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Sample records for bivalve nacre manifest

  1. Dynamics of sheet nacre formation in bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Marthe; Meibom, Anders; Gèze, Marc; Bourrat, Xavier; Angellier, Martine; Lopez, Evelyne

    2009-03-01

    Formation of nacre (mother-of-pearl) is a biomineralization process of fundamental scientific as well as industrial importance. However, the dynamics of the formation process is still not understood. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and high spatial resolution ion microprobe depth-profiling to image the full three-dimensional distribution of organic materials around individual tablets in the top-most layer of forming nacre in bivalves. Nacre formation proceeds by lateral, symmetric growth of individual tablets mediated by a growth-ring rich in organics, in which aragonite crystallizes from amorphous precursors. The pivotal role in nacre formation played by the growth-ring structure documented in this study adds further complexity to a highly dynamical biomineralization process.

  2. 淡水三角帆蚌贝壳珍珠质的同步辐射XRD研究%Synchrotron XRD Study on the Nacre of Freshwater Bivalve H.cumingii Lea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢晓晖; 王胜男; 杜博; 王小祥

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron XRD was used to study internal stress of nacre and microstructure of individual nacre tablet in the shell of freshwater bivalve H. cumingii Lea. The diffraction patterns show some biopolymers (intra-crystalline organic matrix) are occluded inside nacre tablets during biomineralization, causing that nacre powder exhibits tensile-like internal stress which is strongly anisotropic along different vectors of the reciprocal lattice. The characteristic of internal stress suggests that the intra-crystalline organic matrix is most probably arranged in the specific form. And line profile analysis which is conducted with the synchrotron XRD patterns of heated and unheated nacre powder samples, further confirms that the intra-crystalline organic matrix is adsorbed on (002) atomic planes of nacre tablets. The findings will facilitate the study on the formation mechanism and the strengthening and toughening mechanism of the nacre and provide theoretical basis for designing new organic-inorganic composite with high performances and cultivating pearl.%利用同步辐射XRD研究淡水三角帆蚌贝壳珍珠质的内应力和珍珠质中单个文石板片的微结构,发现淡水三角帆蚌贝壳珍珠质中单个文石板片内存在晶内有机物,且该晶内有机物导致珍珠质层中产生拉应力.这一拉应力沿不同晶向呈现强烈的各向异性,表明晶内有机物在文石板片内很可能以某一特定的方式排列.同步辐射XRD图谱的线形分析进一步证实淡水三角帆蚌贝壳珍珠质中的晶内有机物吸附于文石板片的(002)晶面.这些研究结果将促进珍珠质矿化及强韧化机制的研究,为设计高性能无机-有机复合材料及培育珍珠提供科学的根据.

  3. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Checa, Antonio G; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2012-01-01

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (< 60 nm), earlier reported to be mineral bridges, found to be such.

  4. Polarimetry of Pinctada fucata nacre indicates myostracal layer interrupts nacre structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Rebecca A; Jones, Joshua A; D'Addario, Anthony J; Galvez, Enrique J

    2017-02-01

    The inner layer of many bivalve and gastropod molluscs consists of iridescent nacre, a material that is structured like a brick wall with bricks consisting of crystalline aragonite and mortar of organic molecules. Myostracal layers formed during shell growth at the point of muscle attachment to the shell can be found interspersed within the nacre structure. Little has been done to examine the effect the myostracal layer has on subsequent nacre structure. Here we present data on the structure of the myostracal and nacre layers from a bivalve mollusc, Pinctada fucata. Scanning electron microscope imaging shows the myostracal layer consists of regular crystalline blocks. The nacre before the layer consists of tablets approximately 400 nm thick, while after the myostracal layer the tablets are approximately 500 nm thick. A new technique, imaging polarimetry, indicates that the aragonite crystals within the nacre following the myostracal layer have greater orientation uniformity than before the myostracal layer. The results presented here suggest a possible interaction between the myostracal layer and subsequent shell growth.

  5. Nacre and false nacre (foliated aragonite) in extant monoplacophorans (=Tryblidiida: Mollusca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G.; Ramírez-Rico, Joaquín; González-Segura, Alicia; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Extant monoplacophorans (Tryblidiida, Mollusca) have traditionally been reported as having an internal nacreous layer, thus representing the ancestral molluscan condition. The examination of this layer in three species of Neopilinidae ( Rokopella euglypta, Veleropilina zografi, and Micropilina arntzi) reveals that only V. zografi secretes an internal layer of true nacre, which occupies only part of the internal shell surface. The rest of the internal surface of V. zografi and the whole internal surfaces of the other two species examined are covered by a material consisting of lath-like, instead of brick-like, crystals, which are arranged into lamellae. In all cases examined, the crystallographic c-axis in this lamellar material is perpendicular to the surface of laths and the a-axis is parallel to their long dimension. The differences between taxa relate to the frequency of twins, which is much higher in Micropilina. In general, the material is well ordered, particularly towards the margin, where lamellae pile up at a small step size, which is most likely due to processes of crystal competition. Given its morphological resemblance to the foliated calcite of bivalves, we propose the name foliated aragonite for this previously undescribed biomaterial secreted by monoplacophorans. We conclude that the foliated aragonite probably lacks preformed interlamellar membranes and is therefore not a variant of nacre. A review of the existing literature reveals that previous reports of nacre in the group were instead of the aragonitic foliated layer and that our report of nacre in V. zografi is the first undisputed evidence of nacre in monoplacophorans. From the evolutionary viewpoint, the foliated aragonite could easily have been derived from nacre. Assuming that nacre represents the ancestral condition, as in other molluscan classes, it has been replaced by foliated aragonite along the tryblidiidan lineage, although the fossil record does not presently provide evidence as to

  6. Nacre-like ceramic/polymer laminated composite for use in body-armor applications

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Nacre is a biological material constituting the innermost layer of the shells of gastropods and bivalves. It consists of polygonal tablets of aragonite, tessellated to form individual layers and having the adjacent layers as well as the tablets within a layer bonded by a biopolymer. Due to its highly complex hierarchical microstructure, nacre possesses an outstanding combination of mechanical properties, the properties which are far superior to the ones that are predicted using the techniques...

  7. Nacre tablet thickness records formation temperature in modern and fossil shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Pupa U. P. A.; Bergmann, Kristin D.; Myers, Corinne E.; Marcus, Matthew A.; DeVol, Ross T.; Sun, Chang-Yu; Blonsky, Adam Z.; Tamre, Erik; Zhao, Jessica; Karan, Elizabeth A.; Tamura, Nobumichi; Lemer, Sarah; Giuffre, Anthony J.; Giribet, Gonzalo; Eiler, John M.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2017-02-01

    Nacre, the iridescent outer lining of pearls and inner lining of many mollusk shells, is composed of periodic, parallel, organic sheets alternating with aragonite (CaCO3) tablet layers. Nacre tablet thickness (TT) generates both nacre's iridescence and its remarkable resistance to fracture. Despite extensive studies on how nacre forms, the mechanisms controlling TT remain unknown, even though they determine the most conspicuous of nacre's characteristics, visible even to the naked eye. Thermodynamics predicts that temperature (T) will affect both physical and chemical components of biomineralized skeletons. The chemical composition of biominerals is well-established to record environmental parameters, and has therefore been extensively used in paleoclimate studies. The physical structure, however, has been hypothesized but never directly demonstrated to depend on the environment. Here we observe that the physical TT in nacre from modern and fossil shallow-water shells of the bivalves Pinna and Atrina correlates with T as measured by the carbonate clumped isotope thermometer. Based on the observed TT vs. T correlation, we anticipate that TT will be used as a paleothermometer, useful to estimate paleotemperature in shallow-water paleoenvironments. Here we successfully test the proposed new nacre TT thermometer on two Jurassic Pinna shells. The increase of TT with T is consistent with greater aragonite growth rate at higher T, and with greater metabolic rate at higher T. Thus, it reveals a complex, T-dependent biophysical mechanism for nacre formation.

  8. Nacre in Molluscs from the Ordovician of the Midwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D.J. Baumann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nacre was previously thought to be primitive in the Mollusca, but no convincing Cambrian examples are known. This aragonitic microstructure with crystal tablets that grow within an organic framework is thought to be the strongest, most fracture-resistant type of shell microstructure. Fossils described herein from the Ordovician of Iowa, Indiana, and Ohio provide supporting evidence for the hypothesis that sometime between the middle Cambrian and late Ordovician, nacre originated in cephalopod, bivalve, and possibly gastropod lineages. The correlation of independent origins of fracture-resistant nacre with increasing shell-crushing abilities of predators during the Cambrian-Ordovician suggests an early pulse in the evolutionary arms race between predators and molluscan prey.

  9. Ballistic Impact Behavior of Nacre-Like Laminated Composites Consisting of B4C Tablets and Polyurea Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-03-01

    A nacre-like composite armor consisting of B4C tablets and polyurea matrix is modeled, and its ballistic impact behavior and penetration resistance (under a normal and a 15°-oblique impact by a solid right circular cylindrical projectile) were analyzed using a series of transient, nonlinear dynamic, finite-element analyses. Nacre is a biological material constituting the innermost layer of the shells of gastropods and bivalves. It consists of polygonal tablets of aragonite, tessellated to form individual layers and having the adjacent layers as well as the tablets within a layer bonded by a biopolymer. Due to its highly complex hierarchical microstructure, nacre possesses an outstanding combination of mechanical properties, the properties which are far superior to the ones that are predicted using the homogenization techniques such as the rule of mixtures. The results of the transient nonlinear dynamic analysis pertaining to the ballistic impact response and the penetration resistance of the modeled nacre-like armor are compared with their counterparts for the B4C single-block armor having an identical areal density. Furthermore, the effect of various nacre microstructural features (e.g., surface profiling, micron-scale asperities, mineral bridges between the overlapping tablets lying in adjacent layers) on the ballistic penetration resistance of the nacre-like composite armor is investigated in order to identify an optimal nacre-like composite-armor architecture having the largest penetration resistance. The results obtained clearly show that a nacre-like armor possesses a superior penetration resistance relative to its monolithic counterpart, and that the nacre microstructural features considered play a critical role in the armor penetration resistance.

  10. Evolution of nacre: biochemistry and proteomics of the shell organic matrix of the cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Benjamin; Marin, Frédéric; Marie, Arul; Bédouet, Laurent; Dubost, Lionel; Alcaraz, Gérard; Milet, Christian; Luquet, Gilles

    2009-06-15

    In mollusks, one of the most widely studied shell textures is nacre, the lustrous aragonitic layer that constitutes the internal components of the shells of several bivalves, a few gastropods,and one cephalopod: the nautilus. Nacre contains a minor organic fraction, which displays a wide range of functions in relation to the biomineralization process. Here, we have biochemically characterized the nacre matrix of the cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus. The acid-soluble matrix contains a mixture of polydisperse and discrete proteins and glycoproteins, which interact with the formation of calcite crystals. In addition, a few bind calcium ions. Furthermore, we have used a proteomic approach,which was applied to the acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble shell matrices, as well as to spots obtained after 2D gel electrophoresis. Our data demonstrate that the insoluble and soluble matrices, although different in their bulk monosaccharide and amino acid compositions, contain numerous shared peptides. Strikingly, most of the obtained partial sequences are entirely new. A few only partly match with bivalvian nacre proteins.Our findings have implications for knowledge of the long-term evolution of molluskan nacre matrices.

  11. Nacre-like ceramic/polymer laminated composite for use in body-armor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mica Grujicic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nacre is a biological material constituting the innermost layer of the shells of gastropods and bivalves. It consists of polygonal tablets of aragonite, tessellated to form individual layers and having the adjacent layers as well as the tablets within a layer bonded by a biopolymer. Due to its highly complex hierarchical microstructure, nacre possesses an outstanding combination of mechanical properties, the properties which are far superior to the ones that are predicted using the techniques such as the rule of mixture. In the present work, an attempt is made to model a nacre-like composite armor consisting of boron carbide (B4C tablets and polyurea tablet/tablet interfaces. The armor is next investigated with respect to impact by a solid right-circular-cylindrical rigid projectile, using a transient non-linear dynamics finite element analysis. The ballistic-impact response and the penetration resistance of the armor is then compared with that of the B4C monolithic armor having an identical areal density. Furthermore, the effect of various nacre microstructural features (e.g. surface profiling, micron-scale asperities, mineral bridges between the overlapping tablets lying in adjacent layers, and B4C nano-crystallinity on the ballistic-penetration resistance of the composite-armor is investigated in order to identify an optimal nacre-like composite-armor architecture having the largest penetration resistance. The results obtained clearly show that a nacre-like armor possesses a superior penetration resistance relative to its monolithic counterpart, and that the nacre microstructural features considered play a critical role in the armor penetration resistance.

  12. NACRE Update and Extension Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arai, Koji; Arnould, Marcel; Takahashi, Kohji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-04-01

    NACRE, the `nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies since its publication in 1999. We describe here the current status of a Konan-Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) joint project that aims at its update and extension.

  13. MINERAL BRIDGES OF NACRE AND ITS EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋凡; 白以龙

    2001-01-01

    Nacre, or mother-of-pearl, is a kind of composites of aragonite platelets sandwiched between organic materials. Its excellent mechanical properties are thought to stem from the microarchitecture that is traditionally described as a "brick and mortar" arrangement. In this paper, a new microstructure, referred to as mineral bridge in the biomineralization, is directly observed in the organic matrix layers (mortar) of nacre. This is an indication that the organic matrix layer of nacre should be treated as a three-dimensional interface and the microarchitecture of nacre ought to be considered as a "brick-bridge-mortar" structure rather than the traditional one. Experiments and analyses show that the mineral bridges not only improve the mechanical properties of the organic matrix layers but also play an important role in the pattern of the crack extension in nacre.

  14. Aragonite twinning in gastropod nacre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Hiroki; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2010-10-01

    Aragonite twinning in gastropod nacre has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation technique. At the growth front of nacre, Haliotis discus hannai and Omphalius rusticus form a "stack-of-coins" structures, which consist of pseudo-hexagonal and elliptical aragonite tablets, respectively. SEM, EBSD, and TEM analyses revealed that these tablets are monolithic single crystal and almost free of the {1 1 0} twins that are common in aragonite of biotic or abiotic origin. The longest diagonal of the hexagon and the longer axis of the ellipse are parallel to the a-axis of aragonite. The crystal orientation of each tablet in a stack, measured by TEM-Kikuchi pattern analysis, is almost the same but there is occasionally {1 1 0} twin-like relationship between adjacent tablets along the stacking. On the other hand, the fibrous aragonite layer formed prior to the nacreous structure is composed of polycrystalline aragonite with high density of {1 1 0} twins. TEM observation suggests that the interlamellar organic sheet prevents the inheritance of the twins, by selecting only single domain of the twins, through the mineral bridge.

  15. Gradual Ordering in Red Abalone Nacre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, P. U. P. A.; Metzler, Rebecca A.; Zhou, Dong; Scholl, Andreas; Doran, Andrew; Young, Anthony; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan N.

    2008-09-03

    Red abalone (Haliotis rufescens) nacre is a layered composite biomineral that contains crystalline aragonite tablets confined by organic layers. Nacre is intensely studied because its biologically controlled microarchitecture gives rise to remarkable strength and toughness, but the mechanisms leading to its formation are not well understood. Here we present synchrotron spectromicroscopy experiments revealing that stacks of aragonite tablet crystals in nacre are misoriented with respect to each other. Quantitative measurements of crystal orientation, tablet size, and tablet stacking direction show that orientational ordering occurs not abruptly but gradually over a distance of 50 {micro}m. Several lines of evidence indicate that different crystal orientations imply different tablet growth rates during nacre formation. A theoretical model based on kinetic and gradual selection of the fastest growth rates produces results in qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experimental data and therefore demonstrates that ordering in nacre is a result of crystal growth kinetics and competition either in addition or to the exclusion of templation by acidic proteins as previously assumed. As in other natural evolving kinetic systems, selection of the fastest-growing stacks of tablets occurs gradually in space and time. These results suggest that the self-ordering of the mineral phase, which may occur completely independently of biological or organic-molecule control, is fundamental in nacre formation.

  16. Crystal nucleation and near-epitaxial growth in nacre

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Ian C; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Gilbert, Pupa U P A

    2013-01-01

    Nacre, the iridescent inner lining of many mollusk shells, interests materials scientists because of its unique brick-and-mortar periodic structure at the sub-micron scale and its remarkable resistance to fracture. However, it remains unclear how nacre forms. Here we present 20-nm, 2{\\deg}-resolution Polarization-dependent Imaging Contrast (PIC) images of shells from 15 species, mapping nacre tablets and their orientation patterns, showing where crystals nucleate and how they grow in nacre. In all shells we found stacks of co-oriented aragonite (CaCO3) tablets arranged into vertical columns or staggered diagonally. Only near the nacre-prismatic boundary are disordered crystals nucleated, as spherulitic aragonite. Overgrowing nacre tablet crystals are most frequently co-oriented with the underlying spherulitic aragonite or with another tablet, connected by mineral bridges. Therefore aragonite crystal growth in nacre is epitaxial or near-epitaxial, with abrupt or gradual changes in orientation, with c-axes with...

  17. Voyaging around nacre with the X-ray shuttle: From bio-mineralisation to prosthetics via mollusc phylogeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateigner, D., E-mail: daniel.chateigner@ensicaen.fr [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Ouhenia, S. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Lab. De Physique, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, Bejaia 06000 (Algeria); Krauss, C.; Hedegaard, C. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Gil, O. [ERPCB, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Morales, M. [CIMAP-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Lutterotti, L. [Department of Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, University of Trento, via Mesiano, 77 - 38123 Trento (Italy); Rousseau, M. [UMR 7561 CNRS, Nancy University, BP184, 54505 Vandoeuvre les Nancy,France (France); Lopez, E. [UMR7208 BOREA, CNRS/Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 43, rue Cuvier 75231, Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Nacre could be a non ancestral form of calcium carbonate in molluscs. {yields} Texture terms as useful links to ancestors in classification. {yields} X-ray diffraction useful for biomineralisation, phylogeny, cladistic and implantology. {yields} Farming conditions do not influence much shell growth. {yields} Electrodeposition of aragonite as future technique for implant coating. - Abstract: Strong textures of mollusc shell layers are utilised to provide phylogenetic information. Aragonitic and calcitic layers are the targets here, inside which nacre layers, but not only, play a specific role. At the light of the texture patterns and a parcimonious approach, nacre appears not as an ancestral form of calcium carbonate in mollusc layers. Also, from texture terms we can propose some links to ancestral fossilised species. The aragonite unit-cell distortions due to macromolecule complex insertions in the microstructures are measured on raw specimens for several aragonite layers of gastropods and bivalves. The textural information is used to provide precise structural determination of the biogenic aragonite. Such information might provide useful lights on the biomineralisation processes in the future, in cladistic approaches. Farming conditions are shown not to influence much shell textures of Helix aspersa aspersa. Closely related species exhibit globally close textures, among which three are good candidates for bone neogeneration and which textures are identical. Electrodeposition of aragonite, with inclusion of molecular extract from shell species, results in nacre-like layers exhibiting structural distortions similar to known inductive layers. X-ray diffraction experiments are shown to provide invaluable insights in testing biomineralisation and phylogenetic hypotheses.

  18. Final critical habitat for Orange-nacre Mucket (Lampsilis perovalis)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Polygon shapefile of critical habitat for the Orange-nacre Mucket (Lampsilis perovalis) based on the description provided in the Federal Register.

  19. NACRE II: An Update of the NACRE Compilation of Atarget<16 Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the status of a new evaluation of the rates in astrophysical conditions of 19 capture and 15 transfer reactions on stable targets with mass numbers A<16, referred as NACRE-II. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate the general procedure followed in the NACRE-II construction with two examples.

  20. Nacre II:. AN Update and Extension of the Nacre Compilation of Charged-Particle Thermonuclear Reaction Rates for Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.

    2013-03-01

    The status of a new evaluation of astrophysical nuclear reaction rates, referred as NACRE- II, is reported. It includes 19 radiative capture and 15 transfer reactions on targets with mass numbers A < 16. This work is meant to supersede the NACRE compilation. Post-NACRE experimental data are taken into account. Extrapolations of the astrophysical S-factor to largely sub-Coulomb energies are based on the use of the potential model and of the distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) for capture and transfer reactions, respectively. Adopted rates and their lower and upper limits are provided. Here, we illustrate with some results the general procedure followed in the construction of NACRE-II.

  1. Evidence for variable crystallinity in bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    Bivalve shells are used as important palaeoclimate proxy archives and monitor regional climate variations. The shells mostly exist of two crystalline polymorphic phases of calcium carbonate calcite (rombohedric) and aragonite (orthorhombic). Calcite is the most stable polymorph at standard conditions, whereas vaterite (hexagonal) is the least stable and only rarely found in these structures. Shells are characterized by organized structures and several micro architectures of mollusc shell structures have been identified: Nacre shows different types: columnar and bricked forms and consists of composite inorganic- organic at the nano-scale. They are well known to display a "brick and mortar" structure. By AFM and FIB/TEM methods it could be shown, that its nanostructure consists of the structures in the range of 50 - 100 nm [1, 2]. These structures are vesicles, consisting of CaCO3 and are individually coated by a membrane. Most probably, the mantle epithelian cells of the bivalve extrude CaCO3 vesicles. By Raman spectroscopic investigations the crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs calcite, aragonite and vaterite, as well as ACC were determined. For some species (Diplodon chilensis patagonicus, Hyriopsis cumingii) pure ACC (i.e. not intermingled with a crystalline phase) could be identified. The presence of an amorphous phase is generally deduced from the lack of definite lattice modes, whereas a broad Raman band in this region is to observe. In most of the cultured pearls (Pinctada maxima and genus Hyriopsis) the ν1-Raman band of ACC clearly displays an asymmetric shape and splits into two different bands according to a nanocrystalline and an amorphous fraction. The FWHMs of most of the crystalline fractions are too high for well crystallized materials and support the assumption of nanocrystalline calcium carbonate polymorph clusters in ACC. They are primarily composed of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) which is later transformed into a crystalline modification [3

  2. Can bivalve veligers escape feeding currents of adult bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.; Veldhuizen, R.; Stamhuis, E.J.; Wolff, W.

    2008-01-01

    While the stock of introduced Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) increased in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands), so did the filtration pressure of all bivalve species together. In the same period, stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. The expansion of Pacific oysters in Dutch estuar

  3. Recirculation nursery systems for bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blanco Garcia, A.; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitilia; Magnesen, Thorolf; Nicolas, J.; Petten, Bruno; Robert, Rene

    2016-01-01

    n order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting in

  4. Synthetic nacre by predesigned matrix-directed mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Bo; Gao, Huai-Ling; Yao, Hong-Bin; Liu, Lei; Cölfen, Helmut; Liu, Gang; Chen, Si-Ming; Li, Shi-Kuo; Yan, You-Xian; Liu, Yang-Yi; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-10-01

    Although biomimetic designs are expected to play a key role in exploring future structural materials, facile fabrication of bulk biomimetic materials under ambient conditions remains a major challenge. Here, we describe a mesoscale “assembly-and-mineralization” approach inspired by the natural process in mollusks to fabricate bulk synthetic nacre that highly resembles both the chemical composition and the hierarchical structure of natural nacre. The millimeter-thick synthetic nacre consists of alternating organic layers and aragonite platelet layers (91 weight percent) and exhibits good ultimate strength and fracture toughness. This predesigned matrix-directed mineralization method represents a rational strategy for the preparation of robust composite materials with hierarchically ordered structures, where various constituents are adaptable, including brittle and heat-labile materials.

  5. Nacre extract restores the mineralization capacity of subchondral osteoarthritis osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, A; Zhang, G; Dossot, M; Moby, V; Dumas, D; Hupont, S; Piet, M H; Bianchi, A; Mainard, D; Galois, L; Gillet, P; Rousseau, M

    2015-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of joint chronic pain and involves the entire joints. Subchondral osteoarthritic osteoblasts present a mineralization defect and, to date, only a few molecules (Vitamin D3 and Bone Morphogenetic Protein2) could improve the mineralization potential of this cell type. In this context, we have tested for the first time the effect of nacre extract on the mineralization capacity of osteoblasts from OA patients. Nacre extract is known to contain osteogenic molecules which have demonstrated their activities notably on the MC3T3 pre-osteoblastic cell line. For this goal, molecules were extracted from nacre (ESM, Ethanol Soluble Matrix) and tested on osteoblasts of the subchondral bone from OA patients undergoing total knee replacement and on MC3T3 cells for comparison. We chose to investigate the mineralization with Alizarin Red staining and with the study of extracellular matrix (ECM) structure and composition. In a complementary way the structure of the ECM secreted during the mineralization phase was investigated using second harmonic generation (SHG). Nacre extract was able to induce the early presence (after 7 days) of precipitated calcium in cells. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed the presence of nanograins of an early crystalline form of calcium phosphate in OA osteoblasts ECM and hydroxyapatite in MC3T3 ECM. SHG collagen fibers signal was present in both cell types but lower for OA osteoblasts. In conclusion, nacre extract was able to rapidly restore the mineralization capacity of osteoarthritis osteoblasts, therefore confirming the potential of nacre as a source of osteogenic compounds.

  6. Alteration of shell nacre micromorphology in blue mussel Mytilus edulis after exposure to free-ionic silver and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuykov, Michael; Pelletier, Emilien; Belzile, Claude; Demers, Serge

    2011-07-01

    This study describes the morphology of inner shell surface (ISS) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis Linnaeus after short-term exposures to radiolabeled silver in free-ionic ((110m)Ag(+)) and engineered nanoparticulate ((110m)AgNPs, <40 nm) phases. Radiolabeled silver in starting solutions was used in a similar low concentration (∼15 Bq mL(-1)) for both treatments. After exposure experiments radiolabeled silver was leached from the ISS using HCl. It concentration for shells from both treatments was ∼0.5 Bq mL(-1). Whole ISS of young individuals and prismatic layer of adults showed no evidence of any major alteration process after silver uptake. However, the nacre portion of adult mussels exposed to both treatments revealed distinct doughnut shape structures (DSS) formed by calcium carbonate micrograins that covered the surface of aragonite tablets. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed the existence of only minor differences in DSS morphology between mussels exposed to Ag(+) and AgNPs. From literature survey, DSS were also found in bivalves exposed to Cd(2+). The DSS occurring in a specimen of a field-collected bivalve is also shown. Formation of distinctive DSS can be explained by a disturbance of the shell calcification mechanism. Although the occurrence of DSS is not exclusively associated with metal bioavailability to the mussels, the morphology of DSS seems to be linked to the speciation of the metal used in the uptake experiments.

  7. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  8. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Takahashi, K. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Goriely, S. [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Arnould, M., E-mail: marnould@ulb.ac.be [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophysique, Université Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium); Ohta, M. [Hirao School of Management, Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe (Japan); Utsunomiya, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Kobe (Japan)

    2013-11-20

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the 10{sup 6}≲T⩽10{sup 10} K range. Along with the ‘adopted’ rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [ (http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html)].

  9. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number A<16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Goriely, S.; Arnould, M.; Ohta, M.; Utsunomiya, H.

    2013-11-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number A<16, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical S-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties.

  10. Synergistic toughening of graphene oxide-molybdenum disulfide-thermoplastic polyurethane ternary artificial nacre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Sijie; Li, Yuchen; Peng, Jingsong; Hu, Han; Cheng, Qunfeng; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-27

    Inspired by the ternary structure of natural nacre, robust ternary artificial nacre is constructed through synergistic toughening of graphene oxide (GO) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheets via a vacuum-assisted filtration self-assembly process. The synergistic toughening effect from high mechanical properties of GO and lubrication of MoS2 nanosheets is successfully demonstrated. Meanwhile, the artificial nacre shows high electrical conductivity. This approach for constructing robust artificial nacre by synergistic effect from GO and MoS2 provides a creative opportunity for designing and fabricating integrated artificial nacre in the near future, and this kind of ternary artificial nacre has great potential applications in aerospace, flexible supercapacitor electrodes, artificial muscle, and tissue engineering.

  11. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three di

  12. The nacre protein perlucin nucleates growth of calcium carbonate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, S; Arnoldi, M; Khoshnavaz, S; Treccani, L; Kuntz, M; Mann, K; Grathwohl, G; Fritz, M

    2003-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in aqueous solution was used to investigate native nacre of the marine snail Haliotis laevigata on the microscopic scale and the interaction of purified nacre proteins with calcium carbonate crystals on the nanoscopic scale. These investigations were controlled by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM) and biochemical methods. For investigations with AFM and SEM, nacre was cleaved parallel to the aragonite tablets in this biogenic polymer/mineral composite. Multilamellar organic sheets consisting of a core of chitin with layers of proteins attached on both sides lay between the aragonite layers consisting of confluent aragonite tablets. Cleavage appeared to occur between the aragonite tablet layer and the protein layer. AFM images revealed a honeycomb-like structure to the organic material with a diameter of the 'honeycombs' equalling that of the aragonite tablets. The walls of the structures consisted of filaments, which were suggested to be collagen. The flat regions of the honeycomb-like structures exhibited a hole with a diameter of more than 100 nm. When incubated in saturated calcium carbonate solution, aragonite needles with perfect vertical orientation grew on the proteinacous surface. After treatment with proteinase K, no growth of orientated aragonite needles was detected. Direct AFM measurements on dissolving and growing calcite crystals revealed a surface structure with straight steps the number of which decreased with crystal growth. When the purified nacre protein perlucin was added to the growth solution (a super-saturated calcium carbonate solution) new layers were nucleated and the number of steps increased. Anion exchange chromatography of the water-soluble proteins revealed a mixture of about 10 different proteins. When this mixture was dialysed against saturated calcium carbonate solution and sodium chloride, calcium carbonate crystals precipitated together with perlucin leaving the other proteins

  13. Crystallographic control on the substructure of nacre tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G; Mutvei, Harry; Osuna-Mascaró, Antonio J; Bonarski, Jan T; Faryna, Marek; Berent, Katarzyna; Pina, Carlos M; Rousseau, Marthe; Macías-Sánchez, Elena

    2013-09-01

    Nacre tablets of mollusks develop two kinds of features when either the calcium carbonate or the organic portions are removed: (1) parallel lineations (vermiculations) formed by elongated carbonate rods, and (2) hourglass patterns, which appear in high relief when etched or in low relief if bleached. In untreated tablets, SEM and AFM data show that vermiculations correspond to aligned and fused aragonite nanogloblules, which are partly surrounded by thin organic pellicles. EBSD mapping of the surfaces of tablets indicates that the vermiculations are invariably parallel to the crystallographic a-axis of aragonite and that the triangles are aligned with the b-axis and correspond to the advance of the {010} faces during the growth of the tablet. According to our interpretation, the vermiculations appear because organic molecules during growth are expelled from the a-axis, where the Ca-CO3 bonds are the shortest. In this way, the subunits forming nacre merge uninterruptedly, forming chains parallel to the a-axis, whereas the organic molecules are expelled to the sides of these chains. Hourglass patterns would be produced by preferential adsorption of organic molecules along the {010}, as compared to the {100} faces. A model is presented for the nanostructure of nacre tablets. SEM and EBSD data also show the existence within the tablets of nanocrystalline units, which are twinned on {110} with the rest of the tablet. Our study shows that the growth dynamics of nacre tablets (and bioaragonite in general) results from the interaction at two different and mutually related levels: tablets and nanogranules.

  14. Forming nacreous layer of the shells of the bivalves Atrina rigida and Pinctada margaritifera: an environmental- and cryo-scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nudelman, Fabio; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Eugenia; Rousseau, Marthe; Bourrat, Xavier; Lopez, Evelyne; Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2008-05-01

    A key to understanding control over mineral formation in mollusk shells is the microenvironment inside the pre-formed 3-dimensional organic matrix framework where mineral forms. Much of what is known about nacre formation is from observations of the mature tissue. Although these studies have elucidated several important aspects of this process, the structure of the organic matrix and the microenvironment where the crystal nucleates and grows are very difficult to infer from observations of the mature nacre. Here, we use environmental- and cryo-scanning electron microscopy to investigate the organic matrix structure at the onset of mineralization in the nacre of two mollusk species: the bivalves Atrina rigida and Pinctada margaritifera. These two techniques allow the visualization of hydrated biological materials coupled with the preservation of the organic matrix close to physiological conditions. We identified a hydrated gel-like protein phase filling the space between two interlamellar sheets prior to mineral formation. The results are consistent with this phase being the silk-like proteins, and show that mineral formation does not occur in an aqueous solution, but in a hydrated gel-like medium. As the tablets grow, the silk-fibroin is pushed aside and becomes sandwiched between the mineral and the chitin layer.

  15. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The spec......Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established...... crustacean, the remainder hide under shale, rocks and coral blocks, often in small intra- or interspecific family flocks. The behaviour was also noted for some of the species. It is presumed that galeommatid species go through a lengthy planktonic phase....

  16. NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yi; Goriely, Stephane; Arnould, Marcel; Ohta, Masahisa; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels...

  17. Towards an Understanding of the Role of Aragonite in the Mechanical Properties of Nacre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-08-25

    Nacre, also known as mother-of-pearl, is a biocomposite material that exhibits higher strength and fracture toughness than its component materials. It derives its strength from the brick-and-mortar layering of aragonite (CaCO{sub 3}) platelets and organic binder. It is believed that the protein binder helps redistribute the stress throughout all tablets for optimal mechanical performance. In this study, we attempt to measure the mechanical properties of aragonite within nacre and compare them to bulk aragonite and bulk nacre and understand the redistribution of stresses. Here we show that x-ray diffraction techniques are useful for isolating and measuring strain of crystallites within a composite material. Our results show that the apparent stiffness of aragonite varies with crystallographic directions and is higher than the stiffness of bulk nacre in all cases, meaning that aragonite tablets are exposed to less than the average bulk stress. The average force applied to the bulk sample is partitioned between the aragonite and the binder, so that the protein layer bears as much as 27.2% of the total applied force. Different crystallographic directions exhibit behaviors different than bulk aragonite or bulk nacre. These are related to texture of aragonite platelets (i.e. preferred orientations within nacre). By examining nacre, we can obtain a better understanding of the mechanical relationship between the ceramic and polymer in composite materials. We expect that x-ray diffraction will become the standard method for probing the mechanical properties of composite materials.

  18. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  19. Curtailing noncondensables in steel heat pipes using a NaCr solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akyurt, M.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. [King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-10-01

    Experiments were performed for investigation of the long term performance of mild-steel heat pipes. Working fluids were a NaCr solution in water, as well as water. The test period covered approximately 15,000 h. It is concluded that both types of heat pipes perform well; the performance of the heat pipe containing the NaCr solution, however, is superior. (author)

  20. Mercury concentration in bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkoda Józef

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 85 mussel samples of eight species were examined. Analysis of mercury in the freeze-dried samples was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry method using direct mercury analyser AMA 254. The analytical procedure for determination of mercury was covered by the quality assurance programme of research and participation in national and international proficiency tests. Concentrations of total mercury in all investigated samples were found to be generally low, in the range of 0.033-0.577 mg/kg of dry weight and of 0.003-0.045 mg/kg of wet weight. The results indicate that obtained levels of mercury in bivalve molluscs are not likely to pose a risk to the health of consumers.

  1. Nacre-like calcium carbonate controlled by ionic liquid/graphene oxide composite template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Chengli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230039 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei, Anhui 230601 (China); Xie, Anjian, E-mail: anjx@163.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230039 (China); Shen, Yuhua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anhui University, Hefei, Anhui 230039 (China); Zhu, Jinmiao; Li, Hongying [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei, Anhui 230601 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures have been mediated by an ionic liquid (IL)-graphene oxide (GO) composite template. The resultant crystals were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD). The results showed that either 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM]BF{sub 4}) or graphene oxide can act as a soft template for calcium carbonate formation with unusual morphologies. Based on the time-dependent morphology changes of calcium carbonate particles, it is concluded that nacre-like calcium carbonate nanostructures can be formed gradually utilizing [BMIM]BF{sub 4}/GO composite template. During the process of calcium carbonate formation, [BMIM]BF{sub 4} acted not only as solvents but also as morphology templates for the fabrication of calcium carbonate materials with nacre-like morphology. Based on the observations, the possible mechanisms were also discussed. - Highlights: • Nacre-like CaCO{sub 3}/GO were prepared by gas diffusion. • Ionic liquid/GO served as composite templates. • The interaction of Ca{sup 2+} ions and GO played a very important role in the formation of nacre-like CaCO{sub 3}.

  2. Water soluble bioactives of nacre mediate antioxidant activity and osteoblast differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available The water soluble matrix of nacre is a proven osteoinductive material. In spite of the differences in the biomolecular compositions of nacre obtained from multiple species of oysters, the common biochemical properties of those principles substantiate their biological activity. However, the mechanism by which nacre stimulates bone differentiation remains largely unknown. Since the positive impact of antioxidants on bone metabolism is well acknowledged, in this study we investigated the antioxidant potential of a water soluble matrix (WSM obtained from the nacre of the marine oyster Pinctada fucata, which could regulate its osteoblast differentiation activity. Enhanced levels of ALP activity observed in pre-osteoblast cells upon treatment with WSM, suggested the induction of bone differentiation events. Furthermore, bone nodule formation and up-regulation of bone differentiation marker transcripts, i.e. collagen type-1 and osteocalcin by WSM confirmed its ability to induce differentiation of the pre-osteoblasts into mature osteoblasts. Remarkably, same WSM fraction upon pre-treatment lowered the H2O2 and UV-B induced oxidative damages in keratinocytes, thus indicating the antioxidant potential of WSM. This was further confirmed from the in vitro scavenging of ABTS and DPPH free radicals and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by WSM. Together, these results indicate that WSM poses both antioxidant potential and osteoblast differentiation property. Thus, bioactivities associated with nacre holds potential in the development of therapeutics for bone regeneration and against oxidative stress induced damages in cells.

  3. Nanoscale structural and functional mapping of nacre by scanning probe microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xilong; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-01

    Nacre has received great attention due to its nanoscale hierarchical structure and extraordinary mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the nanoscale piezoelectric properties of nacre have also been investigated but the structure-function relationship has never been addressed. In this work, firstly we realized quantitative nanomechanical mapping of nacre of a green abalone using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The modulus of the mineral tablets is determined to be ~80 GPa and that of the organic biopolymer no more than 23 GPa, and the organic-inorganic interface width is determined to be about 34 ± 9 nm. Then, we conducted both AFAM and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) mapping in the same scanning area to explore the correlations between the nanomechanical and piezoelectric properties. The PFM testing shows that the organic biopolymer exhibits a significantly stronger piezoresponse than the mineral tablets, and they permeate each other, which is very difficult to reproduce in artificial materials. Finally, the phase hysteresis loops and amplitude butterfly loops were also observed using switching spectroscopy PFM, implying that nacre may also be a bio-ferroelectric material. The obtained nanoscale structural and functional properties of nacre could be very helpful in understanding its deformation mechanism and designing biomimetic materials of extraordinary properties.

  4. Nanoscale structural and functional mapping of nacre by scanning probe microscopy techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xilong; Miao, Hongchen; Li, Faxin

    2013-11-01

    Nacre has received great attention due to its nanoscale hierarchical structure and extraordinary mechanical properties. Meanwhile, the nanoscale piezoelectric properties of nacre have also been investigated but the structure-function relationship has never been addressed. In this work, firstly we realized quantitative nanomechanical mapping of nacre of a green abalone using atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM). The modulus of the mineral tablets is determined to be ~80 GPa and that of the organic biopolymer no more than 23 GPa, and the organic-inorganic interface width is determined to be about 34 +/- 9 nm. Then, we conducted both AFAM and piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) mapping in the same scanning area to explore the correlations between the nanomechanical and piezoelectric properties. The PFM testing shows that the organic biopolymer exhibits a significantly stronger piezoresponse than the mineral tablets, and they permeate each other, which is very difficult to reproduce in artificial materials. Finally, the phase hysteresis loops and amplitude butterfly loops were also observed using switching spectroscopy PFM, implying that nacre may also be a bio-ferroelectric material. The obtained nanoscale structural and functional properties of nacre could be very helpful in understanding its deformation mechanism and designing biomimetic materials of extraordinary properties.

  5. Nacre-inspired integrated strong and tough reduced graphene oxide-poly(acrylic acid) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Sijie; Hu, Han; Peng, Jingsong; Li, Yuchen; Fan, Yuzun; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-03-01

    Inspired by the relationship between interface interactions and the high performance mechanical properties of nacre, a strong and tough nacre-inspired nanocomposite was demonstrated based on graphene oxide (GO) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) prepared via a vacuum-assisted filtration self-assembly process. The abundant hydrogen bonding between GO and PAA results in both high strength and toughness of the bioinspired nanocomposites, which are 2 and 3.3 times higher than that of pure reduced GO film, respectively. In addition, the effect of environmental relative humidity on the mechanical properties of bioinspired nanocomposites is also investigated, and is consistent with previous theoretical predictions. Moreover, this nacre-inspired nanocomposite also displays high electrical conductivity of 108.9 S cm-1. These excellent physical properties allow this type of nacre-inspired nanocomposite to be used in many applications, such as flexible electrodes, aerospace applications, and artificial muscles etc. This nacre-inspired strategy also opens an avenue for constructing integrated high performance graphene-based nanocomposites in the near future.

  6. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  7. Acceleration of calcite kinetics by abalone nacre proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, G; Qiu, S R; Orme, C A; Morse, D E; De Yoreo, J J

    2005-06-09

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures have long been an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over synthesis of crystalline materials. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineral surfaces. Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that bio-organic additives can dramatically alter crystal shapes and growth-rates in vitro. However, previous molecular-scale studies revealing mechanisms of growth modification focused on small molecules such as amino acids or peptides and always observed growth inhibition. In contrast, studies using full proteins were non-quantitative and underlying sources of growth modification were ill-defined. Here we investigate interactions between proteins isolated from abalone shell nacre and growing surfaces of calcite. We find that these proteins significantly accelerate the molecular-scale kinetics and, though much larger than atomic steps, alter growth morphology through step-specific interactions that lower their free energies. We propose that these proteins act as surfactants to promote ion attachment at calcite surfaces.

  8. Micrometer-Thick Graphene Oxide-Layered Double Hydroxide Nacre-Inspired Coatings and Their Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, You-Xian; Yao, Hong-Bin; Mao, Li-Bo; Asiri, Abdullah M; Alamry, Khalid A; Marwani, Hadi M; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-02-10

    Robust, functional, and flame retardant coatings are attractive in various fields such as building construction, food packaging, electronics encapsulation, and so on. Here, strong, colorful, and fire-retardant micrometer-thick hybrid coatings are reported, which can be constructed via an enhanced layer-by-layer assembly of graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets and layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets. The fabricated GO-LDH hybrid coatings show uniform nacre-like layered structures that endow them good mechanic properties with Young's modulus of ≈ 18 GPa and hardness of ≈ 0.68 GPa. In addition, the GO-LDH hybrid coatings exhibit nacre-like iridescence and attractive flame retardancy as well due to their well-defined 2D microstructures. This kind of nacre-inspired GO-LDH hybrid thick coatings will be applied in various fields in future due to their high strength and multifunctionalities.

  9. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  10. NACr14: A 3D model for the crustal structure of the North American Continent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tesauro, Magdala; Kaban, Mikhail; Mooney, Walter; Cloetingh, Sierd

    2014-01-01

    Based on the large number of crustal seismic experiments carried out in the last decadeswe create NACr14, a 3D crustal model of the North American continent at a resolution of 1° × 1°. We present maps of thickness and average velocities of the main layers that comprise the North American crystalline

  11. Nacre biomimetic design--a possible approach to prepare low infrared emissivity composite coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weigang; Xu, Guoyue; Ding, Ruya; Duan, Kaige; Qiao, Jialiang

    2013-01-01

    Mimicking the highly organized brick-and-mortar structure of nacre, a kind of nacre-like organic-inorganic composite material of polyurethane (PU)/flaky bronze composite coatings with low infrared emissivity was successfully designed and prepared by using PU and flaky bronze powders as adhesives and pigments, respectively. The infrared emissivity and microstructure of the coatings were systematically investigated by infrared emissometer and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, and the cause of low infrared emissivity of the coatings was discussed by using the theories of one-dimensional photonic structure. The results show that the infrared emissivity of the nacre-like PU/flaky bronze composite coatings can be as low as 0.206 at the bronze content of 60 wt. %, and it is significantly lower than the value of PU/sphere bronze composite coatings. Microstructure observation illustrated that the nacre-like PU/flaky bronze composite coatings have similar one-dimensional photonic structural characteristics. The low infrared emissivity of PU/flaky bronze composite coatings is derived from the similar one-dimensional photonic structure in the coatings.

  12. A laser-engraved glass duplicating the structure, mechanics and performance of natural nacre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valashani, Seyed Mohammad Mirkhalaf; Barthelat, Francois

    2015-03-30

    Highly mineralized biological materials such as nacre (mother of pearl), tooth enamel or conch shell boast unique and attractive combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness. The structures of these biological materials and their associated mechanisms are now inspiring new types of advanced structural materials. However, despite significant efforts, no bottom up fabrication method could so far match biological materials in terms of microstructural organization and mechanical performance. Here we present a new 'top down' strategy to tackling this fabrication problem, which consists in carving weak interfaces within a brittle material using a laser engraving technique. We demonstrate the method by fabricating and testing borosilicate glasses containing nacre-like microstructures infiltrated with polyurethane. When deformed, these materials properly duplicate the mechanisms of natural nacre: combination of controlled sliding of the tablets, accompanied with geometric hardening, strain hardening and strain rate hardening. The nacre-like glass is composed of 93 volume % (vol%) glass, yet 700 times tougher and breaks at strains as high as 20%.

  13. Extraction and Purification of Matrix Protein from the Nacre of Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Caiping; ZHANG Cen; NIE Yancheng; XIE Liping; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    A soluble matrix protein P14 with an apparent molecular mass of 14.5 kDa was isolated from fragmented nacre of pearl oysters (Pinctada fucata) treated with 10% NaOH solution to investigate the nacre matrix proteins and their effect on the CaCO3 crystal. The protein was characterized by gel exclusion chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography after demineralization by 10% acetic acid. The X-ray diffraction pattern of P14 crystals indicates that P14 plays an important role in nacre biomineralization. P14 can induce aragonite formation, stimulate CaCO3 crystal formation, and accelerate aragonite precipitation. Heating of the acid insoluble nacre residue, which was named conchiolin, in 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution supplemented with 10% β-mercaptoethanol solution for 10-20 min at about 100(C gave two other soluble proteins having molecular masses of 19.4 kDa and 25.0 kDa. The present study suggests that these two proteins are linked to the insoluble organic matrix by disulfide bridges because the extraction yield increases when β-mercaptoethanol is added to the medium.

  14. Chemical-mechanical stability of the hierarchical structure of shell nacre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hierarchical structure and mechanical property of shell nacre are experimentally investigated from the new aspects of chemical stability and chemistry-mechanics coupling. Through chemical deproteinization or demineralization methods together with characterization techniques at micro/nano scales,it is found that the nacre of abalone,haliotis discus hannai,contains a hierarchical structure stacked with irregular aragonite platelets and interplatelet organic matrix thin layers. Yet the aragonite platelet itself is a nanocomposite consisting of nanoparticles and intraplatelet organic matrix framework. The mean diameter of the nanoparticles and the distribution of framework are quite different for different platelets. Though the interplatelet and in-traplatelet organic matrix can be both decomposed by sodium hydroxide solution,the chemical stability of individual aragonite platelets is much higher than that of the microstructure stacked with them. Further,macroscopic bending test or nanoindentation experiment is performed on the micro/nanostructure of nacre after sodium hydroxide treatment. It is found that the Young’s modulus of both the stacked microstructure and nanocomposite platelet reduced. The reduction of the microstructure is more remark than that of the platelet. Therefore the chemical-mechanical stability of the nanocomposite platelet itself is much higher than that of the stacked microstructure of nacre.

  15. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33-84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood.

  16. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  17. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  18. Integrated ternary artificial nacre via synergistic toughening of reduced graphene oxide/double-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(vinyl alcohol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shanshan; Wu, Mengxi; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-07-01

    The synergistic toughening effect of building blocks and interface interaction exists in natural materials, such as nacre. Herein, inspired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillar chitin and two-dimensional (2D) calcium carbonate platelets of natural nacre, we have fabricated integrated strong and tough ternary bio-inspired nanocomposites (artificial nacre) successfully via the synergistic effect of 2D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and 1D double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) and hydrogen bonding cross-linking with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix. Moreover, the crack mechanics model with crack deflection by 2D rGO nanosheets and crack bridging by 1D DWNTs and PVA chains induces resultant artificial nacre exhibiting excellent fatigue-resistance performance. These outstanding characteristics enable the ternary bioinspired nanocomposites have many promising potential applications, for instance, aerospace, flexible electronics devices and so forth. This synergistic toughening strategy also provides an effective way to assemble robust graphene-based nanocomposites.

  19. Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel V. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nacre, when implanted in vivo in bones of dogs, sheep, mice, and humans, induces a biological response that includes integration and osteogenic activity on the host tissue that seems to be activated by a set of proteins present in the nacre water-soluble matrix (WSM. We describe here an experimental approach that can accurately identify the proteins present in the WSM of shell mollusk nacre. Four proteins (three gigasin-2 isoforms and a cystatin A2 were for the first time identified in WSM of Crassostrea gigas nacre using 2DE and LC-MS/MS for protein identification. These proteins are thought to be involved in bone remodeling processes and could be responsible for the biocompatibility shown between bone and nacre grafts. These results represent a contribution to the study of shell biomineralization process and opens new perspectives for the development of new nacre biomaterials for orthopedic applications.

  20. Ornaments in radiation treatment of cultural heritage: Color and UV-vis spectral changes in irradiated nacres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić, Katarina; Pucić, Irina; Desnica, Vladan

    2016-07-01

    Cultural heritage objects that are radiation treated in order to stop their biodegradation often contain ornamenting materials that cannot be removed. Radiation may produce unwanted changes to such materials. Nacre is a common ornamenting material so this is an attempt to assess the impact of gamma-radiation on its optical properties. Two types of nacre (yellow and white) were obtained from a museum and subjected to different absorbed doses of Co-60 gamma irradiation under the same conditions. The radiation induced changes of nacres color were investigated with fiber optic reflectance spectroscopy (FORS). Colorimetry in CIE Lab space revealed that in both nacres the lightness shifted to darker grey hues at high doses while the color component's (red, green, yellow and blue) behavior depended on the nacre type. Observable changes occurred at doses much above the dose range needed for radiation treatment of cultural heritage objects that are often ornamented with nacre. In UV-vis reflectance spectra of samples irradiated to high doses carbonate radical anion absorption appeared.

  1. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there i...

  2. Thermal-Induced Wear Mechanisms of Sheet Nacre in Dry Friction

    OpenAIRE

    Stempflé, Philippe; Djilali, T.; Kouitat Njiwa, Richard; Rousseau, Marthe; Lopez, Evelyne; Bourrat, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Sheet nacre is a natural biocomposite with a multiscale structure including a mineral phase of calcium carbonate (97 wt.%) and two organic matrices (3 wt.%). The mineral phase is constituted by an arrangement of CaCO3 biocrystal nanograins (ca 40 nm in size) drowned in an ‘‘intracrystalline'' organic matrix (4 nm thick) in order to form a microsized flat organomineral aragonite platelet. These platelets are themselves surrounded by an ‘‘intercrystalline'' organic matri...

  3. Transformation of nacre coatings into apatite coatings in phosphate buffer solution at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaping; Zhou, Yu

    2008-08-01

    Nacre coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V substrates by electrophoretic technique, and subsequently converted into apatite coatings with hierarchical porous structures by treatment with a phosphate buffer solution. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherms. The results show that the nacre coatings are converted into the plate-like apatite coatings via a dissolution-precipitation reaction, while the organic components of the nacre are reserved. The mesopores with pore size of 4.4 nm are formed within the plate-like structure, and the macropores are formed among the plate-like structure. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion tests reveal that the apatite coatings have a good in vitro bioactivity. Bone-like apatite crystals are formed on the surfaces of the apatite coatings after soaking in SBF for 12 h, and fill up the macropores on the coatings with increasing the soaking time. In addition, XPS indicates that a TiO(x) layer and PO(4) (3-) ions appear on the substrate surfaces by pretreatment with a H(3)PO(4)/HF solution. The TiO(x) layer and PO(4) (3-) ions can induce the formation of apatite crystals, resulting in a composition gradient from the oxide layer to the external apatite layer.

