WorldWideScience

Sample records for bituminous sands

  1. The bituminous sands : a Canadian mirage?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousse, D.R. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Dept. des Sciences Appliquees; Nasr, G.J. [Lebanese Univ., Roumieh (Lebanon). Faculty of Engineering; Turcotte, S.F. [Quebec Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Centre d' Etudes Internationales et Mondialisation; Salah, N.B. [Ecole Superieure des Sciences et Techniques De Tunis, Tunis (Tunisia). LMMP

    2009-07-01

    This paper examined the controversy about the potential role of a significant increase in Canadian oil sands production in order to bridge the upcoming gap between the world's increasing energy demand and the total recoverable oil supply. The paper presented the actual potential of different scenarios and considered the prediction cost forecasts. A brief overview of environmental impacts and the real return on investments were also provided. Environmental impacts that were considered included land degradation; water contamination; ecosystem damage; and air pollution. Nuclear energy was also presented as a possible solution. The paper demonstrated that even in a very optimistic scenario, Canada's oil sands accelerated production has a negligible effect on the aforementioned gap, has a considerable impact on environment that has yet to be accounted for. Energy ratios that were presented included energy return on energy investment; energy available on energy used; and energy payback. It was concluded that enhanced recovery techniques are clearly needed for future sustainable exploitation of these bituminous sands. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Transformism in Alberta: The Environmental Political Economy of the Bituminous Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Rosene, Ryan

    This thesis attempts to help establish environmental political economy as a viable academic field while providing an example of work in the discipline. It offers an analysis of societal processes resulting in the co-optation and/or neutralization of critical environmentalist ideas. Using Alberta's bituminous sands as a case study, and a Gramsci-influenced eco-Marxist theory as a foundation, the thesis argues that the term 'environmental transformism' (inspired by the Gramscian term trasformismo) is helpful in describing and framing such processes. Accordingly, the ensuing chapters provide an analysis of why environmental transformism is happening in Alberta, and demonstrate how this mechanism works at protecting the status quo from threatening ideologies, thereby consolidating neoliberal capitalism. A concluding argument discusses the inherent dangers posed to society by the transformism of certain environmental subjectivities. The thesis begins by introducing the contentious social and environmental issues surrounding the development of the bituminous sands.

  3. Bituminization plant Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this leaflet the principle of the bituminization plant for radioactive concentrate (the intermediate liquid radioactive waste generated during the NPP A1, V-1, V-2 operations) solidification used in the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment Centre (BSC RAO) is presented

  4. Cold bituminous mixes

    OpenAIRE

    Delak, Boštjan

    2012-01-01

    Asphalt mix (short also asphalt) can be obtained from nature (natural asphalt) or produced technically (artificial asphalt), i. e. as a mix of bituminous binder, stone grain, and other additives that improve the asphalt properties. The beginnings of the use of asphalt can be traced from 6,000 to 4,000 BC since people back then knew some materials that contained bitumen as a binder. A more frequent use of the natural asphalt, however, starts around 3,000 BC. Different peoples used it primar...

  5. The Role of Bituminous Sands in Extending the Petroleum Era Beyond 2000 A. D. (Summary Le rôle des sables bitumineux pour prolonger l'ère du pétrole au-delà de l'an 2000 (résumé

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrigy M.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous sand is an energy resource that is receiving increasing attention and there is a strong interest by the international community in co-operating in the development of new methods of exploration, and in the solution of common technological problems to reduce the time when oil from this enormous energy source is available. A detailed knowledge of the geological setting and the reservoir is of paramount importance to the assessment of the magnitude of the resource, its successful exploitation and to facilitate the transfer of the highly complicated recovery technology from one deposit to another. Much research also remains to be done to improve our understanding of the origin of the bitumen and the factors controlling the location of its accumulation. Based on the scant information we have, it is estimated that bituminous sand deposits contain from 5 to 10 x 10. 12 (trillion barrels of crude bitumen and are surely large enough to make a significant contribution to extending the petroleum era until alternative energy sources are developed. However, great amounts of synthetic oil from this source will probably not be brought onto the market until after the year 2000 A. D. because of the high capital cost, and large numbers of skilled technicians required to bring them into production. In the more industrialized nations where the demand for portable liquid fuel is strongest, notably Canada, Venezuela, and USA, billions of dollars are being spent on exploring and exploiting their bituminous sand resources. It is, however, in those undeveloped nations, who cannot afford to buy light crude oil, and who have bituminous deposits, where exploitation of this resource should have its greatest impact. It is therefore imperative that all geologists be aware of the new technologies that are now available to turn these low-grade hydrocarbons into high-grade products. Une attention croissante est accordée aux sables bitumineux comme source d

  6. Crumb Rubber in cold recycled bituminous mixes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondi, Giulio; Tataranni, Piergiorgio; Pettinari, Matteo;

    2014-01-01

    Today recycling is one of the most innovative and interesting techniques for the rehabilitation of destressed road pavements. In recent years the increased interest in this process, has led to the development of various alternative methods for the recovery and the reuse of road bituminous materials....... Cold recycling is, among the recycling techniques, certainly the most studied and developed: it allows the recovering of bituminous material from an existing pavement without the addition of heat, whilst ensuring the creation of high quality bound base layers. A wide range of materials have been tested...... together with Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP) and, consequently, there is a large number of variables that can be considered in the mix-design process of new eco-friendly Cold Recycled Mixes. In particular, the present research involves the use of Crumb Rubber within a mixture containing 100% Reclaimed...

  7. Response Modelling of Bitumen, Bituminous Mastic and Mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldekidan, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses on testing and modelling the viscoelastic response of bituminous binders. The main goal is to find an appropriate response model for bituminous binders. The desired model should allow implementation into numerical environments such as ABAQUS. On the basis of such numerical envi

  8. Skid resistance of bituminous surfaces in Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colony, D. C.

    1984-03-01

    Statistical studies of skid number (SN) on the state highway system in Ohio reveal apparently systematic variations in distributions of SN among the twelve districts in the state. These variations appear to be significantly related to traffic and to geological characteristics of a given district. Regression calculations using traffic index, a function of ADT and age of the pavement surface in months, show a high correlation with SN, although standard errors of estimate were too large to make the equations useful for predicting SN from traffic variables. Similar results were obtained by elating SN to physiographic features in the state. Pavement surface type (bituminous or pcc) and coarse aggregate type (limestone, gravel or slag) are significantly related to SN.

  9. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uezuelmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m-3. It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration. (authors)

  10. Radon concentration measurements in bituminous coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisne, Abdullah; Okten, Gündüz; Celebi, Nilgün

    2005-01-01

    Radon measurements were carried out in Kozlu, Karadon and Uzülmez underground coal mines of Zonguldak bituminous coal basin in Turkey. Passive-time integrating method, which is the most widely used technique for the measurement of radon concentration in air, was applied by using nuclear etched track detectors (CR-39) in the study area. The radon concentration measurements were performed on a total of 42 points in those three mines. The annual exposure, the annual effective dose and lifetime fatality risk, which are the important parameters for the health of workers, were estimated based on chronic occupational exposure to the radon gas, which is calculated using UNCEAR-2000 and ICRP-65 models. The radon concentrations at several coal production faces are higher than the action level of 1000 Bq m(-3). It is suggested that the ventilation rates should be rearranged to reduce the radon concentration.

  11. Long-term properties of bituminized waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a survey of the factors of importance for long term behaviour of bituminized ion exchange resins. Phenomena occurring in bituminized waste products affected by the treatment, storage and disposal are identified. Test methods have been developed for characterizing product properties, which are important for the long-term behaviour. The long-term properties of bituminized ion-exchange resins are studied in a repository environment with access of water equilibrated with concrete. In these circumstances the most important properties are ralated to the interactions of bituminized waste with the surrounding barriers. The most important phenomena are water uptake due to rehydration of the resins and subsequent swelling of the product. (author)

  12. Long-term properties of bituminized waste products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a survey of the factors of importance for the long term behaviour of bituminized ion exchange resins. Phenomena occurring in bituminized waste products affected by the treatment, storage and disposal are identified. Test methods have been developed for characterizing product properties, which are important for the long-term behaviour. The long-term properties of bituminized ion-exchange resins are studied in a repository environment with access of water equilibrated with concrete. In these circumstances the most important properties are related to the interactions of bituminized waste with the surrounding barriers. The most important phenomena are water uptake due to rehydration of the resins and subsequent swelling of the product

  13. Development of non-standard equipment of bituminization line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description is presented of some components of the bituminization line developed at the Research Institute of Chemical Installations in Brno. The film rotor evaporator has an evaporation area of 2 m2. The mixing tank is the main technological assembly for processing loose materials, i.e., sorbents and fly ash which it mixes with melted bitumen. The screw conveyor with a three-way valve is designed for batching the dried radioactive sorbent and fly ash into mixing tanks. Attention is also devoted to certain systems of measurement and control of the bituminization line, namely to measurement of the level of the bituminization product, the flow rate of bituminization emulsion and the water-sorbent mixture and to the diagnostics of failure and accident conditions of the film rotor evaporator. (Z.M.)

  14. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON HORIZONTAL COMBUSTION TECHNIQUE FOR BITUMINOUS COAL BRIQUET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路春美; 程世庆; 邵延玲; 张晔

    1997-01-01

    Through a lot of experiments, a new kind of stove using horizontal combustion technique for bituminous coal briquet has been developed. Making use of this stove, studies have been made on burning process of bituminous coal briquet, distribution of temperature field in the stove, the regularities of evolution and combustion of volatile matter, the burning rate and efficiency of bituminous coal briquet, characteristics of fire-sealing and sulfur-retention. The results show that, with the technique, some achievements can be obtained in combustion of bituminous coal briquet, such as lower pollution that the flue gas black degree is below 0.5R and dust concentration is below 90mg/m3 . The stove's combustion efficiency reaches 90%, sulfur fixing efficiency is 60%, and CO concentration is decreased by 40% compared with other traditional stoves. With so many advantages, the stove can be used extensively in civil stoves and smaller industrial boilers.

  15. Bituminous and asphaltic membranes for radioactive waste repositories on land

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study has been to identify, within generic designs for waste facilities, areas where bituminous materials might be incorporated as a barrier. The report is presented in three sections: Part I - The properties of bitumen are described, with particular reference to the long-term behaviour of the material. The durability of bitumen is discussed, including aspects such as ageing, microbial degradation, chemical resistance and radiation resistance. Part II -The use of bituminous materials in hydraulic engineering is outlined. Much of this section of the report concentrates on the use of bituminous materials in embankment dams and reservoir construction. A review of material technology and construction techniques is presented and a detailed assessment made of the performance of the materials in service. Part III - Generic trench type radioactive waste repository designs incorporating bituminous materials are presented. Material and construction specifications for the designs are detailed, and a performance assessment presented. (author)

  16. Effects of bituminous layer as backfill material on mechanical behavior in tunnel model

    OpenAIRE

    Moriyoshi, Akihiro; Takano, Shin-ei; Urata, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Takaki

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of bituminous material as a backfill material on mechanical behavior in model tunnel in laboratory. It is known that load spreading and relaxation of bituminous material are good properties. Then if we use bituminous material as a backfill material of tunnel, the tunnel will have waterproof, good load spreading property. We used new bituminous material (Aquaphalt) which can solidify in water. We conducted relaxation test in tension for new bituminous mat...

  17. Bituminization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results and experiences are summed up from the research and development of the technology of bituminization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive concentrates generated in the operation of nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors. The experiments took place on a pilot plant bituminization line with various model solutions at an evaporator capacity of 70, 100 and 140 litres per hour. The composition of the solutions changed in dependence on the knowledge of the composition of actual concentrates in the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice. The following factors were studied in the concentrate: the effect of its pH, its borate content and content of metal carbonates, the content of organic acid salts, the content of detergents, etc., on the process of bituminization. Physico-chemical conditions are described under which the operation of the evaporator was fail-safe and filling of the bituminization product with salts homogeneous. A low water content of up to 1% was achieved. The properties of the bituminization product were negatively affected by a high level of heavy metal oxides, surfactants, oxalates and citrates. In order to improve the properties of the product it will be necessary to replace bitumen emulsion Silembit-60 used as reinforcement matrix, by a different type of bitumen. (Z.M.)

  18. Measurement of heat generation from simulated bituminized product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fire and explosion incident occurred at Bituminization Demonstration Facility of PNC Tokai Works on March 11, 1997. In order to ascertain the cause of incident, the investigation has been pushed forward. For the investigation, we prepared simulated bituminized product of measurement of heat generation in low temperature region less than 200degC. We used calvet Calorimeter MS80 for the heat generation measurement. Result of measurement, we were able to catch the feeble heat generation from bituminized product. The maximum calorific value that was able to detect it in isothermal measurement was approximately 1 mW/g in 160degC. It was approximately 2 mW/g in 200degC. And, as the another measurement, the measurement condition went heat rate by 0.01degC/minute, the highest temperature 190degC. As a result, the maximum generation of heat value that was able to detect it was approximately 0.5 mW/g. I changed simulated bituminized products and measured these. A difference of condition is salt particle size, salt content rate (45%, 60%), addition of the simulated precipitate. But there was not a difference in the generation of heat characteristic detected. (author)

  19. Reuse of steel slag in bituminous paving mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Sanzeni, Alex; Rondi, Luca

    2012-03-30

    This paper presents a comprehensive study to evaluate the mechanical properties and environmental suitability of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag in bituminous paving mixtures. A variety of tests were executed on samples of EAF slag to characterize the physical, geometrical, mechanical and chemical properties as required by UNI EN specifications, focusing additionally on the volumetric expansion associated with hydration of free CaO and MgO. Five bituminous mixtures of aggregates for flexible road pavement were designed containing up to 40% of EAF slag and were tested to determine Marshall stability and indirect tensile strength. The leaching behaviour of slag samples and bituminous mixtures was evaluated according to the UNI EN leaching test. The tested slag showed satisfactory physical and mechanical properties and a release of pollutants generally below the limits set by the Italian code. Tests on volume stability of fresh materials confirmed that a period of 2-3 months is necessary to reduce effects of oxides hydration. The results of tests performed on bituminous mixtures with EAF slag were comparable with the performance of mixtures containing natural aggregates and the leaching tests provided satisfactory results. PMID:22305201

  20. 30 CFR 716.4 - Special bituminous coal mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM REGULATIONS SPECIAL PERFORMANCE STANDARDS § 716.4 Special bituminous coal mines... may be used if necessary to prevent erosion. (3) Spoil piles will be graded and contoured with no more... of an amendment or revision to the State of Wyoming's regulatory program, regulations, or...

  1. Amenability of Muzret bituminous coal to oil agglomeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahinoglu, E.; Uslu, T. [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mining Engineering, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-12-15

    Laboratory scale agglomeration tests were undertaken to investigate the amenability of Muzret (Yusufeli-Artvin) bituminous coal to oil agglomeration. Kerosene was extensively used as oil in the tests. In addition, fuel oil, diesel oil, and hazelnut oil were also used in order to determine the effect of oil type. The effects of the parameters including coal content, kerosene content, agglomeration time, coal particle size, pH, oil type, and agitation rate, on the combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction, were investigated. It was found that Muzret bituminous coal could be readily cleaned by oil agglomeration with substantial reductions in ash and pyritic sulphur content. Maximum combustible matter recovery, ash reduction and pyritic sulphur reduction were achieved to be 85.54%, 59.98%, and 85.17%, respectively. (author)

  2. Performance of PAHs emission from bituminous coal combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严建华; 尤孝方; 李晓东; 倪明江; 尹雪峰; 岑可法

    2004-01-01

    Carcinogenic and mutagenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) generated in coal combustion have caused great environmental health concern. Seventeen PAHs (16 high priority PAHs recommended by USEPA plus Benzo[e]pyrene) present in five raw bituminous coals and released during bituminous coal combustion were studied. The effects of combustion temperature, gas atmosphere, and chlorine content of raw coal on PAHs formation were investigated. Two additives (copper and cupric oxide) were added when the coal was burned. The results indicated that significant quantities of PAHs were produced from incomplete combustion of coal pyrolysis products at high temperature, and that temperature is an important causative factor of PAHs formation. PAHs concentrations decrease with the increase of chlorine content in oxygen or in nitrogen atmosphere. Copper and cupric oxide additives can promote PAHs formation (especially the multi-ring PAHs) during coal combustion.

  3. Identification of aggregates for Tennessee bituminous surface courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, Heather Jean

    Tennessee road construction is a major venue for federal and state spending. Tax dollars each year go to the maintenance and construction of roads. One aspect of highway construction that affects the public is the safety of its state roads. There are many factors that affect the safety of a given road. One factor that was focused on in this research was the polish resistance capabilities of aggregates. Several pre-evaluation methods have been used in the laboratory to predict what will happen in a field situation. A new pre-evaluation method was invented that utilized AASHTO T 304 procedure upscaled to accommodate surface bituminous aggregates. This new method, called the Tennessee Terminal Textural Condition Method (T3CM), was approved by Tennessee Department of Transportation to be used as a pre-evaluation method on bituminous surface courses. It was proven to be operator insensitive, repeatable, and an accurate indication of particle shape and texture. Further research was needed to correlate pre-evaluation methods to the current field method, ASTM E 274-85 Locked Wheel Skid Trailer. In this research, twenty-five in-place bituminous projects and eight source evaluations were investigated. The information gathered would further validate the T3CM and find the pre-evaluation method that best predicted the field method. In addition, new sources of aggregates for bituminous surface courses were revealed. The results of this research have shown T3CM to be highly repeatable with an overall coefficient of variation of 0.26% for an eight sample repeatability test. It was the best correlated pre-evaluation method with the locked wheel skid trailer method giving an R2 value of 0.3946 and a Pearson coefficient of 0.710. Being able to predict field performance of aggregates prior to construction is a powerful tool capable of saving time, money, labor, and possibly lives.

  4. Contribution to improving of the sands-bitumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddadi, S.; Saoula, S.; Muñoz, M. E.; Santamaría, A.

    2012-09-01

    Algeria is a country made up of about 75% desert. It is a country rich in sand dune. Roads made in these regions have had very significant damage. Their repairs are very expensive because there are generally isolated roads and supporting low traffic. Aggregates represent about 94% of the asphalt mixture. Aggregate quarries which have good characteristics for bituminous concrete are found in northern Algeria. The transport of these aggregates from north to south is extremely expensive. This makes the project to the south of Algeria very expensive. In order to overcome the lack of aggregates, the use of local materials becomes a necessity. In this study we were interested in the sand dunes in two regions of southern Algeria: El-Oued and Ouargla. The objective of this work is to find ways to improve the mechanical properties of these sands to increase the life of pavements with low traffic in these areas. We have associated with these sands: crushed sand of the north, cement, lime and sulfur. Hubbard Field test, Marshall test, and Duriez test were applied to the different bituminous mixtures. This study showed that some associations have given encouraging results.

  5. Sorption of aqueous phosphorus onto bituminous and lignitous coal ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Jinying; Kirk, Donald W. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Jia, Charles Q. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)], E-mail: cqjia@chem-eng.toronto.edu; Liu Xinan [College of Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing (China)

    2007-09-05

    Aiming at the development of a phosphorus removal technology for waste water, phosphate (PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}) retention behavior of bituminous and lignitous coal ashes was investigated using a batch reactor. Ash samples, including fresh and weathered fly and bottom ashes, were studied for their sorption isotherms and reversibility. Fly ashes had a much higher phosphate retention capacity (4000-30,000 mg P/kg) than bottom ashes (15-600 mg P/kg). Lignitous coal ashes were more capable of retaining phosphate than bituminous coal ashes. The retention process was largely irreversible, and the irreversibility increased with the increase in the retention capacity. Weathering enlarged the retention capacity of the bituminous bottom ash, but substantially lowered that of the fly ash, likely due to the difference in the weather-induced changes between the fly and bottom ashes. Sorption isotherms of fly ashes were found to be adequately represented by the Langmuir model while those of bottom ashes fitted better to the Freundlich model. Concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} in the aqueous phase were measured at the end of sorption and desorption experiments, and were compared with solubilities of three calcium phosphate minerals. The aqueous solutions were saturated or super-saturated with respect to tricalcium phosphate (Ca{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}) and hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}OH), and slightly under-saturated with respect to amorphous calcium phosphate. It is concluded that precipitation of calcium phosphate is the predominant mechanism for phosphate retention by coal ash under the conditions studied. There is a strong and positive correlation between alkalinity and phosphate sorption capacity. Consequently, acid neutralization capacity (ANC) can be used as an indicator of phosphate sorption capacity of coal ashes.

  6. Study of thermal reactivity during bituminization of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work deals with the study of chemical reactions and phases transitions which can occur between magnesium nitrate, sodium nitrate, cobalt sulphur product, and nickel potassium ferrocyanide, when they are heated together during bituminization process of nuclear waste. The applied methodology associates a few techniques: temperature, enthalpy, and kinetics of reaction are determined by calorimetry, reaction products are characterised by chemical analyses, mass spectrometry and XRD analysis. Three fields of temperature and energy are observed in function of composition (one compound or a mixture of compounds). The study of reactions between NaNO3 and cobalt sulphur product shows that the presence of water has got an effect on reaction temperature. The study of Mg(NO3)2, 6 H2O and CoS shows an overlapping of different signals, and that the reaction rate is very slow (a few hours). (author)

  7. Leaching tests of simulated Cogema bituminized waste form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, S.; Akimoto, T.; Iida, Y.; Nagano, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The leaching behavior of COGEMA-type bituminized radioactive waste was studied for the atmospheric and anaerobic conditions. Active and inactive laboratory-scale bitumen samples, including two major salts of NaNO{sub 3} and BaSO{sub 4}, were contacted with deionized water, an alkaline solution (0.01 mol/L Ca(OH){sub 2} or 0.03 mol/L KOH), or a saline solution (0.5 mol/L KCl). It was found that the release of salt was reduced in the Ca(OH){sub 2} solution compared with deionized water under the atmospheric conditions. No significant difference in the concentrations of {sup 237}Np in leachants contacted with the samples for 7 days was observed between the atmospheric and the anaerobic conditions. (authors)

  8. Steam and air plasma gasification of bituminous coal and petrocoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Messerle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a numerical analysis and experimental investigation of two very different solid fuels, low-rank bituminous coal of 40 % ash content and petrocoke of 3 % ash content, gasification under steam and air plasma conditions with an aim of producing synthesis gas. Numerical analysis was fulfilled using the software package TERRA for equilibrium computation. Using the results of the numerical simulation, experiments on plasma steam gasification of the petrocoke and air and steam gasification of the coal were conducted in an original installation. Nominal power of the plasma installation is 100 kWe and sum consumption of the reagents is up to 20 kg/h. High quality synthesis gas was produced in the experiments on solid fuels plasma gasification. It has been found that the synthesis gas content at about 97.4 vol.% can be produced. Comparison between the numerical and experimental results showed satisfactory agreement. 

  9. Investigation of the combustion characteristics of Zonguldak bituminous coal using DTA and DTG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Okutan, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-06-21

    Combustion characteristics of coking, semicoking, and noncoking Turkish bituminous coal samples from Zonguldak basin were investigated applying differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG) techniques. Results were compared with that of the coke from Zonguldak bituminous coal, a Turkish lignite sample from Soma, and a Siberian bituminous coal sample. The thermal data from both techniques showed some differences depending on the proximate analyses of the samples. Noncombustible components of the volatile matter led to important changes in thermal behavior. The data front both methods were, evaluated jointly, and some thermal properties were interpreted considering these methods in a complementary combination.

  10. Effect of Cement on Properties of Over-Burnt Brick Bituminous Concrete Mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dipankar; Pal, Manish

    2016-06-01

    The present investigation is carried out to propose the use of cement coated over burnt brick aggregate in the preparation of bituminous concrete mix. The effect of cement on various mechanical properties such as Marshall stability, flow, Marshall quotient (stability to flow ratio), indirect tensile strength, stripping, rutting and fatigue life of bituminous concrete overlay has been evaluated. In this study, different cement percentages such as 2, 3, 4 and 5 % by weight of aggregate have been mixed with Over Burnt Brick Aggregate (OBBA). The laboratory results indicate that bituminous concrete prepared by 4 % cement coated OBBA gives the highest Marshall stability. The bituminous concrete mix with 4 % cement shows considerable improvement in various mechanical properties of the mix compared to the plain OBBA concrete mix.

  11. State of the art report on bituminized waste forms of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, research and development results on the bituminization of radioactive wastes are closely reviewed, especially those regarding waste treatment technologies, waste solidifying procedures and the characteristics of asphalt and solidified forms. A new concept of the bituminization method is suggested in this report which can improve the characteristics of solidified forms. Stable solid forms with high leach resistance, high thermal resistance and good compression strength were produced by the suggested bituminization method, in which spent polyethylene from agricultural farms was added. This report can help further research and development of improved bituminized forms of radioactive wastes that will maintain long term stabilities in disposal sites. (author). 59 refs., 19 tabs., 18 figs

  12. State of the art report on bituminized waste forms of radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Kook; Shon, Jong Sik; Kim, Kil Jeong; Lee, Kang Moo; Jung, In Ha

    1998-03-01

    In this report, research and development results on the bituminization of radioactive wastes are closely reviewed, especially those regarding waste treatment technologies, waste solidifying procedures and the characteristics of asphalt and solidified forms. A new concept of the bituminization method is suggested in this report which can improve the characteristics of solidified forms. Stable solid forms with high leach resistance, high thermal resistance and good compression strength were produced by the suggested bituminization method, in which spent polyethylene from agricultural farms was added. This report can help further research and development of improved bituminized forms of radioactive wastes that will maintain long term stabilities in disposal sites. (author). 59 refs., 19 tabs., 18 figs

  13. Industrial sand and gravel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolley, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic production of industrial sand and gravel in 2012 was about 49.5 Mt (55 million st), increasing 13 percent compared with that of 2011. Some important end uses for industrial sand and gravel include abrasives, filtration, foundry, glassmaking, hydraulic fracturing sand (frac sand) and silicon metal applications.

  14. Natural gas storage with activated carbon from a bituminous coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jielun; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Lizzio, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    Granular activated carbons ( -20 + 100 mesh; 0.149-0.84 mm) were produced by physical activation and chemical activation with KOH from an Illinois bituminous coal (IBC-106) for natural gas storage. The products were characterized by BET surface area, micropore volume, bulk density, and methane adsorption capacities. Volumetric methane adsorption capacities (Vm/Vs) of some of the granular carbons produced by physical activation are about 70 cm3/cm3 which is comparable to that of BPL, a commercial activated carbon. Vm/Vs values above 100 cm3/cm3 are obtainable by grinding the granular products to - 325 mesh (adsorption capacity increases with increasing pore surface area and micropore volume when normalizing with respect to sample bulk volume. Compared with steam-activated carbons, granular carbons produced by KOH activation have higher micropore volume and higher methane adsorption capacities (g/g). Their volumetric methane adsorption capacities are lower due to their lower bulk densities. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  16. The hydrogasification of lignite and sub-bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, B.; Fallon, P. T.; Steinberg, M.

    1981-02-01

    A North Dakota lignite and a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal have been hydrogenated at up to 900°C and 2500 psi hydrogen pressure. Yields of gaseous hydrocarbons and aromatic liquids have been studied as a function of temperature, pressure, residence time, feed rates and H2/coal ratio. Coal feed rates in excess of 10 lb/hr have been achieved in the 1 in. I. D.×8 ft reactor and methane concentration as high as 55% have been observed. A four-step reaction model was developed for the production and decomposition of the hydrocarbon products. A single object function formulated from the weighted errors for the four dependent process, variables, CH4, C2H6, BTX, and oil yields, was minimized using a program containing three independent iterative techniques. The results of the nonlinear regression analysis for lignite show that a first-order chemical reaction model with respect to C conversion satisfactorily describes the dilute phase hydrogenation. The activation energy for the initial products formation was estimated to be 42,700 cal/gmole and the power of hydrogen partial pressure was found to be +0.14. The overall correlation coefficient was 0.83. The mechanism, the rate expressions, and the design curves developed can be used for scale-up and reactor design.

  17. Bituminous reference document: synthesis of knowledge on the long time behavior of bituminous packages; Dossier de reference bitume: synthese des connaissances sur le comportement a long terme des colis bitumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sercombe, J.; Adenot, F.; Vistoli, P.P.; Parraud, S.; Riglet-Martial, C.; Gwinner, B.; Felines, I.; Tiffreau, C.; Libert, M

    2004-07-01

    This document is a synthesis of the knowledge acquired at the CEA on the behavior of bituminous packages. In this framework, the CEA studied bituminous packages in generic conditions of a package lifetime. The main factors, the evolution mechanisms and influential parameters have been determined and quantitative s simulation have been developed. After a description of the main initial bituminous packages characterizations, the evolutions in saturated and un-saturated environment are exposed. (A.L.B.)

  18. Effect of thickness variation of bituminous layer in the structural responses of flexible pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pavan Vidotto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a sensitivity analysis was performed to investigate the effect of thickness variation of bituminous layer in the structural responses of flexible pavements and, therefore in performance. For this, it used traffic data from a weigh station located at Km 28 of the Immigrants Highway, at state of Sao Paulo, whose data collection was realized in 2008. The loads deriving from traffic were applied to the computational program ELSYM5 to obtain structural responses related to damage such as fatigue cracks and rutting. With these values, the damage factors were calculated and then the sensitivity analysis related to the thickness variation of bituminous layer was performed. Through the obtained results was concluded that the variation of thickness of bituminous layer have an influence on structural responses, and that damage factors related to fatigue cracks were more sensitive than those factors related to rutting.

  19. Global market trade policy analysis for petroleum oils and oils obtained from bituminous minerals, crude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagheri, F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on surveying the custom tariffs imposed on the world export market of Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude. We obtained the data according to the most updated available data provided online by UNCTAD and World Bank. The results indicate that none of the 142 countries in the world market of this product have imposed non-tariff trade barriers on the import of Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude. The developed countries and the countries with transition economies are the main world import partners. European Union, United States, China, Japan, South Korea, Canada, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, South Africa, Australia, Turkey, Brazil, Sweden and Belarus are the examples and have imposed low custom tariffs on Petroleum Oils and Oils Obtained from Bituminous Minerals, Crude.

  20. Safety assessment for the bituminization facility of the medium-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessment for the home-made bituminization facility of the medium-level waste during hot test is made. The average external dose equivalent per month is 0.136 x 10-2 Sv. The radioactive substance released into the environment is much lower than the permissible limit. The danger of burning and exploding of the bituminized product is avoided because the operation temperature is controlled strictly below 170 C degree. The report also briefly describes the structural characteristic of the facility, the main process and radiation protection and safety measures

  1. Project and design of apparatus and equipment of pilot plant experimental bituminization line PS 44 EBO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifications are described made in the design of major components of the pilot plant experimental bituminization line involving: the mixing equipment, the film rotor evaporator, the calciner, and various transport mechanisms for handling drums and containers. The difficulty and complexity of the problem which Kralovopolska strojirna Brno, the end supplier of the bituminization line, will have to tackle is evident mainly from the case of bridge cranes, which feed the line, and the full-portal gantry crane which handles the containers and drums at regional sites of radioactive waste disposal. (Z.M.)

  2. Installation in the A-1 plant of an experimental bituminization line by VUCHZ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the termination of the experimental operation of the bituminization line at the Research Institute for Chemical Installations in Brno, the line was dismantled and transferred to the nucler power plant in Jaslovske Bohunice. The installation of the line, the layout of the assemblies are described and the results of tests with non-radioactive simulated wastes and actual radioactive wastes briefly described. An amount of 3.2 m3 of actual radioactive wastes from the V-1 nuclear power plant was processed in the tests. The results confirmed the suitability of bituminization for processing liquid radioactive wastes from WWER nuclear power plants. (Z.M.)

  3. Noise Reduction Properties of an Experimental Bituminous Slurry with Crumb Rubber Incorporated by the Dry Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Bueno

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, cold technology for asphalt pavement in the field of road construction is considered as an alternative solution to conventional procedures from both an economic and environmental point of view. Among these techniques, bituminous slurry surfacing is obtaining an important role due to the properties of the obtained wearing course. The functional performance of this type of surfaces is directly related to its rough texture. Nevertheless, this parameter has a significant influence on the tire/road noise generation. To reduce this undesirable effect on the sound performance, new designs of elastic bituminous slurries have been developed. Within the FENIX project, this work presents the acoustical characterization of an experimental bituminous slurry with crumb rubber from wasted automobile tires incorporated by the dry process. The obtained results show that, under controlled operational parameters, the close proximity sound levels associated to the experimental slurry are considerably lower than those emitted by a conventional slurry wearing course. However, after one year of supporting traffic loads and different weather conditions, the evaluated bituminous slurry, although it conserves the original noise reduction properties in relation to the conventional one, noticeably increases the generated sound emission. Therefore, it is required to continue improving the design of experimental surfaces in order to enhance its long-term performance.

  4. 8th RILEM International Symposium on Testing and Characterization of Sustainable and Innovative Bituminous Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Partl, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    This work presents the results of RILEM TC 237-SIB (Testing and characterization of sustainable innovative bituminous materials and systems). The papers have been selected for publication after a rigorous peer review process and will be an invaluable source to outline and clarify the main directions of present and future research and standardization for bituminous materials and pavements. The following topics are covered: - Characterization of binder-aggregate interaction - Innovative testing of bituminous binders, additives and modifiers - Durability and aging of asphalt pavements - Mixture design and compaction analysis - Environmentally sustainable materials and technologies - Advances in laboratory characterization of bituminous materials - Modeling of road materials and pavement performance prediction - Field measurement and in-situ characterization - Innovative materials for reinforcement and interlayer systems - Cracking and damage characterization of asphalt pavements - Rec...

  5. Towards an Accurate Stress Dependant Time & Frequency Domain VE Response Model for Bituminous Binders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldekidan, M.F.; Huurman, M.; Pronk, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Linear viscoelastic properties of bituminous binders for short loading times are analyzed using dynamic mechanical analysis methods. Dynamic Shear Rheometer (DSR) test with parallel plate (PP) configuration is widely used for this purpose. Due to the complex stress distribution over the cross-sectio

  6. Influence green sand system by core sand additions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Špirutová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, about two thirds of iron alloys casting (especially for graphitizing alloys of iron are produced into green sand systems with usually organically bonded cores. Separation of core sands from the green sand mixture is very difficult, after pouring. The core sand concentration increase due to circulation of green sand mixture in a closed circulation system. Furthermore in some foundries, core sands have been adding to green sand systems as a replacement for new sands. The goal of this contribution is: “How the green sand systems are influenced by core sands?”This effect is considered by determination of selected technological properties and degree of green sand system re-bonding. From the studies, which have been published yet, there is not consistent opinion on influence of core sand dilution on green sand system properties. In order to simulation of the effect of core sands on the technological properties of green sands, there were applied the most common used technologies of cores production, which are based on bonding with phenolic resin. Core sand concentration added to green sand system, was up to 50 %. Influence of core sand dilution on basic properties of green sand systems was determined by evaluation of basic industrial properties: moisture, green compression strength and splitting strength, wet tensile strength, mixture stability against staling and physical-chemistry properties (pH, conductivity, and loss of ignition. Ratio of active betonite by Methylene blue test was also determined.

  7. Recycling of petroleum-contaminated sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, R; Ba-Omar, M; Pillay, A E; Roos, G; al-Hamdi, A

    2001-08-01

    The environmental impact of using petroleum-contaminated sand (PCS) as a substitute in asphalt paving mixtures was examined. An appreciable component of PCS is oily sludge, which is found as the dregs in oil storage tanks and is also produced as a result of oil spills on clean sand. The current method for the disposal of oily sludge is land farming. However, this method has not been successful as an oil content of tests and environmental studies were conducted to establish the integrity of the materials containing the recycled sludge. These included physical and chemical characterization of the sludge itself, and an assessment of the mechanical properties of materials containing 0%, 5%, 22% and 50% oily sludge. The blended mixtures were subjected to special tests, such as Marshall testing and the determination of stability and flow properties. The experimental results indicated that mixtures containing up to 22% oily sludge could meet the necessary criteria for a specific asphalt concrete wearing course or bituminous base course. To maximize the assay from the recycled material, the environmental assessment was restricted to the 50% oily sludge mixture. Leachates associated with this particular mixture were assayed for total organic residue and certain hazardous metal contaminants. The results revealed that the organics were negligible, and the concentrations of the metals were not significant. Thus, no adverse environmental impact should be anticipated from the use of the recycled product. Our research showed that the disposal of oily sludge in asphalt paving mixtures could possibly yield considerable savings per tonne of asphalt concrete, and concurrently minimize any direct impact on the environment.

  8. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Bødker, Lars Bødker

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar...

  9. Baskarp Sand No. 15

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Marianne; Hedegaard, Jette

    The Soil Mechanics Laboratory has started performing tests with a new sand, Baskarp No 15. Baskarp No 15 is a graded sand from Sweden. The shapes of the largest grains are round, while the small grains have sharp edges. The main part of of Baskarp No 15 is quarts, but it also contains feldspar an...

  10. A Method to Estimate the Dynamic Displacement and Stress of a Multi-layered Pavement with Bituminous or Concrete Materials

    OpenAIRE

    LU, ZHENG; Yao, Hailin; Zhang, JingBo

    2014-01-01

    In this research work, a method to estimate the dynamic characteristics of a multilayered pavement with bituminous or concrete materials is proposed. A mechanical model is established to investigate the dynamic displacement and stress of the multi-layered pavement structure. Both the flexible and the rigid pavements, corresponding to bituminous materials and concrete materials, respectively, are studied. The theoretical solutions of the multi-layered pavement structure are deduced considering...

  11. Study on Plastic Coated Overburnt Brick Aggregate as an Alternative Material for Bituminous Road Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Dipankar; Pal, Manish; Sarkar, Ashoke K.

    2016-01-01

    There are different places in India where natural stone aggregates are not available for constructional work. Plastic coated OBBA can solve the problem of shortage of stone aggregate to some extent. The engineers are always encouraged to use locally available materials. The present investigation is carried out to evaluate the plastic coated OBBA as an alternative material for bituminous road construction. Shredded waste plastics are mixed with OBBA in different percentages as 0.38, 0.42, 0.46...

  12. Modelling the quasi-static behaviour of bituminous material using a cohesive zone model

    OpenAIRE

    Tabakovic, Amir; Karac, Aleksandar; Ivankovic, Alojz; Gibney, Amanda; McNally, Ciaran; Gilchrist, M. D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of a cohesive zone model for simulating the performance of bituminous material subjected to quasistatic loading. The Dugdale traction law was implemented within a finite volume code in order to simulate the binder course mortar material response when subjected to indirect tensile loading. A uniaxial tensile test and a threepoint bend test were employed to determine initial stress-strain curves at different test rates and the cohesive zone parameters (...

  13. Study on Plastic Coated Overburnt Brick Aggregate as an Alternative Material for Bituminous Road Construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are different places in India where natural stone aggregates are not available for constructional work. Plastic coated OBBA can solve the problem of shortage of stone aggregate to some extent. The engineers are always encouraged to use locally available materials. The present investigation is carried out to evaluate the plastic coated OBBA as an alternative material for bituminous road construction. Shredded waste plastics are mixed with OBBA in different percentages as 0.38, 0.42, 0.46, 0.50, 0.54, and 0.60 of the weight of brick aggregates. Marshall Method of mix design is carried out to find the optimum bitumen content of such bituminous concrete mix prepared by plastic coated OBBA. Bulk density, Marshall Stability, flow, Marshall Quotient, ITS, TSR, stripping, fatigue life, and deformations have been determined accordingly. Marshall Stability value of 0.54 percent of plastic mix is comparatively higher than the other mixes except 0.60 percent of plastic mix. Test results are within the prescribed limit for 0.54 percent of plastic mix. There is a significant reduction in rutting characteristics of the same plastic mix. The fatigue life of the mix is also significantly higher. Thus plastic coated OBBA is found suitable in construction of bituminous concrete road.

  14. The microstructure of petroleum vacuum residue films for bituminous concrete: a microscopy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourty, E D; Tamminga, A Y; Michels, M A J; Vellinga, W-P; Meijer, H E H

    2011-02-01

    Selected carbon-rich refinery residues ('binders') mixed with mineral particles can form composite materials ('bituminous concrete') with bulk mechanical properties comparable to those of cement concrete. The microstructural mechanism underlying the remarkable composite properties has been related to the appearance of a rigid percolating network consisting of asphaltenes and mineral particles [Wilbrink M. et al. (2005) Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured visco-elastic matrix. Phys. Rev. E71, 031402]. In this paper, we explore the microstructure of thin binder films of varying thickness with a number of microscopic characterization techniques, and attempt to relate the observed microstructure to the distinctive mechanical behaviour. Two binders, only one of which has been proven to be suitable for bituminous concrete were investigated, and their microstructure compared. Both binders show the formation of asphaltene aggregates. The binder suitable for bituminous concrete is distinguished by the fact that the asphaltenes show a stronger tendency towards such aggregation, due to a higher concentration and less stabilization in the maltene phase. They also show a clear affinity to other species (such as waxes) and may act as nucleation sites for crystals and aggregates of those species. PMID:21118207

  15. JV Task 126 - Mercury Control Technologies for Electric Utilities Burning Bituminous Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jason Laumb; John Kay; Michael Jones; Brandon Pavlish; Nicholas Lentz; Donald McCollor; Kevin Galbreath

    2009-03-29

    The EERC developed an applied research consortium project to test cost-effective mercury (Hg) control technologies for utilities burning bituminous coals. The project goal was to test innovative Hg control technologies that have the potential to reduce Hg emissions from bituminous coal-fired power plants by {ge}90% at costs of one-half to three-quarters of current estimates for activated carbon injection (ACI). Hg control technology evaluations were performed using the EERC's combustion test facility (CTF). The CTF was fired on pulverized bituminous coals at 550,000 Btu/hr (580 MJ/hr). The CTF was configured with the following air pollution control devices (APCDs): selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFDS). The Hg control technologies investigated as part of this project included ACI (three Norit Americas, Inc., and eleven Envergex sorbents), elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation catalysts (i.e., the noble metals in Hitachi Zosen, Cormetech, and Hitachi SCR catalysts), sorbent enhancement additives (SEAs) (a proprietary EERC additive, trona, and limestone), and blending with a Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. These Hg control technologies were evaluated separately, and many were also tested in combination.

  16. Continuous bench-scale slurry catalyst testing direct coal liquefaction rawhide sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, R.F.; Coless, L.A.; Davis, S.M. [and others

    1995-12-31

    In 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research to demonstrate a dispersed catalyst system using a combination of molybdenum and iron precursors for direct coal liquefaction. This dispersed catalyst system was successfully demonstrated using Black Thunder sub-bituminous coal at Wilsonville, Alabama by Southern Electric International, Inc. The DOE sponsored research continues at Exxon Research and Development Laboratories (ERDL). A six month continuous bench-scale program using ERDL`s Recycle Coal Liquefaction Unit (RCLU) is planned, three months in 1994 and three months in 1995. The initial conditions in RCLU reflect experience gained from the Wilsonville facility in their Test Run 263. Rawhide sub-bituminous coal which is similar to the Black Thunder coal tested at Wilsonville was used as the feed coal. A slate of five dispersed catalysts for direct coal liquefaction of Rawhide sub-bituminous coal has been tested. Throughout the experiments, the molybdenum addition rate was held constant at 100 wppm while the iron oxide addition rate was varied from 0.25 to 1.0 weight percent (dry coal basis). This report covers the 1994 operations and accomplishments.

