated variety, Tongil, by inoculating these materials with induced mutant races of blast fungus which are likely to occur in the future. Blast conidia were irradiated with X-rays and the virulent mutants were identified according to their ability to infect Tongil. Seven blast-resistant mutant lines from the Pungkwang variety, selected through the uplands blast nursery test, were likewise outstanding in resistance in the field compared with the parent. Ten resistant lines from the variety Tongil, identified by artificial inoculation with the mutant race IA-67, were also selected. The results in the study of resistance inheritance showed that blast resistance was conditioned by a single dominant gene and the Tongil variety has three or more resistant genes. (author)

  4. Blast furnace lining and cooling technology: experiences at Corus IJmuiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokman, R.; van Stein Cellenfels, E.; van Laar, R.

    2004-11-01

    This article describes the blast furnace lining and cooling concept as originally developed and applied by Hoogovens (Corus IJmuiden). The technology has also been applied by Danieli Corus in all its blast furnace projects executed in the last 25 years. The technology has helped Corus increase its PCI rate to over 200 kg/thm. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Reduction Mechanism of Chromite Ore in Blast Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yi-wei; DING Wei-zhong; LU Xiong-gang; XU Kuang-di

    2004-01-01

    The structural changes and reduction degree of chromite ore in blast furnace were studied by optical micrograph analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). The smelting reduction mechanism of chromite in blast furnace was primarily discussed.

  6. Methodology of Testing Shot Blasting Machines in Industrial Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wrona

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Shot blasting machines are widely used for automated surface treatment and finishing of castings. In shot blasting processes the stream of shots is generated and shaped by blasting turbines, making up a kinetic and dynamic system comprising a separating rotor, an adapting sleeve and a propelling rotor provided with blades. The shot blasting performance- i.e. the quality of shot treated surfaces depends on the actual design and operational parameters of the unit whilst the values of relevant parameters are associated with the geometry of turbine components and the level of its integration with the separator system. The circulation of the blasting medium becomes the integrating factor of the process line, starting from the hopper, through the propeller turbine, casting treatment, separation of contaminated abrasive mixture, to its recycling and reuse.Inferior quality of the abrasive agent (shot and insufficient purity of the abrasive mixture are responsible for low effectiveness of shot blasting. However, most practitioners fail to fully recognise the importance of proper diagnostics of the shot blasting process in industrial conditions. The wearing of major machine components and of the blasting agent and quality of shot treated surfaces are often misinterpreted, hence the need to take into account all factors involved in the process within the frame of a comprehensive methodology.This paper is an attempt to formulate and apply the available testing methods to the engineering practice in industrial conditions.

  7. Structural Analysis Of Offshore Structures Exposed To Blast Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Jakup; Thygesen, Ulf; Kristensen, Anders;

    2002-01-01

    Numerical methods for simulations of blast loads and resulting structural response are investigated and compared to results obtained from tests. The CFD code EXSIM is used for the simulation of the blast load. This code provides a load profile wich is entered in the FEM analysis model....

  8. Self-similar solutions of laser produced blast waves

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, KPJ

    1996-01-01

    The aerodynamics of the blast wave produced by laser ablation is studied using the piston analogy. The unsteady one-dimensional gasdynamic equations governing the flow an solved under assumption of self-similarity. The solutions are utilized to obtain analytical expressions for the velocity, density, pressure and temperature distributions. The results predict. all the experimentally observed features of the laser produced blast waves.

  9. Wet blasting in conjunction with decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -crystallization and through ion exchange. It may also be integrated into the oxide by filling vacancies present in the oxide. Activity is lower on cold system surfaces than on the hot surfaces because of the slower corrosion rate. The oxide layer is not as thick as on the hot system surfaces and the contamination has looser bonds to the oxide surface which makes it easier to decontaminate. One effective method to decontaminate components is wet blasting with glass beads or alumina oxide for a more effective peeling i.e., when decommissioning. When compared with the other main options available, high pressure cleaning, electro polishing and chemical bating, wet blasting provides comparable or better decontamination factors leaving a derived waste easier to handle and store. Wet blasting is compared to other methods a fast way to decontaminate components. When wet blasting the beads are surrounded with a film of water, so at the moment of impact against the components works like a pressure-absorbing cushion. This prevents the beads from being in direct contact with the metal surface. The oxides on the metal surface blows away by the pressure shock by the water-cushions around the beads. And in the aspect when it's time to decommission a plant where a huge systematic operation is needed, safety is important i.e. time exposed to active components. Wet blasting providing outer operator's position with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment results in a lesser dose taken by the operator. As mentioned oxides on cold system parts is easier to strip with wet blasting, while on hot system parts it's tougher and it could be profitable to first put the decontaminated parts in a electrolyte bath with i.e. Sodium sulfate solution (5% Na2SO4), to crack the oxide layer to easier remove it with wet blasting afterwards. Possible savings through wet blasting if equipment is used systematically in order to ensure that goods being sent for melting have an