  4. Nacre-inspired design of mechanical stable coating with underwater superoleophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Peng, Jitao; Liu, Yibiao; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Shutao

    2013-06-25

    Because of the frequent oil spill accidents in marine environment, stable superoleophobic coatings under seawater are highly desired. Current underwater superoleophobic surfaces often suffer from mechanical damages and lose their superoleophobicity gradually. It remains a challenge to fabricate a stable and robust underwater superoleophobic film which can endure harsh conditions in practical application. Nacre is one of most extensively studied rigid biological materials. Inspired by the outstanding mechanical property of seashell nacre and those underwater superoleophobic surfaces from nature, we fabricated a polyelectrolyte/clay hybrid film via typical layer-by-layer (LBL) method based on building blocks with high surface energy. 'Bricks-and-mortar' structure of seashell nacre was conceptually replicated into the prepared film, which endows the obtained film with excellent mechanical property and great abrasion resistance. In addtion, the prepared film also exhibits stable underwater superoleophobicity, low oil adhesion, and outstanding environment durability in artificial seawater. We anticipate that this work will provide a new method to design underwater low-oil-adhesion film with excellent mechanical property and improved stability, which may advance the practical applications in marine antifouling and microfluidic devices.

  5. In-situ bioassays using caged bivalves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, M.H.; Salazar, S.M.

    1995-12-31

    It is important to make the distinction between chemical measurements to assess bioaccumulation potential versus biological measurements to assess potential bioeffects because bioaccumulation is not a bioeffect. Caging provides a unique opportunity to make synoptic measurements of each and facilitates making these measurements over space and time. Measuring bioaccumulation in resident and transplanted bivalves has probably been the most frequently used form of an in-situ bioassay because bivalves concentrate chemicals in their tissues. They are also easy to collect, cage, and measure. The authors have refined bivalve bioassay methods by minimizing the size range of test animals, making repetitive measurements of the same individuals, and standardizing test protocols for a variety of applications. They are now attempting to standardize criteria for accepting and interpreting data in the same way that laboratory bioassays have been standardized. Growth measurements can serve two purposes in this assessment strategy: (1) An integrated biological response endpoint that is easily quantifiable and with significance to the population, and (2) A means of calibrating bioaccumulation by assessing the relative health and physiological state of tissues that have accumulated the chemicals. In general, the authors have found the highest bioconcentration factors associated with the highest growth rates, the highest concentrations ({micro}g/g) of chemicals in juvenile mussels, and the highest chemical content ({micro}g/animal) in adult mussels. Without accounting for possible dilution of chemical concentrations by tissue growth or magnification through degrowth, contaminant concentrations can be misleading. Examples are provided for the Sudbury River in Massachusetts (Elliptio complanata), San Diego Bay (Mytilus galloprovincialis), and the Harbor Island Superfund Site in Puget Sound (Mytilus trossulus).

  6. Active pelagic migrations of the bivalve Macoma balthica are dangerous

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, J.G.; Kock, R.P; Wolff, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The bivalve Macoma balthica migrates twice during the benthic part of its life cycle. During the spring migration (May-June), the newly settled spat (0-group) migrates to the nurseries in the high intertidal. Seven to nine months later, the bivalves migrate back to the low tidal flats and the subtid

  7. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, David A; Sutton, Mark D; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-12-07

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans ('great-appendage' arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids).

  8. Nutritional strategies of the hydrothermal ecosystem bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pennec, Marcel; Donval, Anne; Herry, Angèle

    Studies of deep-sea hydrothermal bivalves have revealed that the species, which are strictly dependent upon the interstitial fluid emissions, derive their food indirectly via symbiotic relationships with chemosynthetic bacteria present in their gill tissues. As the gill plays the main trophic role, structural and ultrastructural modifications occur in the digestive tract. Scanning and transmission electron microscope studies reveal that the digestive system of species belonging to the genera Calyptogena, Bathymodiolus and Bathypecten have anatomical differences. In Calyptogena, the reduction of several parts of the digestive tract and the stomach content which is either empty or full, according to the various species examined indicate that the digestive system is hardly if at all functional. In Bathymodiolus, the labial palps are well developed, the stomach is always full with particles and the two cellular types, digestive and secretory, are present in the digestive gland. All these characteristics indicate that the digestive system is functional. In Bathypecten, the digestive tract is well developed and it seems that it plays the main trophic role. We conclude that the nutritional strategies of the hydrothermal vents bivalves are quite varied. They range from a normal trophic process, through a mixotrophic diet, to one based purely on chemoautotrophic bacteria. The strategy of each species is adapted to and influences its distribution.

  9. Artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets with excellent mechanical and thermally conductive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaoliang; Ye, Lei; Yu, Shuhui; Li, Hao; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jianbin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Inspired by the nano/microscale hierarchical structure and the precise inorganic/organic interface of natural nacre, we fabricated artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets (NF-BNNSs) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) via a vacuum-assisted self-assembly technique. The artificial nacre-like papers exhibit excellent tensile strength (125.2 MPa), on a par with that of the natural nacre, and moreover display a 30% higher toughness (2.37 MJ m-3) than that of the natural nacre. These excellent mechanical properties result from an ordered `brick-and-mortar' arrangement of NF-BNNSs and PVA, in which the long-chain PVA molecules act as the bridge to link NF-BNNSs via hydrogen bonds. The resulting papers also render high thermal conductivity (6.9 W m-1 K-1), and reveal their superiority as flexible substrates to support light-emitting-diode chips. The combined mechanical and thermal properties make the materials highly desirable as flexible substrates for next-generation commercial portable electronics.Inspired by the nano/microscale hierarchical structure and the precise inorganic/organic interface of natural nacre, we fabricated artificial nacre-like papers based on noncovalent functionalized boron nitride nanosheets (NF-BNNSs) and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) via a vacuum-assisted self-assembly technique. The artificial nacre-like papers exhibit excellent tensile strength (125.2 MPa), on a par with that of the natural nacre, and moreover display a 30% higher toughness (2.37 MJ m-3) than that of the natural nacre. These excellent mechanical properties result from an ordered `brick-and-mortar' arrangement of NF-BNNSs and PVA, in which the long-chain PVA molecules act as the bridge to link NF-BNNSs via hydrogen bonds. The resulting papers also render high thermal conductivity (6.9 W m-1 K-1), and reveal their superiority as flexible substrates to support light-emitting-diode chips. The combined mechanical and thermal properties make

  10. Lower Jurassic beds with bivalves in south Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Debeljak

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available The Lower Jurassic beds of south Slovenia outcrop on a surface of several hundred km^ with their thickness in places exceeding 300 meters. They were deposited on the Dinaric Carbonate Platform. In them rich accumulations of characteristic bivalves occur that in Pliensbachian and Toarcian inhabited the wide interconnected shallow water regions of the western and southern margins of Tethysand the eastern Pacific. The most interesting are three large bivalve species:Lithiotis problematica, Cochlearites loppianus and Lithiopedalion scutatus.In addition, numerous other genera can be found: Gervilleiopema, Mytilus, Opisoma and Pachyrisma (with subgenera Pachymegalodon and Durga.The bivalves formed in the region of south Slovenia, in the prevailingly quiet environment of the restricted shelf, sea-bottom mats or biostromes. Their shells can be only rarely found in their growth position. The horizon with bivalves ("lithiotid horizon" in south Slovenia is attributed to Pliensbachian (Domerian. It isup to 75 metres thick and it almost does not pinch out. Within it individual lumachelles of bivalves occur which are from several centimetres to ten metres thick.They are almost exclusively associated with dark, micritic, in places marly limestone and bituminous dolomite. The biodiversity in lumachelles is very low. The intermediate beds that do not contain bivalves mostly consist of oolitic and biospariticlimestone. In this article some localities from various areas of the carbonate platform are described. Considered are paleogeographical and paleoecological conditions that permitted the existence of this typical bivalve fauna.

  11. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible.

  12. Bivalve reefs from the Upper Triassic of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz T. Fürsich

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Upper Triassic Nayband Formation of east-central Iran, bivalves repeatedly form small patch reefson a mid to outer mixed carbonate-siliciclastic ramp in close stratigraphic neighbourhood to coral and coralspongereefs. In contrast to other Triassic-Jurassic bivalve-dominated patch reefs, the bivalve reefs of theNayband Formation are characterized by a comparatively high diversity of framebuilding taxa. These includetaxa from three different families, i.e., the ostreids Umbostrea emamii, U. iranica and U.? aff. parasiticum, the prospondylids Newaagia stocklini and Persia monstrosa, and the plicatulids Eoplicatula parvadehensis and Pseudoplacunopsis asymmetrica. The bivalve reef constructors may have had a competitive advantage over coral and calcareous sponges in environments characterized by a higher degree of turbidity and/or higher nutrient contents.

  13. Non-explosive hydrogen and helium burnings Abundance predictions from the NACRE reaction rate compilation

    CERN Document Server

    Arnould, M; Jorissen, A

    1999-01-01

    The abundances of the isotopes of the elements from C to Al produced by the non-explosive CNO, NeNa and MgAl modes of hydrogen burning, as well as by helium burning, are calculated with the thermonuclear rates recommended by the European compilation of reaction rates for astrophysics (NACRE: details about NACRE may be found at http://astro.ulb.ac.be. This electronic address provides many data of nuclear astrophysics interest and also offers the possibility of generating interactively tables of reaction rates for networks and temperature grids selected by the user). The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on the derived abundances is discussed in the framework of a simple parametric astrophysical model. These calculations have the virtue of being a guide in the selection of the nuclear uncertainties that have to be duly analyzed in detailed model stars, particularly in order to perform meaningful confrontations between abundance observations and predictions. They are also hoped to help nuclear astrophysici...

  14. From colloidal nanoparticles to a single crystal: new insights into the formation of nacre's aragonite tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gangsheng; Xu, Jun

    2013-04-01

    Nacre has long served as a model for understanding the biomineralization mechanism and designing bio-inspired materials. However, its basic building blocks, the aragonite tablets, are still under debate in terms of their fine structure at the nanoscale and corresponding formation mechanism. Here, using a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and X-ray diffractometer, we comparatively investigate the immature and mature tablet from the green mussel's nacre. We find that: (1) the early immature tablet consists of closely-packed colloidal nanoparticles, which contain nanocrystals surrounded by the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase. Moreover, these nanocrystals are generally different in shape, size, and orientation; (2) the immature tablet can grow via oriented attachment besides via transformation of the ACC phase; and (3) with growth, the colloidal nanoparticles gradually increase in crystallinity and size until fully crystallized and fused together, leading to a mature tablet that is a monolithic single crystal of aragonite. Based on these findings, we propose a new model showing how the mature tablet evolves from the primary colloidal ACC nanoparticles. We expect this work will provide new insights into the formation of single crystal biominerals via the amorphous precursor route.

  15. Isotopic fingerprints of bacterial chemosymbiosis in the bivalve Loripes lacteus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, A.; Stannek, L.; Blumenberg, M.; Taviani, M.; Sigovini, M.; Wrede, C.; Thiel, V.; Hoppert, M.

    2012-04-01

    Metazoans with chemosynthetic bacterial endosymbionts are widespread in marine habitats and respective endosymbioses are known from seven recent animal phyla. However, little is known about endosymbioses in fossil settings and, hence, ecological significance in earth history. In the presented project, we investigate the ancient and recent bivalve fauna living at marine sedimentary oxic/anoxic interfaces. Two bivalve species collected from the same benthic environment - a Mediterranean lagoon - were studied in detail. The diet of Loripes lacteus is based on thiotrophic gill symbionts whereas Venerupis aureus is a filter feeding bivalve without symbionts. The presence of three key enzymes from sulfur oxidation (APS-reductase), carbon fixation (RubisCO) and assimilation of nitrogen (glutamine synthetase [GS]) were detected by immunofluorescence in symbionts of Loripes and/or by activity tests in living specimens. In search of biosignatures associated with thiotrophic chemosymbionts that might be suitable for detection of chemosymbiotic diets in recent and fossil bivalve shells, we analyzed the isotopic composition of shell lipids (δ13C) and the bulk organic matrix of the shell (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S). We could show that the combined δ15N and δ13C values from shell extracts are stable in subfossil (Pleistocene) bivalve specimens, as long as the isotopic data is "calibrated" with respective signatures from a filter feeding bivalve sampled from the same site or lithostratigraphic bed.

  16. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote–microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. PMID:28100665

  17. Cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prejbisz, A.; Lenders, J.W.M.; Eisenhofer, G.; Januszewicz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical expression of phaeochromocytoma may involve numerous cardiovascular manifestations, but usually presents as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension associated with other signs and symptoms of catecholamine excess. Most of the life-threatening cardiovascular manifestations of phaeochromocytoma,

  18. Influence of the Depth on the Shape and Thickness of Nacre Tablets of Pinctada margaritifera Pearl Oyster, and on Oxygen Isotopic Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthe Rousseau

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nacre, or mother of pearl, is composed of aragonite tablets and is produced by some mollusks. Because of the highly organized internal structure, chemical complexity, mechanical properties and optical effects of nacre, its formation is among the best-studied examples of calcium carbonate biomineralization. The pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera is harvested in French Polynesia for pearl farming. The quality of the pearl depends on the quality of the nacre on its surface and its iridescent colors are affected by the thickness of the layers. Here we report on an experimental study conducted to influence the shape and the thickness of nacre tablets by keeping pearl oysters at four different depths (7, 20, 30 and 39 m for one week. Scanning electron microscopy was used to measure the thickness of the nacre tablets and to analyze their final shape. The shape of the tablets changed from hexagonal to rhomboid at a depth of 39 m. The change in shape led to a change in size. The thickness of the tablets was reduced by between 16 and 30% on average. We also measured the oxygen isotopic composition using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. In this study, we demonstrated that depth can modify the size, shape and thickness of nacre tablets, but not the d18O. This environmental modification is important for the biomineralization of the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera.

  19. Non-explosive hydrogen and helium burnings: abundance predictions from the NACRE reaction rate compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnould, M.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.

    1999-07-01

    The abundances of the isotopes of the elements from C to Al produced by the non-explosive CNO, NeNa and MgAl modes of hydrogen burning, as well as by helium burning, are calculated with the thermonuclear rates recommended by the European compilation of reaction rates for astrophysics (NACRE). The impact of nuclear physics uncertainties on the derived abundances is discussed in the framework of a simple parametric astrophysical model. These calculations have the virtue of being a guide in the selection of the nuclear uncertainties that have to be duly analyzed in detailed model stars, particularly in order to perform meaningful confrontations between abundance observations and predictions. They are also hoped to help nuclear astrophysicists pinpointing the rate uncertainties that have to be reduced most urgently. An electronic version of this paper, with colour figures, is available at {\\it http://astro.ulb.ac.be}

  20. Role of the polymer phase in the mechanics of nacre-like composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebel, Tobias P.; Bouville, Florian; Kokkinis, Dimitri; Studart, André R.

    2016-11-01

    Although strength and toughness are often mutually exclusive properties in man-made structural materials, nature is full of examples of composite materials that combine these properties in a remarkable way through sophisticated multiscale architectures. Understanding the contributions of the different constituents to the energy dissipating toughening mechanisms active in these natural materials is crucial for the development of strong artificial composites with a high resistance to fracture. Here, we systematically study the influence of the polymer properties on the mechanics of nacre-like composites containing an intermediate fraction of mineral phase (57 vol%). To this end, we infiltrate ceramic scaffolds prepared by magnetically assisted slip casting (MASC) with monomers that are subsequently cured to yield three drastically different polymers: (i) poly(lauryl methacrylate) (PLMA), a soft and weak elastomer; (ii) poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), a strong, stiff and brittle thermoplastic; and (iii) polyether urethane diacrylate-co-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PUA-PHEMA), a tough polymer of intermediate strength and stiffness. By combining our experimental data with finite element modeling, we find that stiffer polymers can increase the strength of the composite by reducing stress concentrations in the inorganic scaffold. Moreover, infiltrating the scaffolds with tough polymers leads to composites with high crack initiation toughness KIC. An organic phase with a minimum strength and toughness is also required to fully activate the mechanisms programmed within the ceramic structure for a rising R-curve behavior. Our results indicate that a high modulus of toughness is a key parameter for the selection of polymers leading to strong and tough bioinspired nacre-like composites.

  1. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., organism and high (>90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope

  2. Extrahepatic manifestations of HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grignoli, R; Goossens, N; Negro, F

    2015-03-01

    The hepatic consequences of an infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) are well recognised, but extrahepatic manifestations of HCV may be just as severe. Here we have reviewed various extrahepatic manifestations of HCV such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, lymphoma, metabolic features and neurologic consequences and we discuss pathogenesis and management of these clinical problems. We concluded with important aspects of therapy with novel anti-HCV agents and its effects on extrahepatic manifestations.

  3. PARANEOPLASTIC MANIFESTATIONS IN CHILDREN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEGRAAF, JH; TAMMINGA, RYJ; KAMPS, WA

    1994-01-01

    Paraneoplastic manifestations are signs and symptoms observed in patients with cancer, distant from the tumour or its metastases and not caused by invasion, obstruction or bulk mass. In children with cancer, paraneoplastic manifestations are rare and distinct from those observed in adults. Knowledge

  4. Atypical manifestations of leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo, Chaturaka; Balaji, Krishan; Fernando, Sumadhya Deepika

    2015-05-01

    Leptospirosis is an illness with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and severe illness affects nearly all organ systems. Serious and potentially life-threatening clinical manifestations of acute leptospirosis are caused by both direct tissue invasion by spirochaetes and by the host immune responses. In its severe form, leptospirosis can cause multi-organ dysfunction and death in a matter of days. Therefore it is critical to suspect and recognize the disease early, in order to initiate timely treatment. While the classical presentation of the disease is easily recognized by experienced clinicians practising in endemic regions, rarer manifestations can be easily missed. In this systematic review, we summarize the atypical manifestations reported in literature in patients with confirmed leptospirosis. Awareness of these unusual manifestations would hopefully guide clinicians towards early diagnosis.

  5. Additions to the Marine bivalve mollusks of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Paredes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The following species of marine bivalve mollusks were recorded for the first time from the Peruvian sea: Glycymeris (Axinactus delessertii (Reeve, 1843; Botula cylista Berry, 1959; Parahyotissa (Pliohyotissa quercinus (Sowerby II, 1871; Pitar (Pitar helenae Olsson, 1961; Eurhomalea lenticularis (Sowerby I, 1835; and Cardiomya planetica (Dall, 1908. Description, habitat and the geographical distribution are cited for each species.

  6. The adaptive value of migrations for the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, Johan Gerrit

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is about the movements of the coastal marine bivalve Macoma balthica. M. balthica migrates over several kilometres between nurseries at high tidal flats, where juveniles are found in high numbers, and the adult habitat on low-lying tidal flats. Most benthic species in the Wadden Sea have

  7. Molecular approaches to bivalve population studies: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir-Cosmin David

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review concerning the importance of molecular approaches in bivalve’s population study. The class Bivalvia counts more than 20,000 species with a wide distribution both in freshwater and marine environment. Given their importance especially in aquaculture as a source of food, they have also a strong economic impact upon human society. This review encompasses best practices in bivalve studies from field sampling to laboratory analyses, addressing questions about molecular methods and tools commonly used by specialized researchers. Molecular tools specifically deals with phylogeography, population genetics, biology, ecology and taxonomy. In all these fields, molecular markers play an important role by completing some unanswered questions such as the role of the bivalves in the ecosystems in relation to anthropogenic and global change issues. Numerous genetic markers were developed for specific problems, thereferore we identify as a major issue the absence of uniform and universally recognized methods. The various sections of the paper emphasize from peer reviewed literature literature which are considered the most useful markers, costs and benefits of different methodology, major gaps of knowledge.in bivalve population studies. By reviewing virtually all genetic markers employed during nearly half a century of bivalve molecular research, in our opinion two are the best option “tools: the mitochondrial COI (cytochrome oxidase subunit I and nuclear ITS2 (internal transcribed spacer 2.

  8. The Holocene and Recent marine Bivalve Mollusca of Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regteren Altena, van C.O.

    1968-01-01

    As the preparation of an annotated check list of the marine Mollusca of Surinam (Dutch Guiana) will take some more years, it was thought appropriate to publish a preliminary report on the bivalves. This report consists of a list of 126 species with a few notes containing, i.a., the description of se

  9. Lower Carboniferous marine bivalves from the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amler, M.R.W.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous bivalves of the Vegamián and Genicera formations are described, followed by a brief discussion on palaeoenvironmental and palaeogeographical aspects. The black shales of the Vegamián Fm. (Tournaisian) yield a peculiar association of euchondriid taxa (Euchondria wagneri sp. no

  10. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    dimensional (3D) objects, the first ever artificial evolution of a physical bivalve shell was performed. The result was a vertically flattened shell occupying only the top sediment layers. Insufficient control of the sediment was the major limitation of the setup and restricted the significance of the results...

  11. Cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairamani Kandan

    2016-07-01

    Conclusions: This study shows that cardiovascular manifestations are quite common and varied in hyperthyroidism which are to be looked for in the management. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3032-3038

  12. Nacre-like hybrid films: Structure, properties, and the effect of relative humidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abba, Mohammed T; Hunger, Philipp M; Kalidindi, Surya R; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2015-03-01

    Functional materials often are hybrids composed of biopolymers and mineral constituents. The arrangement and interactions of the constituents frequently lead to hierarchical structures with exceptional mechanical properties and multifunctionality. In this study, hybrid thin films with a nacre-like brick-and-mortar microstructure were fabricated in a straightforward and reproducible manner through manual shear casting using the biopolymer chitosan as the matrix material (mortar) and alumina platelets as the reinforcing particles (bricks). The ratio of inorganic to organic content was varied from 0% to 15% and the relative humidities from 36% to 75% to determine their effects on the mechanical properties. It was found that increasing the volume fraction of alumina from 0% to 15% results in a twofold increase in the modulus of the film, but decreases the tensile strength by up to 30%, when the volume fraction of alumina is higher than 5%. Additionally, this study quantifies and illustrates the critical role of the relative humidity on the mechanical properties of the hybrid film. Increasing the relative humidity from 36% to 75% decreases the modulus and strength by about 45% and triples the strain at failure. These results suggest that complex hybrid materials can be manufactured and tailor made for specific applications or environmental conditions.

  13. Haematological manifestations of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyaz, Anum; Igoe, Ann; Kurien, Biji T; Danda, Debashish; James, Judith A; Stafford, Haraldine A; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manifestation. Neutropenia can lead to morbidity and mortality from increased susceptibility to infection. Severe neutropenia can be successfully treated with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. While related to disease activity, there is no specific therapy for lymphopenia. Severe lymphopenia may require the use of prophylactic therapy to prevent select opportunistic infections. Isolated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura maybe the first manifestation of SLE by months or even years. Some manifestations of lupus occur more frequently in association with low platelet count in these patients, for example, neuropsychiatric manifestation, haemolytic anaemia, the antiphospholipid syndrome and renal disease. Thrombocytopenia can be regarded as an important prognostic indicator of survival in patients with SLE. Medical, surgical and biological treatment modalities are reviewed for this manifestation. First-line therapy remains glucocorticoids. Through our review, we conclude glucocorticoids do produce a response in majority of patients initially, but sustained response to therapy is unlikely. Glucocorticoids are used as first-line therapy in patients with SLE with AIHA, but there is no conclusive evidence to guide second-line therapy. Rituximab is promising in refractory and non-responding AIHA. TTP is not recognised as a criteria for classification of SLE, but there is a considerable overlap between the presenting features of TTP and SLE, and a few patients with SLE have concurrent

  14. The Bivalve Yangtzedonta is not the Brachiopod Xianfengella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wen

    2005-01-01

    The alleged "holotype" of the bivalve Yangtzedontaprimitiva Yu, 1985 figured by Qian (2001) is a broken and distorted specimen of the brachiopod Xianfengella prima He and Yang, 1982 and not the holotype of Y. primitiva. Qian contends that the oldest recognized monoplacophoran, Maikhanella pristinis (Jiang, 1980), is neither a monoplacophoran nor the oldest molluscan fossil in the Meishucunian Stage of China. Furthermore, he considers that the oldest bivalve Xianfengoconcha elliptica Zhang, 1980 is an inarticulate brachiopod, not a mollusc. Watsonella yunnanensis (He and Yang, 1982), is associated with Yangtzedonta primitiva Yu but indicates no evolutionary relationship between the Classes Rostroconchia and Bivalvia in the Lower Cambrian Zhongyicun Member of the Yuhucun Formation. Qian's confusion in using non-molluscan fossils to discuss the early evolution of shelled molluscs also confuses the basic concepts of the respective groups.

  15. Bivalves: Indicateurs de pollution microbienne des eaux littorales

    OpenAIRE

    Plusquellec, A; Beucher, M; Legal, Y

    1984-01-01

    Une étude a été réalisée en baie de Concarneau (France), dans le but de comparer la contamination de l'eau et de moules d'un même site naturel par le dénombrement des indicateurs fécaux usuels : Coliformes fécaux et Streptocoques fécaux. La concentration par les bivalves est importante, mais diffère pour les deux indicateurs bactériens. Le dénombrement des Streptocoques fécaux dans les bivalves permet d'annuler une partie des variations observées dans l'eau. L'efficacité des moules comme maté...

  16. Indian marine bivalves: Potential source of antiviral drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Bichurina, M.A.; Sovetova, M.; Boikov, Y.A.

    in large quantities by traditional methods and sold live in the market for human consumption. The economically important sp e cies of marine bivalves are green mussel ( Perna viridis ), e s tuarine oyster ( Crassostrea madrasensis ), giant oyster... in developing an effecti ve drug has been the unique characteristics of antigenic variation of virus resulting in the emergence of new variant virus strains 14 . There are a number of antiviral drugs introduced in the market such as tricyclic sy m- metric...

  17. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  18. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Waldbusser

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4 with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material

  19. [Unusual Migraine Manifestations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, Sivan; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Sandor, Peter S

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a complex neurologic disorder by which several systems of the central nervous system (autonomous system, affective, cognitive, sensoric and motoric system) may be affected on different levels. Around a fourth of the patients have migraine aura. The most common aura is the visual aura, followed by sensoric aura. But motoric deficits as well as deficits of higher cortical centers (disorders of thinking, orientation, coherence or concentration) may occur as well. In analogy with a headache calendar, an aura calendar can deliver important help in the diagnostic process of rare migraine manifestations and prevent underdiagnosis of unusual migraine manifestations. Complex migraine manifestations are diagnoses of exlusion, and a broad diagnostic work-up is warranted in order to exclude dangerous neurologic pathologies. There are no specific therapeutic recommendations, as there is a lack of randomized controlled studies.

  20. Absence of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) in three marine bivalves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandermeulen, J.H. (Bedford Inst. of Oceanography, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia); Penrose, W.R.

    1978-05-01

    Bivalves exposed to short-term (4 d) and long-term (6 yr) oil pollution were assayed for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) and N-demethylase activity. Short-term induction studies were carried out on Mya arenaria, Mytilus edulis, and Ostrea edulis incubated in aqueous extracts of Kuwait crude oil or Bunker C (fuel) oil. For the chronic-induction studies Mya arenaria and Mytilus edulis were collected from oiled clam beds (Arrow Bunker C) in Chedabucto Bay, Nova Scotia. None of the bivalves showed any basal or petroleum-hydrocarbon-induced aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase or N-demethylase activity, as shown by their inability to metabolize benzopyrene or imipramine. In contrast, oil-free control trout and trout taken from a polluted lake readily metabolized both these compounds. The inability of these bivalves to degrade petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons and the tendency of these compounds to accumulate in their tissues present an opportunity for transfer of unaltered hydrocarbons into the food chain.

  1. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  2. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome in tissues secreting purple and white nacre in the pearl mussel Hyriopsis cumingii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyi Bai

    Full Text Available The triangle sail mussel Hyriopsis cumingii (Lea is the most important mussel species used for commercial freshwater pearl production in China. Mussel color is an important indicator of pearl quality. To identify genes involved in the nacre coloring, we conducted RNA-seq and obtained 541,268 sequences (298 bp average size and 440,034 sequences (293 bp average size in secreting purple and white nacre libraries (P- and W-libraries, respectively. The 981,302 Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs were assembled into 47,812 contigs and 289,386 singletons. In BLASTP searches of the deduced protein, 22,495 were proteins with functional annotations. Thirty-three genes involved in pearl or shell formation were identified. Digital expression analysis identified a total of 358 differentially expressed genes, and 137 genes in the P-library and 221 genes in the W-library showed significantly higher expression. Furthermore, a set of SSR motifs and SNPs between the two samples was identified from the ESTs, which provided the markers for genetic linkage, QTL analysis and future breeding. These EST sequences provided valuable information to further understand the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation, color determination and evolution of the pearl or shell.

  3. Databases and tools for nuclear astrophysics applications. BRUSsels Nuclear LIBrary (BRUSLIB), Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REactions II (NACRE II) and Nuclear NETwork GENerator (NETGEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Goriely, S.; Jorissen, A.; Chen, G. L.; Arnould, M.

    2013-01-01

    An update of a previous description of the BRUSLIB + NACRE package of nuclear data for astrophysics and of the web-based nuclear network generator NETGEN is presented. The new version of BRUSLIB contains the latest predictions of a wide variety of nuclear data based on the most recent version of the Brussels-Montreal Skyrme-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model. The nuclear masses, radii, spin/parities, deformations, single-particle schemes, matter densities, nuclear level densities, E1 strength functions, fission properties, and partition functions are provided for all nuclei lying between the proton and neutron drip lines over the 8 ≤ Z ≤ 110 range, whose evaluation is based on a unique microscopic model that ensures a good compromise between accuracy, reliability, and feasibility. In addition, these various ingredients are used to calculate about 100 000 Hauser-Feshbach neutron-, proton-, α-, and γ-induced reaction rates based on the reaction code TALYS. NACRE is superseded by the NACRE II compilation for 15 charged-particle transfer reactions and 19 charged-particle radiative captures on stable targets with mass numbers A < 16. NACRE II features the inclusion of experimental data made available after the publication of NACRE in 1999 and up to 2011. In addition, the extrapolation of the available data to the very low energies of astrophysical relevance is improved through the systematic use of phenomenological potential models. Uncertainties in the rates are also evaluated on this basis. Finally, the latest release v10.0 of the web-based tool NETGEN is presented. In addition to the data already used in the previous NETGEN package, it contains in a fully documented form the new BRUSLIB and NACRE II data, as well as new experiment-based radiative neutron capture cross sections. The full new versions of BRUSLIB, NACRE II, and NETGEN are available electronically from the nuclear database at http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/NuclearData. The nuclear material is presented in

  4. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine L. Ly

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema.

  5. Inflammatory Manifestations of Lymphedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Catherine L.; Kataru, Raghu P.; Mehrara, Babak J.

    2017-01-01

    Lymphedema results from lymphatic insufficiency leading to a progressive inflammatory process that ultimately manifests as discomfort, recurrent infections, and, at times, secondary malignancy. Collectively, these morbidities contribute to an overall poor quality of life. Although there have been recent advances in microsurgical interventions, a conservative palliative approach remains the mainstay of treatment for this disabling disease. The absence of a cure is due to an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological changes that result in lymphedema. A histological hallmark of lymphedema is inflammatory cell infiltration and recent studies with animal models and clinical biopsy specimens have suggested that this response plays a key role in the pathology of the disease. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the ongoing research in and the current understanding of the inflammatory manifestations of lymphedema. PMID:28106728

  6. Haematological manifestations of lupus

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose was to compile information on the haematological manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), namely leucopenia, lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) and myelofibrosis. During our search of the English-language MEDLINE sources, we did not place a date-of-publication constraint. Hence, we have reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading SLE in combination with each manif...

  7. MANIFEST OF DEPTH SOCIOPSYCHOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    ZELITCHENKO ALEXANDER

    2013-01-01

    The observations of motives of activity of big groups (nations, confessions etc.) as a whole result in discovery of the part of unconscious mind that is common for all members of big group a collective unconscious. Two parts of collective unconscious may be determined: the collective superconscious known first as a group archetype and the collective subconscious, which manifest itself for example in phenomenon of collective trauma. Depth sociopsychology is a science about the collective uncon...

  8. Ocular manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathinam S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospiral uveitis is a common entity in tropical countries. Ocular manifestations are noted in the second phase of illness, but these remain under-diagnosed mainly because of the prolonged symptom-free period that separates the systemic manifestations from detection of ocular manifestations.Varying ophthalmic presentations and the intrinsic nature of different types of uveitis to mimic one another also challenge the accuracy of the diagnosis. Of the individual ocular signs, the combination of acute, non-granulomatous, panuveitis, hypopyon, vasculitis, optic disc edema, membranous vitreous opacities and absence of choroiditis or retinitis have high predictive value for the clinical diagnosis of leptospiral uveitis. Geographic location of the patient, occupation, socio-economic status, risk factors related to exposure, past history of fever or jaundice also aid in diagnosis.Steroids are the mainstay of treatment for leptospiral uveitis. Depending upon the severity and anatomical location of inflammatory lesion, topical, peri-ocular and/or systemic steroids are given. The prognosis is generally good, even when the inflammation is severe.

  9. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of alga

  10. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Kachhara; R L Jodhawat; K Bigyapati Devi

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions – the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina (Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten (Amussiopecten) labadyei d’Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne’) var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23° 50′N; 68

  11. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  12. Toxic dinoflagellates and Vibrio spp. act independently in bivalve larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Van Acker, E; Nevejan, N; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2016-10-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) and marine pathogens - like Vibrio spp. - are increasingly common due to climate change. These stressors affect the growth, viability and development of bivalve larvae. Little is known, however, about the potential for interactions between these two concurrent stressors. While some mixed exposures have been performed with adult bivalves, no such work has been done with larvae which are generally more sensitive. This study examines whether dinoflagellates and bacteria may interactively affect the viability and immunological resilience of blue mussel Mytilus edulis larvae. Embryos were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (100, 500, 2500 & 12,500 cells ml(-1)) of a dinoflagellate (Alexandrium minutum, Alexandrium ostenfeldii, Karenia mikimotoi, Protoceratium reticulatum, Prorocentrum cordatum, P. lima or P. micans), a known pathogen (Vibrio coralliilyticus/neptunius-like isolate or Vibrio splendidus; 10(5) CFU ml(-1)), or both. After five days of exposure, significant (p larval viability and larval development were found for all dinoflagellates (except P. cordatum) and V. splendidus. Yet, despite the individual effect of each stressor, no significant interactions were found between the pathogens and harmful algae. The larval viability and the phenoloxidase innate immune system responded independently to each stressor. This independence may be related to a differential timing of the effects of HABs and pathogens.

  13. Hierarchical Nacre Mimetics with Synergistic Mechanical Properties by Control of Molecular Interactions in Self-Healing Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baolei; Jasinski, Nils; Benitez, Alejandro; Noack, Manuel; Park, Daesung; Goldmann, Anja S; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Walther, Andreas

    2015-07-20

    Designing the reversible interactions of biopolymers remains a grand challenge for an integral mimicry of mechanically superior biological composites. Yet, they are the key to synergistic combinations of stiffness and toughness by providing sacrificial bonds with hidden length scales. To address this challenge, dynamic polymers were designed with low glass-transition temperature T(g) and bonded by quadruple hydrogen-bonding motifs, and subsequently assembled with high-aspect-ratio synthetic nanoclays to generate nacre-mimetic films. The high dynamics and self-healing of the polymers render transparent films with a near-perfectly aligned structure. Varying the polymer composition allows molecular control over the mechanical properties up to very stiff and very strong films (E≈45 GPa, σ(UTS)≈270 MPa). Stable crack propagation and multiple toughening mechanisms occur in situations of balanced dynamics, enabling synergistic combinations of stiffness and toughness. Excellent gas barrier properties complement the multifunctional property profile.

  14. Respiratory manifestations of hypothyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Jesper Roed; Winther, Kristian Hillert; Bonnema, Steen Joop

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypothyroidism has been associated with increased pulmonary morbidity and overall mortality. We conducted a systematic review to identify the prevalence and underlying mechanisms of respiratory problems among patients with thyroid insufficiency. METHODS: PubMed and EMBASE databases were...... searched for relevant literature from January 1950 through January 2015 with study eligibility criteria: English-language publications; Adult subclinical or overt hypothyroid patients; Intervention, observational or retrospective studies; and respiratory manifestations. We followed the PRISMA statement......% of newly diagnosed patients with overt hypothyroidism, and demonstrated reversibility following treatment. The evidence for or against a direct effect on pulmonary function was ambiguous. However, each of the above mentioned areas were only dealt with in a limited number of studies. Therefore, we refrain...

  15. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  16. Hepatitis C: extrahepatic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metts, Julius; Carmichael, Lesley; Kokor, Winfred; Scharffenberg, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multiple extrahepatic manifestations (EHM) affecting various organs in the body. Approximately 40% to 75% of patients with chronic HCV infection experience at least one clinical EHM during the course of the HCV infection. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (type 2) is the most documented EHM associated with chronic HCV infection. This has been documented in up to 50% of patients. Clinically, it presents as arthralgia, weakness, and cutaneous symptoms. Morphologically, immune complex depositions are identified in small vessels and glomerular capillary walls, leading to leukocytoclastic vasculitis in the skin and membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis in the kidney. In other EHMs of chronic HCV infection not related to cryoglobulinemia, such as Sjögren syndrome, lichen planus, and autoimmune thyroiditis, autoimmune processes resulting in chronic inflammatory infiltrates are thought to be the underlying mechanism.

  17. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Robledo, José A; Vasta, Gerardo R; Record, Nicholas R

    2014-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature). Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in prioritizing research

  18. Pulmonary manifestation of leptospirosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Kim, Chu Wan; Lee, Jung Sang; Kim, Suhng Gwon; Han, Yong Chol; Chang, Woo Hyun; Chi, Je Geun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-02-15

    Authors analysed and present chest X-ray findings of serologically proven leptospirosis from Seoul National University Hospital, either admitted or referred for serological verification, during recent 2 years. Radiological findings were correlated with the lung specimen findings of experimentally induced leptospirosis in guinea pig. The results are as follows: 1. 24 cases (56%) showed positive X-ray findings. 2. Predominant radiological patterns of involved lung were tiny dot, small nodule, rosette density in 11 cases, massive confluent consolidation in 4 cases, and diffuse ill-defined velly increased density in 9 cases. 3. Distribution of pulmonary lesions were bilateral (100%), non-lobar, non-segmental (95%), and there were conspicuous tendency of peripheral lung predominance. 4. Extrapulmonary manifestation, such as pleural effusion or cardiomegaly was rate. 5. Pulmonary lesions resolved completely usually 5 to 10 days after their appearance. 6. From the gross and microscopic findings of serially sacrificed guinea pig's lung and a case of autopsy, authors concluded that fine dot-like density in chest X-ray was due to paleolithic hemorrhage in intraalveolar space at initial stage, growing up to ressette density or confluent consolidation as the pathetic extends to surrounding lung forming purpura and coalescent hemorrhage.

  19. A nacre protein, n16.3, self-assembles to form protein oligomers that dimensionally limit and organize mineral deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Iva; Chang, Eric P; Lui, Michael; Rao, Ashit; Cölfen, Helmut; Evans, John Spencer

    2014-04-29

    The mollusk shell is a complex biological material that integrates mineral phases with organic macromolecular components such as proteins. The role of proteins in the formation of the nacre layer (aragonite mineral phase) is poorly understood, particularly with regard to the organization of mineral deposits within the protein extracellular matrix and the identification of which proteins are responsible for this task. We report new experiments that provide insight into the role of the framework nacre protein, n16.3 (Pinctada fucata), as an organizer or assembler of calcium carbonate mineral clusters. Using a combination of biophysical techniques, we find that recombinant n16.3 (r-n16.3) oligomerizes to form amorphous protein films and particles that possess regions of disorder and mobility. These supramolecular assemblies possess an intrinsically disordered C-terminal region (T64-W98) and reorganize in the presence of Ca(2+) ions to form clustered protein oligomers. This Ca(2+)-induced reorganization leads to alterations in the molecular environments of Trp residues, the majority of which reside in putative aggregation-prone cross-β strand regions. Potentiometric Ca(2+) titrations reveal that r-n16.3 does not significantly affect the formation of prenucleation clusters in solution, and this suggests a role for this protein in postnucleation mineralization events. This is verified in subsequent in vitro mineralization assays in which r-n16.3 demonstrates its ability to form gel-like protein phases that organize and cluster nanometer-sized single-crystal calcite relative to protein-deficient controls. We conclude that the n16 nacre framework proteome creates a protein gel matrix that organizes and dimensionally limits mineral deposits. This process is highly relevant to the formation of ordered, nanometer-sized nacre tablets in the mollusk shell.

  20. Gastrointestinal manifestations of endocrine disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christina Maser; Arnbjorn Toset; Sanziana Roman

    2006-01-01

    The hormonal interactions among the systems throughout the body are not fully understood; many vague clinical symptoms may in fact be manifestations of underlying endocrine diseases. The aim of the following review is to discuss gastrointestinal manifestations of surgically correctable endocrine diseases, focusing on abnormalities of thyroid function, cancer and finally autoimmune diseases. We also review manifestations of pancreatic endocrine tumors, and multiple endocrine neoplasia.

  1. [Extrahepatic manifestations in hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risum, Malene

    2011-05-09

    Hepatitis C does not only affect the liver, but also manifests outside the liver. The skin, kidneys and nervous system are often involved due to mixed cryoglobulinaemia. Porphyria cutanea tarda, lymphoma and thyroid diseases among others can also attend a chronic infection, but the exact pathogenesis behind these manifestations is not clearly mapped. Antiviral treatment is reported to induce sustained virological response in more than half of the treated patients with a variable clinical response in the extrahepatic manifestations.

  2. Databases and tools for nuclear astrophysics applications BRUSsels Nuclear LIBrary (BRUSLIB), Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REactions II (NACRE II) and Nuclear NETwork GENerator (NETGEN)

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Yi; Jorissen, Alain; Chen, Guangling; Arnould, Marcel; 10.1051/0004-6361/201220537

    2012-01-01

    An update of a previous description of the BRUSLIB+NACRE package of nuclear data for astrophysics and of the web-based nuclear network generator NETGEN is presented. The new version of BRUSLIB contains the latest predictions of a wide variety of nuclear data based on the most recent version of the Brussels-Montreal Skyrme-HFB model. The nuclear masses, radii, spin/parities, deformations, single-particle schemes, matter densities, nuclear level densities, E1 strength functions, fission properties, and partition functions are provided for all nuclei lying between the proton and neutron drip lines over the 8<=Z<=110 range, whose evaluation is based on a unique microscopic model that ensures a good compromise between accuracy, reliability, and feasibility. In addition, these various ingredients are used to calculate about 100000 Hauser-Feshbach n-, p-, a-, and gamma-induced reaction rates based on the reaction code TALYS. NACRE is superseded by the NACRE II compilation for 15 charged-particle transfer react...

  3. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palekar, Nicole A; Harrison, Stephen A

    2005-10-01

    Hepatitis C affects approximately 170 million people worldwide. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C infection are clinically evident in nearly 40% of patients. Much research has been done over the last decade to better understand their incidence, clinical presentation, mechanism of disease, and the role of antiviral therapy in their treatment. Of the commonly reported manifestations, cryoglobulinemia, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, and porphyria cutanea tarda remain the best understood manifestations. More recently, the association of insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus with chronic hepatitis C has been demonstrated. This paper serves to review the growing body of literature detailing the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C.

  4. Bioconcentration and biotransformation of [¹⁴C]methoxychlor in the brackish water bivalve Corbicula japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Minoru; Ohyama, Kazutoshi; Hayashi, Osamu; Satsuma, Koji; Sato, Kiyoshi

    2011-09-01

    To obtain basic information on the metabolic fate of xenobiotics in the brackish water, bivalve Corbicula japonica, bioconcentration and biotransformation experiments were performed using methoxychlor (MXC) as a model compound. Bivalves were exposed to [ring-U-¹⁴C]MXC (10 µg L⁻¹) for 28 days under semi-static conditions followed by a 14-day depuration phase. The ¹⁴C concentration in the bivalves rapidly increased and reached a steady state after exposure for 7 days (BCFss = 2010); however, it rapidly decreased with a half-life of 2.2 days in the depuration phase. Mono- and bis-demethylated MXC, and their corresponding sulphate conjugates, were identified as minor metabolites. No glycoside conjugates (including glucuronide and glucoside) were detected. Despite this biotransformation system, bivalves were found to excrete retained MXC mostly unchanged although its relatively hydrophobic nature.

  5. Effect of different extraction procedures on antimicrobial activity of marine bivalves: A comparison

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Chatterji, A.; Das, P.

    Anti-bacterial activity was evaluated in different crude extracts of five commercially important edible marine bivalves, namely Meretrix casta (Chemnitz), Polymesoda (Geloina) P. erosa (Solander), Perna viridis (Linnaeus), Crassostrea gryphoides...

  6. Respiratory manifestations in amyloidosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ling; CAI Bai-qiang; ZHONG Xu; ZHU Yuan-jue

    2005-01-01

    Background Amyloidosis is a collection of diseases in which different proteins are deposited. Amyloid deposits occur in systemic and organ-limited forms. In both systemic and localized forms of the disease, lung can be involved. The aim of this study was to explore the different respiratory manifestations of amyloidosis. Methods Chest radiology, clinical presentations, bronchoscopic/laryngoscopic findings and lung function data of 59 patients with amyloidosis involving respiratory tract collected during January 1986 to March 2005, were analysed.Results Of the 16 cases with localized respiratory tract amyloidosis, 8 had the lesions in the trachea and the bronchi, 2 in the larynx and the trachea, 5 in the larynx and/or the pharynx, and 1 in the lung parenchyma. Of 43 systemic amyloidosis with respiratory tract involvement, 3 had the lesions in bronchi, 13 in lung parenchyma, 33 in pleura, 8 in mediastina, 1 in nose and 1 in pharynx. Chest X-rays were normal in most cases of tracheobronchial amyloidosis. CT, unlike chest X-rays, showed irregular luminal narrowing, airway wall thickening with calcifications and soft tissue shadows in airway lumen. Localized lung parenchymal amyloidosis presented as multiple nodules. Multiple nodular opacities, patch shadows and reticular opacities were the main radiological findings in systemic amyloidosis with lung parenchymal involvement. In pleural amyloidosis, pleural effusions and pleural thickening were detected. Mediastinal and/or hilar adenopathy were also a form of lung involvement in systemic amyloidosis. The major bronchoscopic findings of tracheobronchial amyloidosis were narrowing of airway lumen, while nodular, 'tumour like' or 'bubble like' masses, with missing or vague cartilaginous rings, were detected in about half of the patients.Conclusions Localized respiratory tract amyloidosis mostly affects the trachea and the bronchi. Chest X-rays are not sensitive to detect these lesions. Systemic amyloidosis often involves

  7. [Energy metabolism and body mass ratio in bivalves mollusca (Mollusca: Bivalvia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, I G; Kleĭmenov, S Iu; Radzinskaia, L I

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of experimental and published data, the interspecific and intraspecific (ontogenetic) dependence of energy metabolism on body weight in bivalves was calculated. Changes in the parameters of intraspecific allometric dependence under the effect of environmental factors were analyzed. The rate of comparable standard metabolism (coefficient a at k = 0.76) was shown to vary in different taxonomic and zoogeographic groups of bivalves.

  8. Influence of intertidal recreational fisheries and 'bouchot' mussel culture on bivalve recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupoint, Nicolas; Barbier, Pierrick; Tremblay, Réjean; Archambault, Philippe; McKindsey, Christopher W; Winkler, Gesche; Meziane, Tarik; Olivier, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In coastal environments, fishing and aquaculture may be important sources of disturbance to ecosystem functioning, the quantification of which must be assessed to make them more sustainable. In the Chausey Archipelago, France, recreational fishing and commercial shellfish farming are the only two evident anthropogenic activities, dominated by bivalve hand-raking and 'bouchot' mussel culture, respectively. This study evaluates the impact of both activities on bivalve recruitment dynamics by comparing primary recruitment intensity (short-term effect) and recruitment efficiency (medium-term effect) by sampling bivalves in reference (undisturbed) and disturbed (i.e. subjected to hand-raking or in 'bouchot' mussel culture areas) parcels throughout and at the end of the recruitment season, respectively. Specific hypotheses evaluated were that (H1) bivalve hand-raking negatively affects bivalve recruitment and that (H2) 'bouchot' mussel culture promotes bivalve recruitment. Patterns in bivalve community structure in reference parcels (i.e. natural pattern) differed between initial and final recruitment, underlining the great importance of early post-settlement processes, particularly secondary dispersal. Primary recruitment intensity was inhibited in hand-raking parcels whereas it was promoted in 'bouchot' mussel culture parcels, but the effect on recruitment efficiency was muted for both activities due to post-settlement processes. Nevertheless, the importance of effects that occur during the first step of recruitment should not be ignored as they may affect bivalve communities and induce immediate consequences on the trophic web through a cascade effect. Finally, it is highlighted that hand-raking damages all life stages of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule, one of the major target species, suggesting that this activity should be managed with greater caution than is currently done.

  9. Nursery function of coastal temperate benthic habitats: New insight from the bivalve recruitment perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Pierrick; Meziane, Tarik; Forêt, Martin; Tremblay, Réjean; Robert, René; Olivier, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Marine habitat function has been typically investigated in terms of biogeochemical regulation but rarely in terms of population renewal, which is mainly controlled by recruitment dynamics. The recruitment phase is crucial for organisms with a bentho-pelagic life cycle, such as bivalves, and it regulates the population renewal success. This study provides new insight on the role of temperate benthic habitats on bivalve recruitment, as a function of nursery areas. Six dominant benthic habitats of the Chausey archipelago (Normandy, France) were studied. In each habitat, bivalve recruit assemblages were described at the end of two reproductive seasons. Furthermore, Ostrea edulis juveniles were immerged on each habitat during two months to compare growth performances and feeding status, estimated by fatty acid composition. Recruit assemblages differ from each habitat according to sediment grain-size composition and bathymetrical levels. Subtidal habitats, and especially Crepidula fornicata banks and Glycymeris glycymeris coarse sands, supported the highest species abundance and richness of recruits. All O. edulis juveniles fed on the same trophic resources but digestive glands of juveniles from C. fornicata banks were more concentrated in total fatty acids than those from subtidal G. glycymeris coarse sands and maerl banks. Our results depict the key role of subtidal and structured habitats, composed of ecosystem engineers, in enhancing bivalve recruitment and extending the bivalve population renewal. This study suggests that the crucial role of these habitats as bivalve nurseries must be integrated in management perspectives.

  10. Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome: cutaneous manifestations*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Stolf, Hamilton Ometto; Polizel, Juliana Ocanha; Munhoz, Tânia; Brandão, Marcela Calixto; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Hyaline fibromatosis syndrome is the current name for clinical manifestations of diseases previously known as “infantile systemic hyalinosis” and “juvenile hyaline fibromatosis”. The authors report representative clinical cases of each one of the above subtypes with emphasis on cutaneous manifestations and difficulties for early diagnosis in this syndrome, essentially of multidisciplinary approach. PMID:27192526

  11. Cerebrovascular manifestations following scorpion sting

    OpenAIRE

    Nataraja P; Naveen Prasad SV; Obulareddy G; Anil Ch; Naveen T; Vengamma B

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion sting is a common clinical problem in Rayalaseema area of Andhra Pradesh State in India. Clilnical presentation of scorpion envenomation can range from mild local pain to systemic manifestations involving almost all systems. Cerebrovascular manifestations of scorpion sting have been sparsely documented. We report two cases who presented with ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke following scorpion sting.

  12. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  13. Ocular manifestations of feline herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, S E

    2001-03-01

    Feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) infection is ubiquitous in the domestic cat population worldwide. The most common clinical ocular manifestations of infection with FHV-1 are conjunctivitis and keratitis. This paper reviews the pathogenesis of feline herpesvirus-1 and discusses the various clinical ocular manifestations, diagnostic techniques and treatment of FHV-1-induced diseases. Ocular manifestations include: conjunctivitis, keratitis, stromal keratitis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, ophthalmia neonatorium, symblepharon, corneal sequestrum, eosinophilic keratitis and anterior uveitis. Diagnostic techniques discussed include: virus isolation, fluorescent antibody testing, serum neutralising titers, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction. Various therapies are also discussed.