  17. Sand and Gravel Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  18. Oil sands tax expenditures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oil sands are a strategic Canadian resource for which federal and provincial governments provide financial incentives to develop and exploit. This report describes the Oil Sands Tax Expenditure Model (OSTEM) developed to estimate the size of the federal income tax expenditure attributed to the oil sands industry. Tax expenditures are tax concessions which are used as alternatives to direct government spending for achieving government policy objectives. The OSTEM was developed within the business Income Tax Division of Canada's Department of Finance. Data inputs for the model were obtained from oil sands developers and Natural Resources Canada. OSTEM calculates annual revenues, royalties and federal taxes at project levels using project-level projections of capital investment, operating expenses and production. OSTEM calculates tax expenditures by comparing taxes paid under different tax regimes. The model also estimates the foregone revenue as a percentage of capital investment. Total tax expenditures associated with investment in the oil sands are projected to total $820 million for the period from 1986 to 2030, representing 4.6 per cent of the total investment. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  19. Lund Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Jakobsen, Finn Rosendal

    During the last 15 years the Geotechnical Engineering Group (GEG) at Aalborg University has performed triaxial tests with a sand called Lund No 0. Lund No 0 is a graded sand from a gravel pit near Horsens in Denmark. For the classification of the sand the following tests have been performed: Sieve...... test, Grain density, ds, Maximum, emax, and minimum, emin, void ratio. The strength parameters of Lund No 0 are detennined by some drained and undrained triaxial tests in the Danish Triaxial Cell. The Danish Triaxial Cell prescribes smooth pressure heads and specimens with equal height and diameter....... Four series with Id equal to 0.92, 0.87 0.76 and 0.55 have been performed....

  20. UK Frac Sand Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Although still just a glimmer in the gas man’s eye, the prospect of shale hydrocarbon (oil and gas) development in the UK has many companies thinking about the industrial minerals it will require. Chief amongst these is silica sand which is used as a ‘proppant’ in the hydraulic fracturing, or ‘fracking’, of shales to help release the gas. The UK has large resources of sand and sandstone, of which only a small proportion have the necessary technical properties that classify them as ‘silica san...

  1. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-08-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  2. Time dependent viscoelastic rheological response of pure, modified and synthetic bituminous binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airey, G. D.; Grenfell, J. R. A.; Apeagyei, A.; Subhy, A.; Lo Presti, D.

    2016-04-01

    Bitumen is a viscoelastic material that exhibits both elastic and viscous components of response and displays both a temperature and time dependent relationship between applied stresses and resultant strains. In addition, as bitumen is responsible for the viscoelastic behaviour of all bituminous materials, it plays a dominant role in defining many of the aspects of asphalt road performance, such as strength and stiffness, permanent deformation and cracking. Although conventional bituminous materials perform satisfactorily in most highway pavement applications, there are situations that require the modification of the binder to enhance the properties of existing asphalt material. The best known form of modification is by means of polymer modification, traditionally used to improve the temperature and time susceptibility of bitumen. Tyre rubber modification is another form using recycled crumb tyre rubber to alter the properties of conventional bitumen. In addition, alternative binders (synthetic polymeric binders as well as renewable, environmental-friendly bio-binders) have entered the bitumen market over the last few years due to concerns over the continued availability of bitumen from current crudes and refinery processes. This paper provides a detailed rheological assessment, under both temperature and time regimes, of a range of conventional, modified and alternative binders in terms of the materials dynamic (oscillatory) viscoelastic response. The rheological results show the improved viscoelastic properties of polymer- and rubber-modified binders in terms of increased complex shear modulus and elastic response, particularly at high temperatures and low frequencies. The synthetic binders were found to demonstrate complex rheological behaviour relative to that seen for conventional bituminous binders.

  3. Investigation of activity release from bituminized intermediate-level waste forms under thermal stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the consequences of a fire during fabrication, intermediate storage and transport of bituminized NaNO3 waste forms, the fractions of plutonium released from the waste forms were assessed. For this purpose, laboratory tests were made with PuO2-containing specimens as well as a field test with specimens containing Eu2O3. By the evaluation of plutonium release in the laboratory and by the determination of the total sodium release and the relative Eu/Na release in the field tests the plutonium release can be deduced from full-scale specimens. The results show that for bituminized waste forms with high NaNO3 contents (approx. 36 wt%) the average plutonium release obtained in laboratory testing is 15%. In the field tests (IAEA fire test conditions) an average Eu release of 8% was found. These results justify the statement that also for waste forms in open 175 L drum inserts a maximum plutonium release of about 15% can be expected. From the time-dependence of Eu/Na release in the field tests an induction period of 15-20 minutes between the start of testing and the first Na/Eu release can be derived. The maximum differential Na/Eu release occurs after a test period of 45 to 60 minutes duration and after 90 to 105 minutes (tests K2 and K4, respectively); after that time also the highest temperatures in the products are measured. The release values were determined for products in open 175 L drum inserts which in this form are not eligible for intermediate and ultimate storage. For bituminized waste forms in concrete packages (lost concrete shieldings) a delayed increase in temperature to only 70-80 deg. C takes place (4-5 hours after extinction of the fire) if the fire lasts 45 minutes. The concrete package remains intact under test conditions. This means that activity release from bituminized waste forms packaged in this way can be ruled out in the case under consideration. (author)

  4. Adsorption of SO2 on bituminous coal char and activated carbon fiber prepared from phenol formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBarr, Joseph A.; Lizzio, Anthony A.; Daley, Michael A.

    1996-01-01

    Carbon-based materials are used commercially to remove SO2 from coal combustion flue gases. Historically, these materials have consisted of granular activated carbons prepared from lignite or bituminous coal. Recent studies have reported that activated carbon fibers (ACFs) may have potential in this application due to their relatively high SO2 adsorption capacity. In this paper, a comparison of SO2 adsorption for both coal-based carbons and ACFs is presented, as well as ideas on carbon properties that may influence SO2 adsorption

  5. Extracting Oil From Tar Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, L. B.; Daly, D.

    1984-01-01

    Recovery of oil from tar sands possible by batch process, using steam produced by solar heater. In extraction process, solar heater provides steam for heating solvent boiler. Boiling solvent removes oil from tar sands in Soxhlet extractor.

  6. A Method to Estimate the Dynamic Displacement and Stress of a Multi-layered Pavement with Bituminous or Concrete Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng LU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work, a method to estimate the dynamic characteristics of a multilayered pavement with bituminous or concrete materials is proposed. A mechanical model is established to investigate the dynamic displacement and stress of the multi-layered pavement structure. Both the flexible and the rigid pavements, corresponding to bituminous materials and concrete materials, respectively, are studied. The theoretical solutions of the multi-layered pavement structure are deduced considering the compatibility condition at the interface of the structural layers. By introducing FFT (Fast Fourier Transform algorithm, some numerical results are presented. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental result implied that the proposed method is reasonable in predicting the stress and displacement of a multi-layered pavement with bituminous or concrete materials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6071

  7. Assessing radioactive concentrates and waste vapor condensate in solidifying radioactive wastes by bituminization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief overview is presented of chemical and radiochemical methods used in the world for the analysis of the concentrate of liquid radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants destined for bituminization. Most methods are also suitable for an analysis of the condensate of waste vapors produced in bituminization. The methods of analysis of the radioactive concentrate from the V-1 nuclear power plant in Jaslovske Bohunice and of the waste vapors condensate were developed and tested in practice. Gross gamma activity was measured using a well-type Na(Tl) scintillation detector, the content of radionuclides was determined using semiconductor Ge(Li) spectrometry. The concentration of boric acid in the concentrate was determined by titration with mannite; in the condensate, using spectrophotometry with curcumine. The content of nitrates in both the concentrate and the condensate was determined spectrophotometrically using salicylic acid, the content of nitrites was determined by spectrophotometry using sulfanilic acid and α-naphthylamine. Carbonates and chlorides were determined by titration, sodium and potassium by flame photometry. The content of organic acids was measured by gravimetry of extracted methyl esters, the content of surfactants by spectrophotometry. Infrared spectrophotometry was used in determining hydrocarbons in the waste vapor condensate. The measured value range and the measurement errors are shown for each method. (A.K.)

  8. Chemical activation of bituminous coal for hampering oligomerization of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Liang; Sorial, George A

    2011-12-15

    Activated carbons prepared by KOH activation of bituminous coal were studied for hampering oligomerization of phenolic compounds on its surface. A total of 24 activated carbons with different microporosity and BET surface area were created. The effect of the different variables of the activation process (KOH/bituminous coal ratio, heating temperature, activation time, and flow rate of nitrogen gas) on critical carbon parameters was analyzed. The impact of activated carbon on oligomerization was examined by conducting isotherm experiments at a neutral pH on Carbon(exp) produced with optimal characteristics and granular activated carbon (GAC) F400 for phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol. These isotherms were collected under anoxic (absence of molecular oxygen) and oxic (presence of molecular oxygen) conditions. The single solute adsorption of phenol, 2-methylphenol and 2-ethylphenol on Carbon(exp) showed no obvious differences between oxic and anoxic environment, which indicated that the Carbon(exp) sample is very effective in hampering the oligomerization of phenolic compounds under oxic conditions. On the other hand, F400, which have lower micropore percentage and BET surface area, significant increases in the adsorptive capacity had been observed when molecular oxygen was present. PMID:22004832

  9. THE HISTORY OF EXPLORATION AND EXPLOITATION OF BITUMINOUS AND KEROGENOUS DEPOSITS IN CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berislav Šebečić

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed thal the first known sedimens of natural bitumen or asphalt in coastal Croatia were exploited as the early moddle ages. Yet authenticated written documents about Vinišće near Trogir derive from no earlier than 1628, about Vrgorac/Paklina from only 1753. By the end of the 18th century, many deposits were discovered in Dalmatia, but it was Škrip on the Island of Brač and Suhi Dolac that were important. The earliest known deposits and occurrences of kerogenous rocks, or bituminous or oil shales, are mentioned as stone or fossil coal in Sovinjak, in the upper course of the River Mirna, and in Rebići in Istria; near Sinj, Slivno not far from the River Neretva, Mirta and near Nerežišće on the Island uf Brač. All if these were well known and described in 1804, while Sovinjak was mentioned in the 16th century. In the article, some of new information derived from mining and geological research into bituminous and kerogenous sediments and deposits are provided (the paper is published in Croatian.

  10. Utilization of Waste Clay from Boron Production in Bituminous Geosynthetic Barrier (GBR-B) Production as Landfill Liner

    OpenAIRE

    Müfide Banar; Yücel Güney; Aysun Özkan; Zerrin Günkaya; Eren Bayrakcı; Derya Ulutaş

    2016-01-01

    Bituminous geomembranes, one type of geosynthetics, include a hot bituminous mixture with mineral filler and reinforcement. In this study, boron production waste clay (CW) was used as filler to produce a geosynthetic barrier with bentonite, waste tire, and bitumen. Bentonite and waste tires were used as auxiliary fillers and bitumen as the binder. CW/bitumen, CW/bentonite/bitumen, and CW/waste tire/bitumen mixtures were prepared by using a laboratory mixer at 100°C. Hot mixtures were extruded...

  11. Biomarker geochemistry of bituminous shale sequence and crude oil in the Ereǧli-Bor Basin (Konya-Niǧde), Central Anatolia, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara-Gulbay, Reyhan; Erdogan, Mert; Korkmaz, Sadettin; Kadinkiz, Gökhan

    2016-04-01

    In the Ereǧli-Bor Basin (Konya-Niǧde), Central Anatolia, bituminous shale sequence with thickness ranging between 72 and 160 m occurs in lacustrine deposits of Upper Miocene-Pliocene age. The live oil has also been observed in this bituminous shale sequence. Rock-Eval/TOC, GC and GC-MS analyses were conducted on selected bituminous shale samples from four borehole (key-12/1, key-12/2, key-12/3 key-12/4) and one crude oil sample from a borehole (key-12/2) in the basin. In this study, organic matter type, maturity and depositional environment of bituminous shale are evaluated and the origin of crude oil is determined by the bituminous shale-crude oil correlation. The total organic carbon (TOC) values of the bituminous shale samples range from 1.21-13.98 wt% with an average TOC value of 4.75wt%. The bituminous shale sequence is characterized by high HI (127-662 mg HC/g TOC) and low OI (7-50 mgCO2/TOC). Tmax varies from 332-419ᵒC. Very low Pr/Ph ratios of bituminous shale (0.09-0.22) are indicative of anoxic depositional conditions. C27 is dominate sterane for bituminous shale and crude oil samples with C27>C29>C28. Normal steranes are more dominant compare to iso- and diasteranes. Ouite high sterane/hopane ratios (1.14-2.70) indicate dominant algal organic matter input for bituminous shale and source rock of crude oil. C31R/hopane ratio for bituminous shale and crude oil samples are very low (0.09-0.13) and these ratio show a lacustrine depositional envirronment for bituminous shale and source rock of crude oil. Sterane and terpane distributions of bituminous shale and crude oil are very similar. A very good correlation in terms of biomarker between bituminous shale and crude oil samples indicate that source rock of crude oil is bituminous shale. The 22S/(22R + 22S) C32 homohopane ratios of bituminous shale and crude oil samples are found to be 0.56 and 0.61, indicating that homohopane isomerization has attained equilibrium and bituminous shale and crude oil are

  12. Booming Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriend, Nathalie

    "Booming" sand dunes are able to produce low-frequency sound that resembles a pure note from a music instrument. The sound has a dominant audible frequency (70-105 Hz) and several higher harmonics and may be heard from far distances away. A natural or induced avalanche from a slip face of the booming dune triggers the emission that may last for several minutes. There are various references in travel literature to the phenomenon, but to date no scientific explanation covered all field observations. This thesis introduces a new physical model that describes the phenomenon of booming dunes. The waveguide model explains the selection of the booming frequency and the amplification of the sound in terms of constructive interference in a confined geometry. The frequency of the booming is a direct function of the dimensions and velocities in the waveguide. The higher harmonics are related to the higher modes of propagation in the waveguide. The experimental validation includes quantitative field research at the booming dunes of the Mojave Desert and Death Valley National Park. Microphone and geophone recordings of the acoustic and seismic emission show a variation of booming frequency in space and time. The analysis of the sensor data quantifies wave propagation characteristics such as speed, dispersion, and nonlinear effects and allows the distinction between the source mechanism of the booming and the booming itself. The migration of sand dunes results from a complicated interplay between dune building, wind regime, and precipitation. The morphological and morphodynamical characteristics of two field locations are analyzed with various geophysical techniques. Ground-penetrating radar images the subsurface structure of the dunes and reveal a natural, internal layering that is directly related to the history of dune migration. The seismic velocity increases abruptly with depth and gradually increases with downhill position due to compaction. Sand sampling shows local

  13. Osmosis-induced swelling of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste in constant total stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcke, E.; Marien, A.; Smets, S.; Li, X.; Mokni, N.; Olivella, S.; Sillen, X.

    2010-11-01

    In geological disposal conditions, contact of Eurobitum bituminized radioactive waste, which contains high amounts of the hygroscopic and highly soluble NaNO 3, with groundwater will result in water uptake and swelling of the waste, and in subsequent leaching of the embedded NaNO 3 and radionuclides. The swelling of and the NaNO 3 leaching from non-radioactive Eurobitum samples, comprised between two stainless steel filters and in contact with 0.1 M KOH, was studied in restricted (semi-confined) swelling conditions, i.e. under a constant total stress, or counterpressure, of 2.2, 3.3, or 4.4 MPa ( i.e. oedometer conditions). Four tests were stopped after hydration times between 800 and 1500 days, and the samples were analyzed by micro-focus X-ray Computer Tomography (μCT) and by Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM). The complete set of data enabled a consistent interpretation of the observations and lead to an improved understanding of the phenomenology of the water uptake, swelling, and NaNO 3 leaching in restricted swelling conditions. Under the studied conditions, the bituminous matrix surrounding the NaNO 3 crystals and pores with NaNO 3 solution behaved as a highly efficient semi-permeable membrane, i.e. osmotic processes occurred. In the main part of the leached layers, a high average NaNO 3 concentration and related to this a high osmotic pressure prevailed, explaining why in the studied range the swelling was not measurably affected by the counterpressure. At the interface with the stainless steel filters, a low permeable re-compressed bitumen layer was formed, contributing to the slow release of NaNO 3 compared to the water uptake rate. A fully coupled Chemo-Hydro-Mechanical (CHM) constitutive model has been developed that integrates the key processes involved and that reproduces satisfactorily the results; this is presented in another work. Combination of the experimental and the modelling study allow to conclude that under semi

  14. Mechanical properties of hot bituminous mixes manufactured with recycled aggregate of Silestone® waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio, M. C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a research project which analyzes the viability of incorporating waste material from decorative quartz solid surfacing in the manufacture of hot bituminous mixes. For this purpose, various bituminous mixes were manufactured with waste aggregate in different percentage. A set of tests were carried out that permitted the characterization of the mechanical behavior of these mixes. The results of these tests were similar to the results obtained when conventional mixes made from virgin quarry aggregate were tested. The results for moisture sensitivity as well as for wheel track rutting on mixes showed the optimal performance of this waste material even under very demanding traffic conditions. Laboratory studies showed that the use of this waste material in the manufacture of bituminous mixes is technically viable and can provide high-quality recycled aggregates at a very low cost, which can be used in the pavement of road.

    Este artículo muestra los resultados de un proyecto de investigación que tiene por objeto analizar la viabilidad de incorporación de residuos procedentes de piedra decorativa en la fabricación de mezclas bituminosas en caliente. Para ello se fabricaron mezclas con áridos reciclados de residuos procedentes de piedra decorativa en distintos porcentajes, realizando un conjunto de ensayos que posibilitaron caracterizar el comportamiento mecánico de dichas mezclas. Los resultados obtenidos fueron similares a los de las mezclas convencionales fabricadas con áridos vírgenes procedentes de cantera. Los valores de resistencia conservada ante la acción del agua y deformación en pista, pusieron de manifiesto la aptitud del residuo incluso ante las condiciones de tráfico más exigentes. Los trabajos realizados en el laboratorio indican que la utilización del residuo en la fabricación de mezclas bituminosas es técnicamente viable, pudiendo obtenerse áridos reciclados de gran calidad y

  15. Sediment mathematical model for sand ridges and sand waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Daming; WANG Xiao; WANG Xin; LI Yangyang

    2016-01-01

    A new theoretical model is formulated to describe internal movement mechanisms of the sand ridges and sand waves based on the momentum equation of a solid-liquid two-phase flow under a shear flow. Coupling this equation with two-dimensional shallow water equations and wave reflection-diffraction equation of mild slope, a two-dimensional coupling model is established and a validation is carried out by observed hydrogeology, tides, waves and sediment. The numerical results are compared with available observations. Satisfactory agreements are achieved. This coupling model is then applied to the Dongfang 1-1 Gas Field area to quantitatively predict the movement and evolution of submarine sand ridges and sand waves. As a result, it is found that the sand ridges and sand waves movement distance increases year by year, but the development trend is stable.

  16. Sanding process and permeability change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, S. [Petroleum Univ., Beijing (China); Yuan, Y.

    2004-07-01

    Sand production is a major problem in the petroleum industry, particularly with operators aggressive production schedules. Sand production occurs when the well fluid under high pumping rate dislodges part of the formation solids causing a continuous flux of formation solids. It increases completion costs, plus it erodes casings, pipes and pumps. However, sand production can also effectively increase well productivity in heavy oil and light oil reservoirs.The challenge in understanding the sanding process lies in developing a mathematical model which can predict the amount of sand production. A quantitative model would allow engineers to understand the unique phenomena and evaluate the impact of sand production on reservoir enhancement. Measures could then be taken to reduce unnecessary costs during field operations. In order to develop such a model, the complicated sanding process equations was divided into a fluid flow and sand transport equation, and into a porous solid matrix deforming and stress concentration or failure function equation. The two types of sand production mechanisms that were presented in this paper were the production of coarse sands under mechanical failure and the production of fine sands under hydro-dynamical erosion. The behaviour of sandstone deformation was examined using the Drucker-Prager constitutive law with cap hardening criterion. The governing equation system was solved using the finite element method. The model was validated using field data for sand production and permeability change obtained from 10 wells in Gudong, China. It was shown that permeability can be modified at any time during the sanding process of a well. Permeability can be reduced by up to 60 per cent of the initial level under depletion production. It was determined that the best way to control permeability decline is to balance the pore pressure. 9 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  17. Physical properties of solid fuel briquettes from bituminous coal waste and biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZARRINGHALAM-MOGHADDAM A; GHOLIPOUR-ZANJANI N; DOROSTIS; VAEZ M

    2011-01-01

    Biomass and bituminous coal fines from four different coalfields were used to produce fuel briquettes.Two physical properties of briquettes,water resistance index and compressive strength were analyzed.The influence of type and quantity of biomass on physical properties was also studied.The results reveal that depending on the mineral content of the coal,the physical properties of the briquettes differ noticeably.The comparison of briquettes with and without biomass showed that the presence of the beet pulp increased CS in all types of coal samples.Samples containing beet pulp had better physical properties than sawdust.Mezino Ⅱ coal briquettes had highest CS and WRI than the other ones.Calorific value of biomass/Mezino Ⅱ coal briquettes was lessened in comparison with raw coal,but it remained in an acceptable range.

  18. US bituminous coal test program in the British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Souza, M.D.; Tart, K.R.; Eales, D.F. (British Gas plc, London (United Kingdom)); Turna, O. (Lurgi GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany))

    1991-12-01

    The BGL moving-bed, slagging-gasification process is an extension of the commercially proven Lurgi dry-ash, moving-bed gasification process. British Gas and Lurgi have demonstrated the process over an 11-year period at the 350 and 500 t/d scale at British Gas' Westfield Development Center, Scotland, with a wide variety of US and British coals. British Gas also installed a gas purification and HICOM methanation plant at Westfield to treat approximately 190,000 sft{sup 3}/h of purified syngas. Objectives are: To demonstrate the suitability of US bituminous coals as feed-stocks in the BGL gasification process; to provide performance data for use in designing commercial-scale BGL-based gasification-combined-cycle (GCC) power plants; and to evaluate the performance of the British Gas HICOM process for methanation of US coal-derived syngas.

  19. Biological markers in bitumens and pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous bituminous chalks from the Ghareb Formation (Israel)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullkötter, Jürgen; Aizenshtat, Zeev; Spiro, Baruch

    1984-01-01

    The sterane and triterpane distributions of three bituminous chalks from the Upper Cretaceous Ghareb Formation (Israel) were investigated both in the original extractable bitumens and in extracts obtained after pyrolysis of whole rock and isolated kerogen samples at 450°C. Pyrolysis was performed in a closed system under hydrous (whole rock) and anhydrous conditions (isolated kerogens). The carbon number distributions of steranes and triterpanes differ significantly between original bitumen and pyrolyzates. Unlike the bitumens in which diasteranes were not detected, the anhydrous pyrolyzates contain small amounts of diasteranes. The presence of water during pyrolysis leads to an increase of sterane isomerization, the abundant formation of diasteranes and an increase of the 18α( H)- trisnorneohopane/17α( H)- trisnorhopane ratio. Sterane isomerization maturation parameters show a closer match between original bitumen and pyrolyzates after pyrolysis in a closed system when compared with an open system.

  20. STUDY ON EVOLUTION REGULARITIES AND ABSORPTION CHARACTERISTICS OF SULFIDE DURING BITUMINOUS BRIQUETTE HORIZONTAL COMBUSTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路春美; 王永征

    1999-01-01

    This paper discusses the evolution regularity and the absorption characters of sulfide for bituminous briquette burned in a horizontal burning furnace. The evolution rate of sulphur is affected by some factors, such as the sulphur content in the burning coal, burning time and the meane excess air coefficient in the furnace. With processing the experimental result, the calculation related expression has been obtained to predict the evolution rate of sulfide. The sulphur absorption efficiency of briquette is affected by the factors such as the character of the sulphur sorbent, the type of the coal and the operating parameters. "By means of appropriately adjusting the calciumsulphur mole ratio, the mean excess air coefficient and the time-interval between pushing two layer briquettes, a high sulphur absorption efficiency (>74%) can be obtained.

  1. Examination and comparision of structure: lignite, bituminous and anthracite coal. [10 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winans, R.E.; Hayatsu, R.; Scott, R.G.; Moore, L.P.; Studier, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Coal can be described as an amorphous mixture of macromolecules each made up of a complex array of organic molecules chemically linked together. Methods for breaking up these macromolecules in order to characterize the aromatic structural types have been explored. Pyrolysis is a common method for depolymerizing coal, but under the conditions necessary for pyrolysis much structural rearrangement occurs making a comparison of the products to the initial structural groups in coal difficult if not impossible. One approach has been to use a variety of selective oxidation methods. Aqueous sodium dichromate, aqueous air oxidation with uv light, and hydrogen peroxide in acetic acid have been used. Initial results of some of these studies have been published. This work has been extended to include characterization and comparison of a lignite, bituminous coal, and anthracite. Besides the oxidation products, the monomeric organic molecules trapped within the macromolecules are examined and the results interpreted in relation to coal structure and the coalification process.

  2. Using proximate analysis to characterize airborne dust generation from bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.J.; Organiscak, J.A. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Lab.

    2002-06-01

    Laboratory crushing experiments were conducted on a range of low to high volatile bituminous coals to investigate the various factors influencing airborne respirable dust generation. Bituminous coal samples from 8 mines (5 U.S. and 3 Polish) were uniformly prepared and processed through a double roll crusher located in a low air velocity wind tunnel. Experimental factors studied included inherent coal seam constituents, specific energy of crushing, product size characteristics, dust cloud electrostatic field, and specific quantity of airborne respirable dust generated. A combination of factors is associated with the generation of airborne respirable dust. One factor involved is the effect of coal rank, described by the inherent moist fuel ratio, on the product size characteristics. However, since coals of high moist fuel ratio (high rank) are generally more extensively cleated, it is suggested that the degree of cleating is directly responsible for the quantity of respirable-sized particles produced in the crushed product material for eastern U.S. coals. This is implied by the relationship of ash content and at least one mineral constituent (pyrite, determined from pyritic sulfur analysis) to the percentage of airborne respirable dust. A clear delineation of coals, based on well-known proximate analysis characteristics, that generate the most respirable dust appears to be possible. It was also shown that the dust-generating characteristics of coals could be reasonably described by both the moist fuel ratio and the Hardgrove Grindability Index (HGI). These results show a clear distinction between eastern and western U.S. coals. However, no consistent distinction for Polish coal was observed.

  3. Uraniferous lignites and bituminous clays of the Serres Basin. Pt. A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lignites of the southern area (Christos-Vissiani-Lefkes-Perdikari) and the bituminous clay silts of the northern area (Maramena, Ano Metohi, Chrysopigi) are the main uraniferous beds in the Serres Basin. The sediments of the basin (Upper Miocene to recent) have been stratigraphically divided into three informal unities: the Lefkon, Georgios and Spilia formations. The uraniferous lignites pertaining to the Lefkon limnic-fluvial formation are developed into two discrete horizons, the upper Double Seam and the lower Main Seam. The bituminous clays are of the same age with the lignites, those of Maramena being, however, younger, equivalent to the marine and brackish Georgios formation. The continuity, thickness and dip of the strata reveal considerable regional changes resulting from the intense tectonism of the basin. Further to the surface works the upper lignites have been reached through small excavations and also about 100 boreholes totalling 10,000 m have been drilled. The composition of the organic constituents and the calorific value show a dull transitional to shiny hard lignite with ash rich in pyrite and sulphur. There have been no discrete U minerals detected, while the electron microprobe analysis showed that the uranium is uniformly disseminated into the lignite mass, mainly absorbed through its humic acids. More than 75% of the uranium is extractable, the control of its combustion conditions being, however, a major problem. The potential reserves have been up to date estimated to be of over 4,000 tons (uranium metal), this figure resulting mainly from data evaluated from the borehole γ-ray logs using the computer programmes LOGFILE and LOGPLOT developed at the Radioactive Raw Materials Dept. of the Greek AEC. (author)

  4. Distribution of inorganic and organic substances in the hydrocyclone separated Slovak sub-bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anton Zubrik; Slavomir Hredzak; Ludmila Turcaniova; Michal Lovas; Ingo Bergmann; Klaus Dieter Becker; Maria Lukcova; Vladimir Sepelak [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia). Institute of Geotechnics

    2010-08-15

    A low-rank Slovak sub-bituminous coal from the Handlova deposit was physically treated by washing in a water-only cyclone with the goal to find the separation effect for inorganic (mainly Fe-bearing minerals) and organic substances (humic acids, diterpanes). A high-quality coal product with the ash content in the dry matter of 9.02% and carbon content of C{sup d} = 68.12% at a mass yield of 29.51% was obtained using the water-only cyclone processing. At first, the physically treated coal samples were detailed characterized by XRD, {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, FT-IR and HR-TEM. In addition to non-crystalline organic coal components, inorganic compounds belonging to silicate minerals (kaolinite, muscovite and quartz) as well as to Fe-bearing sulphide minerals (pyrite) were identified in the sub-bituminous coal by XRD. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy detected the presence of iron carbonate (siderite), iron-containing clay mineral and two sulphur-containing minerals (pyrite, jarosite) in the untreated coal. On the other hand, only one Fe-bearing mineral, (pyrite) was found in the washed coal. Effect of the physical separation is also demonstrated in FT-IR spectra, where the peak at 1040 cm{sup -1} representing the silicate component in the untreated sample is not detectable in the washed coal sample. Presence of extractive organic substances, i.e. humic acids and tetracyclic diterpane (16a(H)-phyllocladane), in the hydrocyclone products is also evidenced. It was confirmed that the isolated diterpenoic compound is attendant in the washed product with the lowest ash content and it is assimilated with the organic part of coal. Surprisingly, humic acids were found in the highest concentration in the slurry that has the highest content of ash (63.14%). 54 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Comparative study of test methods for bituminized and other low- and medium-level solidified waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of the behaviour of bituminized or cemented simulated low- or medium-level radioactive waste in contact with water or salt solutions have been investigated. The solubility (approximately 0.5%) and the diffusion coefficient (approximately 5.10-8 cm2/sec) determining transort of water in pure bitumen have been measured for Mexphalte 40/50 at room temperature. A weighing method has been used to study water uptake and swelling of bituminized sodium nitrate, sodium sulphate or cation-exchange resin. The swelling of samples in contact with water was in some cases very pronounced. In strong salt solutions the tendency to swell is much less. The particle size of the embedded waste material is an important parameter. Thermal pre-treatment of cation-exchange resin before bituminization does not seem to improve the quality of the final product. The interaction between bituminized-exchange resin and concrete barrier materials has been studied. Microbial degradation of bitumen and bituminized waste under aerobic conditions has been investigated. It is probably of minor importance as far as leaching is concerned. A method for measuring leaching from a plane surface of cemented waste has been developed. The method avoids the problem of cracks between the sample and the container. Leaching from cemented sodium nitrate or sulphate was investigated. Absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere was found to have only minor effect on Cs- and Na-leaching but gave a pronounced decrease in Ca-leaching. The use of silica-fume as an additive to cemented sodium nitrate decreased the leach rate by a factor 4. (author)

  6. Oil sands development update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed review and update of oil sands development in Alberta are provided covering every aspect of the production and economic aspects of the industry. It is pointed out that at present oil sands account for 28 per cent of Canadian crude oil production, expected to reach 50 per cent by 2005. Based on recent announcements, a total of 26 billion dollars worth of projects are in progress or planned; 20 billion dollars worth of this development is in the Athabasca area, the remainder in Cold Lake and other areas. The current update envisages up to 1,800,000 barrels per day by 2008, creating 47,000 new jobs and total government revenues through direct and indirect taxes of 118 billion dollars. Provinces other than Alberta also benefit from these development, since 60 per cent of all employment and income created by oil sands production is in other parts of Canada. Up to 60 per cent of the expansion is for goods and services and of this, 50 to 55 per cent will be purchased from Canadian sources. The remaining 40 per cent of the new investment is for engineering and construction of which 95 per cent is Canadian content. Aboriginal workforce by common consent of existing operators matches regional representation (about 13 per cent), and new developers are expected to match these standards. Planned or ongoing development in environmental protection through improved technologies and optimization, energy efficiency and improved tailings management, and active support of flexibility mechanisms such as emission credits trading, joint implementation and carbon sinks are very high on the industry's agenda. The importance of offsets are discussed extensively along with key considerations for international negotiations, as well as further research of other options such as sequestration, environmentally benign disposal of waste, and enhanced voluntary action

  7. Sand Storms Trigger Alarm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LI

    2010-01-01

    @@ After an unusually humid winter with at least 10 snowfalls in Beijing, a severe andstorm blown by strong winds bringing with it thousands of tons of desert sand took many residents of the city by surprise.On the morning of March 20, Beijingers woke up to see clouds of yellow dust in the air and a sky that was an ominous orange in color.The loose soil and dust that had traveled htmdreds of miles from deserts in Mongolia and China's northwest blanketed Beijing's streets, covering parked vehicles, bikes, roofs and even plant life,as well as making its way into people's homes.

  8. Fortune Cookie Sand Dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-432, 25 July 2003This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a field of small barchan sand dunes in the north polar region near 71.7oN, 51.3oW. Some of them are shaped like fortune cookies. The message these dunes provide: winds blow through this region from the lower right toward the upper left. The steep slip face slopes of these dunes, which point toward the upper left, indicate the wind direction. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the upper right. The image is 3 km (1.9 mi) wide.

  9. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  10. Dilatometric Characterization of Foundry Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Břuska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this contribution is summary of physical – chemistry properties of usually used foundry silica and no – silica sands in Czech foundries. With the help of dilatometry analysis theoretical assumptions of influence of grain shape and size on dilatation value of sands were confirmed. Determined was the possibility of dilatometry analysis employment for preparing special (hybrid sands with lower and/or more linear character of dilatation.

  11. Co-gasification of oil sand coke with coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vejahati, Farshid; Gupta, Rajender [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2013-07-01

    Gasification of oil sand delayed coke with sub-bituminous and lignite coals was performed in an atmospheric entrained flow gasifier using steam and oxygen as gasifying agents. The underlying objective of this work was to assess the effects of the operating variables (i.e. temperature, oxygen and steam concentrations) and coal/coke blending ratio on gasification performance in a high-temperature in order to find the possible synergies in co-gasification of the fuels. Experiments were conducted at 1,400 C, using steam and oxygen to carbon weight ratios of (0.36-1.08) and (0.07-0.2), respectively in N{sub 2} carrier gas. The coke to coal weight ratios of 1/3, 1/2, and 2/3 were used for the blending tests. Particle size of 53-90 {mu}m with d{sub 50} = 75 {mu}m were used. In terms of char reactivity, blending did not show any significant positive effect. Slight deviations from linear additive line are in the order of experiment error. Gasification efficiency was also following a linear additive trend once more pointing out the lack of synergy in entrained flow gasification systems. The results however, showed that higher coke content clearly favored the H{sub 2} production.

  12. Sand swimming lizard: sandfish

    CERN Document Server

    Maladen, Ryan D; Kamor, Adam; Goldman, Daniel I

    2009-01-01

    We use high-speed x-ray imaging to reveal how a small (~10cm) desert dwelling lizard, the sandfish (Scincus scincus), swims within a granular medium [1]. On the surface, the lizard uses a standard diagonal gait, but once below the surface, the organism no longer uses limbs for propulsion. Instead it propagates a large amplitude single period sinusoidal traveling wave down its body and tail to propel itself at speeds up to ~1.5 body-length/sec. Motivated by these experiments we study a numerical model of the sandfish as it swims within a validated soft sphere Molecular Dynamics granular media simulation. We use this model as a tool to understand dynamics like flow fields and forces generated as the animal swims within the granular media. [1] Maladen, R.D. and Ding, Y. and Li, C. and Goldman, D.I., Undulatory Swimming in Sand: Subsurface Locomotion of the Sandfish Lizard, Science, 325, 314, 2009

  13. Sand, jams and jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granular media are offering new insights into problems in condensed-matter physics and materials science, as Heinrich Jaeger explains. The remarkable properties of granular materials are so familiar that most of us do not even notice them. It is clear, for example, that we cannot walk on water unless the temperature has dropped below freezing. However, we take it for granted that sand will support our weight as if it were a solid, even though it can also be poured like a liquid under the same ambient conditions. From breakfast cereal, sugar and flour to construction materials, mining products and pharmaceuticals, granular media are present everywhere in our daily lives. (U.K.)

  14. Atlas of Dutch drift sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riksen, Michel; Jungerius, Pieter

    2013-04-01

    The Netherlands is well known for its aeolian landscapes. Frequent storms during the High Middle Ages (1000-1300 AD) reactivated Pleistocene coversands and river dunes and are responsible for the formation of the Holocene drift sands at a scale which is unique for Europe. A hypothesized relationship with farmer practices for making plaggensoils has recently been refuted, because drift sand formation began centuries earlier. The coastal dune belt with their parabolic dunes dates from the same period as the drift sand. An estimate of the extent of drift sands can be made from soil maps: drift sands are too young to show much profile development (Regosols). With this method Koster estimated the maximum extent of Holocene drift sands in the Netherlands to be about 800 km2 (Koster 2005). Laser altimetry allows a more precise estimate of the total surface affected by wind from the characteristic relief patterns produced by the Holocene wind, which is different from the smooth surface of cover sand deposits. Laser altimetry has been used before to investigate the mechanism of drift sand formation (Jungerius & Riksen 2010). Most of the surface affected by wind is not active anymore, but the tell-tale rough surface survived ages of different landuse. The total affected surface amounts to 825 km2. It is noteworthy that both methods give comparable results. We recorded a total number of 367 of affected areas of varying shapes, ranging in size from 1.6 ha to a large complex of drif sands of 7,119.5 ha. As is to be expected from their mode of origin, most occurrences are associated with cover sands, and with river dunes along the river Meuse and smaller rivers in other parts of the country. Particularly the final phases of cover sand and river dunes that show more relief as parabolic dunes were affected. There are also small aeolian deposits at the lee side blown from fallow agricultural fields but they are (sub)recent. Most of the relief is irregular, but the larger

  15. 2010 oil sands performance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    With the depletion of traditional energy resources and the rising demand for energy, oil sands have become an important energy resource for meeting energy needs. Oil sands are a mixture of water, sand, clay and bitumen which is recovered either through open pit mining or in situ drilling techniques. The bitumen is then converted into syncrude or sold to refineries for the production of gasoline, diesel or other products. Shell has oil sands operations in Alberta and the aim of this report is to present its 2010 performance in terms of CO2, water, tailings, land, and reclamation and engagement. This document covers several of Shell's operations in the Muskeg River and Jackpine mines, Scotford upgrader, Peace River, Orion, Seal, Cliffdale and Chipmunk. It provides useful information on Shell's oil sands performance to governments, environmental groups, First Nations, local communities and the public.

  16. Sand harm in taklimakan Desert highway and sand control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HANZhiwen; WANGTao; SUNQingwei; DONGZhibao; WANGXunming

    2003-01-01

    Reputed as a wonderful achievement of the world’s highway construction history,the Taklimakan Desert highway is nor facing serious sand drift encroachment problems due to its 447-km-long passage of sand sea consisting of crescent dunes,barchan chains,compound transverse dune ridges and complex megadunes.To solve some technical problems in the protection of the highway from sang drift encroachment,desert experts have been conducting the theoretical and applied studies on sand movement laws;causes,severities and time-space differentiation of sand drift damages;and control ways including mechanical,chemical and biological measures.In this paper the authors give an overall summry on the research contents and recent progress in the control of sand drift damages in China and hold that the theoretical researc results and practices in the prevention of sand drift encroachment on the cross-desert highway represnt a breakthrough and has an cpoch-making significance.Since the construction of protective forest along the cross-desert highway requires large amount of ground water,what will be its environmental consequence and whether it can effectively halt sand drift encroachment on the highway forever are the questions to be studied urgently.

  17. A study of bituminous pavements to determine a correlation between pavement structure designs and tripping of asphalt cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, B. R.

    1984-03-01

    After detecting a few cases of stripping of asphalt cement from the aggregate in bituminous pavement, there was concern that stripping might be a widespread problem in the state. It is agreed that water is the cause of stripping, and it was the opinion of some that pavements on granular bases would be less likely to strip because of supposedly better drainage characteristics. Differently designed pavement structures in all areas of the state were investigated to determine if there is a correlation between base and pavement design and stripping. Stripping was not as widespread as had been feared and there was less stripping in fulldepth bituminous base and pavement constructed over a lime-treated subgrade than in pavements constructed oer granular bases. This was contrary to what some had theorized.

  18. Study on the cause of the fire and explosion incident at Bituminization Demonstration Facility of PNC Tokai Works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 1997, a fire and explosion incident occurred in Bituminization Demonstration Facility (BDF) at Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP). The cause of the incident was thoroughly investigated and after thirty meetings of 'Investigation Committee of Science and Technology Agency (STA)'. STA reported possible cause of this incident. Continually detailed investigation was discussed at 'Follow-up Committee of STA'. Based on the results of five meetings, JNC concluded that the main cause of fire was frictional heating and viscous heating in the extruder, which provided an unusually high temperature in the bituminized product at filling, since there was no chemical analysis data suggesting the generation of chemical heat. It is considered that these excessive heat generations were due to the decreased feed rate of liquid waste to the extruder. The Follow-up Committee almost agreed to this conclusion. This paper describes general information concerning the incident and details of the cause of the incident. (author)

  19. The bituminization in Marcoule and la Hague plants. Description of the processes and the fire risk prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical precipitation is an efficient process to decontaminate liquid effluents and has been selected as early as 1966 for the liquid waste treatment of MARCOULE. The process has been designed by the French CEA and improved along the time. The first implementation in LA HAGUE was for the STE 2 facility (Station de Traitement d'Effluents no 2). A new facility, STE 3, has been commissioned in 1989 in LA HAGUE, benefiting from these previous experience and therefore contributing into a drastic reduction of liquid discharges. The sludges coming from the treatment in MARCOULE and STE 3 are bituminized into continuous extruders. The resulting waste is kept in interim storage, waiting for final disposal. The industrial production, up to now, is close to 10000 drums (55 gallons) in LA HAGUE and 60000 drums in MARCOULE. A retrieval operation of the MARCOULE drums from the present storage has been launched to send them into a recently built interim storage operating since the beginning of 2000. At the present time, in LA HAGUE, evaporation has been preferred to chemical precipitation for the treatment of liquid effluents. After concentration, the effluents go to the vitrification and the volume of resulting waste is much smaller. However, bituminization is still the preferred option for the 10000 m3 of sludges resulting from the STE 2 operations which are being stored in tanks. A complete reevaluation of the operation safety measures of bituminization has been made lately in both plants following recent incidents on other installations. The paper describes the chemical precipitation and the bituminization processes and focuses on safety measures which are implemented for prevention, detection and fight. (authors)

  20. Utilization of Waste Clay from Boron Production in Bituminous Geosynthetic Barrier (GBR-B Production as Landfill Liner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müfide Banar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous geomembranes, one type of geosynthetics, include a hot bituminous mixture with mineral filler and reinforcement. In this study, boron production waste clay (CW was used as filler to produce a geosynthetic barrier with bentonite, waste tire, and bitumen. Bentonite and waste tires were used as auxiliary fillers and bitumen as the binder. CW/bitumen, CW/bentonite/bitumen, and CW/waste tire/bitumen mixtures were prepared by using a laboratory mixer at 100°C. Hot mixtures were extruded into strips by using a lab-scale corotating twin screw extruder (L/D: 40 followed by die casting (2 mm × 100 mm. Glass fleece or nonwoven polyester was used as reinforcement material and while die casting, both sides of the reinforcement materials were covered with bituminous mixture. Thickness, mass per unit area, tensile strength, elongation at yield, and hydraulic conductivity were used to characterize the geomembranes. Among all geomembranes, nonwoven polyester covered with 30% bitumen-70% boron waste clay mixture (PK-BTM30CW70 was found to be the most promising in terms of structure and mechanical behaviour. After that, consequences of its exposure to distilled water (DW, municipal solid waste landfill leachate (L-MSW, and hazardous waste landfill leachate (L-HW were examined to use for an innovative impermeable liner on solid waste landfills.