  10. Numerical Calculation of Concrete Slab Response to Blast Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaoqing; HAO Hong; KUZNETSOV Valerian A; WASCHL John

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper,a dynamic plastic damage model for concrete has been employed to estimate responses of a reinforced concrete slab subjected to blast loading.The interaction between the blast wave and the concrete slab is considered in 3D simulation.In the first stage,the initial detonation and blast wave propagation is modelled in 2D simulation before the blast wave reaches the concrete slab,then the results obtained from 2D calculation are remapped to a 3D model.The calculated blast load is compared with that obtained from TM5-1300.Numerical results of the concrete slab response are compared with the explosive test carried out in the Weapons System Division,Defence Science and Technology Organisation,Department of Defence,Australia.

  11. SURFACE PREPARATION OF STEEL SUBSTRATES USING GRIT-BLASTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen; D. J. Varacalle, Jr.; D. Deason; W. Rhodaberger; E. Sampson

    2005-05-01

    The primary purpose of grit blasting for thermal spray applications is to ensure a strong mechanical bond between the substrate and the coating by the enhanced roughening of the substrate material. This study presents statistically designed experiments that were accomplished to investigate the effect of abrasives on roughness for A36/1020 steel. The experiments were conducted using a Box statistical design of experiment (SDE) approach. Three grit blasting parameters and their effect on the resultant substrate roughness were investigated. These include blast media, blast pressure, and working distance. The substrates were characterized for roughness using surface profilometry. These attributes were correlated with the changes in operating parameters. Twin-Wire Electric Arc (TWEA) coatings of aluminum and zinc/aluminum were deposited on the grit-blasted substrates. These coatings were then tested for bond strength. Bond strength studies were conducted utilizing a portable adhesion tester following ASTM standard D4541.

  12. Fracture analysis for controlled blasting demolition of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toward establishing a design method for controlled blasting demolition used for the designed dismantling of large reinforced concrete (RC) structures, this study is intended to prove the overall suitability and efficiency of this method. The previous paper (Controlled Blasting for Demolition of Biological Shield Concrete Wall: Part 2) described an application of controlled blasting demolition to an inner part of the radioactive RC biological shield in the JPDR (Japan Power Demonstration Reactor). Through this experience, it was confirmed that the partial demolition of the structure was carried out safely and rationally using this method. In order to clarify the characteristics of blasting effect, an RC cylinder blasting test was performed and the results of this test were compared with analytical simulation of this test using the discrete element method (DEM) and the finite element method (FEM). This paper outlines the test, the analyses and the comparison. (author)

  13. Remote operated vehicle with carbon dioxide blasting (ROVCO2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Operated Vehicle with Carbon Dioxide Blasting (ROVCO2), as shown in a front view is a six-wheeled remote land vehicle used to decontaminate concrete floors. The remote vehicle has a high pressure Cryogenesis blasting subsystem, Oceaneering Technologies (OTECH) developed a CO2 xY Orthogonal Translational End Effector (COYOTEE) subsystem, and a vacuum/filtration and containment subsystem. The cryogenesis subsystem performs the actual decontamination work and consists of the dry ice supply unit, the blasting nozzle, the remotely controlled electric and pneumatic valves, and the vacuum work-head. The COYOTEE subsystem positions the blasting work-head within a planar work space and the vacuum subsystem provides filtration and containment of the debris generated by the CO2 blasting. It employs a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration unit to separate contaminants for disposal. All of the above systems are attached to the vehicle subsystem via the support structure

  14. Influence of maximum decking charge on intensity of blasting vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on the character of short-time non-stationary random signal, the relationship between the maximum decking charge and energy distribution of blasting vibration signals was investigated by means of the wavelet packet method. Firstly, the characteristics of wavelet transform and wavelet packet analysis were described. Secondly, the blasting vibration signals were analyzed by wavelet packet based on software MATLAB, and the change of energy distribution curve at different frequency bands were obtained. Finally, the law of energy distribution of blasting vibration signals changing with the maximum decking charge was analyzed. The results show that with the increase of decking charge, the ratio of the energy of high frequency to total energy decreases, the dominant frequency bands of blasting vibration signals tend towards low frequency and blasting vibration does not depend on the maximum decking charge.