  14. Cutaneous Manifestations of Crohn Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Joshua W; Swoger, Jason M; Grandinetti, Lisa M

    2015-07-01

    Awareness of the extraintestinal manifestations of Crohn disease is increasing in dermatology and gastroenterology, with enhanced identification of entities that range from granulomatous diseases recapitulating the underlying inflammatory bowel disease to reactive conditions and associated dermatoses. In this review, the underlying etiopathology of Crohn disease is discussed, and how this mirrors certain skin manifestations that present in a subset of patients is explored. The array of extraintestinal manifestations that do not share a similar pathology, but which are often seen in association with inflammatory bowel disease, is also discussed. Treatment and pathogenetic mechanisms, where available, are discussed.

  15. Different carbon sources affect PCB accumulation by marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitano, M V; Silva Barni, M F; Costa, P G; Cledón, M; Fillmann, G; Miglioranza, K S B; Panarello, H O

    2016-02-01

    Pampean creeks were evaluated in the present study as potential land-based sources of PCB marine contamination. Different carbon and nitrogen sources from such creeks were analysed as boosters of PCB bioaccumulation by the filter feeder bivalve Brachidontes rodriguezii and grazer limpet Siphonaria lessoni. Carbon of different source than marine and anthropogenic nitrogen assimilated by organisms were estimated through their C and N isotopic composition. PCB concentration in surface sediments and mollusc samples ranged from 2.68 to 6.46 ng g(-1) (wet weight) and from 1074 to 4583 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, reflecting a punctual source of PCB contamination related to a landfill area. Thus, despite the low flow of creeks, they should not be underestimated as contamination vectors to the marine environment. On the other hand, mussels PCB bioaccumulation was related with the carbon source uptake which highlights the importance to consider this factor when studying PCB distribution in organisms of coastal systems.

  16. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  17. First evidence of immunomodulation in bivalves under seawater acidification and increased temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Matozzo

    Full Text Available Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 at two temperatures (22 and 28°C. Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes.

  18. Determination of the recovery efficiency of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts from seeded bivalve mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schets, Franciska M; van den Berg, Harold H J L; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia are transmitted by water and food and cause human gastroenteritis. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, filter large volumes of water and thus concentrate such pathogens, which makes these bivalves potential vectors of disease. To assess the risk of infection from consumption of contaminated bivalves, parasite numbers and parasite recovery data are required. A modified immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure was used to determine Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst numbers in individually homogenized oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis). About 12% of the commercial bivalves were positive, with low (oo)cyst numbers per specimen. The recovery efficiency of the IMS procedure was systematically evaluated. Experiments included seeding of homogenized bivalves and whole animals with 100 to 1,000 (oo)cysts. Both seeding procedures yielded highly variable recovery rates. Median Cryptosporidium recoveries were 7.9 to 21% in oysters and 62% in mussels. Median Giardia recoveries were 10 to 25% in oysters and 110% in mussels. Giardia recovery was significantly higher than Cryptosporidium recovery. (Oo)cysts were less efficiently recovered from seeded whole animals than from seeded homogenates, with median Cryptosporidium recoveries of 5.3% in oysters and 45% in mussels and median Giardia recoveries of 4.0% in oysters and 82% in mussels. Both bivalve homogenate seeding and whole animal seeding yielded higher (oo)cyst recovery in mussels than in oysters, likely because of the presence of less shellfish tissue in IMS when analyzing the smaller mussels compared with the larger oysters, resulting in more efficient (oo)cyst extraction. The data generated in this study may be used in the quantitative assessment of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium or Giardia associated with the consumption of raw bivalve mollusks. This information may be used for making risk management

  19. Renal (Kidney) Manifestations in TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... International TSC Research Conference Text Size Get Involved RENAL (KIDNEY) MANIFESTATIONS IN TSC Download a PDF of ... sclerosis complex (TSC) will develop some form of renal (kidney) disease during their lifetime. There are three ...

  20. Nail manifestations in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahali Juliana Burihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We describe 5 patients with pemphigus vulgaris presenting nail involvement. In this disease, nail manifestations present, by order of frequency, as chronic paronychia, onychomadesis, onycholysis, Beau's lines and trachyonychia. All our 5 cases presented with paronychia, and 1 of them also had Beau's lines. Treatment with prednisone and/or cyclophosphamide controlled mucocutaneous and nail manifestations in all cases.

  1. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  2. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlorn, R.J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Mendez, A.T. [Fundacion Educativa Ana G. Mendez, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico); Higashi, R. [California Univ., Bodega Bay, CA (United States). Bodega Marine Lab.; Fan, T. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  3. Environmental influence on population dynamics of the bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte, Guilherme Nascimento; Coleman, Ross A.; Amaral, A. Cecília Z.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding how species respond to the environment in terms of population attributes (e.g. abundance, growth, mortality, fecundity, and productivity) is essential to protect ecologically and economically important species. Nevertheless, responses of macrobenthic populations to environmental features are overlooked due to the need of consecutive samplings and time-consuming measurements. We examined the population dynamics of the filter-feeding bivalve Anomalocardia brasiliana on a tidal flat over the course of one year to investigate the hypothesis that, as accepted for macrobenthic communities, populations inhabiting environments with low hydrodynamic conditions such as tidal flat should have higher attributes than populations inhabiting more energetic habitats (i.e. areas more influenced by wave energy such as reflective and intermediate beaches). This would be expected because the harsh conditions of more energetic habitats force organisms to divert more energy towards maintenance, resulting in lower population attributes. We found that A. brasiliana showed moderate growth and secondary production at the study area. Moreover the recruitment period was restricted to a few months. A comparison with previous studies showed that, contrary to expected, A. brasiliana populations from areas with low hydrodynamic conditions have lower abundance, growth, recruitment and turnover rate. It is likely that morphodynamic characteristics recorded in these environments, such as larger periods of air exposure and lower water circulation, may affect food conditions for filter-feeding species and increase competition. In addition, these characteristics may negatively affect macrobenthic species by enhancing eutrophication processes and anoxia. Overall, our results suggest that models accepted and applied at the macrobenthic community level might not be directly extended to A. brasiliana populations.

  4. Core structure of aligned chitin fibers within the interlamellar framework extracted from Haliotis rufescens nacre. Part I: Implications for growth and mechanical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubarda Vlado A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of consecutive alkaline and proteolytic treatments of the organic framework’s interlamellar layers extracted from the nacre of H. rufescens, we have exposed a core of aligned parallel chitin fibers. Our findings both verify basic elements of the interlamellar layer structural model of Levi-Kalisman et al. (2001 and extend the more detailed model of Bezares et al. (2008, 2010. We observe via SEM imaging of square millimeter sized samples, which include numerous interlamellar layers and micron sized, yet nanocrystalline, CaCO3 tiles whose native orientation within the shell was first documented, that the chitin fibers in all layers are aligned normal to the growth direction of the shell. Similar alignment has been suggested in the literature for two other classes of mollusks, viz. N. rupertus and P. martensii (Weiner and Traub, 1983; Wada, 1958, suggesting that this may be a more general motif. We find that in order to expose the chitin core it is necessary to first remove protein by an alkaline treatment followed by enzymatic digestion with proteinase-K. We also observe what appear to be the points of traversal of the exposed chitin core by mineral bridges. The implications of these findings touch directly and most specifically upon the expected mechanical properties of organic framework layers such as stiffness and relaxation time constants, viz. they should be planeorthotropic. Single interlamellar layers extracted from nacre should, by implication, also exhibit an orthotropic stiffness. These novel findings provide the structural picture required for a complete anisotropic, time dependent, constitutive description of nacre long thought to be a paradigm of structural optimization. Such a model is briefly described herein and is developed, in full, in Part II of this series.

  5. A comparative study on the effects of barite, ilmenite and bentonite on four suspension feeding bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Maia F; Kingston, Paul F

    2012-10-01

    The impact of drilling mud components on the filtration activity and survival of bivalve molluscs was investigated by exposing them to suspensions of 'standard' barite, finely milled barite, ilmenite and bentonite in sea water. Introduction of the components stimulated filtration activity in all four bivalves. In addition, the introduction of standard barite and ilmenite both had lethal effects, with none of the bivalves surviving the full duration of the experiments. In-vivo observations of the gill surfaces provided direct evidence of physical damage caused by the administration of barite and ilmenite. A marked difference between filtration activity and survival of animals dosed with 'standard' barite and 'fine' barite suggests that the observed effects were primarily caused by physical interference with gill function. The results also suggest that the use of fine barite in offshore drilling may provide a more favourable environmental impact profile than the use of ilmenite.

  6. Saturation-state sensitivity of marine bivalve larvae to ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G.; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J.; Haley, Brian A.; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L.; Gray, Matthew W.; Miller, Cale A.; Gimenez, Iria

    2015-03-01

    Ocean acidification results in co-varying inorganic carbon system variables. Of these, an explicit focus on pH and organismal acid-base regulation has failed to distinguish the mechanism of failure in highly sensitive bivalve larvae. With unique chemical manipulations of seawater we show definitively that larval shell development and growth are dependent on seawater saturation state, and not on carbon dioxide partial pressure or pH. Although other physiological processes are affected by pH, mineral saturation state thresholds will be crossed decades to centuries ahead of pH thresholds owing to nonlinear changes in the carbonate system variables as carbon dioxide is added. Our findings were repeatable for two species of bivalve larvae could resolve discrepancies in experimental results, are consistent with a previous model of ocean acidification impacts due to rapid calcification in bivalve larvae, and suggest a fundamental ocean acidification bottleneck at early life-history for some marine keystone species.

  7. Characterization of the mantle transcriptome in bivalves: Pecten maximus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarra, Tejaswi; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2016-06-01

    The calcareous shells secreted by bivalve molluscs display diverse and species specific structural compositions, which indicates possible divergent biomineralization processes. Thus, studying multiple mollusc species will provide a more comprehensive understanding of shell formation. Here, the transcriptomes of the mantle tissues responsible for shell deposition were characterized in three commercially relevant bivalve species. Using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics tools, de novo transcriptome assemblies of mantle tissues were generated for the mussel Mytilus edulis, the oyster Crassostrea gigas and the scallop Pecten maximus. These transcriptomes were annotated, and contigs with similarity to proteins known to have shell formation roles in other species were identified. Comparison of the shell formation specific proteins in the three bivalves indicates the possibility of species specific shell proteins.

  8. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mat, I. (Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia))

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  9. Approaches for evaluating the effects of bivalve filter feeding on nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Marine bivalves such as clams, mussels, and oysters are an important component of the food web, which influence nutrient dynamics and water quality in many estuaries. The role of bivalves in nutrient dynamics and, particularly, the contribution of commercial shellfish activities, are not well understood in Puget Sound, Washington. Numerous approaches have been used in other estuaries to quantify the effects of bivalves on nutrient dynamics, ranging from simple nutrient budgeting to sophisticated numerical models that account for tidal circulation, bioenergetic fluxes through food webs, and biochemical transformations in the water column and sediment. For nutrient management in Puget Sound, it might be possible to integrate basic biophysical indicators (residence time, phytoplankton growth rates, and clearance rates of filter feeders) as a screening tool to identify places where nutrient dynamics and water quality are likely to be sensitive to shellfish density and, then, apply more sophisticated methods involving in-situ measurements and simulation models to quantify those dynamics.

  10. Spatial and temporal distribution of mercury and methylmercury in bivalves from the French coastline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, N; Chouvelon, T; Martinez, L; Brach-Papa, C; Chiffoleau, J F; Savoye, N; Sonke, J; Knoery, J

    2017-01-30

    Marine mercury (Hg) concentrations have been monitored in the French coastline for the last half a century using bivalves. The analyses presented in this study concerned 192 samples of bivalves (mussels: Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis and oysters: Crassostrea gigas and Isognomon alatus) from 77 sampling stations along the French coast and in the French Antilles sea. The goals of this study were to assess MeHg levels in various common bivalves from French coastline, and to identify possible geographic, taxonomic or temporal variations of concentrations. We show that the evolution of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations covary with total mercury (HgT) concentrations. Moreover, in most of the study sites, HgT concentrations have not decreased since 1987, despite regulations to decrease or ban mercury used for anthropic activities.

  11. Pathogenic marine microbes influence the effects of climate change on a commercially important tropical bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lucy M; Alsterberg, Christian; Turner, Andrew D; Girisha, S K; Rai, Ashwin; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Venugopal, M N; Karunasagar, Indrani; Godhe, Anna

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that climate change will increase the prevalence of toxic algae and harmful bacteria, which can accumulate in marine bivalves. However, we know little about any possible interactions between exposure to these microorganisms and the effects of climate change on bivalve health, or about how this may affect the bivalve toxin-pathogen load. In mesocosm experiments, mussels, Perna viridis, were subjected to simulated climate change (warming and/or hyposalinity) and exposed to harmful bacteria and/or toxin-producing dinoflagellates. We found significant interactions between climate change and these microbes on metabolic and/or immunobiological function and toxin-pathogen load in mussels. Surprisingly, however, these effects were virtually eliminated when mussels were exposed to both harmful microorganisms simultaneously. This study is the first to examine the effects of climate change on determining mussel toxin-pathogen load in an ecologically relevant, multi-trophic context. The results may have considerable implications for seafood safety.

  12. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filgueira, R.; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.; Jansen, H.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities,

  13. Facilitation on an intertidal mudflat : the effect of siphon nipping by flatfish on burying depth of the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Goeij, P; Luttikhuizen, PC; van der Meer, J; Piersma, T

    2001-01-01

    During deposit feeding on benthic microalgae, the siphon of buried tellinid bivalves like Macoma balthica is vulnerable to nipping by plaice Pleuronectes platessa and other flatfish. We experimentally tested the hypothesis that siphon nippers facilitate predation on the entire bivalve (by shorebirds

  14. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.;

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densitie...

  15. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of human toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavignet, Béatrice; Piarroux, Renaud; Aubin, François; Millon, Laurence; Humbert, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic disease characterized by the presence of larvae of the genus Toxocara in human tissues. T canis and T cati, the adult roundworms of which are found in dog and cat intestines, respectively, are the most common causative agents of the disease. Toxocaral larvae usually cause two severe syndromes: visceral larva migrans and ocular larva migrans, depending on the location of the larvae. Two other syndromes, covert toxocariasis and common toxocariasis, which are less typical and not as severe, have also been described. During the last two decades, cutaneous manifestations such as chronic urticaria, chronic pruritus, and miscellaneous eczema, in patients with Toxocara antibodies, have been studied by different authors. In some cases, these cutaneous manifestations are the only signs indicating the presence of the disease, and they are cured after antihelmintic treatment when there is good patient compliance. In this review, we focus on these particular skin manifestations regarding their clinical description, diagnosis, and treatment.

  17. [Cardiovascular manifestations of human toxocariasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-Mejía, Adrián; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto E; Delgado, Olinda

    2013-01-01

    Toxocariasis is a parasitic infection produced by helminths that cannot reach their adult stage in humans. For their etiological species (Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati), man is a paratenic host. Infection by such helminths can produce a variety of clinical manifestations, such as: visceral larvae migrans syndrome, ocular larvae migrans syndrome and covert toxocariasis. In the visceral larvae migrans syndrome, the organs that are mainly involved include liver, lungs, skin, nervous system, muscles, kidneys and the heart. Regarding the latter, the importance of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, as well as its clinical relevance, has increasingly begun to be recognized. The current article is based on a systematic information search, focused mainly on the clinical and pathological aspects of cardiovascular manifestations in toxocariasis, including its pathophysiology, laboratory findings, diagnosis and therapeutical options, with the objective of highlighting its importance as a zoonosis and its relevance to the fields of cardiovascular medicine in adults and children.

  18. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  19. RHEUMATIC MANIFESTATIONS IN VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L P Anan'eva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune reactions are of primary importance in the development of extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis, among which there are rheumatic symptoms and syndromes. The incidence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is shown to be relatively low, but they may be in the foreground in the clinical picture of the disease and are noted for severity. It is concluded that due to the high prevalence of hepatitis and the systemic pattern of their chronic forms, patients with extrahepatic manifestations of viral hepatitis may be encountered in the practice of a therapist and a rheumatologist. The onset of the infection caused by hepatitis viruses may be accompanied by articular lesion therefore the rheumatologist may be the first physician such a patient may resort to.

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Said, Adnan

    2015-02-01

    There are several extrahepatic cutaneous manifestations associated with hepatitis B and hepatitis C virus infection. Serum sickness and polyarteritis nodosa are predominantly associated with hepatitis B infection, whereas mixed cryoglobulinemia associated vasculitis and porphyria cutanea tarda are more frequently seen in hepatitis C infection. The clinico-pathogenic associations of these skin conditions are not completely defined but appear to involve activation of the host immune system including the complement system. Management of the aforementioned cutaneous manifestations of viral hepatitis is often similar to that done in cases without viral hepatitis, with control of immune activation being a key strategy. In cases associated with hepatitis B and C, control of viral replication with specific antiviral therapy is also important and associated with improvement in most of the associated clinical manifestations.

  1. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian G. Jakobsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

  2. Heavy metals in bivalves collected from river estuaries of Thailand. [Perna viridis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menasveta, P.; Cheevapora, V.; Wongwit, C.

    1984-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the levels of lead, zinc, copper, cadmium, and mercury in five species of bivalves collected from six river estuaries of Thailand during July 1978 to January 1979. The in situ bioassay for studying heavy metals uptake by green mussels (Perna viridis) was also conducted at the Chao Phraya river estuary during February 1980 to March 1981. The results revealed high contamination of lead in mussels during the period of river run-off. The factors that might contribute to this incidence were discussed. Contaminations of the other four metals in bivalves did not show great variation and they were still within the acceptable limits.

  3. Cutaneous manifestations in celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L Abenavoli; G Addolorato; I Proietti; L Leggio; A Ferrulli; L Vonghia; R Capizzi; M Rotoli; PL Amerio; G Gasbarrini

    2006-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gluten-dependent enteropathy characterized by atrophy of intestinal villi that improves after gluten-free diet (GFD). CD is often associated with extra-intestinal manifestations;among them, several skin diseases are described in CD patients. The present review reports all CD-associated skin manifestations described in the literature and tries to analyze the possible mechanisms involved in this association. The opportunity to evaluate the possible presence of CD in patients affected by skin disorders is discussed.

  4. Quantum manifestations of Nekhoroshev stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanari, Daniele, E-mail: fontanari@purple.univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France); Fassò, Francesco, E-mail: fasso@math.unipd.it [Università di Padova, Dipartimento di Matematica, Via Trieste 63, Padova 35121 (Italy); Sadovskií, Dmitrií A., E-mail: sadovski@univ-littoral.fr [Département de physique, Université du Littoral – Côte d' Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2016-09-16

    We uncover quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory of resonant dynamics using a simple quantum system of two coupled angular momenta with conserved equal magnitudes which corresponds to a perturbed classical integrable anisochronous Hamiltonian system. - Highlights: • Basic quantum manifestations of classical Nekhoroshev theory are studied. • A simple anisochronous convex system with two degrees of freedom is proposed. • Zones are uncovered in the joint expectation value spectrum of quantized actions. • The width of the zones is given by the Nekhoroshev resonant normal forms.

  5. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Cowden's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundoor Vinay Kumar Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden's syndrome is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis with variable orofacial and systemic manifestations. Here we present one such classical case of Cowden's syndrome in a 45-year-old female patient with features such as multiple cutaneous papillomatosis, oral fibromas, and fibromas involving multiple organs such as gastrointestinal tract (multiple polyps, thyroid disorders, and breast cancer.

  6. Parasitic Diseases With Cutaneous Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Mark M; Phillips, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic diseases result in a significant global health burden. While often thought to be isolated to returning travelers, parasitic diseases can also be acquired locally in the United States. Therefore, clinicians must be aware of the cutaneous manifestations of parasitic diseases to allow for prompt recognition, effective management, and subsequent mitigation of complications. This commentary also reviews pharmacologic treatment options for several common diseases.

  7. Neurological Manifestations of Takayasu Arteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xin Zhou; Jun Ni; Shan Gao; Bin Peng; Li-ying Cui

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical neurological manifestations of Takayasu arteritis (TA).Methods A retrospective study was conducted with 63 consecutive TA cases admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from January 2009 to May 2010.All the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of TA by the American College of Rheumatology.Among the 63 TA patients,27 with neurological manifestations were included in the present study.All the patients were evaluated using standardized neurological examination,sonography,computed tomography (CT) angiography,and cerebral CT or magnetic resonance imaging.Results Dizziness and visual disturbance were the most common symptoms,which occurred in 20 (74.1%) and 16 (59.3%) patients respectively.Another common symptom was headache,observed in 15 (55.6%) patients.Six (22.2%) patients had suffered from ischemic stroke; 7 (25.9%) patients had epileptic seizures.Two (7.4%) patients were diagnosed as reversible posterior encephalopathy syndrome (RPES) based on typical clinical and imaging manifestations.Conclusions Neurological manifestations are common symptoms in TA patients in the chronic phase,including dizziness,visual disturbance,headache,ischemic stroke,seizures,and some unusual ones such as RPES.We suggested RPES be included into the differential diagnosis of acute neurological changes in TA.

  8. The shell matrix of the freshwater mussel Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Involvement of acidic polysaccharides from glycoproteins in nacre mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Benjamin; Luquet, Gilles; Pais De Barros, Jean-Paul; Guichard, Nathalie; Morel, Sylvain; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bollache, Loïc; Marin, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Among molluscs, the shell biomineralization process is controlled by a set of extracellular macromolecular components secreted by the calcifying mantle. In spite of several studies, these components are mainly known in bivalves from only few members of pteriomorph groups. In the present case, we investigated the biochemical properties of the aragonitic shell of the freshwater bivalve Unio pictorum (Paleoheterodonta, Unionoida). Analysis of the amino acid composition reveals a high amount of glycine, aspartate and alanine in the acid-soluble extract, whereas the acid-insoluble one is rich in alanine and glycine. Monosaccharidic analysis indicates that the insoluble matrix comprises a high amount of glucosamine. Furthermore, a high ratio of the carbohydrates of the soluble matrix is sulfated. Electrophoretic analysis of the acid-soluble matrix revealed discrete bands. Stains-All, Alcian Blue, periodic acid/Schiff and autoradiography with (45)Ca after electrophoretic separation revealed three major polyanionic calcium-binding glycoproteins, which exhibit an apparent molecular mass of 95, 50 and 29 kDa, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis shows that these bands, provisionally named P95, P50 and P29, are composed of numerous isoforms, the majority of which have acidic isoelectric points. Chemical deglycosylation of the matrix with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid induces a drastic shift of both the apparent molecular mass and the isoelectric point of these matrix components. This treatment induces also a modification of the shape of CaCO(3) crystals grown in vitro and a loss of the calcium-binding ability of two of the main matrix proteins (P95 and P50). Our findings strongly suggest that post-translational modifications display important functions in mollusc shell calcification.

  9. Shell growth and environmental control of methanophyllic Thyasirid bivalves from Svalbard cold seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Michael; Åström, Emmelie; Ambrose, William; Locke, William; Oliver, Graham; Hong, Wei-Li; Carroll, JoLynn

    2016-04-01

    The analysis of molluscan shell material (sclerochronology) can provide information about an organism's age, growth history, and environmental conditions during its lifetime. Bivalve molluscs are common members of hydrothermal vents and methane cold seeps communities where, supported by chemosynthetic symbionts, they can reach high density and biomass. But little is known about methane-associated bivalve populations inhabiting high-Arctic cold seeps, and sclerochronological analysis of methane-influenced bivalves is rare. We measured growth rates and elemental and isotopic shell signatures in a newly discovered species of bivalve (Thyasiridae) from cold seeps at 350-390m depth southwest of Svalbard. First discovered in 2014, recently described shells of Thyasira capitanea sp.nov. were found at 2 independent seep systems in Storfjordrenna. Mean shell carbon isotopic ratios from inorganic δ13C (mean = -4.8‰) and organic δ13C (mean = -26.9‰) fractions clearly indicate a methane influenced habitat and food source for these organisms. Shell mineral ratios (Li/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Fe/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca, Pb/Ca) sampled along the axis of growth with laser-ablated ICP-MS exhibit variability through time and between sites, suggesting that concentrations of these elements that may be affected by methane emissions. The mineralogical data also elucidates the internal pattern of shell deposition and growth checks, and combined with the isotopic and growth rate data, enables us to interpret the temporal history of methane release from these locations.

  10. Bivalve aquaculture transfers in Atlantic Europe. Part A: Transfer activities and legal framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muehlbauer, F.; Fraser, D.; Brenner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intentional transfers of numerous bivalve species have had a long tradition and are commonly conducted along the European Atlantic coast. However numerous studies have concluded that intentional transfer of species for aquaculture purposes is one of the most principal vectors for the introduction...

  11. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J;

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  12. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; Roda Husman AM de; RIKILT; MGB

    2007-01-01

    The main result of the validation study to show the equivalence of two methods for the enumeration of faecal coliforms in bivalve molluscs is that the plate count method on Mac Conkey agar was indeed found to be equivalent to the MPN method. Meaning that the Netherlands fulfilled the demands as stat

  13. A predatory bivalved euarthropod from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Xiaoshiba Lagerstätte, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie; Ortega-Hernández, Javier; Lan, Tian; Hou, Jin-Bo; Zhang, Xi-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Bivalved euarthropods represent a conspicuous component of exceptionally-preserved fossil biotas throughout the Lower Palaeozoic. However, most of these taxa are known from isolated valves, and thus there is a limited understanding of their morphological organization and palaeoecology in the context of early animal-dominated communities. The bivalved euarthropod Clypecaris serrata sp. nov., recovered from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Hongjingshao Formation in Kunming, southern China, is characterized by having a robust first pair of raptorial appendages that bear well-developed ventral-facing spines, paired dorsal spines on the trunk, and posteriorly oriented serrations on the anteroventral margins of both valves. The raptorial limbs of C. serrata were adapted for grasping prey employing a descending stroke for transporting it close the mouth, whereas the backwards-facing marginal serrations of the bivalved carapace may have helped to secure the food items during feeding. The new taxon offers novel insights on the morphology of the enigmatic genus Clypecaris, and indicates that the possession of paired dorsal spines is a diagnostic trait of the Family Clypecarididae within upper stem-group Euarthropoda. C. serrata evinces functional adaptations for an active predatory lifestyle within the context of Cambrian bivalved euarthropods, and contributes towards the better understanding of feeding diversity in early ecosystems.

  14. Burrowing Behavior of a Deposit Feeding Bivalve Predicts Change in Intertidal Ecosystem State

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compton, T.J.; Bodnar, W.; Koolhaas, A.; Dekinga, A.; Holthuijsen, S.; Ten Horn, J.; McSweeney, N.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T,

    2016-01-01

    Behavior has a predictive power that is often underutilized as a tool for signaling ecological change. The burrowing behavior of the deposit feeding bivalve Macoma balthica reflects a typical food-safety trade-off. The choice to live close to the sediment surface comes at a risk of predation and is

  15. Burrowing behavior of a deposit feeding bivalve predicts change in intertidal ecosystem state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compton, Tanya J.; Bodnar, Wanda; Koolhaas, Anita; Dekinga, Anne; Holthuijsen, Sander; ten Horn, Job; McSweeney, Niamh; van Gils, Jan; Piersma, Theunis

    2016-01-01

    Behavior has a predictive power that is often underutilized as a tool for signaling ecological change. The burrowing behavior of the deposit feeding bivalve Macoma balthica reflects a typical food-safety trade-off. The choice to live close to the sediment surface comes at a risk of predation and is

  16. Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the objective to evaluate the changes in the Oosterschelde ecosys

  17. Temperature dependent larval occurrence and spat settlement of the invasive brackish water bivalve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gaag, M.; van der Velde, G.; Wijnhoven, S.; Rajagopal, S.

    2014-01-01

    Mytilopsis leucophaeata, an invasive bivalve species, causes fouling problems by settling on submerged constructions and in cooling water circuits in brackish water. To predict spat fall we studied the larval occurrence and settlement of this species in the brackish Noordzeekanaal canal in the Nethe

  18. Novas ocorrências de gastrópodes e bivalves marinhos no Brasil (Mollusca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Absalão Ricardo Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastropods Costaclis egregia (Dall, 1889, Thaleia nisonis (Dall, 1889, Tjaernoeia michaeli Engl, 2001 and the bivalves Bathyarca sp., Myonera aff. ruginosa (Jeffreys, 1882 are recorded for the first time in Brazilian waters. This paper presents a brief description of these species and also include ilustrations.

  19. Fossil predation: did some clavilithine fasciolariid gastropods employ valve-wedging to feed on bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2015-01-01

    Several gastropods, including members of the Busyconinae, wedge or chip bivalve prey by inserting the outer lip between the valves. This habit, which is associated with an abapically downwardly convex outer lip, often results in breakage and subsequent repair of the lip. I tested the hypothesis that

  20. Mosaic haploid-diploid embryos and polyspermy in the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Pijnacker, LP

    2002-01-01

    We investigated meiosis, fertilization, and early development in eggs of the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica (L.), which has external fertilization. Meiosis is standard but polyspermy is found to be very common. In all eight crosses examined, mosaic embryos consisting of a mixture of diploid (2n =

  1. Dynamic Energy Budget model parameter estimation for the bivalve Mytilus californianus: Application of the covariation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzelle, A.; Montalto, V.; Sarà, G.; Zippay, M.; Helmuth, B.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models serve as a powerful tool for describing the flow of energy through organisms from assimilation of food to utilization for maintenance, growth and reproduction. The DEB theory has been successfully applied to several bivalve species to compare bioenergetic and physiological strategies for the utilization of energy. In particular, mussels within the Mytilus edulis complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) have been the focus of many studies due to their economic and ecological importance, and their worldwide distribution. However, DEB parameter values have never been estimated for Mytilus californianus, a species that is an ecological dominant on rocky intertidal shores on the west coast of North America and which likely varies considerably from mussels in the M. edulis complex in its physiology. We estimated a set of DEB parameters for M. californianus using the covariation method estimation procedure and compared these to parameter values from other bivalve species. Model parameters were used to compare sensitivity to environmental variability among species, as a first examination of how strategies for physiologically contending with environmental change by M. californianus may differ from those of other bivalves. Results suggest that based on the parameter set obtained, M. californianus has favorable energetic strategies enabling it to contend with a range of environmental conditions. For instance, the allocation fraction of reserve to soma (κ) is among the highest of any bivalves, which is consistent with the observation that this species can survive over a wide range of environmental conditions, including prolonged periods of starvation.

  2. Nutritional and reproductive strategies in a chemsoymbiotic bivalve living in a tropical intertidal seagrass bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Matthijs; Sall, Amadou Abderahmane; Ely, SIdi Ould; Nauta, Reindert W.; Gils, Jan A. van; Piersma, Theunis

    2014-01-01

    Sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiont-bearing bivalves often dominate the infauna of seagrass-covered sediments, where they control sulphide levels and contribute to carbon cycling by feeding on chemosynthetically fixed carbon and suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM). Previous studies from temperat

  3. Nutritional and reproductive strategies in a chemosymbiotic bivalve living in a tropical intertidal seagrass bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, M.; Sall, A.A.; Ely, S.O.; Nauta, R.W.; van Gils, J.A.; Piersma, T.

    2014-01-01

    Sulphide-oxidizing endosymbiont-bearing bivalves often dominate the infauna of seagrass-covered sediments, where they control sulphide levels and contribute to carbon cycling by feeding on chemosynthetically fixed carbon and suspended particulate organic matter (SPOM). Previous studies from temperat

  4. A molecular phylogeny of bivalve mollusks: ancient radiations and divergences as revealed by mitochondrial genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Plazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bivalves are very ancient and successful conchiferan mollusks (both in terms of species number and geographical distribution. Despite their importance in marine biota, their deep phylogenetic relationships were scarcely investigated from a molecular perspective, whereas much valuable work has been done on taxonomy, as well as phylogeny, of lower taxa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present a class-level bivalve phylogeny with a broad sample of 122 ingroup taxa, using four mitochondrial markers (MT-RNR1, MT-RNR2, MT-CO1, MT-CYB. Rigorous techniques have been exploited to set up the dataset, analyze phylogenetic signal, and infer a single final tree. In this study, we show the basal position of Opponobranchia to all Autobranchia, as well as of Palaeoheterodonta to the remaining Autobranchia, which we here propose to call Amarsipobranchia. Anomalodesmata were retrieved as monophyletic and basal to (Heterodonta + Pteriomorphia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Bivalve morphological characters were traced onto the phylogenetic trees obtained from the molecular analysis; our analysis suggests that eulamellibranch gills and heterodont hinge are ancestral characters for all Autobranchia. This conclusion would entail a re-evaluation of bivalve symplesiomorphies.

  5. In situ method for measurements of community clearance rate on shallow water bivalve populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni W.; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent

    2011-01-01

    with an air lift connected to a SCUBA diver pressure tank generating a continuous and gentle water circulation. This ensures a complete mixture of suspended particles, and thereby, a maximum filtration by the bivalves. An in situ fluorometer was mounted to record plant pigment reduction due to mussel...

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Emerging Bivalve Pathogen Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinard, Edward J; Dubert, Javier; Nelson, David R; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L

    2016-07-28

    Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus is a bivalve pathogen isolated during episodes of mortality affecting larval cultures in different shellfish hatcheries. Here, we announce the draft genome sequence of the type strain PP-638 and describe potential virulence factors, which may provide insight into the mechanism of pathogenicity.

  7. Modiolarca lateralis (Pteryomorphia: Mytilidae: bivalve associated to six species of ascidians from Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I Cañete

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of the bivalve Modiolarca lateralis (Say, 1822 in six tropical ascidians Ascidia curvata, A. sydneiensis, A. panamensis, A. interrupta, Herdmania pallida and Polycarpa spongiabilis collected at depths of 1-3 m on coral reefs, mangrove roots and dock supports in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro, Panama (9°18'N, 82°13'W during June-July 2011. Bivalve prevalence varied between 9-30% across species, but was mainly associated with A. panamensis, P. spongiabilis and A. interrupta. Prevalence seems to be influenced by tunic thickness rather than by the ascidian size. Bivalves varied in size (0.6-11 mm shell length, with the smallest individual found in A. sydneiensis. There were only one or two bivalves per ascidians, although a maximum of 18 was found in one A. panamensis. M. lateralis seems to behave similarly to its temperate counterparts: it has a variety of hosts, occurs mainly in the anterior region of the ascidians, and has a variable abundance per host.

  8. 76 FR 65200 - Risk Assessment on Norovirus in Bivalve Molluscan Shellfish: Request for Comments and for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-20

    ... preventive practices and controls, food preparation and consumption practices, and the relationship between... thousands of cases in Canada annually (Refs. 2 to 4). The viruses can be transmitted through consumption of... consumption have been traced to contamination during growth and harvest (Refs. 1 and 6). Bivalve...

  9. Freshwater bivalve mollusca (unionidae, sphaeriidae, corbiculidae) of the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, J.C.; Fuller, S.L.H.

    1980-11-01

    A guide to freshwater bivalve molluscs found at the Savannah River Plant is presented. A dichotomous taxonomic key is provided to common forms and to unreported species whose geographic distributions include nearby localities. Discussions of ecology, life history, larval hosts, and other pertinent information is provided. (ACR)

  10. Monobrachium parasitum (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) epizoic on antarctic bivalves and its bipolarity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarms, G.; Mühlenhardt-Siegel, U.

    1998-01-01

    During antarctic macrozoobenthos research, colonies of Monobrachium were found on small bivalves. The species problem of the genus Monobrachium is discussed and it is stated that there are three species. However, the widespread species Monobrachium parasitum might be a species-complex comprising sev

  11. 40 CFR 262.21 - Manifest tracking numbers, manifest printing, and obtaining manifests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO GENERATORS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE The... paragraph (c) of this section, EPA will provide the registrant an electronic file of the manifest... for Transporters” on Copy 5; and (C) The “Instructions for Treatment, Storage, and Disposal...

  12. Unusual clinical manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has protean clinical manifestations. The classical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Unusual clinical manifestations may result from involvement of pulmonary, cardiovascular, neural, gastrointestinal, ocular and other systems. Immunological phenomena secondary to antigenic mimicry may also be an important component of many clinical features and may be responsible for reactive arthritis. Leptospirosis in early pregnancy may lead to fetal loss. There are a few reports of leptospirosis in HIV- infected individuals but no generalisation can be made due to paucity of data. It is important to bear in mind that leptospiral illness may be a significant component in cases of dual infections or in simultaneous infections with more than two pathogens.

  13. Some Manifestations of Japanese Exclusionism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Morita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese subscribe to ethnic nationalism, which is an ideology with the aim to develop an ethnically exclusive and homogeneous nationhood. One manifestation of ethnic nationalism is the belief that Japan is, or should be, a mono-ethnic society. Ethnic nationalism is manifested in the exclusionary attitude or opinion of the Japanese. In the context of foreigners living in Japan, the exclusionary attitude or opinion of the Japanese often translates into the insistence that foreigners should do things the Japanese way. This is unfriendly to foreigners living in Japan, to say the least. This article illustrates how unwelcoming and inconvenient Japanese exclusionism can be by using two examples that directly affect foreigners: housing and discrimination against foreigners.

  14. Orofacial manifestations of systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, B J; Jablonski, R Y; Frech, T M; Pauling, J D

    2016-09-23

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by microangiopathy, dysregulated immune function and tissue remodelling, which commonly involves the oral cavity. Orofacial manifestations of SSc contribute greatly to overall disease burden and yet are regularly overlooked and under-treated. This may reflect a pre-occupation amongst rheumatology clinicians on potentially life-threatening internal organ involvement, but is also a consequence of insufficient engagement between rheumatologists and dental professionals. A high proportion of SSc patients report difficulty accessing a dentist with knowledge of the disease and there is recognition amongst dentists that this could impact negatively on patient care. This review shall describe the clinical features and burden of orofacial manifestations of SSc and the management of such problems. The case is made for greater collaborative working between rheumatologists and dental professionals with an interest in SSc in both the research and clinical setting.

  15. Digestive manifestations of parathyroid disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bassam Abboud; Ronald Daher; Joe Boujaoude

    2011-01-01

    The parathyroid glands are the main regulator of plasma calcium and have a direct influence on the digestive tract. Parathyroid disturbances often result in unknown long-standing symptoms. The main manifestation of hypoparathyroidism is steatorrhea due to a deficit in exocrine pancreas secretion. The association with celiac sprue may contribute to malabsorption. Hyperparathyroidism causes smooth-muscle atony, with upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms such as nausea, heartburn and constipation. Hyperparathyroidism and peptic ulcer were strongly linked before the advent of proton pump inhibitors. Nowadays, this association remains likely only in the particular context of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1/Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. In contrast to chronic pancreatitis, acute pancreatitis due to primary hyperparathyroidism is one of the most studied topics. The causative effect of high calcium level is confirmed and the distinction from secondary hyperparathyroidism is mandatory. The digestive manifestations of parathyroid malfunction are often overlooked and serum calcium level must be included in the routine workup for abdominal symptoms.

  16. ORBITAL MANIFESTATIONS OF SINUS DISEASE

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    Jyothirmayi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To study the orbital manifestations in patients with sinus disease. METHODS : Patients wit h paranasal sinus disease presenting to OPD at Government ENT Hospital, AMC, Visakhapatnam from January 2012 to June 2014 were screened for orbital manifestations. Out of these, thirteen patients with orbital disease were referred to GREH, AMC, Visakhapatn am and were thoroughly investigated and managed appropriately. RESULTS : Out of the 14 patients 4 were female and 10 were male. Age ranged from 19 years to 70 years. 5 had maxillary sinus disease (4 - carcinoma and 1 case of mucormycosis. Frontal sinus dis ease was seen in two patients, one fibrous dysplasia and one malignancy. Five patients had ethmoidal sinus disease of which three patients were found to have ethmoidal sinus tumour (Malignant melanoma, Squamous cell Carcinoma. More than two sinuses were i nvolved in 2 patients. CONCLUSIONS : Early screening of patients with sinus disease by an Ophthalmologist can help in preventing severe vision threatening orbital complications.

  17. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, S.; Gaudron, S. M.; Rodrigues, C. F.; Cunha, M. R.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae). Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  18. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duperron

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria which ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, East America, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous more easily accessible shallow marine species were studied. We here provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to Marmara Sea, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 51 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae, and compared among families with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions, yet relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on Oceans, we advocate for a better assessment of bivalve symbioses diversity in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change

  19. How predictable is high bivalve recruitment in the Wadden Sea after a severe winter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Matthias; Dekker, Rob; Essink, Karel; Günther, Carmen-Pia; Jaklin, Sandra; Kröncke, Ingrid; Madsen, Poul Brinch; Michaelis, Hermann; Vedel, Grace

    2003-02-01

    Higher than average recruitment among bivalves on the intertidal flats of the Wadden Sea was often observed after severe winters in the period 1940-1995. The occurrence of another severe winter in 1995/96 prompted us to test the hypothesis of severe winters leading to universally high bivalve recruitment on a large geographic scale (500 km coastline) in temperate shallow waters. We analysed data sets on bivalve abundance from seven areas in the Dutch, German and Danish Wadden Sea. The longer data sets showed generally higher bivalve recruitment in the 1970s and 1980s than in the 1990s which may be related to the near absence of severe winters since 1987. Considering the period 1988 onwards (the longest possible period in which 1995/96 was the only severe winter), recruitment of Cerastoderma edule was in 1996 - in agreement with our hypothesis - above average in all seven areas investigated. In contrast, recruitment of Macoma balthica and Mya arenaria was for the same period above average only in the southern Wadden Sea (south-west of Jade Bay) but not in the northern Wadden Sea (north of Eiderstedt peninsula). These regional differences may be related to (i) the different topography of the northern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands west of the mainland) compared to the southern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands north of the mainland) and subsequent differential effects of wind-induced currents on bivalve recruitment, (ii) differences in biotic factors such as standing stocks, larval supply or epibenthic predation or (iii) changes in environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale comparisons along coasts are an indispensable addition to insights derived from local studies alone.

  20. First records of Freshwater Bivalves of Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil

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    Flávio Henrique Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil, is located in the Upper Paraná River and has characteristics typical of a floodplains. This protected area includes lagoons connected and disconnected to the Paraná River, although the latter also connect during periods of high water level, thus composing a heterogeneous group of lacustrine environments. The enormous potential the flora and fauna diversities are still little known to the region, as can be seen through benthic invertebrates, inclunding bivalves mollusks. The granulometric composition of these floodplain lagoons was formed mainly by mud and very fine sand. Furthermore, organic matter composition was predominantly of fine particulate. The other abiotic factors differed from lagoons located within the island of the park to those located in the left margin of Paraná River. The results demonstrated the importance of abiotic factors such as the physical composition of granulometric texture, organic matter and macrophyte banks, to the establishment of bivalves in these floodplain lagoons. We recorded bivalves of Pisidium (native, Diplodon (native, and Corbicula (invasive. The highest values of Diplodon sp. density were observed at São João/C lake, for Pisidium sterkianum (Pilsbry, 1897 at São João/M lake, and to Jatobá/C lagoon with high density of invasive species Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774. This study to obtain conduct the first records of freshwater bivalves in floodplains lagoon in the Ilha Grande National Park, and provides contributions to better understanding the ecology of these mollusks. The recording of native species in the region of Upper Paraná River floodplain after a lomg period without new records, demonstrated the importance of protecting the lagoons of the Ilha Grande National Park as they can be a possible refuge to some species of native freshwater bivalves.

  1. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duperron

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae. Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  2. Rheumatic manifestations of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebiedz-Odrobina, Dorota; Kay, Jonathan

    2010-11-01

    DM is associated with various musculoskeletal manifestations. The strength of this relationship varies among the various musculoskeletal disorders; the associations are based mostly on epidemiologic data. For most of these conditions, definitive pathophysiologic correlates are lacking.Hand and shoulder disorders occur more frequently than other musculoskeletal manifestations of DM. Recognition of the association between DM and shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, and stenosing flexor tenosynovitis facilitates their correct diagnosis in the setting of DM and prompt initiation of appropriate treatment, which may include optimizing glycemic control. Conversely, awareness and identification of the characteristic musculoskeletal manifestations of DM may facilitate earlier diagnosis of DM and initiation of glucose-lowering therapy to retard the development of diabetic complications.Much less has been published about the musculoskeletal complications of DM than about its micro- and macrovascular complications. Prospective case-control cohort studies are needed to establish the true prevalence of musculoskeletal complications of DM and the metabolic syndrome, especially in this era of tighter glycemic control.The potential relationship between DM and the development of OA needs to be clarified in large, prospective, case-control cohort studies. The effect on musculoskeletal manifestations of various therapeutic regimens to manage DM should be studied prospectively. Treatment regimens for some musculoskeletal conditions associated with DM, such as DISH, should be studied in larger prospective, randomized,controlled clinical trials.At the molecular level, further studies are warranted to clarify the potential contribution of AGEs and adipokines to the development of OA and diabetic musculoskeletal syndromes, such as shoulder adhesive capsulitis, DD, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, and LJM. Identification of such molecular targets for therapy would promote the development of

  3. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Stansbury, Robert C.; Strollo, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests tha...

  4. Systemic diseases with cutaneous manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1995-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to briefly discuss the following cutaneous manifestations of selected systemic diseases: poxvirus; feline leukemia virus (FeLV); feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV); herpesvirus; calcivirus; pseudorabies; plague; tularemia; toxoplasmosis; leishmania; hypothyroidism; hyperthyroidism; hyperadrenocorticism; diabetes mellitus; acromegaly; thallium poisoning; pancreatic disease; hypereosinophilic syndrome; mucopolysaccharidosis; and pansteatitis. Recognition of these cutaneous signs may help alert the clinician to the possibility of an internal disorder so that the appropriate diagnostic tests can be considered.

  5. Imaging Manifestations of Thoracic Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Carlos Santiago; Katre, Rashmi; Mumbower, Amy

    2016-05-01

    Despite significant improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis achieved during the last 3 decades, tuberculosis still remains one of the deadliest communicable diseases worldwide. Tuberculosis is still present in all regions of the world, with a more significant impact in developing countries. This article reviews the most common imaging manifestations of primary and postprimary tuberculosis, their complications, and the critical role of imaging in the diagnosis and follow-up of affected patients.

  6. Toxoplasmosis and its Ocular Manifestations

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    Koev Kr.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review provides general information about the parasitic infection of toxoplasmosis and describes the ways of its transmission. It outlines the importance of the consequences of toxoplasmosis infection and the methods of its prevention. The review traces the harmful effects of the disease on human and animal organisms, the causes and stages of development of the disease. The review specifically focuses on the ocular manifestations of toxoplasmosis which can cause ocular lesions, inflammation and scarring. Herein are described the ways toxoplasmosis can damage the eyes causing chorioretinitis, nystagmus, microphthalmia, etc. Furthermore, the review addresses the problem of how congenital and acquired toxoplasmosis affects eyes. The ocular symptoms of toxoplasmosis include weakened or blurred vision, eyeballs pain, ocular sensitivity to light, etc. The harmful effects of toxoplasmosis to pregnant women and immunocompromised patients have been delineated. Some of the disease manifestations include jaundice, rash, asphyxia, etc. The review traces the diagnostic work-up and comments on common tests for toxoplasmosis, such as taking of blood serum samples. The review ends with the treatment of the disease and of its ocular manifestations in particular, for example application of intravitreous injection. The prevention of the infection is extremely important for pregnant women, immunocompromised patients and patients with AIDS.

  7. Thoracic manifestation of tuberculosis; Thorakale Manifestation der Tuberkulose

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    Kienzl-Palma, D.; Prosch, H. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer Allgemeine Radiologie und Kinderradiologie, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2016-10-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a granulomatous disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and transmission is via an airborne route by droplet infection. In the majority of cases patients have thoracic TB, which most frequently presents with hilar lymphadenopathy and pulmonary manifestation. Due to the rise in incidence of TB in central Europe to be expected over the coming years, it is essential to be acquainted with the radiological manifestations of pulmonary TB, particularly to be able to discriminate active from inactive TB. Due to the use of molecular techniques entailing DNA fingerprinting, the traditional classification of TB in primary and postprimary TB is being challenged. These genetic studies have revealed that variations in the clinical and radiographic appearance of TB are mainly affected by the immune status of the patients. Due to the low prevalence of TB in central Europe and the wide variation of radiological presentations, the diagnosis and therapy of TB is often delayed. In this article, the radiographic manifestations of thoracic TB are summarized and discussed. Together with the medical history and bacteriological tests, chest X-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) play a major role not only in the detection of TB but also in the follow-up during and after therapy. Chest X-radiographs should be the primary diagnostic method in patients with suspected TB in screening as well as for diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The use of CT is more sensitive than chest radiographs and is frequently performed after chest radiographs to obtain detailed information about subtle parenchymal changes or lymph node manifestation. When active TB is suspected CT should be performed. Tree in bud, lobular consolidations, centrilobular nodules, cavities and ground-glass opacification are typical changes in active TB. (orig.) [German] Tuberkulose (Tbc) ist eine durch Troepfchen uebertragene granulomatoese Infektionserkrankung, die durch das Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  8. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  9. Clinical manifestations of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansbury, Robert C; Strollo, Patrick J

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may manifest in a number of ways from subtle intrusion into daily life to profound sleepiness, snoring, witnessed apneas and other classic symptoms. Although there is increasing evidence suggesting OSA can adversely affect health in a variety of ways, this disorder remains underdiagnosed. The most well-escribed health consequences of OSA relate to the cardiovascular system. Hypertension and arrhythmias have a strong association with OSA, and evidence suggests that treatment of OSA in patients with refractory hypertension and in patients planning cardioversion for atrial fibrillation may be of particularly importance. Significant associations between heart failure and OSA as well as complex sleep apnea have also been well-described. Cerebrovascular insult, impaired neurocognition, and poorly controlled mood disorder are also associated with in OSA. Therapy for OSA may ameliorate atherosclerotic progression and improve outcomes post-cerebrovascular accident (CVA). OSA should be considered in patients complaining of poor concentration at work, actual or near-miss motor vehicle accidents, and patients with severe sleepiness as a component of their co-morbid mood disorders. The metabolic impact of OSA has also been studied, particularly in relation to glucose homeostasis. Also of interest is the potential impact OSA has on lipid metabolism. The adverse effect untreated OSA has on glucose tolerance and lipid levels has led to the suggestion that OSA is yet another constituent of the metabolic syndrome. Some of these metabolic derangements may be related to the adverse effects untreated OSA has on hepatic health. The cardiovascular, neurocognitive, and metabolic manifestations of OSA can have a significant impact on patient health and quality of life. In many instances, evidence exists that therapy not only improves outcomes in general, but also modifies the severity of co-morbid disease. To mitigate the long-term sequela of this disease

  10. Cardiac manifestations in systemic sclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sevdalina; Lambova

    2014-01-01

    Primary cardiac involvement, which develops as a direct consequence of systemic sclerosis(SSc), may manifest as myocardial damage, fibrosis of the conduction system, pericardial and, less frequently, as valvular disease. In addition, cardiac complications in SSc may develop as a secondary phenomenon due to pulmonary arterial hypertension and kidney pathology. The prevalence of primary cardiac involvement in SSc is variable and difficult to determine because of the diversity of cardiac manifestations, the presence of subclinical periods, the type of diagnostic tools applied, and the diversity of patient populations. When clinically manifested, cardiac involvement is thought to be an important prognostic factor. Profound microvascular disease is a pathognomonic feature of SSc, as both vasospasm and structural alterations are present. Such alterations are thought to predict macrovascular atherosclerosis over time. There are contradictory reports regarding the prevalence of atherosclerosis in SSc. According to some authors, the prevalence of atherosclerosis of the large epicardial coronary arteries is similar to that of the general population, in contrast with other rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the level of inflammation in SSc is inferior. Thus, the atherosclerotic process may not be as aggressive and not easily detectable in smaller studies. Echocardiography(especially tissue Doppler imaging), single-photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and cardiac computed tomography are sensitive techniques for earlier detection of both structural and functional scleroderma-related cardiac pathologies. Screening for subclinical cardiac involvement via modern, sensitive tools provides an opportunity for early diagnosis and treatment, which is of crucial importance for a positive outcome.