  1. Recycling of polyethylene terephthalate (PET plastic bottle wastes in bituminous asphaltic concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Olatunbosun Sojobi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research sheds light on the concept of eco-friendly road construction which comprises eco-design, eco-extraction, eco-manufacturing, eco-construction, eco-rehabilitation, eco-maintenance, eco-demolition, and socioeconomic empowerment. It also revealed the challenges being faced in its adoption and the benefits derivable from its application. Furthermore, the effects of recycling PET plastic bottle wastes produced in North Central Nigeria in bituminous asphaltic concrete (BAC used in flexible pavement construction were also evaluated. The mix design consists of 60/70 penetration-grade asphaltic concrete (5%, 68% coarse aggregate, 6% fine aggregate, and 21% filler using the dry process at 170°C. The optimum bitumen content (OBC for conventional BAC was obtained as 4% by weight of total aggregates and filler. Polymer-coated aggregate (PCA-modified BAC seems preferable because it has the potential to utilize more plastic wastes with a higher optimum plastic content (OPC of 16.7% by weight of total aggregates and filler compared to that of 9% by weight of OBC achieved by PMB-BAC. For both PMB- and PCA-modified BAC, an increase in air void, void in mineral aggregate, and Marshall stability were observed. Eco-friendly road construction which recycles PET wastes should be encouraged by government considering its potential environmental and economic benefits.

  2. Comparing potentials for gas outburst in a Chinese anthracite and an Australian bituminous coal mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guoqing; Saghafi Abouna

    2014-01-01

    Gas outbursts in underground mining occur under conditions of high gas desorption rate and gas content, combined with high stress regime, low coal strength and high Young’s modulus. This combination of gas and stress factors occurs more often in deep mining. Hence, as the depth of mining increases, the poten-tial for outburst increases. This study proposes a conceptual model to evaluate outburst potential in terms of an outburst indicator. The model was used to evaluate the potential for gas outburst in two mines, by comparing numerical simulations of gas flow behavior under typical stress regimes in an Australian gassy mine extracting a medium-volatile bituminous coal, and a Chinese gassy coal mine in Qinshui Basin (Shanxi province) extracting anthracite coal. We coupled the stress simulation program (FLAC3D) with the gas simulation program (SIMED II) to compute the stress and gas pressure and gas content distribution following development of a roadway into the targeted coal seams. The data from gas content and stress distribution were then used to quantify the intensity of energy release in the event of an outburst.

  3. Burnout behaviour of bituminous coals in air-staged combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluger, F.; Spliethoff, H.; Hein, K.R.G. [University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany). Inst. of Process Engineering and Power Plant (IVD)

    2001-07-01

    In order to determine the influence on burnout by the combustion conditions and the coal preparation, three bituminous coals sold on the world market, from three different locations in Poland, South Africa, and Australia, were studied more closely. For this purpose, the coals were ground in two different particle size ranges, which, besides the influence of the combustion conditions, such a temperature, residence time, and stoichiometry, made it possible to also investigate the impact on burnout by the coal preparation. The experiments were carried out in an electrically heated entrained-flow reactor with a thermal input of 8.5 kW. The parameters for the experiments are wall temperature (1000-1350{degree}C), air ratio (0.6-1.15) and two particle sizes (70% {lt} 75 {mu}m, 90% {lt} 75 {mu}m). The results show that in general, for increasing temperatures, the burnout quality will improve. For the Australian Illawara coal, another outcome is increased NOx emissions. Lowering the air ratio in the reduction zone leads to less NOx emission but to increased unburnt matter in ash. For the smaller particle size fraction, the analysis of the different particle sizes shows an improvement of the burnout without a change in NOx emissions. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Using proximate analysis to characterize airborne dust generation from bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, S.J.; Organiscak, J.A.

    2005-11-01

    Prolonged exposure to airborne respirable coal dust is responsible for coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP), commonly called black lung. Health research studies have identified that the prevalence and severity of CWP are directly related to both the amount of dust exposure and the coal rank. The amount of airborne respirable dust (ARD) smaller than 10 micrometers generated from breakage of different coals varies widely. To investigate the cause, researchers for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have conducted experiments to identify the causes of airborne respirable dust liberation. Laboratory crushing experiments were conducted on a range of low to high volatile bituminous coals from eight mines. The results indicate that the proximate analysis of a coal sample can provide a very good indicator of the potential for a dust problem. For application to the coal mining, processing, and utilization industries, data from 977 US coal seams compiled by the Department of Energy (DoE) has been used to calculate this dust generation potential from an equation based on the NIOSH measured data. A simple procedure for this calculation is provided. 1 fig.

  5. Experimental and modelling of the thermal regions of activity during pyrolysis of bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strezov, Vladimir [Newbolds Applied Research, The University of Newcastle, Cnr Frith and Gavey Streets, Mayfield 2304, NSW (Australia); Lucas, John A. [Discipline of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan 2308, NSW (Australia); Strezov, Les [Strezov Consulting, 7 Marin Street, Adamstown 2289, NSW (Australia)

    2004-03-01

    Computer-aided thermal analysis technique, incorporated with thermogravimetric and Fourier transform infrared (TG-FTIR), and mass spectrometry, were employed in studying the devolatilisation of three thermal bituminous coals under packed bed pyrolysing conditions. The heats of reactions evolved during coal devolatilisation were determined by computational calorimetry and compared with the evolution rate of fourteen volatile species. The devolatilisation was classified into five major regions of thermal activity, according to the analysis, where the first was related to the dehydration of strongly bounded water. The second was the pre-plastic region with an endothermic prepyrolytic reaction, while the third was the exothermic plastic range with primarily evolution of tars and re-solidification reactions. The secondary devolatilisation was found to be endothermic and the major contributors were hydrocarbons, secondary water, CS{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. The largest reaction was the contraction of carbon planes with evolution of hydrogen. Each reaction region was assumed to follow the first-order Arrhenius kinetic correlation and the activation energy was determined for each of the five regions. The activation energies were then incorporated into a simplified model for predicting the overall heats of reactions.

  6. Analysis and modeling of 3D complex modulus tests on hot and warm bituminous mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nguyen Hoang; Sauzéat, Cédric; Di Benedetto, Hervé; González-León, Juan A.; Barreto, Gilles; Nicolaï, Aurélia; Jakubowski, Marc

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents the results of laboratory testing of hot and warm bituminous mixtures containing Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP). Complex modulus measurements, using the tension-compression test on cylindrical specimens, were conducted to determine linear viscoelastic (LVE) behavior. Sinusoidal cyclic loadings, with strain amplitude of approximately 50ṡ10-6, were applied at several temperatures (from -25 to +45 °C) and frequencies (from 0.03 Hz to 10 Hz). In addition to axial stresses and strains, radial strains were also measured. The complex modulus E ∗ and complex Poisson's ratios ν ∗ were then obtained in two perpendicular directions. Measured values in these two directions do not indicate anisotropy on Poisson's ratio. The time-temperature superposition principle (TTSP) was verified with good approximation in one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) conditions for the same values of shift factor. Experimental results were modeled using the 2S2P1D model previously developed at the University of Lyon/ENTPE. In addition, specific analysis showed that eventual damage created during complex modulus test is very small and is equivalent to the effect of an increase of temperature of about 0.25 °C.

  7. Alberta oil sands royalty regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long term objective of the Oil Sands Business Unit of Alberta Energy is to pave the way for Alberta's bitumen production to reach 3 million barrels per day by 2020. This presentation described the national government's role in resource development. It was emphasized that since the Crown is the owner of the oil sands resource, it would benefit by providing strategic leadership and by generating a larger royalty base. The oil sands fiscal regime was described with reference to generic royalty, risk sharing, investment, and project economics. Business rule principles were also outlined along with criteria for project expansions. Both upstream and downstream challenges and opportunities were listed. 4 figs

  8. CAPILLARITY OF CONCRETE INCORPORATING FOUNDRY SAND AS REPLACEMENT OF SAND

    OpenAIRE

    Khatib, Jamal M.; HERKI, B A; Fırat, Seyhan; Menadi, B; S. Kenai

    2011-01-01

    The potential uses and the high cost of land-filling of used foundry sands have prompted research into their beneficial reuse. This paper presents the results of experimental research into concrete produced by replacing the natural aggregates with recycled aggregates coming from foundry industries. Little work has been done so far on the effect of used foundry sand on the durability of concrete especially water absorption. The main aim of this work was to determine capillary water absorption ...

  9. Reclaimability of the spent sand mixture – sand with bentonite – sand with furfuryl resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of new binding materials and new technologies of their hardening in casting moulds and cores production requires theapplication of reclamation methods adequate to their properties as well as special devices realizing tasks. The spent sands circulationsystem containing the same kind of moulding and core sands is optimal from the point of view of the expected reclamation results.However, in the face of a significant variability of applied technologies and related to them various reclamation methods, the need - of theobtained reclamation products assessment on the grounds of systematic criteria and uniform bases – arises, with a tendency of indicatingwhich criteria are the most important for the given sand system. The reclaimability results of the mixture of the spent moulding sand withGeko S bentonite and the spent core sand with the Kaltharz 404U resin hardened by acidic hardener 100 T3, are presented in the paper.Investigations were performed with regard to the estimation of an influence of core sands additions (10 –25% on the reclaimed materialquality. Dusts and clay content in the reclaim, its chemical reaction (pH and ignition loss were estimated. The verification of the reclaiminstrumental assessment was performed on the basis of the technological properties estimation of moulding sand with bentonite, where the reclaimed material was used as a matrix.

  10. Diurnal patterns of blowing sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex process that involves an interaction between solar heating, thermal instability, atmospheric turbulence, wind strength, and surface threshold conditions. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances the convect...

  11. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  12. STUDY OF CREEP OF SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. D. Chyong

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the problem. Subgrade has perceived rheological properties, most importantly, creep. As a result, the number subbase displacements and their irregularities grow constantly in re-cent years. But this fact is not taken into account in calculations, this is why additional studies of structural strength and creep of sand are essential.Results. Empirical relationships between displacements of models of sand subbase and loading conditions are obtained. It is shown that creep in sand subbase develops within a few months and years even. A degree of an increase in strength of sand with low moisture content with time result-ing from structural strength formation is examined. It is found that a deformation rate depends largely on a loading level.Conclusions. The data obtained allow us to develop more reliable methods to predict a defor-mation change with time.

  13. Non-aeolian sand ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, J. F.; Amarouchene, Y.; Bonnier, B.; Kellay, H.

    2005-02-01

    By examining the initial stages of the impact of a granular jet on a flat horizontal solid surface we evidenced the existence of oscillatory sand fronts. These oscillations give rise to a novel mechanism for the formation of ripples on sand surfaces. We here show that as the front advances, its slope changes periodically in time, leaving behind a succession of surface elevations and depressions. A key feature of these oscillations is the interplay between the deposition of mobile sand and the avalanching of the static parts giving rise to a remarkable self-regulating system. These features come out naturally from a simplified version of recently proposed models for the dynamics of sand piles.

  14. Study on the submicron and micron morphology and the properties of poor bituminous coal burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei-Fang Fu; Huai-Chun Zhou; Qing-Yan Fang; Hai Yao; Jianrong Qiu; Minghou Xu [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

    2007-05-15

    Carbon burnout and its reaction mechanism have been widely focused on in the past decades. The properties of burnout, submicron and micron morphology and the reaction mechanism of poor bituminous coal/char (PBC) in a W-shaped power plant boiler was studied and was compared with those in DTF and in TGA, which showed that the degree of PBC burnout in TGA at 1450{sup o}C was greater than or approximately equal to that in a W-shaped boiler, and that the complexity of the reactions among residual char, oxygen and SiO{sub 2} did not seem to result in mass loss in TGA, although the weight percentage of the residual char in ash decreased from 33% ad (air dry basis) at 900{sup o}C to 9% and at 1450{sup o}C. According to the distribution of pores and the properties of the char burnout, the char can be simply categorized into three classes: char burnout easy, char burnout difficult and char burnout very difficult. The differences of the reaction mechanism must be considered while predicting the burning rate and degree of char burnout in a full-scale boiler by making use of experimental results from TGA and DTF. A different char particle contains markedly different amount of carbons, but for a special char particle, the ratio of carbon to ash is generally constant, and an ash shell does not exist on the char surface. The fusion mineral matter composing of C-O-Si-Al is amorphous, not in the form of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2} above 1450{sup o}C.

  15. Variations in pore characteristics in high volatile bituminous coals: Implications for coal bed gas content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalerz, Maria; Drobniak, A.; Strapoc, D.; Solano-Acosta, W.; Rupp, J.

    2008-01-01

    The Seelyville Coal Member of the Linton Formation (Pennsylvanian) in Indiana was studied to: 1) understand variations in pore characteristics within a coal seam at a single location and compare these variations with changes occurring between the same coal at different locations, 2) elaborate on the influence of mineral-matter and maceral composition on mesopore and micropore characteristics, and 3) discuss implications of these variations for coal bed gas content. The coal is high volatile bituminous rank with R0 ranging from 0.57% to 0.60%. BET specific surface areas (determined by nitrogen adsorption) of the coals samples studied range from 1.8 to 22.9??m2/g, BJH adsorption mesopore volumes from 0.0041 to 0.0339??cm3/g, and micropore volumes (determined by carbon dioxide adsorption) from 0.0315 to 0.0540??cm3/g. The coals that had the largest specific surface areas and largest mesopore volumes occur at the shallowest depths, whereas the smallest values for these two parameters occur in the deepest coals. Micropore volumes, in contrast, are not depth-dependent. In the coal samples examined for this study, mineral-matter content influenced both specific surface area as well as mesopore and micropore volumes. It is especially clear in the case of micropores, where an increase in mineral-matter content parallels the decrease of micropore volume of the coal. No obvious relationships were observed between the total vitrinite content and pore characteristics but, after splitting vitrinite into individual macerals, we see that collotelinite influences both meso- and micropore volume positively, whereas collodetrinite contributes to the reduction of mesopore and micropore volumes. There are large variations in gas content within a single coal at a single location. Because of this variability, the entire thickness of the coal must be desorbed in order to determine gas content reliably and to accurately calculate the level of gas saturation. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All

  16. Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

    2006-12-31

    This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates

  17. Characterization of hydrocarbon emissions from green sand foundry core binders by analytical pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yujue Wang; Fred S. Cannon; Magda Salama; Jeff Goudzwaard; James C. Furness [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2007-11-15

    Analytical pyrolysis was conducted to compare the hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas emissions of three foundry sand binders: (a) conventional phenolic urethane resin, (b) biodiesel phenolic urethane resin, and (c) collagen-based binder. These binders are used in the metal casting industry to create internal cavities within castings. Green sand contains silica sand, clay, carbonaceous additives (eg bituminous coal) and water. The core samples were flash pyrolyzed in a Curie-point pyrolyzer at 920{sup o}C with a heating rate of about 3000{sup o}C/sec. This simulated some key features of the fast heating conditions that the core binders would experience at the metal-core interface when molten metal is poured into green sand molds. The core samples were also pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) from ambient temperature to 1000{sup o}C with a heating rate of 30{sup o}C/min, and this simulated key features of the slow heating conditions that the core binders would experience at distances that are further away from the metal-core interface during casting cooling. Hydrocarbon emissions from flash pyrolysis were analyzed with a gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, while hydrocarbon and greenhouse gas emissions from TGA pyrolysis were monitored with mass spectrometry. The prominent hazardous air pollutant emissions during pyrolysis of the three binders were phenol, cresols, benzene, and toluene for the conventional phenolic urethane resin and biodiesel resin, and benzene and toluene for the collagen-based binder. Bench-scale analytical pyrolysis techniques could be a useful screening tool for the foundries to compare the relative emissions of alternative core binders and to choose proper materials in order to comply with air-emission regulations. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Oil sands tailings management project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  19. Oil sands tailings management project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godwalt, C. [Alberta WaterSMART, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kotecha, P. [Suncor Energy Inc, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aumann, C. [Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures, Alberta Governement, AB (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The Oil sands leadership initiative (OSLI) works with the Government of Alberta on the development of the oil sands industry, considering environmental, economical and social aspects. Water management was identified as one of most important areas to focus on. Alberta WaterSMART was requested to support the development and the management of projects resulting from the work done or underway in this field. The development of a regional water management solution stood out as the most interesting solution to obtain significant results. In the Athabasca Region, oil sands producers work independently on their water sourcing and disposal with particular attention to fresh water conservation and economics. The Athabasca River represents a source for mines and distant saline aquifers are the target of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operators. As part of a four-phase project aiming to study the environmental and economic footprint (EEF) benefit of alternatives for Athabasca oil sands production water supply and disposal, the purpose of the tailings water management project was to identify tailings treatment technologies that are ready to be implemented, and to design and evaluate solutions in order to improve regional oil sands production water sourcing and disposal. Alternatives were evaluated based on their total EEF, applying a lifecycle assessment methodology with a particular attention on the quantification of important performance indicators. 25 refs., 8 tabs., 40 figs.

  20. Organic petrology and geochemistry of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl, north-central Afghanistan: Depositional environment and source rock potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Sanfilipo, John

    2016-01-01

    Organic geochemistry and petrology of Eocene Suzak bituminous marl outcrop samples from Madr village in north-central Afghanistan were characterized via an integrated analytical approach to evaluate depositional environment and source rock potential. Multiple proxies suggest the organic-rich (TOC ∼6 wt.%) bituminous marls are ‘immature’ for oil generation (e.g., vitrinite Ro  1) indicating organic input from marine algae and/or bacterial biomass, and sterane/hopane ratios are low (0.12–0.14). Monoaromatic steroids are dominated by C28clearly indicating a marine setting. High gammacerane index values (∼0.9) are consistent with anoxia stratification and may indicate intermittent saline-hypersaline conditions. Stable C isotope ratios also suggest a marine depositional scenario for the Suzak samples, consistent with the presence of marine foraminifera including abundant planktic globigerinida(?) and rare benthic discocyclina(?) and nummulites(?). Biomarker 2α-methylhopane for photosynthetic cyanobacteria implies shallow photic zone deposition of Madr marls and 3β-methylhopane indicates presence of methanotrophic archaea in the microbial consortium. The data presented herein are consistent with deposition of Suzak bituminous marls in shallow stratified waters of a restricted marine basin associated with the southeastern incipient or proto-Paratethys. Geochemical proxies from Suzak rock extracts (S content, high polar content, C isotopes, normal (αααR) C27–29 steranes, and C29/C30 and C26/C25 hopane ratios) are similar to extant data from Paleogene oils produced to the north in the Afghan-Tajik Basin. This observation may indicate laterally equivalent strata are effective source rocks as suggested by previous workers; however, further work is needed to strengthen oil-source correlations.

  1. Petrographic and Vitrinite Reflectance Analyses of a Suite of High Volatile Bituminous Coal Samples from the United States and Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Kolak, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents vitrinite reflectance and detailed organic composition data for nine high volatile bituminous coal samples. These samples were selected to provide a single, internally consistent set of reflectance and composition analyses to facilitate the study of linkages among coal composition, bitumen generation during thermal maturation, and geochemical characteristics of generated hydrocarbons. Understanding these linkages is important for addressing several issues, including: the role of coal as a source rock within a petroleum system, the potential for conversion of coal resources to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and the interactions between coal and carbon dioxide during enhanced coalbed methane recovery and(or) carbon dioxide sequestration in coal beds.

  2. Sands at Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Nathalie A.; Herkenhoff, Kenneth E.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Farmer, Jack D.; Arvidson, Raymond E.; Grin, E.A.; Li, Ron; Fenton, Lori; Cohen, B.; Bell, J.F.; Yingst, R. Aileen

    2014-01-01

    Processes, environments, and the energy associated with the transport and deposition of sand at Gusev Crater are characterized at the microscopic scale through the comparison of statistical moments for particle size and shape distributions. Bivariate and factor analyses define distinct textural groups at 51 sites along the traverse completed by the Spirit rover as it crossed the plains and went into the Columbia Hills. Fine-to-medium sand is ubiquitous in ripples and wind drifts. Most distributions show excess fine material, consistent with a predominance of wind erosion over the last 3.8 billion years. Negative skewness at West Valley is explained by the removal of fine sand during active erosion, or alternatively, by excess accumulation of coarse sand from a local source. The coarse to very coarse sand particles of ripple armors in the basaltic plains have a unique combination of size and shape. Their distribution display significant changes in their statistical moments within the ~400 m that separate the Columbia Memorial Station from Bonneville Crater. Results are consistent with aeolian and/or impact deposition, while the elongated and rounded shape of the grains forming the ripples, as well as their direction of origin, could point to Ma'adim Vallis as a possible source. For smaller particles on the traverse, our findings confirm that aeolian processes have dominated over impact and other processes to produce sands with the observed size and shape patterns across a spectrum of geologic (e.g., ripples and plains soils) and aerographic settings (e.g., wind shadows).

  3. Behaviour of bituminized waste under gamma irradiation. Effect of STE3 decontamination process components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid wastes of light and medium activity are treated by chemical co-precipitation and sludge are mixed with bitumen. Irradiation is responsible of gas production and potential swelling of the embedded. It prevails on limitation of filling of storage containers and activity to 140 Ci. The aim of this work is the study of influence of the components of the decontamination process on the behaviour of bituminous wastes, in order to control swelling and to state radiolysis mechanisms, both for production and storage of wastes. For pure bitumen, mechanism of production of H2 and CH4 are specified. Oxygen consumption, localised on the surface of samples, leads to conversion of aromatic oils and resins to asphaltenes, by a chain reaction mechanism. CO2 et CO are reaction products of gaseous oxygen, respectively with bitumen and light hydrocarbons. The composition of bitumen is slightly modified to heavier and higher polarity products, with parallel hardening. NaNO3, Na2SO4, BaSO4, PPFNi, K2SO4, NiSO4, et diatoms DIT3R et DIC3 have strictly a dilution effect towards gas generation. CoS, above 1% embedded, strongly inhibits production of H2, CH4 and light hydrocarbons. Degradation of bitumen being reduced, a radical mechanism with both radicals H· et R· might exist. Kinetic shows that a bi-radicals mechanism (or more) is probable. In the same way, Raney's nickel induces a important decrease of production of H2, CH4 et C2, with a capacity of 7,7 ml/g. Swelling depends on dimension of sample gas production and dose rate. Solid content and particle size are not determining parameters. Low swelling is obtained for penetrability higher than 70 1/10 mm, This can be realised by addition of a solvent as TBP and by increasing temperature above 40 deg C. Rheological characterizations (oscillation and creeping mode) have not been successful to correlate swelling with a physical parameter. (author)

  4. Mechanical, sorption and transport experiments on a German high volatile bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gensterblum, Y.; Krooss, B.M. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geology and Geochemistry of Petroleum and Coal; Massarotto, Paul [Queensland Univ., Brisbane, St Lucia, QLD (Australia). School of Engineering

    2013-08-01

    A high volatile bituminous coal (vitrinite reflectance: 0.93%, carbon content: 83%) from the Prosper-Haniel mine, North Rhine-Westphalia has been studied using a comprehensive set of measurements and experimental procedures at RWTH Aachen University and the University of Queensland. Using the True Triaxial Stress Coal Permeameter (TTSCP) (Massarotto 2003) of the University of Queensland, permeability and gas displacement tests were performed on an 80 mm cube of the Prosper-Haniel coal. Extensive data sets were recorded to assess the effects of stress changes on gas transport and the impact of nitrogen, methane and CO{sub 2} sorption on the mechanical properties. We investigate the permeability coefficients for helium, nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide measured on this sample as a function of net stress. As expected, permeability values decrease with increasing stress. Methane and nitrogen have nearly identical permeability coefficients throughout the entire net stress range, while permeability coefficients measured with helium are higher and those measured with CO{sub 2} significantly lower. During the permeability measurements with CO{sub 2} an anisotropic swelling of the coal cube by about 0.19% to 0.23% was observed. The volumetric effect (swelling) is 100 times slower than gas displacement. Simultaneous mechanical tests indicated a softening of the coal block upon exposure to CO{sub 2}. Thus, a decrease of Young's modulus (YM) of the coal cube during the CO{sub 2} flow test was observed as compared to the methane and nitrogen tests. High-pressure sorption isotherms with CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} were determined on different grain-size fractions of the Prosper-Haniel coal at 318K and different moisture contents. Methane sorption capacity decreases by 29% with increasing moisture content. Also, a decrease of sorption rate was observed with increasing moisture content. While sorption rates are generally faster for CO{sub 2} than for CH{sub 4}, the sorption

  5. Organic geochemistry of Upper Carboniferous bituminous coals and clastic sediments from the Lublin Coal Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Marek R.; Karger, Michał; Gazda, Lucjan; Grafka, Oliwia

    2013-09-01

    Bituminous coals and clastic rocks from the Lublin Formation (Pennsylvanian, Westphalian B) were subjected to detailed biomarker and Rock-Eval analyses. The investigation of aliphatic and aromatic fractions and Rock-Eval Tmax suggests that the Carboniferous deposits attained relatively low levels of thermal maturity, at the end of the microbial processes/initial phase of the oil window. Somewhat higher values of maturity in the clastic sediments were caused by postdiagenetic biodegradation of organic matter. The dominance of the odd carbon-numbered n-alkanes in the range n-C25 to n-C31 , high concentrations of moretanes and a predominance of C 28 and C29 steranes are indicative of a terrigenous origin of the organic matter in the study material. This is supported by the presence of eudesmane, bisabolane, dihydro-ar-curcumene and cadalene, found mainly in the coal samples. In addition, tri- and tetracyclic diterpanes, e. g. 16β(H)-kaurane, 16β(H)-phyllocladane, 16α(H)-kaurane and norisopimarane, were identified, suggesting an admixture of conifer ancestors among the deposited higher plants. Parameters Pr/n-C17 and Rdit in the coal samples show deposition of organic matter from peat swamp environments, with the water levels varying from high (water-logged swamp) to very low (ephemeral swamp). Clastic deposits were accumulated in a flood plain environment with local small ponds/lakes. In pond/lake sediments, apart from the dominant terrigenous organic matter, research also revealed a certain quantity of algal matter, indicated, i.a., by the presence of tricyclic triterpanes C28 and C29 and elevated concentrations of steranes. The Paq parameter can prove to be a useful tool in the identification of organic matter, but the processes of organic matter biodegradation observed in clastic rocks most likely influence the value of the parameter, at the same time lowering the interpretation potential of these compounds. The value of Pr/Ph varies from 0.93 to 5.24 and from 3

  6. Beneficiation of beach magnetite sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Münevver TEL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, beneficiation of beach magnetite sand was investigated by applying high intensity dry magnetic separator. The effect of feed particle size, feed rate, roll rotation speed, induced magnetic field intensity, and separator knife angle on Fe grade and recovery of the magnetite concentrate were investigated. As a result of dry magnetic separation at about 750 Gauss magnetic field conducted with -0.212+0.106 mm size fraction under optimum conditions, a magnetite concentrate assaying 54.41% Fe was obtained with 63.46% recovery where the beach sand sample contained %48.41 Fe.

  7. Effect of Pre-oxidation on the Properties of Crushed Bituminous Coal and Activated Carbon Prepared Therefrom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The influence of a pre-oxidation process on the chemical properties of crushed bituminous coal and on adsorption properties of the subsequently formed char and activated carbon is discussed in this paper.Datong bituminous coal samples sized 6 mm were oxidized at different temperatures and for different times and then carbonized and activated by steam to obtain activated carbons.A Uniform Design method was used to arrange the experiments, IR and adsorption experiments were used to characterize these oxidized coals, chars and activated carbon samples.The results show that the carboxyl group disappeared and α-CH2 groups joined to alkenes decreased dramatically but the carbonyl group clearly increased in the coal sample oxidized at 543 K; The chemical composition of coal samples oxidized at lower temperature is different from that of coal oxidized at 543 K.Oxidizing coal samples at higher temperatures for a short time or at lower temperatures for a longer time resulted in activated carbon samples that tended toward the same adsorption properties: Iodine number 1100 mg/g and Methylene blue value 252 mg/g.The yield of activated carbon obtained from the pre-oxidized coal is 10% higher than the yield from parent coal but the activated carbons have the same adsorption properties.

  8. Characterization of burning and CO2 gasification of chars from mixtures of Zonguldak (Turkey) and Australian bituminous coals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, different mixtures (30 wt.% + 70 wt.% and 50 wt.% + 50 wt.%, respectively) of Zonguldak bituminous coal (Turkey) and an Australian bituminous coal are carbonized to obtain char samples. The ignition temperatures of the samples are determined by sending O2 onto the samples in a system designed for determining the ignition temperature. The gasification reactivity of the chars in a CO2 atmosphere is also measured at temperatures between 800 deg. C and 1050 deg. C. The relationship between the ignition temperature and the burning character of the same samples is investigated thermogravimetrically. The moisture, ash and volatile matter analyses are also performed. An increase in carbonization temperature leads to a decrease in the amount of volatile matter. The differences between the effects of volatile matter on the ignition temperature and the gasification reactivity of the samples with CO2 might be explained by the change in pore structure and the varying catalytic effect of mineral components in the structure. It is also seen that there is a good correlation between the thermal analysis and the complete analysis results of the samples

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Carbon Content in Bituminous Coal by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Using UV Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiongwei; Mao, Xianglei; Wang, Zhe; Richard, E. Russo

    2015-11-01

    The carbon content of bituminous coal samples was analyzed by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The 266 nm laser radiation was utilized for laser ablation and plasma generation in air. The partial least square method and the dominant factor based PLS method were used to improve the measurement accuracy of the carbon content of coal. The results showed that the PLS model could achieve good measurement accuracy, and the dominant factor based PLS model could further improve the measurement accuracy. The coefficient of determination and the root-mean-square error of prediction of the PLS model were 0.97 and 2.19%, respectively; and those values for the dominant factor based PLS model were 0.99 and 1.51%, respectively. The results demonstrated that the 266 nm wavelength could accurately measure the carbon content of bituminous coal. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51276100) and the National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (No. 2013CB228501). The authors also thank the financial funding from the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Science Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (No. 2013CB228501)

  10. Dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the characteristics of used sodium silicate sand and the different use requirements for recycled sand, "dry reusing and wet reclaiming of used sodium silicate sand" is considered as the most suitable technique for the used sand. When the recycled sand is used as support sand, the used sand is only reused by dry process including breaking, screening, dust-removal, etc., and it is not necessary that the used sand is reclaimed with strongly rubbing and scraping method, but when the recycled sand is used as facing sand (or single sand), the used sand must be reclaimed by wet method for higher removal rate of the residual binders. The characteristics and the properties of the dry reused sand are compared with the wet reclaimed sand after combining the different use requirements of support sand and facing sand (or single sand), and above the most adaptive scheme has also been validated.

  11. UK silica sand resources for fracking

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive

    2013-01-01

    UK silica sand resources for fracking Clive Mitchell, Industrial Minerals Specialist, British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham, NG12 5GG Email: Silica sand is high purity quartz sand that is mainly used for glass production, as foundry sand, in horticulture, leisure and other industrial uses. One specialist use is as a ‘proppant’ to enhance oil and gas recovery. This presentation will focus on this application, particularly for shale gas recovery where it is mo...

  12. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. Point resistance of piles in sand

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Norihiko

    1983-01-01

    Mechanism of point resistance of pile in sand was investigated mainly from the viewpoint of the particle-crushing of sand at the pile tip. It is shown that the work dissipated in the particle-crushing of sand is as large as 66 percent of the total work done by the external force, hence the point resistance of a pile in sand greatly depends on the particle-crushing property of the sand. It is also shown that the relationship between point resistance and vertical pressure of a pile can be predi...

  14. Selected annotated bibliography of the geology of uraniferous and radioactive native bituminous substances, exclusive of coals, in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harriet Nell

    1956-01-01

    Native bituminous substances are divided into two groups, 1) bitumens and, 2) pyrobitumens. Bitumens are composed principally of hydrocarbons substantially free from oxygenated bodies, are fusible, and are soluble in carbon disulfide. Native bitumens occur in liquid and solid forms. The native liquid bitumens include all petroleums or crude oils. Native solid bitumens include native waxes such as ozocerite, asphalts or petroleum tars, and asphaltites such as gilsonite and grahamite. Pyrobitumens are composed principally of hydrocarbons which may contain oxygenated bodies. They are infusible and are insoluble, or nearly insoluble, in carbon disulfide. Native pyrobitumens are divided into an oxygen-containing group including peats, lignites, and coals, and an essentially oxygen-free, asphaltic group including such substances as wurtzilite, albertite, impsonite, and ingramite. Thucholites, which are carbonaceous substances that may contain uranium, thorium, and rare earths, commonly are considered to be pyrobitumens. Their compositions are variable and may fall into either the oxygen-containing or oxygen-free group. All varieties of native bituminous substances may be associated with mineral matter. The nomenclature of bitumens and pyrobitumens is used very loosely in the literature. This circumstance arises from the difficulty in recognizing many of these substances by visual examination, and because many of them can be identified accurately only by chemical methods. Inasmuch as some of the chemical procedures are time-consuming and satisfactory analytical methods have not been devised for all these substances, geologists generally have not obtained precise identifications but rather have used names that appeared most appropriate to the circumstances. It is expected that future research will show many substances called "asphaltite," "thucholite," etc., to be incorrectly identified. The nomenclature used by the authors of the various references of this bibliography is

  15. Petrography and geochemistry of Oligocene bituminous coal from the Jiu Valley, Petrosani basin (southern Carpathian Mountains), Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, Jennifer M.K. [Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 40351 (United States); Tatu, Calin A. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Immunology, Clinical Laboratory No. 1, Pta. E. Murgu No. 2, RO-1900 Timisoara (Romania); Buia, Grigore [University of Petrosani, Department of Geology, University St. 20, RO-2675 Petrosani (Romania)

    2010-05-01

    Belt samples of Oligocene (Chattian) bituminous coal from 10 underground mines located in the Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County, Petrosani basin, Romania, have been examined and analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, major-, minor- and trace-element chemistry, organic petrography, and vitrinite reflectance. The mineral chemistry and mode of occurrence of trace elements also have been investigated using SEM and electron microprobe techniques. Twenty coal beds occur in the Jiu Valley and most of the samples are from bed no. 3, the most productive bed of the Dilja-Uricani Formation of Oligocene age. The Petrosani basin, oriented SW-NE, is 48-km long, 10-km wide at the eastern part and 2-km wide at the western part. The coal mines are distributed along the center of the valley generally following the Jiu de Vest River. Reflectance measurements indicate that the rank of the coals ranges from high-volatile B to high-volatile A bituminous. Overall, rank decreases from the southwest to the northeast. In bed no. 3, R{sub max} varies from 0.75% in the northeast to 0.93% in the southwest. Although, most Oligocene coals in Romania and adjacent countries are lignite in rank, the Jiu Valley bituminous coals have been affected by regional metamorphism and attending hydrothermal fluids related to the Alpine orogenic event. The coals are all dominated by vitrinite; resinite and funginite are important minor macerals in most of the coals. Pyrite and carbonate generally dominate the mineral assemblages with carbonate more abundant in the northwest. Siderite occurs as nodules and masses within the macerals (generally vitrinite). Dolomite and calcite occur as fracture fillings, plant-cell fillings, and in other authigenic forms. Late-stage fracture fillings are siderite, dolomite, calcite, and ankerite. In one instance, two populations of siderite ({proportional_to} 35 and {proportional_to} 45 wt.% FeO) plus ankerite fill a large fracture. Late-stage pyrite framboid alteration is Ni

  16. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17.

  17. Formation of Craters in Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun; Se-Won Jang

    2007-01-01

    The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  18. Formation of Craters in Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanissra Boonyaleepun

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diameter of craters formed by spheres of varying mass dropped into sand at low speed was studied. The relationship between the diameter of the crater formed and the kinetic energy of the projectile at impact was found to be of the same general form as that for planetary meteor craters. The relationship is shown to be a power law with exponent 0.17

  19. Effect of structural alteration on the macromolecular properties of brown and bituminous coals, quantitative relationships to the hydrogenation reactivity with tetralin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I. [Inst. of Chemistry and Chemico-Metallurgical Processes, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Bimer, J.; Salbut, P.D. [Inst. of Organic Chemistry, Warszawa (Poland); Gruber, R. [Univ. de Metz (France)

    1996-12-31

    The mobility of macromolecular network has been found to be the fundamental property of both brown and bituminous coals governing the reactivity for hydrogenation with tetralin. In Kansk-Achinsk brown coal, this was primarily affected by carboxylate cross-linking via polyvalent cations like Ca.

  20. Combustion characteristics of Malaysian oil palm biomass, sub-bituminous coal and their respective blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Siti Shawalliah; Rahman, Norazah Abd; Ismail, Khudzir

    2012-11-01

    The combustion characteristics of Malaysia oil palm biomass (palm kernel shell (PKS), palm mesocarp fibre (PMF) and empty fruit bunches (EFB)), sub-bituminous coal (Mukah Balingian) and coal/biomass blends via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were investigated. Six weight ratios of coal/biomass blends were prepared and oxidised under dynamic conditions from temperature 25 to 1100°C at four heating rates. The thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that the EFB and PKS evolved additional peak besides drying, devolatilisation and char oxidation steps during combustion. Ignition and burn out temperatures of blends were improved in comparison to coal. No interactions were observed between the coal and biomass during combustion. The apparent activation energy during this process was evaluated using iso-conversional model free kinetics which resulted in highest activation energy during combustion of PKS followed by PMF, EFB and MB coal. Blending oil palm biomass with coal reduces the apparent activation energy value. PMID:22944493

  1. Comparative study of thermal properties of bio-coal from aromatic spent with low rank sub-bituminous coals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vineet; Baruah, B P; Khare, Puja

    2013-06-01

    In present investigation, biocoal samples were prepared from aromatic plant waste of two perennial grasses, i.e. Cymbopogon flexuosus (lemongrass) and Vetiveria zizanioides (khus) after oil extraction, root of Rosa damascene (rose), bark of Eucalyptus citriodora. These biocoals were characterized by proximate, ultimate, metal, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and ash analyses. Activation energies, initial temperature of devolatilization, maximum rate of weight loss (Rmax), fouling, slagging and alkali index were determined on the basis of TGA and ash analysis. These biocoals have good calorific values. There is possibility of slagging and fouling in combustion system but it is not severe. Owing to their similar fuel properties as high sulphur sub-bituminous coal, they can be good candidates for co-firing. Blending of these biocoals with high sulphur coals will serve dual purpose as (i) alternate fuel, and (ii) reduction in SO2 emission. PMID:23603187

  2. Structural characterization of vitrinite-rich and inertinite-rich Permian-aged South African bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Niekerk, Daniel; Mathews, Jonathan P. [Energy and Mineral Engineering and the EMS Energy Institute, Pennsylvania State University, Hosler Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Pugmire, Ronald J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Solum, Mark S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Painter, Paul C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, 320 Steidle Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2008-12-01

    Two South African coals of the same rank and age, but different in maceral composition were subjected to extensive structural analyses. Inertinite-rich Highveld coal (dominated by semifusinite) and vitrinite-rich Waterberg coal were studied to determine structural differences and similarities. The two coals had similar carbon content ({proportional_to} 84%, dmmf) and vitrinite reflectance (mean-maximum 0.71% for vitrinite-rich vs. 0.75% for inertinite-rich), but differed in hydrogen content (6.23% for vitrinite-rich and 4.53% for inertinite-rich). The inertinite-rich coal was more aromatic (86% for inertinite-rich and 76% for vitrinite-rich) and more polycondensed (indicated by a higher bridgehead carbon content). The inertinite-rich coal was structurally more ordered, with a higher degree of crystalline stacking. Both coals had similar average aromatic cluster sizes (16 carbons for vitrinite-rich and 18 carbons for inertinite-rich) and number of cluster attachments (6 attachments for vitrinite-rich and 5 attachments for inertinite-rich). Mass spectrometry showed that both coals consist of similar molecular weight distributions; ranging to approximately 1700 m/z with a maximum abundance of {proportional_to} 450 m/z for the vitrinite-rich coal and {proportional_to} 550 m/z for the inertinite-rich coal. Compared to the Argonne Premium coals the South African vitrinite-rich Waterberg coal was comparable to the coals in the high-volatile bituminous range and inertinite-rich Highveld was closer to the medium- to low-volatile bituminous range. Both coals were surprisingly similar in bulk characterization, although inertinite-rich Highveld coal was structurally more ordered, hydrogen deficient, and more aromatic. (author)

  3. [Environmental toxicity of waste foundry sand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Wang, Yu-Jue; Wang, Jin-Lin; Huang, Tian-You; Xiong, Ying

    2013-03-01

    The metal leaching characteristics and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of five different types of waste foundry sands were analyzed with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and head space-gas chromatography (HS-GC). Microtox and soil dehydrogenase activity (DHA) tests were then used to evaluate the bio-effects of these waste sands. The results showed that due to the different metals poured and casting materials used to make the sand molds, there was significant difference among the five waste foundry sands in the compositions and concentrations of metal and organic pollutants. The concentrations of Fe in the leachates of iron and steel casting waste foundry sand exceeded the maximal allowable concentrations specified in the National Standard of Drinking Water Quality, whereas the As concentration in the leachate of aluminum casting waste foundry sand exceeded the standard. The five waste foundry sands had quite different compositions and levels of VOCs, which resulted in different levels of inhibition effects on the luminescent bacteria (30% and 95%). Additionally, the soil DHA tests suggested that metal pollutants in waste foundry sands may inhibit the soil microbial activity, whereas organics in the sands may slightly promote the microbial activity. The results of this study indicated that the waste foundry sands may pose considerable threat to the environment when improperly disposed. PMID:23745431

  4. Liquefaction of Sand under Low Confining Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shaoli; Rolf Sandven; Lars Grande

    2003-01-01

    Undrained behaviour of sand under low cell pressure was studied in static and cyclic triaxial tests. It was found that very loose sand liquefies under static loading with the relative density being a key parameter for the undrained behaviour of sand. In cyclic triaxial tests, pore water pressures built up during the cyclic loading and exceeded the confining cell pressure. This process was accompanied by a large sudden increase in axial deformation. The necessary number of cycles to obtain liquefaction was related to the confining cell pressure, the amplitude of cyclic loading and the relative density of sand.In addition, the patterns of pore water pressure response are different from those of sand samples with different relative densities. The test results are very useful for expounding scour mechanism around coastal structures since they relate to the low stress behaviour of the sand.

  5. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    OpenAIRE

    van der Meulen, M.J.; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy requires that scarce mineral resources (including silica sand) are taken into consideration in spatial planning and when preparing for largescale engineering or construction works. For this purpose, ...

  6. The mechanics of fibre-reinforced sand

    OpenAIRE

    Dos Santos, APS; Consoli, NC; Baudet, BA

    2010-01-01

    Fibres can be an effective means of reinforcing soils. This paper presents data from laboratory triaxial tests on quartzitic sand reinforced with polypropylene fibres. By keeping the studied composite consistent throughout the study (host sand and fibre characteristics kept constant), it has been possible to develop a framework of behaviour for the sand-fibre material, which provides a solid base for future research on fibre-reinforced soils. Data from previous work and from new tests have be...