  15. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  16. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  17. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  18. Neuropathophysiology of Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillinan, Nidia; Herson, Paco S; Traystman, Richard J

    2016-09-01

    Every year in the United States, millions of individuals incur ischemic brain injury from stroke, cardiac arrest, or traumatic brain injury. These acquired brain injuries can lead to death or long-term neurologic and neuropsychological impairments. The mechanisms of ischemic and traumatic brain injury that lead to these deficiencies result from a complex interplay of interdependent molecular pathways, including excitotoxicity, acidotoxicity, ionic imbalance, oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis. This article reviews several mechanisms of brain injury and discusses recent developments. Although much is known from animal models of injury, it has been difficult to translate these effects to humans. PMID:27521191

  19. Lisfranc Joint Injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lisa Chinn

    2009-01-01

    @@ The ankle and foot are the most common sites for athletic injuries.[1]Midfoot,or Lisfranc,injuries are the second most common foot injury and have a high in cidence in particular sports.They account for 4% of all football injuries per year,occurring frequently in linemen.[2]They are also common in equestrians,surfers,and windsurfers.[2]Lisfranc injuries are often misdiagnosed and if not treated properly can have lingering symptoms.It is estimated that Lisfranc joint injuries occur in 1 in every 55,000 persons every year.[3,4

  20. Structural and biochemical abnormalities in the absence of acute deficits in mild primary blast-induced head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Michael K; Race, Nicholas; Zheng, Lingxing; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha M; Acosta, Glen; Park, Jonghyuck; Shi, Riyi

    2016-03-01

    OBJECT Blast-induced neurotrauma (BINT), if not fatal, is nonetheless potentially crippling. It can produce a wide array of acute symptoms in moderate-to-severe exposures, but mild BINT (mBINT) is characterized by the distinct absence of acute clinical abnormalities. The lack of observable indications for mBINT is particularly alarming, as these injuries have been linked to severe long-term psychiatric and degenerative neurological dysfunction. Although the long-term sequelae of BINT are extensively documented, the underlying mechanisms of injury remain poorly understood, impeding the development of diagnostic and treatment strategies. The primary goal of this research was to recapitulate primary mBINT in rodents in order to facilitate well-controlled, long-term investigations of blast-induced pathological neurological sequelae and identify potential mechanisms by which ongoing damage may occur postinjury. METHODS A validated, open-ended shock tube model was used to deliver blast overpressure (150 kPa) to anesthetized rats with body shielding and head fixation, simulating the protective effects of military-grade body armor and isolating a shock wave injury from confounding systemic injury responses, head acceleration, and other elements of explosive events. Evans Blue-labeled albumin was used to visualize blood-brain barrier (BBB) compromise at 4 hours postinjury. Iba1 staining was used to visualize activated microglia and infiltrating macrophages in areas of peak BBB compromise. Acrolein, a potent posttraumatic neurotoxin, was quantified in brain tissue by immunoblotting and in urine through liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry at 1, 2, 3, and 5 days postinjury. Locomotor behavior, motor performance, and short-term memory were assessed with open field, rotarod, and novel object recognition (NOR) paradigms at 24 and 48 hours after the blast. RESULTS Average speed, maximum speed, and distance traveled in an open-field exploration paradigm did not show

  1. The analysis of ground vibrations induced by bench blasting at Akyol quarry and practical blasting charts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Umit; Kahriman, Ali; Aksoy, Mehmet; Adiguzel, Deniz; Karadogan, Abdulkadir

    2008-04-01

    Ground vibrations arising from excavation with blasting is one of the fundamental problems in the mining industry. Therefore, the prediction of ground vibration components plays an important role in the minimization of environmental complaints. In this study, 582 events were recorded during limestone production at a quarry (Akyol Quarry) during a period of time. The blasting parameters of these shots were also carefully recorded. During the statistical analysis of the collected data, three predictor equations proposed by the United States Bureau of Mines (USBM), Ambraseys Hendron and Langefors Kihlstrom were used to establish a relationship between peak particle velocity and scaled distance described by these prediction equations. As a result of this analysis, the most powerful relationship was determined and proposed to be used in this site. And also, this equation was used in the derivation of the practical blasting charts specific to this site as a practical way of predicting the peak particle velocity and maximum charge amount per delay for future blasting.

  2. Laser ablation of human atherosclerotic plaque without adjacent tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundfest, W. S.; Litvack, F.; Forrester, J. S.; Goldenberg, T.; Swan, H. J. C.

    1985-01-01

    Seventy samples of human cadaver atherosclerotic aorta were irradiated in vitro using a 308 nm xenon chloride excimer laser. Energy per pulse, pulse duration and frequency were varied. For comparison, 60 segments were also irradiated with an argon ion and an Nd:YAG laser operated in the continuous mode. Tissue was fixed in formalin, sectioned and examined microscopically. The Nd:YAG and argon ion-irradiated tissue exhibited a central crater with irregular edges and concentric zones of thermal and blast injury. In contrast, the excimer laser-irradiated tissue had narrow deep incisions with minimal or no thermal injury. These preliminary experiments indicate that the excimer laser vaporizes tissue in a manner different from that of the continuous wave Nd:YAG or argon ion laser. The sharp incision margins and minimal damage to adjacent normal tissue suggest that the excimer laser is more desirable for general surgical and intravascular uses than are the conventionally used medical lasers.