  11. [Corneal manifestations in systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz Ventura, J; De Nova, E; Moreno-Montañés, J

    2008-01-01

    Systemic diseases affecting the cornea have a wide range of manifestations. The detailed study of all pathologies that cause corneal alteration is unapproachable, so we have centered our interest in the most prevalent or characteristic of them. In this paper we have divided these pathologies in sections to facilitate their study. Pulmonar and conective tissue (like colagen, rheumatologic and idiopathic inflamatory diseases), dermatologic, cardiovascular, hematologic, digestive and hepatopancreatic diseases with corneal alteration are described. Endocrine and metabolic diseases, malnutrition and carential states are also studied, as well as some otorhinolaryngologic and genetic diseases that affect the cornea. Finally, a brief report of ocular toxicity induced by drugs is referred.

  12. Cutaneous manifestations of chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, K A; Sridevi, K; Vidyasagar, P

    2012-01-01

    Chikungunya fever, a re-emerging RNA viral infection produces different cutaneous manifestations in children compared to adults. 52 children with chikungunya fever, confirmed by positive IgM antibody test were seen during 2009-2010. Pigmentary lesions were common (27/52) followed by vesiculobullous lesions (16/52) and maculopapular lesions (14/52). Vesiculobullous lesions were most common in infants, although rarely reported in adults. Psoriasis was exacerbated in 4 children resulting in more severe forms. In 2 children, guttate psoriasis was observed for the first time.

  13. Gaucher disease and bone manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Gemma; Zimran, Ari; Bembi, Bruno; Kanis, John; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Rizzoli, Renè; Cooper, Cyrus; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-12-01

    Gaucher disease is a relatively rare metabolic disease caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase. Gaucher disease affects multiple organs, among which is the skeleton. Bone involvement occurs frequently in Gaucher disease, and is one of its most debilitating features, reducing the quality of life of patients. Bone status is an important consideration for treatment to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of irreversible complications. We have conducted a systematic review of all the various aspects of Gaucher disease, focusing on different skeletal manifestations, pathophysiology of bone alterations, clinical symptoms, and current diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  14. Neurological manifestation of colonic adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzair Chaudhary

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders are extremely rare in cancer patients and are most commonly associated with certain tumors, such as ovarian cancer, small cell lung cancer, and breast cancer. We report here a paraneoplastic neurological syndrome in a 53-year-old man with colonic adenocarcinoma with a solitary liver metastasis. His paraneoplastic syndrome was successfully treated by methylprednisolone and primary oncologic therapies including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and definitive surgery. This is also the first documented case of simultaneous manifestation of a sensory neuropathy and limbic encephalitis with colon cancer.

  15. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikai Wang

    Full Text Available Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI and fatty acid (FA techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25% to particular organic matter (POM in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17% during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44% and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%, and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Roujayee Abdulaziz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has many extraintestinal manifestations, and skin lesions are one of the most frequently described extraintestinal findings. Reports indicate an incidence of cutaneous manifestations ranging from 2 to 34%, Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. In this review we aim to address the various cutaneous manifestations associated with IBD, their impact on the disease course, and the treatment options available.

  17. Cutaneous manifestations of internal malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ayyamperumal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many malignancies affecting the internal organs display cutaneous manifestations which may be either specific (tumor metastases or nonspecific lesions. Aims: The study is aimed at determining the frequency and significance of cutaneous manifestations among patients with internal malignancy. Materials and Methods: 750 cases of proven internal malignancy, who attended a cancer chemotherapy center in South India, were studied. Specific infiltrates were confirmed by histopathology, fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC and marker studies. Results: Out of the 750 patients with internal malignancy, skin changes were seen in a total of 52 (6.93% patients. Conclusion: Cutaneous metastases (specific lesions were seen in 20 patients (2.66%: contiguous in 6 (0.8%, and non-contiguous in 14 (1.86%. Nonspecific skin changes were seen in 32 patients (4.26%. None of our patients presented with more than one type of skin lesions. Herpes zoster was the most common nonspecific lesion noticed in our patients, followed by generalized pruritus, multiple eruptive seborrheic keratoses, bullous disorder, erythroderma, flushing, purpura, pyoderma gangrenosum, insect bite allergy and lichenoid dermatitis.

  18. Atypical Manifestation of Vestibular Schwannoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster, Guilherme

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vestibular schwannoma (also known as acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor whose cells are derived from Schwann sheaths, which commonly occurs from the vestibular portion of the eighth cranial nerve. Furthermore, vestibular schwannomas account for ∼8% of intracranial tumors in adults and 80 to 90% of tumors of the cerebellopontine angle. Its symptoms are varied, but what stands out most is a unilateral sensorineural hearing loss, with a low index of speech recognition. Objective: Describe an atypical manifestation of vestibular schwannoma. Case Report: The 46-year-old woman had vertigo and binaural hearing loss and fullness, with ear, nose, and throat examination suggestive of cochlear injury. After 6 months, the patient developed worsening of symptoms and onset of right unilateral tinnitus. In further exams the signs of cochlear damage remained, except for the vestibular test (hyporeflexia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive lesion in the right cerebellopontine angle. Discussion: This report warns about the atypical manifestations of vestibular schwannoma, which must always be remembered in investigating and diagnosing hearing loss.

  19. Oral manifestations of acute leukaemia

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    Ivanović Mirjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukaemia is the most common form of chilhood cancer. The aim of this paper was to underline the importance of oral manifestations in children with acute leukaemia. The disease and its treatment can directly or indirectly affect oral health. Oral manifestations are gingival inflammation and enlargement. Leukaemic cells are capable of infiltrating the gingiva and the deeper periodontal tissues which leads to ulceration and infection of oral tissues. Gingival bleeding is a common sign in patients with leukaemia. Symptoms include local lymphadenopathy, mucous membrane Petechiae and ecchymoses. Cytotoxic drugs have direct effects like mucositis, involving atrophy, desquamation and ulceration of the mucosa, with increasing the risk for local and systemic infections. Leukaemia can directly influence dental care and dental treatment, while oral lesions may have life-threatening consequences. Knowledge and skills among dentists may also not be adequate to treat children with acute leukaemia. It is therefore imperative that all stomatologists be aware of dental problems that occur in leukaemia in order to be able to effectively carry out appropriate measures to mitigate these problems.

  20. Synthesis and Characteristic of a New Niobate:Ba5NaCr0.5Nb9.5O30

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Shi-xi; ZHANG Gao-ke; XIAO Jing; XIE Yi; JIA Yuan-yuan

    2004-01-01

    A new niobate crystal was synthesized for the first time in BaO-NaO-Cr2O3-Nb2O3 system by the solid state reaction and the flux method. The new compound was studied by X-ray diffraction, electron probe, X-ray microanalysis, chemical analysis and SEM. The result of X-ray powder diffraction shows that Ba5NaCr0.5Nb9.5O30 belongs to the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure, with space group P4 bm(100) and lattice parameters a=b=12.4450(2)A°,c=3.9931(2)A° and Z=1. The X-ray powder diffraction lines of the compound were well indexed.

  1. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs, in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  2. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-27

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  3. Trace elements in the organs and tissues of bivalves in the northwestern Black Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkevich, T.A.; Gorbyleva, T.P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was made of the distribution of 16 trace elements (copper, manganese, iron, aluminum, zinc, barium, strontium, lead, tin, silver, vanadium, nickel, chromium, lithium, titanium and cobalt) in the organs and tissues of bivalves in the northwestern Black Sea and in the Sukhoy and Berezanskiy estuaries. These elements were selected because they are constituents of enzymes, vitamins and other metal-protein complexes, or activate enzymes, and are involved in redox reactions in the transfer of electrons and hydrogen. We investigated mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) and oysters (Ostrea edulis), analyzing the mantle, gills, liver, gonads, adductor muscles, foot and shell, and also in Mya the siphon and its outer epithelial layer, the cuticle. Similar data on Anodonta, a freshwater bivalve of the Dniester estuary, were used for comparison.

  4. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-21

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  5. p53 Superfamily proteins in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles W; Van Beneden, Rebecca J; Muttray, Annette F; Böttger, S Anne; Kelley, Melissa L; Tucker, Abraham E; Thomas, W Kelley

    2011-01-01

    The human p53 tumour suppressor protein is inactivated in many cancers and is also a major player in apoptotic responses to cellular stress. The p53 protein and the two other members of this protein family (p63, p73) are encoded by distinct genes and their functions have been extensively documented for humans and some other vertebrates. The structure and relative expression levels for members of the p53 superfamily have also been reported for most major invertebrate taxa. The functions of homologous proteins have been investigated for only a few invertebrates (specifically, p53 in flies, nematodes and recently a sea anemone). These studies of classical model organisms all suggest that the gene family originally evolved to mediate apoptosis of damaged germ cells or to protect germ cells from genotoxic stress. Here, we have correlated data from a number of molluscan and other invertebrate sequencing projects to provide a framework for understanding p53 signalling pathways in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology. These data suggest that (a) the two identified p53 and p63/73-like proteins in soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Northern European squid (Loligo forbesi) have identical core sequences and may be splice variants of a single gene, while some molluscs and most other invertebrates have two or more distinct genes expressing different p53 family members; (b) transcriptional activation domains (TADs) in bivalve p53 and p63/73-like protein sequences are 67-69% conserved with human p53, while those in ecdysozoan, cnidarian, placozoan and choanozoan eukaryotes are ≤33% conserved; (c) the Mdm2 binding site in the transcriptional activation domain is 100% conserved in all sequenced bivalve p53 proteins (e.g. Mya, Mytilus, Crassostrea and Spisula) but is not present in other non-deuterostome invertebrates; (d) an Mdm2 homologue has been cloned for Mytilus trossulus; (e) homologues for both human p53 upstream regulatory and

  6. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cranford, Peter J.; Kamermans, Pauline; Krause, Gesche;

    2012-01-01

    An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social...... and ecological systems, marine regulators require an ecosystem-based decision framework that structures and integrates the relationships between these systems and facilitates communication of aquaculture–environment interactions and policy-related developments and decisions. The Drivers-Pressures-State Change...... to assess DPSIR framework components, are reviewed with a focus on the key environmental issues associated with bivalve farming. Indicator selection criteria are provided to facilitate constraining the number of indicators within the management framework. It is recommended that an ecosystem-based approach...

  7. Anticoagulant activity of marine bivalve Donax incarnates Lin, 1758 Collected from Thazhanguda, Southeast coast of India

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P. Bharathirajan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Molluscs are highly delicious seafood and they are also very good source for biomedically imported products. Among the molluscs some have pronounced pharmacological activities or other properties which are useful in biomedical area. Methods: In the present study GAGs was isolated from the bivalve such as Donax incarnates. Results: The isolated GAGs were quantified in crude samples and they were estimated as 6.84 gm/kg crude GAGs in Donax incarnates. The bivalve showed the anticoagulant activity of the crude samples 124.53 USP units/mg in Donax incarnates. FTIR analysis reveals the presence of anticoagulant substance signals at different ranges. Conclusions: The determined in this research show that gastropod Donax incarnates tissue is value medicinal due to high quality of anticoagulant compounds.

  8. Contamination of raw bivalve molluscs available in Poland between 2009 and 2013 with marine biotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalski Mirosław

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing consumption of shellfish is associated with an increased risk of food poisoning. The study was carried out on live bivalve molluscs available on the Polish market between 2009 and 2013. Material and Methods: ELISA was used for the determination of the following marine biotoxins: paralytic shellfish poison (PSP, amnaesic shellfish poison (ASP, and diarrhoeic shellfish poison (DSP. The molluscs, of which seven species were examined, were obtained from wholesale companies and markets. Results: Marine biotoxins were detected below the permitted levels in 67.6% of the samples. The maximum amounts of PSP and ASP biotoxins were found in great scallops (532.6 μg/kg and 1.0 mg/kg respectively and the peak for DSP was in blue mussels (107 μg/kg. Conclusion: The analysis of toxicological status of raw bivalve molluscs available on the market in Poland indicates that they are safe for consumers.

  9. Paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic significance of freshwater bivalves in the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation, Western Interior, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Steven C.

    2004-05-01

    Freshwater unionid bivalves are spatially and temporally distributed throughout the Morrison depositional basin, and locally dominate the biomass of many aquatic depositional environments. Two bivalve assemblages are identified. Within-channel assemblages are death assemblages that have been transported and may represent mixed assemblages from multiple communities. These assemblages are predominately disarticulated, in current stable orientations, and composed of higher stream velocity ecophenotypes (medium size, lanceolate form, and very thick shells). The floodplain-pond assemblages are disturbed neighborhood assemblages in the mudstones inhabited during life. The bivalves are predominately articulated, variable in size, and composed of low stream velocity ecophenotypes (large maximum sizes, ovate shell shapes, and thinner shells). The glochidial parasitic larval stage of unionid bivalves provides an effective means of dispersing species throughout drainage basins. These larvae attach to fish and are carried through the fluvial drainage where the larvae detach and establish new bivalve communities. Preliminary paleobiogeographic analyses are drawn at the genus level because of the need to reevaluate bivalve species of the Morrison. Unio spp. and Vetulonaia spp. are widespread throughout the Morrison depositional basin, but Hadrodon spp. are restricted to the eastern portion of the Colorado Plateau during Salt Wash Member deposition, suggesting that Salt Wash drainage was isolated from other contemporaneous regions of the basin. Bivalves from five localities in the Morrison Formation were thin-sectioned for growth band analysis. Growth bands of modern unionid bivalves are produced when the valves are forced to close. Closure can produce annual growth bands in response to seasonal variation, such as temperature-induced hibernation, or precipitation-induced aestivation or turbidity. Pseudoannual growth bands form from non-cyclical events such as predation attacks or

  10. Studies on filtration rate in four species of suspension feeding bivalves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林元烧; 罗文新; 曹文清; 郭东晖; 郑爱榕; 黄长江

    2002-01-01

    The filtration rates of four kinds of bivalves that were cultivated dominantly around Xiamen sea area were measured by using a laboratory flowing system. The experimental results were shown below: (1) Filtration rates were measured in the range of 54~74.8 ml/ (g@min) among the four bivalves, sequencing descently Saccostrea cucullata > Sinonovacula constricta > Mytilus viridis > Ruditapes philippinarum. (2) The relationship between filtration rates on individual size showed a negative exponential function (FR = aWb, FR' = aWb-1), with b - 1 = - 0.435 6 and - 0.392. (3) Filtration rates on Skeletonema costatum were much higher than on Alexandrium tamarensis and Scrippsilla trochoidea inS. Cucullata and R. Philippinarum. (4) FR'on algal densities was also shown a negative function(FR' = aDb-1), with b-1 =-0.143 and-0.215 2 in S.cucullata and R.philippinarum, respectively.

  11. [Isolation of enteropathogenic Vibrio in bivalves and mud from the Nicoya Gulf, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cortés, V; Antillón, F

    1990-11-01

    The presence of enteropathogenic Vibrio was evaluated in 36 sediment samples and 41 bivalve samples obtained from 3 collecting sites in the Golfo de Nicoya, Costa Rica. Isolation methods for halophilic and non halophilic Vibrio were used. The biochemical profiles of the strains obtained revealed the presence of the following isolates: 224 Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 3 V. furnissii, 1 V. damsela and 3 V. fluvialis. V. cholerae was not isolated, due principally to the use of TCBS agar.

  12. Bivalves and gastropods from the middle Campanian Anacacho limestone, South Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, W.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Anacacho Limestone was deposited during the Campanian and represents two depositional intervals, one of early Campanian and one of middle Campanian age. These two intervals correspond to periods of major eustatic sea level rise. This study focuses on the molluscan paleontology of the middle Campanian interval in the eastern part of the Anacacho exposure belt in Medina County, Texas. Molluscan assemblages in this area are indicative of inner to mid-shelf environments. No significant reef components are present. These eastern Anacacho deposits are interpreted to represent more offshore, deeper water environments than those to the southwest, where reef and lagoonal deposits have been reported. Analysis of the macrofossil components from these eastern localities has expanded the number of invertebrate species known from the Anacacho Limestone by nearly three-fold. This increase in diversity, based on a small amount of new work, suggests that many more taxa are yet to be identified, particularly in the western part of the exposure belt in Uvalde and Kinney Counties. This paper documents the bivalve and gastropod fauna, discussing and illustrating 24 bivalve taxa and 11 gastropod species. Two new bivalve species are named, Panopea anacachoensis new species and Spondylus siccus new species, and two potentially new gastropod species are identified but not named herein due to inadequate material. This paper expands the distribution of many eastern Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast taxa westward into Texas and shows strong ties between the Anacacho fauna and that of the Campanian Tar Heel and Bladen Formations of the Black Creek Group in North Carolina. The taxonomic ties between these two areas probably reflect the thorough documentation of the North Carolina fauna, which is the best documented Campanian bivalve fauna in the Gulf or Atlantic Coast regions.

  13. Ethno-malacological knowledge of bivalve mollusks gathering in Acupe mangrove, Santo Amaro, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Bezerra Souto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove is a highly productive ecosystem that carries out important ecological functions and that historically it has been used for the subsistence and income of countless craft fishing communities. In the mangroves of Todos os Santos Bay, including those of the District of Acupe (Santo Amaro – Bahia State, the bivalve mollusks (shellfish are among the most important resources, and their gathering is known as “mariscagem”. This work aims to characterize the knowledge of the local female shellfish gatherers regarding the biology and ecology of bivalve shellfish. Semi-structured interviews were used with local shellfish women (N=54 involving ethnotaxonomy, trophic ecology, hydrodynamics, fenology and ethnocronology. Etic-emic analisys of the data was chosen in order to compare the information obtained in the field to that from the academic literature. The results demonstrated that the shellfish women of Acupe have a significant knowledge of bivalve shellfish, in addition to aspects related to the dynamics of local mangroves, that is sometimes compatible with academic knowledge.

  14. Predicting growth and mortality of bivalve larvae using gene expression and supervised machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, Sleiman; Chapman, Robert W; Tanguy, Arnaud; Moraga, Dario; Tremblay, Rejean

    2015-12-01

    It is commonly known that the nature of the diet has diverse consequences on larval performance and longevity, however it is still unclear which genes have critical impacts on bivalve development and which pathways are of particular importance in their vulnerability or resistance. First we show that a diet deficient in essential fatty acid (EFA) produces higher larval mortality rates, a reduced shell growth, and lower postlarval performance, all of which are positively correlated with a decline in arachidonic and eicosapentaenoic acids levels, two EFAs known as eicosanoid precursors. Eicosanoids affect the cell inflammatory reactions and are synthesized from long-chain EFAs. Second, we show for the first time that a deficiency in eicosanoid precursors is associated with a network of 29 genes. Their differential regulation can lead to slower growth and higher mortality of Mytilus edulis larvae. Some of these genes are specific to bivalves and others are implicated at the same time in lipid metabolism and defense. Several genes are expressed only during pre-metamorphosis where they are essential for muscle or neurone development and biomineralization, but only in stress-induced larvae. Finally, we discuss how our networks of differentially expressed genes might dynamically alter the development of marine bivalves, especially under dietary influence.

  15. Lincoln Park shoreline erosion control project: Monitoring for surface substrate, infaunal bivalves and eelgrass, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antrim, L.D.; Thom, R.M.; Gardiner, W.W. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    In 1988, the US Army Corps of Engineers and the City of Seattle placed material on the upper beach at Lincoln Park, in West Seattle, Washington. The fill served to mitigate shoreline erosion that had caused undercutting and collapse of the seawall in several places. A series of pre- and post-construction studies have been conducted to assess the impacts to marine biota of fill placement and movement of surface substrate. This study was designed to monitor infaunal bivalves and eelgrass from intertidal areas in and adjacent to the area of original fill placement. Findings from this survey were compared to previous survey results to determine (1) if recruitment of infaunal bivalves to the fill area has occurred, (2) if infaunal bivalve densities outside the fill area are stable, and (3) if eelgrass distribution and abundance have remained stable along the adjacent shoreline. To maximize comparability of findings from this survey with previous studies, sampling techniques, transects, and tidal elevations were consistent with previous studies at this site.

  16. Availability of pearl producing marine bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ataur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted during September 2014 to July 2015 to identify the pearl bearing bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities of marine oyster in captivity based on field investigation. A total of 7 pearl bearing bivalve species were identified in the coast with a salinity of 18-34 ppt, pH 8.1-8.3 and water depth ranged 0.2-2.0 meter in their habitat. From the collected bivalves, most abundant oyster species windowpane oyster, Placuna placenta (Linnaeus, 1758 was reared in fiber glass tanks with seawater for a period of 6 months. During rearing highest survival rate of 88% was observed in T1 with sandy and gravel substratum and lowest survival rate of 78% was found in T2 with muddy substratum. Average temperature and salinity were varied between 24 °C-25 °C and 21-26 ppt respectively. From the reared oyster, highest 54 nos. small pearls in the month of April and lowest 7 pearls in December from a single P. placenta were obtained. The study proved that pearls can be obtained from the marine oysters in captivity in Bangladesh, and this offers large scale culture potentialities in our coast.

  17. Trace element ratios in bivalve shells as records of environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, S.; Opdyke, B.; Welch, S.; Beavis, S.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotope and trace element data from the carbonate of both marine and freshwater bivalves are proving to be useful tools in studies of palaeoclimate and environmental change. However, much of the work already done has shown that the trace element ratios in bivalve shells exhibit a complex relationship with the ambient environment and caution must be exercised when attempting to use them as environmental proxies. This work examines the feasibility of using the trace element ratios Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca of the shells of a number of different species of bivalves as records of the temperature and salinity of their ambient aquatic environment. The species analysed were the estuarine oysters Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, and Crassostrea gigas, an estuarine mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and the freshwater mussel Velesunio ambiguus. The estuarine shells were taken from monitoring experiments conducted over a period of 12 months at two different field sites. Freshwater shells were collected wild, from locations close to water monitoring stations. Preliminary results show distinct variations in the Mg/Ca of O. angasi shells with an apparent seasonal pattern. V. ambiguus shells show clear patterns in Mn/Ca, linked to environmental variations.

  18. Observations on shell growth and morphology of the bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The bivalve Ruditapes philippinarum is not only one of the main mollusc species in the west Pacific Ocean, but also one of the main species for aquaculture in China. Knowledge of growth of the R. philippinarum shell will improve our understanding of the shell as an environmental archive. It is also useful for the aquaculture of R. philippinarum. In this research, a hanging box culture method was introduced in the culture of R. philippinarum. The bivalves were cultured for 126 days, from March 31 to August 3, 2002. The average growth rates of shell width, height, and thickness were 0.069, 0.046, and 0.032 mm/d, respectively. The mean increase of average individual wet mass was 0.028 g/d. The largest growth rates of both shell and average individual wet mass occurred in June, indicating that water temperature and bivalve reproduction were 2 important factors. The shell morphology underwent significant changes with shell growth. The ratio of height to thickness (value of B/C) shifted 1.58 in the first 60 days to 1.54 in the last 30 days, which was resulted from the change in major shell growth direction. Periodic changes in the B/C ratio led to corrugated shell form, which could be used to determine the age of the shell.

  19. Explosive demographic expansion by dreissenid bivalves as a possible result of astronomical forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Harzhauser

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human induced range expansions of invasive dreissenid bivalves are of great concern. However, the underlying biological processes are only poorly understood, partly due to the lack of information on natural expansion events. Here we use the extinct bivalve species Sinucongeria primiformis as a model organism for testing natural (i.e. non-Anthropocene blooms of dreissenid species in a lacustrine system of Lake Pannon during the Tortonian (~10.5 Myr; Late Miocene. 600 samples from a consecutive core were evaluated for the relative abundance of this pavement-forming mollusc, which cover about 8 millennia of Late Miocene time with a decadal resolution. Our data indicate that the settlement by bivalves in the offshore environment was limited mainly by bottom water oxygenation, which follows predictable and repetitive patterns through time. These population fluctuations might be related to solar cycles: successful dreissenid settlement is re-occurring in a frequency known as the lower and upper Gleissberg cycles with a 50–80 and 90–120 yr period. These cycles appear to control regional wind patterns, which are directly linked to water mixing of the lake. This is modulated by the even more prominent 500 yr cycle, which seems to be the most important pacemaker for Lake Pannon hydrology.

  20. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 {mu}g.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (x5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (x2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. - Highlights: > Relevant information concerning the chronic impact of uranium on biota is scarce. > We study its biological speciation to explain bioavailability, accumulation, toxicity. > 80% of U accumulated was measured in the pellet fraction (organelles + granules/MRG). > Chronic exposure to U induced genetic damage in gill and haemolymph cells of the bivalve.

  1. Chemosynthetic bacteria found in bivalve species from mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Clara F; Webster, Gordon; Cunha, Marina R; Duperron, Sébastien; Weightman, Andrew J

    2010-09-01

    As in other cold seeps, the dominant bivalves in mud volcanoes (MV) from the Gulf of Cadiz are macrofauna belonging to the families Solemyidae (Acharax sp., Petrasma sp.), Lucinidae (Lucinoma sp.), Thyasiridae (Thyasira vulcolutre) and Mytilidae (Bathymodiolus mauritanicus). The delta(13)C values measured in solemyid, lucinid and thyasirid specimens support the hypothesis of thiotrophic nutrition, whereas isotopic signatures of B. mauritanicus suggest methanotrophic nutrition. The indication by stable isotope analysis that chemosynthetic bacteria make a substantial contribution to the nutrition of the bivalves led us to investigate their associated bacteria and their phylogenetic relationships based on comparative 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis and cloning of bacterial 16S rRNA-encoding genes confirmed the presence of sulfide-oxidizing symbionts within gill tissues of many of the studied specimens. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences demonstrated that most bacteria were related to known sulfide-oxidizing endosymbionts found in other deep-sea chemosynthetic environments, with the co-occurrence of methane-oxidizing symbionts in Bathymodiolus specimens. This study confirms the presence of several chemosynthetic bivalves in the Gulf of Cadiz and further highlights the importance of sulfide- and methane-oxidizing symbionts in the trophic ecology of macrobenthic communities in MV.

  2. Neurological manifestations in Fabry disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Bruno Bidin Brooks; Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a rare, progressive, multisystem and highly debilitating disease. FD is an X-linked lysosome storage disorder that results in α-galactosidase A deifciency. The subsequent accumulation of glycosphingolipids is more evident in vascular endothelium and smooth-muscle cells. The resulting effect of the deposition is generalized inlfammation and vasculopathy, which can also affect the central and peripheral nervous system. FD progresses with kidney dysfunction, angiokeratoma of the skin, cardiomyopathy, cerebrovascular events and neurological disorders. In the present review, the neurological manifestations of FD are summarized with emphasis on cerebral vasculopathy, cochlear nerve dysfunction, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms, autonomic dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy. Enzyme replacement therapy is also discussed in the light of its more prominent effects when administered early in life, which make it essential to diagnose FD as soon as possible.

  3. [Pulmonary manifestations in rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Justyna; Domysławska, Izabela; Bagrowska, Magdalena; Sierakowski, Stanislaw

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by destructive cartilages, bones and other structures formed joints. RA belongs to connective tissue diseases represented by systemic nature, internal illness, extra-articular features and rapidly progress of atherosceirosis. The extra-articular complications cause the reduction of patient longevity. The frequency of symptoms in patient with RA and respiratory disorders occur in 10-20% of cases. Pulmonary complications are the second most common cause of premature of patient deaths. Respiratory disorders associated with RA are devided into 3 groups: infection, lung disease caused by drugs and pulmonary manifestation connected by RA. These last affect interstitial tissue, bronchioli, pulmonary vessels, pleura, also are presented by pulmonary rheumatoid nodules and pulmonary hypertension.

  4. Ocular manifestations of mitochondrial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Mathebula

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA is recognized as one of the most common causes of inherited neurological disease. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are a common feature of mitochondrial disease.  Optic atrophy causing central visual loss is the dominant feature of mitochondrial DNA diseases. Nystagmus is also encountered in mitochondrial disease.Although optometrists are not involved with the management of mitochondrial disease, they are likely to see more patients with this disease. Oph-thalmic examination forms part of the clinical assessment of mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial disease should be suspected in any patient with unexplained optic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy or retrochiasmal visual loss. Despite considerable advances in the under-standing of mitochondrial genetics and the patho-genesis of mtDNA diseases, no effective treatment options are currently available for patients withmitochondrial dysfunction. (S Afr Optom 201271(1 46-50

  5. Oropharyngeal dysphagia: manifestations and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommel, Nathalie; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    Swallowing disorders (dysphagia) have been recognized by the WHO as a medical disability associated with increased morbidity, mortality and costs of care. With increasing survival rates and ageing of the population, swallowing disorders and their role in causing pulmonary and nutritional pathologies are becoming exceedingly important. Over the past two decades, the study of oropharyngeal dysphagia has been approached from various disciplines with considerable progress in understanding its pathophysiology. This Review describes the most frequent manifestations of oropharyngeal dysphagia and the clinical as well as instrumental techniques that are available to diagnose patients with dysphagia. However, the clinical value of these diagnostic tests and their sensitivity to predict outcomes is limited. Despite considerable clinical research efforts, conventional diagnostic methods for oropharyngeal dysphagia have limited proven accuracy in predicting aspiration and respiratory disease. We contend that incorporation of measurable objective assessments into clinical diagnosis is needed and might be key in developing novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jaime Liou; Aceves, Seema S

    2011-04-01

    The rates of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders appear to be increasing. The most common of these is eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) which is a clinicopathologic condition consisting of characteristic symptoms and endoscopic features accompanied by a pan-esophageal, acid resistant epithelial eosinophilia of greater than equal to 15 per high power field. Typical symptoms include dysphagia and abdominal pain. Typical endoscopic features include pallor, plaques, furrows, concentric rings. Complications include food impactions and strictures. EoE resolution with food elimination diets provides evidence that EoE is a food-antigen driven process. In vitro and microarray studies have identified specific immunologic factors underlying EoE pathogenesis. Other gastrointestinal manifestations of food intolerances/allergy include food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome.

  7. Mucocutaneous manifestations of Chikungunya fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya fever (CF is an arboviral acute febrile illness transmitted by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. After a quiescence of more than three decades, CF has recently re-emerged as a major public health problem of global scale. CF is characterized by an acute onset of high fever associated with a severe disabling arthritis often accompanied by prominent mucocutaneous manifestations. The disease is usually self-limiting, but the joint symptoms and some of the cutaneous features may persist after the defervescence. A wide range of mucocutaneous changes has been described to occur in association with CF during the current epidemic. Besides a morbilliform erythema, hyperpigmentation, xerosis, excoriated papules, aphthous-like ulcers, vesiculobullous and lichenoid eruptions, and exacerbation of pre-existing or quiescent dermatoses had been observed frequently. These unusual features may help in the clinical differential diagnosis of acute viral exanthems mimicking CF.

  8. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Sonaye, B S; Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S B; Bipin, P D; D'costa, A; Chaubey, R C

    2014-05-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of 'Comet assay' for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in both bivalve species. This showed a dose-dependent increase of genetic damage induced in bivalves by EMS as well as gamma radiation. Further, the highest DNA damage was observed at 24h. The damage gradually decreased with time, i.e. was smaller at 48 and 72 h than at 24h post irradiation in both species of bivalves. This may indicate repair of the damaged DNA and/or loss of heavily damaged cells as the post irradiation time advanced. The present study

  9. Museum Preserved Bivalves as Indicators of Long-term Trends in Methylmercury Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengen, A. C.; Foslund, H. M.; Greenfield, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many efforts to reduce mercury concentrations in the environment, there are relatively few datasets on long-term trends in mercury in biota, especially for the bioavailable form, methylmercury (MeHg). This study used museum preserved bivalves (stored in ethanol) to look at MeHg trends in the Asian date mussel Musculista senhousia and the Asian clam Potamocorbula amurensis, collected from San Francisco Bay, California between 1975 and 2012. For each sampling date, 4 to 15 individuals were obtained from museum collections (N = 156 total specimens), freeze-dried, weighed, homogenized, digested, and individually analyzed for MeHg using trace metal clean techniques. The bivalves were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to look for changes in food web structure. P. amurensis specimens were only available from 1988 to 2012, and an increase in MeHg was observed during that time. In contrast, M. senhousia specimens were available for the entire 37 year period and exhibited a significant decline in MeHg in the southern reach of the estuary (South Bay). The median MeHg concentration in M. senhousia was highest at 239 ng/g dw in October 1975. That year was the last year of operations for the New Almaden Mercury Mining District, which drained into South Bay. By the 1990s, MeHg concentrations in M. senhousia dropped significantly to a median of 37 ng/g dw. Isotopic δ15N values did not support a hypothesis of reduced trophic position causing the MeHg decline. Over the study duration, δ15N increased in M. senhousia, which we attributed to a baseline shift. We also observed a decline in δ13C since 2000, which may represent a shift in bivalve carbon towards greater utilization of planktonic sources. To validate the use of museum specimens, we ran a preservation study, where we collected fresh bivalves, fixed them in ethanol or formalin, and then transferred them to ethanol for long-term storage. Although MeHg concentrations increased after 1 week, they stabilized over

  10. Adaptive morphologies and guild structure in a high-diversity bivalve fauna from an early Campanian rocky shore, Ivö Klack (Sweden)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn; Jagt, John W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve fauna from a late early Campanian rocky shore at Ivö Klack (southern Sweden), comprises just over sixty species, a very high diversity in comparison to other Late Cretaceous and modern rocky shore bivalve assemblages. This high diversity is here considered to represent a reliable census...... adjacent environments. It includes some of the most northerly known, very small rudistid bivalves, in addition to the oldest known occurrences of Mytilus and Barbatia in association with rocky shores. Bivalves constituted the most important invertebrate group inhabiting the late early Campanian rocky shore...

  11. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sassa

    Full Text Available The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  12. Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Signe; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2010-01-01

    ', 'bronchiectasis', 'bronchitis', 'cutaneous manifestations', 'erythema nodosum', 'extraintestinal manifestations', 'hyperhomocysteinemia', 'infliximab', 'iridocyclitis', 'lung disease', 'ocular manifestations', 'osteomalacia', 'pancreatitis', 'primary sclerosing cholangitis', 'renal stones', 'sulfasalazine...

  13. Mucocutaneous manifestations of HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobhana A

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with various mucocutaneous features, which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV infection. This study was done to note the different mucocutaneous lesions present in the HIV population in eastern India. METHODS: Four hundred and ten HIV seropositive patients attending the outpatient and inpatient departments were included in the study. RESULTS: Out of 410 HIV positives, 40% had mucocutaneous involvement at presentation. The mean age of the study population was 29 years and male to female ratio was 2.5:1. The common mucocutaneous morbidities included oral candidiasis (36%, dermatophytosis and gingivitis (13% each, herpes zoster (6%, herpes simplex and scabies (5% each. A striking feature, noted in 36% males, was straightening of hairs. Genital herpes was the commonest genital ulcer disease. Lesions associated with declining immunity included oral candidiasis, oral hairy leukoplakia and herpes zoster with median CD4 counts of 98, 62 and 198/ L respectively. CONCLUSION: Early recognition of mucocutaneous manifestations and associated STDs help in better management of HIV/AIDS.

  14. Rheumatological manifestations in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, Angela; Cerinic, Marco Matucci; De Giorgio, Francesca; Minari, Chiara; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2006-11-01

    Rheumatological manifestations of Diabetes Mellitus may be classified in: non articular, articular and bone conditions. Among non articular conditions, diabetic cheiroarthropathy, frequent in type I diabetes, the most important disorder related to limited joint mobility, results in stiff skin and joint contractures. Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, flexor tenosynovitis, and Duputryen's and Peyronie's diseases are also linked to limited joint mobility. Diffuse skeletal hyperostosis, due to calcification at entheses, is frequent and early, particularly in type 2 diabetes. Neuropathies cause some non articular conditions, mainly neuropathic arthritis, a destructive bone and joint condition more common in type I diabetes. Algodistrophy, shoulder-hand and entrapment syndromes are also frequent. Mononeuropathy causes diabetic amyotrophy, characterised by painless muscle weakness. Among muscle conditions, diabetic muscle infarction is a rare, sometimes severe, condition. Among articular conditions, osteoarthritis is frequent and early in diabetes, in which also chondrocalcinosis and gout occur. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes I have a common genetic background and the presence of diabetes gives to RA an unfavourable prognosis. Among bone conditions, osteopenia and osteoporosis may occur early in type 1 diabetes. Contrarily, in type 2 diabetes, bone mineral density is similar or, sometimes, higher than in non diabetic subjects, probably due to hyperinsulinemia.

  15. Skin manifestations in autoinflammatory syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Falco, Markus; Ruzicka, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Autoinflammatory diseases encompass a group of inflammatory diseases that are non-infectious, non-allergic, non-autoimmune and non-immunodeficient. The term was initially coined for a small group of familial periodic fever syndromes of which familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common and best known. Genetic and molecular analyses demonstrated for the majority of these diseases an impairment of inflammasomes to cause an increased activity of an interleukin-1-dependent inflammatory response. Over the last years an increasing number of either rare hereditary syndromes or acquired common diseases could be summarized under the designation of autoinflammatory disease, thus creating an emerging new rubric of inflammatory diseases. Many of them display cutaneous manifestations as both concomitant or more rarely main symptoms. To name some of them like erysipelas-like erythema in FMF; urticaria-like rashes in tumor necrosis factor receptor 1- or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (TRAPS, CAPS), hyperimmunoglobulin D syndrome (HIDS) or Schnitzler syndrome; pyoderma gangrenosum and acne in PAPA syndrome; or behçetoid aphthous ulcerations in HIDS and PFAPA syndrome. Based on the new insights into pathogenesis one increasingly realizes the good response of these diseases to IL-1 antagonist therapies.

  16. Rheumatic manifestations of pituitary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavrou, S; Kleinberg, D L

    2001-10-01

    Pituitary tumors may cause rheumatologic problems as a result of under production or overproduction of one pituitary hormone. Excessive growth hormone causes destruction of cartilage by a direct action. Facial and acral changes and arthralgias may be some of the first symptoms of acromegaly. The arthritis associated with acromegaly is often devastating. Carpal tunnel syndrome is very common in patients with acromegaly. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) has indirect effects via the action of glucocorticoid on bones, muscles, and the immune system. Proximal muscle weakness is a characteristic feature of Cushing's syndrome. Patients with Cushing's syndrome commonly have osteopenia and osteoporosis that lead to an increase in bone fractures. Avascular necrosis is associated with exogenous steroid administration. The effects of too much glucocorticoid or too rapid withdrawal can be severe. Gonadotropins act via the gonadal steroids and protect bone mass from loss. Prolactin is less involved in rheumatologic disease; the data for which are limited in humans. Pituitary tumors can have manifestations similar to rheumatologic disorders and should be included in the differential diagnosis of these diseases.

  17. Extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, J E

    1979-08-01

    Bacterial endocarditis is an elusive disease that challenges clinicians' diagnostic capabilities. Because it can present with various combinations of extravalvular signs and symptoms, the underlying primary disease can go unnoticed.A review of the various extracardiac manifestations of bacterial endocarditis suggests three main patterns by which the valvular infection can be obscured. (1) A major clinical event may be so dramatic that subtle evidence of endocarditis is overlooked. The rupture of a mycotic aneurysm may simulate a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a congenital aneurysm. (2) The symptoms of bacterial endocarditis may be constitutional complaints easily attributable to a routine, trivial illness. Symptoms of low-grade fever, myalgias, back pain and anorexia may mimic a viral syndrome. (3) Endocarditis poses a difficult diagnostic dilemma when it generates constellations of findings that are classic for other disorders. Complaints of arthritis and arthralgias accompanied by hematuria and antinuclear antibody may suggest systemic lupus erythematosus; a renal biopsy study showing diffuse proliferative glomerulonephritis may support this diagnosis. The combination of fever, petechiae, altered mental status, thrombocytopenia, azotemia and anemia may promote the diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. When the protean guises of bacterial endocarditis create these clinical difficulties, errors in diagnosis occur and appropriate therapy is delayed. Keen awareness of the varied disease presentations will improve success in managing endocarditis by fostering rapid diagnosis and prompt therapy.

  18. Unusual florid skeletal manifestations of primary hyperparathyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashebu, Samuel D.; Dahniya, Mohamed H.; Muhtaseb, Sayeed A.; Aduh, Prosper [Department of Radiology, Al-Adan Hospital (Kuwait)

    2002-12-01

    We report a case of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) with advanced and unusual skeletal manifestations - a rare occurrence in developed countries nowadays. The literature is briefly reviewed. (orig.)

  19. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamar, Nassim; Marion, Olivier; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques; Dalton, Harry R

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E virus can cause acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis and has been associated with a range of extrahepatic manifestations. Guillain-Barré syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy and encephalitis are the main neurological manifestations associated with acute and chronic hepatitis E virus infection. Renal injuries have been also reported, including membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis with or without cryoglobulinemia and membranous glomerulonephritis. Acute pancreatitis, haematological disorders and other autoimmune extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis E virus, such as myocarditis and thyroiditis, have been also reported. In this comprehensive article, we review all published reports describing hepatitis E virus-associated extrahepatic manifestations.

  20. Assessment of ametryn contamination in river water, river sediment, and mollusk bivalves in São Paulo state, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacomini, Analu Egydio; de Camargo, Plínio Barbosa; Avelar, Wagner Eustáquio Paiva; Bonato, Pierina Sueli

    2011-04-01

    São Paulo state, Brazil, is one of the main areas of sugar cane agriculture in the world. Herbicides, in particular, ametryn, are extensively used in this extensive area, which implies that this herbicide is present in the environment and can contaminate the surface water by running off. Thereby, residues of ametryn were analyzed in samples of river water an river sediment and in freshwater bivalves obtained from the rivers Sapucaí, Pardo and Mogi-Guaçu in São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples were taken in the winter of 2003 and 2004 in two locations in each river. The specimens of freshwater bivalves collected and analyzed were Corbicula fluminea, an exotic species, and Diplodon fontaineanus, a native species. Additionally, the evaluation of the ability of bioconcentration and depuration of ametryn by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea was also performed. Ametryn concentrations in the samples were measured by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Residues of ametryn in water (50 ng/L) and in freshwater bivalves (2-7 ng/g) were found in the Mogi-Guaçu River in 2004, and residues in river sediments were found in all rivers in 2003 and 2004 (0.5-2 ng/g). The observation of the aquatic environment through the analysis of these matrixes, water, sediment, and bivalves, revealed the importance of the river sediment in the accumulation of the herbicide ametryn, which can contaminate the biota.

  1. Permian bivalves of the Taciba Formation, Itararé Group, Paraná Basin, and their biostratigraphic significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Guimarães Simões

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A small and poorly diversified bivalve fauna from Taciba Formation, Itararé Group, Paraná Basin (State of Santa Catarina,Mafra Municipality, is described in this paper for the first time, based on new findings. The fauna is recorded in a 30 cmthick interval of fine sandstone locally at the top of Taciba Formation, in the Butiá quarry. The studied fossil-bearing sandstonebed is a marine intercalation recording a brief eustatic rise in sea-level, probably following glacier retreat and climateamelioration at the end of a broad glacial scenario. The fauna is mainly dominated by productid brachiopods, which are notdescribed here, and rare mollusk shells (bivalves and gastropods. Two bivalve species were identified: Myonia argentinensis(Harrington, 1955, and Aviculopecten multiscalptus (Thomas, 1928. The presence of Myonia argentinensis is noteworthysince this species is also present in the Baitaca assemblage found in marine siltstones (Baitaca assemblage of theRio do Sul Formation, cropping out at the Teixeira Soares region, Paraná State. This species is also recorded in the bivalvefauna from the Bonete Formation, Pillahinco Group, Sauce Grande Basin, Buenos Aires Province, in Argentina. Hence, themarine bivalves of the Taciba Formation are associated with the transgressive event that characterizes the Eurydesma fauna,indicating a Late Asselian-Sakmarian age for the bivalve fauna. Presence of the Myonia argentinensis megadesmid speciesreinforces the Gondwanic nature of the studied fauna.

  2. Electrocardiographic Manifestations of Benzodiazepine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Kazemzadeh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and electrocardiographic (ECG manifestations of benzodiazepines (BZs. Methods: In this retrospective study, all BZ-poisoned patients hospitalized at Loghman Hakim Hospital between September 2010 and March 2011 were evaluated. Patients’ information including age, sex, time elapsed between the ingestion and presentation, and type of the BZ used were extracted from the patients' charts and recorded. ECGs on presentation to the emergency department (ED were evaluated and parameters such as PR interval, QRS duration, corrected QT, amplitude of S wave in lead I, height of R wave and R/S ratio in the lead aVR were also measured and recorded. Results: Oxazepam, chlordiazepoxide, lorazepam, alprazolam, diazepam, and clonazepam were ingested by 9 (3%, 13 (4.4%, 29 (9.9%, 105 (35.8%, 65 (22.2%, and 72 (24.6% patients, respectively. Mean PR interval was reported to be 0.16 ± 0.03 sec and PR interval of greater than 200 msec was detected in 12 (4.5% patients. Mean QRS duration was 0.07 ± 0.01sec and QRS≥120 msec was observed in 7 (2.6% cases. Conclusion: Diazepam is the only BZ that does not cause QRS widening and oxazepam is the only one not causing PR prolongation. It can be concluded that if a patient refers with a decreased level of consciousness and accompanying signs of BZ toxicity, QRS widening in ECG rules out diazepam, whereas PR prolongation rules out oxazepam toxicity.

  3. Gastrointestinal manifestations in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, E

    1996-08-01

    CFTR, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the gene product that is defective in cystic fibrosis, is present in the apical membrane of the epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. In the foregut, the clinical manifestations are not directly related to the primary defect of the CFTR chloride channel. The most troublesome complaints and symptoms originate from the oesophagus as peptic oesophagitis or oesophageal varices. In the small intestinal wall, the clinical expression of CF depends largely on the decreased secretion of fluid and chloride ions, the increased permeability of the paracellular space between adjacent enterocytes and the sticky mucous cover over the enterocytes. As a rule, the brush border enzyme activities are normal and there is some enhanced active transport as shown for glucose and alanine. The results of continuous enteral feeding of CF patients clearly show that the small intestinal mucosa, in the daily situation, is not functioning at maximal capacity. Although CFTR expression in the colon is lower, the large intestine may be the site of several serious complications such as rectal prolapse, meconium ileus equivalent, intussusception, volvulus and silent appendicitis. In recent years colonic strictures, after the use of high-dose pancreatic enzymes, are being increasingly reported; the condition has recently been called CF fibrosing colonopathy. The CF gastrointestinal content itself differs mainly from the normal condition by the lower acidity in the foregut and the accretion of mucins and proteins, eventually resulting in intestinal obstruction, in the ileum and colon. Better understanding of the CF gastrointestinal phenotype may contribute to improvement of the overall wellbeing of these patients.

  4. Endocrine manifestations of celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Philip

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Celiac disease can have extra gastrointestinal tract (GIT presentations, most of which are endocrine. The aim of this study was to present patients diagnosed to have celiac disease from an endocrine department and to study the prevalence of endocrinopathies in celiac disease. Materials and Methods: A total of 36 patients from the endocrinology department (LLRM Medical College, Meerut between January 2011 and July 2012 and who were diagnosed to have celiac disease were included in the study. Results: Short stature was the commonest presentation (25%, other presentations included short stature and delayed puberty (20%, delayed puberty (11%, screening for celiac disease in type-1 DM patients (17%, rickets (6%, anemia not responding to oral therapy (6%, type-1 DM with recurrent hypoglycaemia (6%, and osteomalacia (3%. The endocrine manifestations include (after complete evaluation short stature (58%, delayed puberty (31%, elevated alkaline phospahatase (67%, low calcium (22%, X-rays suggestive of osteomalacia or rickets (8%, capopedal spasm (6%, and night blindness (6%. Anti-TPO antibody positivity was found in 53%, hypothyroidism in 28%, subclinical hypothyroidism in 17%, and type-1 DM in 25% of the patients. A total of 14% patients had no GI symptoms. Conclusion: Celiac disease is an endocrine disrupter as well as the great masquerader having varied presentations including short stature, delayed puberty, and rickets. Some patients who have celiac disease may not have any GI symptoms, making the diagnosis all the more difficult. Also, there is significant incidence of celiac disease with hypothyroidism and type-1 DM, making screening for it important in these diseases.

  5. Clinical manifestation of myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F

    1998-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an iron-containing heme protein localized in the azurophilic granules of neutrophil granulocytes and in the lysosomes of monocytes, is involved in the killing of several micro-organisms and foreign cells, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, red cells, and malignant and nonmalignant nucleated cells. Despite the primary role of the oxygen-dependent MPO system in the destruction of certain phagocytosed microbes, subjects with total or partial MPO deficiency generally do not have an increased frequency of infections, probably because other MPO-independent mechanism(s) for microbicidal activity compensate for the lack of MPO. Infectious diseases, especially with species of Candida, have been observed predominantly in MPO-deficient patients who also have diabetes mellitus, but the frequency of such cases is very low, less than 5% of reported MPO-deficient subjects. Evidence from a number of investigators indicates that individuals with total MPO deficiency show a high incidence of malignant tumors. Since MPO-deficient PMNs exhibit in vitro a depressed lytic action against malignant human cells, it can be speculated that the neutrophil MPO system plays a central role in the tumor surveillance of the host. However, any definitive conclusion on the association between MPO deficiency and the occurrence of cancers needs to be confirmed in further clinical studies. Clinical manifestations of this disorder depend on the nature of the defect; an acquired abnormality associated with other hematological or nonhematological diseases has been occasionally described, but the primary deficiency is the form more commonly reported. Another area of interest pertinent to MPO expression is related to the use of anti-MPO monoclonal antibodies for the lineage assignment of acute leukemic cells, the definition of FAB MO acute myeloid leukemia, the identification of biphenotypic acute leukemias, and their distinction from acute leukemia with minimal phenotypic deviation

  6. Cystic thymic diseases: CT manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Soon Young; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Eui Yong; Jeon, Seok Chol; Seo, Heung Suk; Hahm, Chang Kok [School of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-09-15

    To describe CT findings and differential points of cystic thymic lesions. We evaluated retrospectively total 19 masses with well marginated cystic lesions at thymic area on CT scans. They were 10 teratomas, 3 congenital thymic cysts, 2 multilocular thymic cysts(associated with thymoma and myasthenia gravis in each), 2 cysts Assciated with thymic Hodgkin's lymphomas an ectopic parathyroid cyst, and an infected thymic cyst. The radiological abnormalities evaluated were thickness of the wall, presence or abscene of septa, mural nodule, solid component, calcification and fat component. All three cases of congenital thymic cysts and an ectopic parathyroid cyst appeared as thin-walled unilocular cyst with homogeneous internal density and without identifiable solid component. In multilocular thymic cyst, there were thick wall and solid components(n =2), thick internal septa and calcifications(n = 1). The cysts of teratomas manifested thick walls(n = 9), internal septa(n = 4), calcifications(n = 6), fat components(n = 4), and solid components(n = 4). Cysts in Hodgkin's diseases appeared as multilocular or unilocular and had thick wall and septa without calcification. Infected thymic cyst presented with multilocular cystic mass with identifiable wall and septa, calcification, and solid components. The thymic diseases with cystic lesion include teratomas, congenital thymic cysts, multilocular thymic cysts, parathyroid cyst, and Hodgkin's disease. Congenital thymic cyst and ectopic parathyroid cyst are thin-walled unilocular cystic lesions. Cystic lesions associated with teratoma, Hodgkin's disease, and multilocular thymic cyst are thick-walled cystic lesions with or without solid component.

  7. Distribution of persistent toxic substances in benthic bivalves from the inshore areas of the Yellow Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen X; Hu, Jing; Chen, Jiang L; Fan, Yong S; Xing, Baoshan; Tao, Shu

    2008-01-01

    A baseline survey of trace metals and organic pollutants in bivalves from the coastal areas of the Yellow Sea (China) showed the the concentrations of Cd and Pb in the bivalves from more than 85 and 73%, respectively, of the total sites (30 sites in all) exceeded the low limits of the national quality standards for marine organisms. At three sites, the contents of Cd in three species were even higher than the median limit, and a similar case with Pb occurred at another site. The tissue concentrations of As at four sites and of Hg at one site were above the low and the median limits, respectively, of the quality standards. At 43% of all sites, the levels of petroleum hydrocarbons were higher than the low limit of the quality standards, and the tissue concentrations at two sites even went beyond the median limit at one site and the high limit at the other. The concentrations of phthalate esters and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the collected bivalves were not high, as shown by peak values of 305 and 302 ng/g, respectively. The contents of polychlorinated biphenyls for all the species were much lower than the low limit of the quality standards. The compositional properties and isomeric ratios of PAHs indicated various pyrolytic procedures as the dominant origins. The sites with higher tissue contents of DDT and its metabolites (DDTs) over the low or the median quality limit were located mainly in the South Yellow Sea. The fractions and specific ratios of DDTs suggested that new inputs of DDT existed at two sites in the North Yellow Sea, and the potential sources involved technical DDT, technical dicofol, and their mixture.