  7. Innovative developments in sand reclamation technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dañko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Proper sand management and efficient sand reclamation system are two main factors influencing economical and ecological side of modern foundry plant. It is well known fact that the production of 1 metric ton of casting from ferrous alloys generates circa 1 metric ton of waste [1], which due to containing certain amounts of harmful and dangerous compounds should undergo a reclamation – at least of the main component, which means a silica sand grains. The paper present problems of scientific and development research concerning the innovative reclamation technologies of used foundry sands such as: mechanical-cryogenic reclamation and innovative thermal reclamation.

  8. Nuclear energy for oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1980, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, working with a number of Alberta-based companies, assessed the technical and economic feasibility of using a CANDU nuclear reactor to raise the production steam for the recovery of bitumen. The study followed several years of analysis which identified oil sands projects as the most appropriate single users of thermal energy of the amount and quality available from reactors. Over the life of an oil sands project a steam supply system based on a nuclear reactor is expected to offer a substantial cost advantage (25 - 50%) over the alternative system based on coal as the make-up fuel. Steam from natural gas is marginally more expensive than that from coal because the cost of natural gas is expected to escalate at a rate higher than inflation. For shallow deposits (150 - 250 metres) using intermediate pressure steam, the commercially proven Pressurized Heavy Water (PHW) reactor is most suitable. For deeper deposits (250 - 650 metres), the PHW reactor can provide the higher pressure steam using a compressor, but only with a reduction in thermal efficiency that substantially reduces its cost advantage. The CANDU Organic Cooled Reactor (OCR), however, can provide the high presure steam required with the large cost advantage. The economic benefit of nuclear steam supply systems, a saving of $2-4 per barrel of product, is large enough to justify a more detailed study

  9. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Sunday Isehunwa,; Andrew Farotade

    2010-01-01

    Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field ...

  10. Sand residence times of one million years in the Namib Sand Sea from cosmogenic nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.; Fenton, C. R.; Kober, F.; Wiggs, G. F. S.; Bristow, C. S.; Xu, S.

    2010-12-01

    The Namib Sand Sea is one of the world's oldest and largest sand deserts, yet little is known about the source of the sand in this, or other large deserts. In particular, it is unclear whether the sand is derived from local sediment or comes from remote sources. The relatively uniform appearance of dune sands and low compositional variability within dune fields make it difficult to address this question. Here we combine cosmogenic-nuclide measurements and geochronological techniques to assess the provenance and migration history of sand grains in the Namib Sand Sea. We use U-Pb geochronology of detrital zircons to show that the primary source of sand is the Orange River at the southern edge of the Namib desert. Our burial ages obtained from measurements of the cosmogenic nuclides 10Be, 26Al and 21Ne suggest that the residence time of sand within the sand sea is at least one million years. We therefore conclude that, despite large climatic changes in the Namib region associated with Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles, the area currently occupied by the Namib Sand Sea has never been entirely devoid of sand during the past million years.

  11. Study of Black Sand Particles from Sand Dunes in Badr, Saudi Arabia Using Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abbas Khwaja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Particulate air pollution is a health concern. This study determines the microscopic make-up of different varieties of sand particles collected at a sand dune site in Badr, Saudi Arabia in 2012. Three categories of sand were studied: black sand, white sand, and volcanic sand. The study used multiple high resolution electron microscopies to study the morphologies, emission source types, size, and elemental composition of the particles, and to evaluate the presence of surface “coatings or contaminants” deposited or transported by the black sand particles. White sand was comprised of natural coarse particles linked to wind-blown releases from crustal surfaces, weathering of igneous/metamorphic rock sources, and volcanic activities. Black sand particles exhibited different morphologies and microstructures (surface roughness compared with the white sand and volcanic sand. Morphological Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM analyses revealed that the black sand contained fine and ultrafine particles (50 to 500 nm ranges and was strongly magnetic, indicating the mineral magnetite or elemental iron. Aqueous extracts of black sands were acidic (pH = 5.0. Fe, C, O, Ti, Si, V, and S dominated the composition of black sand. Results suggest that carbon and other contaminant fine particles were produced by fossil-fuel combustion and industrial emissions in heavily industrialized areas of Haifa and Yanbu, and transported as cloud condensation nuclei to Douf Mountain. The suite of techniques used in this study has yielded an in-depth characterization of sand particles. Such information will be needed in future environmental, toxicological, epidemiological, and source apportionment studies.

  12. Bituminous solidification, disposal, transport and burial of spent ion-exchange resins. Part of a coordinated programme on treatment of spent ion exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project dealing with the incorporation of spent ion-exchange resins into bitumen was performed within the Agency coordinated research programme on treatment of spent ion-exchange resins. Physical and chemical properties of commercial ion-exchange resins, bitumens and bituminized resins were studied. It was shown that bitumen with low oil content and with a softening point of 60-70 deg. C are applicable for the incorporation of resins. The final waste form is allowed to contain maximum 50% resin. The comprehensive study of the biological resistance of B-30 bitumen was performed. That showed that any bacteriological attack can be regarded as generally insignificant. A continuously operating technology was realized on a semi-plant scale. The best operating conditions of this technology were determined. On the basis of the experience gained from the experiments a design of the bituminization plant of 50m3 dry resin/year treatment capacity was proposed

  13. Advances in Interlaboratory Testing and Evaluation of Bituminous Materials State-of-the-Art Report of the RILEM Technical Committee 206-ATB

    CERN Document Server

    Bahia, Hussain; Canestrari, Francesco; Roche, Chantal; Benedetto, Hervé; Piber, Herald; Sybilski, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    This STAR on asphalt materials presents the achievements of RILEM TC 206 ATB, acquired over many years of interlaboratory tests and international knowledge exchange. It covers experimental aspects of bituminous binder fatigue testing; the background on compaction methods and imaging techniques for characterizing asphalt mixtures including validation of a new imaging software; it focuses on experimental questions and analysis tools regarding mechanical wheel tracking tests, comparing results from different labs and using finite element techniques. Furthermore, long-term rutting prediction and evaluation for an Austrian road are discussed, followed by an extensive analysis and test program on interlayer bond testing of three different test sections which were specifically constructed for this purpose. Finally, the key issue of manufacturing reclaimed hot mix asphalt in the laboratory is studied and recommendations for laboratory ageing of bituminous mixtures are given.

  14. Silica sand resources in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulen, M.J. van der; Westerhoff, W.E.; Menkovic, A.; Gruijters, S.H.L.L.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Maljers, D.

    2009-01-01

    Silica sand, (almost) pure quartz sand, is a valuable and scarce mineral resource within the shallow Dutch subsurface. High-grade deposits are exploited in the southeastemmost part of the country, as raw material for the glass, ceramic, chemical and other process industries. Dutch land-use policy re

  15. Dinural patterns of blowing sand and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    The diurnal pattern of blowing sand results from a complex interaction between the sun, the atmosphere, and the sand surface. During the day, solar heating produces thermal instability, which enhances convective mixing of high momentum winds from the upper levels of the atmosphere to the surface la...

  16. On the Size Distribution of Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A model is presented of the development of the size distribution of sand while it is transported from a source to a deposit. The model provides a possible explanation of the log-hyperbolic shape that is frequently found in unimodal grain size distributions in natural sand deposits, as pointed out...

  17. Effect of transesterification degree and post-treatment on the in-service performance of NCO-functionalized vegetable oil bituminous products

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadri Vega, Antonio Abad; García Morales, Moisés; Navarro Domínguez, Francisco Javier; Partal López, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The bitumen modification through polyurethane prepolymers presents significant benefits for the manufacture of bituminous products for the paving industry. In this sense, this work explores the use, as bitumen modifier, of a novel reactive prepolymer synthesized by reaction of 4,4´,diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) and a vegetable oil-based polyol, castor oil (CO), previously transesterified with pentaerythritol. On the one hand, thermal analysis on transesterified CO revealed a highly stabl...

  18. Developing new markets for oil sands products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a review by Purvin and Gertz of western Canadian crude oil supply. This energy consulting firm provides advise to the energy sector. It suggests that oil sands production will surpass declining conventional production. Oil sands supply includes bitumen, synthetic crude oil (SCO), and diluent. It is forecasted that oil sands will increase from 42 per cent of western supply in 2002 to 78 per cent in 2015. The potential of Alberta's oil sands was discussed along with a recent study of refined products and petrochemicals from bitumen. Upgrading, refining and petrochemical case studies were presented. The author examined if a Canadian oil sands upgrading project with high capital costs can be competitive with competing projects in the United States and internationally. In addition to supply and demand issues, the presentation examined infrastructure capability and market potential in the United States. The economic potential and risks of preferred business cases compared to upgrading to SCO were also evaluated. 15 figs

  19. Sand Failure Mechanism and Sanding Parameters in Niger Delta Oil Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunday Isehunwa,

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sand production is a major issue during oil and gas production from unconsolidated reservoirs. In predicting the onset of sand production, it is important to accurately determine the failure mechanism and the contributing parameters. The aim of this study was to determine sand failure mechanism in the Niger-Delta, identify themajor contributing parameters and evaluate their effects on sanding.Completion and production data from 78 strings completed on 22 reservoirs in a Niger Delta oil Field were evaluated. Sand failure mechanisms and contributing parameters were identified and compared with published profiles. The results showed that cohesive stress is the predominant sand failure mechanism. Water cut, bean size and gas oil ratio (GOR impact sand production in the Niger Delta.

  20. JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-05-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

  1. Co-combustion of bituminous coal and biomass fuel blends: Thermochemical characterization, potential utilization and environmental advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuncai; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Xudong; Qi, Cuicui

    2016-10-01

    The thermochemical characteristics and gaseous trace pollutant behaviors during co-combustion medium-to-low ash bituminous coal with typical biomass residues (corn stalk and sawdust) were investigated. Lowering of ignition index, burnout temperature and activation energy in the major combustion stage are observed in the coal/biomass blends. The blending proportion of 20% and 30% are regarded as the optimum blends for corn stalk and sawdust, respectively, in according the limitations of heating value, activation energy, flame stability and base/acid ratio. The reductions of gaseous As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) were 4.5%, 7.8%, 6.3%, 9.8%, 9.4% and 17.4%, respectively, when co-combustion coal with 20% corn stalk. The elevated capture of trace elements were found in coal/corn stalk blend, while the coal/sawdust blend has the better PAHs control potential. The reduction mechanisms of gaseous trace pollutants were attributed to the fuel property, ash composition and relative residence time during combustion. PMID:27393832

  2. Nuclear method for determination of asphalt content corrected for moisture in bituminous mixture. Final report, March 1988-February 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents results of research on the development of a method for determination of asphalt content corrected for moisture using the nuclear-gauge method. The researchers selected an approach that involved rapid drying of the asphalt concrete samples in a microwave oven prior to the determination of asphalt content using a Troxler Model 3241-C nuclear asphalt-content gauge. As a reference, asphalt contents were also measured using quantitative extraction. In general, good agreement was found between asphalt contents measured by the Troxler Model 3241-C nuclear gauge and asphalt contents measured by quantitative extraction. In extended sampling for Plant 1, no significant increase in nuclear gauge error was seen over a 10-day sampling period, which indicates that daily calibration of the nuclear gauge is probably unnecessary to maintain satisfactory performance. The field demonstration of the procedure of drying the bituminous mixture in a microwave oven and then determining its asphalt content by the nuclear method indicated asphalt-content results were obtained approximately 1 hour faster than results obtained by quantitative extraction

  3. Applied Technological Direction of Power Plant Ash and Slag Waste Management when Kuznetsk Bituminous Coal is Burned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihach Snejana A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently a lot of power plants have a problem with storage of coal combustion solid by-products (ash and slag. Holding capacity of existing power plants available ash dumps were enlarged and modernized repeatedly. Many plants have two or even three of them. Today new ash dump construction is economically inconvenient due to need to assign new plots of land and their inconveniently big distance from a plant, which increase ash and slag transportation expenses. The goal of our research work is to find promising directions for ash and slag waste mass utilization based on Kuznetsk bituminous coals experimental data on ultimate composition and properties. The experimental research of ash, slag and their mixture samples from ash dumps brought us to conclusion that the most promising direction for these materials application in large quantities is construction industry including road construction. Be-sides, we lined up some other directions for ash, slag, and ash and slag mixture possible application. These directions might not provide mass utilization but they are promising from a point of view of the researched waste properties.

  4. Dye-adsorption capacity of bituminous fly ash and its pozzolanic property after used as dye-adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penpolcharoen, M.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Bituminous fly ash, which is an industrial waste, was used as an adsorbent to remove dyestuff from the textile-dye wastewater. The batch kinetic and isotherm experiments of the synthetic wastewater were firstly conducted to determine the adsorption behavior and optimal conditions for adsorption. The optimal conditions were then applied to the actual textile-dye wastewater. Under the original conditions of fly ash and wastewater, the results indicated that the color could be removed up to 86.65% by 12 g of the fly ash /L of the wastewater within 30 min. Its adsorption was described by the Freundlich isotherm. The dye-adsorbed fly ash was further studied on its pozzolanic property in terms of compressive strength by using it as a partial substitute to Portland cement type I to produce mortar. The result revealed that the highest compressive strength was of the sample containing 10% by weight of the dye-adsorbed fly ash in replacement of cement. It possessed 215 kg/cm2 at 28 days, which is 92.67% of the sample containing 10% by weight of the original fly ash in replacement of cement, or 83.33 of the cement mortar. For the environmental concern, leachabilities of lead (Pb, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu and zinc (Zn from all mortars were also carried out. No leaching of the heavy metals from any samples could be detected. Hence, the dye-adsorbed fly ash can be used as an environmental friendly construction material.

  5. Effect of mineral matrix and seam thickness on reflectance of vitrinite in high to low volatile bituminous coals - an enigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, F.; Gentzis, T.; Snowdon, L.R.; Bustin, R.M.; Feinstein, S.; Labonte, M. (Geological Survey of Canada, Calgary, AB (Canada). Inst. of Sedimentary and Petroleum Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The variation of vitrinite reflectance with respect to mineral matrix (lithology), the thickness of coal seams and coal lenses and the type of organic matter was studied from two cores in a 550 m sedimentary succession from the Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Kootenay Group. The data obtained indicate that reflectance in high to low volatile bituminous coals (%R[sub o], max0.8-1.35) with depth of burial is affected by the percentage of organic matter in the samples. A positive correlation between the vitrinite reflectance and the percentage of organic matter and a negative correlation with the percentage of mineral matter exist and the thicker the coal interval, the higher the vitrinite reflectance. Variations in vitrinite reflectance may be attributed to chemical differences in the organic matter, possibly induced by degradation and diagenesis syn- or post-depositionally, and to the effect of some clay minerals present in the sediments, which may act as catalysts. Differences in the thermal conductivity of the strata have demonstrably not accounted for the observed variations in reflectance with lithology. The differences in the vitrinite reflectance of organic matter between lithotypes is substantial and is thus an important consideration in resolving the time-temperature history and generation of hydrocarbons from a sedimentary succession.

  6. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko eOhtomo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Geological CO2 sequestration in unmineable subsurface oil/gas fields and coal formations has been proposed as a means of reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere. However, the feasibility of injecting CO2 into subsurface depends upon a variety of geological and economic conditions, and the ecological consequences are largely unpredictable. In this study, we developed a new flow-through-type reactor system to examine potential geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impacts associated with CO2 injection by simulating in situ pressure (0–100 MPa and temperature (0–70°C conditions. Using the reactor system, anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 mL/min, respectively were continuously supplemented into a column comprised of bituminous coal and sand under a pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa at 40°C for 56 days. 16S rRNA gene analysis of the bacterial components showed distinct spatial separation of the predominant taxa in the coal and sand over the course of the experiment. Cultivation experiments using sub-sampled fluids revealed that some microbes survived, or were metabolically active, under CO2-rich conditions. However, no methanogens were activated during the experiment, even though hydrogenotrophic and methylotrophic methanogens were obtained from conventional batch-type cultivation at 20°C. During the reactor experiment, the acetate and methanol concentration in the fluids increased while the δ13Cacetate, H2 and CO2 concentrations decreased, indicating the occurrence of homo-acetogenesis. 16S rRNA genes of homo-acetogenic spore-forming bacteria related to the genus Sporomusa were consistently detected from the sandstone after the reactor experiment. Our results suggest that the injection of CO2 into a natural coal-sand formation preferentially stimulates homo-acetogenesis rather than methanogenesis, and that this process is accompanied by biogenic CO2 conversion to

  7. Formation mechanism of cracks in saturated sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobing Lu; Zhemin Zheng; Yongren Wu

    2006-01-01

    The formation mechanism of "water film" (or crack) in saturated sand is analyzed theoretically and numerically.The theoretical analysis shows that there will be no stable "water film" in the saturated sand if the strength of the skeleton is zero and no positions are choked.It is shown by numerical simulation that stable water films initiate and grow if the choking state keeps unchanged once the fluid velocities decrease to zero in the liquefied sand column.The developments of "water film" based on the model presented in this paper are compared with experimental results.

  8. LABORATORY STUDY ON CRACKS IN SATURATED SANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Fujiao; Tan Qingming; Che-Min Cheng

    2000-01-01

    It has been reported[1]that when a loosely packed column of saturated sand in a vertical cylindrical container is shock loaded axially by dropping to the floor,large horizontal cracks initiate,grow and eventually fade away in the sand as it settles under gravity.This paper shows that a similar phenomenon can also be observed when shock loading is replaced by forcing water to percolate upward through the sand column.It is believed that our result sheds further light on the physics of formation of these cracks.

  9. Sandėlių modeliavimas

    OpenAIRE

    Sungaila, Marius

    2008-01-01

    Šiame magistriniame darbe yra aptariama logistikos svarba prekybinėse įmonėse. Atliekamas sandėliavimo ir transportavimo, bei efektyvaus klientų užsakymų tenkinimo naudojant informacines technologijas optimizavimo tyrimas. Panašių programų analizė. Neformaliai ir formaliai Z kalba sandėlių sistemos aprašymas. Bendro prekybos centro ir sandėlio PLA modelio parengimas su agregacine schema ir koncepciniu modeliu, formalia specifikacija. Taip pat išskirtos perėjimų ir išėjimų operacijos. Vėliau b...

  10. Watching Faults Grow in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accretionary sandbox experiments provide a rich environment for investigating the processes of fault development. These experiments engage students because 1) they enable direct observation of fault growth, which is impossible in the crust (type 1 physical model), 2) they are not only representational but can also be manipulated (type 2 physical model), 3) they can be used to test hypotheses (type 3 physical model) and 4) they resemble experiments performed by structural geology researchers around the world. The structural geology courses at UMass Amherst utilize a series of accretionary sandboxes experiments where students first watch a video of an experiment and then perform a group experiment. The experiments motivate discussions of what conditions they would change and what outcomes they would expect from these changes; hypothesis development. These discussions inevitably lead to calculations of the scaling relationships between model and crustal fault growth and provide insight into the crustal processes represented within the dry sand. Sketching of the experiments has been shown to be a very effective assessment method as the students reveal which features they are analyzing. Another approach used at UMass is to set up a forensic experiment. The experiment is set up with spatially varying basal friction before the meeting and students must figure out what the basal conditions are through the experiment. This experiment leads to discussions of equilibrium and force balance within the accretionary wedge. Displacement fields can be captured throughout the experiment using inexpensive digital image correlation techniques to foster quantitative analysis of the experiments.

  11. Effect of asphaltene and resin oils on the viscosity of bituminous petroleum materials to be used as asphalt primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bencomo, M. R.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The bituminous crude from the Machete, Venezuela, area, which has such a fluid consistency that it falls outside the normal scope of the A5TM D-5 (1 penetration test exceeding the 3D-mm ceiling specified in that standard and can be used as an asphalt primer: Like other asphalt products, these materials are -chemically speaking- a mix of numerous naphthenic, paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds containing sulphur, nitrogen, oxygen and so on. They have a dense and a malthene oil phase which, along with the natural hydrocarbons additives used in these products acts as a volatile fluidizer. The former is described as a mix of asphaltenes: complex high molecular weight substances that are insoluble in paraffinic hydrocarbons and soluble in aromatic compounds such as benzene. The malthene oil phase, in turn, consists in a mix of resins and hydrocarbons and together the two constitute a colloidal system. The experiments discussed in the present paper were conducted to determine the effect of the proportion of asphaltenes and resin oils on the viscosity of such bituminous crude emulsions/ with a view to their use as primers. These experiments were run in a Parr batch reactor in a nitrogen atmosphere using n-heptane as a solvent. The resins were separated after the asphaltenes precipitated from the samples and subsequently from the malthene fraction obtained. The results showed that the asphaltenes account for the structural characteristics and consistency of the medium and the resin oils for its cohesive properties/,the malthene oils act as solvents.Los crudos extrapesados procedentes del área Machete (Venezuela son materiales de consistencia blanda o fluida, por lo que se salen del campo en el que normalmente se aplica el ensayo de penetración a productos asfálticos según el método ASTM D-5 (1, cuyo límite máximo es 30 mm, y pueden ser utilizados como pinturas asfálticas de imprimación. Al igual que otros productos

  12. FTIR analysis of bentonite in moulding sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, C.; Holtzer, M.; Bobrowski, A.

    2008-05-01

    Bentonite is used in a wide range of applications. One of them is the foundry industry. The aim of this study was to investigate modification of moulding sands by dust which is generated during foundry process. Recycling of this dust is very important from ecological point of view. The samples of moulding sands were examined by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Analysis of the bands due to the Si-O stretching vibrations allows to reveal the changes of active bentonite and silica sand, i.e. the main components of the moulding sands. FTIR results are compared with technological properties of the materials studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods have been used as the complementary measurement.

  13. CRADE OF SAND AND DUST STORM WEATHER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Ruoyun; Tian Cuiying; Bi Baogui; Yang Keming; Wang Youheng; Tuo Ya; Ding Haifang; Zhang Tairen

    2011-01-01

    Background Sand and dust storm,as one of the main disastrous weathers that affect northern China,not only affect the people health and normal life,but cause the short-term climatic changes due to the direct and indirect radiation of the earth-atmosphere system through the dust floating in the sky.The sand end dust weather and its potential harm on the national economy,ecological environment,social activities and other aspects have aroused worldwide concern.

  14. Virtual Calibration Chamber CPT on Ticino sand

    OpenAIRE

    Butlanska, Joanna; Arroyo Alvarez de Toledo, Marcos; Gens Solé, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The following paper surnmarizes results of CPT's performed in virtual calibration chamber (VCC) built with a 3D model based on the distinct element method (DEM). A discrete material tailored to mimic Ticino sand is tested at different densities, stress and stress history. The limit cone tip resistance from the numerical experiments shows quantitative agreement with different empirical curves summarizing previous tests on Ticino sand in physical calibration chambers (ENEL and ISMES).

  15. Sand dunes on Mars and on Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro Parteli, Eric Josef

    2007-01-01

    In this work the dune model introduced by Sauermann et al. (2001) is extended and applied to investigate the formation of different dune shapes on Mars and on Earth as function of wind directionality and sand availability. The formation of sand dunes on Mars under the present atmospheric conditions of the red planet is studied and conclusions about wind speed, migration velocity of dunes and changing wind regimes on Mars are presented. Field measurements of the shape of coastal transverse dun...

  16. Laboratory evaluation of selected tar sand asphalts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.W.; Epps, J.A.; Gallaway, B.M.

    1980-12-01

    Three tar sand asphalts of similar grades prepared from one syncrude by three different refining methods were characterized by tests commonly used to specify paving asphalts together with certain special tests. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures were prepared using these asphalts and tested in the laboratory to determine strength stiffness stability, tensile properties, temperature effects and water susceptibility. Comparison of the tar sand asphalt properties to conventional petroleum asphalt properties reveal no striking differences.

  17. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  18. Analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Li Bo; Xiao-Jing Zheng; Shao-Zhen Duan; Yi-Rui Liang

    2013-01-01

    In the research of windblown sand movement,the lift-off and incident velocities of saltating sand particles play a significant role in bridging the spatial and temporal scales from single sand particle's motion to windblown sand flux.In this paper,we achieved wind tunnel measurements of the movement of sand particles near sand bed through improving the wind tunnel experimental scheme of paticle image velocimetry (PIV) and data processing method.And then the influence of observation height on the probability distributions of lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles was analyzed.The results demonstrate that the observation height has no obvious influence on the distribution pattern of the lift-off and incident velocities of sand particles,i.e.,the probability distribution of horizontal and vertical velocities of lift-off and incident sand particles follow a Gaussian distribution and a negative exponential distribution,respectively.However,it influences the center of the Gaussian distribution,the decay constant and the amplitude of the negative exponential distribution.

  19. Pragmatics of reclaimed sand quality assessment recovered nowadays from various used sand systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dańko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of the reclamation degree of used sands is not a simple, clearly defined issue. The great variety of technologies ofmoulding and core sands, based on the organic and inorganic binders does not allow the use of a single, universal index assessing thedegree of reclamation. The article presents the problems of research relating to selection of proper criteria for assessing the degree ofreclamation process of used moulding and core sands deriving from different technologies. The most often applied in practice types ofused sands and the most adequate in practice methods of assessing the degrees of their reclamation were characterized.

  20. Generating dam construction material from tailings sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, H. [Northgate Minerals Corp., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-02-15

    Northgate Minerals is a leading gold and copper producer with mining operations, development projects and exploration properties in Canada and Australia. This presentation provided background information on the Northgate Minerals Corp. Kemess Mines and how to generate dam construction material from tailings sand. Specifically, the objectives of the program are to generate construction material from tailings sand and replace earth fill construction with tailings sand from which sulphur has been removed. This presentation reviewed environmental specifications such as producing a construction material that does not generate poor water quality. It also reviewed engineering specifications such as producing a material suitable for d/s buttress zone placement. The presentation discussed the evaluation of source material as well as analysis challenges. The evaluation of Kemess ore was also outlined. along with other topics such as environmental testing and verification of sand plant beta testing; criteria and communication; operational procedures including sand plant operation and fail safe procedures; placement of sulphur-free sand; and benefits. It was concluded that the tailings cyclone plant was constructed at a cost of 5.4 million dollars. tabs., figs.

  1. Discrete particle simulation of mixed sand transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengjun Xiao; Liejin Guo; Debiao Li; Yueshe Wang

    2012-01-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian numerical simulation is performed on mixed sand transport.Volume averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved to calculate gas motion,and particle motion is calculated using Newton's equation,involving a hard sphere model to describe particle-to-particle and particle-to-wall collisions.The influence of wall characteristics,size distribution of sand particles and boundary layer depth on vertical distribution of sand mass flux and particle mean horizontal velocity is analyzed,suggesting that all these three factors affect sand transport at different levels.In all cases,for small size groups,sand mass flux first increases with height and then decreases while for large size groups,it decreases exponentially with height and for middle size groups the behavior is in-between.The mean horizontal velocity for all size groups well fits experimental data,that is,increasing logarithmically with height in the middle height region.Wall characteristics greatly affects particle to wall collision and makes the flat bed similar to a Gobi surface and the rough bed similar to a sandy surface.Particle size distribution largely affects the sand mass flux and the highest heights they can reach especially for larger particles.

  2. Predicting the occurrence of sand banks in the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, van der Henriët H.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.

    2009-01-01

    Sand banks have a wavelength between 1 and 10 km, and they are up to several tens of meters high. Also, sand banks may have an impact on large-scale human activities that take place in the North Sea like sand mining, shipping, offshore wind farms, etc. Therefore, it is important to know where sand b

  3. Effects of advanced oxidation on green sand properties via iron casting into green sand molds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujue; Cannon, Fred S; Voigt, Robert C; Komarneni, Sridhar; Furness, J C

    2006-05-01

    The effects of advanced oxidation (AO) processing on the properties of green sand were studied via pouring cast iron into green sand molds. Upon cooling, the green sand molds were autopsied at various distances from the metal-sand interface. Autopsy green sand samples collected from a mold that incorporated AO water were characterized and compared to controlled samples collected from a similar autopsied mold made with conventional tap water (TAP). It was found that the AO processing removed a coating of coal pyrolysis products from the clay surface that typically accumulated on the clay surface. As a result, the AO-conditioned green sand retained 10-15% more active clay as measured bythe standard ultrasonic methylene blue titration than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. The AO processing also nearly doubled the generation of activated carbon from the normalized amount of coal composition of the green sand during the casting process. The AO-enhanced activated carbon generation and the AO-incurred clay surface cleaning provided the AO-conditioned green sand with higher normalized pore volume, and thus higher normalized m-xylene adsorption capacity, i.e., relative to before-metal-pouring conditions. Furthermore, mathematical analysis indicated that the AO-conditioned green sand better retained its important properties after pouring than did the TAP-conditioned green sand. Effectively, this meant after metal pouring, the AO-conditioned sample offered about the same net properties as the TAP-conditioned sample, even though the AO-conditioned sample contained less clay and coal before metal pouring. These results conformed to the full-scale foundry empirical finding that when AO is used, foundries need less makeup clay and coal addition through each casting cycle, and they release less air emissions. PMID:16719117

  4. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D. Jungerius; M.J.P.M. Riksen

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice-age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  5. Contribution of laser altimetry images to the geomorphology of the Late Holocene inland drift sands of the European Sand Belt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungerius, P.D.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper explores the possibilities of applying the analysis of laser altimetry images to Dutch drift sands. All along the European Sand Belt, which stretches from Great Britain to the Ural Mountains, Late Glacial cover sands, river dunes and other ice–age deposits were reactivated as drift sand du

  6. Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

    1993-03-01

    Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

  7. Nuclear energy in the oils sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arsenault, J.E.

    2014-09-15

    The major Canadian oil sands are located in Alberta and Saskatchewan, with most production from the strata along the Athabasca River in Alberta. The economically recoverable oil sands reserves are estimated to be 168 billion barrels which at a current production rate of 1.8 million barrels per day (2012), are projected to last a very long time. Canada has been blessed with vast energy resources which make it potentially energy-independent and able to provide significant exports but there are concerns that their development cannot be managed in a wholly acceptable manner. Comparable concerns have been applied to nuclear energy in the past and in recent times to the oil sands. The technologies associated with these energy sources have always been controversial because they are at the confluence of economics and politics where finding a balance between risk and reward is difficult. So it should be no surprise that when these technologies get linked together in certain proposals their prospect for success is doubly difficult. The possible use of nuclear energy for production of oil from the oil sands dates back to the late 1950s, when an experiment to mine the oil by detonating an underground nuclear device was proposed. It was predicted that the heat and pressure released from such a device would create a large cavern into which oil would flow, and from where it would be pumped to the surface. Almost at the same time, oil sands research using conventional sources of energy had culminated with the development of practical refining processes, essentially those still in use today. These methods require large amounts of heat energy in the form of hot water and steam. In this century nuclear energy was proposed as the source for the heat required by the oil sands production processes. To date neither of these nuclear proposals for oil sands projects have been successful, because the economic and political balance could not be struck. (author)

  8. Detection of rare earth elements in Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal ash using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Phuoc [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United State; Mcintyre, Dustin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United State

    2015-10-01

    We reported our preliminary results on the use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy to analyze the rare earth elements contained in ash samples from Powder River Basin sub-bituminous coal (PRB-coal). We have identified many elements in the lanthanide series (cerium, europium, holmium, lanthanum, lutetium, praseodymium, promethium, samarium, terbium, ytterbium) and some elements in the actinide series (actinium, thorium, uranium, plutonium, berkelium, californium) in the ash samples. In addition, various metals were also seen to present in the ash samples

  9. Probability of rebound and eject of sand particles in wind-blown sand movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Xiaojing Zheng

    2007-01-01

    When incident particles impact into a sand bed in wind-blown sand movement, rebound of the incident particles and eject of the sand particles by the incident particles affect directly the development of wind sand flux. In order to obtain rebound and eject lift-off probability of the sand particles, we apply the particle-bed stochastic collision model presented in our pervious works to derive analytic solutions of velocities of the incident and impacted particles in the postcollision bed. In order to describe randomness inherent in the real particle-bed collision, we take the incident angle, theimpact position and the direction of resultant action of sand particles in sand bed on the impacted sand particle as random variables, and calculate the rebound and eject velocities,angles and coefficients (ratio of rebound and eject velocity to incident velocity). Numerical results are found in accordance with current experimental results. The rebound and eject lift-off probabilities versus the incident and creeping velocities are predicted.

  10. Controls on coalbed methane potential and gas sorption characteristics of high-volatile bituminous coals in Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Acosta, Wilfrido

    distribution, and adsorption experiments at high and low gas pressures are employed to estimate reservoir gas capacity and to characterize high volatile bituminous coals of Indiana for potential future CO2 sequestration. Understanding the mechanisms and geologic conditions that control the occurrence of gas in coal allows us to better characterize: (1) CBM reservoirs for their potential economic use, and (2) coal seams as future receptacles of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.

  11. Progressive oxidation of pyrite in five bituminous coal samples: An As XANES and 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naturally occurring pyrite commonly contains minor substituted metals and metalloids (As, Se, Hg, Cu, Ni, etc.) that can be released to the environment as a result of its weathering. Arsenic, often the most abundant minor constituent in pyrite, is a sensitive monitor of progressive pyrite oxidation in coal. To test the effect of pyrite composition and environmental parameters on the rate and extent of pyrite oxidation in coal, splits of five bituminous coal samples having differing amounts of pyrite and extents of As substitution in the pyrite, were exposed to a range of simulated weathering conditions over a period of 17 months. Samples investigated include a Springfield coal from Indiana (whole coal pyritic S = 2.13 wt.%; As in pyrite = detection limit (d.l.) to 0.06 wt.%), two Pittsburgh coal samples from West Virginia (pyritic S = 1.32-1.58 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 0.34 wt.%), and two samples from the Warrior Basin, Alabama (pyritic S = 0.26-0.27 wt.%; As in pyrite = d.l. to 2.72 wt.%). Samples were collected from active mine faces, and expected differences in the concentration of As in pyrite were confirmed by electron microprobe analysis. Experimental weathering conditions in test chambers were maintained as follows: (1) dry Ar atmosphere; (2) dry O2 atmosphere; (3) room atmosphere (relative humidity ∼20-60%); and (4) room atmosphere with samples wetted periodically with double-distilled water. Sample splits were removed after one month, nine months, and 17 months to monitor the extent of As and Fe oxidation using As X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively. Arsenic XANES spectroscopy shows progressive oxidation of pyritic As to arsenate, with wetted samples showing the most rapid oxidation. 57Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy also shows a much greater proportion of Fe3+ forms (jarosite, Fe3+ sulfate, FeOOH) for samples stored under wet conditions, but much less difference among samples stored

  12. Capturing phosphates with iron enhanced sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Andrew J; Gulliver, John S; Weiss, Peter T

    2012-06-01

    Most treatment practices for urban runoff capture pollutants such as phosphorus by either settling or filtration while dissolved phosphorus, typically as phosphates, is untreated. Dissolved phosphorus, however, represents an average 45% of total phosphorus in stormwater runoff and can be more than 95%. In this study, a new stormwater treatment technology to capture phosphate, called the Minnesota Filter, is introduced. The filter comprises iron filings mixed with sand and is tested for phosphate removal from synthetic stormwater. Results indicate that sand mixed with 5% iron filings captures an average of 88% phosphate for at least 200 m of treated depth, which is significantly greater than a sand filter without iron filings. Neither incorporation of iron filings into a sand filter nor capture of phosphates onto iron filings in column experiments had a significant effect on the hydraulic conductivity of the filter at mixtures of 5% or less iron by weight. Field applications with up to 10.7% iron were operated over 1 year without detrimental effects upon hydraulic conductivity. A model is applied and fit to column studies to predict the field performance of iron-enhanced sand filters. The model predictions are verified through the predicted performance of the filters in removing phosphates in field applications. Practical applications of the technology, both existing and proposed, are presented so stormwater managers can begin implementation.

  13. Planet-wide sand motion on mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, N.T.; Bourke, M.C.; Geissler, P.E.; Banks, M.E.; Colon, C.; Diniega, S.; Golombek, M.P.; Hansen, C.J.; Mattson, S.; McEwen, A.S.; Mellon, M.T.; Stantzos, N.; Thomson, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior to Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data, images of Mars showed no direct evidence for dune and ripple motion. This was consistent with climate models and lander measurements indicating that winds of sufficient intensity to mobilize sand were rare in the low-density atmosphere. We show that many sand ripples and dunes across Mars exhibit movement of as much as a few meters per year, demonstrating that Martian sand migrates under current conditions in diverse areas of the planet. Most motion is probably driven by wind gusts that are not resolved in global circulation models. A past climate with a thicker atmosphere is only required to move large ripples that contain coarse grains. ?? 2012 Geological Society of America.

  14. Sand attrition in conical spouted beds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aranzazu R. Fernández-Akarregui; Jon Makibar; Isabel Alava; Luis Diaz; Fernando Cueva; Roberto Aguado; Gartzen Lopez; Martin Olazar

    2012-01-01

    A study was carried out on the attrition in conical spouted beds using two sands with different properties for several bed heights and gas flow rates.Furthermore,the influence of a draft tube was studied at ambient and high temperatures.The main objective was to acquire knowledge on the attrition of sand beds for biomass pyrolysis in a pilot plant provided with a conical spouted bed reactor.A first-order kinetic equation is proposed for sand attrition in a conical spouted bed at room temperature.The predicted attrition rate constant depends exponentially on excess air velocity over that for minimum spouting.Both the draft tube and temperature increase contribute to reduction of attrition.

  15. Instrumented model pile tests on sand plugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haaren, L.J.C. van; Verruijt, A. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Kolk, H.J. [Fugro Engineers B.V., Leidschendam (Netherlands)

    1995-12-31

    0pen ended piles develop internal frictional resistance between the internal soil plug end the pile wall during axial loading. Current pipe pile design practice assumes that the ultimate internal skin friction is of the same order of magnitude as the outer skin friction. This paper describes a series of laboratory pile load tests on instrumented model pipe piles, designed to investigate the development of plug stresses and skin friction along the plug length during pile loading. The piles contain sand columns of various relative densities and of different heights. The soil plugs are loaded to failure under fully drained conditions. The test data indicate that internal skin friction in sand can be substantially higher than assumed in conventional design practice. This finding could lead to significant economical savings on future pipe pile foundations in sand.

  16. Thermoluminescent dosimetric properties of Descalvado sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, M.I.; Caldas, L.V.E

    2006-07-01

    Sand samples proceeding from Descalvado, Sao Paulo, were studied with regard to their dosimetric properties using the thermoluminescence technique (TL) for high doses. These sand samples present steady physical and chemical characteristics to the end items, and they are used in the glass industry and for casting. The TL curves of the samples were obtained after an irradiation at the Gamma-Cell system ({sup 60} Co), of IPEN. The glow curves present two peaks at 80 C and 220 C approximately. Calibration curves were obtained for doses between 50 Gy and 5 kGy. The results indicate that the sand samples can be used for high-doses dosimetry in several areas of applications of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  17. Mine Drainage and Oil Sand Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xinchao; Wolfe, F Andrew; Li, Yanjun

    2015-10-01

    Mine drainage from the mining of mineral resources (coal, metals, oil sand, or industrial minerals) remains as a persistent environmental problem. This review summarizes the scientific literature published in 2014 on the technical issues related to mine drainage or mine water in active and abandoned coal/hard rock mining sites or waste spoil piles. Also included in this review is the water from oil sand operations. This review is divided into the four sections: 1) mine drainage characterization, 2) prediction and environmental impact, 3) treatment technologies, 4) oil sand water. Many papers presented in this review address more than one aspect and different sections should not be regarded as being mutuallyexclusive or all-inclusive.

  18. An integrated oil sands environment monitoring plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-15

    This oil sands monitoring plan was published by Environment Canada, which coordinated the work of several independent scientists in a process intended to deliver a world class environmental monitoring program. The plan was created in keeping with the core principles laid out by the federal oil sands advisory panel. These are that the plan should be comprehensive, scientifically rigorous, adaptive and robust, collaborative, transparent and accessible. The proposed oil Sands monitoring program framework conforms to these principles. The approach used was ecosystem-based and took into account several essential components of the system such as hydrology, water quality and quantity, and climatology and it also incorporated the relationships between these components. The best available science-based approach was used. The implementation of the plan is expected to result in standardized reporting, including peer-reviewed and plain language publications.

  19. Development tendencies of moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislaw M. Dobosz1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the technology for making moulding and core sands will be strictly limited by tough requirements due to protection of the natural environment. These tendencies are becoming more and more tense, so that we will reach a point when even processes, that from technological point of view fulfill high requirements of the foundry industry, must be replaced by more ecologically-friendly solutions. Hence, technologies using synthetic resins as binding materials will be limited. This paper presents some predictable development tendencies of moulding and core sands. The increasing role of inorganic substances will be noticed, including silicate binders with significantly improved properties, such as improved knock-out property or higher reclamation strength. Other interesting solutions might also be moulding sands bonded by geo-polymers and phosphate binders or salts and also binders based on degradable biopolymers. These tendencies and the usefulness of these binders are put forward in this paper.

  20. Sand transport, erosion and granular electrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrison, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    The transport of granular materials by wind has a major impact on our environment through sand/soil erosion and the generation and transport of atmospheric dust aerosols. Terrestrially the transport of dust involves billions of tons of material every year, influencing the global climate...... can affect grain transport through the generation of intense electric fields and processes of electrostatic assembly. Importantly the transport of sand is characterized by saltation, which is known to be an active process for erosion and therefore a source for dust and sand formation. Using novel...... erosion simulation techniques the link between grain transport rates and erosion rates has been quantified. Furthermore this can be linked to production rates for dust and has been associated with chemical and mineral alteration through a process of mechanical activation of fractured surfaces. This work...

  1. Sand Dunes Fixation in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This study was carried out at Sand Dunes Stabilization Researches Station in Baiji district (230 ln north of Baghdad, Iraq) to evaluate the effects of local soil conditioners manufactured from oil derivatives and plant residuals on sand dunes fixation as the first step for sand dunes stabilization. The results indicate that the fuel oil has the first place in improving wind erosion parameters in the study area, such as increasing mean weight diameter, dry aggregates percentage, the needed time for complete disaggregation by dry sieving, and decreasing the disaggregation rates. Bitumen emulsion occupies the second place, while the plant residuals occupies the third place and has slight effects on the studied parameters. Effects of conditioners on natural vegetation cover are negative in oil derivatives treatments,while positive in plants residuals treatments.

  2. Effect of sand production on casing integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.Q.; Zhu, T.G.; Fang, L.T. [Dongsheng Petroleum Development Stock Co. Ltd., Shengli Oilfield (China); Yuan, Y. [BitCan Geosciences and Engineering Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    Well casings are exposed to potentially corrosive formation fluids and subject to in situ stresses, fluid pressure, and reservoir compaction and expansion. Casing integrity can be compromised by human errors such as poor cement placement and inappropriate perforations. This paper described the outcome of an engineering study examining the effects of unintended excessive sand production on casing integrity. Supports to casings can be impacted when excessive amounts of sand are produced from the near-wellbore region. Compromised casing supports can buckle under axial loading from reservoir compaction. A case study of a well in the NiuZhang oilfield that experienced significant casing deformation 11 years after its completion was presented. Workover tools and production tubings could not pass through the damaged interval due to dramatic multiple doglegs. A mathematical analysis of casing buckling and activation of weak planes in the overburden suggested that a combination of excessive sand production and reservoir compaction during the well washing was responsible for the casing damage. The rapid 35 MPa pressure drop during the well washing disturbed rock materials around the perforation interval. Injected waste water reduced the rock strength due to swelling of the clay fines upon exposure to the water, causing significant amounts of rock solids to be produced over time. The excessive sand production formed a large void behind the casing and depleted its lateral support. It was concluded that proper management of sand production is necessary. However, control of sand production increases operating costs and can compromise oil production rates. Preliminary field measures such as the use of inclined wells, and gentle pressure drop during well washing were recommended. 16 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs.