  3. Evaluation of orientation and environmental factors on the blast hazards to bomb suit wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, James T; Clutter, J Keith

    2007-09-01

    This paper discusses the use of 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software for simulation of explosive detonations against the wearer of a typical bomb suit. The focus is to demonstrate the utility of the model to assess the differential overpressure loads on the various bomb suit components protecting critical body parts. Since overpressures can vary significantly depending on the position and orientation of the wearer, simulations are performed for a range of orientations including kneeling and standing at common standoff distances. Overpressure loads on the head, neck, and torso regions are predicted for each orientation, capturing ground and other surface reflections that can enhance effects of the blast. This is not normally observed during tests of individual bomb suit components. Direct correlations between the suit orientation and environmental factors to load enhancements are documented, and an effort to address probable injury is made. PMID:17078920

  4. Quantitative trait locus analysis of resistance to panicle blast in the rice cultivar Miyazakimochi

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Takeaki; Hayano-Saito, Yuriko; Oide, Shinichi; Ebana, Kaworu; La, Nghia Tuan; Hayashi, Keiko; Ashizawa, Taketo; Suzuki, Fumihiko; Koizumi, Shinzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Rice blast is a destructive disease caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, and it has a large impact on rice production worldwide. Compared with leaf blast resistance, our understanding of panicle blast resistance is limited, with only one panicle blast resistance gene, Pb1, isolated so far. The japonica cultivar Miyazakimochi shows resistance to panicle blast, yet the genetic components accounting for this resistance remain to be determined. Results In this study, we evaluated the panicle ...

  5. Control of City Shallow Buried Tunnel Blasting Hazard to Surface Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Deqiang; Chi Enan; Ji Yucheng; Liu Jia; Wang Xuguang; Zhao Mingsheng; Tao Tiejun; Wang Yang

    2015-01-01

    Combining with the blasting test of an under-construction tunnel, this paper optimizes the overall blasting construction scheme. The optimized blasting scheme is used in the site construction test and the peak particle vibration velocity is strictly controlled under working conditions through blasting vibration monitoring to ensure the safety of surrounding buildings and structures in the construction process. The corresponding control measures are proposed to reduce the blasting vibration wh...

  6. Review of Methods for Calculating Pressure Profiles of Explosive Air Blast and its Sample Application

    OpenAIRE

    Chock, Jeffrey Mun Kong

    1999-01-01

    Blast profiles and two primary methods of determining them were reviewed for use in the creation of a computer program for calculating blast pressures which serves as a design tool to aid engineers or analysts in the study of structures subjected to explosive air blast. These methods were integrated into a computer program, BLAST.F, to generate air blast pressure profiles by one of these two differing methods. These two methods were compared after the creation of the program and can conserv...

  7. Teknologi Pembuatan Material Shot Blast untuk Mendukung Industri Pengecoran Logam Nasional

    OpenAIRE

    Fajar Nurjaman

    2009-01-01

    Shot blast material is a supporting material in foundry which is used at surface finishing process of metal casting. Recently, there is no one of national industry that produce shot blast material, in consequence, the purpose of this research is to lessen the dependence of using shot blast material import by making a shot blast material which improve its hardness exceed the shot blast material import. This research use the raw material from scrap iron with the following composition: C (3.2%),...

  8. Control of City Shallow Buried Tunnel Blasting Hazard to Surface Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Deqiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining with the blasting test of an under-construction tunnel, this paper optimizes the overall blasting construction scheme. The optimized blasting scheme is used in the site construction test and the peak particle vibration velocity is strictly controlled under working conditions through blasting vibration monitoring to ensure the safety of surrounding buildings and structures in the construction process. The corresponding control measures are proposed to reduce the blasting vibration which brings certain guiding significance to the following construction project.