  8. P-glycoprotein and its inducible expression in three bivalve species after exposure to Prorocentrum lima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu; Liu, Su-Li; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Li, Hong-Ye; Liu, Jie-Sheng; Yang, Wei-Dong

    2015-12-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp or ABCB1) belongs to the family of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters responsible for multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in aquatic organisms. To provide more information of P-gp in shellfish, in this study, complete cDNA of P-gp in three bivalve species including Ruditapes philippinarum, Scapharca subcrenata and Tegillarca granosa were cloned and its expressions in gill, digestive gland, adductor muscle and mantle of the three bivalves were detected after exposure to Prorocentrum lima, a toxogenic dinoflagellate. The complete sequences of R. philippinarum, S. subcrenata and T. granosa P-gp showed high homology with MDR/P-gp/ABCB proteins from other species, having a typical sequence organization as full transporters from the ABCB family. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the amino acid sequences of P-gp from S. subcrenata and T. granosa had a closest relationship, forming an independent branch, then grouping into the other branch with Mytilus californianus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. However, P-gp sequences from R. philippinarum were more similar to the homologs from the more distantly related Aplysia californica than to homologs from S. subcrenata and T. granosa, suggesting that bivalves P-gp might have different paralogs. P-glycoprotein expressed in all detected tissues but there were large differences between them. After exposure to P. lima, the expression of P-gp changed in the four tissues in varying degrees within the same species and between different species, but the changes in mRNA and protein level were not always synchronous.

  9. Pulmonary manifestations of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H James; Roubey, Robert A S

    2010-09-01

    A broad spectrum of pulmonary disease may occur in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The most common pulmonary manifestations are pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension. In this article the authors review these manifestations, as well as less common findings including acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar hemorrhage, and pulmonary capillaritis.

  10. Cardiac manifestations of inborn errors of metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evangeliou, A.; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, K.; Daphnis, E.; Ganotakis, E.; Vavouranakis, I.; Michailidou, H.; Hitoglou-Makedou, A.; Nicolaidou, P.; Wevers, R.A.; Varlamis, G.

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the study was to investigate the frequency and type of cardiac manifestations in a defined group of patients with inborn errors of metabolism. This paper also explores the key role of cardiac manifestations in the diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism in daily practice. METHODS: O

  11. Oral manifestations of syphilis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Soares

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Syphilis is an infectious disease presenting stages associated with specific oral lesions. Therefore, health professionals should be familiar with the different syphilis oral manifestations at each stage and be prepared to refer any suspected patient for further evaluation. This report describes the most important clinical factors of each stage, emphasizing the oral manifestations.

  12. [Hemolytic uremic syndrome. Clinical manifestations. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exeni, Ramón A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical manifestation are described in children with epidemic HUS. The intestinal involvement in the prodromic period, is outlined and the most common disturbances such acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, hemolytic anemia, leucocitosis hypertension, neurological, pancreatic and cardiac manifestations are described. We discuss the acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, metabolic acidosis, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia. The etiopathogenic treatment and the control of renal sequelae are also discussed.

  13. 21 CFR 11.50 - Signature manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Signature manifestations. 11.50 Section 11.50 Food... RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Records § 11.50 Signature manifestations. (a) Signed electronic...: (1) The printed name of the signer; (2) The date and time when the signature was executed; and...

  14. Congenital rubella syndrome and delayed manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Several hypotheses of different medical and psychological delayed manifestations among people who have congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) have been discussed. This study tests some of these hypotheses of delayed manifestations. Methods: Gathering information about 35 individuals who hav...... which people with CRS face must primarily be understood in relation to congenital deafblindness and dual sensory and communicative deprivation....

  15. NEUROLOGIC MANIFESTATION OF ORGANIC ACADEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Hassan TONEKABONI

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Inborn errors of organic acid metabolism are relatively recently recognized diseases with a wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms: ranging from asymptomatic, normal appearing children to death during first few days of life.In my presentation I will try to explain some of the most common clinical presentation of these disorder with stress on neurologic findings. Organic acidemia usually have three clinical manifestations Severe neonatal form, Intermittent late-onset form and chronic progressive form. Recurrent coma, The main feature of these disorders is due to accumulation of toxic metabolites in Central Nervous system with direct effect on the function, while chronic accumulation of these materials may interfere with CNS development or cerebral metabolism leading to developmental delay.Severe neonatal formsFollowing a symptom free interval of a few days from birth, poor sucking and difficult feeding appears in the newborn, followed by unexplained and progressive coma. Seizures may appear during the course of the disease and EEG may show a burst-suppression pattern. During this stage most infants have axial hypotonia with peripheral dystonia, choreoathetosis, episodic opisthotonus and some repetitive bicycling and boxing movements.Associated biochemical abnormalities including metabolic acidosis, ketonuria and hyperammonemia also is usually present. The overall short-term prognosis with recent advances in medical care is improving. But later in life acute intercurrent episodes triggered by a stress often occur, which can be occasionally fatal.bulging fontanelle and cerebral edema may mimic CNS infection in these babies.Intermittent late-onset formsRecurrent attacks of coma or lethargy with ataxia can occur in childhood or even in adolescence or adulthood. These episodes may be frequent, though in between these the child is entirely normal. These attacks are precipitated by conditions that enhance protein catabolism (trauma, infection etc

  16. Diversity of Gastropods and Bivalves in mangrove ecosystem rehabilitation areas in Aceh Besar and Banda Aceh districts, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewiyanti Irma

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This study was conducted in mangrove rehabilitation area on May to November 2011. The objective of the present study was toevaluate the diversity of Gastropods and Bivalves based on the different level of vegetation age of mangrove. Sampling were conducted on 1x 1 m2 of square transects. We recorded 14 species of Gastropods and 5 species of Bivalves with abundance of 371 individuals/m2 and 28 individuals/m2, respectively. The highest abundance of Gastropod was found on 4 years vegetation age on Cerithidae cingulata (150 individuals/m2, while the highest abundance of Bivalves was found on 3 years vegetation age on Pedalion isognomum (8 individuals/m2. In conclusion,the condition of community structure post tsunami was unstable.

  17. New records of recently described chemosymbiotic bivalves for mud volcanoes within the European waters (Gulf of Cádiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. RUEDA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemosymbiotic bivalves are important members of cold seep communities and information on their distribution in theEuropean waters is still quite scarce. This study reports the presence of living populations and shell remains of some recently described bivalves such as Lucinoma asapheus, Solemya elarraichensis and Acharax gadirae as well as Bathymodiolus sp. in the mud volcanoes of the Spanish Atlantic waters. Living populations of these species were thus far only found in Anastasya, Aveiro and Almazán mud volcanoes, together with other chemosymbiotic metazoa (Siboglinum spp., suggesting the presence of moderate seepage activity. In other mud volcanoes (Albolote, Gazul, the benthic communities are dominated by sessile filter feeders on authigenic carbonates (chimneys, slabs and only the shell remains of some chemosymbiotic bivalves were found, indicating earlier or very low seepage conditions. The present study elaborates on the known distribution of L. asapheus and S. elarraichensis to the European waters of the Gulf of Cádiz.

  18. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, M.K., E-mail: here.praveen@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Shyama, S.K., E-mail: skshyama@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Sonaye, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Goa Medical College, Goa (India); Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S.B.; Bipin, P.D.; D’costa, A. [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Chaubey, R.C. [Radiation Biology and Health Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Possible genotoxic effect of accidental exposure of aquatic fauna to γ radiation. • Relative sensitivity of bivalves to γ radiation is also analyzed using comet assay. • γ radiation induced significant genetic damage in both the species of bivalves. • P. malabarica and M. casta exhibited a similar level of sensitivity to γ radiation. • Comet assay may be used as a biomarker for the environmental biomonitoring. - Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of ‘Comet assay’ for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in

  19. Detection and identification of tdh- and trh-positive Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from four species of cultured bivalve molluscs on the Spanish Mediterranean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Ana; Lopez-Joven, Carmen; Lacuesta, Beatriz; Elandaloussi, Laurence; Wagley, Sariqa; Furones, M Dolores; Ruiz-Zarzuela, Imanol; de Blas, Ignacio; Rangdale, Rachel; Gomez-Gil, Bruno

    2009-12-01

    Presented here is the first report describing the detection of potentially diarrheal Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from cultured bivalves on the Mediterranean coast, providing data on the presence of both tdh- and trh-positive isolates. Potentially diarrheal V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated from four species of bivalves collected from both bays of the Ebro delta, Spain.

  20. Investigating the impact of drilling mud and its major components on bivalve species of Georges Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-11-01

    The objective of this program has been to measure the response of commercially important marine bivalve molluscs to low levels of drilling muds. Because these materials are composed of several major components whose proportions vary between wells and with depth for a single well, the approach of this study has been to test the major components individually and then to test a representative synthetic mud and finally a used drilling mud from an offshore platform. In all but one of these tests the target organism has been the sea scallop, Placopecten magellanicus.

  1. Host-parasite interactions: Marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, Perkinsus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudant, Philippe; E Chu, Fu-Lin; Volety, Aswani

    2013-10-01

    This review assesses and examines the work conducted to date concerning host and parasite interactions between marine bivalve molluscs and protozoan parasites, belonging to Perkinsus species. The review focuses on two well-studied host-parasite interaction models: the two clam species, Ruditapes philippinarum and R. decussatus, and the parasite Perkinsus olseni, and the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and the parasite Perkinsus marinus. Cellular and humoral defense responses of the host in combating parasitic infection, the mechanisms (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, extracellular products) employed by the parasite in evading host defenses as well as the role of environmental factors in modulating the host-parasite interactions are described.

  2. Estimation of food limitation of bivalve larvae in coastal waters of north-western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, O.G.; Hendriks, I.E.; Strasser, M.;

    2006-01-01

    Marine invertebrate recruitment may be affected by food limitation during the pelagic larval life stages. In the present study, field data on abundance of bivalve larvae along with their prey (small phytoplankton) were examined to see whether they were consistent with predictions made by an energ...... assimilation rate averaged 7-26% of the maximum assimilation rate. Under the assumptions made for the present study, it is suggested that growth of larvae in north-west European waters is often food-limited. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved...

  3. Bivalves and Gastropods of the Gulf of Tehuantepec, Mexico: A Checklist of Species with Notes on Their Habitat and Local Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ríos-Jara

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The taxonomic composition of 160 species of bivalves and gastropods recorded in the Gulf of Tehuantepec is presented with information on their habitat and distribution along 10 different localities of the shoreline and 42 stations of the continental shelf. The species were on sandy and rocky beaches, coastal lagoons, estuaries, mangroves, rocky breakwaters of ports, and shallow subtidal areas (14–47 m depth. A total of 78 bivalve species and 82 gastropod species were recorded. Most of these were associated with sandy and rocky beaches and breakwaters of ports. The estuaries host 30 species and the coastal lagoons only two. In the shallow subtidal there were 18 gastropod species and 40 bivalve species representing 36.3% of all. This study adds 24 bivalve species and 29 gastropod species not recorded in previous studies for a total count of 213 species (102 bivalves and 111 gastropods for Gulf of Tehuantepec.

  4. Neurological Manifestations In Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    youssef HNACH

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe purpose of this retrospective study was to report neurological manifestations noted in patients who were monitored for inflammatory bowel disease, in order to document the pathophysiological, clinical, progressive, and therapeutic characteristics of this entity.Material and methodsWe conducted a retrospective study on patients monitored -in the gastroenterology service in Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat, Morocco- for inflammatory bowel disease from 1992 till 2013 and who developed neurological manifestations during its course. Patients with iatrogenic complications were excluded, as well as patients with cerebrovascular risk factors.ResultsThere were 6 patients, 4 of whom have developed peripheral manifestations. Electromyography enabled the diagnosis to be made and the outcome was favorable with disappearance of clinical manifestations and normalization of the electromyography.The other 2 patients, monitored for Crohn’s disease, developed ischemic stroke. Cerebral computed tomography angiography provided positive and topographic diagnosis. Two patients were admitted to specialized facilities.ConclusionNeurological manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are rarely reported.  Peripheral neuropathies and stroke remain the most common manifestations. The mechanisms of these manifestations are not clearly defined yet. Currently, we hypothesize the interaction of immune mediators.

  5. [Lyme disease--clinical manifestations and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2016-05-01

    Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is a systemic infectious disease that can present in a variety of clinical manifestations. The disease is caused by a group of spirochaetes--Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato or Lyme borrelia--that are transmitted to humans by the bite of Ixodes ticks. Lyme disease is the most common arthropode-borne infectious disease in many European countries including Germany. Early localized infection is typically manifested by an erythema migrans skin lesion, in rarer cases as a borrelial lymphocytoma. The most common early disseminated manifestation is (early) neuroborreliosis. In adults, neuroborreliosis appears typically as meningoradiculoneuritis. Neuroborreliosis in children, however, is typically manifested by meningitis. In addition, multiple erythema migrans lesions and Lyme carditis occur relatively frequently. The most common manifestation oflate Lyme disease is Lyme arthritis. Early manifestations (and usually also late manifestations) of Lyme disease can be treated successfully by application of suitable antibacterial agents. For the treatment of Lyme disease, doxycycline, certain penicillins such as amoxicillin and some cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, cefuroxime axetil) are recommended in current guidelines. A major challenge is the treatment of chronic, non-specific disorders, i. e., posttreatment Lyme disease syndrome and "chronic Lyme disease". Prevention of Lyme disease is mainly accomplished by protecting against tick bites. Prophylactic administration of doxycycline after tick bites is generally not recommended in Germany. There is no vaccine available for human beings.

  6. Novel matrix proteins of Pteria penguin pearl oyster shell nacre homologous to the jacalin-related β-prism fold lectins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Naganuma

    Full Text Available Nacreous layers of pearl oyster are one of the major functional biominerals. By participating in organic compound-crystal interactions, they assemble into consecutive mineral lamellae-like photonic crystals. Their biomineralization mechanisms are controlled by macromolecules; however, they are largely unknown. Here, we report two novel lectins termed PPL2A and PPL2B, which were isolated from the mantle and the secreted fluid of Pteria penguin oyster. PPL2A is a hetero-dimer composed of α and γ subunits, and PPL2B is a homo-dimer of β subunit, all of which surprisingly shared sequence homology with the jacalin-related plant lectin. On the basis of knockdown experiments at the larval stage, the identification of PPLs in the shell matrix, and in vitro CaCO3 crystallization analysis, we conclude that two novel jacalin-related lectins participate in the biomineralization of P. penguin nacre as matrix proteins. Furthermore, it was found that trehalose, which is specific recognizing carbohydrates for PPL2A and is abundant in the secreted fluid of P. penguin mantle, functions as a regulatory factor for biomineralization via PPL2A. These observations highlight the unique functions, diversity and molecular evolution of this lectin family involved in the mollusk shell formation.

  7. Diagenetic effects of compaction on reservoir properties: The case of early callovian ``Dalle Nacrée'' formation (Paris basin, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Fadi H.; Champenois, France; Barbier, Mickaël; Adelinet, Mathilde; Rosenberg, Elisabeth; Houel, Pascal; Delmas, Jocelyne; Swennen, Rudy

    2016-11-01

    The impact of compaction diagenesis on reservoir properties is addressed by means of observations made on five boreholes with different burial histories of the Early Callovian "Dalle Nacrée" Formation in the Paris Basin. Petrographic analyses were carried out in order to investigate the rock-texture, pore space type and volume, micro-fabrics, and cement phases. Based on the acquired data, a chronologically ordered sequence of diagenetic events (paragenesis) for each borehole was reconstructed taking the burial history into account. Point counting and a segmentation algorithm (Matlab) were used to quantify porosity, as well as the amounts of grain constituents and cement phases on scanned images of studied thin sections. In addition, four key samples were analyzed by 3D imaging using microfocus X-ray computer tomography. Basin margin grainstones display a different burial diagenesis when compared to basin centre grainstones and wackestones. The former have been affected by considerable cementation (especially by blocky calcite) prior to effective burial, in contrast to the basin centre lithologies where burial and compaction prevailed with relatively less cementation. Fracturing and bed-parallel stylolitization, observed especially in basinal wackestone facies also invoke higher levels of mechanical and chemical compaction than observed in basin marginal equivalents. Compaction fluids may have migrated at the time of burial from the basin centre towards its margins, affecting hence the reservoir properties of similar rock textures and facies and resulting in cross-basin spatial diagenetic heterogeneities.

  8. SAR Indicators for Morphological Changes and Bivalve Beds on Intertidal Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Martin; Melchionna, Sabrina; Kemme, Linnea

    2016-08-01

    We analysed a large amount of high-resolution Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of dry-fallen intertidal flats on the German North Sea coast with respect to the imaging of sediments, macrophytes, and mussels. TerraSAR-X and Radarsat-2 images of four test areas acquired from 2008 to 2013 form the basis for the present investigation and are used to demonstrate that pairs of SAR images, if combined through basic algebraic operations, can already provide indicators for morphological changes and for bivalve (oyster and mussel) beds. Multi-temporal analyses of series of SAR images allow detecting bivalve beds, since the radar backscattering from those beds is generally high, whereas that from sediments may vary with imaging geometry and environmental conditions. Our results further show evidence that also single-acquisition, dual- polarization SAR imagery can be used in this respect. The polarization coefficient (i.e., the ratio of the difference and the sum of both co-polarizations) can be used to infer indicators for oyster and blue-mussel beds.

  9. Physiological effects of hypercapnia in the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata (Fabricius, 1779) (Bivalvia; Limidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karen M.; Kristiansen, Erlend; Zachariassen, Karl Erik

    2011-01-01

    The option of storing CO(2) in subsea rock formations to mitigate future increases in atmospheric CO(2) may induce problems for animals in the deep sea. In the present study the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata was subjected to environmental hypercapnia (pHSW 6.35, P(CO2), =33,000 mu atm) corresp......The option of storing CO(2) in subsea rock formations to mitigate future increases in atmospheric CO(2) may induce problems for animals in the deep sea. In the present study the deep-sea bivalve Acesta excavata was subjected to environmental hypercapnia (pHSW 6.35, P(CO2), =33,000 mu atm......) corresponding to conditions reported from natural CO(2) seeps. Effects on acid base status and metabolic rate were related to time of exposure and subsequent recovery. During exposure there was an uncompensated drop in both hemolymph and intracellular pH. Intracellular pH returned to control values, while...... extracellular pH remained significantly lower during recovery. Intracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity of the posterior adductor muscle of hypercapnic animals was significantly lower than control values, but this was not the case for the remaining tissues analyzed. Oxygen consumption initially dropped...

  10. Norovirus in bivalve molluscs: a study of the efficacy of the depuration system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Savini

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are the most common viral agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and are often associated with the consumption of either fresh or undercooked live bivalve molluscs. The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of the water depuration systems in the presence of Norovirus contamination A total of 96 shellfish samples was examined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, as follows: 58 mussel samples (Mytilus galloprovincialis, 35 Manila clam samples (Tapes decussatus and 3 Pacific oyster samples (Crassostrea gigas. Of these, 67 were collected before and 29 following depuration. Viral RNA was detected in one of the 67 non-depurated samples examined (1.5%; 95% confidence interval: 0.36-7.92% and in one of the 29 depurated samples (3.4%; 95% confidence interval: 0.82-17.22%. There were no statistically significant differences between depurated and non-depurated samples which indicated that the purifying systems in place were not able to remove Norovirus contamination from the live bivalve molluscs.

  11. THE USE OF ALGAE CONCENTRATES, DRIED ALGAE AND ALGAL SUBSTITUTES TO FEED BIVALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludi Parwadani Aji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae have high nutritional value and are used to feed adult and larval stages of bivalves, the larvae of some fish and crustaceans and zooplankton. However, microalgae production for aquaculture animal is very expensive. To overcome this, the use of preserved microalgae such as algae concentrate and dried algae, or algal substitutes has been developed. There are both advantages and disadvantages to this alternative food. For example, even though the cost production for algal substitute yeast-based diet is cheaper, their nutritional value is much lower compared to fresh microalgae. Moreover, there is no significant difference in nutritional value between preserved (concentrated or dried and fresh microalgae; however, preserving microalgae for long periods will affect their nutritional value. In spite of this problem, preserved microalgae such as algal concentrate and dried algae seem to be more effective to feed bivalves than algal substitutes yeast based diet due to their availability and relatively high nutritional value. Furthermore, algae concentrates are more suitable to replace fresh algae than dried algae.

  12. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles as carrier facilitate bioaccumulation of phenanthrene in marine bivalve, ark shell (Scapharca subcrenata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shengyan; Zhang, Yaodan; Song, Chunzheng; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) on the uptake of hydrophobic organic chemicals by marine bivalves, we conducted a comparative bioaccumulation study by exposing clam, Scapharca subcrenata, to phenanthrene (Phe) in the presence and absence of nTiO2. The large surface area of nTiO2 resulted in adsorption of co-existing Phe in aqueous solution to form nTiO2-Phe complexes. Accumulation of nTiO2 was not observed in clams at exposed concentration (500 μg/L) in this study. However, enhanced uptake of Phe by clams was observed in the presence of nTiO2, with ku and BAFs values being 2 and 1.7 times higher than that of Phe alone, respectively. The enhanced uptake can be explained by ingestion of nTiO2-Phe complexes into the gut and subsequent desorption of Phe there. Therefore, nTiO2 as a carrier facilitated the uptake of Phe by marine bivalves.

  13. Bivalve Omics: State of the Art and Potential Applications for the Biomonitoring of Harmful Marine Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Venier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  14. Traces (ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides of predatory gastropods on bivalve shells from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal-Yong Kong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Circular to subcircular drill holes were identified on the bivalve shells collected from the Seogwipo Formation, Jejudo, Korea. A great majority of the drill holes (>70% were found on the surfaces of a bivalve species Glycymeris rotunda. They are characterized by a beveled sharp edge and paraboloid in cross section with larger outer borehole diameter (OBD; mean 4.21 mm and smaller inner borehole diameter (mean 2.94 mm. Walls of the drill holes are generally smooth, and walls ornamented with etched relief-like structures were also recognized. A slightly raised central boss observed in an incomplete specimen may indicate a failure of predator’s attack. All drill holes collected are classified as a single ichnospecies Oichnus paraboloides Bromley, 1981. They are interpreted as boring traces produced by predatory gastropods, particularly naticid gastropods. Most O. paraboloides boreholes are observed in the central area of shell surfaces; a few boreholes lie marginally, which may reflect a borehole-site selectivity. No correlation between size of prey (shell height and size of predator (OBD is recognized. It is likely, however, that drilled shells of about 30 mm in height represent optimal prey size for naticid predators that lived in a benthic Seogwipo community.

  15. Genetic alterations in syndromes with oral manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Anuthama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since Gregor Johan Mendel proposed the law of inheritance, genetics has transcended the field of health and has entered all walks of life in its application. Thus, the gene is the pivoting factor for all happenings revolving around it. Knowledge of gene mapping in various diseases would be a valuable tool in prenatally diagnosing the condition and averting the future disability and stigma for the posterity. This article includes an array of genetically determined conditions in patients seen at our college out-patient department with complete manifestation, partial manifestation and array of manifestations not fitting into a particular syndrome.

  16. Molecular approaches to understand biomineralization of shell nacreous layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li-Ping; Zhu, Fang-Jie; Zhou, Yu-Juan; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2011-01-01

    The nacreous layer of molluskan shells, which consists of highly oriented aragonitic crystals and an organic matrix (including chitin and proteins), is a product of biomineralization. This paper briefly introduces the recent research advances on nacre biomineralization of shells from bivalves and gastropods, which mainly focus on analysis of the micro- and nano-structure and components of shell nacreous layers, and investigations of the characteristics and functions of matrix proteins from nacre. Matrix proteins not only participate in construction of the organic nacre framework, but also control the nucleation and growth of aragonitic crystals, as well as determine the polymorph specificity of calcium carbonate in nacre. Moreover, the inorganic aragonite phase also plays an active role in organizing nacre microstructure. Based on these studies, several models to illustrate the formation mechanism related to lamellar nacre in bivalves, and columnar nacre in gastropods are introduced.

  17. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  18. Hydrophysical manifestations of the Indian ocean tsunami

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Murthy, T.V.R.; Rao, B.P.

    described in detail by several authors. This chapter summarises the results of our investigations on the hydrophysical manifestations (salinity and temperature, coastal currents, internal waves, etc.) of the tsunami on the coastal environments in India...

  19. Musculoskeletal manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureldine, M H A; Khamashta, M A; Merashli, M; Sabbouh, T; Hughes, G R V; Uthman, I

    2016-04-01

    The scope of clinical and laboratory manifestations of the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) has increased dramatically since its discovery in 1983, where any organ system can be involved. Musculoskeletal complications are consistently reported in APS patients, not only causing morbidity and mortality, but also affecting their quality of life. We reviewed all English papers on APS involvement in the musculoskeletal system using Google Scholar and Pubmed; all reports are summarized in a table in this review. The spectrum of manifestations includes arthralgia/arthritis, avascular necrosis of bone, bone marrow necrosis, complex regional pain syndrome type-1, muscle infarction, non-traumatic fractures, and osteoporosis. Some of these manifestations were reported in good quality studies, some of which showed an association between aPL-positivity and the occurrence of these manifestations, while others were merely described in case reports.

  20. Cutaneous manifestations of dermatomyositis and their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Jeffrey P

    2010-06-01

    Dermatomyositis is a condition with pathognomonic and characteristic cutaneous lesions. This article describes the skin manifestations observed in patients with dermatomyositis, their differential diagnosis, their relationship to internal disease (particularly malignancy), and their management.

  1. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-12-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disorders that affect pediatric patients. It is valuable to think about 'endocrine disorder' as a cause of the neurologic manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of hormonal imbalance can rapidly relieve the neurologic symptoms. Better understanding of the interaction between the endocrine system and the nervous system, combined with the knowledge about the pathophysiology of the neurologic manifestations presented in the endocrine disorders might allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of the endocrine disorders.

  2. Manifest toob klassika taas kinoekraanile / Andri Maimets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Maimets, Andri, 1979-

    2007-01-01

    2.-9. veebr. on kinos "Sõprus" ja 11.-15. veebr. Tartu Sadamateatris 5. kultusfilmide festival Manifest, seekord USA filmid ja teemaks sõnavabadus. Esilinastub ka Urmas E. Liivi dokumentaalfilm "Tervitusi Nõukogude Eestist!"

  3. Systemic manifestations of hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lydia; Marcell, Lauren; Kottilil, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (HCV) is a common infection affecting 185 million people worldwide. The most common manifestation of chronic HCV is progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, several systemic manifestations of HCV have been recognized and reported in the literature. The purpose of this review is to assimilate published literature based on evidence to categorize these extrahepatic manifestations with the likelihood of a causal association with HCV. Exciting recent developments have resulted in simple all oral interferon-free highly effective therapy for HCV. However, this treatment is also expensive and less accessible to most affected individuals as treatment recommendations are based on stage of liver fibrosis. Expanding the scope of HCV therapy to those with extrahepatic manifestations beyond what is currently recommended will significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality in this aging population.

  4. Current oral manifestations of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M

    2001-02-01

    The oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus infection have changed drastically since the introduction of the highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in developed countries. Recent studies have documented significant reductions in morbidity and mortality rates among HIV-infected patients on HAART. This article focuses on the latest information about the oral manifestations of HIV infection and will discuss the impact of HAART.

  5. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Peixinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome.

  6. Endocrine disorders and the neurologic manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jeesuk

    2014-01-01

    The nervous system and the endocrine system are closely interrelated and both involved intimately in maintaining homeostasis. Endocrine dysfunctions may lead to various neurologic manifestations such as headache, myopathy, and acute encephalopathy including coma. It is important to recognize the neurologic signs and symptoms caused by the endocrine disorders while managing endocrine disorders. This article provides an overview of the neurologic manifestations found in various endocrine disord...

  7. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

    OpenAIRE

    Gloria Lugo; Lara Pena; Fernando Cordido

    2012-01-01

    Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Ac...

  8. Neuropsychiatric Manifestations of Parkinson`s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Peixinho, Ana; De Azevedo, Ana Luísa; Simões, Rita Moiron

    2006-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease affects about 1% of the world population older than 65 years. It’s most frequently considered a movement disorder, but the neuropsychiatric manifestations associated with the disease and/or its treatment may be of equal or greater significance in some patients. We will discuss briefly the epidemiology, physiopathology and diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, highlighting the neuropsychiatric manifestations: depression, anxiety, psychosis, dementia, sleep disorders, dopamine d...

  9. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza SHIARI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally.

  10. [Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Bernardino

    2004-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus predominantly affects the liver, although it may also produce a number of extrahepatic manifestations, such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and several types of kidney disease. The pathogenesis of these conditions is not completely understood, but immunologic mechanisms are involved in many cases. In some patients with hepatitis C virus infection, the extrahepatic manifestations predominate and their proper diagnosis and management is very important.

  11. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eWang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be pre-manifest. Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  12. Metabolic and hormonal signatures in pre-manifest and manifest Huntington's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Ross, Christopher A; Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Carlson, Olga D; Egan, Josephine M; Siddiqui, Sana; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder typified by involuntary body movements, and psychiatric and cognitive abnormalities. Many HD patients also exhibit metabolic changes including progressive weight loss and appetite dysfunction. Here we have investigated metabolic function in pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects to establish an HD subject metabolic hormonal plasma signature. Individuals at risk for HD who have had predictive genetic testing showing the cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) expansion causative of HD, but who do not yet present signs and symptoms sufficient for the diagnosis of manifest HD are said to be "pre-manifest." Pre-manifest and manifest HD patients, as well as both familial and non-familial controls, were evaluated for multiple peripheral metabolism signals including circulating levels of hormones, growth factors, lipids, and cytokines. Both pre-manifest and manifest HD subjects exhibited significantly reduced levels of circulating growth factors, including growth hormone and prolactin. HD-related changes in the levels of metabolic hormones such as ghrelin, glucagon, and amylin were also observed. Total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C were significantly decreased in HD subjects. C-reactive protein was significantly elevated in pre-manifest HD subjects. The observation of metabolic alterations, even in subjects considered to be in the pre-manifest stage of HD, suggests that in addition, and prior, to overt neuronal damage, HD affects metabolic hormone secretion and energy regulation, which may shed light on pathogenesis, and provide opportunities for biomarker development.

  13. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic viral hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrsopoulos, N T; Reddy, K R

    2001-02-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses are well-recognized causes for chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and even for hepatocellular carcinoma. Apart from liver disease, these viral infections are known to be associated with a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. The prevalence of clinically significant extrahepatic manifestations is relatively low, but it can be associated with significant morbidity and even mortality. An awareness and recognition of these manifestations is of paramount importance in facilitating early diagnosis and in offering treatment. However, treatments are not necessarily effective, and patients may continue with disabling extrahepatic manifestations. Hepatitis B virus has been well recognized as causing a variety of manifestations that include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis. More recently, infection with hepatitis C virus has elicited considerable interest for its role in a spectrum of extrahepatic manifestations. Among the best-reported are cryoglobulinemia, glomerulonephritis, high titer of autoantibodies, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, lichen planus, Mooren's corneal ulcer, Sjögren's syndrome, porphyria cutanea tarda, and necrotizing cutaneous vasculitis. The precise pathogenesis of these extrahepatic complications has not been determined, although the majority represent the clinical expression of autoimmune phenomena.

  14. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Bivalves Molluscs of Apulian Region: a 3-years control activity of a EU Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedico O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve molluscs represent an important matrix to be studied for several reasons. Their nutritional properties make them valuable to the consumers, so that their consumption and commercial value has risen worldwide. Simultaneously, their significant water-filtering capability and their persistence in the same place make them good bio-indicators of marine ecosystems. The presence of the heavy metal contaminants, as Cd, Pb and Hg, was investigated in bivalve molluscs such as mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venus gallina and oysters (Ostrea edulis. In the present study, a survey was carried out on 334 samples addressed to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale – Puglia e Basilicata, Foggia (ITALY between 2009-2011, and collected by official authorities along the coasts of Apulia Region. The conformity of heavy metal content in bivalve molluscs was verified, in according to EC Reg. 1881/2006. The compliance was found for the total amount of samples. The obtained data on heavy metals concentration in bivalve molluscs were compared with data found in monitoring studies on the incidence of heavy metals in 1981 in North-Western Mediterranean Sea, in 2003 in Tyrrhenian Sea and in 2010 in Pacific Ocean (Chile, reported in literature. The information obtained from this work offer an essential database, not only for the authorities involved in food control, but also for the official institutions responsible of a constant control of the marine ecosystem pollution.

  15. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in macroalgaes, bivalves, and fish from coastal areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Muñoz, D.; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S.; Maulvault, A.L.; Tediosi, A.; Fernández-Tejedor, M.; Heuvel, Van den F.; Kotterman, M.; Marques, A.; Barceló, D.

    2015-01-01

    The ocurrence and levels of PhACs, Endocrine Disrupting and related Compounds (EDCs) in seafood from potential contaminated areas in Europe has been studied. Macroalgae (S. accharina latissima and Laminaria digitata), bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus spp., Chamalea gallina and Crassos

  16. Growth and size-dependent loss of newly settled bivalves in two distant regions of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andresen, H.; Dorresteijn, I.; van der Meer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual growth and the timing of life history events determine the course of individual body sizes. Hence, these factors can influence size-dependent species interactions, such as predation. In the Wadden Sea, predation by crustaceans plays an important role in the survival of pre-recruit bivalve

  17. Uniform Variation in Genetic-Traits of a Marine Bivalve Related to Starvation, Pollution and Geographic Clines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, H.; Bogaards, R.H.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Bachelet, G.; Desprez, M.; Marchand, J.; Rybarczyk, H.; Sylvand, B.; De Wit, Y.; De Wolf, L.

    1995-01-01

    Consistent patterns of genetic variation in the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were found after exposure to low levels of copper, starvation, and along geographic dines. The geographic dines were related to temperature and salinity. Genetic differences were primarily found in the LAP (Leucine a

  18. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Zhang, Shaojun; Liu, Ying; Yang, Hongsheng

    2014-01-01

    Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm) and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm) was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1) • d(-1), respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS) deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  19. Lineage tracing of the bivalve shell field with special interest in the descendants of the 2d blastomere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohri, Masakuni; Hashimoto, Naoki; Wada, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    By evolving bilaterally separated shell plates, bivalves acquired a unique body plan in which their soft tissues are completely protected by hard shell plates. In this unique body plan, mobility between the separated shell plates is provided by novel structures such as a ligament and adductor muscles. As a first step towards understanding how the bivalve body plan was established, we investigated the development of the separated shell plates and ligament. Over 100 years ago, it was hypothesized that the development of separated shell plates is tightly linked with the unique cell cleavage (division) pattern of bivalves during development, wherein each bilateral daughter cell of the 2d descendant 2d(1121) develops into one of the bilateral shell fields. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by tracing the cell lineages of the Japanese purple mussel Septifer virgatus. Although the shell fields were found to be exclusively derived from the bilateral descendant cells of 2d: 2d(11211) and 2d(11212), the descendants of these cells were not restricted to shell fields alone, nor were they confined to the left or right side of the shell field based on their lineage. Our study demonstrated that ligament cells are also derived from 2d(11211) and 2d(11212), indicating that the ligament cells emerged as a subpopulation of shell field cells. This also suggests that the establishment of the novel developmental system for the ligament cells was critical for the evolution of the unique body plan of bivalves.

  20. Variation of the physiological energetics of the bivalve Spisula subtruncata (da Costa, 1778) within an annual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueda, J.L.; Smaal, A.C.

    2004-01-01

    Spisula subtruncata is an infaunal filter-feeding bivalve, which lives in shallow sandy bottoms (2¿20 m depth) from Norway to the Atlantic coasts of Morocco, including the Mediterranean Sea. Considering that fisheries of this species have become an important economic resource in some European countr

  1. Disjunct distribution of highly diverged mitochondrial lineage clade and population subdivision in a marine bivalve with pelagic larval dispersal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Drent, J; Baker, AJ

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA sequence data for 295 individuals of the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were collected from 10 sites across the European distribution, and from Alaska. The data were used to infer population subdivision history and estimate current levels of gene flow. Inferred historical biog

  2. The Ghost in the Shell : Local and Remote Forcing of a Coastal Bivalve Inhabiting the Humboldt Current System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, M.

    2014-12-01

    The external skeleton of mollusc bivalves, the shell, can furnish a recording of the environmental changes to which the organisms and population are exposed during their lives. The bivalve's growth is subjected to the thermocline variability; which itself is affected by environmental and climatic events. A highly variable environment such as the Humboldt current system (HCS) requires tools capable of recording its variations over a wide range of periodicities. Upwelling, Coastal trapped waves (CTWs), El Niño Southern Oscillation, and Pacific decadal oscillation events contribute to this environmental and climatic variability. The thermocline depth is modified by these different events at their own time-scales (respectively, daily to weekly, intraseasonally, interseasonally to interannually, and on a decadal scale). The thermocline variation translates into changes in Sea surface temperature (SST) and in the qualitative and quantitative productivity of phytoplankton. These two environmental factors are critical to bivalve growth.The sclerochronological (increment width) and sclerochemical (δ18O and δ13C) study consisted on the analysis of the Chilean bivalve Eurhomalea rufa, collected in 2005, as a recorder of the environmental HCS variability. The calibration step identified daily, monthly, and annual marks in the growth patterns of E. rufa. The results confirmed that the thermocline variability mainly drives the bivalve's activity and led to the establishment of a paleotemperature equation. Moreover, periodogram and wavelet analyses exposed the respective impacts of each environmental event from daily to interannual periodicities. In particular, the growth pattern of E. rufa follows SST variability at an intraseasonal periodicity (~ 60 days) which is remotely induced by CTWs. CTWs are generated by Kelvin oceanic waves, which are formed primarily by eastward equatorial Pacific winds (e.g. Shaffer et al. 1997; Montecino and Lange 2009).Sclerochronological studies

  3. Influences of organic matter and calcification rate on trace elements in aragonitic estuarine bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takesue, R.K.; Bacon, C.R.; Thompson, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    A suite of elements (B, Na, Mg, S, K, Ca, V, Mn, Cr, Sr, and Ba) was measured in aragonitic shells of the estuarine bivalve Corbula amurensis, the Asian clam, using the Sensitive High-Resolution Ion MicroProbe with Reverse Geometry (SHRIMP RG). Our initial intent was to explore potential geochemical proxy relationships between shell chemistry and salinity (freshwater inflow) in northern San Francisco Bay (SFB). In the course of this study we observed variations in shell trace element to calcium ([M]/Ca) ratios that could only be attributed to internal biological processes. This paper discusses the nature and sources of internal trace element variability in C. amurensis shells related to the shell organic fraction and shell calcification rates. The average organic content of whole C. amurensis shells is 19%. After treating whole powdered shells with an oxidative cleaning procedure to remove organic matter, shells contained on average 33% less total Mg and 78% less total Mn. Within our analytical uncertainty, Sr and Ba contents were unchanged by the removal of organic matter. These results show that aragonitic C. amurensis shells have a large component of non-lattice-bound Mg and Mn that probably contribute to the dissimilarity of [M]/Ca profiles among five same-sized shells. Non-lattice-bound trace elements could complicate the development and application of geochemical proxy relationships in bivalve shells. Because B, Ba and Sr occur exclusively in shell aragonite, they are good candidates for external proxy relationships. [M]/Ca ratios were significantly different in prismatic and nacreous aragonite and in two valves of the same shell that had different crystal growth rates. Some part of these differences can be attributed to non-lattice-bound trace elements associated with the organic fraction. The differences in [M]/Ca ratios were also consistent with the calcification rate-dependent ion transport model developed by Carr?? et al. [Carr?? M., Bentaleb I

  4. Short and long term consequences of larval stage exposure to constantly and ephemerally elevated carbon dioxide for marine bivalve populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Gobler

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While larval bivalves are highly sensitive to ocean acidification, the basis for this sensitivity and the longer term implications of this sensitivity are unclear. Experiments were performed to assess the short term (days and long term (months consequences of larval stage exposure to varying CO2 concentrations for calcifying bivalves. Higher CO2 concentrations depressed both calcification rates assessed using 45Ca uptake and RNA:DNA ratios in Mercenaria mercenaria and Argopecten irradians larvae with RNA:DNA ratios being highly correlated with larval growth rates r2 > 0.9. These findings suggested that high CO2 has a cascading negative physiological impact on bivalve larvae stemming in part from lower calcification rates. Exposure to elevated CO2 during the first four days of larval development significantly depressed A. irradians larval survival rates, while a 10 day exposure later in larval development did not, demonstrating the extreme CO2-sensitivity of bivalve larvae during first days of development. Short- (weeks and long-term (10 month experiments revealed that individuals surviving exposure to high CO2 during larval development grew faster when exposed to normal CO2 as juveniles compared to individuals reared under ambient CO2 as larvae. These increased growth rates could not, however, overcome size differences established during larval development, as size deficits of individuals exposed to even moderate levels of CO2 as larvae were evident even after 10 months of growth under normal CO2 concentrations. This `legacy effect' emphasizes the central role larval stage CO2 exposure can play in shaping the success of modern day bivalve populations.

  5. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    Full Text Available Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1 • d(-1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001. Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05. It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  6. Coexistence of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) and blue mussels Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 on a sheltered intertidal bivalve bed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per;

    2016-01-01

    The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 was introduced in Denmark for aquaculture in the 1970s. Presently, feral populations are found in many parts of the country, with the largest populations established on existing beds of blue mussel, Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758...... and M. edulis were collected from the bivalve bed, shell lengths were converted into biomass, which were interpolated to create biomass contours and combined with modelled topography of the bivalve bed to study niche separation. The bivalve bed slowly extended northwards over a period of 11 years, where...

  7. Field clearance of an intertidal bivalve bed: relative significance of the co-occurring blue mussel Mytilus edulis and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vismann, Bent; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens;

    2016-01-01

    At an approximately 12 000 m2 sheltered intertidal bivalve bed in the western part of the Limfjord, Denmark, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas co-occurs with the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. The relative significance of the impact of the 2 species on phytoplankton density during a tidal cycle....... However, the estimated water column cleared during low tide is overestimated due to phytoplankton depletion. Hence, it is concluded that the bivalve bed clears the water close to 1 time each tidal cycle. This, together with a low dry weight of soft parts, indicates that the bivalve bed, in general...

  8. 14 CFR 121.693 - Load manifest: All certificate holders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Load manifest: All certificate holders. 121... manifest: All certificate holders. The load manifest must contain the following information concerning the... certificate holder....

  9. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals by bivalves from lim fjord (North Adriatic Sea)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martincic, D.; Nurnberg, H.W.; Stoeppler, M.; Branica, M.

    1984-08-01

    The accumulation of trace metals (Zn, Cd, Pb, and Cu) by two bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ostrea edulis) growing at the same station and therefore under the same physicochemical conditions was studied. The oysters were more effective bioaccumulators for zinc, cadmium, lead and copper than the mussels. Oysters accumulate about 10-fold higher quantities of zinc than mussels, 16-fold higher for copper, 3-fold higher cadmium, and 2-fold higher lead concentrations. The observed differences in the copper and zinc distribution within the investigated organs can be attributed to some recently recognized blood cells in the oyster which are rich in zinc and copper. The tissue copper and zinc distribution in this animal depends on where these cells are at the time of sampling. The mussel contains no such cells. 53 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  10. Turnover of postlarval bivalves in sediments of tidal flats in Königshafen (German Wadden sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armonies, W.

    1994-06-01

    After larval settlement, juvenile bivalves may rapidly re-enter the water column and attain secondary dispersal by byssus-drifting. In order to estimate the quantitative importance of byssus-drifting, the abundance of drifters in the water column, their re-entry into the sediment, and their density in the ambient sediment were measured simultaneously over 3 months on a tidal flat in Königshafen near the Island of Sylt in the North Sea. Turnover of juvenile clams Macoma balthica and cockles Cerastoderma edule was more than once per week in summer, showing strong short-term variability because of semi-lunar rhythms of drifting activity. While there is currently no evidence for active habitat selection in settling M. balthica and C. edule larvae, it is suggested that habitat selection occurs following postlarval migrations.

  11. Musculoskeletal Manifestations in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fornaciari

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal manifestations are the most common extraintestinal complications of inflammatory bowel disease. Wide ranges in prevalence have been reported, depending on the criteria used to define spondylarthropathy. In 1991, the European Spondylarthropathy Study Group developed classification criteria that included previously neglected cases of undifferentiated spondylarthropathies, which had been ignored in most of the oldest epidemiological studies on inflammatory bowel disease. The spectrum of muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease patients includes all of the clinical features of spondylarthropathies: peripheral arthritis, inflammatory spinal pain, dactylitis, enthesitis (Achilles tendinitis and plantar fasciitis, buttock pain and anterior chest wall pain. Radiological evidence of sacroiliitis is common but not obligatory. The articular manifestations begin either concomitantly or subsequent to the bowel disease; however, the onset of spinal disease often precedes the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. The prevalence of the different muscoloskeletal manifestations is similar in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Symptoms usually disappear after proctocolectomy. The pathogenetic mechanisms that produce the muscoloskeletal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease are unclear. Several arguments favour an important role of the intestinal mucosa in the development of spondylarthropathy. The natural history is characterized by periods of flares and remission; therefore, the efficacy of treatment is difficult to establish. Most patients respond to rest, physical therapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs may activate bowel disease. Sulphasalazine may be recommended in some patients. There is no indication for the systemic use of steroids.

  12. Nocturnal manifestations of atypical parkinsonian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Jitkritsadakul, Onanong; Colosimo, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Although nocturnal disturbances are increasingly recognized as an integral part of the continuum of daytime manifestations of Parkinson's disease (PD), there is still little evidence in the medical literature to support the occurrence of these complex phenomena in patients with atypical parkinsonian disorders (APDs). Based on the anatomical substrates in APDs, which are considered to be more extensive outside the basal ganglia than in PD, we might expect that patients with APDs encounter the whole range of nocturnal disturbances, including motor, sleep disorders, autonomic dysfunctions, and neuropsychiatric manifestations at a similar, or even greater, frequency than in PD. This article is a review of the current literature on the problems at nighttime of patients with progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. MEDLINE, life science journals and online books were searched by querying appropriate key words. Reports were included if the studies were related to nocturnal manifestations in APDs. Forty articles fulfilled the selection criteria. Differences between these symptoms in APDs and PD are highlighted, given the evidence available about each manifestation. This analysis of nocturnal manifestations of APDs suggests the need for future studies to address these issues to improve the quality of life not only of patients with APDs but the caregivers who encounter the challenges of supporting these patients on a daily basis.

  13. RHEUMATOLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Gurinder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM : To determine the prevalence of rheumatic musculoskeletal manifestations in type 2 diabetic individuals and compare them with non - diabetic individuals. METHODS: 100 type 2 diabetic patients and 100 age and sex matched individuals were included in the study. Complete musculoskeletal examination was carried out which included examinatio n of shoulder joints , hands , back and knees. Patients were also asked to mark the sites of pain on a mannequin. Intensity of pain was marked on a visual analogue scale. These variables were then evaluated using Chi square test . RESULTS : Prevalence of RMS was found to be much higher in case of diabetic individuals except osteoarthritis. 49 patients out of 100 diabetic patients were found to have some form of rheumatic musculoskeletal manifestations. Diabetic cheiroarthropathy was found in the highest number of cases. A significant relation of these manifestations was found with age , duration of diabetes and glycemic control. A significant relation was also found between these manifestations and chronic microangiopathic complications like retinopathy and neph ropathy. CONCLUSION : A detailed examination of musculoskeletal system is an important part of care in patients with type 2 diabetes and some of the manifestations could be a simple and reliable marker of microangiopathic complications like retinopathy and nephropathy.

  14. Clarifying phylogenetic relationships and the evolutionary history of the bivalve order Arcida (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combosch, David J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    The systematics of the bivalve order Arcida constitutes an unresolved conundrum in bivalve systematics. The current definition of Arcida encompasses two superfamilies: Limopsoidea, which includes the recent families Philobryidae and Limopsidae, and Arcoidea, which encompasses the families Arcidae, Cucullaeidae, Noetiidae, Glycymerididae and Parallelodontidae. This classification, however, is controversial particularly with respect to the position and taxonomic status of Glycymerididae. Previous molecular phylogenies were limited either by the use of only a single molecular marker or by including only a few limopsoid and glycymeridid taxa. The challenging nature of Arcida taxonomy and the controversial results of some of the previous studies, prompted us to use a broad range of taxa (55 species), three nuclear markers (18S rRNA, 28S rRNA and histone H3) and a wide range of algorithmic approaches. This broad but stringent approach led to a number of results that differ significantly from previous studies. We provide the first molecular evidence that supports the separation of Arcoidea from Limopsoidea, although the exact position of Glycymerididae remains unresolved, and the monophyly of Limopsoidea is algorithm-dependent. In addition, we present the first time-calibrated evolutionary tree of Arcida relationships, indicating a significant increase in the diversification of arcidan lineages at the beginning of the Cretaceous, around 140Ma. The monophyly of Arcida, which has been supported previously, was confirmed in all our analyses. Although relationships among families remain somehow unresolved we found support for the monophyly of most arcidan families, at least under some analytical conditions (i.e., Glycymerididae, Noetiidae, Philobryidae, and Limopsidae). However, Arcidae, and particularly Arcinae, remain a major source of inconsistency in the current system of Arcida classification and are in dire need of taxonomic revision.

  15. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J.; Haynert, K.; Wegner, K. M.; Melzner, F.

    2015-07-01

    Bivalve calcification, particularly of the early larval stages, is highly sensitive to the change in ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32-] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the exact carbonate system component by which growth and calcification are affected it is necessary to utilize more complex carbonate chemistry manipulations. As single factors, pCO2 had no effects and [HCO3-] and pH had only limited effects on shell growth, while lowered [CO32-] strongly impacted calcification. Dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) limiting conditions led to strong reductions in calcification, despite high [CO32-], indicating that [HCO3-] rather than [CO32-] is the inorganic carbon source utilized for calcification by mytilid mussels. However, as the ratio [HCO3-] / [H+] is linearly correlated with [CO32-] it is not possible to differentiate between these under natural seawater conditions. An equivalent of about 80 μmol kg-1 [CO32-] is required to saturate inorganic carbon supply for calcification in bivalves. Below this threshold biomineralization rates rapidly decline. A comparison of literature data available for larvae and juvenile mussels and oysters originating from habitats differing substantially with respect to prevailing carbonate chemistry conditions revealed similar response curves. This suggests that the mechanisms which determine sensitivity of calcification in this group are highly conserved. The higher sensitivity of larval calcification seems to primarily result from the much higher relative calcification rates in early life stages. In order to reveal and understand the mechanisms that limit or facilitate adaptation to future ocean acidification, it is necessary to better

  16. Ocular manifestations in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silpa-archa, Sukhum; Lee, Joan J; Foster, C Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) can involve many parts of the eye, including the eyelid, ocular adnexa, sclera, cornea, uvea, retina and optic nerve. Ocular manifestations of SLE are common and may lead to permanent blindness from the underlying disease or therapeutic side effects. Keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common manifestation. However, vision loss may result from involvement of the retina, choroid and optic nerve. Ocular symptoms are correlated to systemic disease activity and can present as an initial manifestation of SLE. The established treatment includes prompt systemic corticosteroids, steroid-sparing immunosuppressive drugs and biological agents. Local ocular therapies are options with promising efficacy. The early recognition of disease and treatment provides reduction of visual morbidity and mortality.

  17. Vertigo as a Predominant Manifestation of Neurosarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasnim F. Imran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology that affects multiple organ systems. Neurological manifestations of sarcoidosis are less common and can include cranial neuropathies and intracranial lesions. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who presented with vertigo and uveitis. Extensive workup including brain imaging revealed enhancing focal lesions. A lacrimal gland biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sarcoidosis. The patient was initially treated with prednisone, which did not adequately control his symptoms, and then was switched to methotrexate with moderate symptomatic improvement. Our patient had an atypical presentation with vertigo as the predominant manifestation of sarcoidosis. Patients with neurosarcoidosis typically present with systemic involvement of sarcoidosis followed by neurologic involvement. Vertigo is rarely reported as an initial manifestation. This case highlights the importance of consideration of neurosarcoidosis as an entity even in patients that may not have a typical presentation or systemic involvement of disease.