  3. Use Possibilities for River Sand in Foundry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Rădulea

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the following characteristics are studied: the chemical and mineralogical composition, the granulation and content of leachate component of different types of sands, collected from various fords of running waters in comparison to those coming from known mines and used as such in foundries for the preparation of casting mixtures. The purpose of the study starts from the premises of finding reduction possibilities of costs in part casting, keeping in mind that known deposits from our country contain increasingly reduced quantities of casting sands.

  4. Undrained Cyclic Behaviour of Dense Frederikshavn Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Sørensen, Kris Wessel;

    2013-01-01

    A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series of undra......A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series...

  5. Log-inject-log in sand consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is described for gathering information for the determination of the adequacy of placement of sand consolidating plastic for sand control in oil and gas wells. The method uses a high neutron cross-section tracer which becomes part of the plastic and uses pulsed neutron logging before and after injection of the plastic. Preferably, the method uses lithium, boron, indium, and/or cadmium tracers. Boron oxide is especially useful and can be dissolved in alcohol and mixed with the plastic ingredients

  6. Oil sand synfuel production using nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of oil sand as a primary energy carrier is illustrated. The oil sand mining project 'synfuel' in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, is described. On the basis of a layout of an In-situ-process different possibilities of introducing nuclear energy to the process are described. This leads to an increase of the product yield, leading finally to a doubling of the energy output compared to the reference layout. The introduction of nuclear energy contributes to the reduction of emissions, in particular to the emission of carbon dioxide in the conversion process. (orig.)

  7. Real-Time Simulation of Aeolian Sand Movement and Sand Ripple Evolution: A Method Based on the Physics of Blown Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Bao-Gang Hu

    2012-01-01

    Simulation and visualization of aeolian sand movement and sand ripple evolution are a challenging subject.In this paper,we propose a physically based modeling and simulating method that can be used to synthesize sandy terrain in various patterns.Our method is based on the mechanical behavior of individual sand grains,which are widely studied in the physics of blown sand.We accounted significant mechanisms of sand transportation into the sand model,such as saltation,successive saltation and collapsing,while simplified the vegetation model and wind field model to make the simulation feasible and affordable.We implemented the proposed method on the programming graphics processing unit (GPU) to get real-time simulation and rendering.Finally,we proved that our method can reflect many characteristics of sand ripple evolution through several demonstrations.We also gave several synthesized desert scenes made from the simulated height field to display its significance on application.

  8. LEARNING ABOUT THE OCEANS FROM SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As a young geophysicist in the 1980s, Rob Holman attended a conference in San Francisco that included a field trip to a beach. Dr Holman, who grew up inland, stared at the ocean, assessing the strengths of the waves. But when he looked around, everyone else was studying the sand.

  9. Two Tales of Martian Sands and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapotre, M. G. A.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Arvidson, R. E.; Minson, S. E.; Ayoub, F.; Bridges, N.

    2014-07-01

    We invert for mineral abundances and grain sizes of dunes at Endeavour and Gale craters from CRISM data and Hapke's theory. Our results are consistent with ground truth from the rovers. We detect dust on dunes at Gale, and relate it to sand activity.

  10. Drawing a Line in the Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ni Yanshuo

    2011-01-01

    @@ CONVERTING vast tracks of desert into arable land is no easy task, even using the most advanced technology.Yet a woman who hails from north Cbina's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region met this challenge head on.Using the helping hands of other determined women, she has made remarkable progress in pushing back the sands of time.

  11. Permeability Tests on Silkeborg Sand No. 0000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Willy; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  12. Permeability Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    The flow through porous media plays an important role in various engineering disciplines, as for example in ground water hydrology and soil mechanics. In the present study the permeability is determined for a fine, saturated sand. As the flow through a porous media strongly depends...

  13. EXPRESSING SUPPLY LIMITATION IN SAND SALTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltation-driven sandblasting is the most effective producer of windblown dust. Modeling of wind-blown dust emissions requires an efficient parameterization of sand flux in the saltating mode. According to the theory of P. R. Owen the horizontal mass flux of saltating uniform p...

  14. Building Whales in Sand and Mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Carolyn

    1980-01-01

    Describes two-week summer workshops on evolution, adaptation, and behavior of whales, conducted for children by Cold Spring Harbor Whaling Museum (New York), and culminating in creation of life-size sand sculptures of whales. Provides selected list of periodicals, teaching materials, identification guides, records, and societies devoted to whales…

  15. Dike intrusions into bituminous coal, Illinois Basin: H, C, N, O isotopic responses to rapid and brief heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Mastalerz, Maria; Gao, Ling; Sauer, Peter E.; Topalov, Katarina

    2009-10-01

    Unlike long-term heating in subsiding sedimentary basins, the near-instantaneous thermal maturation of sedimentary organic matter near magmatic intrusions is comparable to artificial thermal maturation in the laboratory in terms of short duration and limited extent. This study investigates chemical and H, C, N, O isotopic changes in high volatile bituminous coal near two Illinois dike contacts and compares observed patterns and trends with data from other published studies and from artificial maturation experiments. Our study pioneers in quantifying isotopically exchangeable hydrogen and measuring the D/H (i.e., 2H/ 1H) ratio of isotopically non-exchangeable organic hydrogen in kerogen near magmatic contacts. Thermal stress in coal caused a reduction of isotopically exchangeable hydrogen in kerogen from 5% to 6% in unaltered coal to 2-3% at contacts, mostly due to elimination of functional groups (e.g., sbnd OH, sbnd COOH, sbnd NH 2). In contrast to all previously published data on D/H in thermally matured organic matter, the more mature kerogen near the two dike contacts is D-depleted, which is attributed to (i) thermal elimination of D-enriched functional groups, and (ii) thermal drying of hydrologically isolated coal prior to the onset of cracking reactions, thereby precluding D-transfer from relatively D-enriched water into kerogen. Maxima in organic nitrogen concentration and in the atomic N/C ratio of kerogen at a distance of ˜2.5 to ˜3.5 m from the thicker dike indicate that reactive N-compounds had been pyrolytically liberated at high temperature closer to the contact, migrated through the coal seam, and recombined with coal kerogen in a zone of lower temperature. The same principle extends to organic carbon, because a strong δ13C kerogen vs. δ15N kerogen correlation across 5.5 m of coal adjacent to the thicker dike indicates that coal was functioning as a flow-through reactor along a dynamic thermal gradient facilitating back-reactions between mobile

  16. Gating Technology for Vertically Parted Green Sand Moulds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Per

    Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems.......Gating technology for vertically parted green sand moulds. Literature study of different ways of designing gating systems....

  17. Expandable sand screens: from novel concept to proven sand control technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Paul; Jones, Colin; Ballard, Tracey; Beare, Steve; Hillis, Dave [Weatherford International Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Expandable Sand Screens (ESS) have proved a viable alternative to gravel packing for sand control. With over 300 installations worldwide, analysis of their use has confirmed that ESS offers excellent production performance and sand control reliability in Open hole. This paper presents details of a global survey on ESS performance that gives accurate information on production performance, sand exclusion reliability and cost effectiveness in Open hole and cased hole application scenarios. This paper also discusses the role and effect of compliant expansion in observed productivity performance and skin values. The rock mechanical, reservoir characterization and metallurgical requirements of ESS systems are also investigated. Finally, the latest advances of the technology for use within the reservoir are explained. This paper demonstrates how the combination of ESS and Expandable Zonal Isolation devices can offer cased hole functionality (in terms of zonal isolation) in combination with Open hole levels of production performance (from the ESS). (author)

  18. New Method for Estimation of Aeolian Sand Transport Rate Using Ceramic Sand Flux Sensor (UD-101

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Udo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new method for the estimation of aeolian sand transport rate was developed; the method employs a ceramic sand flux sensor (UD-101. UD-101 detects wind-blown sand impacting on its surface. The method was devised by considering the results of wind tunnel experiments that were performed using a vertical sediment trap and the UD-101. Field measurements to evaluate the estimation accuracy during the prevalence of unsteady winds were performed on a flat backshore. The results showed that aeolian sand transport rates estimated using the developed method were of the same order as those estimated using the existing method for high transport rates, i.e., for transport rates greater than 0.01 kg m–1 s–1.

  19. Increased maximum sand free rate by use of chemical sand consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haavind, Frode

    2006-04-15

    In this work, a chemical sand consolidation method is developed in order to increase the Maximum Sand Free Rate (MSFR). The method can be applied as a sand control tool in addition to or instead of more traditional sand control equipment at completion of a well or at a later stage. Several sand consolidation chemicals were evaluated for their ability to consolidate sand in an experimental study. The evaluation was done by measuring sand production and permeability before and after treatment for each experiment. Three different groups of chemicals were tested: 1) Six chemicals that are based on organosilane chemistry, 2) one chemical that is a polymer and 3) one enzyme derived method based on precipitation of CaCO{sub 3} (s). The best overall chemical was an organosilane. This specific organosilane was chosen for further work. Design of experiments was used in order to investigate the influence of concentration of the chemical, the temperature during shut-in and the shut-in time on sand production and permeability impairment. The results showed that increasing concentration and shut-in temperature decreased sand production and increased pressure drop during sand production, whereas shut-in time had only a minor effect. It was not possible to obtain a good model for permeability reduction. During the summer of 2004, a Norwegian Sea field showed interest in the chemical sand consolidation method. The chemical previously evaluated using design of experiments was chosen. The chemical was tested on sand from the field. In addition, the chemical was tested on several reservoir cores. Theoretical calculations on fluid velocities and hydrodynamic forces in the perforations were performed. Finally, the chemical was pumped in three wells during September 2004. Originally, the plan was to treat only one well, but due to the success of this treatment, two additional wells were treated with the organosilane. The first well had an inclination of 80 degrees from the vertical, had

  20. Imaging of Acoustic Waves in Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

    2003-08-01

    There is considerable interest in detecting objects such as landmines shallowly buried in loose earth or sand. Various techniques involving microwave, acoustic, thermal and magnetic sensors have been used to detect such objects. Acoustic and microwave sensors have shown promise, especially if used together. In most cases, the sensor package is scanned over an area to eventually build up an image or map of anomalies. We are proposing an alternate, acoustic method that directly provides an image of acoustic waves in sand or soil, and their interaction with buried objects. The INEEL Laser Ultrasonic Camera utilizes dynamic holography within photorefractive recording materials. This permits one to image and demodulate acoustic waves on surfaces in real time, without scanning. A video image is produced where intensity is directly and linearly proportional to surface motion. Both specular and diffusely reflecting surfaces can be accomodated and surface motion as small as 0.1 nm can be quantitatively detected. This system was used to directly image acoustic surface waves in sand as well as in solid objects. Waves as frequencies of 16 kHz were generated using modified acoustic speakers. These waves were directed through sand toward partially buried objects. The sand container was not on a vibration isolation table, but sat on the lab floor. Interaction of wavefronts with buried objects showed reflection, diffraction and interference effects that could provide clues to location and characteristics of buried objects. Although results are preliminary, success in this effort suggests that this method could be applied to detection of buried landmines or other near-surface items such as pipes and tanks.

  1. Geochemical evidence for a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bata, Timothy; Parnell, John; Samaila, Nuhu K.; Abubakar, M. B.; Maigari, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Paleogeographic studies have shown that Earth was covered with more water during the Cretaceous than it is today, as the global sea level was significantly higher. The Cretaceous witnessed one of the greatest marine transgressions in Earth's history, represented by widespread deposition of sands directly on underlying basement. These sand bodies hold much of the world's heavy oil. Here, we present for the first time, geochemical evidence of a Cretaceous oil sand (Bima oil sand) in the Chad Basin, Nigeria. Bima oil sand is similar to other Cretaceous oil sands, predominantly occurring at shallow depths on basin flanks and generally lacking a seal cover, making the oil susceptible to biodegradation. The bulk properties and distribution of molecular features in oils from the Bima oil sand suggest that they are biodegraded. Sterane maturity parameters and the trisnorhopane thermal indicator for the oils suggest thermal maturities consistent with oils generated as conventional light oils, which later degraded into heavy oils. These oils also show no evidence of 25-norhopane, strongly suggesting that biodegradation occurred at shallow depths, consistent with the shallow depth of occurrence of the Bima Formation at the study locality. Low diasterane/sterane ratios and C29H/C30H ratios greater than 1 suggest a carbonate source rock for the studied oil. The Sterane distribution further suggests that the oils were sourced from marine carbonate rocks. The C32 homohopane isomerization ratios for the Bima oil sand are 0.59-0.60, implying that the source rock has surpassed the main oil generation phase, consistent with burial depths of the Fika and Gongila Formations, which are both possible petroleum source rocks in the basin.

  2. SPECIFIC RESISTANCE AND SPECIFIC INTENSITY OF BELT SANDING OF WOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boleslaw Porankiewicz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines and discusses the specific belt sanding resistance K (N·cm-2 and specific belt sanding intensity SI (g·cm-2·min-1, for wood of Pinus sylvestris L., Picea abies L., Quercus robra L., Acer pseudoplatanus L., Alnus glutinosa Gaertn., and Populus Nigra L., by different sanding pressure pS, different sanding grit NG number, and different wood grain angles Phi(v.

  3. Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporating Waste Foundry Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Rafat SIDDIQUE; Ravinder Kaur SANDHU

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the possibilities of using waste foundry sand as partial replacement of sand in self-compacting concrete. Self-compacting concrete, as the name indicates, is a type of concrete that does not require external or internal compaction, because it becomes levelled and consolidated under its self-weight. Foundry sand is high quality silica sand used as a moulding material by ferrous and non-ferrous metal casting industries. It can be reused several times in foundries but, af...

  4. Numerical Modeling of Flow in a Horizontal Sand Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Ruth Mossad; Hal Aral

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Horizontal sand filters may offer some advantage over vertical sand filters as they could be used for in-line treatment of wastewaters. Horizontal pipelines of tens and if not hundreds of meters length, filled with ordinary sand or permeable reactive media such as activated carbon or natural zeolite or iron filings, may be used to remove impurities from mine drainage waters, sewer and storm waters. Approach: However, in reality, in industrial-scale applications, the sand fi...

  5. Supercritical-Fluid Extraction of Oil From Tar Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    New supercritical solvent mixtures have been laboratory-tested for extraction of oil from tar sands. Mixture is circulated through sand at high pressure and at a temperature above critical point, dissolving organic matter into the compressed gas. Extract is recovered from sand residues. Low-temperature super-critical solvents reduce energy consumption and waste-disposal problems.

  6. Design and management of conventional fluidized-sand biofilters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluidized sand biofilters (FSBs) are relatively compact, efficient, and cost-competitive biofilters, especially in recirculating systems that require maintaining consistently low levels of ammonia and nitrite. Filter sand is low cost (often $70-200/m3 of sand delivered) and has a high specific surf...

  7. Plant Availability of Metals in Waste Foundry Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foundries in the United States generate several million tons of waste sand each year. These sands are no longer suitable for metalcasting processes, and about 90% are discarded in landfills. However, the majority of these waste foundry sands (WFSs) qualify as non-hazardous industrial waste and the...

  8. Status of sand as a thermoluminescence (TL) gamma dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations have revealed that sand has desired characteristics for its use as an accident gamma dosimeter. The present paper describes the status of typical Rajasthan sand, its energy response, thermal annealing characteristics and effect of ultraviolet radiations on TL signals induced by gamma irradiated sand samples. (authors). 14 refs., 3 figs

  9. Dredging Processes I: The Cutting of Sand, Clay & Rock - Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    This book gives an overview of cutting theories. It starts with a generic model, which is valid for all types of soil (sand, clay and rock) after which the specifics of dry sand, water saturated sand, clay, rock and hyperbaric rock are covered. For each soil type small blade angles and large blade a

  10. 76 FR 78168 - Importation of Chinese Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... of Chinese Sand Pears From China AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... would set forth shipping requirements for sand pears from China. It would require sealed containers of... importation of Chinese sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) from China into the United States. As a condition of...

  11. Numerical simulation of wind sand movement in straw checkerboard barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ning; Xia, Xianpan; Tong, Ding

    2013-09-01

    Straw checkerboard barrier (SCB) is the most representative antidesertification measure and plays a significant role in antidesertification projects. Large-eddy simulation and discrete-particle tracing were used to numerically simulate the wind sand movement inside the straw checkerboard barrier (SCB), study the movement characteristics of sand particles, find the transverse velocities of sand particles and flow field, and obtain the contour of the transverse velocity of coupled wind field within the SCB. The results showed that 1) compared with that at the inlet of the SCB, the sand transport rate inside the SCB greatly decreases and the speed of sand grain movement also evidently drops, indicating that the SCB has very good sand movement preventing and fixing function; 2) within the SCB there exists a series of unevenly distributed eddies of wind sand flow, their strength decreases gradually with increasing the transverse distance; 3) affected by eddies or reflux, sand particles carried by the wind sand flow have to drop forward and backward the two interior walls inside the SCB, respectively, forming a v-shaped sand trough; 4) the sand transport rate gradually decreases with increasing number of SCBs, which reveals that the capacity of the wind field to transport sand particles decreases. This research is of significance in sandstorm and land desertification control. PMID:24026396

  12. Pengaruh Ketebalan Media dan Rate filtrasi pada Sand Filter dalam Menurunkan Kekeruhan dan Total Coliform

    OpenAIRE

    Deni Maryani; Ali Masduqi; Atiek Moesriati

    2014-01-01

    Pada penelitian ini dilakukan proses filtrasi dengan menggunakan sand filter sebagai salah satu metode dalam pengolahan air bersih. Pada sand filter proses penyaringan terjadi pada media filter yang sangat halus, seperti media filter pada unit slow sand filter. Kecepatan penyaringan yang diinginkan pada sand filter ini adalah kecepatan seperti pada unit rapid sand filter. Sehingga sand filter ini adalah penggabungan antara kelebihan yang dimiliki slow sand filter dan rapid sand filter. Varias...

  13. Spanish Round Robin test on water sensitivity test of bituminous mixtures; Ejercicio espanol interlaboratorios sobre el ensayo de sensibilidad al gua de mezclas bituminosas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez Saez, R.; Enrique Gabeiras, L.; Miranda Perez, L.; Valor Hernandez, F.

    2011-07-01

    The amendment of Article 542 and 543 on the hot asphalt mixtures included in the Spanish Technical specifications for Road Construction (PG-3), by Circular Order 24/2008, introduced a new series of modification to adapt Spanish regulations to European standards series EN 13108. Among the various amendments, new tests methods and design criteria are considered, as UNE-EN 12697-12 for assessing the water sensitivity on compacted specimens, which is mandatory for every kind of bituminous mixture. In this paper, firstly a comparison between the European method and the old Spanish method described in the NLT-162 is made, explaining the experimental conditions selected. The results of an interlaboratory study or Round Robin Test conducted in ten Spanish laboratories are subsequently described and analyzed, in order to allow each laboratory to assess its technical performance, and also to determine quantitatively the precision of the new method in terms of repeatability and reproducibility. (Author) 15 refs.

  14. Preliminary Studies on Metal Adsorption by Waste Foundry Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Afonso, Ana

    2011-01-01

    In the casting industries, sand is typically reused through the production cycles. Since sand for itself do not have the necessary properties to this process, it’s necessary to introduce binders to force the sand grains to hold their shape during the casting process. When the casting sand cannot be reused it considered a residue, and it is formally called waste foundry sand. Worldwide, China is the larger producer with 35.3 million tonnes (in 2009), followed by North America with 9.6 mi...

  15. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Jasper F; Parteli, Eric J R; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-10-01

    The transport of sand and dust by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This paper presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  16. The physics of wind-blown sand and dust

    CERN Document Server

    Kok, Jasper F; Michaels, Timothy I; Karam, Diana Bou

    2012-01-01

    The transport of dust and sand by wind is a potent erosional force, creates sand dunes and ripples, and loads the atmosphere with suspended dust aerosols. This article presents an extensive review of the physics of wind-blown sand and dust on Earth and Mars. Specifically, we review the physics of aeolian saltation, the formation and development of sand dunes and ripples, the physics of dust aerosol emission, the weather phenomena that trigger dust storms, and the lifting of dust by dust devils and other small-scale vortices. We also discuss the physics of wind-blown sand and dune formation on Venus and Titan.

  17. 纤维沥青混合料的拌和成型工艺研究%Research on Mixing and Shaping Technology of Fiber Bituminous Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程英伟; 何晓鸣

    2012-01-01

    利用正交试验对剑麻纤维沥青混凝土混合料的拌和成型工艺进行研究.在固定配合比的前题下,以拌和方案、沥青加热温度、集料加热温度和成型温度为试验因素,模拟路面施工的各种拌和成型情况设计了L9正交表分别进行马歇尔试验.运用极差分析法对试验结果进行分析,确定了纤维沥青混合料拌和成型的优选方案为“同步法拌和+沥青加热温度为175℃+集料加热温度为206℃+成型温度为165℃”.最后分析了几种试验因素对试验指标的影响机理.%In this paper, mixing and shaping technology of bituminous concrete mixture with sisal fiber is researched by orthogonal experiment. Under a fixed mix proportion, mixing solutions, asphalt heating temperature, aggregate heating temperature and shaping temperature are selected as test factors. The variety of mixing and shaping in pavement construction is simulated by designing a L9 orthogonal table for Marshall tests. Range Analysis Method is used to analyze test results, and then the optimal scheme of mixing and shaping for fiber bituminous concrete mixture is determined. The optimal scheme is "synchronization method of mixing+asphalt heating temperature of 175℃+aggregate heating temperature of 206℃ + shaping temperature of 165℃”. Last, the influence mechanism of test factors on test indicators is analyzed.

  18. Log-inject-log sand consolidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns a method of detecting an effective placement of a sand consolidating plastic in a producing formation penetrated by a well. Two logs sensitive to the presence of a tracer in the plastic are run, one before and the other after treating the formaton. Wherever a comparison of the logs shows a zone which was to be consolidated having an insufficient increase in neutron capture indicating insufficient plastic, remedial action such as isolating the zone having insufficient plastic and squeezing additional plastic is performed before resuming production, which avoids the well sanding up and results in great savings. Preferably the method uses lithium, boron, indium and/or cadmium tracers incorporated into the plastic, especially in the form of lithium chloride, boron oxide, or cadmium chloride. (author)

  19. Mineralogy of Eolian Sands at Gale Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. N.; Vaniman, D. T.; Blake, D. F.; Bristow, T. F.; Rampe, E. B.; Ming, D. W.; Chipera, S. J.; Morris, R. V.; Morrison, S. M.; Downs, R. T.; Fendrich, K. V.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Yen, A. S.; Sarrazin, P. C.; Treiman, A. H.; Craig, P. I.; Lapotre, M. G. A.; Edgett, K. S.; Gellert, R.; Crisp, J. A.; Morookian, J. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Des Marais, D. J.; Farmer, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity has been exploring outcrop and regolith in Gale crater since August 6, 2012. During this exploration, the mission has collected 10 samples for mineralogical analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD), using the CheMin instrument. The CheMin (Chemistry and Mineralogy) instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity uses a CCD detector and a Co-anode tube source to acquire both mineralogy (from the pat-tern of Co diffraction) and chemical information (from energies of fluoresced X-rays). A detailed description of CheMin is provided in [1]. As part of the rover checkout after landing, the first sample selected for analysis was an eolian sand deposit (the Rocknest "sand shadow"). This sample was selected in part to characterize unconsolidated eolian regolith, but primarily to prove performance of the scoop collection system on the rover. The focus of the mission after Rocknest was on the consolidated sediments of Gale crater, so all of the nine subsequent samples were collected by drilling into bedrock com-posed of lithified sedimentary materials, including mudstone and sandstone. No scoop samples have been collected since Rocknest, but at the time this abstract was written the mission stands poised to use the scoop again, to collect active dune sands from the Bagnold dune field. Several abstracts at this conference outline the Bagnold dune campaign and summarize preliminary results from analyses on approach to the Namib dune sampling site. In this abstract we review the mineralogy of Rocknest, contrast that with the mineralogy of local sediments, and anticipate what will be learned by XRD analysis of Bagnold dune sands.

  20. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Waste foundry sand: Environmental implication and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Penkaitis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of analyses using Scanning Electron Microscopy in field samples of waste foundry sand, as well as the results of granulometric, chemical and groundwater analyses. Field data allowed to characterize waste foundry sand and showed that there are elevated concentrations of metals in the groundwater (iron, manganese, boron and selenium, in addition to other potentially toxic elements (chromium, copper, cobalt, nickel, zinc, aluminum, iron, manganese, which are present in the waste and are considered not hazardous by current standards. Even if these elements are not considered hazardous, their concentrations above the permissible limit compromise the environmental quality of the site, posing risks to the local population, since they work in agriculture and use groundwater. Two different types of waste foundry sands were identified using granulometric analyses. Electron microscopy showed features related to morphological, chemical and mineralogical characteristics of grains that make up the waste. Quartz was the dominant mineral. Waste foundry sand is composed of two types of grains: a rounded grain with almost no incrustations formed during alloy production, and a second type of grain, which is not rounded, has incrustations, and always has several metals derived from alloys and associated with these incrustations. Chemical elements detected in groundwater with concentrations above the limits established by the regulatory bodies were found in wells located in the landfill area. Most of these elements show higher concentrations downstream, some of them with concentrations above the regulatory limit, and others show an increase in concentration upstream, indicating that the landfill may be impacting the local environment.

  2. Drained Triaxial Tests on Eastern Scheldt Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.; Jakobsen, Kim Parsberg

    In the process of understanding and developing models for geomaterials, the stress-strain behaviour is commonly studied by performing triaxial tests. In the present study static triaxial tests have been performed to gain knowledge of the stress-strain behaviour of frictional materials during mono...... monotonic loading. The tests reported herein are all drained tests, starting from different initial states of stress and following various stress paths. AIl the tests are performed on reconstituted medium dense specimens of Eastern Scheldt Sand....

  3. Kirsten Sand. Arkitekt for sin tid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Seip

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Towards the end of World War II the retreating Germans burnt down nearly all buildings and other constructions in the counties of Finnmark and the northern parts of Troms in North Norway. The population evacuated but many returned as soon as possible, only to find themselves homeless. At this very demanding point Kirsten Sand decided to travel north, and do whatever she could as an architect to help. The pre-war housing situation was generally difficult. Low building standards and lack of money forced families in the cities to live under bad conditions. Kirsten Sand studied these conditions and took part in the efforts to better the situation. This knowledge provided a good starting point for the work she undertook after the war, in particular her profound understanding of the situation of women, their working conditions and positions in the household and society. Houses designed by Sand and her helpmates are simple but adequate, taking into account these women’s point of view. Ingebjørg Hage has thrown light on the work of Kirsten Sand in Finnmark and Troms in several ways. This article aims at describing Sand’s background as an architect before she left Oslo to travel north. It describes how housing and housing policy since long had been central to architects, especially so within the group she belonged to. In pre-war Oslo she had been engaged in planning and designing hospitals. During a period as inspector for the health authorities she learned a lot about the living conditions of people in general. After establishing her own architect’s office she mostly designed family houses, and during the war she engaged in research that further deepened her knowledge in the field. Thus she was particularly well equipped for the demanding tasks she undertook in the summer of 1945.

  4. DOE to assess produced water, sand harm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the Department of Energy which is launching a research program to determine if water and sand produced with oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico pose U.S. environmental or health risks. A court has ordered the Environmental Protection Agency to issue new nation-wide discharge guidelines by next June, and DOE warned that tighter limits could reduce future offshore production by hundreds of millions of barrels

  5. Drawing a Line in the Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An Inner Mongolian woman takes on the desert and converts extensive arid regions into arable land by Ni Yanshuo CONVERTING vast tracks of desert into arable land is no easy task, even using the most advanced technology.Yet a woman who hails from north China’s Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region met this challenge head on.Using the helping hands of other determined women,she has made remarkable progress in pushing back the sands of time.

  6. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Ashraf; Nasr, Ahmed

    2013-03-01

    Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21-31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18-75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  7. Pullout capacity of batter pile in sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Nazir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Many offshore structures are subjected to overturning moments due to wind load, wave pressure, and ship impacts. Also most of retaining walls are subjected to horizontal forces and bending moments, these forces are due to earth pressure. For foundations in such structures, usually a combination of vertical and batter piles is used. Little information is available in the literature about estimating the capacity of piles under uplift. In cases where these supporting piles are not vertical, the behavior under axial pullout is not well established. In order to delineate the significant variables affecting the ultimate uplift shaft resistance of batter pile in dry sand, a testing program comprising 62 pullout tests was conducted. The tests are conducted on model steel pile installed in loose, medium, and dense sand to an embedded depth ratio, L/d, vary from 7.5 to 30 and with various batter angles of 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30°. Results indicate that the pullout capacity of a batter pile constructed in dense and/or medium density sand increases with the increase of batter angle attains maximum value and then decreases, the maximum value of Pα occurs at batter angle approximately equal to 20°, and it is about 21–31% more than the vertical pile capacity, while the pullout capacity for batter pile that constructed in loose sand decreases with the increase of pile inclination. The results also indicated that the circular pile is more resistant to pullout forces than the square and rectangular pile shape. The rough model piles tested is experienced 18–75% increase in capacity compared with the smooth model piles. The suggested relations for the pullout capacity of batter pile regarding the vertical pile capacity are well predicted.

  8. Sorption of Arsenite onto Mackinawite Coated Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, T. J.; Hayes, K. F.; Abriola, L. M.

    2004-05-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem affecting aquifers in the United States as well as abroad. Recent strengthening of the US EPA MCL for arsenic has prompted the need for technology capable of removing both arsenite and arsenate from solution. Arsenite, the more toxic form of arsenic, is more difficult to remove from anoxic zones in the subsurface. Studies by others have demonstrated the affinity of some types of iron sulfides for arsenite, such as troilite, pyrite, amorphous iron sulfide and mackinawite. However, these studies have not provided a comprehensive investigation of the macroscopic behavior of arsenite in the presence of crystalline mackinawite in a form that can be readily applied to real-world treatment technologies. This study examines the behavior of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sand. PH edge results demonstrate that arsenite sorption onto mackinawite coated sand increases with increasing pH, reaching maximum removal at pH 10. Arsenite removal, albeit slight, occurring below pH 5 is independent of pH indicative of a different removal mechanism. Isotherm studies show that at low concentrations, removal is Langmuirian in nature. Arsenite sorption abruptly converts to linear behavior at high concentrations, possibly attributed to the saturation of the monolayer. Ionic strength effects were assessed by comparing pH edge data developed for three different concentrations of NaCl background electrolyte solution. Increases in ionic strength enhance the removal of arsenite from solution, suggesting possible inner-sphere surface complexation removal mechanisms. Information gathered in this study can be used to further develop surface complexation models to describe and predict reactivity of arsenite in the presence of mackinawite coated sands in anoxic regions. Mackinawite coated sands investigated here may provide a feasible reactive medium for implementation in above-ground sorption reactors or subsurface

  9. Guide to preparing SAND reports. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, T.K. [ed.

    1996-04-01

    This guide contains basic information needed to produce a SAND report. Its guidelines reflect DOE regulation and Sandia policy. The guide includes basic writing instructions in an annotated sample report; guidance for organization, format, and layout of reports produced by line organizations; and information about conference papers, journal articles, and brochures. The appendixes contain sections on Sandia`s preferred usage, equations, references, copyrights and permissions, and publishing terms.

  10. American Las Vegas Sands Corp. Visiting Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yinghong; Liu Jinliang

    2006-01-01

    @@ On August 29, Wan Jifei, Chairman of CCPIT, meets the visiting delegation led by Sheldon G. Adelson,Chairman of the Board and principal owner of Las Vegas Sands Corp. in CCPIT. Zhao Zhenge, Vice Director of International Connection Department of CCPIT, Luo Guoxiong from Beijing China Exhibition Investment Company, Xu Jingyi, Assistant Director of American and Oceanian Affairs Division of CCPIT, also attended the meeting.

  11. chemo-Hydro-mechanical modelling of in-situ disposal of a bituminized radioactive waste in boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The current reference solution of the Belgian Agency for the Management of Radioactive Waste and Fissile Materials (ONDRAF/NIRAS) envisages underground disposal of Eurobitum Bituminized radioactive Waste (BW) in a geologically stable clay formation. In Belgium, the Boom Clay, which is a 30 to 35 million years old and ∼100 m thick marine sediment is being studied as a potential host formation because of its favorable properties to limit and delay the migration of the leached radionuclides to the biosphere over extended periods of time. The current disposal concept foresees that several drums (220 litres) of Eurobitum would be grouped in thick-walled cement-based secondary containers, which in turn would be placed in concrete-lined disposal galleries that are excavated at mid-depth in the clay layer. Only 80-90 % of the total volume of the drum is filled with Eurobitum.The remaining voids between the containers would be backfilled with a cement-based material. The interaction between the BW and the host clay formation is a very complicated chemo-hydro-mechanical process and depends not only on the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the Boom Clay itself, but also on that of the BW. In fact, the osmosis-induced uptake of water by the dehydrated hygroscopic salts embedded in the waste induces a geo-mechanical perturbation of the host formation, caused by the swelling and the increase of the pressure in and around the waste. The objectives of the Chemo-Hydro-Chemical (CHM) analysis presented in this work are (i) to get insights on the kinetics of water uptake by BW, dissolution of the embedded NaNO3 crystals, solute leaching, and maximum generated pressure under disposal conditions and (ii) to study the stress redistribution due to the recompression of the clay around a gallery caused by the swelling pressure of the bitumen and the admissible swelling pressure for Boom clay. Firstly, a CHM formulation of chemically and

  12. Experimental investigation of sanding propensity for the Andrew completion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkitaraman, A.; Li, H. [Schlumberger Perforating and Testing Center (United Kingdom); Leonard, A. J.; Bowden, P. R. [BP Exploration (United Kingdom)

    1998-12-31

    A series of laboratory experiments were performed on three reservoir core samples selected from two plot wells to confirm the likelihood of sand production during the completion phase of the planned Andrew horizontal wells, and to perform risk analysis of formation failure at the time of underbalance perforation, and expected producing conditions. CT scans revealed no perforation failure, and the core samples did not show any propensity to produce sand during single-phase oil flow. Transient sand production was observed when water cut was introduced, but sand production declined as the percentage of water cut was increased. There was no evidence of sand production in the core samples during depletion testing either, and the wells were subsequently completed with perforated cemented liners without sand control. No sand problems have been encountered in two years of production, with some wells in water cut and declined reservoir pressure of 200 psi. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. A transport-rate model of wind-blown sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Sand transport by wind plays an important role in environmental problems.Formulating the sand-transport rate model has been of continuing significance,because the majority of the existing models relate sand-transport rate to the wind-shear velocity.However,the wind-shear velocity readapted to blown sand is difficult to determine from the measured wind profiles when sand movement occurs,especially at high wind velocity.Detailed wind tunnel tests were carried out to reformulate the sand-transport rate model,followed by attempts to relate sand-transport rate to parameters of wind velocity,threshold shear-velocity,and grain size.Finally,we validated the model based on the data from field observations.

  14. Numerical simulation of sand jet in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, A.H.; Zhu, D.; Rajaratnam, N. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-07-01

    A numerical simulation of sand jet in water was presented. The study involved a two-phase flow using two-phase turbulent jets. A literature review was also presented, including an experiment on particle laden air jet using laser doppler velocimetry (LDV); experiments on the effect of particle size and concentration on solid-gas jets; an experimental study of solid-liquid jets using particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique where mean velocity and fluctuations were measured; and an experimental study on solid-liquid jets using the laser doppler anemometry (LDA) technique measuring both water axial and radial velocities. Other literature review results included a photographic study of sand jets in water; a comparison of many two-phase turbulent flow; and direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation to study the effect of particle in gas jet flow. The mathematical model and experimental setup were also included in the presentation along with simulation results for sand jets, concentration, and kinetic energy. The presentation concluded with some proposed future studies including numerical simulation of slurry jets in water and numerical simulation of slurry jets in MFT. tabs., figs.

  15. Recycled sand in lime-based mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidou, M; Anastasiou, E; Georgiadis Filikas, K

    2014-12-01

    The increasing awareness of the society about safe guarding heritage buildings and at the same time protecting the environment promotes strategies of combining principles of restoration with environmentally friendly materials and techniques. Along these lines, an experimental program was carried out in order to investigate the possibility of producing repair, lime-based mortars used in historic buildings incorporating secondary materials. The alternative material tested was recycled fine aggregates originating from mixed construction and demolition waste. Extensive tests on the raw materials have been performed and mortar mixtures were produced using different binding systems with natural, standard and recycled sand in order to compare their mechanical, physical and microstructure properties. The study reveals the improved behavior of lime mortars, even at early ages, due to the reaction of lime with the Al and Si constituents of the fine recycled sand. The role of the recycled sand was more beneficial in lime mortars rather than the lime-pozzolan or lime-pozzolan-cement mortars as a decrease in their performance was recorded in the latter cases due to the mortars' structure.

  16. Oil sands mining water use and management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.; Long, D.; Fitch, M. [Golder Associates Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    There are currently 4 bitumen mining operations operating along the Athabasca River in northern Alberta. This paper presented details of the water licences, historical water use, present water use, and future plans for water management in relation to oil sands mining operations. The study was based on work currently conducted for the Oil Sands Developers Group (OSDG) and Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), as well as on mine site water balance analyses for proposed mines in the region. Typical mine site water balances were discussed, and water use rates for the mining operations were reviewed. The new Athabasca River water management framework may require that mines provide additional water storage or delayed reclamation of mine areas in order to offset water losses during winter low-flow periods. New regulations may also reduce the requirement for make-up water. The study also noted that release criteria are still being developed for on-site water within closed-loop mine operations. The oil sands industry will need to balance various factors related to water use in the future. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Integrating sand control, completion decisions pay off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, K.D.; Procyk, A.

    1998-10-01

    Anadarko recently completed an open-hole, horizontal gas well in the Gulf of Mexico using completion and sand control techniques that have proven extremely successful, judging from the production numbers. The well, in the East Addition, High Island Area, about 120 miles southeast of Galveston in 341-ft waters, was completed with a Pall Stratapac Sand Control Screen without a gravel pack. The flow rate of the well is four to sic times what would have been expected from a conventional, vertical, gravel-packed well with similar conditions. The well`s peak production rate was 22.0 MMcfd, and the well produced a total of more than 2.635 bcf of gas from November 1997 to July 1998. Drawdown was calculated at less than 40 psi, and a skin factor of negative 3.5 indicates that formation damage during the completion was negligible. The full range of completion and sand control decisions came together to make this well a success.

  18. Blending foundry sands with soil: Effect on dehydrogenase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungan, Robert S; Kukier, Urzsula; Lee, Brad

    2006-03-15

    Each year U.S. foundries landfill several million tons of sand that can no longer be used to make metalcasting molds and cores. A possible use for these materials is as an ingredient in manufactured soils; however, potentially harmful metals and resin binders (used to make cores) may adversely impact the soil microbial community. In this study, the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of soil amended with molding sand (clay-coated sand known as "green sand") or core sands at 10%, 30%, and 50% (dry wt.) was determined. The green sands were obtained from iron, aluminum, and brass foundries; the core sands were made with phenol-formaldehyde or furfuryl alcohol based resins. Overall, incremental additions of these sands resulted in a decrease in the DHA which lasted throughout the 12-week experimental period. A brass green sand, which contained high concentrations of Cu, Pb, and Zn, severely impacted the DHA. By week 12 no DHA was detected in the 30% and 50% treatments. In contrast, the DHA in soil amended with an aluminum green sand was 2.1 times higher (all blending ratios), on average, at week 4 and 1.4 times greater (30% and 50% treatments only) than the controls by week 12. In core sand-amended soil, the DHA results were similar to soils amended with aluminum and iron green sands. Increased activity in some treatments may be a result of the soil microorganisms utilizing the core resins as a carbon source. The DHA assay is a sensitive indicator of environmental stress caused by foundry sand constituents and may be useful to assess which foundry sands are suitable for beneficial use in the environment. PMID:15975632

  19. Tomato production in sand: vermicompost mixtures compared with sand and nutritive solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Moreno Reséndez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the response of tomato in Miramar and Romina genotypes of indeterminate growth, and to establish the optimum concentration of the mixture sand-vermicompost to satisfy crop nutritional needs, a greenhouse experiment was carried out. Seeds were sown in polystyrene trays with 200 cavities, padded with Peat moss and were transplanted in 20 L black plastic bags. The ratios of sand-vermicompost were 1:1; 2:1; 3:1 and 1:0 by volume. In mixture with ratio 1:0 a nutrient solution was applied. Four substrates and two genotypes were evaluated for a total of eight treatments, each of ones with six replications. Miramar genotype with a yield of 145.9 Mg/ha was exceed a 17.20% to Romina. Regarding the substrates, the yield of tomato in the treatment sand and nutrient solution (control was 168.7 Mg/ha. This value exceeded at least 24.6% the yields of the substrates with vermicompost. For the rest of the parameters, except in the days to harvest, the substrate with sand and nutrient solution also exceeded the three sand-vermicompost substrates. The substrates that included vermicompost, without synthetic fertilizers, for both genotypes developed completely the tomato crop cycle without apparent symptoms of deficiency, and without affecting the quality of fruits.

  20. STUDY ON HOT SAND COOLING EQUIPMENT WITH DAMPING SAND CASCADE AND VERTICAL SPOUTED-FLUIDIZED BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.C. Wang; F. Wang; X.H. You

    2005-01-01

    A new kind of hot sand cooling equipment with vertical spouted-fluidized bed is developed in this paper. It is similar to the traditional horizontal vibrating fluidized boiling cooler in principle but different from it in structure. The processing principle of the cooler is analyzed. The influence of main structural and processing parameters on the cooling effect and its mechanism are researched. Other characteristics of the cooler are discussed also. Experiment results show that the cooling efficiency η is equal to or larger than 83%, the temperature of output sand is less than 40℃ with the temperature of input sand is about between 80 and 90℃, and the productivity is 5t/(h·m)

  1. Diffusion tests of mercury through concrete, bentonite-enhanced sand and sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Margareta; Allard, Bert

    2007-04-01

    The transport by diffusion of Hg(II) and Hg(0) through a barrier of concrete or bentonite-enhanced sand was examined under aerobic conditions. Sand was used as a reference system parallel to the two systems. Speciation of mercury was performed with a purge and trap method, where dissolved Hg(0) was purged with nitrogen gas from the sample, through a trap for volatile oxidized mercury species and finally trapped in an oxidative solution. The apparent diffusion coefficient (from Fick's second law of diffusion) for oxidized mercury was 1 x 10(-14)m(2)/s in Standard Portland concrete and 4 x 10(-13)m(2)/s in quartz sand. The diffusion of Hg(0) seemed to be faster than for Hg(II), Hg(0) was however oxidized to Hg(II) under aerobic conditions, and after 45 months only 1-10% of the total mercury concentration was Hg(0). PMID:17097806

  2. Policy Analysis of the Canadian Oil Sands Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-09-01

    For those who support U.S. oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands industry is often identified as a model the U.S. might emulate, yielding financial and energy security benefits. For opponents of domestic oil sands development, the Canadian oil sands experience illustrates the risks that opponents of development believe should deter domestic policymakers from incenting U.S. oil sands development. This report does not seek to evaluate the particular underpinnings of either side of this policy argument, but rather attempts to delve into the question of whether the Canadian experience has relevance as a foundational model for U.S. oil sands development. More specifically, this report seeks to assess whether and how the Canadian oil sands experience might be predictive or instructive in the context of fashioning a framework for a U.S. oil sands industry. In evaluating the implications of these underpinnings for a prospective U.S. oil sands industry, this report concentrates on prospective development of the oil sands deposits found in Utah.