  9. Wireless Intracranial Pressure Sensors for the Assessment of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xu

    A significant cause of death and long term disability due to head injuries and pathological conditions is an elevation in the intracranial pressure (ICP). ICP measurements before and after the injury in a completely closed-head environment have significant research value, particularly during the acute post-injury period. With the current technology, a tethered fiber optic probe penetrates the brain, and therefore can only remain implanted for relatively short time periods. The goal of this research was to evaluate the dynamic performances of both AICP (previously designed) and digital ICP (DICP) (newly designed) devices in different traumatic brain injury (TBI) models: a swine model of closed-head rotational injury and a rat model of closed-head single and repetitive blast injury. The uniqueness of this work is accentuated by the first time in-vivo studies of dynamic ICP changes using custom-built ICP sensors implanted in two different TBI models. Following implant, baseline ICP readings were relatively stable prior to injury and closed-head rotation TBI induced a rapid and extreme ICP spike occurring directly upon injury. The acute elevation in ICP generally lasted for 40-60 minutes, followed by a gradual decline to a persistently maintained elevated level over several hours post-injury. The AICP devices were redesigned for the study of ICP variation in a rat model of single and repetitive blast induced TBI (bTBI) for seven days and the results revealed the ICP changes in a week under different blast overpressure (BOP) exposure conditions with respect to the peak pressure and the numbers of occurrences of BOP. In addition, a novel TBI in-vitro model was proposed to induce a BOP similar to that in the one measured in the animal's head generated by shock tube for the study of immediate neuron response to BOP in a small Petri dish. This research highlights the utility of wireless ICP devices as a tool to diagnose and track long-term ICP changes following TBI in a

  10. Key Injury and Violence Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Traumatic Brain Injury Violence Prevention Key Injury and Violence Data Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Injuries ... of death among persons 1-44. Injury- and violence-related deaths are only part of the problem ...

  11. Craniocerebral injuries in war against terrorism a contemporary series from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Muhammad Umair

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Terrorism-related bomb at-tacks on civilian population have increased dramatically over the last decade. Craniocerebral injuries secondary to impro-vised explosive devices have not been widely reported in the context of unarmored civilians. This series intends to report the spectrum of these injuries secondary to suicidal and implanted bombs as encountered at the Aga Khan Uni-versity Hospital, Pakistan (AKUH. Further, a few pertinent management guidelines have also been discussed. Methods: The hospital database and clinical coding during a 5-year period were examined for head injuries se-condary to terrorism-associated blasts. In addition to pa-tient demographics, data analysis for our series included initial Glasgow Coma Scale, presenting neurological complaints, associated non-neurological injuries, manage-ment (conservative or operative to associated complications, and discharge neurological status. Results: A total of 16 patients were included in this series. Among them 9 were victims of suicidal blasts while 7 were exposed to implanted devices. The patients presented with diverse patterns of injury secondary to a variety of shrapnel. A follow-up record was available for 12 of the 16 patients (mean follow-up: 7.8 months, with most patients having no active complaints. Conclusion: The results of this series show that civi-lian victims of suicidal and improvised bombings present with a wide range of neurological symptoms and injury patterns, which often differ from the neurological injuries incurred by military personnel in similar situations, and thereby often require individualized care. Key words: Brain injuries; Craniocerebral trauma; Decompressive craniectomy

  12. Untangling the Effect of Head Acceleration on Brain Responses to Blast Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Haojie; Unnikrishnan, Ginu; Rakesh, Vineet; Reifman, Jaques

    2015-12-01

    Multiple injury-causing mechanisms, such as wave propagation, skull flexure, cavitation, and head acceleration, have been proposed to explain blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). An accurate, quantitative description of the individual contribution of each of these mechanisms may be necessary to develop preventive strategies against bTBI. However, to date, despite numerous experimental and computational studies of bTBI, this question remains elusive. In this study, using a two-dimensional (2D) rat head model, we quantified the contribution of head acceleration to the biomechanical response of brain tissues when exposed to blast waves in a shock tube. We compared brain pressure at the coup, middle, and contre-coup regions between a 2D rat head model capable of simulating all mechanisms (i.e., the all-effects model) and an acceleration-only model. From our simulations, we determined that head acceleration contributed 36-45% of the maximum brain pressure at the coup region, had a negligible effect on the pressure at the middle region, and was responsible for the low pressure at the contre-coup region. Our findings also demonstrate that the current practice of measuring rat brain pressures close to the center of the brain would record only two-thirds of the maximum pressure observed at the coup region. Therefore, to accurately capture the effects of acceleration in experiments, we recommend placing a pressure sensor near the coup region, especially when investigating the acceleration mechanism using different experimental setups. PMID:26458125

  13. Teeth Injuries (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Teeth Injuries KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Teeth Injuries ... or young child injures the gums or baby teeth: Apply pressure to the area (if it's bleeding) ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? What is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? ...

  15. Overview of Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children are admitted to the hospital for these reasons or if they were unconscious even briefly or had a seizure. Children are also admitted to the hospital if child abuse is suspected. Severe head injury If the injury ...

  16. What Are Sports Injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 06:02 Size: 11.7 MB November 2014 What Are Sports Injuries? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Research Is Being Done on Treating Sports Injuries? What’s the Difference Between an Acute and a Chronic ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Patient Partnerships How Social Workers Help Transitions How Social Workers Help Transitions Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury Occupational Therapy After Spinal Cord Injury How Occupational Therapists Work How Occupational Therapists Work Occupational Therapy Enables Daily ...