  18. Novel Cutaneous Manifestations of Pleuroparenchymal Fibroelastosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowther, Christopher M; Morrison, Annie O; Candelario, Nicole M; Khalafbeigi, Sheva; Cockerell, Clay J

    2016-10-01

    Pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis (PPFE) is a rare progressive disease that manifests as parenchymal fibrosis of the upper lobe and pleura. Approximately 100 cases have been reported. Cutaneous manifestations of PPFE have not previously been described. Diagnosis is dependent on histologic identification of fibrosis with atypical elastic fibers, necessitating an invasive peripheral lung wedge biopsy.A 68-year-old male with a history of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis presented with an asymptomatic, telangiectatic erythematous eruption on bilateral lower extremities. Biopsies demonstrated a subtle perivascular infiltrate with marked increase in atypical elastic fibers, similar to the elastosis in the patient's lungs.This is the first documented case of cutaneous manifestations in PPFE. Clinicians need to be aware that cutaneous eruptions clinically simulating telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans but lacking a mast cell infiltrate histologically, may have increased abnormal elastic fibers. Thus, early recognition of these lesions in patients with an undefined restrictive lung disorder, may facilitate the diagnosis of PPFE in some patients.

  19. Life-Threatening Cardiac Manifestations of Pheochromocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz R. Leite

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma is a catecholamine-secreting tumor of the adrenal glands, usually with benign manifestations, whose typical clinical presentation includes the triad of headache, palpitations and diaphoresis. However, a wide range of signs and symptoms may be present. In the cardiovascular system, the most common signs are labile hypertension and sinus tachycardia. Systolic heart failure and ST-segment deviations mimicking myocardial infarction have also been reported, as well as QT interval prolongation and, rarely, ventricular tachycardia. We describe a challenging diagnosis of pheochromocytoma with many cardiovascular manifestations, which could have been missed due to the absence of typical symptoms.

  20. Main Ocular Manifestations in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Saray Quignon Santana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is considered an autoimmune disease in which articular and extra articular manifestations are produced and contribute to alter the functional capacity of the individual. This study consists on performing a bibliographical review showing the main ocular manifestations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It is our purpose to give you our experiences to the students as well as the internal medicine, ophthalmology and rheumatologist residents about this topic. The ophthalmological consultation of sick patients contributes to the prevention of ocular illnesses which are characteristic of the base disease and improve the ocular health.

  1. 78 FR 11877 - Announcement of Requirements Gathering Meetings for the Electronic Manifest (e-Manifest) System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... such a system, perhaps through the assessment of reasonable service fees or by a similar ``user pays... agency begins the planning stage of the e-Manifest system development process. EPA envisions that e... RCRA Docket is (202) 566- 0270. II. Historical Background on e-Manifest Project For more than a...

  2. [Extra-articular manifestations of seronegative spondylarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammelli, Daniele

    2006-05-01

    Seronegative spondylarthritis are frequently characterised by extra-articular manifestations. They are frequently in recurrent uveitis. Between the cutaneous manifestations should be mentioned erythema nodosum, typical of inflammatory bowel diseases, and keratoderma blenorrhagicum, in the Reiter's syndrome. Cardiac complications in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) include aortic valvular regurgitation and arrhythmia and, more rarely, mitral valvulopathy, cardiomyopathy and pericarditis. Pulmonary involvement in AS includes ventilatory restrictive syndrome and fibro-bullous disease of the apex. Vertebral osteoporosis is a very important extra-articular manifestation because of the possibility of spontaneous fractures of the vertebrae. Central neurological manifestations include medullary compression from cervical sub-luxation while the most important peripheral involvements are lumbar stenosis and the cauda equina syndrome. Type AA amyloidosis is a rare late complication of the AS, possible cause of death especially in patients with aggressive disease. Kidney complications can be observed as consequences of prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy, but the most frequent renal complications are amyloidosis and mesangial IgA segmental and focal glomerulonephritis.

  3. Propylthiouracil induced leukocytoclastic vasculitis: A rare manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Ayturk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylthiouracil (PTU is a common drug used in patients with hyperthyroidism. It may cause perinuclearantineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (p-ANCA in few patients with Graves′ disease. This antibody has been associated with different forms of vasculitis. We report a patient who presented with cutaneous manifestations of leukocytoclasticvasculitis with simultaneous development of p-ANCAs during PTU therapy for Graves′ disease.

  4. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Gillespie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  5. 19 CFR 122.75 - Complete manifest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Complete manifest. 122.75 Section 122.75 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Documents Required for Clearance and Permission To Depart;...

  6. Hepatitis A: clinical manifestations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Lee, Hyo-Suk

    2010-01-01

    Due to improved living conditions and subsequent changes in hepatitis A epidemiology, the disease burden of hepatitis A is increasing in many regions. Recently, Korea has faced a large, community-wide outbreak of hepatitis A, which has prompted a vaccination program. The clinical spectrum of hepatitis A virus infection ranges from asymptomatic infection to fulminant hepatitis. Clinical manifestations depend on the age of the host: less than 30% of infected young children are symptomatic, while about 80% of infected adults manifest severe hepatitis with remarkably elevated serum aminotransferases. Fulminant hepatitis is rare, with a reported incidence from 0.015 to 0.5%. Atypical manifestations include relapsing hepatitis and prolonged cholestasis, and complicated cases with acute kidney injury have been reported. Extrahepatic manifestations, such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, aplastic anemia, pure red cell aplasia, pleural or pericardial effusion, acute reactive arthritis, acute pancreatitis, acalculous cholecystitis, mononeuritis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome, have been rarely reported. Management of hepatitis A includes general supportive care, and critical decisions regarding liver transplantation await further studies on prognostic predictors. Fundamental management of hepatitis A is active vaccination. However, a vaccination program should be adapted to the regional situation, according to differing epidemiology and disease burden.

  7. Extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zignego, Anna Linda; Craxì, Antonio

    2008-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus may cause hepatic and extrahepatic diseases. Extrahepatic manifestations range from disorders for which a significant association with viral infection is supported by epidemiologic and pathogenetic data, to anecdotal observations without clear proof of causality. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases.

  8. The extrahepatic manifestations of hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Saeeda; Alamgir, Mohiuddin

    2008-07-01

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) leads to a number of hepatic complications, from acute to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, is a well-established fact. Upcoming clinical research, over the years, associates numerous extrahepatic manifestations during the acute and chronic episodes of hepatitis B with significant morbidity and mortality. A causal relationship between HBV and serious autoimmune disorders has also been observed among certain susceptible vaccine recipients in a defined temporal period following immunization. The cause of these extrahepatic manifestations is generally believed to be immune mediated. The most commonly described include skin rash, arthritis, arthralgia, glomerulonephritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and papular acrodermatitis etc. The serum-sickness like "arthritis-dermatitis" prodrome has also been observed in approximately one-third of patients acquiring HBV infections. Skin manifestations of HBV infection typically present as palpable purpura reported to be caused by chronic HBV, although this association remains controversial. To consider the relationship between HBV and other clinically significant disorders as well as serious autoimmune disorders among certain vaccine recipients is the topic of this review. Variable factors that influence extrahepatic manifestation are discussed, including possible synergy between hepatitis B virus and the immune system.

  9. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Steven-Huy B

    2004-05-01

    Several extrahepatic manifestations are associated with chronic HBV infection, many with significant morbidity and mortality. The cause of these extrahepatic manifestations is generally believed to be immune mediated. PAN is a rare, but serious, systemic complication of chronic HBV affecting the small- and medium-sized vessels. PAN is seen more frequently in North American and European patients and rarely in Asian patients. PAN ultimately involves multiple organ systems, some with devastating consequences, though the hepatic manifestations are often more mild. The optimal treatment of HBV-associated PAN is thought to include a combination of antiviral and immunosuppressive therapies. HBV-associated GN occurs mainly in children, predominantly males, in HBV endemic areas of the world, but is only occasionally reported in the United States. In children, GN is usually self-limited with only rare progression to renal failure. In adults, the natural disease course of GN may be more relentless, slowly progressing to renal failure. Immunosuppressive therapy in HBV-related GN is not recommended, but antiviral therapy with alpha-interferon has shown promise. The serum-sickness like "arthritis-dermatitis" prodrome is seen in approximately one third of patients acquiring HBV. The joint and skin manifestations are varied, but the syndrome spontaneously resolves at the onset of clinical hepatitis with few significant sequelae. Occasionally, arthritis following the acute prodromal infection may persist; however, joint destruction is rare. The association between HBV and mixed essential cryoglobulinemia remains controversial; but a triad of purpura, arthralgias, and weakness, which can progress to nephritis, pulmonary disease, and generalized vasculitis, has characterized the syndrome. Finally, skin manifestations of HBV infection typically present as palpable purpura. Though papular acrodermatitis of childhood has been reported to be caused by chronic HBV, this association

  10. [Aeromonas spp. and Plesiomonas shigelloides in bivalves, mud, and water from the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, E; Antillón, F

    1989-06-01

    Bivalves, mud, and surface water were collected at three different sites of the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica, in search of Aeromonas spp. and Plesiomonas shigelloides. For their isolation, these bacteria were enriched in alkaline peptone water and streaked on MacConkey agar and on brilliant green bile inositol agar. This was followed by the biochemical tests necessary for their identification. Thirty-five strains of A. hydrophila, 58 of A. caviae, 43 of A. sobria, and 7 of P. shigelloides were isolated. None of these predominated nor was there any indication of a seasonal distribution along the 15 month's duration of the study. Seven strains of A. hydrophila and two of A. sobria showed the biochemical characteristics associated with toxin production (positive Voges-Proskauer and lysine decarboxylase tests). These species are widely distributed in the gulf and there is risk of contracting an infection while bathing or when eating raw bivalves from this area.

  11. [Bacteriological study of bivalves from the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. I. Condition of the mollusk recently collected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, B; Brunker, T

    1977-07-01

    During the first six months of 1970 we collected 16 lots of the bivalve Anadara tuberculosa from two areas within the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica. These were examined bacteriologically and the coliform levels found in all of them were such that they had to be graded as not satisfactory for human consumption, according to generally accepted norms. The source of these coliforms is attributed to the sewage discharge of the city of Puntarenas into its estuary.

  12. Suspended material availability and filtration-biodeposition processes performed by a native and invasive bivalve species in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, C.L.; First, M.R.; Covich, A.P.; Opsahl, S.P.; Golladay, S.W.

    2011-01-01

    Unionid mussels are among the most threatened group of freshwater organisms globally. They are known for their ability to filter food particles from flowing and standing waters. However, invasive bivalve species, such as the Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea) in North America, have the potential to overlap in feeding and potentially out-compete the native species. Yet, the feeding preferences of unionid mussels and C. fluminea are incompletely understood. We hypothesized that Elliptio crassidens (native) and C. fluminea (invasive) would select for specific organic components present within seston. We examined changes in seston (dry mass and ash-free dry mass) resulting from bivalve feeding activity for three size classes of material that were isolated using gravimetric filtration. The treatments were also sub-sampled for flow cytometry (FC) which separated the suspended materials in the stream water into five categories: detritus, heterotrophic bacteria, picoautotrophs, nanoautotrophs, and heterotrophic nanoeukaryotes. Our results indicated that both species of bivalve showed preferences for organic and living materials. E. crassidens preferentially filtered nanoeukaryotes, whose decreases were associated with an increase in bacteria. In contrast, C. fluminea preferred smaller materials through selective filtration of picoautotrophs. In addition, both species increased the concentration of large materials toward the end of the experiment because of the suspension of their pseudofeces biodeposits. To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine grazing by bivalve species on natural stream particulate matter using FC. Our results suggest that native and non-native mussels have different functional roles, which has important implications for organic matter processing and food webs in streams. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  13. Stable isotopes in bivalves as indicators of nutrient source in coastal waters in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago, Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graniero, Lauren E; Grossman, Ethan L; O'Dea, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    To examine N-isotope ratios ((15)N/(14)N) in tissues and shell organic matrix of bivalves as a proxy for natural and anthropogenic nutrient fluxes in coastal environments, Pinctada imbricata, Isognomon alatus, and Brachidontes exustusbivalves were live-collected and analyzed from eight sites in Bocas del Toro, Panama. Sites represent a variety of coastal environments, including more urbanized, uninhabited, riverine, and oceanic sites. Growth under differing environmental conditions is confirmed by δ (18)O values, with open ocean Escudo de Veraguas shells yielding the highest average δ (18)O (-1.0‰) value and freshwater endmember Rio Guarumo the lowest (-1.7‰). At all sites there is no single dominant source of organic matter contributing to bivalve δ (15)N and δ (13)C values. Bivalve δ (15)N and δ (13)C values likely represent a mixture of mangrove and seagrass N and C, although terrestrial sources cannot be ruled out. Despite hydrographic differences between end-members, we see minimal δ (15)N and δ (13)C difference between bivalves from the river-influenced Rio Guarumo site and those from the oceanic Escudo de Veraguas site, with no evidence for N from open-ocean phytoplankton in the latter. Populated sites yield relative (15)N enrichments suggestive of anthropogenic nutrient input, but low δ (15)N values overall make this interpretation equivocal. Lastly, δ (15)N values of tissue and shell organic matrix correlate significantly for pterioideans P. imbricata and I. alatus. Thus for these species, N isotope studies of historical and fossil shells should provide records of ecology of past environments.

  14. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  15. [Community structure of bivalves and gastropods in roots of red mangrove Rhizophora mangle (Rhizophoraceae) in isla Larga, Mochima Bay, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta Balbas, Vanessa; Betancourt Tineo, Rafael; Prieto Arcas, Antulio

    2014-06-01

    The Rhizophora mangle roots form a complex ecosystem where a wide range of organisms are permanently established, reproduce, and find refuge. In this study, we assessed the diversity of bivalves and gastropods that inhabit red mangrove roots, in isla Larga, Mochima, Venezuela Sucre state. Bimonthly collections were made from January 2007 to May 2008, in four study areas denominated: South, North, East and West. In each area, five mangrove roots were sampled, and the specimens were obtained. We analyzed a total of 180 roots and a total of 35 bivalve species and 25 gastropod species were found. The most abundant bivalves were: Isognomon alatus, Isognomon bicolor, Ostrea equestris, Crassostrea rhizophorae and Brachidontes exustus; among gastropods, the most common where: Littorina angulifera, (Cymatium pileare and Diodora cayenensis. The months with the highest abundances and number of individuals for both groups were January and July 2007, and March 2008. The mangrove ecosystem in isla Larga, presented a number of individuals and species higher than those reported for other regions in Venezuela and the Caribbean.

  16. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onozato, Mayu; Nishigaki, Atsuko; Okoshi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas) were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT), the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21–1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry), five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134–450 μg kg-1-dry) were within the range of the previous reports (2.2–5335 μg kg-1-dry). The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes. PMID:27232189

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire.

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    Mayu Onozato

    Full Text Available Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT, the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21-1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry, five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134-450 μg kg-1-dry were within the range of the previous reports (2.2-5335 μg kg-1-dry. The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes.

  18. Investigation into Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalve mollusks farmed in Sardinia region and destined for human consumption

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    Tiziana Tedde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium and Giardia are protozoan parasites transmitted by fecal-oral ingestion of (oocysts, and are responsible for enteritis in several animal species and humans worldwide. These (oocysts can survive for over a year in aquatic environments and can accumulate in bivalve mollusks, which filter large volumes of water. The aim of this study is to evaluate the natural occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination in different specimens of edible bivalves mollusks from farming sites of the western and north-eastern coasts of Sardinia. From April 2011 to February 2012, 1095 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis and 240 of Crassostrea gigas were sampled from Olbia and Oristano gulf and San Teodoro pond. Hepatopancreas and gills, including the labial palp, were examined for oocysts and cysts after pooling and homogenisation using different techniques: i staining for light and fluorescence microscopy; ii direct immunofluorescence (IF Merifluor® test Cryptosporidium/ Giardia (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA; and iii molecular procedures. However, in the context under study, all mollusks examined with the three main diagnostic techniques were negative for both parasites pointing out the hypothetically low zoonotic risk related to Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalves, especially Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas.

  19. Manganese in the shell of the bivalve Mytilus edulis: Seawater Mn or physiological control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Pedro S.; Clarke, Leon J.; Kennedy, Hilary; Richardson, Christopher A.

    2016-12-01

    Manganese in the shell calcite of marine bivalves has been suggested to reflect ambient seawater Mn concentrations, thus providing a high-resolution archive of past seawater Mn concentrations. However, a quantitative relationship between seawater Mn and shell Mn/Ca ratios, as well as clear understanding of which process(es) control(s) shell Mn/Ca, are still lacking. Blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were grown in a one-year duration field experiment in the Menai Strait, U.K., to study the relationship between seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations and shell calcite Mn/Ca ratios. Shell Mn/Ca showed a well-defined intra-annual double-peak, with maximum values during early spring and early summer and low values during autumn and winter. Seawater particulate Mn peaked during winter and autumn, with a series of smaller peaks during spring and summer, whereas dissolved Mn2+ exhibited a marked single maximum during late-spring to early-summer, being low during the remainder of the year. Consequently, neither seawater particulate Mn nor dissolved Mn2+ concentrations explain the intra-annual variation of shell Mn/Ca ratios. A physiological control on shell Mn/Ca ratios is evident from the strong similarity and timing of the double-peaked intra-annual variations of Mn/Ca and shell growth rate (SGR), the latter corresponding to periods of increased metabolic activity (as indicated by respiration rate). It is thus likely that in M. edulis SGR influences shell Mn/Ca by altering the concentration or activity of Mn2+ within the extra-pallial fluid (EPF), by changing the flux of Mn into or the proportion of protein bound Mn within the EPF. By linking shell Mn/Ca ratios to the endogenous and environmental factors that determine growth and metabolic activity, this study helps to explain the lack of a consistent relationship between shell Mn/Ca in marine bivalve shell calcite and seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations. The use of Mn content from M. edulis

  20. Ocean acidification at high latitudes: potential effects on functioning of the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica.

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    Vonda Cummings

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification is a well recognised threat to marine ecosystems. High latitude regions are predicted to be particularly affected due to cold waters and naturally low carbonate saturation levels. This is of concern for organisms utilising calcium carbonate (CaCO(3 to generate shells or skeletons. Studies of potential effects of future levels of pCO(2 on high latitude calcifiers are at present limited, and there is little understanding of their potential to acclimate to these changes. We describe a laboratory experiment to compare physiological and metabolic responses of a key benthic bivalve, Laternula elliptica, at pCO(2 levels of their natural environment (430 µatm, pH 7.99; based on field measurements with those predicted for 2100 (735 µatm, pH 7.78 and glacial levels (187 µatm, pH 8.32. Adult L. elliptica basal metabolism (oxygen consumption rates and heat shock protein HSP70 gene expression levels increased in response both to lowering and elevation of pH. Expression of chitin synthase (CHS, a key enzyme involved in synthesis of bivalve shells, was significantly up-regulated in individuals at pH 7.78, indicating L. elliptica were working harder to calcify in seawater undersaturated in aragonite (Ω(Ar = 0.71, the CaCO(3 polymorph of which their shells are comprised. The different response variables were influenced by pH in differing ways, highlighting the importance of assessing a variety of factors to determine the likely impact of pH change. In combination, the results indicate a negative effect of ocean acidification on whole-organism functioning of L. elliptica over relatively short terms (weeks-months that may be energetically difficult to maintain over longer time periods. Importantly, however, the observed changes in L. elliptica CHS gene expression provides evidence for biological control over the shell formation process, which may enable some degree of adaptation or acclimation to future ocean acidification scenarios.

  1. Anatomical study on Myoforceps aristatus, an invasive boring bivalve in S.E. Brazilian coast (Mytilidae

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    Luiz Ricardo L. Simone

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve Myoforceps aristatus (Dillwyn, 1817, also known as Lithophaga aristata, have been recently collected in the coasts of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brazil; a species that bores shells of other mollusks. This occurrence has been interpreted as an invasion of this species, originally from the Caribbean. The distinguishing character of the species is the posterior extensions of the shell crossing with each other. Because specimens with this character have also been collected in the Pacific Ocean, they all have been considered a single species. However, it is possible that more than one species may be involved in such worldwide distribution. With the objective of providing full information based on Atlantic specimens, a complete anatomical description is provided, which can be used in comparative studies with specimens from other oceans. Additional distinctive features of M. aristatus are the complexity of the incurrent siphon, the kidney opening widely into the supra-branchial chamber (instead of via a nephropore, and the multi-lobed auricle.O bivalve Myoforceps aristatus (Dillwyn, 1817, também conhecido como Lithophaga aristata, tem sido recentemente coletado nas costas do Rio de Janeiro e São Paulo, Brasil; uma espécie que perfura conchas de outros moluscos. Esta ocorrência está sendo interpretada como uma invasão de uma espécie originada do Caribe. O caráter distintivo da espécie é a região posterior da concha, com extensões que se cruzam. Como espécimes com esta característica também têm sido coletados no oceano Pacífico, eles tem sido considerados como pertencentes à mesma espécie. Entretanto, é possível que mais de uma espécie possam estar envolvidas nesta suposta distribuição mundial. Com o objetivo de fornecer informação completa baseada em material do Atlântico, uma descrição anatômica completa é dada, a qual pode ser usada em estudos comparativos com espécimes de outros oceanos. As caracter

  2. Parasites of economically important bivalves from the southern coast of Bahia State, Brazil Parasitos de bivalves de interesse econômico no Litoral Sul do Estado da Bahia, Brasil

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    Gabriela Calvi Zeidan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the parasites of three commercially important bivalve species (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Mytella guyanensis and Lucina pectinata from the southern coast of Bahia, Brazil. A total of 540 specimens were collected in August 2009 and February 2010, at three localities. The bivalve specimens were measured on their longest axis, opened, and macroscopically examined for the presence of parasites or signs of disease. They were then fixed in Davidson' solution and subjected to routine histological processing, with paraffin embedding and H&E staining; next, the specimens were examined under a light microscope. No parasites were observed associated with L. pectinata. Rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs, Sphenophrya sp. (Ciliophora, Nematopsis sp. (Apicomplexa, Urastoma sp. (Turbellaria and Bucephalus sp. (Digenea were observed in both C. rhizophorae and M. guyanensis, as well as Ancistrocoma sp. (Ciliophora and Tylocephalum sp. (Cestoda in the former. A high prevalence of Nematopsis sp. was seen, but caused no apparent damage to the host. Bucephalus sp. caused the destruction of tissues, with castration, but showed low prevalence. The other parasites occurred in low prevalence and intensity, without causing significant damage.Neste estudo foram investigados os parasitos de três espécies de bivalves de interesse econômico (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Mytella guyanensis e Lucina pectinata da Bahia. Foram analisados 540 exemplares, obtidos em duas coletas (agosto-2009 e fevereiro-2010, em três localidades. Os bivalves foram medidos quanto ao seu maior eixo, abertos e examinados macroscopicamente quanto à presença de parasitos ou sinais de enfermidades. Depois disso, foram fixados em solução de Davidson e processados por rotina de histologia, com inclusão em parafina e coloração com H&E. O material foi examinado ao microscópio de luz. Nenhum parasito esteve associado a L. pectinata. Bactérias do tipo RLOs (organismos assemelhados a

  3. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  4. [Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis: physiopathology, clinical manifestations and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Yudith; Santos, José L; Smalley, Susan V; Maiz, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, caused by genetic deficiency of the 27-hydroxylase enzyme (encoded by CYP27A1). It plays a key role in cholesterol metabolism, especially in bile acid synthesis and in the 25-hydroxylation of vitamin D3 in the liver. Its deficiency causes reduced bile acid synthesis and tissue accumulation of cholestanol. Clinical manifestations are related to the presence of cholestanol deposits and include tendon xanthomas, premature cataracts, chronic diarrhea, progressive neurologic impairment and less frequently coronary heart disease, early onset osteoporosis and abnormalities in the optic disk and retina. An early diagnosis and treatment with quenodeoxycholic acid may prevent further complications, mainly neurological manifestations. This review summarizes cholesterol metabolism related to bile acid synthesis, physiopathology, biochemistry and treatment of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

  5. Cutaneous manifestations of familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, N; Velho, G; Horta, M; Martins, A; Massa, A

    2005-09-01

    Familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy is an autosomal dominant amyloidosis, characterized by the systemic deposition of amyloid with a particular involvement of the peripheral nerves. The disease generally manifests as a severe sensory, motor and autonomic neuropathy. Cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, vitreous opacities and carpal tunnel syndrome may occur in a variable association with the neuropathy. Trophic dermatological lesions are frequent in the more advanced stages of the disease. We examined the skin of 142 patients. The cutaneous manifestations more frequently observed were: xerosis (81.6%), seborrheic dermatitis (21.8%), traumatic and burn lesions (19.7%), acne (18.3%), neurotrophic ulcers (14%) and onychomycosis (10.5%). Among the hepatic transplanted patients (31%), seborrheic dermatitis and acne were the most frequent diagnoses.

  6. [Multiple sclerosis: pathogenesis and manifestations in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, O; Palin, K; Chateil, J F; Pedespan, J M

    2001-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is rare in children and occurs exceptionally before ten years. Sex ratio (girl/boy) is around 2.5 to 3, higher than in adults. Brain stem dysfunction and meningeal symptoms are more commonly first manifestations of the disease than in adults. Optic neuritis is also a frequent early manifestation. The etiology of the disease remains unclear and none of the advanced hypotheses (infectious, genetic, environmental) can by themselves explain its occurrence. There is a genetic susceptibility which is probably linked to many genes leading to a low related risk (less than two). A viral trigger mechanism in a person with a genetic predisposition is possible. New therapies result from a better understanding of the closed immune mechanisms of the disease.

  7. Testicular manifestation of a transformed mycosis fungoides

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    Hendrik Borgmann

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Testicular neoplasms occur in more than 90% of cases, due to primary testicular germ cell tumors. Other entities are non germ cell tumors of the testis, testicular manifestation of lymphomas or metastases. International and interdisciplinary co-operation has led to the development of urological guidelines and to good therapeutic success for testicular neoplasms. The gold standard for treatment of a testicular neoplasm is the radical orchiectomy. However, for individual cases with suspected lymphoma, a treatment decision differing from the guidelines may be reasonable. We present the case of a 38-year-old man with testicular manifestation of a transformed mycosis fungoides, which is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  8. Clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Julio

    2011-12-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic disease of the human brain. Modern imaging studies, CT and MRI, have defined the diagnosis and characterization of the disease. Through these studies the therapeutic approach for each case may be individualized with the aid of antihelmintics, steroids, symptomatic medicines, or surgery. The use of one or various therapeutic measures largely depends on the peculiar combination of number, location, and biological stage of lesions as well as the degree of inflammatory response to the parasites. Although there is not a typical clinical picture of NCC, epilepsy is the most frequent manifestation of parenchymal NCC, whereas hydrocephalus is the most frequent manifestation of meningeal NCC. Eradication of cysticercosis is an attainable goal by public education and sanitary improvement in endemic areas.

  9. Clinical Manifestations and Diagnosis of Acromegaly

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    Gloria Lugo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromegaly and gigantism are due to excess GH production, usually as a result of a pituitary adenoma. The incidence of acromegaly is 5 cases per million per year and the prevalence is 60 cases per million. Clinical manifestations in each patient depend on the levels of GH and IGF-I, age, tumor size, and the delay in diagnosis. Manifestations of acromegaly are varied and include acral and soft tissue overgrowth, joint pain, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart and respiratory failure. Acromegaly is a disabling disease that is associated with increased morbidity and reduced life expectancy. The diagnosis is based primarily on clinical features and confirmed by measuring GH levels after oral glucose loading and the estimation of IGF-I. It has been suggested that the rate of mortality in patients with acromegaly is correlated with the degree of control of GH. Adequately treated, the relative mortality risk can be markedly reduced towards normal.

  10. A gingival manifestation of histoplasmosis leading diagnosis

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    Marco Tullio Brazão-Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a world-wide distributed deep mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum which has been endemic in many countries. We present a case involving an immunocompetent man evidencing the necessity of a multidisciplinary approach and rational requisition of exams. The disease has started as a pulmonary disease mimicking tuberculosis, although the exams have been negative. Immunodiffusion test indicate histoplasmosis, not confirmed by culture of sputum. After days the patient was forwarded by a private doctor for evaluation of oral lesions at our Department of Stomatology. An incisional biopsy revealed a nonspecific granulomatous inflammation and the Grocott-Gomori methenamine silver stain identified scarce oval structures that could represent fungal yeast. Sampling oral lesions with swab, it was observed the typical growth of H. capsulatum on culture. This case highlights the importance of doctor′s integration diagnosing histoplasmosis, while a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations should be expected. Oral lesions may be the critical manifestation leading diagnosis.

  11. Pattern of cutaneous manifestations in diabetes mellitus

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    Goyal Abhishek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes mellitus affects individuals of all ages and socioeconomic status. Skin is affected by the acute metabolic derangements as well as by chronic degenerative complications of diabetes. Aims: To evaluate the prevalence of skin manifestations in patients with diabetes mellitus. To analyze the prevalence and pattern of skin disorders among diabetic patients from this region of Western Himalayas. Materials and Methods: One hundred consecutive patients with the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and having skin lesions, either attending the diabetic clinic or admitted in medical wards were included in this study. Results: The common skin disorders were: x0 erosis (44%, diabetic dermopathy (36%, skin tags (32%, cutaneous infections (31%, and seborrheic keratosis (30%. Conclusion: Skin is involved in diabetes quite often and the manifestations are numerous. High prevalence of xerosis in our diabetic population is perhaps due to cold and dry climatic conditions in the region for most of the time in the year.

  12. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

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    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  13. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

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    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  14. Oral manifestations of HIV positive children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, M G; Bueno, D F; Serra, E; Gonçalves, R

    2001-01-01

    Oral manifestations in HIV positive children were observed in thirty-eight HIV infected children that have received care at the Special Care Dentistry Center (SCDC) of the School of Dentistry, University of Sao Paulo. Results have shown that 52.63% of the children presented at least one oral manifestation related with HIV/AIDS. Angular cheilitis occurred in 28.94%, parotid gland bilateral enlargement, pseudomembranous candidiasis and erythematous candidiasis in 18.42%, conventional gingivitis in 13.15%, herpes simplex in 5.26%, hairy leukoplakia, recurrent aphthous ulcer and condyloma acuminatum in 2.63%. Although enamel hypoplasia occurred in 23.68%, this could not be attributed specifically to HIV infection.

  15. The radiological manifestations of sickle cell disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madani, G. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gittamadani@yahoo.com; Papadopoulou, A.M. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Holloway, B. [Department of Radiology, Royal Free Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Robins, A. [Department of Paediatrics, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Davis, J. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Murray, D. [Department of Radiology, Whittington Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-06-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited abnormality of the ss-globin chain, which causes a spectrum of haemolytic anaemias. Clinical manifestations in SCD include anaemia, jaundice, recurrent vaso-occlusive crises, and infections (particularly by encapsulated bacteria) due to functional asplenia and cerebrovascular accidents. Radiological investigations play a critical role both in the diagnosis and in the primary prevention of the complications of SCD.

  16. Tardive Dystonia: Clinical Spectrum and Novel Manifestations

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    R. Jeffrey Davis

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Tardive dystonia was identified in 25 patients: involvement of the face and neck was most common; truncal and limb dystonia were also observed. There were 3 cases of laryngospasm and 2 of spasmodic dysphonia. The latter has not been previously reported as a manifestation of tardive dystonia. In all cases, movements typical of classic tardive dyskinesia could be demonstrated. This group illustrates the variety of dystonic disorders that may occur in conjunction with tardive dyskinesia.

  17. PULMONARY MANIFESTATION OF LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

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    Duara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM is an uncommon interstitial lung disease that exclusively affects women, usually during their reproductive years. LAM is characterized pathologically by abnormal proliferation of LAM cells in the lungs and in thoracic and retroperitoneal lymphatics. 1 We presented a case of 40-year-old female presented to Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Gauhati Medical College with cough and chest pain for 6 months, which was diagnosed to be pulmonary manifestation of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis in HRCT chest.

  18. Catatonia: an unusual manifestation of Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Aniruddha; Thanapal, Sivakumar; Sood, Mamta; Khandelwal, Sudhir K

    2015-01-01

    Wilson's disease, characterized by abnormal copper accumulation in the human body, may present with psychiatric manifestations in about one-fifth of patients. The authors report a patient with Wilson's disease who initially presented with acute psychosis and later developed catatonic symptoms. The atypical presentation led to a delay in diagnosis and institution of appropriate treatment. Wilson's disease can be ruled out in all young patients presenting with psychiatric symptoms for the first time by screening for a Kayser-Fleischer ring.

  19. Atypical manifestations of multiple myeloma: Radiological appearance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, Thomas [Department of Radiology, St-Vincenz Hospital, Auf dem Schafsberg, D-65549 Limburg (Germany)]. E-mail: t.hess@st-vincenz.de; Egerer, Gerlinde [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kasper, Bernd [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Rasul, Kakil Ibrahim [Hamad Medical Center, Moha (Qatar); Goldschmidt, Hartmut [Department of Internal Medicine V, Haematology/Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauffmann, G.W. [Department of Radiology, University of Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Diagnostic procedures performed on patients with multiple myeloma typically reveal lytic bone lesions, osteopenia or osteoporosis, bone marrow infiltration by plasma cells as well as overproduction of immunoglobulin or light chains in the serum or urine. Skeletal manifestations are extremely variable and the unusual forms have been described extensively. Extramedullary plasma-cell tumours (plasmocytoma) are found in about 5% of newly diagnosed patients with multiple myelomas. In this paper we present eight patients with atypical forms of multiple myeloma.

  20. Palmse viinaköögi manifest

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1996-01-01

    Manifest. Tõlkijate seminari puhul 17. mail 1996 Palmse viinaköögis Juta Bedia, Eric Dickens, Gyözö Fehérvári, Guntars Godinsh, Maima Grinberga, Irja Grönholm, Leif Hannibal, Cornelius Hasselblatt, Pirkko Huurto, Ivo Iliste, Nora Javorskaja, Gisbert Jänicke, Kaisu Lahikainen, Enel Melberg, Vera Ruber, Arnold Tamm, Leili Tamm, Jonatan Tomesh, Lilia Velic'kova, Marianne Vogel. Inglise k.: Estonian Literary Magazine, autumn 1996, nr. 3

  1. Hypersensitivity manifestations to the fruit mango

    OpenAIRE

    Sareen, Richa; SHAH, ASHOK

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this study are 1) To review the published data and document the current knowledge on allergic manifestations to the fruit mango 2) To highlight the two distinct clinical presentations of hypersensitivity reactions caused by mango 3) To discuss the role of cross-reactivity 4) To increase awareness of potentially life threatening complications that can be caused by allergy to mango. An extensive search of the literature was performed in Medline/PubMed with the key terms "mango...

  2. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tatiana Sofía Rodríguez-Reyna; Cynthia Martínez-Reyes; Jesús Kazúo Yamamoto-Furusho

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease(IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways,frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation,aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis,with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur,including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis,and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones.Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability,and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine,methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-α blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  3. Dermatologic Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedania, Bhavtosh; Wu, George Y

    2015-06-28

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects millions of people worldwide, and an estimated 3.2 million people in the United States. HCV is a hepatotropic and lymphotropic virus that causes not only liver disease, but also a significant number of extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs). Up to 74% of patients affected by HCV will have HCV-related EHMs of some severity in their lifetime. The EHMs vary from simple cutaneous palpable purpura to complex lymphoproliferative disorders, including lymphomas and immune-complex deposit diseases causing local and/or systemic complications. Mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) is manifested by multiple systemic organ involvement, mainly skin, kidney, peripheral nerves, and salivary glands, and less frequently causes widespread vasculitis and malignant lymphoma. MC affects up to 3% of HCV-infected patients with cryoglobulinemia of clinical significance, i.e. >6%. Severe disease requires immunosuppressive or plasma exchange therapy. HCV prevalence in the United States in patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) was reported to be 66%, much higher than that in general population. Therefore, all patients with PCT should be screened for HCV. The skin rash of PCT varies from large blisters to small vesicles and/or milia on the hands. Skin manifestations due to PCT usually respond to anti-HCV treatment together with reducing skin sun exposure, avoiding triggers, having routine phlebotomy (especially for people with chronic iron overload states), and using chloroquine. Lichen planus (LP), which typically affects both the skin and oral mucosa is a chronic inflammatory disease of squamous cell origin affecting about 1% of the worldwide population. The prevalence of HCV in patients with LP varies based on geographic location. We review here the basic pathophysiology, clinical features, and management of dermatologic manifestations of HCV.

  4. Uncommon cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaro, J M; Herrero, C; Hausmann, G

    1997-01-01

    Cutaneous manifestations of lupus erythematosus (LE) are, usually, characteristic enough to permit an easy diagnosis. However, some patients may present less typical lesions, associated or not to the classic ones. Therefore, irrespectively of the variety of LE (acute, subacute and chronic), in absence of the typical butterfly rash, erythematosquamous papules or plaques, or any of the characteristic cutaneous alterations, it is important (even though not always easy) to recognize the uncommon and/or atypical changes of the skin.

  5. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Gabriela R; Giacomin, Maria Fernanda A; França, Camila M P; Sallum, Adriana M E; Jacob, Cristina M A; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati and is acquired by ingestion of the parasite's embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthritis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6 weeks). However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation of Toxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at our service (0.017%) had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and was described herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronic polyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30min. Dog contact exposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showed high levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%), bone marrow aspirate revealed marked eosinophilia (32%) and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa) was positive (1:1280). She was treated with paracetamol (40mg/kg/day) and thiabendazole (25mg/kg/day) for 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was on clinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthritis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis and leukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis and eosinophilia.

  6. Hematological manifestations of primary mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef

    2007-01-01

    At onset mitochondrial disorders (MID) frequently manifest as a mono-organic problem but turn into multisystem disease during the disease course in most of the cases. Organs/tissues most frequently affected in MID are the cerebrum, peripheral nerves, and the skeletal muscle. Additionally, most of the inner organs may be affected alone or in combination. Hematological manifestations of MID include aplastic, megaloblastic, or sideroblastic anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, or pancytopenia. In single cases either permanent or recurrent eosinophilia has been observed. Hematological abnormalities may occur together with syndromic or nonsyndromic MIDs. Syndromic MIDs, in which hematological manifestations predominate, are the Pearson syndrome (pancytopenia), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (anemia), Barth syndrome (neutropenia), and the autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy, lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anemia syndrome. In single cases with Leigh's syndrome, MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged-red fiber) syndrome, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, and Friedreich's ataxia anemia has been described. Anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, eosinophilia, or pancytopenia can frequently also be found in nonsyndromic MIDs with or without involvement of other tissues. Therapy of blood cell involvement in MID comprises application of antioxidants, vitamins, iron, bone marrow-stimulating factors, or substitution of cells.

  7. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  8. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis: late skin manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Nannie; Marckmann, Peter; Rossen, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists and nephr......BACKGROUND: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF) is a serious disease that occurs in patients with severe renal disease and is believed to be caused by gadolinium-containing contrast agents. A detailed description of the late skin manifestations of NSF is important to help dermatologists...... confluent dermal plaques with thickening and hardening. In contrast, 3 patients presented with wrinkled, redundant skin as seen in cutis laxa. Patients with NSF had significantly poorer scores than control patients on the Daily Life Quality Index (mean [SD], 11. 4 [7.4] vs 1.5 [2. 3]; P ...: This descriptive case series of patients with NSF gives a detailed clinical picture of the skin manifestations late in the disease. It demonstrates that the clinical picture in the late stage has a varied presentation and that NSF has a significant effect on the quality of life....

  9. Chronic polyarthritis as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela R. Viola

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Human toxocariasis is a parasitic zoonosis mainly caused by Toxocara canis or Toxocara catiand is acquired by ingestion of the parasite’s embryonated eggs. Arthralgia and/or arthri-tis were reported in up to 17% of the cases, generally with acute duration (less than 6weeks. However, to our knowledge, chronic polyarthritis, as the isolated presentation ofToxocara infection, was not reported. One of the 5809 patients that was followed up at ourservice (0.017% had chronic polyarthritis as the single manifestation of toxocariasis and wasdescribed herein. A 3-year-old girl was referred to our service with severe painful chronicpolyarthritis for a period longer than 10 weeks and morning stiffness of 30 min. Dog contactexposure history in the recreational areas of neighborhood was reported. Her exams showedhigh levels of eosinophils in peripheral blood (29%, bone marrow aspirate revealed markedeosinophilia (32% and Toxocara enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Elisa was positive(1:1280. She was treated with paracetamol (40 mg/kg/day and thiabendazole (25 mg/kg/dayfor 10 days, and all manifestations reduced. After eight months of follow-up, she was onclinical and laboratorial remission. In conclusion, we described a case of chronic polyarthri-tis, as isolated manifestation of toxocariasis, mimicking juvenile idiopathic arthritis andleukemia. Importantly, this zoonosis should be considered in patients with arthritis andeosinophilia.

  10. Marine Bivalve Mollusks As Possible Indicators of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli and Other Species of the Enterobacteriaceae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevskott, Didrik H.; Svanevik, Cecilie S.; Sunde, Marianne; Wester, Astrid L.; Lunestad, Bjørn T.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms for the development and spread of antibacterial resistance (ABR) in bacteria residing in environmental compartments, including the marine environment, are far from understood. The objective of this study was to examine the ABR rates in Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from marine bivalve mollusks collected along the Norwegian coast during a period from October 2014 to November 2015. A total of 549 bivalve samples were examined by a five times three tube most probable number method for enumeration of E. coli in bivalves resulting in 199 isolates from the positive samples. These isolates were identified by biochemical reactions and matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry, showing that 90% were E. coli, while the remaining were species within the genera Klebsiella, Citrobacter, and Enterobacter. All 199 isolates recovered were susceptibility tested following the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing disk diffusion method. In total, 75 of 199 (38%) isolates showed resistance to at least one antibacterial agent, while multidrug-resistance were seen in 9 (5%) isolates. One isolate conferred resistance toward 15 antibacterial agents. Among the 75 resistant isolates, resistance toward extended-spectrum penicillins (83%), aminoglycosides (16%), trimethoprim (13%), sulfonamides (11%), tetracyclines (8%), third-generation cephalosporins (7%), amphenicols (5%), nitrofurans (5%), and quinolones (5%), were observed. Whole-genome sequencing on a selection of 10 E. coli isolates identified the genes responsible for resistance, including blaCTX-M genes. To indicate the potential for horizontal gene transfer, conjugation experiments were performed on the same selected isolates. Conjugative transfer of resistance was observed for six of the 10 E. coli isolates. In order to compare E. coli isolates from bivalves with clinical strains, multiple-locus variable number tandem repeats

  11. Comparative analysis of morphometric characteristics of bivalves Anodonta piscinalis from the reservoirs of techa cascade of Mayak Production Association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegoreichenkov, E.; Pryakhin, E.; Akleyev, A. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The reservoirs R-11, R-10 and R-4 of the Techa cascade (Chelyabinsk region) are used as low-active radioactive wastes storages, and are separated from open hydrographical network by a system of dams and by-pass channels. The values of specific activity of radionuclides in water and bottom sediments increases in the row: R-11, R-10, R-4, and at the same time the dose rate for zoo-benthos is increased on an order from reservoir to reservoir. Bivalves, which are obligate filter feeders and produce a significant part of water community biomass, are an important part of energy and matter transformation chain inside the hydro-biocenosis. Among this group of animals, the Anodonta piscinalis, a massive bivalve, takes the most part in biomass of Techa reservoirs cascade. Several studies show that in polluted environment the shell morphology changes are possible: the ratio of most morphometric values changes; the level of fluctuated asymmetry and shell polymorphism increases. For morphological studies of bivalves populations, 34 specimens of Anodonta were taken from R-11, 43 specimens from R-10 and 4 specimens from R-4. The specimens selection was arranged in May 2013, using hydro-biological drag. The shell shape was analyzed using TPS DIG software. Besides the measurements of maximal shell length, shell height, and the distance between shell's top and maximally distant point of front edge of the shell were measured. The ratio between the length and the height of the shell, between the length and the distance from the top to the front edge were calculated. The data analysis was arranged using R statistics. As a result of the data analysis the significant difference between shell's length to height ratios were registered between populations of R-4 and R-10 (p = 0.002). The ratio of maximal length of the shell to the distance from the top to the front edge also significantly differs between the animals of the R-4 and R-10 reservoirs (?= 0.03). Between the animals of

  12. Purification and characterization of an N-acetylglucosamine specific lectin from marine bivalve Macoma birmanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit; Chatterjee, Bishnu P

    2009-07-01

    A calcium independent lectin of molecular mass 47kDa was isolated from the foot muscle of marine bivalve Macoma birmanica by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by affinity chromatography on immobilized GlcNAc column and designated as M. birmanica agglutinin (MBA). The lectin agglutinated rabbit erythrocytes strongly compared to human erythrocytes over a wide pH range from 5 to 9 and up to 50 degrees C. MBA is a glycoprotein and consists of 7.63% sugar. Among the tested sugars for analysis of carbohydrate recognition properties, Me-betaGlcNAc was the most potent inhibitor followed by Me-alphaMan. Enzyme linked solid phase assay revealed that MBA interacted well with complex type N-linked glycans and moderately to high mannose type N-linked glycans. Fluorescence study of MBA indicated that tryptophan was present in a non-hydrophobic region and its binding to GlcNAc was neither quenched nor altered lambda(max) position. The denaturation of MBA induced by urea was a reversible process and urea could not significantly change the Trp environment. MBA interacted with both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by recognizing their surface exposed GlcNAc containing antigens.

  13. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, Angelo, E-mail: aalberti@isof.cnr.it [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Chiaravalle, Eugenio [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Mangiacotti, Michele, E-mail: michelemangiacotti@libero.it [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Marchesani, Giuliana [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Plescia, Elena [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy. We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, SO{sub 2}{sup -} and SO{sub 3}{sup -} radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters. - Highlights: > EPR spectroscopy is confirmed a valuable identification tool for irradiated mollusks. > A conchiolin-derived radical can be used as irradiation marker for some mollusks. > A reliable protocol is outlined for dose reconstruction of irradiated oysters.

  14. Marine bivalve geochemistry and shell ultrastructure from modern low pH environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hahn

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve shells can provide excellent archives of past environmental change but have not been used to interpret ocean acidification events. We investigated carbon, oxygen and trace element records from different shell layers in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (from the Mediterranean and M. edulis (from the Wadden Sea combined with detailed investigations of the shell ultrastructure. Mussels from the harbour of Ischia (Mediterranean, Italy were transplanted and grown in water with mean pHT 7.3 and mean pHT 8.1 near CO2 vents on the east coast of the island of Ischia. The shells of transplanted mussels were compared with M. edulis collected at pH ~8.2 from Sylt (German Wadden Sea. Most prominently, the shells recorded the shock of transplantation, both in their shell ultrastructure, textural and geochemical record. Shell calcite, precipitated subsequently under acidified seawater responded to the pH gradient by an in part disturbed ultrastructure. Geochemical data from all test sites show a strong metabolic effect that exceeds the influence of the low-pH environment. These field experiments showed that care is needed when interpreting potential ocean acidification signals because various parameters affect shell chemistry and ultrastructure. Besides metabolic processes, seawater pH, factors such as salinity, water temperature, food availability and population density all affect the biogenic carbonate shell archive.

  15. The evolutionary origins of the southern ocean Philobryid bivalves: hidden biodiversity, ancient persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Jackson

    Full Text Available Philobryids (Bivalvia: Arcoida are one of the most speciose marine bivalve families in the Southern Ocean and are common throughout the Southern Hemisphere. Considering this diversity and their brooding reproductive mode (limiting long-distance dispersal, this family may have been present in the Southern Ocean since its inception. However Philobrya and Adacnarca appear only in the Quaternary fossil record of the Antarctic, suggesting a much more recent incursion. Molecular dating provides an independent means of measuring the time of origin and radiation of this poorly known group. Here we present the first combined molecular and morphological investigation of the Philobryidae in the Southern Ocean. Two nuclear loci (18S and 28S were amplified from 35 Southern Ocean Adacnarca and Philobrya specimens, with a combined sequence length of 2,282 base pairs (bp. Adacnarca specimens (A. nitens and A. limopsoides were resolved as a strongly supported monophyletic group. Genus Philobrya fell into two strongly supported groups ('sublaevis' and 'magellanica/wandelensis', paraphyletic with Adacnarca. The A. nitens species complex is identified as at least seven morpho-species through morphological and genetic analysis of taxon clustering. Phylogenetic analyses resolve Philobryidae as a strongly supported monophyletic clade and sister taxon to the Limopsidae, as anticipated by their classification into the superfamily Limopsoidea. Bayesian relaxed clock analyses of divergence times suggest that genus Adacnarca radiated in the Southern Ocean from the Early Paleogene, while P. sublaevis and P. wandelensis clades radiated in the late Miocene, following the formation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  16. Influence of acid-soluble proteins from bivalve Siliqua radiata ligaments on calcium carbonate crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zeng-Qiong; Zhang, Gang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    In vitro biomimetic synthesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in the presence of shell proteins is a heavily researched topic in biomineralization. However, little is known regarding the function of bivalve ligament proteins in the growth of CaCO3 crystals. In this study, using fibrous protein K58 from Siliqua radiata ligaments or coverslips as substrates, we report the results of our study of CaCO3 precipitation in the presence or absence of acid-soluble proteins (ASP) from inner ligament layers. ASP can disturb the controlling function of K58 or a coverslip on the crystalline phase, resulting in the formation of aragonite, calcite, and vaterite. In addition, we identified the following four primary components from ASP by mass spectroscopy: alkaline phosphatase (ALP), ABC transporter, keratin type II cytoskeletal 1 (KRT 1), and phosphate ABC transporter, phosphate-binding protein (PstS). Further analysis revealed that the first three proteins and especially ALP, which is important in bone mineralisation, could affect the polymorphism and morphology of CaCO3 crystals by trapping calcium ions in their domains. Our results indicate that ALP may play an important role in the formation of aragonite in S. radiata ligaments. This paper may facilitate our understanding of the biomineralization process.

  17. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Cédric; Catherinet, Bastien; Plasseraud, Laurent; Alcaraz, Gérard; Bundeleva, Irina; Marin, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries. PMID:27213644

  18. New mitochondrial and nuclear primers for the Mediterranean marine bivalve Pinna nobilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. SANNA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pinna nobilis is the largest endemic Mediterranean marine bivalve. During past centuries, various human activities led to the regression of its populations. As a consequence of stringent standards of protection, demographic expansions are currently reported in many sites. We designed a set of four mitochondrial- and two nuclear- specific PCR-primers with the aim to provide molecular tools to gather new insights into the genetic variability of this species. A total of 54 specimens were sampled from 25 Mediterranean localities in order to evaluate the level of polymorphism of these markers in P. nobilis. The most variable molecular markers identified were the mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase subunit I (COI, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 3 (nad3, and 16S ribosomal DNA (16S. Positive results, in terms of good amplifications and scorable sequences, were also obtained in the co-generic Pinna rudis. The molecular markers identified in this study, and the PCR-protocols provided, represent a useful tool for future researches devoted to infer the genetic variability of P. nobilis populations thus allowing the development of effective conservation measures.

  19. The Shell of the Invasive Bivalve Species Dreissena polymorpha: Biochemical, Elemental and Textural Investigations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Immel

    Full Text Available The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha is a well-established invasive model organism. Although extensively used in environmental sciences, virtually nothing is known of the molecular process of its shell calcification. By describing the microstructure, geochemistry and biochemistry/proteomics of the shell, the present study aims at promoting this species as a model organism in biomineralization studies, in order to establish a bridge with ecotoxicology, while sketching evolutionary conclusions. The shell of D. polymorpha exhibits the classical crossed-lamellar/complex crossed lamellar combination found in several heterodont bivalves, in addition to an external thin layer, the characteristics of which differ from what was described in earlier publication. We show that the shell selectively concentrates some heavy metals, in particular uranium, which predisposes D. polymorpha to local bioremediation of this pollutant. We establish the biochemical signature of the shell matrix, demonstrating that it interacts with the in vitro precipitation of calcium carbonate and inhibits calcium carbonate crystal formation, but these two properties are not strongly expressed. This matrix, although overall weakly glycosylated, contains a set of putatively calcium-binding proteins and a set of acidic sulphated proteins. 2D-gels reveal more than fifty proteins, twenty of which we identify by MS-MS analysis. We tentatively link the shell protein profile of D. polymorpha and the peculiar recent evolution of this invasive species of Ponto-Caspian origin, which has spread all across Europe in the last three centuries.