  3. Cytotoxicity of yellow sand in lung epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y H Kim; K S Kim; N J Kwak; K H Lee; S A Kweon; Y Lim

    2003-02-01

    The present study was carried out to observe the cytotoxicity of yellow sand in comparison with silica and titanium dioxide in a rat alveolar type II cell line (RLE-6TN). Yellow sand (China Loess) was obtained from the loess layer in the Gunsu Province of China. The mean particle diameter of yellow sand was about 0.003 ± 0.001 mm. Major elements of yellow sand were Si(27.7 ± 0.6%), Al(6.01 ± 0.17%), and Ca(5.83 ± 0.23%) in that order. Silica and yellow sand significantly decreased cell viability and increased [Ca2+]i. All three particles increased the generation of H2O2. TiO2 did not change Fenton activity, while silica induced a slight increase of Fenton activity. In contrast, yellow sand induced a significant increase of Fenton activity. Silica, yellow sand and TiO2 induced significant nitrite formations in RLE-6TN cells. Silica showed the highest increase in nitrite formation, while yellow sand induced the least formation of nitrite. Silica and yellow sand increased the release of TNF-. Based on these results, we suggest that yellow sand can induce cytotoxicity in RLE-6TN cells and reactive oxygen species, Fenton activity and reactive nitrogen species might be involved in this toxicity.

  4. Water availability in peat-mineral mixes and sands in oil sands reclamation, NE Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil productivity is a function of the soil's ability to provide moisture to plants. This study was initiated by Suncor and Syncrude to determine the water holding capacity of peat-mineral mixtures in the oil sands region. Other concepts dealt with in this presentation include soil drainage classification, soil moisture regime classification, soil permeability, the hydrological regime and the interactions of these phenomena. A further objective was to incorporate this information in a publication entitled 'Land capability classification for forest ecosystems in the oil sands region', scheduled to be released in November 1997

  5. 'Sharks Teeth' -- Sand Dunes in Proctor Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Sometimes, pictures received from Mars Global Surveyor's Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) are 'just plain pretty.' This image, taken in early September 2000, shows a group of sand dunes at the edge of a much larger field of dark-toned dunes in Proctor Crater. Located at 47.9oS, 330.4oW, in the 170 km (106 mile) diameter crater named for 19th Century British astronomer Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888), the dunes shown here are created by winds blowing largely from the east/northeast. A plethora of smaller, brighter ripples covers the substrate between the dunes. Sunlight illuminates them from the upper left.

  6. Aeolian Sand Transport with Collisional Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, James T.; Pasini, Jose Miguel; Valance, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    Aeolian transport is an important mechanism for the transport of sand on Earth and on Mars. Dust and sand storms are common occurrences on Mars and windblown sand is responsible for many of the observed surface features, such as dune fields. A better understanding of Aeolian transport could also lead to improvements in pneumatic conveying of materials to be mined for life support on the surface of the Moon and Mars. The usual view of aeolian sand transport is that for mild winds, saltation is the dominant mechanism, with particles in the bed being dislodged by the impact of other saltating particles, but without in-flight collisions. As the wind becomes stronger, turbulent suspension keeps the particles in the air, allowing much longer trajectories, with the corresponding increase in transport rate. We show here that an important regime exists between these two extremes: for strong winds, but before turbulent suspension becomes dominant, there is a regime in which in-flight collisions dominate over turbulence as a suspension mechanism, yielding transport rates much higher than those for saltation. The theory presented is based on granular kinetic theory, and includes both turbulent suspension and particle-particle collisions. The wind strengths for which the calculated transport rates are relevant are beyond the published strengths of current wind tunnel experiments, so these theoretical results are an invitation to do experiments in the strong-wind regime. In order to make a connection between the regime of saltation and the regime of collisional suspension, it is necessary to better understand the interaction between the bed and the particles that collide with it. This interaction depends on the agitation of the particles of the bed. In mild winds, collisions with the bed are relatively infrequent and the local disturbance associated with a collision can relax before the next nearby collision. However, as the wind speed increases, collision become more frequent

  7. Biogenic crust dynamics on sand dunes

    CERN Document Server

    Kinast, Shai; Yizhaq, Hezi; Ashkenazy, Yosef

    2012-01-01

    Sand dunes are often covered by vegetation and biogenic crusts. Despite their significant role in dune stabilization, biogenic crusts have rarely been considered in studies of dune dynamics. Using a simple model, we study the existence and stability ranges of different dune-cover states along gradients of rainfall and wind power. Two ranges of alternative stable states are identified: fixed crusted dunes and fixed vegetated dunes at low wind power, and fixed vegetated dunes and active dunes at high wind power. These results suggest a cross-over between two different forms of desertification.

  8. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2012-08-07

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  9. Cyclic Triaxial Loading of Cohesionless Silty Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    To engineer efficient structures offshore, we need to extend our knowledge of soil response. Cyclic loading and high water pressure encountered offshore greatly influence cohesionless soil performance. Silty sand from Frederikshavn wind turbine farm was tested using single diameter height samples...... with lubricated, smooth boundary piston heads in a Danish triaxial apparatus. Samples were successfully subjected to loading histories of high complexity. Loading include high strains and stresses, post liquefaction response, transitioning through multiple densities and restoring initial soil...... properties after long test procedures. Results suggest the testing method is highly suitable for observing complicated soil response and worth exploring further....

  10. Thermo-Insulating Moulding Sand for thin Walled Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cholewa M.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In paper the selection of the composition and determination of main properties of novel moulding sand was described. The mail goal was to create moulding sand characterized by high thermal insulating properties in relations with low specific weight. This type of moulding sand will find application in thin walled castings with complex geometry, in particular for cores of the skeleton castings. In this work the results of the compressive strength, permeability and friability was presented. It was noted that aluminosilicate microspheres are suitable as moulding sand matrix. Influence of the polyglicol addition on quality and properties of the moulding sand was described. The use of the aluminosilicate microspheres allowed to obtain the moulding sand characterized by high insulation rate, low specific weight and good mechanical properties.

  11. Removal of heavy metals through adsorption using sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The removal of four heavy metals i.e. Pb, Cr, Cu, and Zn from their aqueous solutions, using ordinary sand as an adsorbent, was studied at 20oC. The amount of metal adsorbed to form monolayer on sand(am), obtained from Langmuir isotherm, exhibited the preference of metals for sand in the order Pb>Cr>Cu>Zn. The heavy metal-sand adsorption phenomena can be illustrated on the basis of the interaction between surface functional group of silicates (sand) and the metal ions. It is deduced that sand can be used as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal from wastewater (containing low conc. of metals), especially in the developing countries.

  12. Compaction resistant wellbore for sand-producing wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shute, D.M. [Volant Products Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Kaiser, T.M.V. [Noetic Engineering Inc., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Munoz, H. [Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a solution to extend the life of a well in high sand producing fields. The economic value of cold heavy oil production depends on maximizing the rate of oil production and well life. One strategy in heavy oil sands is to produce the sand with the oil to increase the deliverability of the well. However, the cumulative sand volume from the reservoir can be very large, resulting in large vertical deformations relative to the elastic strain limit of the steel and liner through the producing interval. A compaction resistant wellbore (CRW) with better structural capacity was designed to absorb the axial compaction. A review of deformation mechanisms associated with sand production strategies has shown that improved deformation assessment tools and measurement systems can provide accurate casing deformation evaluations. A case study from a high sand-producing field showed that this approach can increase well life. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  13. Numerical study on deformation and failure of reinforced sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Fang-le; LI Jian-zhong; Tatsuoka Fumio

    2005-01-01

    In order to investigate the deformation and failure of reinforced sand, and the reinforcing mechanism of flexible and rigid reinforcement, a set of plane strain compression tests of dense Toyoura reinforced sand with planar reinforcement of a wide range of stiffness were analysed by a nonlinear finite element method. The analysis was incorporated into an energy-based elasto-plastic constitutive model for sand to develop a stress path-independent work-hardening parameter based on the modified plastic strain energy concept. Numerical results indicate that the global stress-strain relations of sand specimens are reinforced by using relatively flexible and rigid reinforcement, and an unreinforced sand specimen can be reasonably simulated by the current finite element method. It is also found that the reinforcing mechanism and progressive failure with a development of shear bands in reinforced sand can be reasonably examined by the finite element method.

  14. Sorting out sand and gravel : sediment transport and deposition in sand-gravel bed rivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    The general aim of this PhD-project was to gain better understanding of the sediment transport and depositional processes of sand-gravel mixtures in rivers with subaqueous dunes. The understanding of the fundamental processes of sediment transport and deposition in channel beds is crucial for morpho

  15. Chemical Stablilisation of Sand : Part VIII Furan Resins as Dune and Coastal Sand Stabiliser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal

    1990-04-01

    Full Text Available Studies on furan resin as dune sand stabiliser are presented. Influence of acid catalysts, viz. phenol disulphonic acid, sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid and phosphoric acid and other catalysts, viz. trichlorotoluene and benzoyl chloride along with promoters, zinc chloride and ferric chloride, on the strength of stabilised furan resin-sand specimens has been discussed. Optimisation studies on resin content, catalysts and promoters and curing conditions have revealed that maximum strength of 260 kg/cm/sup 2/ of the standard specimens made by compaction of coastal sand using furan resins (10 per cent, sulphuric acid (9N, 30 per cent and a curing time of 2 hr at 40 degree Centigrade is higher than the 170 kg/cm/sup 2/ of specimens made of Rajasthan desert sand. Sandy patches stabilised by seepage technique recorded a maximum strength of 125 kg/cm/sup 2/. Physico-chemical characteristics of this system and effect of environment on stabilised specimens have also been studied and field trials conducted successfully. This resin-catalyst system would be extremely useful in humid and saline field (coastal areas for different military applications.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF FLUORIDE IN SAND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-mei; SU Bao-yu

    2006-01-01

    The transport and transformation of fluoride in sand were studied by using soil tank test under the condition of saturated water in this article. Based on the analysis of the laboratory experiments, the rules of fluorine transportation and transformation were simulated in sand by solving the advection-diffusion equation. Through comparison between computed results and observed data , it is shown that the established model and determined parameters could be used to simulate the fluoride transport in sand.

  17. Stabilization of Dune Sand with Ceramic Tile Waste as Admixture

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. N. K. Ameta

    2013-01-01

    The Dune-Sand has nil cohesion and thus has a very low compressive strength. The stabilization of Dune-Sand is of prime importance since it can be used for various construction works and highways, airfields and helipads projects. The investigation reported herein presents a study of stabilization of Dune- Sand with Ceramic Tiles Wastage as admixture. All the California Bearing Ratio tests were conducted at maximum dry density and optimum moisture content as arrived from Standard Proctor Test....

  18. Surplus foundry sand and its assessment of applicability in composting

    OpenAIRE

    Maharjan, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to carry out a research on reuse possibility of surplus foundry sand in composting and develop a general proposal for guideline only as appendix in this thesis for the Finnish foundries to assist them in setting quality control system criteria to control the quality of surplus foundry sand suitable for composting and preventing any harm or risk to environment, human and natural resources. The research was made on the typical foundry sand used such as alkaline ph...

  19. Treatment of Wastewater from Backwashing Process Sand Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Miletić, S.; Panjkret, V.; Zečević, N.

    2011-01-01

    In the process of raw water treatment for use in the petrochemical industry, one of the most important treatments is the filtration process with process sand filters. A by-product of the filtration process of raw water is wastewater. The wastewater results from the technological process of backwashing process sand filters. Wastewater from backwashing sand filters is unsuitable for further use, since it is contaminated with residual suspended matter and chemical compounds that are added in the...

  20. Strength properties of moulding sands with chosen biopolymer binders

    OpenAIRE

    St.M. Dobosz; K. Major-Gabryś

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the results of primary researches of the IV generation moulding sands, in which as the binders are used differentbiodegradable materials. The bending and the tensile strength of the moulding sands with polylactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid),polycaprolactone, polyhydroxybutyrate and cellulose acetate as binders were measured. The researches show that the best strengthproperties have the moulding sands with polylactide as binder. It was proved that the tested moulding s...

  1. A soil emergence trap for collections of phlebotomine sand flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casanova Cláudio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of breeding sites of sand flies is of great epidemiological interest. A soil emergence trap for investigating potential sand fly breeding sites is described. The trap was tested in two rural areas in the Mogi Guaçu River Valley where the American cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease. Seventy-three sand fly individuals of three species, Lutzomyia intermedia s. l., L. whitmani and L. pessoai, were collected on the forest floor and peridomicile.

  2. Final report on Thermally Modified Sand demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-23

    The use of salt and salt/sand mixtures on icy roadway surfaces has dramatically increased during the past 30 years. Despite extensive documentation on salt related damage to the roadway improvements, vehicles and the environment, road maintenance departments have continued to rely on this practice. Road maintenance departments in northern climate areas have long recognized the safety benefits for public mobility on icy roadways from the use of sand. As an abrasive material, the sand improves the surface traction that results in more drivable and less hazardous road conditions during the winter months. Stockpiles of pure sand stored during the winter months oftentimes freeze into large unworkable, monolithic piles. To maintain a free-flowing condition, it has been found to be necessary to add salt to the sand. The addition of salt in amounts ranging from 5 to 10 percent to that of sand, is usually sufficient to provide relatively free-flowing abrasive material that could be stored in stockpiles and applied to icy road surfaces with conventional sand spreading trucks. Another alternative for winter storage of pure sand to maintain a free-flowing condition is in humidity-controlled, heated buildings. As would be expected, this method has high capital and operating costs. and not cost effective for general highway maintenance use. The invention demonstrated herein is a method of thermally modifying pure sand that will remain in a free-flowing state throughout the winter season without the need for the salt additive. The thermally modified sand provides an abrasive material that when applied to icy roads does not cause environmental and corrosive damage as done by the application of sand with salt. By employing a very simple process of freezing screened sand particles by forced air convection under subfreezing conditions, the invention creates a product that has significant value in terms of economic and environmental benefits.

  3. [Influence of perlite sand on the skin in experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dracheva, E E; Iatsyna, I V; Lapina, N E; Ianin, V A; Antoshina, L I; Zhadan, I Iu; Krasavina, E K

    2012-01-01

    In the present work influence of perlite sand has been studied on a skin of Sprague-Dawley male rat (300-350 g). The biopsy of intact rat skin has been used as control. Contact of the perlite sand with animals' skin causes the reaction of an inflammation amplifying with increase of duration of the influence of substance. Therefore, despite an inert chemical compound, long contact with perlite sand in conditions of production can promote development of skin diseases. From the result of this investigation it is concluded that perlite sand causes irritating action on the skin and it is necessary to apply additional protective means to workers contacting to this substance.

  4. An investigation of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakis, Recep; Koyuncu, Hakan; Demirbas, Ayhan

    2006-06-01

    A laboratory study regarding the reuse of waste foundry sand in asphalt concrete production by replacing a certain portion of aggregate with WFS was undertaken. The results showed that replacement of 10% aggregates with waste foundry sand was found to be the most suitable for asphalt concrete mixtures. Furthermore, the chemical and physical properties of waste foundry sand were analysed in the laboratory to determine the potential effect on the environment. The results indicated that the investigated waste foundry sand did not significantly affect the environment around the deposition PMID:16784170

  5. Trajectories of saltating sand particles behind a porous fence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Lee, Sang Joon; Chen, Ting-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Trajectories of aeolian sand particles behind a porous wind fence embedded in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer were visualized experimentally, to investigate the shelter effect of the fence on sand saltation. Two sand samples, one collected from a beach (d = 250 μm) and the other from a desert (d = 100 μm), were tested in comparison with the previous studies of a 'no-fence' case. A wind fence (ε = 38.5%) was installed on a flat sand bed filled with each sand sample. A high-speed photography technique and the particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) method were employed to reconstruct the trajectories of particles saltating behind the fence. The collision processes of these sand particles were analyzed, momentum and kinetic energy transfer between saltating particles and ground surface were also investigated. In the wake region, probability density distributions of the impact velocities agree well with the pattern of no-fence case, and can be explained by a log-normal law. The horizontal component of impact velocity for the beach sand is decreased by about 54%, and about 76% for the desert sand. Vertical restitution coefficients of bouncing particles are smaller than 1.0 due to the presence of the wind fence. The saltating particles lose a large proportion of their energy during the collision process. These results illustrate that the porous wind fence effectively abates the further evolution of saltating sand particles.

  6. Bioclogging and Biocementation in Construction of Water Pond in Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.; Ivanov, V.; Stabnikov, V.; Li, B.

    2012-12-01

    Conventionally, compacted bentonite, geosynthetic clay liner or plastic liners are used to seal ponds, channels, and reservoirs in sand. Recently, a new approach to form a low permeability layer of several centimetres thick through the microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) process has been developed (Chu et al., 2012). This method has been adopted to build a laboratory scale water pond model in sand. Calcium solution for bioclogging and biocementation was supplied initially by spaying to form a layer of the clogged sand by precipitation in the pores and then by slow percolation from solution above sand surface, which formed a crust of calcite. This combination of bioclogging and biocementation formed a sand layer of 1 - 3 cm depth with low permeability. The permeability of sand after this treatment was reduced from the order of 10^-4 m/s to 10^-7 m/s when an average 2.1 kg of Ca per m^2 of sand surface was precipitated. The bending strengths of the walls and the base of the model pond were in the range of 90 to 256 kPa. The unconfined compressive strengths obtained from samples from the walls and the base were in the range of 215 to 932 kPa. The graded sand and uniform supply of calcium solution were used for the model pond construction but it was significant spatial three-dimensional heterogeneity of sand bioclogging and biocementation.

  7. Traceability of optical length measurements on sand surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohaghegh, Kamran; Yazdanbakhsh, Seyed Alireza; Tiedje, Niels Skat;

    2016-01-01

    of optical measurements on a sand surface. A new customised sand sample was developed using a hard binder to withstand the contact force of a touch probe, while keeping optical cooperativeness similar to that of green sand. The length of the sample was calibrated using a dial gauge set-up. An optical 3D...... scanner with fringe pattern projection was used to measure the length of a green sand sample (soft sample) with traceability transfer through the hard sample. Results confirm that the uncertainty of the optical scanner on the substituted hard sample is similar to that of the soft sample, so the hard...

  8. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathews, S., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

  9. Experimental Study on Minimum Ignition Temperature of Bituminous Coal Dust Cloud%烟煤煤尘云最低着火温度实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 屈姣; 王秋红; 谢长春

    2014-01-01

    In this PaPer,study and measurement were carried out on the minimum ignition temPerature of three kinds of bituminous coal dust clouds by using the Godbert-Greenwald heating furnace,including the non-caking coal taken from Dafusi Mine in Binxian County,the gas coal from Kouzi East Mine in Anhui Province and the lean coal from 301 working face of Tianchi Mine in Shanxi Province. It was found out from the exPerimental results that the ash content of the gas coal,non-caking coal and lean coal increased in turn,their volatile content reduced in turn,their fixed carbon content increased in turn,and the water content of the lean coal,gas coal and non-caking coal increased in turn;the minimum ignition temPerature of the three kinds of bituminous coal dust clouds decreased with the reduction of their Particle sizes;based on their minimum ignition temPeratures,it was found out that the hardest ignited coal dust was the lean coal and the easiest ignited coal dust was gas coal. This study can Provide an exPerimental basic for the safe Production in coal mines.%为了研究彬县大佛寺矿不粘煤、安徽口孜东矿气煤、山西天池矿301工作面瘦煤等3种烟煤的煤尘云最低着火温度,实验采用Godbert-Greenwald加热炉对以上3种烟煤的煤尘云最低着火温度进行了测试。研究发现气煤、不粘煤、瘦煤的灰分依次增大,挥发分依次减小,固定碳依次增大,水分随瘦煤、气煤、不粘煤依次增大;这3种烟煤煤尘云的最低着火温度都随煤尘粒径的减小而降低;根据最低着火温度,得知煤尘云被引燃的难易程度依次为瘦煤、不粘煤、气煤。此基础研究可为煤矿的安全生产提供实验依据。

  10. [Imperial Oil's Cold Lake oil sands operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imperial Oil Limited's Cold Lake oil sands resources, production and operations in Alberta are discussed. Cold Lake is the company's largest single asset and its largest source of crude oil production. In 1998, Cold Lake accounted for just under half of Imperial's total liquid production, averaging more than 135,000 barrels of bitumen a day. Despite the very difficult operating conditions experienced by the oil sands industry in 1998, Imperial Oil's Cold Lake operations generated a positive cash flow and earnings. Just as important, the near and long-term potential of Cold Lake property continues to be strong, even with the tough market conditions today and the foreseeable future. Proved reserves at the end of 1997 were 1.3 billions barrels, equal to about 24 years of current production, but even more important is Imperial's resource base in the Athabasca region, which represents 150 years of production at current rates. Although production forecasts for the near future are are revised downward because of production shut-in due to low prices, the company is confident of its long-term prospects mainly because of existing infrastructure, superior reservoir quality, 30 years worth of operating improvements and established bitumen-blend markets. Details of the company's future Cold Lake development plans are discussed. The need to continue technology development, which has been at the core of the industry's growth in the past and will continue to be the key to the future, are emphasized

  11. Oil sands tailings leachability and toxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine tailings disposal and reclamation is a major issue facing the oil sands mining and extraction industry. Government regulations dictate that reclamation must return the site to a level of self-sustaining biological capability which approximates the natural condition. A two-phase laboratory program has been completed to investigate the suitability of alternative reclamation materials. For the first phase of the study, chemical and toxicological analyses were carried out on 13 different reclamation and reference materials (solid phase and extractions). Seedling emergence, nematode maturation, algal growth and bacterial luminescence for leachate samples showed a range of sensitivities in response to the tested materials, although phytotoxicity tests were generally the most sensitive. With the exception of one test material, high toxicity ratings were consistent with that expected from the chemical data. The second phase of the study focused on the evaluation of chemical and toxicological conditions in leachate water generated using bench-scale column percolation tests. Leachate water equivalent to 10 pore volume replacements was generated and temporal variations in toxicity and chemistry monitored. Similar to phase 1 findings, phytotoxicity tests were the most sensitive tests to leachate waters. For most materials tested, most toxicity was removed after 2--3 porewater replacements. More persistent toxicity was noted for samples containing bitumen (e.g., fine tails and oil sands). No clear correspondence was noted between chemical concentrations and toxicity in leachate waters

  12. Ilmenite Mineral's Recovery from Beach Sand Tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mineral ilmenite is the major source of rutile for industrial use and is of interest to paint and fertiliser industries. Enormous unutilised tailing dams lie on the eastern coast of the South Africa. Although covered by a simulation of the original indigenous vegetation, these tailings are still ilmenite bearing and of economic value. Tailings emanating from beach sand mineral slimes dams of the Kwazulu-Natal area (South Africa) have been processed. Screening, flotation, spiral concentration and magnetic separation methods were used either separately or successively. The present work sheds light on alternative routes for the extraction of the ilmenite, from these tailings. It moreover points out the usefulness of the Moessbauer spectroscopy in the mineral processing product monitoring. Tailings from the beach sands were used in the present study after the economic industrial minerals zirconia, ilmenite and rutile had been extracted in previous mining operations. About 61% natural ilmenite recovery was observed in the flotation concentrate of a Humphrey Spiral concentrate while a 62% recovery of hematite was found in the flotation tailings. The combination of screening, spiral concentration and magnetic separation, and flotation yielded a product with the highest ilmenite and hematite concentration being 71% and 19%, respectively. A natural ilmenite mineral, containing 87% ilmenite and 13% hematite, could be produced and extracted from the tailings of the flotation process, collected subsequently to the spiral concentration and the initial screening.

  13. Microstructural characterization of a Canadian oil sand

    CERN Document Server

    Dinh, Hong Doan; Nauroy, Jean-François; Tang, Anh-Minh; Souhail, Youssef; 10.1139/T2012-072

    2013-01-01

    The microstructure of oil sand samples extracted at a depth of 75 m from the estuarine Middle McMurray formation (Alberta, Canada) has been investigated by using high resolution 3D X-Ray microtomography ($\\mu$CT) and Cryo Scanning Electron Microscopy (CryoSEM). $\\mu$CT images evidenced some dense areas composed of highly angular grains surrounded by fluids that are separated by larger pores full of gas. 3D Image analysis provided in dense areas porosity values compatible with in-situ log data and macroscopic laboratory determinations, showing that they are representative of intact states. $\\mu$CT hence provided some information on the morphology of the cracks and disturbance created by gas expansion. The CryoSEM technique, in which the sample is freeze fractured within the SEM chamber prior to observation, provided pictures in which the (frozen) bitumen clearly appears between the sand grains. No evidence of the existence of a thin connate water layer between grains and the bitumen, frequently mentioned in th...

  14. Western Gas Sands Project: status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-05-01

    Progress of the major government sponsored projects undertaken to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the western United States during March 1978 is summarized. The Bartlesville Energy Research Center (BERC) and participating National Laboratories, funded by DOE, are continuing their work in the area of research and development. The emphasis is on the development of new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics, mathematical modeling and data analysis. Field Tests and demonstrations active in the Uinta and Piceance Basins include: Gas Producing Enterprises (GPE) Natural Buttes Unit Wells No. 9, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21 and 22, Mobil Research and Development Corporation, Well No. F-31-13G, and Rio Blanco Natural Gas Company, Well No. 498-4-1. Gas Producing Enterprises Natural Buttes Unit Well No. 9 was fractured on March 27, 1978. The treatment consisted of 554,000 pounds of sand and 349,000 gallons of gel. Mitchell Energy Corporation of Houston, Texas was awarded Department of Energy Contract EF-78-C-08-1547 on March 15, 1978. Field work under this contract is scheduled to begin on June 15, 1978, with the drilling of a new well.

  15. Enabling technologies for oil sands development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of oil sands production and expansion possibilities in Alberta were presented. The enabling technologies for oil sands projects include mining (bucketwheels, draglines, trucks, shovels conveyors, slurry hydrotransport); extraction (conditioning tumblers, pipelines, tanks, hot water, caustic, cold water, frothers); froth cleaning (centrifuges, solvent treatment); tailings (tailings ponds, consolidated tailings); and upgrading (coking, hydrotreating for SCO, hydrocracking and multiple products). The enabling technologies for in situ production include cyclic steam stimulation for vertical wells, steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) for dual horizontal wells, and cold production with wormholes. This paper described the recovery potentials of each of these processes. It also discussed the role of government and industry in research and cooperative research involving both the private and public sectors. Examples of each of these were described such as SAGD, the OSLO cold water extraction process, The consolidated tailings (CT) project, the low energy extraction process (slurry production, hydrotransport, pipeline conditioning and warm water extraction), and research in fine tailings, to demonstrate that although objectives may differ, government and industry research objectives are complementary

  16. Falling sand tests on various coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manetti, M.; Zonfrillo, G.; Pratesi, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Meccanica e Tecnologie Industriali; Giovannetti, I. [GE Oil and Gas - Nuovo Pilnone, Florence (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Abrasive wear is responsible for severe machine parts and in particular of compressor impellers. Methods of increasing service lifetime are based on employment of abrasion resistant materials or more frequently of the creation of hard, wear-resistant surface layers. In this work a bare aluminium alloy and the same alloy with four different coatings have been tested at room temperature, in order to verify their resistance to falling abrasive. Following standard ASTM D968-93, tests have been performed using a precise quantity of sand as abrasive and letting it fall on the sample with a standard apparatus: two different kinds of sand have been used, in order to obtain also information on the influence of composition and Grain size of the abrasive on material resistance. Determinations of hardness, roughness, weight loss, and morphology of the eroded surface have also been carried out. The comparison between the coatings in vestilated has been performed on the basis of the thickness decrease of the samples. (orig.)

  17. Sulfur biogeochemistry of oil sands composite tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Lesley; Stephenson, Kate [Earth Sciences, McMaster University (Canada)], email: warrenl@mcmaster.ca; Penner, Tara [Syncrude Environmental Research (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper discusses the sulfur biogeochemistry of oil sands composite tailings (CT). The Government of Alberta is accelerating reclamation activities on composite tailings. As a CT pilot reclamation operation, Syncrude is currently constructing the first freshwater fen. Minor unpredicted incidents with H2S gas released from the dewatering process associated with these reclamations have been reported. The objective of this study is to ascertain the connection between microbial activity and H2S generation within CT and to assess the sulfur biogeochemistry of untreated and treated (fen) CT over seasonal and annual timescales. The microbial geochemical interactions taking place are shown using a flow chart. CT is composed of gypsum, sand, clay and organics like naphthenic acids and bitumen. Sulfur and Fe cycling in mining systems and their microbial activities are presented. The chemistry and the processes involved within CT are also given along with the results. It can be said that the diverse Fe and S metabolizing microorganisms confirm the ecology involved in H2S dynamics.

  18. Consolidation testing of oil sand fine tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Znidarcic, Dobroslav; Miller, Robert [University of Colorado (United States); Zyl, Dirk van [Mining Engineering, University of British Columbia (Canada); Fredlund, Murray [SoilVision Systems Ltd. (Canada); Wells, Sean [Suncor Energy Inc. (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The most fundamentally challenging issue facing the geo-environmental community is containment, long-term storage, and volume reduction of oil sands fine tailings produced by the extraction process. This paper presents the results of a testing program in which the seepage induced consolidation test (SICT) is used to determine consolidation properties, i.e. the compressibility and permeability characteristics, of a mature fine tailings (MFT) sample. The obtained properties are verified independently by increased gravity in a geotechnical centrifuge. It is shown that MFT behave like other slurries and undergo a consolidation process when subjected to loading, seepage forces or increased self-weight stresses in a centrifuge. The void ratio (solids content) within each sample is variable and no restrictive assumptions are made on the variability of the consolidation properties of the sample. The results confirm that the SICT is applicable to the testing of oil sand MFT, and produces repeatable datasets under controlled laboratory conditions; nevertheless, more detailed field studies are recommended.

  19. Thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous mixtures at low temperatures. Links between the binder characteristics and the mix properties; Comportement thermomecanique des enrobes bitumeux a basses temperatures: relations entre les proprietes du liant et de l'enrobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olard, F.

    2003-10-01

    This thesis has been realized within the framework of a partnership between the Ecole Nationale des TPE, APPIA and EUROVIA. The company Total has also been associated to this project. The study deals with the thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous materials at low temperatures. The aim is to establish the links between the characteristics of the binder and the properties of bituminous mixes at low temperatures, and to better understand the existing low-temperature parameters and criteria for binders (or to propose new ones), related to the in-situ behavior of bituminous mixtures. A large experimental campaign has been carried out so as to fulfill this goal. After a bibliographical study on the rheology and the thermo-mechanical properties of (pure or modified) binders, putties and mixes, the experimental campaign carried out both in the small strain domain and in the large strain domain, is presented. The low temperature behavior of binders has been evaluated with three common fundamental tests: i)the complex modulus determination, ii)the Bending Beam Rheometer and iii)the tensile strength at a constant strain rate and constant temperatures. A new three point bending test on pre-notched bitumen beams has also been developed at the ENTPE. The low-temperature fracture properties of bitumens were studied at constant temperatures and cross-head speeds considering the Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) assumptions. The thermo-mechanical behavior of bituminous mixtures has been studied by performing i)complex modulus tests, ii)measurements of the coefficient of thermal dilatation and contraction, iii)tensile tests at constant temperatures and strain rates, and iv)Thermal Stress Restrained Specimen Tests. Apart from the determination of some pertinent links between binder and mix properties and discriminating characteristics with regard to the thermal cracking of bituminous mixes at low temperatures, the analysis has also consisted in modeling the behavior of

  20. Interactions between microbial activity and distribution and mineral coatings on sand grains from rapid sand filters treating groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülay, Arda; Tatari, Karolina; Musovic, Sanin;

    Rapid sand filtration is a traditional and widespread technology for drinking water purification which combines biological, chemical and physical processes together. Granular media, especially sand, is a common filter material that allows several oxidized compounds to accumulate on its surface......, physico-chemical and biokinetic techniques to determine the interaction between attached bacteria and attached minerals in rapid sand filters as well as the causality of the relation. Strong pairwise correlations revealed the strong relation between mineral physical properties and bacterial activity...

  1. Comparison of buried sand ridges and regressive sand ridges on the outer shelf of the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyin; Jin, Xianglong; Zhou, Jieqiong; Zhao, Dineng; Shang, Jihong; Li, Shoujun; Cao, Zhenyi; Liang, Yuyang

    2016-07-01

    Based on multi-beam echo soundings and high-resolution single-channel seismic profiles, linear sand ridges in U14 and U2 on the East China Sea (ECS) shelf are identified and compared in detail. Linear sand ridges in U14 are buried sand ridges, which are 90 m below the seafloor. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the transgressive systems tract (TST) formed 320-200 ka ago and that their top interface is the maximal flooding surface (MFS). Linear sand ridges in U2 are regressive sand ridges. It is presumed that these buried sand ridges belong to the TST of the last glacial maximum (LGM) and that their top interface is the MFS of the LGM. Four sub-stage sand ridges of U2 are discerned from the high-resolution single-channel seismic profile and four strikes of regressive sand ridges are distinguished from the submarine topographic map based on the multi-beam echo soundings. These multi-stage and multi-strike linear sand ridges are the response of, and evidence for, the evolution of submarine topography with respect to sea-level fluctuations since the LGM. Although the difference in the age of formation between U14 and U2 is 200 ka and their sequences are 90 m apart, the general strikes of the sand ridges are similar. This indicates that the basic configuration of tidal waves on the ECS shelf has been stable for the last 200 ka. A basic evolutionary model of the strata of the ECS shelf is proposed, in which sea-level change is the controlling factor. During the sea-level change of about 100 ka, five to six strata are developed and the sand ridges develop in the TST. A similar story of the evolution of paleo-topography on the ECS shelf has been repeated during the last 300 ka.

  2. Faecal indicator bacteria enumeration in beach sand: A comparison study of extraction methods in medium to coarse sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, A.B.; Griffith, J.; McGee, C.; Edge, T.A.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Whitman, R.; Cao, Y.; Getrich, M.; Jay, J.A.; Ferguson, D.; Goodwin, K.D.; Lee, C.M.; Madison, M.; Weisberg, S.B.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The absence of standardized methods for quantifying faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) in sand hinders comparison of results across studies. The purpose of the study was to compare methods for extraction of faecal bacteria from sands and recommend a standardized extraction technique. Methods and Results: Twenty-two methods of extracting enterococci and Escherichia coli from sand were evaluated, including multiple permutations of hand shaking, mechanical shaking, blending, sonication, number of rinses, settling time, eluant-to-sand ratio, eluant composition, prefiltration and type of decantation. Tests were performed on sands from California, Florida and Lake Michigan. Most extraction parameters did not significantly affect bacterial enumeration. anova revealed significant effects of eluant composition and blending; with both sodium metaphosphate buffer and blending producing reduced counts. Conclusions: The simplest extraction method that produced the highest FIB recoveries consisted of 2 min of hand shaking in phosphate-buffered saline or deionized water, a 30-s settling time, one-rinse step and a 10 : 1 eluant volume to sand weight ratio. This result was consistent across the sand compositions tested in this study but could vary for other sand types. Significance and Impact of the Study: Method standardization will improve the understanding of how sands affect surface water quality. ?? 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Selected properties of spruce dust generated from sanding operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Očkajová

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research of selected properties of spruce dust generated from experimental sanding by a hand belt sander with two sanding models - along the wood fibres and perpendicular to the wood fibres in the radial direction. The experiment was carried out for the purpose of obtaining the basic characteristics of wood sanding dust – granularity, size and shape of individually formed particles, and bulk properties (bulk density, bulk angle, and tilt angle that are important for suction, which is connected with the quality of living and working environments. The particles smaller than 100 micrometers are unsuitable for both environments, since they do not sediment in space at all or only partly, and they are characterized as airborne dust. The most harmful particles for humans are those smaller than 2.5 μm as they reach the lung alveoli. When sanding wood the finest particles are formed and therefore it is important to know the basic characteristics of sanding dust in order to deal with these problems effectively. On the basis of the mesh sieve analysis, we can state that in sanding perpendicular to the wood fibres the share of particles smaller than 100 μm is 76.94 % on average and along the wood fibres it is only 56.01 %. The structure, shape and size of particles were investigated by microscope. When using the longitudinal model of sanding, the fibrous elements were formed for the most part. When using the perpendicular model, isometric particles were predominantly formed in smaller fractions and particles of fibrous shape in larger fractions. The smallest particles were found in the following samples. When the perpendicular model of sanding was used, we have found the smallest particle in the investigated samples with the diameter of 1.68 μm, and when the longitudinal model of sanding was used, the particle with the diameter of 1.75 μm. Bulk density of spruce dust from the longitudinal model of sanding is 77.77 kg · m-3

  4. Properties of Desert Sand and CMAS Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2014-01-01

    As-received desert sand from a Middle East country has been characterized for its phase composition and thermal stability. X-ray diffraction analysis showed the presence of quartz (SiO2), calcite (CaCO3), gypsum (CaSO4.2H2O), and NaAlSi3O8 phases in as-received desert sand and showed weight loss of approx. 35 percent due to decomposition of CaCO3 and CaSO4.2H2O when heated to 1400 C. A batch of as-received desert sand was melted into calcium magnesium aluminosilicate (CMAS) glass at approx. 1500 C. From inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, chemical composition of the CMAS glass was analyzed to be 27.8CaO-4MgO-5Al2O3-61.6SiO2-0.6Fe2O3-1K2O (mole percent). Various physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the glass have been evaluated. Bulk density of CMAS glass was 2.69 g/cc, Young's modulus 92 GPa, Shear modulus 36 GPa, Poisson's ratio 0.28, dilatometric glass transition temperature (T (sub g)) 706 C, softening point (T (sub d)) 764 C, Vickers microhardness 6.3 +/- 0.4 GPa, indentation fracture toughness 0.75 +/- 0.15 MPa.m (sup 1/2), and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) 9.8 x 10 (exp -6)/degC in the temperature range 25 to 700 C. Temperature dependence of viscosity has also been estimated from various reference points of the CMAS glass using the Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman (VFT) equation. The glass remained amorphous after heat treating at 850 C for 10 hr but crystallized into CaSiO3 and Ca-Mg-Al silicate phases at 900 C or higher temperatures. Crystallization kinetics of the CMAS glass has also been investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA). Activation energies for the crystallization of two different phases in the glass were calculated to be 403 and 483 kJ/mol, respectively.

  5. Development of a method to determine the nuclide inventory in bituminized waste packages; Entwicklung eines Verfahrens zur Bestimmung des Nuklidinventars in bituminierten Abfallgebinden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesalic, E.; Kortman, F.; Lierse von Gostomski, C. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Zentrale Technisch-Wissenschaftliche Betriebseinheit Radiochemie Muenchen (RCM)

    2014-01-15

    Until the 1980s, bitumen was used as a conditioning agent for weak to medium radioactive liquid waste. Its use can be ascribed mainly to the properties that indicated that the matrix was optimal. However, fires broke out repeatedly during the conditioning process, so that the method is meanwhile no longer permitted in Germany. There are an estimated 100 waste packages held by the public authorities in Germany that require a supplementary declaration. In contrast to the common matrices, such as for example resins or sludges, there is still no standardized technology for taking samples and subsequently determining the radio-nuclide for bitumen. Aspects, such as the thermoplastic behaviour, make determining the nuclide inventory more difficult in bituminized waste packages. The development of a standardized technology to take samples with a subsequent determination of the radio-nuclide analysis is the objective of a project funded by the BMBF. Known, new methods, specially developed for the project, are examined on inactive bitumen samples and then transferred to active samples. At first non-destructive methods are used. The resulting information forms an important basis to work out and apply destructive strategy for sampling and analysis. Since the project is on-going, this report can only address the development of the sampling process. By developing a sampling system, it will be possible to take samples from an arbitrary selected location of the package across the entire matrix level and thus gain representative analysis material. The process is currently being optimized. (orig.)

  6. Adsorption of bituminous components at oil/water interfaces investigated by quartz crystal microbalance: implications to the stability of water-in-oil emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goual, Lamia; Horváth-Szabó, Géza; Masliyah, Jacob H; Xu, Zhenghe

    2005-08-30

    Silica-gel-coated QCM crystals oscillating in a thickness shear mode are used to measure adsorption of bituminous components in water-saturated heptol (1/1 vol ratio of a heptane/toluene mixture) at the oil/water interface. In addition to the viscoelasticity of the adsorbed film, the effects of the bulk liquid density and viscosity as well as the liquid trapped in interfacial cavities are taken into account for the calculation of adsorbed mass. Asphaltenes in heptol adsorb continuously at the oil/water interface, while resins (the surface-active species in maltenes) show adsorption saturation in the same solvent. For Athabasca bitumen in heptol, two adsorption regimes are observed depending on concentration. At low concentrations, a slow, non-steady-state, and irreversible adsorption takes place. At high concentrations, a steady-state adsorption with limited reversibility results in a quick adsorption saturation. The threshold concentration between these adsorption regimes is 1.5 wt % and 8 wt % for oil/water and oil/gold interfaces, respectively. The threshold concentration, the total adsorbed amount, and the flux of non-steady-state adsorption depend on the resin-to-asphaltene ratio. The threshold concentration is related to the earlier reported critical bitumen concentration characterizing the rigid-to-flexible transition of the interfacial film. We propose a new mechanism based on the change of the effective resin-to-asphaltene ratio with dilution to explain both the adsorption behavior and emulsion stability. PMID:16114932

  7. Compensation Grouting in Sand: Experiments, Field Experiences and Mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezuijen, A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on experimental research on compensation grouting in sand. It is investigated in model tests, how the shape of the grout bodies made during injection depends on the grout properties, the density of the sand and the way the tubes are installed. The shape of the grout body affects

  8. The stable stiffness triangle - drained sand during deformation cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic, drained sand stiffness was observed using the Danish triaxial appa- ratus. New, deformation dependant soil property (the stable stiffness triangle) was detected. Using the the stable stiffness triangle, secant stiffness of drained sand was plausible to predict (and control) even during...

  9. 77 FR 75007 - Importation of Sand Pears From China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ..., 2011, we published a proposed rule \\2\\ in the Federal Register (76 FR 78168- 78172, Docket No. APHIS... Health Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 319 RIN 0579-AD42 Importation of Sand Pears From China AGENCY... and vegetables regulations to allow the importation of sand pears (Pyrus pyrifolia) from China...

  10. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  11. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  12. Critical size effect of sand particles on cavitation damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-hua; GOU Wen-juan

    2013-01-01

    The critical size of the sand particles in liquid is determined by means of the special vibratory apparatus,and it is related to various effects on the cavitation damage.The increase of the sand size or concentration would aggravate the cavitation damage if their sizes are larger than this critical size,conversely,this damage would be relieved.

  13. Acetylcholinesterase mutations and organophosphate resistance in sand flies and mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sand fly, Phlebotomus papatasi (Scopoli) is a major vector of Leishamnia major, the principle causative agent of human cutaneous leishmaniasis in the Middle East, southern Europe, northern Africa, and Southern Asia. Sand fly bites and leishmaniasis significantly impacted U.S. military operations...