  18. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. These injuries can affect the entire leg, or just the foot, ankle, knee, or hip. Certain diseases also lead to leg ...

  19. Injuries in classical ballet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, R

    1984-11-01

    The specialised medical knowledge about dancers' injuries is negligible compared with that which surrounds sports medicine. The author discusses his experience in the management of more than 2000 injuries sustained by dancers of classical ballet. PMID:6151832

  20. Head injury - first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000028.htm Head injury - first aid To use the sharing features on this page, ... a concussion can range from mild to severe. First Aid Learning to recognize a serious head injury and ...

  1. Impact and Blast Resistance of Sandwich Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, George J.; Bahei-El-Din, Yehia A.; Suvorov, Alexander P.

    Response of conventional and modified sandwich plate designs is examined under static load, impact by a rigid cylindrical or flat indenter, and during and after an exponential pressure impulse lasting for 0.05 ms, at peak pressure of 100 MPa, simulating a nearby explosion. The conventional sandwich design consists of thin outer (loaded side) and inner facesheets made of carbon/epoxy fibrous laminates, separated by a thick layer of structural foam core. In the three modified designs, one or two thin ductile interlayers are inserted between the outer facesheet and the foam core. Materials selected for the interlayers are a hyperelas-tic rate-independent polyurethane;a compression strain and strain rate dependent, elastic-plastic polyurea;and an elastomeric foam. ABAQUS and LS-Dyna software were used in various response simulations. Performance comparisons between the enhanced and conventional designs show that the modified designs provide much better protection against different damage modes under both load regimes. After impact, local facesheet deflection, core compression, and energy release rate of delamination cracks, which may extend on hidden interfaces between facesheet and core, are all reduced. Under blast or impulse loads, reductions have been observed in the extent of core crushing, facesheet delaminations and vibration amplitudes, and in overall deflections. Similar reductions were found in the kinetic energy and in the stored and dissipated strain energy. Although strain rates as high as 10-4/s1 are produced by the blast pressure, peak strains in the interlayers were too low to raise the flow stress in the polyurea to that in the polyurethane, where a possible rate-dependent response was neglected. Therefore, stiff polyurethane or hard rubber interlayers materials should be used for protection of sandwich plate foam cores against both impact and blast-induced damage.

  2. Gas cloud explosions and resulting blast effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of nuclear power plant structures to resist blast effects due to chemical explosions requires the determination of load-time functions of possible blast waves. Whether the explosion of a hydrocarbon gas in the atmosphere will occur in the form of a deflagration or a detonation is largely depending on the type of the flame acceleration process which is closely related to the rate of energy release. Flame propagations at normal flame velocities in a free explosible gas cloud will certainly not lead to a detonation. With sufficiently large clouds, however, the flame acceleration could become so high that an initial deflagration changes into a detonative process. Results of recent investigations, which will be discussed in detail, show that in a free cloud with deflagrative ignition (flame, heated wire, sparks) the occurrence of a gas detonation can practically be excluded. Apparently, free gas clouds can only be induced to detonate by a sufficiently strong detonative initiation. Independently from the initiating event (deflagration, detonation) in the practice of damage analysis it has become customary to describe the consequences of an explosion event by means of the so-called TNT-equivalent. Therefore, it is attempted to specify this equivalent for hydrocarbons by means of energetic considerations including the propagation functions for the case of spherically symmetric detonations. In correspondence with U.S. recommendations it follows that with regard to the effects, 1 kg of hydrocarbon could be equated to about 1 kg TNT. In analogous manner to the safety distances required in the handling and storage of high-explosives a mass-distance relation of the form R = k x Lsup(1/3) could be considered, where L is the mass of spontaneously released hydrocarbon and k varies only with the structural shape of the blast loaded buildings. (orig./HP)

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord ... Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury How Family Life ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Coping with a New Injury Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Substance Abuse and Spinal ... is designed to provide Internet-based information and support for people with spinal cord injuries and the ...

  5. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury How does the spinal cord work? What is a spinal cord injury? Why is the level of a spinal cord ... stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell ...

  7. Assessment of Ankle Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Nicholas; Cooper, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    School nurses are faced with the challenge of identifying and treating ankle injuries in the school setting. There is little information guiding the assessment and treatment of these children when an injury occurs. It is essential for school nurses to understand ankle anatomy, pathophysiology of the acute ankle injury, general and orthopedic…

  8. "Floating shoulder" injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Kenneth

    2016-12-01

    "Floating shoulder" is a rare injury complex resulting from high-energy blunt force trauma to the shoulder, resulting in scapulothoracic dissociation. It is commonly associated with catastrophic neurovascular injury. Two cases of motorcyclists with floating shoulder injuries are described. PMID:26961729

  9. NASA TEERM Project: Corn Based Blast Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    Coatings removal is a necessary part of the maintenance, repair, and overhaul activities at many NASA centers and contractor support sites. Sensitive substrates, such as composites and thin aluminum alloys require special handling such as the use of chemical stripping, pneumatic hand sanding, or softer blast media. Type V, acrylic based PMB is commonly used to de-coat, strip, or de-paint the delicate substrates of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) currently used in support of the Shuttle and slated to be used in support of CxP.