  20. Habitat creation and biodiversity maintenance in mangrove forests: teredinid bivalves as ecosystem engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendy, Ian W; Michie, Laura; Taylor, Ben W

    2014-01-01

    Substantial amounts of dead wood in the intertidal zone of mature mangrove forests are tunnelled by teredinid bivalves. When the tunnels are exposed, animals are able to use tunnels as refuges. In this study, the effect of teredinid tunnelling upon mangrove forest faunal diversity was investigated. Mangrove forests exposed to long emersion times had fewer teredinid tunnels in wood and wood not containing teredinid tunnels had very few species and abundance of animals. However, with a greater cross-sectional percentage surface area of teredinid tunnels, the numbers of species and abundance of animals was significantly higher. Temperatures within teredinid-attacked wood were significantly cooler compared with air temperatures, and animal abundance was greater in wood with cooler temperatures. Animals inside the tunnels within the wood may avoid desiccation by escaping the higher temperatures. Animals co-existing in teredinid tunnelled wood ranged from animals found in terrestrial ecosystems including centipedes, crickets and spiders, and animals found in subtidal marine ecosystems such as fish, octopods and polychaetes. There was also evidence of breeding within teredinid-attacked wood, as many juvenile individuals were found, and they may also benefit from the cooler wood temperatures. Teredinid tunnelled wood is a key low-tide refuge for cryptic animals, which would otherwise be exposed to fishes and birds, and higher external temperatures. This study provides evidence that teredinids are ecosystem engineers and also provides an example of a mechanism whereby mangrove forests support intertidal biodiversity and nurseries through the wood-boring activity of teredinids.

  1. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, Angelo; Chiaravalle, Eugenio; Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante; Mangiacotti, Michele; Marchesani, Giuliana; Plescia, Elena

    2011-12-01

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy.We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO2-, CO33-, SO2- and SO3- radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters.

  2. Zachsia zenkewitschi (Teredinidae), a Rare and Unusual Seagrass Boring Bivalve Revisited and Redescribed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipway, J. R.; O’Connor, R.; Stein, D.; Cragg, S. M.; Korshunova, T.; Martynov, A.; Haga, T.; Distel, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The sea-grass borer Zachsia zenkewitschi belongs to a group of economically and ecologically important bivalves, commonly referred to as shipworms. The sole recognized representative of the genus Zachsia, this species displays an unusual life history and reproductive strategy that is now understood to include: environmental sex determination of free swimming larvae, extreme sexual and size dimorphism between males and females, internal fertilization, maintenance of often large harems of male dwarfs within a specialized cavity of the female mantle, and complex maternal care of larvae in specialized brood pouches within the gill. It is also the only shipworm species known to burrow in sea grass rhizomes rather than terrestrial wood. Although Z. zenkewitschi is rare and little studied, understanding of its biology and anatomy has evolved substantially, rendering some aspects of its original description inaccurate. Moreover, no existing type specimens are known for this species. In light of these facts, we designate a neotype from among specimens recently collected at the type location, and undertake a re-description of this species, accounting for recent reinterpretation of its life history and functional anatomy. PMID:27171209

  3. The bivalve Anopaea (Inoceramidae) from the Upper Jurassic-lowermost Cretaceous of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zell, Patrick; Crame, J. Alistair; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Beckmann, Seija

    2015-07-01

    In Mexico, the Upper Jurassic to lowermost Cretaceous La Casita and coeval La Caja and La Pimienta formations are well-known for their abundant and well-preserved marine vertebrates and invertebrates. The latter include conspicuous inoceramid bivalves of the genus Anopaea not formally described previously from Mexico. Anopaea bassei (Lecolle de Cantú, 1967), Anopaea cf. stoliczkai (Holdhaus, 1913), Anopaea cf. callistoensis Crame and Kelly, 1995 and Anopaea sp. are rare constituents in distinctive Tithonian-lower Berriasian levels of the La Caja Formation and one Tithonian horizon of the La Pimienta Formation. Anopaea bassei was previously documented from the Tithonian of central Mexico and Cuba, while most other members of Anopaea described here are only known from southern high latitudes. The Mexican assemblage also includes taxa which closely resemble Anopaea stoliczkai from the Tithonian of India, Indonesia and the Antarctic Peninsula, and Anopaea callistoensis from the late Tithonian to ?early Berriasian of the Antarctic Peninsula. Our new data expand the palaeogeographical distribution of the high latitude Anopaea to the Gulf of Mexico region and substantiate faunal exchange, in the Late Jurassic-earliest Cretaceous, between Mexico and the Antarctic Realm.

  4. Aspartic acid racemization dating of Holocene brachiopods and bivalves from the southern Brazilian shelf, South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour Wood, Susan L.; Krause, Richard A.; Kowalewski, Michał; Wehmiller, John; Simões, Marcello G.

    2006-09-01

    The extent of racemization of aspartic acid (Asp) has been used to estimate the ages of 9 shells of the epifaunal calcitic brachiopod Bouchardia rosea and 9 shells of the infaunal aragonitic bivalve Semele casali. Both taxa were collected concurrently from the same sites at depths of 10 m and 30 m off the coast of Brazil. Asp D/L values show an excellent correlation with radiocarbon age at both sites and for both taxa ( r2Site 9 B. rosea = 0.97, r2Site 1 B. rosea = 0.997, r2Site 9 S. casali = 0.9998, r2Site 1 S. casali = 0.93). The Asp ratios plotted against reservoir-corrected AMS radiocarbon ages over the time span of multiple millennia can thus be used to develop reliable and precise geochronologies not only for aragonitic mollusks (widely used for dating previously), but also for calcitic brachiopods. At each collection site, Bouchardia specimens display consistently higher D/L values than specimens of Semele. Thermal differences between sites are also notable and in agreement with theoretical expectations, as extents of racemization for both taxa are greater at the warmer, shallower site than at the cooler, deeper one. In late Holocene marine settings, concurrent time series of aragonitic and calcitic shells can be assembled using Asp racemization dating, and parallel multi-centennial to multi-millennial records can be developed simultaneously for multiple biomineral systems.

  5. Into the deep: a phylogenetic approach to the bivalve subclass Protobranchia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant P; Zardus, John D; Boyle, Elizabeth E; González, Vanessa L; Jennings, Robert M; McIntyre, Erin; Wheeler, Ward C; Etter, Ron J; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2013-10-01

    A molecular phylogeny of Protobranchia, the subclass of bivalve mollusks sister to the remaining Bivalvia, has long proven elusive, because many constituent lineages are deep-sea endemics, which creates methodological challenges for collecting and preserving genetic material. We obtained 74 representatives of all 12 extant protobranch families and investigated the internal phylogeny of this group using sequence data from five molecular loci (16S rRNA, 18S rRNA, 28S rRNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit I, and histone H3). Model-based and dynamic homology parsimony approaches to phylogenetic reconstruction unanimously supported four major clades of Protobranchia, irrespective of treatment of hypervariable regions in the nuclear ribosomal genes 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA. These four clades correspond to the superfamilies Nuculoidea (excluding Sareptidae), Nuculanoidea (including Sareptidae), Solemyoidea, and Manzanelloidea. Salient aspects of the phylogeny include (1) support for the placement of the family Sareptidae with Nuculanoidea; (2) the non-monophyly of the order Solemyida (Solemyidae+Nucinellidae); (3) and the non-monophyly of most nuculoid and nuculanoid genera and families. In light of this first family-level phylogeny of Protobranchia, we present a revised classification of the group. Estimation of divergence times in concert with analyses of diversification rates demonstrate the signature of the end-Permian mass extinction in the phylogeny of extant protobranchs.

  6. Marine bivalves as high-temporal-resolution paleoclimate proxies: a study in the northern Peruvian littoral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, S. D.; Maasch, K. A.; Sandweiss, D. H.

    2003-04-01

    This study indicates the need for further methodological development of marine bivalves as high-temporal-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) proxies. Daily incremental growth of the intertidal species Chione subrugosa as well as subdaily growth of the mangrove swamp species Anadara tuberculosa and the subtidal species Trachycardium procerum accommodate the temporal correlation of stable oxygen isotope samples extracted from these aragonite shells. Incremental growth of modern comparative specimens and those from the Siches (7420 cal yr B.P. to 5650 cal yr B.P.) and Ostra Base Camp (6660 cal yr B.P.) shell middens on the north coast of Peru was used to constrain δ18O data with monthly resolution. Modern A. tuberculosa, C. subrugosa, and T. procerum provide discrete δ18O time series two to four years in duration, which were correlated with mean monthly SST and salinity in order to test the accuracy of growth increment counts. The δ18O time series constructed from the ancient shells float within a date range provided by radiocarbon-dated contexts from which the shells were excavated. Results suggest that stable oxygen isotope ratios in subtidal species, beyond the influence of local salinity and temperature variations or subaerial exposure at low tide, significantly covary with ocean surface temperatures. Further synthesis of growth increment and stable isotope analyses, including specific calibration of an oxygen isotope ratio-temperature function, might establish a quantitative description of interseasonal and interannual SST variability along the Middle Holocene coast of Peru.

  7. Marine bivalve geochemistry and shell ultrastructure from modern low pH environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, S.; Rodolfo-Metalpa, R.; Griesshaber, E.; Schmahl, W. W.; Buhl, D.; Hall-Spencer, J. M.; Baggini, C.; Fehr, K. T.; Immenhauser, A.

    2011-10-01

    Bivalve shells can provide excellent archives of past environmental change but have not been used to interpret ocean acidification events. We investigated carbon, oxygen and trace element records from different shell layers in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (from the Mediterranean) and M. edulis (from the Wadden Sea) combined with detailed investigations of the shell ultrastructure. Mussels from the harbour of Ischia (Mediterranean, Italy) were transplanted and grown in water with mean pHT 7.3 and mean pHT 8.1 near CO2 vents on the east coast of the island of Ischia. The shells of transplanted mussels were compared with M. edulis collected at pH ~8.2 from Sylt (German Wadden Sea). Most prominently, the shells recorded the shock of transplantation, both in their shell ultrastructure, textural and geochemical record. Shell calcite, precipitated subsequently under acidified seawater responded to the pH gradient by an in part disturbed ultrastructure. Geochemical data from all test sites show a strong metabolic effect that exceeds the influence of the low-pH environment. These field experiments showed that care is needed when interpreting potential ocean acidification signals because various parameters affect shell chemistry and ultrastructure. Besides metabolic processes, seawater pH, factors such as salinity, water temperature, food availability and population density all affect the biogenic carbonate shell archive.

  8. Immune-related genes in gastropods and bivalves: a comparative overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Gerdol

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The biological diversity of molluscs and their adaptation to highly diverse environments offer a unique opportunity for studying the evolution of the innate immune system in invertebrates. This review provides an updated account about the progresses made over the past few years in the study of the molecular players involved in the recognition of pathogen associated molecular patters (PAMPs, in the transduction of immune signaling and in the elimination of potentially pathogenic microbes in gastropod and bivalve molluscs. A major focus will be put on the differences and peculiarities of the molecular immune system of the two major molluscan classes, which have developed specific adaptations to cope with diverse living environments, pathogenic and nonpathogenic microbes over the course of several hundred million years of independent evolution. Intriguing but still poorly understood aspects, such as antiviral response and immune priming, will be also explored, highlighting the present challenges and opportunities connected to the application of modern genomics techniques to the study of the immune system in these fascinating metazoans.

  9. Marine Bacteria with antimicrobials capacity isolated from cultures of bivalve mollusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Pellon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have commonly been studied as producers of antibacterial substances; yet they are also considered producers of antifungic, antiviral, antiparasitic, citotoxics and inhibitory of other forms of cellular growth substances. This paper describes the isolation, inhibitory potential and phenotipic characterization of native bacterial strains associated to bivalve mollusks such as Argopecten purpuratus “concha de abanico” and Crassostrea gigas “ostra” in cultivation systems. From 345 marine strains collected, 20 strains were recovered that had the ability of inhibiting a wide spectrum of fish, mollusks and shellfish pathogenic bacteria; being the most sensitive pathogens Aeromonas sobria P-281, Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 7966, Vibrio vulnificus ATCC 27562 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17803. The phenotipic characterization of this strains with inhibitory capacity allowed the identification of the following genera: Vibrio (40%, Aeromonas (15%, Flavobacterium (10%, Pseudomonas (5%, Moraxella (5%, Flexibacter (5%. A 20% could not be identified. The results suggest that the isolated bacteria could be used as probiotics agents for the biological control of pathogens from marine organisms of interest in mariculture.

  10. Structure and Classification of Haemocytes in the Bivalve Mollusc Meretrix meretrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanyan; REN Sulian; WANG Dexiu; SONG Weibo

    2006-01-01

    Light and electron microscopic studies were carried out in order to characterize haemocytes in the bivalve mollusc Meretrix meretrix. According to nucleus and cytoplasm characters, four types of haemocytes were recognized: agranular haemocytes, lymphoid haemocyte, large granular and small granular haemocytes. Agranular hamocyte is the main cell type,accounting for 75%. It is agranular with rich organelles in cytoplasm, including mitochondria, golgi body and endoplasmic reticulum. Glycogen deposits were usually found in this cell type. The number of lymphoid haemocyte accounts for 1% -2%. This cell type is agranular and shows a high ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm. A few organelles were found. High electrondense granules with diameters of 0.2 - 0.5 μm and rich organelles were found in small granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 15%. Rich granules of high electron-dense with diameters of 0.8- 2.4μm were found in large granular haemocyte. The proportion of this cell type is about 10%, and the quantity of organelles is the least.

  11. Vertical transmission of chemoautotrophic symbionts in the bivalve Solemya velum (Bivalvia: Protobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, D M; Gustafson, R G; Cavanaugh, C M

    1996-04-01

    Adults of the bivalve species Solemya velum live in symbiosis with chemoautotrophic bacteria in specialized gill bacteriocytes. The bacteria play an essential nutritional role in the mature association, fixing CO2 via the Calvin cycle with energy obtained through the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds. To understand how the continuity of this partnership is maintained between host generations, we investigated the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum. A diagnostic assay using the polymerase chain reaction and primers specific for the S. velum symbiont ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) gene consistently detected bacterial sequence in female gonad tissue, suggesting the presence of symbiont cells in host ovaries and a vertical mode of symbiont transmission from mother to offspring. Furthermore, intracellular bacteria were present in the developing gills of juveniles that had not yet hatched from the gelatinous capsule in which larval development occurs (11 days after fertilization). By 64 days postfertilization, the typical adult gill ultrastructure of alternating bacteriocytes and symbiont-free-intercalary cells was apparent. Knowledge about the mode of symbiont transfer in S. velum allows further study into the dynamics of host-symbiont interactions in chemoautotrophic associations.

  12. Cutaneous Manifestations in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Elif Demirgüneş

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: This study is designed to determine the prevalence and the clinical spectrum of skin diseases in renal transplant recipients (RTRs.Material and Method: In this study RTRs who were referred to our department between 2005 and 2007 for dermatologic examination were evaluated. Dermatologic investigation included direct clinical observation and culture or histolopathological investigation when indicated. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, post-transplantation periods £1 year; group B, post-transplantation periods of 1-5 years; and group C, post-transplantation periods >5 years. Results: In this study 88 (M=50, F=38 RTRs were evaluated. The mean age was 37 ± 12 years and the median interval since transplantation was 38.5 months (range=1 month-27 years. Over a 2-year period 298 cutaneous manifestations were identified. Ninety-five immunosuppressive (IS drug-related manifestations were observed in 58 (%65.9 patients and the most common one was acneiform eruption (n=23. Forty (45.5% patients developed cutaneous viral infections, consisting of verruca vulgaris (n=29, herpes zoster (n=9, herpes simplex (n=5, molluscum (n=2 and varicella (n=1 infections. Superficial fungal infections were observed in 35(39.2% patients, most common lesions were dermatophytosis (n = 23 and pityriasis versicolor (n=17. Bacterial infections were observed in 14 (%16 patients, folliculitis was present in 12 of them. Premalignant and malignant lesions were identified in 12 (%13.6 patients, consisting of actinic keratoses (n=9, basal cell carcinoma (n=2, squamous cell carcinoma (n=1 and Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1. There were more premalignant and malignant lesions in patients receiving azathioprine (p=0.002. Cutaneous viral infections were more common in group C (p=0.023 and IS drug-related manifestations were more common in group A (p=0.003. Conclusion: Most common cutaneous manifestation among RTRs was IS drug-related and seen in early post

  13. [Psychiatric manifestations in dementia: phenomenologic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, I

    1993-12-01

    The study of psychiatric manifestations in dementia has long been overshadowed by the more classical manifestations of the disease, such as memory loss and other cognitive deficits. In recent years, however, psychiatric symptoms as part of the demential process have attracted interest and research has become more specific. Clinicians are faced with diagnostic, treatment and management difficulties related to affective or psychotic symptoms, which account for much distress and morbidity. Several studies indicate that the prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in clinical populations of patients suffering from dementia is high: 15% to 30% for hallucinations, 15% to 30% for delusions, ten percent to 20% for major depression and 40% to 50% for depressed mood. These figures tend to confirm the hypothesis that psychiatric features in dementia are neither infrequent nor atypical. Thus, researchers have sought to link psychotic or depressive symptomatology with several clinical characteristics of dementia, namely stage, severity, prognosis or cognitive dysfunction. Some recent studies involving extensive neuropsychological evaluations indicate that subgroups of patients can be defined according to psychiatric criteria, as well as cognitive or neurological criteria. Unfortunately, results are inconsistent. Some of the contradictions in the literature are related to poorly defined terms and symptoms, a lack of reliable operational criteria, absence of validation of instruments and scales and heterogeneity of the populations studied. Ambiguous syndromes, such as pseudodementia, while illustrative of certain clinical situations, have not been helpful in categorizing demented patients. The author suggests that research focused on specific and clearly defined psychiatric symptoms in dementia will better serve our comprehension of mixed syndromes.

  14. Lithium Insertion in LiCr3O8, NaCr3O8, and KCr3O8 at Room Temperature and at 125°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koksbang, R.; Fauteux, D.; Norby, P.;

    1989-01-01

    at high temperature. At both temperatures,LiCr3O8 inserts chemically and electrochemically ca. 4 and 5 Li per formula unit, respectively. Experimental data revealthat the reaction involves major structural changes. Insertion of only small amounts of Li leads to irreversible structuralbreakdown...... is close to 4Li/NaCr3O8 and 1.3Li/KCr3O8.Lithium ion diffusion coefficients are similar for the two compounds in the comparable composition range.Thermally, the fully lithiated compounds appear to be as stable as the pristine materials.......Lithium insertion and deinsertion reactions have been carried out with LiCr3O8, NaCr3O8, and KCr3O8 chemically andelectrochemically at room temperature and at 125°C. The electrochemical experiments were performed with a nonaqueousliquid electrolyte at room temperature and with a polymer electrolyte...

  15. Manifestations of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; Mikkelsen, Dorthe; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-01-01

    manifestations and the fact that patients are especially sensitive to ionizing radiation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome seen at the Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre or at Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital......, kyphoscoliosis, rib anomalies, coalitio, cleft lip/palate, eye anomalies, milia and syndactyly. In one family, medulloblastoma and astrocytoma occurred. Traditional treatment principles of basal cell carcinomas were used including radiotherapy performed in six patients. PTCH1 mutations were identified in five...

  16. Paraneoplastic dermatological manifestation of gastrointestinal malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Numerous dermatological disorders have been associated with underlining malignancies of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Such cutaneous manifestations might have an important diagnostic value if they are the sole expressions of otherwise asymptomatic carcinomas. The recognition of some typical paraneoplastic dermatologic disorders can lead to the prompt diagnosis of the underlying malignancy, timely administration of therapy, and ultimately, better prognosis. In this review we discuss the most common paraneoplastic dermatological syndromes from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist. We also outline a comprehensive practical approach for the evaluation for occult malignancy in patients presenting with cutaneous findings potentially associated with GI cancers.

  17. Norwegian scabies - rare case of atypical manifestation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahim, Karina Corrêa; Alves, Júlia Barazetti; Tomé, Lísias de Araújo; de Moraes, Carlos Floriano; Gaspar, Arianne Ditzel; Franck, Karin Fernanda; Hussein, Mohamad Ali; da Cruz, Lucas Raiser; Ebrahim, Leonardo Duque; Sidney, Luis Felipe de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Human scabies affects all social classes and different races around the world. It is highly contagious, but the exact figures on its prevalence are unknown. A 19-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency room reporting fever (38°C) and multiple lesions throughout the body, except face, soles, and palms. Lesions were non-pruritic, which hampered the initial diagnostic suspicion. Skin biopsy was performed, and the final diagnosis was crusted scabies (Norwegian). It was concluded that human scabies is a significant epidemic disease, due to its different clinical manifestations, and because it is extremely contagious. PMID:28099611

  18. Pulmonary manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kee Hyuk; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Joo, Kyung Bin; Hahm, Chang Kok; Lee, Seung Ro [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-01

    Pulmonary involvement is more common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in any other connective tissue disease, and more than half of patients with SLE suffer from respiratory dysfunction during the course of their illness. Although sepsis and renal disease are the most common causes of death in SLE, lung disease is the predominant manifestation and is an indicator of overall prognosis. Respiratory disease may be due to direct involvement of the lung or as a secondary consequence of the effect of the disease on other organ systems.

  19. On the history of nuclear matrix manifestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZBARSKYIB

    1998-01-01

    The nonchromatin proteinous residue of the cell nucleus was revealed in our laboratory as early as in 1948 and then identified by light and electron microscopy as residual nucleoli,intranuclear network and nuclear envelope before 1960,This structure termed afterwards as "nuclear residue","nuclear skeleton","nuclear cage","nuclear carcass"etc.,was much later(in 1974) isolated,studied and entitled as "nuclear matrix" by Berezney and Coffey,to whom the discovery of this residual structure is often wronly ascribed.The real history of nuclear matrix manifestation is reported in this paper.

  20. Sarcoidosis: Oral and extra-oral manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease, which is usually associated with the formation of noncaseating granulomas in affected tissues and organs. It is mostly present with bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy, pulmonary infiltration, ocular, and cutaneous lesions. Oral manifestations of this disease are relatively rare. The present case report shows a 40-year-old male with lesions in the soft tissue of oral cavity (buccal mucosa, gingiva, and palate and a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was established following hematological, biochemical and pulmonary function tests, chest radiograph, and histopathological investigation.

  1. Dermatomal sensory manifestations in lateral medullary infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Hiroki; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Shimada, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Ryota; Hattori, Nobutaka; Urabe, Takao

    2014-01-01

    A 61-year-old man who experienced a sudden onset of unstable gait followed by nuchal pain was admitted to our department. The neurologic examination revealed right-sided limb ataxia, right partial ptosis, and decreased sensation to 50% of the normal side to pinprick and temperature stimuli on the left side below the level of the T-6 dermatome. A lateral medullary infarction caused by spontaneous vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography angiography. In conclusion, lateral medullary infarction is an important entity to consider in the differential diagnosis of dermatomal sensory manifestations.

  2. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS OF HEPATITIS C VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Panov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a serious public health problem. New infections continue to occur, and morbidity and mortality are increasing. The date reported that 3% of infected world population are affected.Morbidity associated with hepatitis C virus infection can involve a variety of extrahepatic conditions including the oral region. Some of the oral manifestation are oral disease like lichen planus and Sjögren-like sialadenitis , other affects the dental status, and side effect of the virus therapy. The aim of this review is to summarize the oral sings, accompanying hepatitis C virus.

  3. Reiki and changes in pattern manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Marcia E

    2009-07-01

    The purposes of this qualitative research study were to describe the changes in pattern manifestations that individuals experienced associated with receiving Reiki, and to present the theoretical understanding of these changes. The unitary field pattern portrait research method was utilized because it was ontologically, epistemologically, and methodologically consistent with the science of unitary human beings. Reiki was found to be associated with changes in awareness from dissonance and turbulence to harmony and well-being by helping individuals knowingly participate in actualizing their own capacities for healing. Reiki was found to be an appropriate voluntary mutual patterning nursing modality.

  4. Imaging manifestations of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, R. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Bag, A.K., E-mail: abag@uabmc.ed [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Chapman, P.R.; Cure, J.K. [Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease caused by reactivation of JC virus in immunosuppressed patients. The diagnosis is usually suggested on imaging and confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for JC virus DNA. In this article, we review the imaging manifestations of PML on computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), MR spectroscopy, single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron-emission tomography (PET), and outline the role of imaging in follow-up and prognostication.

  5. Research Misconduct—Definitions, Manifestations and Extent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the international scientific community has been rocked by a number of serious cases of research misconduct. In one of these, Woo Suk Hwang, a Korean stem cell researcher published two articles on research with ground-breaking results in Science in 2004 and 2005. Both articles were later revealed to be fakes. This paper provides an overview of what research misconduct is generally understood to be, its manifestations and the extent to which they are thought to exist.

  6. Chronic hepatitis C with extrahepatic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poantă, Laura; Albu, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C is often asymptomatic and is mostly discovered accidentally. The natural course of viral C infection varies considerably from one person to another. Chronic hepatitis C more than other forms of hepatitis is diagnosed because of extrahepatic manifestations associated with the presence of HCV such as thyroiditis, porphyria cutanea tarda, cryoglobulinemia and glomerulonephritis, specifically membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, sicca syndrome, thrombocytopenia, lichen planus, diabetes mellitus and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. We report here a case of a young man with hepatitis C and porphyria cutanea tarda who developed psoriasis after the beginning of systemic interferon therapy.

  7. Extrahepatic Manifestations of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viganò, Mauro; Colombo, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease worldwide and is also responsible for extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) involving the skin, kidneys, salivary glands, eyes, thyroid, and immune system. Mixed cryoglobulinemia is the prototype EHM related to HCV infection. Although these HCV-related EHMs may contribute to significant rates of morbidity affecting patient's quality of life and survival, most of these complications can reverse after HCV eradication by interferon therapy. This notwithstanding, individual patients may have an irreversible injury in various organs that is not reversed by a cure of the HCV infection.

  8. Congener-specific distribution and bioaccumulation of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in sediments and bivalves of the Bohai Sea, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xindong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Haijun; Gao, Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Yao, Ziwei; Chen, Jiping; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-02-15

    Short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a new type of persistent organic pollutants that are of great environmental concern because of their wide distribution. In this study, surface sediments and bivalve samples were collected from the coastal area of the Bohai Sea in China. Total SCCP (ΣSCCP) concentrations in surface sediments and bivalves ranged from 97.4 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) to 1756.7 ng g(-1) dw and 476.4-3269.5 ng g(-1) dw, respectively. C10-CPs and C11-CPs were the predominant homologue groups in all sediments and bivalves. Specific congener composition analysis and correspondence analysis indicated that the local SCCP source mainly came from CP-42 and CP-52 products, and riverine input had an important function. The biota-sediment accumulation factors of ΣSCCPs for bivalves ranged from 1.08 to 1.61, and a significant correlation indicated that the SCCP congener with higher chlorination degree was more likely to be accumulated in bivalves.

  9. Species composition, richness, and distribution of marine bivalve molluscs in Bahía de Mazatlán, México

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqueda-González, María del Carmen; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moises; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabian Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe the composition and distribution of bivalve molluscs from the sandy and rocky intertidal and the shallow subtidal environments of Bahía de Mazatlán, México. The bivalve fauna of the bay is represented by 89 living species in 28 families, including 37 new records and four range extensions: Lithophaga hastasia, Adula soleniformis, Mactrellona subalata, and Strigilla ervilia. The number of species increases from the upper (44) and lower intertidal (53) to the shallow subtidal (76), but only 11 (17%) have a wide distribution in the bay (i.e., found in all sampling sites and environments). The bivalve assemblages are composed of four main life forms: 27 epifaunal species, 26 infaunal, 16 semi-infaunal, and 20 endolithic. A taxonomic distinctness analysis identified the sampling sites and environments that contribute the most to the taxonomic diversity (species to suborder categories) of the bay. The present work increased significantly (31%) to 132 species previous inventories of bivalves of Bahía de Mazatlán. These species represent 34% of the bivalve diversity of the southern Golfo de California and approximately 15% of the Eastern Tropical Pacific region. PMID:24843252

  10. Species composition, richness, and distribution of marine bivalve molluscs in Bahía de Mazatlán, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Esqueda-González

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the composition and distribution of bivalve molluscs from the sandy and rocky intertidal and the shallow subtidal environments of Bahía de Mazatlán, México. The bivalve fauna of the bay is represented by 89 living species in 28 families, including 37 new records and four range extensions: Lithophaga hastasia, Adula soleniformis, Mactrellona subalata, and Strigilla ervilia. The number of species increases from the upper (44 and lower intertidal (53 to the shallow subtidal (76, but only 11 (17% have a wide distribution in the bay (i.e., found in all sampling sites and environments. The bivalve assemblages are composed of four main life forms: 27 epifaunal species, 26 infaunal, 16 semi-infaunal, and 20 endolithic. A taxonomic distinctness analysis identified the sampling sites and environments that contribute the most to the taxonomic diversity (species to suborder categories of the bay. The present work increased significantly (31% to 132 species previous inventories of bivalves of Bahía de Mazatlán. These species represent 34% of the bivalve diversity of the southern Golfo de California and approximately 15% of the Eastern Tropical Pacific region.

  11. Optic neuritis as onset manifestation of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, T L; Frederiksen, J L; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik;

    1999-01-01

    To determine the predictive value on survival of optic neuritis (ON) as onset manifestation of MS.......To determine the predictive value on survival of optic neuritis (ON) as onset manifestation of MS....

  12. 77 FR 54863 - Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs): Revisions to Manifesting Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 761 ] RIN 2050-AG71 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs): Revisions to Manifesting... CFR Part 761 Environmental protection, Hazardous substances, Manifest, Polychlorinated...

  13. Mg isotopes in biocarbonates: new insight into vital effects associated to echinoderms and bivalves calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planchon, F.; Hermans, J.; Borremans, C.; Dubois, P.; Poulain, C.; Paulet, Y.; Andre, L.

    2007-12-01

    Mg isotopes can be helpful tracers to reveal the fundamental pathways of Mg incorporation during biomineralisation. We report in this study a detailed characterisation of the Mg isotopic signatures of different biominerals: high magnesium calcitic skeletons of selected echinoderms (sea urchins and starfish) and low magnesium aragonitic shells of a bivalve species (clam). State of the art analytical procedures were applied including sample purification step followed by high precision measurements using MC-ICP-MS (Nu instrument) in dry plasma conditions. 26Mg/24Mg and 25Mg/24Mg are expressed as per mil deviations from the DSM3 (Dead Sea Metal 3) reference standard in delta notation (d26Mg and d25Mg). For echinoderms, we considered: (a) adult specimens of six starfish species (Asteria r., Marthasterias g., Anseropoda p., Asterina g., Echinaster s. and Henricia o.), sampled in Brittany (France); (b) a sea urchin species (Paracentrotus lividus) with field samples (Mediterranean Sea, Marseille, France) and culture specimen under T and S controlled conditions. In vivo endoskeletons display negative, but different d26Mg values of -3.06 for starfish (with uniform interspecies signatures) and -2.65 for sea urchin. Relative to seawater signature (-0.82), all echinoderms favour the incorporation of light isotopes during biocalcification. The d26Mg depletion is lower than theoretically expected from a inorganic calcite precipitation from seawater (at -3.5). These differences suggest that on its route from seawater to the shell, Mg isotopes are partly biologically fractionationated through "vital effects" leaving heavier Mg isotopic signatures. Taken into account that calcification in echinoderms is an intra- cellular process involving transient amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) phase, the observed bio-fractionation factors can be related to: (1) changes in the isotopic composition of the precipitating intracellular fluids due to active pumping in and out of the cell; (2) a

  14. Mixed function oxygenases and xenobiotic detoxication/toxication systems in bivalve molluscs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. N.; Livingstone, D. R.; Donkin, P.; Bayne, B. L.; Widdows, J.; Lowe, D. M.

    1980-03-01

    Components of a xenobiotic detoxication/toxication system involving mixed function oxygenases are present in Mytilus edulis. Our paper critically reviews the recent literature on this topic which reported the apparent absence of such a system in bivalve molluscs and attempts to reconcile this viewpoint with our own findings on NADPH neotetrazolium reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldrin epoxidation and other reports of the presence of mixed function oxygenases. New experimental data are presented which indicate that some elements of the detoxication/toxication system in M. edulis can be induced by aromatic hydrocarbons derived from crude oil. This includes a brief review of the results of long-term experiments in which mussels were exposed to low concentrations of the water accommodated fraction of North Sea crude oil (7.7-68 µg 1-1) in which general stress responses such as reduced physiological scope for growth, cytotoxic damage to lysosomal integrity and cellular damage are considered as characteristics of the general stress syndrome induced by the toxic action of the xenobiotics. In addition, induction in the blood cells of microsomal NADPH neotetrazolium reductase (associated with mixed function oxygenases) and the NADPH generating enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are considered to be specific biological responses to the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The consequences of this detoxication/toxication system for Mytilus edulis are discussed in terms of the formation of toxic electrophilic intermediate metabolites which are highly reactive and can combine with DNA, RNA and proteins with subsequent damage to these cellular constituents. Implications for neoplasms associated with the blood cells are also discussed. Finally, in view of the increased use of mussel species in pollutant monitoring programmes, the induction phenomenon which is associated with microsomal enzymes in the blood cells is considered as a possible tool for the

  15. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity—59 species—of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future

  16. Sedimentary environment influences the effect of an infaunal suspension feeding bivalve on estuarine ecosystem function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah F E Jones

    Full Text Available The suspension feeding bivalve Austrovenus stutchburyi is a key species on intertidal sandflats in New Zealand, affecting the appearance and functioning of these systems, but is susceptible to several environmental stressors including sedimentation. Previous studies into the effect of this species on ecosystem function have been restricted in space and time, limiting our ability to infer the effect of habitat change on functioning. We examined the effect of Austrovenus on benthic primary production and nutrient dynamics at two sites, one sandy, the other composed of muddy-sand to determine whether sedimentary environment alters this key species' role. At each site we established large (16 m(2 plots of two types, Austrovenus addition and removal. In winter and summer we deployed light and dark benthic chambers to quantify oxygen and nutrient fluxes and measured sediment denitrification enzyme activity to assess denitrification potential. Rates of gross primary production (GPP and ammonium uptake were significantly increased when Austrovenus was added, relative to removed, at the sandy site (GPP, 1.5 times greater in winter and summer; ammonium uptake, 8 times greater in summer; 3-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA, p<0.05. Denitrification potential was also elevated in Austrovenus addition plots at the sandy site in summer (by 1.6 times, p<0.1. In contrast, there was no effect of Austrovenus treatment on any of these variables at the muddy-sand site, and overall rates tended to be lower at the muddy-sand site, relative to the sandy site (e.g. GPP was 2.1 to 3.4 times lower in winter and summer, respectively, p<0.001. Our results suggest that the positive effects of Austrovenus on system productivity and denitrification potential is limited at a muddy-sand site compared to a sandy site, and reveal the importance of considering sedimentary environment when examining the effect of key species on ecosystem function.

  17. Persistent free radical ESR signals in marine bivalve tissues. [Electron Spin Resonance (ESR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehlorn, R.J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering); Mendez, A.T. (Fundacion Educativa Ana G. Mendez, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)); Higashi, R. (California Univ., Bodega Bay, CA (United States). Bodega Marine Lab.); Fan, T. (California Univ., Davis, CA (United States))

    1992-08-01

    Freeze-dried homogenates of the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae collected from waters in Puerto Rico near urban and industrial sites as well as at relatively pristine locations yielded electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra characteristic of free radicals as well as spectral components of transition metal ions, dominated by manganese. The magnitudes of these ESR signals and the concentrations of trace elements (determined by X-ray fluorescence) varied considerably among oyster samples, masking any potential correlation with polluted waters. Laboratory studies were initiated to identify the factors controlling the magnitudes of the tissue free radical ESR signals. Another mollusc, Mytilus californianus collected at the Bodega Marine laboratory in northern California, was fractionated into goneds and remaining tissue. Freeze-dried homogenates of both fractions exhibited ESR signals that increased gradually with time. ESR signals were observed in freeze-dried perchloric acid (PCA) precipitates of the homogenates, delipidated PCA precipitates, and in chloroform extracts of these precipitates. Acid hydrolysis to degrade proteins to amino acids produced a residue, which yielded much larger ESR free radical signals after freeze-drying. Freshly thawed homogenates of Crassostrea rhizophorae also exhibited ESR signals. A laboratory model of copper stress in Crassostrea rhizophorae was developed to study the effect of this transition metal on dssue free radicals. Preliminary results suggested that sublethal copper exposure had little effect on tissue fire radicals, except possibly for a signal enhancement in an oyster fraction that was enriched in kidney granules. Since kidney granules are known to accumulate heavy metals in mussels and probably other marine bivalves, this signal enhancement may prove to be an indicator of free radical processes associated with heavy metal deposition in molluscs.

  18. Habitat creation and biodiversity maintenance in mangrove forests: teredinid bivalves as ecosystem engineers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian W. Hendy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Substantial amounts of dead wood in the intertidal zone of mature mangrove forests are tunnelled by teredinid bivalves. When the tunnels are exposed, animals are able to use tunnels as refuges. In this study, the effect of teredinid tunnelling upon mangrove forest faunal diversity was investigated. Mangrove forests exposed to long emersion times had fewer teredinid tunnels in wood and wood not containing teredinid tunnels had very few species and abundance of animals. However, with a greater cross-sectional percentage surface area of teredinid tunnels, the numbers of species and abundance of animals was significantly higher. Temperatures within teredinid-attacked wood were significantly cooler compared with air temperatures, and animal abundance was greater in wood with cooler temperatures. Animals inside the tunnels within the wood may avoid desiccation by escaping the higher temperatures. Animals co-existing in teredinid tunnelled wood ranged from animals found in terrestrial ecosystems including centipedes, crickets and spiders, and animals found in subtidal marine ecosystems such as fish, octopods and polychaetes. There was also evidence of breeding within teredinid-attacked wood, as many juvenile individuals were found, and they may also benefit from the cooler wood temperatures. Teredinid tunnelled wood is a key low-tide refuge for cryptic animals, which would otherwise be exposed to fishes and birds, and higher external temperatures. This study provides evidence that teredinids are ecosystem engineers and also provides an example of a mechanism whereby mangrove forests support intertidal biodiversity and nurseries through the wood-boring activity of teredinids.

  19. Early stage biomineralization in the periostracum of the 'living fossil' bivalve Neotrigonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio G Checa

    Full Text Available A detailed investigation of the shell formation of the palaeoheterodont 'living fossil' Neotrigonia concentrated on the timing and manufacture of the calcified 'bosses' which stud the outside of all trigonioid bivalves (extant and fossil has been conducted. Electron microscopy and optical microscopy revealed that Neotrigonia spp. have a spiral-shaped periostracal groove. The periostracum itself is secreted by the basal cell, as a thin dark pellicle, becoming progressively transformed into a thin dark layer by additions of secretions from the internal outer mantle fold. Later, intense secretion of the internal surface of the outer mantle fold forms a translucent layer, which becomes transformed by tanning into a dark layer. The initiation of calcified bosses occurred at a very early stage of periostracum formation, deep within the periostracal groove immediately below the initialmost dark layer. At this stage, they consist of a series of polycyclically twinned crystals. The bosses grow as the periostracum traverse through the periostracal groove, in coordination with the thickening of the dark periostracal layer and until, upon reaching the mantle edge, they impinge upon each other and become transformed into large prisms separated by dark periostracal walls. In conclusion, the initial bosses and the external part of the prismatic layer are fully intraperiostracal. With later growth, the prisms transform into fibrous aggregates, although the details of the process are unknown. This reinforces the relationships with other groups that have the ability to form intraperiostracal calcifications, for example the unionoids with which the trigonioids form the clade Paleoheterodonta. The presence of similar structures in anomalodesmatans and other euheterodonts raises the question of whether this indicates a relationship or represents a convergence. The identification of very early calcification within an organic sheet has interesting implications for our

  20. Early stage biomineralization in the periostracum of the 'living fossil' bivalve Neotrigonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G; Salas, Carmen; Harper, Elizabeth M; Bueno-Pérez, Juan de Dios

    2014-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the shell formation of the palaeoheterodont 'living fossil' Neotrigonia concentrated on the timing and manufacture of the calcified 'bosses' which stud the outside of all trigonioid bivalves (extant and fossil) has been conducted. Electron microscopy and optical microscopy revealed that Neotrigonia spp. have a spiral-shaped periostracal groove. The periostracum itself is secreted by the basal cell, as a thin dark pellicle, becoming progressively transformed into a thin dark layer by additions of secretions from the internal outer mantle fold. Later, intense secretion of the internal surface of the outer mantle fold forms a translucent layer, which becomes transformed by tanning into a dark layer. The initiation of calcified bosses occurred at a very early stage of periostracum formation, deep within the periostracal groove immediately below the initialmost dark layer. At this stage, they consist of a series of polycyclically twinned crystals. The bosses grow as the periostracum traverse through the periostracal groove, in coordination with the thickening of the dark periostracal layer and until, upon reaching the mantle edge, they impinge upon each other and become transformed into large prisms separated by dark periostracal walls. In conclusion, the initial bosses and the external part of the prismatic layer are fully intraperiostracal. With later growth, the prisms transform into fibrous aggregates, although the details of the process are unknown. This reinforces the relationships with other groups that have the ability to form intraperiostracal calcifications, for example the unionoids with which the trigonioids form the clade Paleoheterodonta. The presence of similar structures in anomalodesmatans and other euheterodonts raises the question of whether this indicates a relationship or represents a convergence. The identification of very early calcification within an organic sheet has interesting implications for our understanding of

  1. Unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) of Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masteller, E.C.; Maleski, K.R.; Schloesser, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine species composition and relative abundance of unionid bivalves (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae) in Presque Isle Bay, Erie, Pennsylvania 1990-1992. This information was compared with data from the only other extensive survey of unionids in the bay conducted in 1909-1911 (Ortmann 1919) to assess changes over the 80 years preceding the present study. A total of 1,540 individuals representing 18 species were collected in 1990-1992. Five relatively common species (between 7 and 42% of total individuals), six uncommon species (2 and 6%), and seven rare species (<1%) were found. The rare species were Anodontoides ferussacianus, Lasmigona costata, Ligumia recta, Ptychobranchus fasciolaris, Quadrula pustulosa pustulosa, Strophitus undaulatus, and Truncilla donaciformis. Five of the species found in Presque Isle Bay (Leptodea fragilis, Ligumia nasuta, Potamilus alatus, Quadrula quadrula, and Truncilla donaciformis) are listed as critically imperiled and one species (Truncilla truncata) as extirpated in the State of Pennsylvania by the Western Pennsylvania Conservancy. Comparisons between unionid populations in 1909-1911 and 1990-1992 indicate few substantial changes occurred during the past 80 years. A total of 22 species were found; 21 in 1909-1911 and 18 in 1990-1992. Seventeen species were found in both studies, an additional four in 1909-1911 and one in 1990-1992. The relative abundance of 11 of the 17 species found in both studies remained stable (i.e., common or uncommon) over the past 80 years. Only four species listed as uncommon in 1909-1911 were listed as rare in 1990-1992. However, the invasion of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) is considered a threat to the continued existence of the entire Unionidae fauna in Presque Isle Bay, a unique habitat of the Great Lakes.

  2. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ting Hui; Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C J

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity-59 species-of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future monitoring

  3. Impact of high pCO2 on shell structure of the bivalve Cerastoderma edule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Stefania; Schöne, Bernd R; Wang, Schunfeng; Müller, Werner E

    2016-08-01

    Raised atmospheric emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) result in an increased ocean pCO2 level and decreased carbonate saturation state. Ocean acidification potentially represents a major threat to calcifying organisms, specifically mollusks. The present study focuses on the impact of elevated pCO2 on shell microstructural and mechanical properties of the bivalve Cerastoderma edule. The mollusks were collected from the Baltic Sea and kept in flow-through systems at six different pCO2 levels from 900 μatm (control) to 24,400 μatm. Extreme pCO2 levels were used to determine the effects of potential leaks from the carbon capture and sequestration sites where CO2 is stored in sub-seabed geological formations. Two approaches were combined to determine the effects of the acidified conditions: (1) Shell microstructures and dissolution damage were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and (2) shell hardness was tested using nanoindentation. Microstructures of specimens reared at different pCO2 levels do not show significant changes in their size and shape. Likewise, the increase of pCO2 does not affect shell hardness. However, dissolution of ontogenetically younger portions of the shell becomes more severe with the increase of pCO2. Irrespective of pCO2, strong negative correlations exist between microstructure size and shell mechanics. An additional sample from the North Sea revealed the same microstructural-mechanical interdependency as the shells from the Baltic Sea. Our findings suggest that the skeletal structure of C. edule is not intensely influenced by pCO2 variations. Furthermore, our study indicates that naturally occurring shell mechanical property depends on the shell architecture at μm-scale.

  4. Deep transcriptome sequencing of Pecten maximus hemocytes: a genomic resource for bivalve immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletto, Marianna; Milan, Massimo; Moreira, Rebeca; Novoa, Beatriz; Figueras, Antonio; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Patarnello, Tomaso; Bargelloni, Luca

    2014-03-01

    Pecten maximus, the king scallop, is a bivalve species with important commercial value for both fisheries and aquaculture, traditionally consumed in several European countries. Major problems in larval rearing, however, still limit hatchery-based seed production. High mortalities during early larval stages, likely related to bacterial pathogens, represent the most relevant bottleneck. To address this issue, understanding host defense mechanisms against microbes is extremely important. In this study next-generation RNA-sequencing was carried on scallop hemocytes. To enrich for immune-related transcripts, cDNA libraries from hemocytes challenged in vivo with inactivated-Vibrio anguillarum and in vitro with pathogen-associated molecular patterns, as well as unchallenged controls, were sequenced yielding 216,444,674 sequence reads. De novo assembly of the scallop hemocyte transcriptome consisted of 73,732 contigs (31% annotated). A total of 934 contigs encoded proteins with a known immune function, grouped into several functional categories. Particular attention was reserved to Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in non-self recognition. Through mining the scallop hemocyte transcriptome, at least four TLRs could be identified. The organization of canonical TLR domains demonstrated that single cysteine cluster and multiple cysteine cluster TLRs co-exist in this species. In addition, preliminary data concerning their mRNA level following bacterial challenge suggested that different members of this family could exhibit opposite responses to pathogenic stimuli. Finally, a global analysis of differential expression comparing gene-expression levels in in vitro and in vivo stimulated hemocytes against controls provided evidence on a large set of transcripts involved in the great scallop immune response.

  5. Gene expression profiling of genetically determined growth variation in bivalve larvae (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, E; Manahan, D T

    2010-03-01

    Growth rates in animals are governed by a wide range of biological factors, many of which remain poorly understood. To identify the genes that establish growth differences in bivalve larvae, we compared expression patterns in contrasting phenotypes (slow- and fast-growth) that were experimentally produced by genetic crosses of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Based on transcriptomic profiling of 4.5 million cDNA sequence tags, we sequenced and annotated 181 cDNA clones identified by statistical analysis as candidates for differential growth. Significant matches were found in GenBank for 43% of clones (N=78), including 34 known genes. These sequences included genes involved in protein metabolism, energy metabolism and regulation of feeding activity. Ribosomal protein genes were predominant, comprising half of the 34 genes identified. Expression of ribosomal protein genes showed non-additive inheritance - i.e. expression in fast-growing hybrid larvae was different from average levels in inbred larvae from these parental families. The expression profiles of four ribosomal protein genes (RPL18, RPL31, RPL352 and RPS3) were validated by RNA blots using additional, independent crosses from the same families. Expression of RPL35 was monitored throughout early larval development, revealing that these expression patterns were established early in development (in 2-day-old larvae). Our findings (i) provide new insights into the mechanistic bases of growth and highlight genes not previously considered in growth regulation, (ii) support the general conclusion that genes involved in protein metabolism and feeding regulation are key regulators of growth, and (iii) provide a set of candidate biomarkers for predicting differential growth rates during animal development.

  6. CO2 uptake and fixation by endosymbiotic chemoautotrophs from the bivalve Solemya velum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kathleen M; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2007-02-01

    Chemoautotrophic symbioses, in which endosymbiotic bacteria are the major source of organic carbon for the host, are found in marine habitats where sulfide and oxygen coexist. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of pH, alternate sulfur sources, and electron acceptors on carbon fixation and to investigate which form(s) of inorganic carbon is taken up and fixed by the gamma-proteobacterial endosymbionts of the protobranch bivalve Solemya velum. Symbiont-enriched suspensions were generated by homogenization of S. velum gills, followed by velocity centrifugation to pellet the symbiont cells. Carbon fixation was measured by incubating the cells with (14)C-labeled dissolved inorganic carbon. When oxygen was present, both sulfide and thiosulfate stimulated carbon fixation; however, elevated levels of either sulfide (>0.5 mM) or oxygen (1 mM) were inhibitory. In the absence of oxygen, nitrate did not enhance carbon fixation rates when sulfide was present. Symbionts fixed carbon most rapidly between pH 7.5 and 8.5. Under optimal pH, sulfide, and oxygen conditions, symbiont carbon fixation rates correlated with the concentrations of extracellular CO(2) and not with HCO(3)(-) concentrations. The half-saturation constant for carbon fixation with respect to extracellular dissolved CO(2) was 28 +/- 3 microM, and the average maximal velocity was 50.8 +/- 7.1 micromol min(-1) g of protein(-1). The reliance of S. velum symbionts on extracellular CO(2) is consistent with their intracellular lifestyle, since HCO(3)(-) utilization would require protein-mediated transport across the bacteriocyte membrane, perisymbiont vacuole membrane, and symbiont outer and inner membranes. The use of CO(2) may be a general trait shared with many symbioses with an intracellular chemoautotrophic partner.

  7. Jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap estimates of growth rates in bivalve mollusks using nearest living relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Troy A; Kowalewski, Michał

    2013-12-01

    Quantitative estimates of growth rates can augment ecological and paleontological applications of body-size data. However, in contrast to body-size estimates, assessing growth rates is often time-consuming, expensive, or unattainable. Here we use an indirect approach, a jackknife-corrected parametric bootstrap, for efficient approximation of growth rates using nearest living relatives with known age-size relationships. The estimate is developed by (1) collecting a sample of published growth rates of closely related species, (2) calculating the average growth curve using those published age-size relationships, (3) resampling iteratively these empirically known growth curves to estimate the standard errors and confidence bands around the average growth curve, and (4) applying the resulting estimate of uncertainty to bracket age-size relationships of the species of interest. This approach was applied to three monophyletic families (Donacidae, Mactridae, and Semelidae) of mollusk bivalves, a group characterized by indeterministic shell growth, but widely used in ecological, paleontological, and geochemical research. The resulting indirect estimates were tested against two previously published geochemical studies and, in both cases, yielded highly congruent age estimates. In addition, a case study in applied fisheries was used to illustrate the potential of the proposed approach for augmenting aquaculture management practices. The resulting estimates of growth rates place body size data in a constrained temporal context and confidence intervals associated with resampling estimates allow for assessing the statistical uncertainty around derived temporal ranges. The indirect approach should allow for improved evaluation of diverse research questions, from sustainability of industrial shellfish harvesting to climatic interpretations of stable isotope proxies extracted from fossil skeletons.

  8. Neurological manifestations in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Etemadifar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anti-phospholipids syndrome (APS is considered a non inflammatory auto-immune disease with a significant thrombophilic risk with varied clinical manifestations. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the frequency of thrombotic and non-thrombotic events in patients with APS.In this retrospective study, 102 definite APS subjects were recruited (2007-2011 at Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The patients were referred to Multiple Sclerosis Clinic with the diagnosis of definite APS according to 2006 Sydney's criteria. Disorders associated with APS such as pregnancy complication, vascular thrombosis and livedo reticularis (LR were assessed. Neurological signs and symptoms such as cognitive dysfunction were recorded. Data analyses were performed using SPSS software and P < 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant.Our findings showed that majority of female gender, higher rate of ischemic thrombotic stroke and high miscarriage lied in a large number of APS patients.Overall recurrent miscarriage is a common complication among (antiphospholidpid antibody aPL patients. Furthermore, ischemic stroke is the second common neurological manifestations of APS patients.