  14. Pathogen removal using saturated sand colums supplemented with hydrochar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chung, J.W.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD study has evaluated hydrochars derived from biowastes as adsorbents for pathogen removal in water treatment. Pathogen removal experiments were conducted by carrying out breakthrough analysis using a simple sand filtration set-up. Glass columns packed by 10 cm sand bed supplemented with mino

  15. Sand transport in urbanized beaches - models and reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general objective is to quantify the wind transport of sand in the urbanized beaches. The specific objectives include testing and calibration of the wind velocity as well as the classification of the beaches according to the magnitude and the direction of sand transport

  16. Efficient modelling of sand wave behaviour [Powerpoint Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den Joris; Damme, van Ruud

    2004-01-01

    Sand waves form a pattern of more or less parallel ridges. The wave length is about 300 meters and the height up to 10 meters, which is a considerable amount of the total water depth. Sand waves migrate with speeds of about 10 meters per year. Information on their behaviour is valuable: the larger p

  17. Test Setup for Axially Loaded Piles in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Kristina

    The test setup for testing axially static and cyclic loaded piles in sand is described in the following. The purpose for the tests is to examine the tensile capacity of axially loaded piles in dense fully saturated sand. The pile dimensions are chosen to resemble full scale dimension of piles used...... in offshore pile foundations today....

  18. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrott, J.; Colavecchia, M.; Hewitt, L.; Sherry, J.; Headley, J. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Turcotte, D.; Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Regina, SK (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  19. SAND: Automated VLBI imaging and analyzing pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The Search And Non-Destroy (SAND) is a VLBI data reduction pipeline composed of a set of Python programs based on the AIPS interface provided by ObitTalk. It is designed for the massive data reduction of multi-epoch VLBI monitoring research. It can automatically investigate calibrated visibility data, search all the radio emissions above a given noise floor and do the model fitting either on the CLEANed image or directly on the uv data. It then digests the model-fitting results, intelligently identifies the multi-epoch jet component correspondence, and recognizes the linear or non-linear proper motion patterns. The outputs including CLEANed image catalogue with polarization maps, animation cube, proper motion fitting and core light curves. For uncalibrated data, a user can easily add inline modules to do the calibration and self-calibration in a batch for a specific array.

  20. Direct Production of Silicones From Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry N. Lewis; F.J. Schattenmann: J.P. Lemmon

    2001-09-30

    Silicon, in the form of silica and silicates, is the second most abundant element in the earth's crust. However the synthesis of silicones (scheme 1) and almost all organosilicon chemistry is only accessible through elemental silicon. Silicon dioxide (sand or quartz) is converted to chemical-grade elemental silicon in an energy intensive reduction process, a result of the exceptional thermodynamic stability of silica. Then, the silicon is reacted with methyl chloride to give a mixture of methylchlorosilanes catalyzed by cooper containing a variety of tract metals such as tin, zinc etc. The so-called direct process was first discovered at GE in 1940. The methylchlorosilanes are distilled to purify and separate the major reaction components, the most important of which is dimethyldichlorosilane. Polymerization of dimethyldichlorosilane by controlled hydrolysis results in the formation of silicone polymers. Worldwide, the silicones industry produces about 1.3 billion pounds of the basic silicon polymer, polydimethylsiloxane.

  1. Cobalt speciation and mobility in glacial sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration behaviour of cobalt in a sand-groundwater system has been studied. Batch sorption, column and diffusion experiments all showed that more than one cobalt species were present and that interconversion occurred between them. In a column experiment cobalt complexed with natural (probably fulvic) material contained in the groundwater dissociated with a first order rate constant of 1.8 x 10-4 sec-1. This suggested that in a field tracer test in the Drigg borehole array very little cobalt would reach the first sampling point. Experiments with the Co-EDTA, however, showed that although some dissociation occurred the Co-EDTA complexes were sufficiently stable for field use. Sectioning a column through which a pulse of Co-EDTA had passed produced a complicated distribution of sorbed cobalt which was tentatively interpreted as being due to the movement of two retarded (possibly colloidal) species

  2. The state of oil sands wetland reclamation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, L. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    The state of oil sand and wetlands reclamation was the subject of this presentation. Wildlife habitat and response, plant community and production, and microbial biology were examples of research areas surrounding this body of knowledge. Hydrological research and landscape ecology were discussed along with peatlands and marshes such as the Corvette and the Kia. A few examples of what has been learned in the area of wetlands reclamation was presented. Other topics were also discussed, such as timeframes, pragmatic policy approaches, reclamation costs, research needs and some ideas on maturing the field. It was concluded that environmental conditions change with time and area because of time, chemistry, physics, stoichiometry, as well as biotic mediation and facilitation. figs.

  3. Effects of oil sands sediments on fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper described a collaborative project organized by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) Panel of Energy Research and Development (PERD) with researchers from Environment Canada and the University of Saskatchewan. The 4-year study was conducted to assess the toxicity of oil sands sediments and river waters, and reclamation ponds and sediments on laboratory-raised fish. Three sediments from rivers were evaluated for their potential to cause adverse impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larvae for a period of 18 days. The study monitored hatching, larval survival, development, and growth. Naphthenic acids (NA), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals were measured in the sediments to determine if the compounds can be correlated with observed toxicity. The study will also assess walleye eggs exposed to sediments, and in situ fish exposures. Toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) studies will be conducted to isolate the fractions that may affect fish development and growth.

  4. Properties of sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jina; Fan Zitian; Zan Xiaolei; Pan Di

    2009-01-01

    The sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating has many advantages,such as low sodium silicate adding quantity,fast hardening speed,high room temperature strength,good collapsibility and certain surface stability. However,it has big moisture absorbability in the air,which would lead to the compression strength and the surface stability of the sand molds being sharply reduced. In this study,the moisture absorbability of the sodium silicate bonded sand hardened by microwave heating in different humidity conditions and the effect factors were investigated. Meanwhile,the reasons for the big moisture absorbability of the sand were analyzed.Some measures to overcome the problems of high moisture absorbability,bad surface stability and sharply reducing strength in the air were discussed. The results of this study establish the foundation of green and clean foundry technology based on the microwave heating hardening sodium silicate sand process.

  5. A New Type of Exposed Oil Sand Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    With several means of analysis, the unique organic compound component and distribution of exposed oil sand existing in Qinghai, north-west China, is revealed. Qinghhai oil sand has great content of light components with high saturated hydrocarbon content up to approximately 50%, while its heavy components of colloid and asphaltene is rather low (<38%); straight-chain alkane has a regular distribution concentrating mainly around C28; it has a very high atom ratio of H/C. The physical parameters of the oil sand mine are within the range of common heavy oils. Such chemical composition and distribution obviously differs from that of other known exposed oil sand mines. This particular property of the oil sand is formed due to the unique geographical and geological environment. Therefore, it is intended to exploit the mine with a new combined method, i.e., first drill horizontal wells and then opencut.

  6. Stabilization of Dune Sand with Ceramic Tile Waste as Admixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. N. K. Ameta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Dune-Sand has nil cohesion and thus has a very low compressive strength. The stabilization of Dune-Sand is of prime importance since it can be used for various construction works and highways, airfields and helipads projects. The investigation reported herein presents a study of stabilization of Dune- Sand with Ceramic Tiles Wastage as admixture. All the California Bearing Ratio tests were conducted at maximum dry density and optimum moisture content as arrived from Standard Proctor Test. Direct shear tests were also performed. The main objective of this experimental study was to obtain an economical stabilized mix of ceramic tiles wastage and dune sand so that largely and cheaply available dune-sand be used for various construction purposes.

  7. Big picture thinking in oil sands tailings disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boswell, J. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed methods of disposing oil sands tailings. Oil sands operators are currently challenged by a variety of legislative and environmental factors concerning the creation and disposal of oil sands tailings. The media has focused on the negative ecological impact of oil sands production, and technical issues are reducing the effect of some mitigation processes. Operators must learn to manage the interface between tailings production and removal, the environment, and public opinion. The successful management of oil sand tailings will include procedures designed to improve reclamation processes, understand environmental laws and regulations, and ensure that the cumulative impacts of tailings are mitigated. Geotechnical investigations, engineering designs and various auditing procedures can be used to develop tailings management plans. Environmental screening and impact assessments can be used to develop sustainable solutions. Public participation and environmental mediation is needed to integrate the public, environmental and technical tailings management strategies. Operators must ensure public accountability for all stakeholders. tabs., figs.

  8. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  9. Optimization of Blended Mortars Using Steel Slag Sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new kind of mortar made of ground granulated blast-furnace slag (GGBFS), gypsum,clinker and steel slag sand (<4.75 mm) was developed. The ratio of steel slag sand to GGBFS was 1:1 and the amount of gypsum was 4% by weight while the dosage of clinker ranged from 0% to 24%. The optimization formulation of such mortar was studied. The content of steel slag sand should be less than 50% according to the volume stability of blended mortar, and the dosage of clinker is about 10% based on the strength development.Besides strength, the hydration heat, pore structure and micro pattern of blended mortar were also determined.The experimental results show the application of steel slag sand may reduce the dosage of cement clinker and increase the content of industrial waste product such as GGBFS, and the clinker is also a better admixture for blended mortar using steel slag sand.

  10. The effects of psammophilous plants on sand dune dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bel, Golan

    2013-01-01

    Psammophilous plants are special plants that flourish in sand moving environments. There are two main mechanisms by which the wind affects these plants: (i) sand drift exposes roots and covers branches--the exposed roots turn into new plants and the covered branches turn into new roots; both mechanisms result in an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes; (ii) strong winds, often associated with sand movement, tear branches and seed them in nearby locations, resulting in new plants and an enhanced growth rate of the psammophilous plant cover of the dunes. Despite their important role in dune dynamics, to our knowledge, psammophilous plants have never been incorporated into mathematical models of sand dunes. Here, we attempt to model the effects of these plants on sand dune dynamics. We construct a set of three ordinary differential equations for the fractions of surface cover of regular vegetation, biogenic soil crust and psammophilous plants. The latter reach their optimal growth u...

  11. Climatology of yellow sand (Asian sand, Asian dust or Kosa)in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masatoshi; Yoshino

    2002-01-01

    In order to study climatology of yellow sand (Asian sand, Asian dust or Kosa) in EastAsia, secular fluctuation in China, Korea and Japan in the recent 30 years was presented. Thenumber of days with sand-dust storm at five stations in China-Hotan, Zhangye, Minqin, Jurhand Beijing, decreases a lot at the former three stations, but changed little at the latter two stations.Suggesting that the recent global warming is more evident in Xinjiang and Gansu, where the fre-quency of cold air invasions from the higher latitudes is decreasing. But, the eastern parts ofMongolia, inner Mongolia, and North China encounter stronger cyclones in early spring as a resultof global warming. These cyclones bring cold air from higher latitudes, causing severe duststorms. Secular variation in the annual days with sand-dust storms in China and Kosa days in Ko-rea and Japan show a parallel change with higher frequency from 1975 to 1985. This may be re-lated to the higher frequency of La Nina years. However, different tendency was shown in theperiod from 1986 to 1996. Since 1996 or 1997, a sharp increase is clear, which may be caused bythe developed cyclones in East Asia as well as human activities, and stronger land degradationunder La Nina conditions. Anomalies of the total number of stations with Kosa days were dis-cussed in accordance with some synoptic meteorological conditions such as the differences be-tween Siberian anticyclone and Aleutian cyclone center at 500 hPa level during the previous winter.

  12. Properties of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporating Waste Foundry Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat SIDDIQUE

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates the possibilities of using waste foundry sand as partial replacement of sand in self-compacting concrete. Self-compacting concrete, as the name indicates, is a type of concrete that does not require external or internal compaction, because it becomes levelled and consolidated under its self-weight. Foundry sand is high quality silica sand used as a moulding material by ferrous and non-ferrous metal casting industries. It can be reused several times in foundries but, after a certain period, cannot be used further and becomes waste material, referred to as waste, used or spent foundry sand (WFS,UFS or SFS. This experimental investigation was performed to evaluate the strength and durability properties of SCC, in which natural sand was partial replaced with waste foundry sand (WFS. Natural sand was replaced with four percentage (0%, 10%, 15%, 20% of WFS by weight. Fresh properties of self-compacting concrete were studied. Compression test and splitting tensile strength test were carried out to evaluate the strength properties of concrete at the age of 7, 28, and 56 days. In case of durability properties, sulphate resistance was evaluated at the age of 7, 28 and 56 days and Rapid Chloride Permeability test was conducted at age of 28 days. Test results showed that there is increase in compressive strength, splitting tensile strength of self-compacting concrete by incorporating waste foundry sand (WFS as partial replacement by sand up to 15%. Resistance of concrete against sulphate attack and rapid chloride permeability were also improved for concrete mixes.

  13. Measuring Hydraulic Properties of Soil-Foundry Sand Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shouse, P. J.; Dungan, R. S.; Dees, N.; Fargerlund, J.

    2005-12-01

    The foundry industry produces clay coated sand particles that have potential to affect soil water retention and conductivity if mixed with soils at the proper ratio. The purpose of our study was to determine the effects of mixing foundry sand on increasing the saturated hydraulic conductivity of slowly permeable soils. Our methods included mixing Walla-Walla silt loam soil with increasing volumes of foundry sand from 0% to 100%. We then used several packing methods to determine the optimum bulk density for our automated retention and outflow experiments. To increase the range of the retention function, we also measured soil water retention using pressure plates at pressures between 1000 and 15000 cm pressure head. We measured saturated hydraulic conductivity using the constant head method and a single blind approach (the Ksat was measured in two labs, one had knowledge of the mixtures and one had no knowledge of the mixtures). The single blind approach was used to reduce the chance of bias in measuring Ksat and water retention. Our results for the saturated hydraulic conductivity did indicate that additions of foundry sand had a limited effect on Ksat until a critical level of sand was added to the mixture. The retention function was similarly affected by increasing volumes of foundry sand. The rankings of the Ksat measurements between the labs was constant, but the values obtained did differ (some significantly). For the Walla-Walla soil, additions of foundry sands exceeding 40% were needed to affect the measured Ksat and retention function. At these large volumes of foundry sands, it may be more appropriate to use the sands for new installations of turf grass such as athletic fields, and/or golf greens. We are continuing to study the characteristics of different foundry sands and quantifying their effects on the hydraulic properties of clay soils.

  14. Experimental analysis of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in wind-blown sand flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xie; Zhibao Dong; Xiaojing Zheng

    2005-01-01

    The probability distributions of sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities in a wind-blown sand flux play very important roles in the simulation of the wind-blown sand movement. In this paper, the vertical and the horizontal speeds of sand particles located at 1.0 mm above a sand-bed in a wind-blown sand flux are observed with the aid of Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) in a wind tunnel. Based on the experimental data, the probability distributions of not only the vertical lift-off speed but also the lift-off velocity as well as its horizontal component and the incident velocity as well as its vertical and horizontal components can be obtained by the equal distance histogram method. It is found, according to the results of the χ2-test for these probability distributions, that the probability density functions (pdf's) of the sand particles' lift-off and incident velocities as well as their vertical components are described by the Gamma density function with different peak values and shapes and the downwind incident and lift-off horizontal speeds, respectively, can be described by the lognormal and the Gamma density functions. These pdf's depend on not only the sand particle diameter but also the wind speed.

  15. The Geodiversity in Drift Sand Landscapes of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; Riksen, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The authors carried out detailed field studies of more than twelve drift sand landscapes in The Netherlands. The objective of these studies was to restore Natura-2000 values by restoring the wind activity. Active drift sands occur almost exclusively in The Netherlands, Natura 2000 habitat 2330 'Inland dunes with open Corynephorus and Agrostis grasslands', for which reason our country is largely responsible for this European landscape. Active drift sands had almost disappeared for two reasons: first, the stabilization of the drift sands by air pollution, mainly nitrogen, which stimulates the growth of algae and grasses that initiate soil formation, and second, by the growth of forests surrounding the sands, which decreases the wind force. The restoration studies revealed differences in the geodiversity between and within the drift sand areas. Whereas the drift sands on geological and soil maps show as almost homogenous areas, they have in fact highly variable geo-conditions of which examples will be given. These geodiversity aspects concern differences in geomorphological structure, origin, sediments and age of the drift sands. Differences in wind and water erosion, trampling and soil formation add to the geodiversity within the drift sand areas. Especially in the primary stages of succession the differences in geodiversity are relevant for the Natura-2000 values. We discerned three main types of active sands. Firstly, the impressive drift sands with large parabolic dune structures, often consisting of series of interlocking parabolic dunes. They developed from the northeast towards the southwest, against the direction of the dominant wind, and must have taken centuries to develop. Small parts of these systems are still active, other parts show different degrees of soil formation. Their origin is still unclear but probably dates from medieval times (Heidinga, 1985, Jungerius & Riksen, 2008). Second are the drift sand areas with irregular hills from 0.5 to about 2

  16. Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support (SANDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. M.; Keiser, K.; Graves, S. J.; Conover, H.; Ebersole, S.

    2009-12-01

    Since the year 2000, Eastern Louisiana, coastal Mississippi, Alabama, and the western Florida panhandle have been affected by 28 tropical storms, seven of which were hurricanes. These tropical cyclones have significantly altered normal coastal processes and characteristics in the Gulf region through sediment disturbance. Although tides, seasonality, and agricultural development influence suspended sediment and sediment deposition over periods of time, tropical storm activity has the capability of moving the largest sediment loads in the shortest periods of time for coastal areas. The importance of sediments upon water quality, coastal erosion, habitats and nutrients has made their study and monitoring vital to decision makers in the region. Currently agencies such as United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), NASA, and Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) are employing a variety of in-situ and airborne based measurements to assess and monitor sediment loading and deposition. These methods provide highly accurate information but are limited in geographic range, are not continuous over a region and, in the case of airborne LIDAR are expensive and do not recur on a regular basis. Multi-temporal and multi-spectral satellite imagery that shows tropical-storm-induced suspended sediment and storm-surge sediment deposits can provide decision makers with immediate and long-term information about the impacts of tropical storms and hurricanes. It can also be valuable for those conducting research and for projects related to coastal issues such as recovery, planning, management, and mitigation. The recently awarded Sediment Analysis Network for Decision Support will generate decision support products using NASA satellite observations from MODIS, Landsat and SeaWiFS instruments to support resource management, planning, and decision making activities in the Gulf of Mexico. Specifically, SANDS will generate decision support products that address the impacts of tropical storms

  17. Casting Ductile Iron in Layer Moulds Made from Ecological Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rączka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article contains the results of tests performed under the target project in Hardtop Foundry Charsznica.The objective of the tests and studies was to develop a technology of making high-quality ductile iron castings, combined witheffective means of environmental protection. The studies presented in this article related to castings weighing from 1 to 300 kg made from ductile iron of grades 400-15 and 500-7, using two-layer moulds, where the facing and core sand was the sand with an alkaline organic binder, while backing sand was the sand with an inorganic geopolymer binder.A simplified method of sand reclamation was applied with possible reuse of the reclaim as an addition to the backing sand. The castiron spheroidising treatment and inoculation were selected taking into account the specific conditions of Hardtop Foundry. A pilot batch of castings was made, testing the gating and feeding systems and using exothermic sleeves on risers. The study confirmed the validity of the adopted concept of making ductile iron castings in layer moulds, while maintaining the content of sand with an organic binder at a level of maximum 15%.

  18. The technique of sand control with expandable screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P. [Petrochina, Liaohe (China). Liaohe Oilfield Co.

    2009-07-01

    Sand production in heavy oil reservoirs can limit the normal production of oil wells. In this study, expandable screens were used as a sand control mechanism by filtering the sand as it entered the wellbore. The screen systems consists of an expandable outer housing, an expandable base pipe and a filtering layer. The screen expands radially through an expandable cone and presses into the casing well. Axial tension is used to shrink the screens radially through a fishing anchor in order to remove them from the well. The lack of a sand ring between the screen and the casing increases the flow area of the oil and reduces flow resistance caused by fine silt blockages. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted to study the expansion and shrinkage properties of the screens. A field test conducted at a well located in the Liaohe oilfield in China demonstrated that good sand control results can be obtained without the need for pump checking. It was concluded that the sand control method is easy to use and provides good sand control results in large open flow areas. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Materials characterization of the Libyan Ashi-Shibat desert sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemental silicon is produced mainly by the Carbo-thermic reduction of silica sand [1]. This technique produced rather impure silicon, which is termed as metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si). An upgraded MG-Si, produced from high purity silica, is usually used to produced semiconductor and solar grade silicon tilized in the manufacturing of microelectronic components of integrated circuits, transistors and solar cells. In this paper, sand from one of the Libyan desert formations called Ash-Shibat, will be characterized to explore the possibility of its use in the production of high purity silicon. Such sands are thought to be suitable for the production of silicon used in electronic industry. Chemical analysis, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy are the main techniques used to characterize the sand and to asses the type and amount of impurities present. The results indicate that impurities such as B, Na, Ca, K, Mg, Al, Ti and Fe are present in the as received sand in trace amounts. These impurities were found to be contained mainly on the sand particles exterior surfaces, and in the binding material between them. The interior of the form of quartz silica. It is concluded from this study that further purification and processing of Ash-Shibat sand should produce high purity silica that can be used for producing electronic industry grade silicon. (author)

  20. Analytical and Experimental Studieson Fracture Behaviour of Foundry Sand Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasikumar.A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a widely used as vital material in the construction world. We can do partial substitution of industrial waste such as foundry sand like material in sand. Foundry sand is not only the economical material also improves the properties of the concrete. Foundry sand has emerged as construction material in its own right. This type of concrete normally contains around (30%, 40% by mass of total sand materials. It improves the workability, minimizes cracking due to thermal and drying shrinkage, and enhances durability to reinforcement corrosion, sulphateattack, and alkali-silica expansion. Fracture mechanics is the field of mechanics concerned with the study of the formation of cracks in materials. It uses methods of analytical Solid mechanics to calculate the driving force on a crack and those of experimental Solid mechanics to characterize the material's resistance to fracture. J-integral and critical stress intensity factor is the fracture parameter. The fracture parameters calculated in our study are stress intensity factor, Critical j-integral. Three point bending test is used to find the fracture parameter. The study is carried out on beams of grade M20 with 0%, 30%, & 40% foundry sand. The test is conducted for normal beams and pre-cracked beams of having a notch to depth ratio (A/W of 0.2. This study concludes that the critical j-integral and stress intensity factors increases by comparing the 0%, 30%, 40% foundry sand concrete

  1. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Xiaojing

    2007-01-01

    It is very necessary for the investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing danger of windblown sands, which also deals with some general characters and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been undertaken in the research group of environmental mechanics on windblown sand movement in Lanzhou University with the point of mechanical and geography intersecting view. Some original and essential progress has been achieved, which includes that the main regularities of charges on sand particles and the electric field in windblown sand flux and the effect of the electric field on the flux and the microwave propagation are revealed, and the evolution process of windblown sand flux under the mutual couple interactions among several physical fields are predicted as well as the main features of Aeolian sand ripples are simulated.

  2. Investigations on Several Mechanical Problems in Windblown Sand Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Zheng

    2006-01-01

    It is very necessary for investigation on mechanism of windblown sand movement to understand and find out effective measures of preventing and reducing windblown sand. This also deals with some general features and hot spots in the scientific forelands, such as multi-scale problems, interactions among multi-physical-fields, randomness and nonlinearity as well as complex systems. In recent years, a series of experiments in wind tunnels and theoretical modeling as well as computer simulation have been taken by our research group (the Laboratory of Environmental Mechanics on Windblown Sand Movement in Lanzhou University) in a cross-disciplinary (mechanics and geography) viewpoint. Several original and essential studies were explored such as the main regularities of charges on sand particles, the mechanisms of electric field in windblown sand flux, the effects induced by the electric field on the flux, the microwave propagations, the evolution process of windblown sand flux under mutual couple interactions among several physical fields, and the simulation of the main features of Aeolian sand ripples.

  3. Geosynthetic Reinforcement of Sand-Mat Layer above Soft Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Beom Park

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the bearing capacity of soft ground for the purpose of getting trafficability of construction vehicles, the reinforcement of geosynthetics for sand-mat layers on soft ground has often been used. As the strength of the geosynthetics increases, and the sand-mat system becomes stronger, the bearing capacity of sand-mat systems will be increased. The depths of geosynthetics, reinforced in sand-mat layers, were varied with respect to the width of footing. The tensile strengths of geosynthetics were also varied to evaluate the effect of reinforcement on the bearing capacity of soft ground. The dispersion angles, with varying sand-mat thicknesses, were also determined in consideration of the tensile strength of geosynthetics and the depths of reinforcement installations. The bearing capacity ratios, with the variation of footing width and reinforced embedment depth, were determined for the geosynthetics-only, reinforced soft ground, 1-layer sand-mat system and 2-layer sand-mat system against the non-reinforced soft ground. From the test results of various models, a principle that better explains the concept of geosynthetic reinforcement has been found. On the basis of this principle, a new bearing capacity equation for practical use in the design of geosynthetically reinforced soft ground has been proposed by modifying Yamanouchi’s equation.

  4. Estimation of sand liquefaction based on support vector machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏永华; 马宁; 胡检; 杨小礼

    2008-01-01

    The origin and influence factors of sand liquefaction were analyzed, and the relation between liquefaction and its influence factors was founded. A model based on support vector machines (SVM) was established whose input parameters were selected as following influence factors of sand liquefaction: magnitude (M), the value of SPT, effective pressure of superstratum, the content of clay and the average of grain diameter. Sand was divided into two classes: liquefaction and non-liquefaction, and the class label was treated as output parameter of the model. Then the model was used to estimate sand samples, 20 support vectors and 17 borderline support vectors were gotten, then the parameters were optimized, 14 support vectors and 6 borderline support vectors were gotten, and the prediction precision reaches 100%. In order to verify the generalization of the SVM method, two other practical samples’ data from two cities, Tangshan of Hebei province and Sanshui of Guangdong province, were dealt with by another more intricate model for polytomies, which also considered some influence factors of sand liquefaction as the input parameters and divided sand into four liquefaction grades: serious liquefaction, medium liquefaction, slight liquefaction and non-liquefaction as the output parameters. The simulation results show that the latter model has a very high precision, and using SVM model to estimate sand liquefaction is completely feasible.

  5. Isotropic Compression Behaviour of Fibre Reinforced Cemented Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibre-reinforced cemented sands have many applications in improving the response of soils. In this paper, an experimental investigation for the analysis of fiber-reinforced cemented sand in the framework of isotropic compression is presented. The experimental investigations were carried out using a high pressure triaxial apparatus having the capacity of 64 MPa of confining pressure. Tests have been conducted on Portaway sand specimens reinforced with randomly oriented discrete polypropylene fibers with different percentages of fiber and cement contents. Results are presented in the form of e-logp` curves as well as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy micrographs. The effects of the addition of fibre in sand and cemented sand for different initial void ratios were investigated. The results demonstrate that the influence of fibre is not significant in both cemented and uncemented sand during the isotropic compression stage. Moreover, from the SEM micrographs it could be seen that there is breakage of sand particles and cement bonds. The fiber threads were seen pinched and found rarely broken in the specimen exhumed after isotropic compression.

  6. Evaluation of wettability of binders used in moulding sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutera B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Binders used in moulding sand have the differential properties. One of the main parameters influencing on moulding sand properties is wettability of the sand grain by binding material. In the article some problems concerned with wettability evaluation have been presented and the importance of this parameter for quantity description of process occurring in system: binder- sand grain has been mentioned. The procedure of wetting angle measurement and operation of prototype apparatus for wettability investigation of different binders used in moulding sand have been described, as well as the results of wetting angle measurement for different binders at different conditions. The addition of little amount of proper diluent to binder results in the state of equilibrium reached almost immediately. Such addition can also reduce the value of equilibrium contact angle. The uniform distribution of binder on the surface of the sand grains and reducing of the required mixing time can be obtained. It has also a positive effect on the moulding sand strength.

  7. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2016-08-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) - also called sand replenishment or nourishment - was placed on the Dutch coast. The intention is that the sand is redistributed by wind, current, and tide, reinforcing local coastal defence structures and leading to a unique, dynamic environment. In this study we investigated the potential effect of the long-term morphological evolution of the large sand replenishment and climate change on fresh groundwater resources. The potential effects on the local groundwater system were quantified with a calibrated three-dimensional (3-D) groundwater model, in which both variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport were simulated. Model simulations showed that the long-term morphological evolution of the Sand Engine results in a substantial growth of fresh groundwater resources, in all adopted climate change scenarios. Thus, the application of a local sand replenishment could provide coastal areas the opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of the local fresh groundwater availability.

  8. Frozen lump generation of oil sands : climatic challenges and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cyr, D.J.; Tannant, D.D.; Sego, D.C. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). School of Mining and Petroleum Engineering]|[Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Del Valle, V. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    A study was conducted to quantify the significance of frozen lumps on oil sand production at the North Mine in the Fort McMurray area. A model was also developed to predict frost depth in an actively mined bench. Proactive and reactive mitigative measures were presented to reduce or eliminate the challenges posed by frost penetration. Climate has a strong influence on the properties of Athabasca oil sands and the ease or difficulty with which they are excavated. Frost enters into the exposed oil sand surface during the winter, thereby freezing the in situ water. Large frozen lumps are created when shovels excavate the benches. These lumps are sent to a lump dump where increased costs are incurred due to rehandling, or they are sent to the primary crushers where they can cause significant downtimes by jamming the crusher. Data from two consecutive winters in Syncrude Canada's North Mine indicates a high correlation between climate and the generation of frozen oil sand lumps. Temperature, ground cover, traffic, bench exposure time, oil sand grade and moisture content all contribute to this problem. A one-dimensional frost penetration model was developed to predict the depth of frost expected in oil sands and the corresponding likelihood of frozen oil sands lumps. The proactive and reactive measures that can be taken to mitigate the challenge of frozen lump generation include artificial snow, shallow ponds, blasting and ripping. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  9. Canada's toxic tar sands : the most destructive project on earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document addressed the environmental problems associated with tar sands development in Alberta, with particular reference to toxicity problems associated with global warming and the impending destruction of the boreal forest. The authors cautioned that the tar sand projects are highly destructive, leaving downstream toxics equivalent to that of a massive slow motion oil spill that has the potential to poison people. Negligent oversights by the government regarding the impact of tar sands development were also discussed, with reference to toxics on site; toxics downwind; and toxics down the pipe. The report also provided information on the future of tar sands development and global warming in Canada. It included a discussion of reverse alchemy; Canada's failed climate politics; a tar sands tax; and taking responsibility. Last, the report addressed toxic enforcement, including the Fisheries Act; Canadian Environmental Protection Act; Canadian Environmental Assessment Act; and Alberta law. It was concluded that while it is a stretch to believe the tar sands can truly be sustainable, there is a great deal that can be done to clean it up. The authors recommended that new tar sands approvals should wait until certain reform elements are implemented, such as passing a real carbon cap; using dry tailings; requiring wildlife offsets; cleaning up refineries and upgraders; ensuring Aboriginal control and benefit; and having regulation and independent monitoring. 104 refs., 6 figs

  10. Research and practice of the impulse sand fracturing technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Qian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available With the deep development of tight sand gas reservoirs, problems such as short stable production period and quick production decline of gas wells after fracturing have become increasingly prominent. Consequently, there is an increasing demand for the effective penetration and conductivity of artificial fractures. Impulse sand fracturing technology introduces a concept of discrete multilayer sanding inside fractures; joint application of pulse blender which can be switched at high frequency, intensive multi-cluster perforation and special fibrous material made it possible to ensure the flow stability of proppant slug, and placement of nonuniformly-laid sand pinnacles and grooves, which markedly upgraded the capacity of the fracture conductivity to several orders of magnitude more than the conventional method. Laboratory engineering simulation evaluation and field test show that pre-fracturing reservoir evaluation, pulse time design and the optimization of degradable fiber and support equipment are the keys to the success of impulse sand fracturing. Compared with the conventional fracturing, this technique can effectively increase well production, decrease the volume of fracturing proppant, and lower sand plugging risks. An independent sand fracturing pilot test has been conducted in 6 layers of 3 wells for the first time in Block Tao 7 of the Sulige Gasfield, Ordos Basin, as a result, the average volume of fracturing proppant dropped by 28.3%, the average sand intensity dropped by 21.88%, and the post-fracturing average daily gas output increased by 26.8%. This technology provides an efficient and environmentally friendly reservoir stimulation option for tight sand gas reservoirs in China.

  11. New sand consolidation technique using hot alkaline solutions: laboratory evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, F.E.; Rico, A.; Mendez, Z. [PDVSA-Intevep, Caracas (Venezuela); Materan, S. [Simon Bolivar Univ., Caracas (Venezuela)

    2002-06-01

    Some well known problems in the petroleum industry are related to sanding problems caused by pressure falls, friction and dissolution of minerals during steam injection. The prospect of using hot alkaline solutions to achieve sand consolidation was investigated in this paper. Experimental work was performed using Venezuelan sand samples (S-1, S-2, and S-3) from various unconsolidated heavy oil reservoirs and commercial Silboca (S-4) sands to validate this new reservoir sand consolidation technique. A pressure of 500 pounds per square inch was applied to samples that had been packed into Teflon tubes and placed in a horizontal stainless steel cell. Following this, for a period varying from 2 to 5 hours, a hot sodium carbonate solution between 120 and 250 Celsius was injected. Every twenty minutes, the effluent solution was sampled. Before and after each run, permeability measurements were obtained to monitor the variations. Sand packs were dried at 100 Celsius after each test. An electron microscope was used to observe the morphology of secondary phases. For S-1 and S-2, sodium aluminium silicates were identified in the secondary phases for tests with temperature above 240 Celsius. In the case of S-3 and S-4, no consolidation was observed. The authors believe that large grain sizes and a 98 per cent quartz content respectively explain this phenomenon. It is suspected that sand consolidation requires the presence of aluminium contained in clays and/or feldspar. The critical parameters for sand consolidation were identified as temperature, pore volume, composition, and grain size. The process did not seem greatly affected by soaking time and injection rate. The advantages of this technique would be principally the minimization of sanding problems and reductions in the costs associated with production operations. 7 refs., 12 figs.

  12. Development of new non destructive methods for bituminized radioactive waste drums characterization; Developpement de nouvelles methodes de caracterisation non destructive pour des dechets radioactifs enrobes dans du bitume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pin, P

    2004-10-15

    Radioactive waste constitute a major issue for the nuclear industry. One of the key points is their characterization to optimize their management: treatment and packaging, orientation towards the suited disposal. This thesis proposes an evaluation method of the low-energy photon attenuation, based on the gamma-ray spectra Compton continuum. Effectively, the {sup 241}Am measurement by gamma-ray spectrometry is difficult due to the low energy of its main gamma-ray (59.5 keV). The photon attenuation strongly depends on the bituminous mix composition, which includes very absorbing elements. As the Compton continuum also depends on this absorption, it is possible to link the 59.5 keV line attenuation to the Compton level. Another technique is proposed to characterize uranium thanks to its fluorescence X-rays induced by the gamma emitters already present in the waste. The uranium present in the drums disturbs the neutron measurements and its measurement by self-induced X-ray fluorescence allows to correct this interference. Due to various causes of error, the total uncertainty is around 50 % on the activity of the radioisotope {sup 241}Am, corrected by the peak to Compton technique. The same uncertainty is announced on the uranium mass measured by self induced X-ray fluorescence. As a consequence of these promising results, the two methods were included in the industrial project of the 'Marcoule Sorting Unit'. One major advantage is that they do not imply any additional material because they use information already present in the gamma-ray spectra. (author)

  13. Evaluation of Control Strategies to Effectively Meet 70-90% Mercury Reduction on an Eastern Bituminous Coal Cyclone Boiler with SCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Campbell

    2008-12-31

    This is the final site report for testing conducted at Public Service of New Hampshire's (PSNH) Merrimack Unit 2 (MK2). This project was funded through the DOE/NETL Innovations for Existing Plants program. It was a Phase III project with the goal to develop mercury control technologies that can achieve 50-70% mercury capture at costs 25-50% less than baseline estimates of $50,000-$70,000/lb of mercury removed. While results from testing at Merrimack indicate that the DOE goal was partially achieved, further improvements in the process are recommended. Merrimack burned a test blend of eastern bituminous and Venezuelan coals, for a target coal sulfur content of 1.2%, in its 335-MW Unit 2. The blend ratio is approximately a 50/50 split between the two coals. Various sorbent injection tests were conducted on the flue gas stream either in front of the air preheater (APH) or in between the two in-series ESPs. Initial mercury control evaluations indicated that, without SO3 control, the sorbent concentration required to achieve 50% control would not be feasible, either economically or within constraints specific to the maximum reasonable particle loading to the ESP. Subsequently, with SO{sub 3} control via trona injection upstream of the APH, economically feasible mercury removal rates could be achieved with PAC injection, excepting balance-of-plant concerns. The results are summarized along with the impacts of the dual injection process on the air heater, ESP operation, and particulate emissions.

  14. Impacts of halogen additions on mercury oxidation, in a slipstream selective catalyst reduction (SCR), reactor when burning sub-bituminous coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Gao, Zhengyang; Zhu, Jiashun; Wang, Quanhai; Huang, Yaji; Chiu, Chengchung; Parker, Bruce; Chu, Paul; Pant, Wei-Ping

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of impacts of halogen species on the elemental mercury (Hg(0)) oxidation in a real coal-derived flue gas atmosphere. It is reported there is a higher percentage of Hg(0) in the flue gas when burning sub-bituminous coal (herein Powder River Basin (PRB) coal) and lignite, even with the use of selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The higher Hg(0)concentration in the flue gas makes it difficult to use the wet-FGD process for the mercury emission control in coal-fired utility boilers. Investigation of enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of hydrogen halogens (HF, HCl, HBr, and HI) was conducted in a slipstream reactor with and without SCR catalysts when burning PRB coal. Two commercial SCR catalysts were evaluated. SCR catalyst no. 1 showed higher efficiencies of both NO reduction and Hg(0) oxidation than those of SCR catalyst no. 2. NH3 addition seemed to inhibit the Hg(0) oxidation, which indicated competitive processes between NH3 reduction and Hg(0) oxidation on the surface of SCR catalysts. The hydrogen halogens, in the order of impact on Hg(0) oxidation, were HBr, HI, and HCl or HF. Addition of HBr at approximately 3 ppm could achieve 80% Hg(0) oxidation. Addition of HI at approximately 5 ppm could achieve 40% Hg(0) oxidation. In comparison to the empty reactor, 40% Hg(0) oxidation could be achieved when HCl addition was up to 300 ppm. The enhanced Hg(0) oxidation by addition of HBr and HI seemed not to be correlated to the catalytic effects by both evaluated SCR catalysts. The effectiveness of conversion of hydrogen halogens to halogen molecules or interhalogens seemed to be attributed to their impacts on Hg(0) oxidation.

  15. Effect of Sanding on Surface Properties of Medium Density Fiberboard

    OpenAIRE

    Nadir Ayrilmis, Zeki Candan, Turgay Akbulut, Ozgur Balkiz

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of sanding on the surface properties of the medium density fiberboard (MDF) panels made from Rhododendron ponticum L. wood. The MDF panels were sanded with different sizes of the sand paper grit: 60-, 60+80- or 60+80+120-grit. Surface absorption and surface roughness of the MDF panels were determined based on EN 382-1 standard and ISO 4287 by using a fi ne stylus profi lometer, respectively. Sessile water drop technique was used to...

  16. Differences and commonalities impregnation of dry and wet sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maujuda МUZAFFAROVA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to research new methods of physic-chemical methods of preventing deflation to protect railways and highways from such phenomena as exogenous sand drifts. In particular, first studied the possibility of using binders in sand wet state. Results can significantly extend the scope of the method, and identified with particular impregnation maintaining stability requirements protective cover reduces both the concentration previously recommended binders, and their costs, thereby securing implementation in practice of shifting sands resource-saving technology.

  17. Oil sands: Strategies for future development - An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta Chamber of Resources developed a Task Force in 1993 to promote oil sands development, and to identify and publicize the social and economic benefits of oil sands operations. Formation, mission of the National Task Force, impediments and opportunities for development were summarized. Attributes of oil sands, benefits of their development, impediments to development, strategic development and potential growth scenarios were discussed. Cooperation between government and industry was deemed essential. Recommendations included development of a bitumen pipeline network, provision of incentives to encourage development, encouragement of risk and reward sharing between bitumen producers and up graders, and diversification of products and by-products. 7 figs., 12 refs

  18. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of an Oil Sands Composite Tailings Deposit

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, Lesley A.; Kendra, Kathryn E.; Brady, Allyson L.; Slater, Greg F.

    2016-01-01

    Composite tailings (CT), an engineered, alkaline, saline mixture of oil sands tailings (FFT), processed sand and gypsum (CaSO4; 1 kg CaSO4 per m3 FFT) are used as a dry reclamation strategy in the Alberta Oil Sands Region (AOSR). It is estimated that 9.6 × 108 m3 of CT are either in, or awaiting emplacement in surface pits within the AOSR, highlighting their potential global importance in sulfur cycling. Here, in the first CT sulfur biogeochemistry investigation, integrated geochemical, pyros...

  19. Strength properties of moulding sands with chosen biopolymer binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St.M. Dobosz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of primary researches of the IV generation moulding sands, in which as the binders are used differentbiodegradable materials. The bending and the tensile strength of the moulding sands with polylactide, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid,polycaprolactone, polyhydroxybutyrate and cellulose acetate as binders were measured. The researches show that the best strengthproperties have the moulding sands with polylactide as binder. It was proved that the tested moulding sands’ strength properties are goodenough for foundry practice.

  20. Advanced Techniques for Simulating the Behavior of Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.; Bailey, M.

    2009-12-01

    Computer graphics and visualization techniques continue to provide untapped research opportunities, particularly when working with earth science disciplines. Through collaboration with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs we are developing new techniques for simulating sand. In addition, through collaboration with the Oregon Space Grant, we’ve been communicating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to exchange ideas and gain feedback on our work. More specifically, JPL’s DARTS Laboratory specializes in planetary vehicle simulation, such as the Mars rovers. This simulation utilizes a virtual "sand box" to test how planetary rovers respond to different terrains while traversing them. Unfortunately, this simulation is unable to fully mimic the harsh, sandy environments of those found on Mars. Ideally, these simulations should allow a rover to interact with the sand beneath it, particularly for different sand granularities and densities. In particular, there may be situations where a rover may become stuck in sand due to lack of friction between the sand and wheels. In fact, in May 2009, the Spirit rover became stuck in the Martian sand and has provided additional motivation for this research. In order to develop a new sand simulation model, high performance computing will play a very important role in this work. More specifically, graphics processing units (GPUs) are useful due to their ability to run general purpose algorithms and ability to perform massively parallel computations. In prior research, simulating vast quantities of sand has been difficult to compute in real-time due to the computational complexity of many colliding particles. With the use of GPUs however, each particle collision will be parallelized, allowing for a dramatic performance increase. In addition, spatial partitioning will also provide a speed boost as this will help limit the number of particle collision calculations. However, since the goal of this

  1. Testing the influence of a sand mica mixture on basin fill in extension and inversion experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Caroline J S; D'Angelo, Taynara; Almeida, Gisela M S

    2015-03-01

    We compare the deformation patterns produced by sand and a sand mica mixture (14:1 ratio of sand to mica by weight) while simulating basin fill in extension and inversion models to analyze the potential of the sand mica mixture for applications that require a strong elasto-frictional plastic analogue material in physical models. Sand and the sand mica mixture have nearly equal angles of internal friction, but the sand mica mixture deforms at a significantly lower level of peak shear stress. In extension, the sand mica mixture basin fill experiments show fewer normal faults. During inversion, the most striking difference between the sand and the sand mica mixture basin fill experiments is related to the internal deformation in fault-propagation folds, which increases with an increase in the basal friction. We conclude that our strongly elasto-frictional plastic sand mica mixture may be used to simulate folds in experiments that focus on mild inversion in the brittle crust.