  10. Carbon Tubular Morphologies in Blast Furnace Coke

    OpenAIRE

    Stanislav S. Gornostayev; Jouko J. Härkki

    2008-01-01

    The paper reports on the first occurrence of microscale carbon tubular morphologies (CMTs) in a blast furnace (BF) coke. The CMTs were probably formed as a result of the conversion of solid disordered carbon via liquid phase metal particles involving a gas phase containing a substantial amount of N 2 and O 2 . The presence of CMTs may lie behind the generation of the smallest fraction of fines in BF exhaust dust. If the amount of CMTs present in the BF exhausts gases at any particular metallu...

  11. Carbon Tubular Morphologies in Blast Furnace Coke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav S. Gornostayev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on the first occurrence of microscale carbon tubular morphologies (CMTs in a blast furnace (BF coke. The CMTs were probably formed as a result of the conversion of solid disordered carbon via liquid phase metal particles involving a gas phase containing a substantial amount of N2 and O2. The presence of CMTs may lie behind the generation of the smallest fraction of fines in BF exhaust dust. If the amount of CMTs present in the BF exhausts gases at any particular metallurgical site proves to be substantial, it could become a subject of environmental concern.

  12. Aluminum structures exposed to blast loading

    OpenAIRE

    Hustad, Tore Andre; Lindland, Andreas Lyngtveit

    2014-01-01

    Design of blast resistance in structures is an important aspect in modern society. Plated structures are used in a lot of constructions that can be especially vulnerable to explosions. This includes e.g. protective, offshore or automotive structures. The main objective in this study was to investigate the response of thin plates made of the aluminum alloy 1050A-H14, as well as to evaluate the available computational methods.Material tensile tests were performed in order to determine a materia...

  13. Significance of blast wave studies to propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheim, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    Brief survey of experimental methods currently used for the study of blast wave phenomena with emphasis on high rate exothermic processes. The experimental techniques have used such devices as divergent test sections in shock or detonation tubes, employment of proper test gases, as in marginal detonations, and a variety of explosion systems from finite source explosion apparatus to devices where virtually point explosions are obtained by local breakdown initiated by means of focused laser irradiation. Other methods used are detonation tubes where pressure waves are generated by accelerating flames or by exothermic reactions developed behind reflected shocks, as well as a variety of converging shock and implosion vessels.

  14. Blast-wave snapshots from RHIC

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasik, Boris

    2003-01-01

    I present fits with the so-called blast-wave model to single-particle spectra and HBT correlations from Au+Au collisions at a CMS energy of 130 AGeV. There is only little choice of freeze-out temperature and transverse flow velocity for which the model fits both the identified spectra and the correlation radii just well enough not to be excluded. The observed steep M_t dependence of R_side leads to a temperature which it is problematic to interpret. The applicability of the model for the free...

  15. Cosmic Ray Origins in Supernova Blast Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, A R

    2014-01-01

    We extend the self-similar solution derived by Chevalier for a Sedov blast wave accelerating cosmic rays (CR) to show that the Galactic CR population can be divided into: (A) CR with energies above ~200GeV released upstream during CR acceleration by supernova remnants (SNR), (B) CR advected into the interior of the SNR during expansion and then released from the SNR at the end of its life to provide the Galactic CR component below ~200GeV. The intersection between the two populations may correspond to a measured change in the Galactic CR spectral index at this energy.

  16. Non-equilibrium ionized blast wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a cylindrical blast wave with ionization at non-LTE conditions was calculated using equations previously developed by Wu and Fu (1970). The degree of ionization was predicted by a modified Saha equation. Temperature profiles show that the temperature at non-LTE conditions is lower than at LTE near the shock front. This corresponds to a higher degree of ionization for the non-LTE limit, which indicates that the neutral gas absorption is much more efficient at non-LTE than at the LTE limit. The decaying velocity under non-LTE is approximately 15% less than under LTE.