  9. Neurological manifestations of calcific aortic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Egorov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite being thoroughly studied, senile aortic stenosis (AS remains a disease that is frequently underestimated by Russian clinicians. Meanwhile, its manifestations can not only deteriorate quality of life in patients, but can also be poor prognostic signs. The most common sequels of this disease include heart failure and severe arrhythmias. However, there may be also rare, but no less dangerous complications: enteric bleeding associated with common dysembriogenetic backgrounds, infarctions of various organs, the basis for which is spontaneous calcium embolism, and consciousness loss episodes. The latter are manifestations of cardiocerebral syndrome. Apart from syncope, embolic stroke may develop within this syndrome. There is evidence that after syncope occurs, life expectancy averages 3 years. Global practice is elaborating approaches to the intracardiac calcification prevention based on the rapid development of new pathogenetic ideas on this disease. In particular, it is clear that valvular calcification is extraskeletal leaflet ossification rather than commonplace impregnation with calcium salts, i.e. the case in point is the reverse of osteoporosis. This is the basis for a new concept of drug prevention of both calcification and the latter-induced heart disease. But the view of senile AS remains more than conservative in Russia. The paper describes a clinical case of a rare complication as cerebral calcium embolism and discusses the nature of neurological symptoms of the disease, such as vertigo and syncope.

  10. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ali S; Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-07-05

    Hashimoto's encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient's paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto's encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids.

  11. Citing geospatial feature inventories with XML manifests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, R.; McGarva, G.

    2006-12-01

    Today published scientific papers include a growing number of citations for online information sources that either complement or replace printed journals and books. We anticipate this same trend for cartographic citations used in the geosciences, following advances in web mapping and geographic feature-based services. Instead of using traditional libraries to resolve citations for print material, the geospatial citation life cycle will include requesting inventories of objects or geographic features from distributed geospatial data repositories. Using a case study from the UK Ordnance Survey MasterMap database, which is illustrative of geographic object-based products in general, we propose citing inventories of geographic objects using XML feature manifests. These manifests: (1) serve as a portable listing of sets of versioned features; (2) could be used as citations within the identification portion of an international geospatial metadata standard; (3) could be incorporated into geospatial data transfer formats such as GML; but (4) can be resolved only with comprehensive, curated repositories of current and historic data. This work has implications for any researcher who foresees the need to make or resolve references to online geospatial databases.

  12. Pulmonary manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaude Gajanan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD may cause, trigger or exacerbate many pulmonary diseases. The physiological link between GERD and pulmonary disease has been extensively studied in chronic cough and asthma. A primary care physician often encounters patients with extra esophageal manifestations of GERD in the absence of heartburn. Patients may present with symptoms involving the pulmonary system; noncardiac chest pain; and ear, nose and throat disorders. Local irritation in the esophagus can cause symptoms that vary from indigestion, like chest discomfort and abdominal pain, to coughing and wheezing. If the gastric acid reaches the back of the throat, it may cause a bitter taste in the mouth and/or aspiration of the gastric acid into the lungs. The acid can cause throat irritation, postnasal drip and hoarseness, as well as recurrent cough, chest congestion and lung inflammation leading to asthma and/or bronchitis/ pneumonia. This clinical review examines the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of pulmonary manifestations of GERD. It also reviews relevant clinical information concerning GERD-related chronic cough and asthma. Finally, a potential management strategy for GERD in pulmonary patients is discussed.

  13. The Manifestly Gauge Invariant Exact Renormalisation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Rosten, O J

    2005-01-01

    We construct a manifestly gauge invariant Exact Renormalisation Group (ERG) whose form is suitable for computation in SU(N) Yang-Mills theory, beyond one-loop. An effective cutoff is implemented by embedding the physical SU(N) theory in a spontaneously broken SU(N|N) Yang-Mills theory. To facilitate computations within this scheme, which proceed at every step without fixing the gauge, we develop a set of diagrammatic techniques. As an initial test of the formalism, the one-loop SU(N) Yang-Mills beta-function, beta_1, is computed, and the standard, universal answer is reproduced. It is recognised that the computational technique can be greatly simplified. Using these simplifications, a partial proof is given that, to all orders in perturbation theory, the explicit dependence of perturbative $\\beta$-function coefficients, beta_n, on certain non-universal elements of the manifestly gauge invariant ERG cancels out. This partial proof yields an extremely compact, diagrammatic form for the surviving contributions t...

  14. Immunomodulation by different types of N-oxides in the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis.

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    Caterina Ciacci

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs for humans and the environment represents an emerging issue. Since the aquatic environment represents the ultimate sink for NP deposition, the development of suitable assays is needed to evaluate the potential impact of NPs on aquatic biota. The immune system is a sensitive target for NPs, and conservation of innate immunity represents an useful basis for studying common biological responses to NPs. Suspension-feeding invertebrates, such as bivalves, are particularly at risk to NP exposure, since they have extremely developed systems for uptake of nano and microscale particles integral to intracellular digestion and cellular immunity. Evaluation of the effects of NPs on functional parameters of bivalve immunocytes, the hemocytes, may help understanding the major toxic mechanisms and modes of actions that could be relevant for different NP types in aquatic organisms.In this work, a battery of assays was applied to the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis to compare the in vitro effects of different n-oxides (n-TiO(2, n-SiO(2, n-ZnO, n-CeO(2 chosen on the basis of their commercial and environmental relevance. Physico-chemical characterization of both primary particles and NP suspensions in artificial sea water-ASW was performed. Hemocyte lysosomal and mitochondrial parameters, oxyradical and nitric oxide production, phagocytic activity, as well as NP uptake, were evaluated. The results show that different n-oxides rapidly elicited differential responses hemocytes in relation to their chemical properties, concentration, behavior in sea water, and interactions with subcellular compartments. These represent the most extensive data so far available on the effects of NPs in the cells of aquatic organisms. The results indicate that Mytilus hemocytes can be utilized as a suitable model for screening the potential effects of NPs in the cells of aquatic invertebrates, and may

  15. The evolutionary ecology of biotic association in a megadiverse bivalve superfamily: sponsorship required for permanent residency in sediment.

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    Jingchun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine lineage diversification is shaped by the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors but our understanding of their relative roles is underdeveloped. The megadiverse bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea represents a promising study system to address this issue. It is composed of small-bodied clams that are either free-living or have commensal associations with invertebrate hosts. To test if the evolution of this lifestyle dichotomy is correlated with specific ecologies, we have performed a statistical analysis on the lifestyle and habitat preference of 121 species based on 90 source documents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Galeommatoidea has significant diversity in the two primary benthic habitats: hard- and soft-bottoms. Hard-bottom dwellers are overwhelmingly free-living, typically hidden within crevices of rocks/coral heads/encrusting epifauna. In contrast, species in soft-bottom habitats are almost exclusively infaunal commensals. These infaunal biotic associations may involve direct attachment to a host, or clustering around its tube/burrow, but all commensals locate within the oxygenated sediment envelope produced by the host's bioturbation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the formation of commensal associations by Galeommatoidean clams is robustly correlated with an abiotic environmental setting: living in sediments (P < 0.001. Sediment-dwelling bivalves are exposed to intense predation pressure that drops markedly with depth of burial. Commensal galeommatoideans routinely attain depth refuges many times their body lengths, independent of siphonal investment, by virtue of their host's burrowing and bioturbation. In effect, they use their much larger hosts as giant auto-irrigating siphon substitutes. The evolution of biotic associations with infaunal bioturbating hosts may have been a prerequisite for the diversification of Galeommatoidea in sediments and has likely been a key factor in the success of this exceptionally diverse

  16. Chemosymbiotic bivalves from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz, NE Atlantic, with descriptions of new species of Solemyidae, Lucinidae and Vesicomyidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Graham; Rodrigues, Clara F; Cunha, Marina R

    2011-01-01

    The chemosymbiotic bivalves collected from the mud volcanoes of the Gulf of Cadiz are reviewed. Of the thirteen species closely associated with chemosynthetic settings two Solemyidae, Solemya (Petrasma) elarraichensissp. n. and Acharax gadiraesp. n., one Lucinidae, Lucinoma asapheussp. n., and one Vesicomyidae, Isorropodon megadesmussp. n. are described and compared to close relatives of their respective families. The biodiversity and distribution of the chemosymbiotic bivalves in the Gulf of Cadiz are discussed and compared to the available information from other cold seeps in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Although there is considerable similarity at the genus level between seep/mud volcano fields in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean, there is little overlap at the species level. This indicates a high degree of endemism within chemosymbiotic bivalve assemblages.

  17. Interactions between Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes and the bivalve pathogens Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 and Vibrio splendidus LGP32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbi, T; Fabbri, R; Cortese, K; Smerilli, A; Ciacci, C; Grande, C; Vezzulli, L; Pruzzo, C; Canesi, L

    2013-12-01

    Marine bivalves can accumulate large numbers of bacteria, in particular Vibrio species, whose persistence in bivalve tissues largely depends on their sensitivity to the bactericidal activity of circulating hemocytes and hemolymph soluble factors. The interactions between vibrios and hemolymph have been investigated, in particular in bivalve species susceptible to infection by certain Vibrio spp. and strains. In this work, the effects of two bivalve pathogens, Vibrio splendidus LGP32 (V.s.) and Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 (V.a.), isolated from oyster mortality outbreaks, on the hemocytes of Mytilus galloprovincialis were investigated. In vitro, V.s., but not V.a., induced a dramatic decrease in lysosomal membrane stability-LMS in the hemocytes; both vibrios induced a moderate lysozyme release, with V.s. > V.a.. The V.s.-induced decrease in LMS was mediated by activation of PI-3Kinase, as shown by use of different kinase inhibitors. TEM analysis showed rapid internalization of both vibrios; however, V.s. lead to cellular and lysosomal damage and was able to survive within the hemocytes, whereas significant killing of V.a. was observed. In vivo, in mussels challenged with either vibrio and sampled at 6, 24 and 96 h post-injection, transient decreases in hemocyte LMS and progressive increases in serum lysozyme activity were observed, with V.s. > V.a.. Moreover, whereas V.a. was efficiently cleared from hemolymph, V.s. showed significant growth, that was maximal at 24 h p.i. when lowest LMS values were recorded in the hemocytes. Both vibrios also induced significant decreases in LMS in the digestive gland, again with V.s. > V.a.. The results indicate distinct interactions between mussel hemocytes and the two vibrio strains tested. The effects of V.s. may be due to the capacity of this strain to interfere with the signaling pathways involved in hemocyte function, thus escaping the bactericidal activity of the host cell, as observed for certain mammalian pathogens

  18. Convulsions as primary manifestation of nutritional rickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.P. Karunakara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rickets is diagnosed based on classical clinical features like craniotabes, rachitic rosary, widening of wrist joints, pot belly, hypotonia, bowed legs and supported by the laboratory evidence of hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, and raised alkaline phosphatase. Hypocalcemic convulsions are a rare manifestation of nutritional rickets. Decline in the magnitude of the rickets requires high index of suspicion to identify this treatable condition. Herewith presenting retrospective study of twelve cases of rickets who presented with hypocalcemic seizures as primary manifestation. Materials and methods: A detailed retrospective analysis of diagnosed cases of rickets presenting with convulsions was done. Children who were admitted with hypocalcemic convulsion and subsequently diagnosed to have rickets were included in the study. Children who did not fulfill the criteria for diagnosis of rickets either clinically or biochemically or radiologically were excluded from the study. Details including age at presentation, weight, sex, gestational age and other associated diseases were collected and analyzed. Rickets was diagnosed on the basis of clinical features, biochemical parameters (serum calcium, phosphorous, alkaline phosphatase and radiological findings. Results: A Total of 12 children; 8 male and 4 females constituted the study subjects. Mean age of presentation was 6 months. All children had presented with preceding convulsions or active convulsions. One child who presented with active convulsions was treated with parenteral phenobarbitone. All 12 of them were evaluated for the cause and found to have hypocalcemia without any other cause for convulsions. Further clinical examination revealed features of rickets and were subjected to radiological and biochemical investigations. The mean calcium value was 6.3mg/dl, phosphorus -5.35mg/dl, alkaline phosphatase-890.13 units. All the cases had radiological features of rickets. All 12 were

  19. Primary pulmonary manifestation of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia. Primaer pulmonale Manifestation der Makroglobulinaemie Waldenstroem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K. (Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Strahleninstitut)

    1989-10-01

    A case of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia (MGW) is presented with a rare primary pulmonary manifestation. The disease was discovered from abnormal reticulonodular opacities in chest X-ray films, which at first did not have the classic features of MGW. The radiological findings and therapeutic possibilities are discussed with reference to the literature. (orig.).

  20. Neurological manifestations of Chikungunya and Zika infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talys J. Pinheiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The epidemics of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Zika virus (ZIKV infections have been considered the most important epidemiological occurrences in the Americas. The clinical picture of CHIKV infection is characterized by high fever, exanthema, myalgia, headaches, and arthralgia. Besides the typical clinical picture of CHIKV, atypical manifestations of neurological complications have been reported: meningo-encephalitis, meningoencephalo-myeloradiculitis, myeloradiculitis, myelitis, myeloneuropathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome and others. The diagnosis is based on clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory criteria. The most common symptoms of ZIKV infection are skin rash (mostly maculopapular, fever, arthralgia, myalgia, headache, and conjunctivitis. Some epidemics that have recently occurred in French Polynesia and Brazil, reported the most severe conditions, with involvement of the nervous system (Guillain-Barré syndrome, transverse myelitis, microcephaly and meningitis. The treatment for ZIKV and CHIKV infections are symptomatic and the management for neurological complications depends on the type of affliction. Intravenous immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, and corticosteroid pulse therapy are options.

  1. [Orthostatic hypotension: an unusual manifestation of pheochromocytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Acosta, Pamela; Valdés, Gloria

    2003-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma, though an uncommon cause of hypertension, can be a lethal condition. Because of this it is mandatory to diagnose it or rule it out in presence of suggestive symptoms. Typical symptoms are palpitations, sweating, severe headaches and hypertension. However, there are other suggestive symptoms of this dangerous endocrine entity, one of which is the orthostatic hypotension. We report the case of a 65 years old female patient with long standing hypertension in whom the pheochromocytoma was suspected after episodes of orthostatic hypotension. Although this manifestation was described almost fifty years ago, its frequency and pathophysiology has not yet been well established and fully elucidated. Moreover, it has meaningful implications in relation to preoperatory management and the timing of surgery.

  2. Cerebellar stroke-manifesting as mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Jagadesan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary mania resulting from cerebral Cortex are described commonly. But secondary mania produced by cerebellar lesions are relatively uncommon. This case report describes a patient who developed cerebellar stoke and manic features simultaneously. 28 years old male developed giddiness and projectile vomiting. Then he would lie down for about an hour only to find that he could not walk. He became quarrelsome. His Psycho motor activities and speech were increased. He was euphoric and was expressing grandiose ideas. Bender Gestalt Test showed signs of organicity. Score in Young mania relating scale was 32; productivity was low in Rorschach. Neurological examination revealed left cerebellar signs like ataxia and slurring of speech. Computed tomography of brain showed left cerebellar infarct. Relationship between Psychiatric manifestations and cerebellar lesion are discussed.

  3. Natural curvature for manifest T-duality

    CERN Document Server

    Polacek, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We reformulate the manifestly T-dual description of the massless sector of the closed bosonic string, directly from the geometry associated with the (left and right) affine Lie algebra of the coset space Poincare/Lorentz. This construction initially doubles not only the (spacetime) coordinates for translations but also those for Lorentz transformations (and their dual). As a result, the Lorentz connection couples directly to the string (as does the vielbein), rather than being introduced ad hoc to the covariant derivative as previously. This not only reproduces the old definition of T-dual torsion, but automatically gives a general, covariant definition of T-dual curvature (but still with some undetermined connections).

  4. Hereditary angioedema: imaging manifestations and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhal, Mandip S; Marcotte, Gregory V

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema is a genetic disorder typically related to insufficient or dysfunctional C1-esterase inhibitor. Patients present with episodic swelling of various body parts, such as the face, neck, bowel, genitals, and extremities. Acute or severe symptoms can lead to patients presenting to the emergency room, particularly when the neck and abdominopelvic regions are affected, which is often accompanied by radiologic imaging evaluation. Patients with hereditary angioedema can pose a diagnostic challenge for emergency department physicians and radiologists at initial presentation, and the correct diagnosis may be missed or delayed, due to lack of clinical awareness of the disease or lack of its consideration in the radiologic differential diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of hereditary angioedema and rapid initiation of appropriate therapy can avoid potentially life-threatening complications. This article focuses on the spectrum of common and characteristic acute imaging manifestations of hereditary angioedema and provides an update on important recent developments in its clinical management and treatment.

  5. Neurosarcoidosis: Clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Kenkichi; Judson, Marc A

    2012-06-01

    Sarcoidosis is an idiopathic granulomatous disease affecting multiple organs. Neurosarcoidosis, involving the central and/or peripheral nervous systems, is a relatively rare form of sarcoidosis. Its clinical manifestations include cranial neuropathies, meningitis, neuroendocrinological dysfunction, hydrocephalus, seizures, neuropsychiatric symptoms, myelopathy and neuropathies. The diagnosis is problematic, especially when occurring as an isolated form without other organ involvement. Distinguishing neurosarcoidosis from other granulomatous diseases and multiple sclerosis is especially important. Although biopsy of neural tissue is the gold standard for the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis, this is often not practical and the diagnosis must be inferred though other tests, often coupled with biopsy of extraneural organs. Corticosteroids and other immuno-suppressants are frequently used for the treatment of neurosarcoidosis. This article reviews the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis, diagnostic tests, diagnostic criteria, and therapy of neurosarcoidosis.

  6. Opsoclonus as a manifestation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, R; Mehta, C; Zaher, N; Miller, D

    2012-10-01

    We present a 59-year-old male with early manifestation of opsoclonus associated with gait ataxia as a rare clinical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Empiric use of intravenous immunoglobulin followed by intravenous high dose methylprednisolone was initiated with subsequent remittance of opsoclonus, encephalopathy, ataxia, and tremor. Extensive workup for infectious, autoimmune, and paraneoplastic etiologies were undertaken and all studies were negative. Thyroglobulin antibodies (312 U/mL) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (457 U/mL) were elevated (normal antibodies were retested and found to have decreased considerably. Thus, with steroid therapy, the patient's opsoclonus and encephalopathy improved. We have presented a patient with a rare case of opsoclonus as the principal presenting feature of Hashimoto's encephalopathy that was incompletely responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin and resolved with corticosteroids. This report underscores the importance for clinical practitioners to maintain a high index of suspicion for Hashimoto's encephalopathy in cases of opsoclonus, especially when accompanied by an atypical presentation.

  7. Tophi as first manifestation of gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koley Sankha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tophaceous gout classically occurs after 10 years or more of recurrent polyarticular gout. However, tophi can also occur as first sign of the disorder. Here we report a 20-year-old male presenting with multiple subcutaneous nodules on bilateral feet and toes, left palm, right elbow, helix of left ear since last one and half year prior to any other manifestation of gout. He was having mild intermittent arthritis since last six months. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of one tophus showed monosodium urate crystals, which are pathognomonic for gout. His serum uric acid was normal and ultrasound revealed bilateral nephrocalcinosis. So far as we know, this is the first case report from India, demonstrating tophi as the initial clinical presentation of gout.

  8. Electrode and device problems: manifestation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, T; Archbold, S

    1997-11-01

    A total of 119 children were implanted with the Nucleus 22 implant on the Nottingham program by March 1996. Twenty-five (i.e. 21%) of these had an electrophysiologically confirmed fault on at least 1 channel and 6 (i.e. 5%) had experienced total device failure. How these problems were first manifested and what the subsequent effects were on the child and family were determined by means of questionnaires and detailed examination of clinical notes. Our findings indicated that 76% of all internal device faults were initially detected in tuning or electrophysiological measurement. All parents expressed deep anxiety about the threat of device failure; cases of total failure occurring over a long period of time resulted in the greatest distress and effect on the family. Recommendations are made for companies to assist clinics in minimizing such effects.

  9. A review of gastrointestinal manifestations of Brucellosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Shahid

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is hyperendemic in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA with more than 8,000 cases reported each year to the public health authorities. The disease can affect almost any organ system in the body including the gastrointestinal system. In some instances, gastrointestinal manifestations may be the only presenting features of the disease. These range from milder complaints like diarrhea, vomiting to more serious complications like involvement of the liver, the spleen and the gallbladder to rarely life-threatening complications like colitis, pancreatitis, peritonitis and intestinal obstruction. Recognition of this type of presentation of brucellosis is important because early diagnosis and treatment usually result in complete recovery without complications

  10. Neonatal muscular manifestations in mitochondrial disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulinius, Már; Oldfors, Anders

    2011-08-01

    During the last decade rapid development has occurred in defining nuclear gene mutations causing mitochondrial disease. Some of these newly defined gene mutations cause neonatal or early infantile onset of disease, often associated with severe progressive encephalomyopathy combined with other multi-organ involvement such as cardiomyopathy or hepatopathy and with early death. Findings suggesting myopathy in neonates are hypotonia, muscle weakness and wasting, and arthrogryposis. We aim to describe the clinical findings of patients with mitochondrial disease presenting with muscular manifestations in the neonatal period or in early infancy and in whom the genetic defect has been characterized. The majority of patients with neonatal onset of mitochondrial disease have mutations in nuclear genes causing dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, leading to defective oxidative phosphorylation.

  11. CUTANEOUS MANIFESTATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM refers to a group of common metabolic disorders that share the phenotype of hyperglycemia. The metabolic dysregulation associated with DM causes secondary pathophysiologic changes in multiple organ systems that impose a tremendous burden on the individual with diabetes and on the health care system. AIM: of the study was to evaluate presence and prevalence of common dermatoses in patients. 250 cases of D.M. with various cutaneous manifestations attending in and outpatient department of Dr. D. Y. Patil medical hospital were evaluated. Detailed history was taken as per proforma and patient investigated. Maximum incidence was seen between 40-70 yrs. of age and in middle class. Fungal infection constituted highest number which included dermatophytosis, candidiasis and pityriasis versicolor. No cutaneous reactions to therapy for diabetes were encountered in the present study.

  12. MRI manifestations of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Rui-li; MA Xiao-ye; CAI Ji-ping; ZHU Huang

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To assess MRI in the evaluation of enlarged superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Methods: MRI manifestations and etiology of forty-six patients with enlarged SOV were analyzed. Results: SOV enlargement was noted to occur in carotid-cavernous fistula, ophthalmic Graves'disease, Tolosa-Hunt syndrome, inflammation at the apex of the orbit, orbital pseudotumor and thrombosis of cavernous sinus. The dilated vein appeared as signal void tubular shadows on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The diameter of the enlarged vein was 3.5-6.0 mm. Extraocular muscle enlargement, orbital pathologies, enlarged carotid cavernous sinus etc were also revealed by MRI. Conclusion: The dilated SOV may be well demonstrated by MRI. The etiological diagnosis of enlarged SOV can be made in combination with the associated findings.

  13. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvio Danese; Stefano Semeraro; Alfredo Papa; Italia Roberto; Franco Scaldaferri; Giuseppe Fedeli; Giovanni Gasbarrini; Antonio Gasbarrini

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations,complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed,physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD.Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin,joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms.

  14. Natural curvature for manifest T-duality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poláček, Martin; Siegel, Warren [C. N. Yang Institute for Theoretical PhysicsState University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3840 (United States)

    2014-01-08

    We reformulate the manifestly T-dual description of the massless sector of the closed bosonic string, directly from the geometry associated with the (left and right) affine Lie algebra of the coset space Poincaré/Lorentz. This construction initially doubles not only the (spacetime) coordinates for translations but also those for Lorentz transformations (and their “dual”). As a result, the Lorentz connection couples directly to the string (as does the vielbein), rather than being introduced ad hoc to the covariant derivative as previously. This not only reproduces the old definition of T-dual torsion, but automatically gives a general, covariant definition of T-dual curvature (but still with some undetermined connections)

  15. Atypical Radiological Manifestation of Pulmonary Metastatic Calcification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Eun Hae; Kim, Eun Sun; Kim, Chul Hwan; Ham, Soo Youn; Oh, Yu Whan [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Metastatic pulmonary calcification is a condition of calcium deposition in the normal pulmonary parenchyma, and this is secondary to abnormal calcium metabolism without any prior soft tissue damage. The predisposing factors for this condition include chronic renal failure, hypercalcemia and increased tissue alkalinity. The most common radiologic manifestation consists of poorly defined nodular opacities in the upper lung zone. These opacities reflect the deposition of calcium salts in the pulmonary interstitium. We present here a case of metastatic pulmonary calcification in a patient who recovered from pneumonia with sepsis and whose high-resolution CT (HRCT) images demonstrated localized parenchymal airspace calcification that was limited to the bilateral lower lobes. These lower lobes had been involved with pneumonic consolidation without calcification, as seen on the previous CT scan. In summary, we report here on an atypical presentation of metastatic pulmonary calcification that showed dense airspace consolidation localized to the bilateral lower lobes in a patient with primary hyperparathyroidism and pneumonia.

  16. Manifest Covariant Hamiltonian Theory of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The problem of formulating a manifest covariant Hamiltonian theory of General Relativity in the presence of source fields is addressed, by extending the so-called "DeDonder-Weyl" formalism to the treatment of classical fields in curved space-time. The theory is based on a synchronous variational principle for the Einstein equation, formulated in terms of superabundant variables. The technique permits one to determine the continuum covariant Hamiltonian structure associated with the Einstein equation. The corresponding continuum Poisson bracket representation is also determined. The theory relies on first-principles, in the sense that the conclusions are reached in the framework of a non-perturbative covariant approach, which allows one to preserve both the 4-scalar nature of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian densities as well as the gauge invariance property of the theory.

  17. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Bellini; Sonia Biagi; Cristina Stasi; Francesco Costa; Maria Gloria Mumolo; Angelo Ricchiuti; Santino Marchi

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness.Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting.A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry,electromyography, functional ultrasonography,scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported.The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, antidyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders.Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD.

  18. Alkylphenols and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from Comunidad Valenciana coastal waters; Alquilfenoles e hidrocarburos aromaticos policiclicos en bivalvos de las coastas de la comunidad Valenciana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti Ortega, N.; Aguado Garcia, D.; Bouzas Blanco, A.; Segovia Martinez, L.; Albargues Llamas, M.; Sevillano Cabeza, A.; Campins Falco, P.; Seco Torrecillas, A.; Ferrer Polo, J.

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the results on alkylphenol and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) pollution in mussels and cleans from Comunidad Valenciana coastal waters, in 2008. The significant presence of nonylphenol observed in both bivalves reflects an exposure to alkyl phenolic surfactants from the discharges of wastewater treatment plants that treat industrial and urban wastewaters, where the presence of alkylphenol polyethoxylated is common due to its extensive use (detergents, solubilizers...). The presence of low levels of PAH was observed in most of the studied areas. However, it must be highlighted that bivalves consumption does not imply any risk for human health. (Author) 21 refs.

  19. Effects of ocean acidification on the metabolic rates of three species of bivalve from southern coast of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Wenguang; HE Maoxian

    2012-01-01

    Oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide results in a decrease in seawater pH,a process known as “ocean acidification”.The pearl oyster Pinctada fucata,the noble scallop Chlamys nobilis,and the green-lipped mussel Perna viridis are species of economic and ecological importance along the southern coast of China.We evaluated the effects of seawater acidification on clearance,respiration,and excretion rates in these three species.The animals were reared in seawater at pH 8.1 (control),7.7,or 7.4.The clearance rate was highest at pH 7.7 for P.fucata and at pH 8.1 for C.nobilis and P.viridis.The pH had little effect on the respiration rate of P.fucata and P.viridis.In contrast,the respiration rate was significantly lower at pH 7.4 in C.nobilis.The excretion rate was significantly lower at pH 7.4 than pH 8.1 for all species.The results indicate that the reduction in seawater pH likely affected the metabolic process (food intake,oxygen consumption,and ammonia excretion) of these bivalves.Different species respond differently to seawater acidification.Further studies are needed to demonstrate the exact mechanisms for this effect and evaluate adaptability of these bivalves to future acidified oceans.

  20. A new sediment-dwelling pholadid bivalve from Oligocene glaciomarine sediments of King George Island, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Hryniewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a re-description of the pholadid bivalve from the Oligocene Polonez Cove Formation, King George Island, West Antarctica, previously identified as Penitella sp. The study is based on a collection of 210 specimens, preserved exclusively in life position in flask-shaped Gastrochaenolites type borings which have been subsequently buried by glaciomarine diamictite. The systematic study showed that this pholadid is a new species belonging to the genus Pholadidea rather than to Penitella and we name it Pholadidea gradzinskii sp. nov. The species is one of very few Late Cretaceous–Paleogene pholadids that we could safely identify as Pholadidea. All of them are known exclusively from the southern Pacific and adjacent areas (New Zealand, Antarctica, and Patagonia. We demonstrate that the genus attained its Recent broad distribution before the middle Miocene, when the first species of Pholadidea appeared in the Northern Hemisphere. The mass occurrence of P. gradzinskii in the Oligocene of West Antarctica results from favourable living condition in a shallow marine environment. Low sedimentation rate allowed the settlement of numerous larvae and their subsequent metamorphosis, growth, and maturity terminated by the mass mortality caused by the burial by marine diamictite. The sediment-boring Paleogene species of Pholadidea, among them P. gradzinskii, follow the wood-boring Late Cretaceous species P. (Hatasia wiffenae, which reflects a general pattern of evolution of substrate selection among pholadoid bivalves.

  1. Early and late lithification of aragonitic bivalve beds in the Purbeck Formation (upper jurassic-lower cretaceous) of Southern England

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahat, Adam; West, Ian

    1983-05-01

    Beds of euryhaline bivalves alternating with shales constitute much of the middle Purbeck Formation. They originated on "tidal" flats at the western margin of an extensive brackish lagoon. When these shell beds are thin and enclosed in shale they are often still preserved as aragonite and are associated with "beef", fibrous calcite formed during compaction. In most cases, however, the shell debris has been converted by diagenesis into calcitic biosparrudite limestones. A compacted type has been lithified at a late stage, after deep burial. In this, pyrite is abundant and most of the shell aragonite has been replaced neomorphically by ferroan pseudopleochroic calcite. A contrasting uncompacted type of biosparrudite is characterised by bivalve fragments with micrite envelopes. Shells and former pores are occupied by non-ferroan sparry calcite cement, and there is little pyrite. These limestones frequently contain dinosaur footprints and originated in "supratidal" environments where they were cemented early, mainly in meteoric water. Once lithified they were unaffected by compaction. This uncompacted type indicates phases of mild uplift or halts in subsidence. These shell-bed lithologies, and also intermediate types described here, will probably be recognised in other lagoonal formations.

  2. Synchrotron-based crystal structure, associated morphology of snail and bivalve shells by X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, D. V.; Gigante, G. E.; Kumar, Y. Manoj; Cesareo, R.; Brunetti, A.; Schiavon, N.; Akatsuka, T.; Yuasa, T.; Takeda, T.

    2016-10-01

    Synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction spectra from the body parts of a snail and bivalve (CaCO3), have been recorded with Pilatus area detector. Experiments were performed at Desy, Hamburg, Germany, utilizing the Resonant and Diffraction beamline (P9), with 15 keV X-rays (λ=0.82666 Å). The external shell of these living organisms, is composed of calcium carbonate, which carries strong biological signal. It consists of some light elements, such as, Ca, C and O, which constitute part of the soft tissue and other trace elements. The knowledge of these diffraction patterns and hence the understanding of structures at molecular level are enormous. The application of synchrotron radiation to powder diffraction is well suited for samples of biological nature via changes in their patterns and also to investigate crystallographic phase composition. With the use of Rietveld refinement procedure, to the high-resolution diffraction spectra, we were able to extract the lattice parameters of orthorhombic polymorph of CaCO3, the most abundant mineral produced by these living organisms. The small size of the crystallite is a very important factor related to the biological structure. The natural model presents a combination of organic and inorganic phases with nanometer size. For the present study, we also used the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to explore the associated morphology of the snail and bivalve.

  3. The vesicomyid bivalve habitat at cold seeps supports heterogeneous and dynamic macrofaunal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Erwan; Menot, Lénaïck; Decker, Carole; Krylova, Elena; Olu, Karine

    2017-02-01

    The high biodiversity found at cold seeps, despite elevated concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide, is attributed to multiple sources of habitat heterogeneity. In addition to geological and geochemical processes, biogenic habitats formed by large symbiont-bearing taxa, such as bivalves and siboglinid tubeworms, or by microbial mats drive the biodiversity of small-sized fauna. However, because these habitat-forming species also depend on geochemical gradients, the respective influence of abiotic and biotic factors in structuring associated macrofaunal communities is often unresolved. The giant pockmark Regab located at 3200 m depth on the Congo margin is characterized by different fluid-flow regimes, providing a mosaic of the most common biogenic habitats encountered at seeps: microbial mats, mussel beds, and vesicomyid clam beds; the latter being distributed along a gradient of environmental conditions from the center to the periphery of the pockmark. Here, we examined the structure of macrofaunal communities in biogenic habitats formed in soft sediment to (1) determine the influence of the habitats on the associated macrofaunal communities (inter-habitat comparison), (2) describe how macrofaunal communities vary among vesicomyid clam beds (intra-habitat comparison) and (3) assess the inter-annual variation in vesicomyid beds based on repeated sampling at a three-year interval. The highest densities were found in the microbial mat communities in intermediate fluid-flow areas, but they had low diversity - also observed in the sediment close to mussel beds. In contrast, vesicomyid beds harbored the highest diversity. The vesicomyid beds did not show a homogeneous macrofaunal community across sampled areas; instead, density and composition of macrofauna varied according to the location of the beds inside the pockmark. The clam bed sampled in the most active, central part of the pockmark resembled bacterial mat communities by the presence of highly sulfide

  4. Gal/GalNAc specific multiple lectins in marine bivalve Anadara granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit

    2016-03-01

    Complete lectin mapping of molluscs with their diversified recognition pattern and possible role in lectin-carbohydrate interaction based immune response triggering need much attention. In this communication, Gal/GalNAc specific three lectins AGL-IA (Anadara granosa lectin-IA), AGL-IB (A. granosa lectin-IB) and AGL-IV (A. granosa lectin-IV) and a lectin having hemolytic activity AGL-III (A. granosa lectin-III) were purified from the plasma of A. granosa bivalve by a combination of gel filtration and affinity chromatography. AGL-IA and IB were oligomeric lectins whereas, AGL-III and IV were monomeric. The molecular weight of AGL-IA, IB, III and IV were 375, 260, 45 and 33 kDa respectively. AGL-IA and IV agglutinated both rabbit and pronase treated human erythrocytes, whereas AGL-IB agglutinated only rabbit erythrocytes. AGL-III was found to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, however, it caused hemolysis of pronase treated human erythrocytes. The activity of all four lectins was calcium dependent and maximum at a pH range 7-8. Apart from Gal/GalNAc specific, the four lectins showed substantial differences in their carbohydrate recognition pattern. Moreover, there was a difference in the carbohydrate specificity between AGL-III and other three lectins (AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV) towards polyvalent glycotope. On the one hand, 'cluster glycoside effect' i.e., an enhancement of the activity of a multivalent ligand, was observed for carbohydrate specificities of AGL-IA, AGL-IB, AGL-IV. On the other hand, the effect of multivalent ligands on the carbohydrate specificity of AGL-III was opposite of cluster glycoside effect. The affinity of AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV for ligands can be ranked as follows: glycoproteins > polysaccharide > oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. However, Gal related monosaccharides were the best inhibitors of AGL-III and the inhibitory activity decreased gradually in the following order: monosaccharide > disaccharide > polysaccharide. Thus, the

  5. High-resolution nitrogen stable isotope sclerochronology of bivalve shell carbonate-bound organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Jolivet, Aurélie; Kelemen, Zita; Chauvaud, Laurent; Bouillon, Steven

    2017-03-01

    work should use compound specific isotope analyses (CSIA) to test this hypothesis, and to determine whether certain amino acids could specifically track N sources or possibly identify amino acids that are more resistant to diagenesis in fossil shells. In conclusion, bivalve shell CBOM δ15N values can be used in a similar manner to soft-tissue δ15N values, and can track various biogeochemical events at a very high-resolution.

  6. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza SHIARI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite this Article: Shiari R. Neurologic Manifestations of Childhood Rheumatic Diseases.  Iran J Child Neurol Autumn 2012; 6(4: 1-7.Children with rheumatic disorders may have a wide variety of clinical features ranging from fever or a simple arthritis to complex multisystem autoimmune diseases. Information about the prevalence of neurological manifestations in children with rheumatologic disorders is limited. This review describes the neurologic complications of childhood Rheumatic disease either solely or combined with symptoms of other organs involvement, as a primary manifestation or as a part of other symptoms, additionally. References1. Benseler S, Schneider R. Central nervous system vasculitisin children. Curr Opin Rheumatol. 2004 Jan;16(1:43-50. 2. Benseler SM. Central nervous system vasculitis in children. Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2006 Dec;8(6:442-9. 3. Mc Carthy HJ, Tizard EJ. Clinical practice: Diagnosis and management of Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Eur J Pediatr.2010 Jun;169(6:643-50. Epub 2009 Dec 12. 4. Robson WL, Leung AK. Henoch-Schönlein purpura. AdvPediatr. 1994;41:163-94. 5. Ostergaard JR, Storm K, Neurologic manifestations of Schönlein-Henoch purpura. Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991Mar;80(3:339-42. 6. Bakkaloğlu SA, Ekim M, Tümer N, Deda G, ErdenI, Erdem T. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura. Nephrol. Dial Transplant. 2000 Feb;15(2:246-8. 7. Mattoo TK, al-Mutair A, al-Khatib Y, Ali A, al-SohaibaniMO. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococcal infection and Henoch-Schonlein purpura with cardiac, renal and neurological complications. Ann Trop Pediatr. 1997Dec;17(4:381-6. 8. Ha TS, Cha SH. Cerebral vasculitis in Henoch-Schönlein purpura: a case with sequential magnetic resonance imaging. Pediatr Nephrol. 1996;10:634-6. 9. Saket S, Mojtahedzadeh S, Karimi A, Shiari R, ShirvaniF. Relationship between electrolyte abnormalities, ESR,CRP and platelet count with severity of Kawasaki disease.Yafteh. 2009;11(3:5-14. 10

  7. Hypertonicity: Clinical entities, manifestations and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Argyropoulos, Christos; Ing, Todd S; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid J; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and is associated with mortality and severe short-term and long-term neurological sequelae. The main clinical syndromes of hypertonicity are hypernatremia and hyperglycemia. Hypernatremia results from relative excess of body sodium over body water. Loss of water in excess of intake, gain of sodium salts in excess of losses or a combination of the two are the main mechanisms of hypernatremia. Hypernatremia can be hypervolemic, euvolemic or hypovolemic. The management of hypernatremia addresses both a quantitative replacement of water and, if present, sodium deficit, and correction of the underlying pathophysiologic process that led to hypernatremia. Hypertonicity in hyperglycemia has two components, solute gain secondary to glucose accumulation in the extracellular compartment and water loss through hyperglycemic osmotic diuresis in excess of the losses of sodium and potassium. Differentiating between these two components of hypertonicity has major therapeutic implications because the first component will be reversed simply by normalization of serum glucose concentration while the second component will require hypotonic fluid replacement. An estimate of the magnitude of the relative water deficit secondary to osmotic diuresis is obtained by the corrected sodium concentration, which represents a calculated value of the serum sodium concentration that would result from reduction of the serum glucose concentration to a normal level. PMID:28101446

  8. Manifestations of the Galactic Center Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Several independent lines of evidence reveal that a relatively strong and highly ordered magnetic field is present throughout the Galaxy's central molecular zone (CMZ). The field within dense clouds of the central molecular zone is predominantly parallel to the Galactic plane, probably as a result of the strong tidal shear in that region. A second magnetic field system is present outside of clouds, manifested primarily by a population of vertical, synchrotron-emitting filamentary features aligned with the field. Whether or not the strong vertical field is uniform throughout the CMZ remains undetermined, but is a key central issue for the overall energetics and the impact of the field on the Galactic center arena. The interactions between the two field systems are considered, as they are likely to drive some of the activity within the CMZ. As a proxy for other gas-rich galaxies in the local group and beyond, the Galactic center region reveals that magnetic fields are likely to be an important diagnostic, if no...

  9. Practical and algorithmical manifestations of quantum chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Li, B; Li, Baowen; Robnik, Marko

    1995-01-01

    Quantum chaos manifests itself also in algorithmical complexity of methods, including the numerical ones, in solving the Schr\\"odinger equation. In this contribution we address the problem of calculating the eigenenergies and the eigenstates by various numerical methods applied to 2-dim generic billiard systems. In particular we analyze the dependence of the accuracy (errors) on the density of discretization of the given numerical method. We do this for several different billiard shapes, especially for the Robnik billiard. We study the numerical error of the boundary integral method and the plane wave decomposition method as a function of the discretization parameter b which by definition is the number of discretization nodes on the boundary per one de Broglie wavelength (arclength) interval. For boundary integral method, we discover that at each \\lambda the error scales as a power law = A b^{-\\alpha}, where \\alpha is a strong function of \\lambda: In the KAM-like regime 0\\le \\lambda\\le 1/4 it is large and cl...

  10. INNOVATION – CREATIVE MANIFESTATION WITH ECONOMIC IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALENTINA MUNTEANU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at a correct perception of innovation, regarded as a present phenomenon, for which it is necessary to resorts to a series of notions and definitions, as well as to multiple perspectives. Thus, the definition of this phenomenon - in all that it captures in it - suggests dynamism and ease of communication. The complexity of the phenomenon of innovation is the creative capacity, around which there revolve all other matters concerning innovation. The present paper also illustrates the relationship between technology and economy, meaning that technical progress makes the economic system that created it. This, in turn, provides a more consistent support for changing technology. Economic factors play a major role in the development of technology, because they are interested in reducing costs, increasing productivity, sales volume, as well as goals that can be achieved through innovation. Successful entrepreneurs in an increasingly more competitive environment try to assert through value creation rewardingly new and different outputs, a fact which represents a change from what was known at the beginning of the business. In general, innovation and to the same extent technical and technological innovation has always accompanied the development of human society. Innovation has manifesting itself throughout history with different levels of intensity. Technical-scientific revolution, present in all spheres of human activity through the accelerated mutations that produce them, fundamentally influence the way in which orientation and innovation evolve.

  11. Subperiosteal osteoid osteoma: radiographic and pathologic manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankman, S. [Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/OI, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Desai, P. [Department of Pathology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/OI, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Beltran, J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital for Joint Diseases/OI, 301 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Objective.To demonstrate the radiologic and pathologic manifestations of osteoid osteoma arising beneath the periosteum, on the surface of the bone. Design. One hundred and sixty osteoid osteomas were seen over a 30-year period. The radiologic, pathologic and operative findings of those that were subperiosteal were reviewed. Patients. Eleven patients with subperiosteal osteoid osteoma were reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 13 to 36 years with a mean of 24 years. Eight were male and three were female. Results and conclusion. Eleven subperiosteal lesions were studied. The reactive periostitis of four lesions was atypical and misleading. Four lesions had features similar to the more common intracortical variety. Three lesions occurring within the joint like other intra-articular lesions were barely seen on plain radiographs. Bone scan and CT scan were virtually diagnostic. The histopathology of these lesions was also atypical though not misleading. In conclusion, subperiosteal osteoid osteoma is a rare lesion with atypical radiographic and histopathologic features. The unusual reactive periostitis seen in several extra-articular cases may suggest other diagnoses. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. ECG manifestations of left ventricular electrical remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, E Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Research and thinking about the electrocardiographic manifestations of left ventricular hypertrophy has been constrained by a limited conceptual model of the process: heart disease produces chamber enlargement (increased mass), which in turn produces an altered electrocardiogram. The process is much more complex than can be represented in this simple model. A more robust and intricate model is proposed, in which heart (and vascular) disease causes structural changes, electrical changes, biochemical changes, and others, all of which interact to produce electrical remodeling of ventricular myocardium. This electrical remodeling results in a variety of ECG changes. All of these changes interact, leading to an altered clinical course, and to premature death. It is suggested that research, based on this model, can provide new clues to the processes involved, and improve the prediction of clinical outcomes. New directions in research, in recording equipment, and in organizational activities are suggested to test this new model, and to improve the usefulness of the electrocardiogram as a research and diagnostic tool.

  13. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestations of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhablani, Preeti Patil; Kekunnaya, Ramesh

    2014-10-01

    Increasing rates of preterm births coupled with better survival of these infants have resulted in higher prevalence of systemic and ocular complications associated with prematurity. In addition to retinopathy of prematurity, infants who are born preterm may suffer from severe visual impairment as a result of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, and other metabolic imbalances. The effect of these processes on the anterior visual pathway may result in optic atrophy, optic nerve hypoplasia or optic disc cupping and affection of the posterior visual pathway leads to cortical visual impairment (CVI). Other ocular associations include strabismus, nystagmus, and ocular motor abnormalities such as tonic down gaze and defective saccades and pursuits. Cortical and subcortical involvement also manifests as defects in functional vision and these have not yet been completely understood. Children with CVI may have visual field defects, photophobia, defective visual processing, and deficient color vision. Since most of these children also suffer from additional systemic disabilities, evaluation, and management remains a challenge. However, early diagnosis and initiation of rehabilitation therapy can prove to be of significant benefit in these children.

  14. Monogenic autoinflammatory diseases: concept and clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida de Jesus, Adriana; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the clinical manifestations of the growing spectrum of monogenic autoinflammatory diseases including recently described syndromes. The autoinflammatory diseases can be grouped based on clinical findings: 1. the three classic hereditary "periodic fever syndromes", familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF); TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS); and mevalonate kinase deficiency/hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS); 2. the cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes (CAPS), comprising familial cold autoinflammatory syndrome (FCAS), Muckle-Wells syndrome (MWS) and neonatal-onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) or CINCA, and; 3. pediatric granulomatous arthritis (PGA); 4. disorders presenting with skin pustules, including deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA); Majeed syndrome; pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome; deficiency of interleukin 36 receptor antagonist (DITRA); CARD14 mediated psoriasis (CAMPS), and early-onset inflammatory bowel diseases (EO-IBD); 5. inflammatory disorders caused by mutations in proteasome components, the proteasome associated autoinflammatory syndromes (PRAAS) and 6. very rare conditions presenting with autoinflammation and immunodeficiency.

  15. Biochemical Manifestation of HIV Lipodystrophy Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Ihenetu, PhD

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART, including protease inhibitors (PI have led to dramatic improvements in the quality and quantity of life in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. However, a significant number of AIDS patients on HAART develop characteristic changes in body fat redistribution referred to as lipodystrophy syndrome (LDS. Features of LDS include hypertrophy in the neck fat pad (buffalo hump, increased fat in the abdominal region (protease paunch, gynecomastia and loss of fat in the mid-face and extremities.Methods:The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge regarding this syndrome. This article reviews the published investigations on biochemical manifestation of HIV lipodystrophy syndrome.Results:It is estimated that approximately 64% of patients treated with PI will experience this syndrome. Biochemically, these patients have increased triglycerides (Trig, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C and extremely low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C.Conclusions and Public Health Implications:It is hoped that awareness of this syndrome would aid in early diagnosis and better patient management, possibly leading to a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications among these patients.

  16. Oral manifestations of lymphoma: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Taísa Domingues Bernardes; Ferreira, Camila Belo Tavares; Leite, Gustavo Boehmer; de Menezes Pontes, José Roberto; Antunes, Héliton S

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma is a malignant disease with two forms: Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is diagnosed in extranodal sites in 40% of cases, and the head and neck region is the second most affected, with an incidence of 11–33%, while HL has a very low incidence in extranodal sites (1–4%). The aim of this study was to identify the oral manifestations of lymphoma through a systematic literature review, which we conducted using the PubMed, Lilacs, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. We found 1456 articles, from which we selected 73. Among the intraoral findings, the most frequent were ulcerations, pain, swelling, and tooth mobility, while the extraoral findings included facial asymmetry and cervical, submandibular, and submental lymphadenopathy. Among the few studies reporting imaging findings, the most cited lesions included hypodense lesions with diffuse boundaries, bone resorptions, and tooth displacements. The publications reviewed highlight gaps in the areas of early detection, diagnosis, and proper treatment. PMID:27594910

  17. Epigenetic manifestations in diet-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariman, E C M

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic phenomena are changes in phenotype that are due to resetting of gene expression under the influence of the environment or genetic factors without changing the DNA sequence. Usually this resetting occurs at a certain stage in life and remains fixed thereafter. In humans, evidence for epigenetic involvement in diet-related complex traits and disorders is accumulating. The fetal origins theory indicates that nutrition can influence the later life risk for certain common disorders like the metabolic syndrome. In parent-of-origin effects, the risk for a common disorder like type I diabetes depends on the sex of the parent who transmits genetic risk factors. Interestingly, both dietary and genetic factors can exert their epigenetic influence over several generations. Imprinting, i.e. silencing of one copy of an autosomal pair of genes, can be part of the mechanism pointing to the importance of DNA methylation. In addition, chromatin modifications have been shown to be involved in epigenetic manifestations. The intriguing possibility that diet may influence the direction and extent of epigenetic changes opens new ways for prevention or treatment of common disorders. At the same time, maternal nutrition might be used to actively direct fetal development with consequences for later life performance such as cognitive abilities. More knowledge on those novel applications is needed. This will in part come from novel strategies to map the epigenomic regions, allowing the identification of more genes involved in epigenetics and allowing the study of their response to nutrition.

  18. Oroal manifestations in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grajales González Hilda María

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by the presence of acute focal inflammatory demyelination, axonal loss and gliosis. It affects predominantly in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age; it is infrequent in the pediatric age. A observational, retrospective and descriptive cohort research was conducted between May 1999 and January 2012 to assess demographic characteristics, and pathological manifestations in the oral cav- ity of children with this condition. Records of 17 patients, under 18 years of age, of either sex were included, who had been evaluated in the Department of Stomatology. Data recorded were age, sex, State of origin, oral and facial pathological features, focal cavity infections and ceod index. There were no patients with trigeminal neuralgia or facial paralysis; a 5.7% ceod index was identified. Most of the patients were under immunopressive treatment. A protocol for stomatological follow-up in patients with multiple sclerosis does not exist. The medical profession must be sensibilized to establish strategies for an integral follow-up in patients with this condition.

  19. DENGUE WITH ATYPICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND WHO CLASSIFICATION

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    Jayant Mahadeorao

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever are important arboviral diseases. Dengue virus belongs to family Flaviviridae , has four serotypes that spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes . Dengue epidemics can have a significant economic and health t oll. Worldwide, an estimated 3.6 billion people are at risk of infection with about 50 - 100 million new cases each year Illness produced by any of the four dengue virus serotypes varies from mild asymptomatic illness to severe fatal dengue haemorrhagic fe ver/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS. During the early febrile stage clinicians cannot predict which patients will progress to severe disease. Atypical manifestations were reported are associated with high risk of mortality. The existing WHO dengue classific ation scheme and case definitions have some drawbacks. A global strategy to reduce the disease burden using integrated vector management in conjunction with early and accurate diagnosis has been advocated. Antiviral drugs and vaccines that are currently un der development could also make an important contribution to dengue control in the future

  20. Oral manifestations of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, Marco; Scally, Kara

    2014-06-28

    Extrahepatic manifestations (EHMs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can affect a variety of organ systems with significant morbidity and mortality. Some of the most frequently reported EHM of HCV infection, involve the oral region predominantly or exclusively. Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a chronic inflammatory condition that is potentially malignant and represents cell-mediated reaction to a variety of extrinsic antigens, altered self-antigens, or super antigens. Robust epidemiological evidence support the link between OLP and HCV. As the virus may replicate in the oral mucosa and attract HCV-specific T lymphocytes, HCV may be implicated in OLP pathogenesis. Sjögren syndrome (SjS) is an autoimmune exocrinopathy, characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes and a multitude of other systemic signs and symptoms. SjS patients have also an increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients with chronic hepatitis C do frequently have histological signs of Sjögren-like sialadenitis with mild or even absent clinical symptoms. However, it is still unclear if HCV may cause a disease mimicking SjS or it is directly responsible for the development of SjS in a specific subset of patients. Oral squamous cell carcinoma is the most common oral malignant tumour and at least in some part of the world could be linked to HCV.