  17. Safety of engineered structures against blast vibrations: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Tripathy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Blasting used for rock excavation is associated with ground vibrations having potential damage to surrounding structures. The extent of damage produced in a structure depends largely on ground motion characteristics, dynamic characteristics of structure and the type of geological strata on which it is founded. The safety of surrounding structures against blast vibrations is a cause of concern. However, use of a systematic approach to rock blasting helps to complete the excavation safely in time without endangering the safety of surrounding structures. Various steps are commonly adopted at construction sites to ensure safety of engineered structures against blast vibrations, e.g. adopting a suitable safe vibration level, developing site-specific attenuation relation, estimating safe charges for different distances, designing blasting pattern, and monitoring vibrations during actual blasting. The paper describes the details of studies conducted for ensuring safety of an 85 years old masonry dam and green concrete of varying ages during excavation of about 30,000 m3 of hard rock in Maharashtra, India. The studies helped to complete the rock excavation safely in time and the safety of the dam was ensured by monitoring blast vibrations during actual rock excavation.

  18. Explosively driven air blast in a conical shock tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Explosively driven shock tubes present challenges in terms of safety concerns and expensive upkeep of test facilities but provide more realistic approximations to the air blast resulting from free-field detonations than those provided by gas-driven shock tubes. Likewise, the geometry of conical shock tubes can naturally approximate a sector cut from a spherically symmetric blast, leading to a better agreement with the blast profiles of free-field detonations when compared to those provided by shock tubes employing constant cross sections. The work presented in this article documents the design, fabrication, and testing of an explosively driven conical shock tube whose goal was to closely replicate the blast profile seen from a larger, free-field detonation. By constraining the blast through a finite area, large blasts (which can add significant damage and safety constraints) can be simulated using smaller explosive charges. The experimental data presented herein show that a close approximation to the free-field air blast profile due to a 1.5 lb charge of C4 at 76 in. can be achieved by using a 0.032 lb charge in a 76-in.-long conical shock tube (which translates to an amplification factor of nearly 50). Modeling and simulation tools were used extensively in designing this shock tube to minimize expensive fabrication costs

  19. Evaluation of blast-induced vibration effects on structures 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Rim; Jeon, Gyu Shick; Lee, Dae Soo; Joo, Kwang Ho; Lee, Woong Keon [Korea Electrotechnology Research Inst., Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chang Ha; Chung, So Keul; Lee, Kyung Won; Shin, Hee Soon; Chun, Sun Woo; Park, Yeon Jun; Synn, Joong Ho; Choi, Byung Hee [Korea Inst. of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Due to the difficulties of obtaining construction site for new plants, following ones are inevitably being built in the site adjacent to existing power plants. Therefore considerable thought has been recently given to the dynamic loading generated by blasting works near the plants to maintain the safety of structures and facilities in power plants. Our own standard for safety level of blast vibration is not prepared yet, and foreign standards have been generally employed without theoretical and experimental verification. Safety-related structures of power plants and facilities have to be protected against the effects of possible hazards due to blast vibration. Earthquakes have been considered a major dynamic design loading as a requirement of plant design, but the effects of blast-induced vibration are not. In order to ensure the safety, rational safe criterion should be established and blast design should be satisfy it, which requires the development of a model for prediction of vibration level through more systematic measurement and analysis. The main objectives of the study are : to provide background data for establishing the rational safe vibration limits, to develop models for prediction of blast vibration level, to establish safe blast design criterion, and to accumulate techniques for field measurements, data acquisition and analysis (author). 80 refs., 347 figs.

  20. Compressive strength after blast of sandwich composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, H; Kelly, M; Worley, A; Del Linz, P; Fergusson, A; Hooper, P A; Dear, J P

    2014-05-13

    Composite sandwich materials have yet to be widely adopted in the construction of naval vessels despite their excellent strength-to-weight ratio and low radar return. One barrier to their wider use is our limited understanding of their performance when subjected to air blast. This paper focuses on this problem and specifically the strength remaining after damage caused during an explosion. Carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite skins on a styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) polymer closed-cell foam core are the primary composite system evaluated. Glass-fibre-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite skins were also included for comparison in a comparable sandwich configuration. Full-scale blast experiments were conducted, where 1.6×1.3 m sized panels were subjected to blast of a Hopkinson-Cranz scaled distance of 3.02 m kg(-1/3), 100 kg TNT equivalent at a stand-off distance of 14 m. This explosive blast represents a surface blast threat, where the shockwave propagates in air towards the naval vessel. Hopkinson was the first to investigate the characteristics of this explosive air-blast pulse (Hopkinson 1948 Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 89, 411-413 (doi:10.1098/rspa.1914.0008)). Further analysis is provided on the performance of the CFRP sandwich panel relative to the GFRP sandwich panel when subjected to blast loading through use of high-speed speckle strain mapping. After the blast events, the residual compressive load-bearing capacity is investigated experimentally, using appropriate loading conditions that an in-service vessel may have to sustain. Residual strength testing is well established for post-impact ballistic assessment, but there has been less research performed on the residual strength of sandwich composites after blast. PMID:24711494