  2. Measurement of elastic modulus and evaluation of viscoelasticity of foundry green sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingchun XIANG

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Elastic modulus is an important physical parameter of molding sand; it is closely connected with molding sand's properties. Based on theories of rheology and molding sand microdeformation, elastic modulus of molding sand was measured and investigated using the intelligent molding sand multi-property tester developed by ourselves. The measuring principle was introduced. Effects of bentonite percentage and compactibility of the molding sand were experimentally studied. Furthermore, the essential viscoelastic nature of green sand was analyzed. It is considered that viscoelastic deformation of molding sand consists mainly of that of Kelvin Body of clay membrane, and elastic modulus of molding sand depends mainly on that of Kelvin Body which is the elastic component of clay membrane between sands. Elastic modulus can be adopted as one of the property parameters, and can be employed to evaluate viscoelastic properties of molding sand.

  3. Experimental Study on Superfine Sand Concrete Mixed by Double Mixing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    yuqing zhao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional concept thought that medium sand and fine sand can be used to mix concrete, superfine sand can not used to mix concrete. This makes the source of superfine sand limited. With the shortage of medium sand and fine sand, it is imperative to exploit the resource of superfine sand. Superfine sand concrete is mixed by means of Double-doped Technology-ultra-fine fly ash and super plasticizer. Primary factor influencing superfine sand concrete strength is studied by orthogonal test, the optimal mixture ratio is found. The results indicated that the primary factors are water-binder ratio and sand ratio. At the same time, the workability and strength of superfine sand concrete mixed by optimal mixture ratio can satisfy the quality request of general engineering. It is proved that the double-doped technology is feasible, which can be used to conduct engineering construction.

  4. Measurement of elastic modulus and evaluation of viscoelasticity of foundry green sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Elastic modulus is an important physical parameter of molding sand; it is closely connected with molding sand's properties. Based on theories of rheology and molding sand microdeformation, elastic modulus of molding sand was measured and investigated using the intelligent molding sand multi-property tester developed by ourselves. The measuring principle was introduced. Effects of bentonite percentage and compactibility of the molding sand were experimentally studied. Furthermore, the essential viscoelastic nature of green sand was analyzed. It is considered that viscoelastic deformation of molding sand consists mainly of that of Kelvin Body of clay membrane, and elastic modulus of molding sand depends mainly on that of Kelvin Body which is the elastic component of clay membrane between sands. Elastic modulus can be adopted as one of the property parameters, and can be employed to evaluate the viscoelastic properties of molding sand.

  5. Numerical modeling of subaqueous sand dune morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré, Arnaud; Bonneton, Philippe; Marieu, Vincent; Garlan, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    The morphodynamic evolution of subaqueous sand dunes is investigated, using a 2-D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes numerical model. A laboratory experiment where dunes are generated under stationary unidirectional flow conditions is used as a reference case. The model reproduces the evolution of the erodible bed until a state of equilibrium is reached. In particular, the simulation exhibits the different stages of the bed evolution, e.g., the incipient ripple generation, the nonlinear bed form growing phase, and the dune field equilibrium phase. The results show good agreement in terms of dune geometrical dimensions and time to equilibrium. After the emergence of the first ripple field, the bed growth is driven by cascading merging sequences between bed forms of different heights. A sequence extracted from the simulation shows how the downstream bed form is first eroded before merging with the upstream bed form. Superimposed bed forms emerge on the dune stoss sides during the simulation. An analysis of the results shows that they emerge downstream of a slight deflection on the dune profile. The deflection arises due to a modification of the sediment flux gradient consecutive to a reduction in the turbulence relaxation length while the upstream bed form height decreases. As they migrate, superimposed bed forms grow on the dune stoss side and eventually provoke the degeneration of the dune crest. Cascading merging sequences and superimposed bed forms dynamics both influence the dune field evolution and size and therefore play a fundamental role in the dune field self-organization process.

  6. Geophysical surveys for oil sands development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, J.; Henderson, J. [Associated Geosciences Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This article discussed two electromagnetic methods used in aerial geophysical surveys for addressing geotechnical issues related to resource extraction, namely Airborne Time Domain Electromagnetics (TEM) and Airborne Frequency Domain Electromagnetics. Electromagnetic methods identify contrasts in electrical conductivity, and the resulting data are interpreted according to how the measured electrical properties relate to the geologic units of interest. It is necessary to understand the limitations of the data to avoid misinterpreting the geophysical results. Both methods resolve the resistivity of the earth's subsurface but use different operations to do so, and both rely on the degree of contrast in the electrical characteristics of successive lithologies, target thickness, and the depth of occurrence for success. Inverse modelling is used to convert the results into a map of resistivity. The techniques can be used for economically mapping the location and thickness of cap rock, covering more area at less cost than drilling, creating maps of potential aquifers and paleo-channels that may control water flow, identifying local supplies of aggregates for road requirements, and mapping the location and depth of muskeg. It was concluded that these geophysical survey methods can cost-effectively provide useful information for oil sands development. 2 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  7. Method of the Moulding Sands Binding Power Assessment in Two-Layer Moulds Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available More and more foundry plants applying moulding sands with water-glass or its substitutes for obtaining the high-quality casting surface at the smallest costs, consider the possibility of implementing two-layer moulds, in which e.g. the facing sand is a sand with an organic binder (no-bake type and the backing sand is a sand with inorganic binder. Both kinds of sands must have the same chemical reaction. The most often applied system is the moulding sand on the water-glass or geopolymer bases - as the backing sand and the moulding sand from the group of self-hardening sands with a resol resin - as the facing sand. Investigations were performed for the system: moulding sand with inorganic GEOPOL binder or moulding sand with water glass (as a backing sand and moulding sand, no-bake type, with a resol resin originated from various producers: Rezolit AM, Estrofen, Avenol NB 700 (as a facing sand. The LUZ apparatus, produced by Multiserw Morek, was adapted for investigations. A special partition with cuts was mounted in the attachment for making test specimens for measuring the tensile strength. This partition allowed a simultaneous compaction of two kinds of moulding sands. After 24 hours of hardening the highest values were obtained for the system: Geopol binder - Avenol resin.

  8. Production of Silica-refractory Bricks from White Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazze Almarahle

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, no refractories are produced in Jordan, but large quantities are imported for use in the lining of furnaces and kilns in the metallurgical industries.The aim of this study is to initiate a program of research for production of silica-refractory bricks from local materials.The raw material, which has been used in this study was white sand. This sand contains less than 0.5% Fe2O3 and is therefore suitable for production of glass. The sand used for production of glass is also suitable for production of silica refractory bricks. The method for production of this bricks consists of mixing the white sand with 2.5 CaO (milklime which acts as a binder and mineraliser in order to convert the free quartz to tridymite and crystobalite.

  9. Annual report : 1938-1939 : Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge covers the 1939 fiscal year. Wildlife populations, artificial islands, haying, share cropping,...

  10. LIQUEFACTION AND DISPLACEMENT OF SATURATED SAND UNDER VERTICAL VIBRATION LOADING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiaobing; TAN Qingming; CHENG C.M.; YU Shanbing; CUI Peng

    2004-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the vertical vibration loading on the liquefaction of saturated sand, one dimensional model for the saturated sand with a vertical vibration is presented based on the two phase continuous media theory. The development of the liquefaction and the liquefaction region are analyzed. It is shown that the vertical vibration loading could induce liquefaction.The rate of the liquefaction increases with the increase of the initial limit strain or initial porosity or amplitude and frequency of loading, and increases with the decrease of the permeability or initial modulus. It is shown also that there is a phase lag in the sand column. When the sand permeability distribution is non-uniform, the pore pressure and the strain will rise sharply where the permeability is the smallest, and fracture might be induced. With the development of liquefaction, the strength of the soil foundation becomes smaller and smaller. In the limiting case, landslides or debris flows could occur.

  11. Multi-Technique Study of a Martian Aeolian Sand Analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K.; Marshall, J.; Evans, N. D.; Luttge, A.

    2001-01-01

    Potential scientific returns from technological advances in various forms of microscopy and benchmarking of currently available in-situ measurements using an aeolian red dune sand from the central Australian desert. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Reef community structure, Sand Island, Oahu HI, (NODC Accession 0000177)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These reports provide the results of nine years (1990-98) of an annual quantitative monitoring of shallow marine communities inshore of the Sand Island Ocean...

  13. Santa Barbara Littoral Cell CRSMP Offshore Sand Sources 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Offshore sand sources exist at four known locations and potentially other yet to be explored regions within the nearshore coastal shelf. Significant reserves of...

  14. Integrated Pest Management Plan for Sand Lake NWR Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Integrated Pest Management Plan is to provide a comprehensive, environmentally sensitive approach to managing pests on the Sand Lake WMD. The...

  15. [Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge : Narrative report : 1935

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report covers activities on Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge during 1935. The road construction, dam construction, food and cover,...

  16. Narrative report : Sand Lake Wetland Management District : 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sand Lake WMD outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1971 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Documenting the global impacts of beach sand mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R.; Griffith, A.

    2009-04-01

    For centuries, beach sand has been mined for use as aggregate in concrete, for heavy minerals, and for construction fill. The global extent and impact of this phenomenon has gone relatively unnoticed by academics, NGOs, and major news sources. Most reports of sand mining activities are found at the very local scale (if the mining is ever documented at all). Yet, sand mining in many localities has resulted in the complete destruction of beach (and related) ecosystems along with severe impacts to coastal protection and tourism. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines at Western Carolina University and Beachcare.org have initiated the construction of a global database of beach sand mining activities. The database is being built through a combination of site visits and through the data mining of media resources, peer reviewed papers, and reports from private and governmental entities. Currently, we have documented sand mining in 35 countries on 6 continents representing the removal of millions of cubic meters of sand. Problems extend from Asia where critical infrastructure has been disrupted by sand mining to the Caribbean where policy reform has swiftly followed a highly publicized theft of sand. The Program for the Study of Developed Shorelines recently observed extensive sand mining in Morocco at the regional scale. Tens of kilometers of beach have been stripped of sand and the mining continues southward reducing hope of a thriving tourism-based economy. Problems caused by beach sand mining include: destruction of natural beaches and the ecosystems they protect (e.g. dunes, wetlands), habitat loss for globally important species (e.g. turtles, shorebirds), destruction of nearshore marine ecosystems, increased shoreline erosion rates, reduced protection from storms, tsunamis, and wave events, and economic losses through tourist abandonment and loss of coastal aesthetics. The threats posed by sand mining are made even more critical given the prospect of a

  18. Sand and Gravel Operations in the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer includes sand and gravel operations in the United States. These data were obtained from information reported voluntarily to the USGS by the aggregate...

  19. Annual report : 1936-'37 : Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report covers activities on Sand Lake Migratory Waterfowl Refuge during the 1937 fiscal year. Weather conditions, water levels, wildlife,...

  20. Narrative report : Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge : 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sand Lake NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by...

  1. A Sand Control System for Light Oil Reservoir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Yuzhang

    1996-01-01

    @@ Over 30-year water flooding in light oil sandstone reservoirs with loose argillaceous cement in Karamay oilfield results in severe sand production, varying from well to well with the different date of well completion.

  2. Comprehensive Conservation Plan: Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sand Lake NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and purpose...

  3. Punctuated sand transport in the lowermost Mississippi River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittrouer, Jeffrey A.; Mohrig, David; Allison, Mead

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of sand flux and water flow in the Mississippi River are presented for a portion of the system 35-50 km upstream from the head of its subaerial delta. These data are used to provide insight into how nonuniform flow conditions, present in the lower reaches of large alluvial rivers, affect the timing and magnitude of sand transport near the river outlet. Field surveys during both low and high water discharge include (1) sequential digital bathymetric maps defining mobile river bottom topography which were used to estimate bed material flux, (2) multiple water velocity profiles, and (3) multiple suspended sediment profiles collected using a point-integrated sampler. These data show that total sand transport increases by two orders of magnitude over the measured range in water discharge (11,300 to 38,400 m3 s-1). During low water discharge no sand is measured in suspension, and sand discharge via bed form migration is minimal. During high water discharge 54% of the sand discharge is measured in suspension while 46% of the sand discharge is part of bed form migration. The component of boundary shear stress associated with moving this sediment is estimated using a set of established sediment transport algorithms, and values for the total boundary shear stress are predicted by fitting logarithmic velocity functions to the measured profiles. The estimates of boundary shear stress, using measurements of suspended sand transport, bed form transport, and downstream oriented velocity profiles are internally consistent; moreover, the analyses show that boundary shear stress increases by nearly 10-fold over the measured water discharge range. We show how this increase in shear stress is consistent with backwater flow arising where the river approaches its outlet. The hydrodynamic properties of backwater flow affect the timing and magnitude of sand flux and produce punctuated sand transport through the lowermost Mississippi River. Our field data are used to evaluate

  4. Investigations of reclamation ability of used moulding sand with water glass binder and used sand with CO2 hardened alkaline resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of modern moulding sands with the organic and unorganic binders requires the use of reclamation carried out in order to reuseof used sands. Used sands depending on the type of binding material are characterized by different susceptibility to the recoveryprocesses. Presented research is aimed at determining reclaimability of selected used sands, which are often used in the Polish foundryindustry. This applies to the used moulding sand with water glass binder hardener by esters (ethylene glycol diacetate - technology floster S and used moulding sand with Carbophen 5692 resin, hardened by CO2 as a representative for this type of resins used in foundry.

  5. Under-mining the environment : the oil sands report card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, S.; Moorhouse, J.; Laufenberg, K.; Powell, R.; Chandler, M. (ed.)

    2008-01-15

    This environmental performance survey is a report to the public on the comparative environmental management and performance of proposed and active oil sands mining projects in Alberta. The report card revealed that the proposed and actual environmental performance of the oil sands mining industry is generally poor, with an average score of 33 per cent. The overall scores for projects ranged from 56 per cent for the Albian Sands Muskeg River Mine to 18 per cent for the Synenco Northern Lights and Syncrude projects. The report indicated that there is much room for improvement in oil sand mining environmental management. Currently, there are many feasible strategies and best practices that could improve performance, but they are inconsistently applied in the oil sands region. The environmental performance of this industry could improve significantly if all operations improved their performance to match industry leaders. Although nearly all companies have environmental policies that commit to improvement, voluntary targets are rare for oil sands companies. Few have publicly committed to reduce greenhouse gas pollution, water intensity or air emissions. Very few have adopted targets to improve their intensity-based environmental performance. The report also indicated a lack of readily available information on environmental performance. The Pembina Institute and the World Wildlife Fund-Canada made the following recommendations to improve environmental management of oil sands mining operations in Alberta: (1) government should enforce acceptable standards of environmental performance, (2) government should report on environmental impacts to public lands, (3) government should request segregated information to enable comparison of environmental performance, (4) companies should implement best available practices, and (5) companies should make project-specific oil sands environmental performance information more widely available. 84 refs., 12 tabs., 8 figs.

  6. Characterization of Beach/River Sand for Foundry Application

    OpenAIRE

    Katsina Christopher BALA; Reyazul Haque KHAN

    2013-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation is been reported on the characterization of beach/river sand for foundry use. Bulk properties of the sand samples collected were evaluated. The experimental results were analyzed as per the American Foundry Society (AFS) standard. The analyses show that samples from Ughelli River, Warri River and Ethiope River could be used effectively in the foundry. The sample from Lagos bar beach requires to be sieved properly to remove the coarse fractions in order to...

  7. Recycling foundry sand in road construction–field assessment

    OpenAIRE

    YAZOGHLI MARZOUK, Oumaya; Vulcano Greullet, Nelly; FRITEYRE, Laurent; CANTEGRIT, Laurent; Jullien, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Foundry industry produces a huge quantity of foundry sand; its management has become an environmental, economic and social imperative since it is now considered as dangerous waste. Besides, non-renewable natural resources conservationdrives investigations on potential recycling of industrial by-products.A source of 150.000 tons of foundry sand stock near a secondary road under rehabilitation led to an investigation on the feasibility recycling of this waste within sub-base layer. The new road...

  8. Microtox(TM) characterization of foundry sand residuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, K.C.; Alleman, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    Although foundry residuals, consisting mostly of waste Sands, represent a potentially attractive, high-volume resource for beneficial reuse applications (e.g. highway embankment construction), prospective end users are understandably concerned about unforeseen liabilities stemming from the use of these residuals. This paper, therefore, focuses on the innovative use of a microbial bioassay as a means of developing a characterization of environmental suitability extending beyond the analytical coverage already provided by mandated chemical-specific tests (i.e., TCLP, etc.). Microtox(TM) bioassays were conducted on leachates derived from residuals obtained at a wide range of facilities, including: 11 gray and ductile iron foundries plus one each steel and aluminum foundries. In addition, virgin sand samples were used to establish a relative 'natural' benchmark against which the waste foundry sands could then be compared in terms of their apparent quality. These bioassay tests were able to effectively 'fingerprint' those residuals whose bioassay behavior was comparable to that of virgin materials. In fact, the majority of gray and ductile iron foundry residuals tested during this reported study elicited Microtox(TM) response levels which fell within or below the virgin sand response range, consequently providing another quantifiable layer of Support for this industry's claim that their sands are 'cleaner than dirt.' However, negative Microtox(TM) responses beyond that of the virgin sands were observed with a number of foundry samples (i.e. four of the 11 gray or ductile iron sands plus both non-iron sands). Therefore, the latter results would suggest that these latter residuals be excluded from beneficial reuse for the immediate future, at least until the cause and nature of this negative response has been further identified.

  9. The influence of cementation on liquefaction resistance of sands

    OpenAIRE

    Iwabuchi, Jotaro

    1986-01-01

    Cohesionless sands are known to be susceptible to failure by liquefaction when they are saturated and subjected to earthquake shaking. Considerable study has been directed towards this subject over the past 20 years in recognition of the possibility of large-scale property damage or loss of life due to this type of failure. Recent evidence has shown that small degrees of cementation in a sand significantly reduce the likelihood of liquefication. However, the work to date has been ...

  10. Sand Production during Improved Oil Recovery in Unconsolidated Cores

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad A. J. Ali.; S. M. Kholosy; A. A. Al-Haddad; K. K. Al-Hamad

    2012-01-01

    Steam injection is a mechanisms used for improved oil recovery (IOR) in heavy oil reservoirs. Heating the reservoir reduces the oil viscosity and causes the velocity of the moving oil to increase; and thus, the heated zone around the injection well will have high velocity. The increase of velocity in an unconsolidated formation is usually accompanied with sand movement in the reservoir creating a potential problem. Core samples from different wells in Kuwait were used to examine sand producti...

  11. Monitoring and characterisation of sand-mud sedimentation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbertson, Alan J. S.; Ibikunle, Olugbenga; McCarter, W. John; Starrs, Gerard

    2016-07-01

    Estuaries and tidal inlets are often characterised by the presence of both cohesive and non-cohesive sediments. Knowledge of the sedimentation behaviour of sand-mud mixtures is therefore crucial to the understanding and prediction of the time-dependent structure (i.e. mixed or segregated), composition and erodibility of sediment bed deposits developing within these environments. In the current study, a series of settling column tests are conducted to investigate the hindered settling and initial bed consolidation phases of a range of sand-clay mixtures to determine the parametric conditions under which bed segregation occurs. A new, non-invasive, electrical resistivity measurement technique is employed to capture both temporal and spatial changes in the density, porosity and composition of the evolving sand-clay bed deposits, complimented by time-lapsed images of the sedimentation process within the column. The results show that the formation of segregated (sand-clay) bed layers with bed deposits is largely controlled by the initial fractional composition (i.e. relative sand and clay concentrations). Specifically, mixtures with low clay contents are shown to form well-defined (sand-clay) layer segregation within the resulting deposits, while higher clay contents result in more transitional segregation patterns or no layer segregation (for very high clay concentrations). The physical mechanisms under which these different segregation types can be generated are illustrated through predictions from an existing polydisperse hindered settling model. This model indicates that the degree of bed segregation, and time scale over which this occurs, correlates well with the difference in predicted hindered settling characteristics and upward displacements associated with the sand and clay fractions, respectively. In this regard, the new experimental dataset provides validation for the polydisperse model (for the first time), with the combined data and model predictions

  12. Western tight gas sands advanced logging workshop proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, J B; Carroll, Jr, H B [eds.

    1982-04-01

    An advanced logging research program is one major aspect of the Western Tight Sands Program. Purpose of this workshop is to help BETC define critical logging needs for tight gas sands and to allow free interchange of ideas on all aspects of the current logging research program. Sixteen papers and abstracts are included together with discussions. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 12 papers. (DLC)

  13. Sustainable water management in Alberta's oil sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, Bill; Usher, Robyn; Roach, Andrea [CH2M HILL, Englewood, CO (United States); Lambert, Gord; Kotecha, Prit [Suncor Energy Inc., Calgary (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers forecast published in 2011 predicts that oil production from oil sands will increase by 50% in the next 3 years and double by 2020. This rate of growth will result in significant pressure on water resources; water use per barrel of oil sands production is comparable to other energy resources - about 2.5 barrels of fresh water per barrel of oil produced are used by mining operations and 0.5 barrels by in-situ operations. Suncor Energy Inc. (Suncor) was the first company to develop the oil sands in northern Alberta and holds one of the largest oil sands positions in Canada. In 2010, Suncor announced plans to increase production to more than 1 million barrels of oil equivalent per day by 2020, which it plans to achieve through oil sands production growth of approximately 10% per year. Because water supply and potential impacts to water quality are critical to its future growth, in 2010-2011 Suncor conducted a risk assessment to identify water-related business risks related to its northern Alberta operations. The assessment identified more than 20 high level business risks in strategic water risk areas including water supply, water reuse, storm water management, groundwater, waste management and river water return. The risk assessment results prompted development of a strategic roadmap to guide water stewardship across Suncor's regional operations. The roadmap describes goals, objectives, and specific activities for each of six key water risk areas, and informs prioritization and selection of prospective water management activities. Suncor is not only exploring water within its own boundaries, but is also collaborating with other oil sands producers to explore ways of integrating its water systems through industry consortia; Suncor is a member of the Oil Sands Leadership Initiative and of the recently formed Canadian Oil Sands Innovation Alliance, among others. (author)

  14. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  15. First quarter technical progress report for Thermally Modified Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilfilian, R.E.

    1994-02-28

    This report documents progress on a project to demonstrate suitability of Thermally Modified Sand (TMS) for large scale use by demonstrating its performance on icy roadways maintained by the State of Alaska Department of Transportation. This report deals primarily with the startup of the project and includes initial observations of the effectiveness of the use of the TMS versus the typical salt/sand combination.

  16. THE STUDY OF CORE SAND MIXTURES BASED ON POLYMERIC BINDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Natalia V. Zakharova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using foamed polystyrene waste as the binder in manufacturing core sand mixtures. The article provides experimental data obtained by studying the core sand mixtures properties depending on the methods of addition, foamed polystyrene solution amount, its viscosity and the method of drying. The author investigates the ways of using foamed polystyrene as the binder and as the polymeric additive.

  17. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining—the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes during a period of

  18. Hierarchical organization of a Sardinian sand dune plant community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccherelli, Giulia; Bertness, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coastal sand dunes have attracted the attention of plant ecologists for over a century, but they have largely relied on correlations to explain dune plant community organization. We examined long-standing hypotheses experimentally that sand binding, inter-specific interactions, abiotic factors and seedling recruitment are drivers of sand dune plant community structure in Sardinia, Italy. Removing foundation species from the fore-, middle- and back-dune habitats over three years led to erosion and habitat loss on the fore-dune and limited plant recovery that increased with dune elevation. Reciprocal species removals in all zones suggested that inter-specific competition is common, but that dominance is transient, particularly due to sand burial disturbance in the middle-dune. A fully factorial 2-year manipulation of water, nutrient availability and substrate stability revealed no significant proximate response to these physical factors in any dune zone. In the fore- and middle-dune, plant seeds are trapped under adult plants during seed germination, and seedling survivorship and growth generally increase with dune height in spite of increased herbivory in the back-dune. Sand and seed erosion leads to limited seed recruitment on the fore-dune while high summer temperatures and preemption of space lead to competitive dominance of woody plants in the back-dune. Our results suggest that Sardinian sand dune plant communities are organized hierarchically, structured by sand binding foundation species on the fore-dune, sand burial in the middle-dune and increasingly successful seedling recruitment, growth and competitive dominance in the back-dune. PMID:27478701

  19. Concentric coiled tubing application for sand cleanout in horizontal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, K.; Fraser, B. [Nowsco Well Services Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1998-10-01

    Concentric tubing technology which has opened up a new area of well service capabilities is discussed. One of these techniques involves incorporating concentric tubing equipment with a patented jet pump tool (Sand-Vac{sup S}M) for the purpose of cleaning well sand out of low pressure horizontal wells. Various issues relating to well cleanout using this technology are described, with brief summaries of five case histories. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Hierarchical organization of a Sardinian sand dune plant community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusseddu, Valentina; Ceccherelli, Giulia; Bertness, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Coastal sand dunes have attracted the attention of plant ecologists for over a century, but they have largely relied on correlations to explain dune plant community organization. We examined long-standing hypotheses experimentally that sand binding, inter-specific interactions, abiotic factors and seedling recruitment are drivers of sand dune plant community structure in Sardinia, Italy. Removing foundation species from the fore-, middle- and back-dune habitats over three years led to erosion and habitat loss on the fore-dune and limited plant recovery that increased with dune elevation. Reciprocal species removals in all zones suggested that inter-specific competition is common, but that dominance is transient, particularly due to sand burial disturbance in the middle-dune. A fully factorial 2-year manipulation of water, nutrient availability and substrate stability revealed no significant proximate response to these physical factors in any dune zone. In the fore- and middle-dune, plant seeds are trapped under adult plants during seed germination, and seedling survivorship and growth generally increase with dune height in spite of increased herbivory in the back-dune. Sand and seed erosion leads to limited seed recruitment on the fore-dune while high summer temperatures and preemption of space lead to competitive dominance of woody plants in the back-dune. Our results suggest that Sardinian sand dune plant communities are organized hierarchically, structured by sand binding foundation species on the fore-dune, sand burial in the middle-dune and increasingly successful seedling recruitment, growth and competitive dominance in the back-dune. PMID:27478701

  1. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes during a period of

  2. Monitoring of rapid sand filters using an acoustic imaging technique

    OpenAIRE

    Allouche, N.; Simons, D.G.; Rietveld, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    A novel instrument is developed to acoustically image sand filters used for water treatment and monitor their performance. The instrument consists of an omnidirectional transmitter that generates a chirp with a frequency range between 10 and 110 kHz, and an array of hydrophones. The instrument was extensively tested in a lab before being deployed in an industrial rapid sand filter, made available by a Dutch drinking water company. This filter was monitored over a period of 10 days. We perform...

  3. Numerical Modeling of Flow in a Horizontal Sand Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Mossad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Horizontal sand filters may offer some advantage over vertical sand filters as they could be used for in-line treatment of wastewaters. Horizontal pipelines of tens and if not hundreds of meters length, filled with ordinary sand or permeable reactive media such as activated carbon or natural zeolite or iron filings, may be used to remove impurities from mine drainage waters, sewer and storm waters. Approach: However, in reality, in industrial-scale applications, the sand filled horizontal structures are almost always avoided due to the fact that water seeks out the path of least resistance. Once such a path is created, the vast majority of the water channels towards the least resistance zone and very small percentage of the water will go through the sand. Results: This study, applying numerical modeling using FLUENT software, which is based on the integral control volume approach, explores a number of geometries to identify a design that helps the inlet water to sweep the entire sand with the least channeling. The Navier Stokes equations for laminar and incompressible flow through porous media (i.e., the sand including the viscous resistance were solved. Retention time of a fluid with properties similar to water, called tracer, were also estimated using Eulerian unsteady two phase flow analysis. Conclusion: The results of the models showed that the geometries involving a pipe with spiral protrusions or plate (baffles inside, would be partially successful in drawing the water away from the channeling zone and moving it through the sand, however the geometry with the spiral protrusions uses much less power than the one with the baffles.

  4. Frac Sand Mines Are Preferentially Sited in Unzoned Rural Areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Locke

    Full Text Available Shifting markets can cause unexpected, stochastic changes in rural landscapes that may take local communities by surprise. Preferential siting of new industrial facilities in poor areas or in areas with few regulatory restrictions can have implications for environmental sustainability, human health, and social justice. This study focuses on frac sand mining-the mining of high-quality silica sand used in hydraulic fracturing processes for gas and oil extraction. Frac sand mining gained prominence in the 2000s in the upper midwestern United States where nonmetallic mining is regulated primarily by local zoning. I asked whether frac sand mines were more commonly sited in rural townships without formal zoning regulations or planning processes than in those that undertook zoning and planning before the frac sand boom. I also asked if mine prevalence was correlated with socioeconomic differences across townships. After creating a probability surface to map areas most suitable for frac sand mine occurrence, I developed neutral landscape models from which to compare actual mine distributions in zoned and unzoned areas at three different spatial extents. Mines were significantly clustered in unzoned jurisdictions at the statewide level and in 7 of the 8 counties with at least three frac sand mines and some unzoned land. Subsequent regression analyses showed mine prevalence to be uncorrelated with land value, tax rate, or per capita income, but correlated with remoteness and zoning. The predicted mine count in unzoned townships was over two times higher than that in zoned townships. However, the county with the most mines by far was under a county zoning ordinance, perhaps indicating industry preferences for locations with clear, homogenous rules over patchwork regulation. Rural communities can use the case of frac sand mining as motivation to discuss and plan for sudden land-use predicaments, rather than wait to grapple with unfamiliar legal processes

  5. Measuring the Dielectric Parameters of Frozen Sand in Microwave Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordonsky, G. S.; Orlov, A. O.; Filippova, T. G.

    2004-04-01

    We measure the dielectric parameters of frozen sand by using a rectangular cavity resonator at frequencies 5.3-8.4 GHz. The transmission spectrum of the resonator completely filled with frozen sand shows supplementary resonances absent in the case where the resonator is filled with dry homogeneous sand. The difference of the resonance curves was observed for the cases of wetting the sand by ordinary (H2O) and heavy (D2O) water. It is supposed that the observed effects are related to percolation due to the existence and specific properties of the conducting liquid films of water on the surfaces of mineral particles. To verify this assumption, we performed measurements for the special medium consisting of a mixture of dry sand and small metal particles. This experiment showed that supplementary resonant peaks in the transmission spectrum of the resonator arise for a certain concentration of metal particles. The same effect is also observed in the case of incomplete filling of the resonator with dry sand. These anomalies can be explained by the appearance of negative dispersion of waves in the waveguide.

  6. Seismotectonic implications of sand blows in the southern Mississippi Embayment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, R.T.; Hill, A.A.; Larsen, D.; Holzer, T.; Forman, S.L.; Noce, T.; Gardner, C.; Morat, J.

    2007-01-01

    We explore seismically-induced sand blows from the southern Mississippi Embayment and their implications in resolving the question of near or distal epicentral source region. This was accomplished using aerial photography, field excavations, and cone penetration tests. Our analysis shows that three sand blow fields exhibit a distinct chronology of strong ground motion for the southern embayment: (1) The Ashley County, Arkansas sand blow field, near the Arkansas/Louisiana state border, experienced four Holocene sand venting episodes; (2) to the north, the Desha County field experienced at least three episodes of liquefaction; and (3) the Lincoln-Jefferson Counties field experienced at least one episode. Cone penetration tests (CPT) conducted in and between the sand blow fields suggest that the fields may not be distal liquefaction associated with New Madrid seismic zone earthquakes but rather are likely associated with strong earthquakes on local faults. This conclusion is consistent with the differences in timing of the southern embayment sand venting episodes and those in the New Madrid seismic zone. These results suggest that active tectonism and strong seismicity in intraplate North America may not be localized at isolated weak spots, but rather widespread on fault systems that are favorably oriented for slip in the contemporary stress field. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sand Fences in the Coastal Zone: Intended and Unintended Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafals-Soto, Rosana; Nordstrom, Karl

    2009-09-01

    Sand-trapping fences modify the character of the coastal landscape and change its spatial structure, image, and meaning. This paper examines the relationship between these changes and fence usage at the municipal level, where most decisions about fence deployment are made. Use of fences in 29 municipalities on the developed coast of New Jersey is examined over a 6-year period. Interviews with municipal officers indicate that wooden slat sand-trapping fences are used primarily to build dunes to provide protection against wave uprush and flooding, but they are also used to control pedestrian traffic and demarcate territory. These uses result in changes in landforms and habitats. An aerial video inventory of fences taken in 2002 indicates that 82% of the shoreline had fences and 72% had dunes. Single and double straight fence rows are the most commonly used. Fences are often built to accomplish a specific primary purpose, but they can cause many different and often unanticipated changes to the landscape. The effects of a sand fence change through time as the initial structure traps sand, creates a dune that is colonized by vegetation, and becomes integrated into the environment by increasing topographic variability and aesthetic and habitat value. Sand fences can be made more compatible with natural processes by not placing them in locations where sources of wind blown sand are restricted or in unnatural shore perpendicular orientations. Symbolic fences are less expensive, are easy to replace when damaged, are less visually intrusive, and can be used for controlling pedestrian access.

  8. Evaluation of Sand Dunes Stabilization Techniques in Baiji District, Iraq

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    This research was conducted at the sand dunes stabilization research station in Baiji district, Iraq. Three techniques for sand dunes stabilization are selected: the first method is stabilization by clayey block barriers; the second method is stabilization by dry planting of tamarix (tamarix articulata)cuttings and the third is stabilization by using cane branch barriers. Randomized samples were taken from the surface and subsurface layers of the stabilized and shifting sand dunes to evaluate the effect of the three techniques on wind erosion parameters. The results indicate high significant differences between the wind erosion parameters in the surface and subsurface layers in the stabilized sand dunes, while there are insignificant differences between the subsurface layer of the stabilized dunes and the surface and subsurface layers in the active sand dunes. The results clarify the fact that there is an increase in the percentage of clay, silt, organic matter, mean weight diameter and the percentage of the dry aggregates (>0. 84 mm). A decrease is found in the rate of disaggregation for the dry aggregates in the samples of the surface layer of stabilized dunes when compared with the subsurface layer of stabilized dunes and the surface layer of the shifting sand dunes. There is a positive high significant correlation among the aggregate stability parameters and the percentage of clay and silt, and the content of organic matter in the studied layers.

  9. Renaturierung von Sandökosystemen im Binnenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe-Kratochwil, Angelika; Kratochwil, Anselm

    Das Vorkommen von Sandökosystemen im Binnenland (Flugsand- und Decksandfelder, Dünen) ist vor allem an Sand-Akkumulationen der vorletzten Eiszeit (in Nordeuropa: Saaleeiszeit und Sand-Ablagerungen an größeren Flüssen gebunden. So finden wir die Verbreitungsschwerpunkte von binnenländischen Sandökosystemen in Mitteleuropa einerseits vor allem im Bereich der flächenhaften saalezeitlichen Ablagerungen in den Niederlanden und in Norddeutschland (Castel et al. 1989), andererseits kommen Sandökosysteme des Binnenlandes linear in den Flussgebieten z.B. von Maas, Rhein, Ems, Elbe, Oder und Regnitz vor. In Niederösterreich fanden sich einst großflächige Dünen- und Flugsandgebiete im Marchfeld östlich von Wien (Wiesbauer et al. 1997). Die Flugsandbildung setzte bereits im Spätglazial ca. 11000 v. Chr. ein, als eine den Sand fixierende Vegetation noch fehlte. Es bildeten sich im norddeutschen Raum aus den leicht verwehbaren Talsanden bereits um 9000 v. Chr.

  10. Coagulation-flocculation in leachate treatment using modified micro sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaldiri, Nur Hanani; Halim, Azhar Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Sanitary landfill leachate is considered as highly polluted wastewater, without any treatment, discharging into water system will cause underground water and surface water pollutions. This study was to investigate the treatability of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate via coagulation-flocculation using poly-aluminum chloride (PAC), cationic polymer, and modified micro sand. Leachate was collected from Pulau Burung Sanitary Landfill (PBSL) located in Penang, Malaysia. Coagulation-flocculation was performed by using jar test equipment and the effect of pH, dose of coagulant and dose of polymer toward removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and suspended solid (SS) were examined. Micro sand was also used in this study to compare settling time of coagulation-flocculation process. The optimum pH, dose of coagulant (PAC) and dose of polymer (cationic) achieved were 7.0, 1000 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively. The dose of micro sand used for the settling time process was 300 mg/L. Results showed that 52.66% removal of COD, 97.16% removal of SS and 96.44% removal of color were achieved under optimum condition. The settling times for the settling down of the sludge or particles that formed during coagulation-flocculation process were 1 min with modified sand, 20 min with raw micro sand and 45 min without micro sand.

  11. Sanding dust from nanoparticle-containing paints: Physical characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koponen, I. K.; Jensen, K. A.; Schneider, T.

    2009-02-01

    Increasing use of nanoparticles in different industrial applications has raised a new potential health risk to the workers as well as to the consumers. This study investigates the particle size distributions of sanding dust released from paints produced with and without engineered nanoparticles. Dust emissions from sanding painted plates were found to consist of five size modes; three modes under 1 μm and two modes around 1 and 2 μm. We observed that the sander was the only source of particles smaller than 50 nm and they dominated the number concentration spectra. Mass and surface area spectra were dominated by the 1 and 2 μm modes. Addition of nanoparticles caused only minor changes in the geometric mean diameters of the particle modes generated during sanding of two paints doped with 17 nm TiO2 and 95 nm Carbon Black nanoparticles as compared to the size modes generated during sanding a conventional reference paint. However, the number concentrations in the different size modes varied considerably in between the two NP-doped paints and the reference paint. Therefore, from a physical point of view, there may be a difference in the exposure risk during sanding surfaces covered with nanoparticle-based paints as compared to sanding conventional paints.

  12. Colloid transport in a heterogeneous partially saturated sand column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishurov, Mikhail; Yakirevich, Alexander; Weisbrod, Noam

    2008-02-15

    Colloid transport was studied in heterogeneous sand columns under unsaturated steady-state conditions, using two sizes of acid-cleaned sand to pack the column. Heterogeneity was created by placing three continuous tubes of fine sand (3.6% of the total volume) within a column of coarse sand (mean grain diameters 0.36 and 1.2 mm, respectively). Experiments were performed under three flow rates (0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 cm/ min) applied by a rain simulator atthe top of the column. Constant water-content profile in the coarse sand was achieved by applying corresponding suction at the column bottom. Three sizes of latex microspheres (1, 0.2, and 0.02 microm) and soluble tracers (LiBr), diluted in a weak base (pH 7.3, ionic strength 0.0023 M) solution, were used simultaneously. Introduction of preferential pathways reduced front-arrival time about 2-fold and increased colloid recovery which, at the 0.2 cm/min flow rate, was higher than at 0.4 and 0.1 cm/min. Maximum solution flux from coarse to fine sand (due to differences in matric pressure) at 0.2 cm/min, verified by hydrodynamic modeling, could explain this phenomenon. Results suggest that in heterogeneous soil, maximum colloid recovery does not necessarily occur at maximum water content. This has clear implications for colloid transport in natural soils, many of which are heterogeneous. PMID:18351073

  13. Effects of the mid-air collision on sand saltation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    As to the fact that the effects of saltating particles’ mid-air collision on the sand transport rate are often neglected in the current theoretical models describing sand saltation movement,expressions to calculate velocity diversity of saltating parti-cles after mid-air collision are presented through collision theory of hard ball in this paper. Then,the theoretical model of the wind blown sand movement at the steady state,taking account of coupled interaction between saltation particles and wind,is combined with the model of the mid-air collision probability to calculate the sal-tating particles’ mass flux at heights,the sand transport rate,and further,their changing rules. The comparison of the results with those when the mid-air collision is not considered suggests that the mass flux at heights and the sand transport rate in this paper are less,and much closer,respectively,to the corresponding experi-mental values. The difference between the sand mass fluxes without and with con-sideration of mid-air collision increases at first,and then decreases as the height increases,exhibiting the stratified characteristics.

  14. Effects of the mid-air collision on sand saltation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Ning; REN Shan; ZHENG XiaoJing

    2008-01-01

    As to the fact that the effects of saltating particles' mid-air collision on the sand transport rate are often neglected in the current theoretical models describing sand saltation movement, expressions to calculate velocity diversity of saltsting parti-cles after mid-air collision are presented through collision theory of hard ball in this paper. Then, the theoretical model of the wind blown sand movement at the steady state, taking account of coupled interaction between saltation particles and wind, is combined with the model of the mid-air collision probability to calculate the sal-tating particles' mass flux at heights, the sand transport rate, and further, their changing rules. The comparison of the results with those when the mid-air collision is not considered suggests that the mass flux at heights and the sand transport rate in this paper are less, and much closer, respectively, to the corresponding experi-mental values. The difference between the sand mass fluxes without and with con-sideration of mid-air collision increases at first, and then decreases as the height increases, exhibiting the stratified characteristics.

  15. Evaluating sand and clay models: do rheological differences matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, Gloria; Sims, Darrell

    2005-08-01

    Dry sand and wet clay are the most frequently used materials for physical modeling of brittle deformation. We present a series of experiments that shows when the two materials can be used interchangeably, document the differences in deformation patterns and discuss how best to evaluate and apply results of physical models. Extension and shortening produce similar large-scale deformation patterns in dry sand and wet clay models, indicating that the two materials can be used interchangeably for analysis of gross deformation geometries. There are subtle deformation features that are significantly different: (1) fault propagation and fault linkage; (2) fault width, spacing and displacement; (3) extent of deformation zone; and (4) amount of folding vs. faulting. These differences are primarily due to the lower cohesion of sand and its larger grain size. If these features are of interest, the best practice would be to repeat the experiments with more than one material to ensure that rheological differences are not biasing results. Dry sand and wet clay produce very different results in inversion models; almost all faults are reactivated in wet clay, and few, if any, are significantly reactivated in sand models. Fault reactivation is attributed to high fluid pressure along the fault zone in the wet clay, a situation that may be analogous to many rocks. Sand inversion models may be best applied to areas where most faults experience little to no reactivation, while clay models best fit areas where most pre-existing normal faults are reactivated.

  16. Submarine sand volcanos: experiments and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, P.; Ngoma, J.; Delenne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid overpressure at the bottom of a soil layer may generate fracturation in preferential paths for a cohesive material. But the case of sandy soils is rather different: a significant internal flow is allowed within the material and can potentially induce hydro-mechanical instabilities whose most common example is fluidization. Many works have been devoted to fluidization but very few have the issue of initiation and development of a fluidized zone inside a granular bed, prior entire fluidization of the medium. In this contribution, we report experimental results and numerical simulations on a model system of immersed sand volcanos generated by a localized upward spring of liquid, injected at constant flow-rate at the bottom of a granular layer. Such a localized state of fluidization is relevant for some industrial processes (spouted bed, maintenance of navigable waterways,…) and for several geological issues (kimberlite volcano conduits, fluid venting, oil recovery in sandy soil, More precisely, what is presented here is a comparison between experiments, carried out by direct visualization throughout the medium, and numerical simulations, based on DEM modelling of the grains coupled to resolution of NS equations in the liquid phase (LBM). There is a very good agreement between the experimental phenomenology and the simulation results. When the flow-rate is increased, three regimes are successively observed: static bed, fluidized cavity that does not extend to the top of the layer, and finally fluidization over the entire height of layer that creates a fluidized chimney. A very strong hysteretic effect is present here with an extended range of stability for fluidized cavities when flow-rate is decreased back. This can be interpreted in terms force chains and arches. The influences of grain diameter, layer height and injection width are studied and interpreted using a model previously developed by Zoueshtiagh [1]. Finally, growing rate of the fluidized zone and

  17. Use of an integrated approach to characterize the physicochemical properties of foundry green sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    A fresh green sand, spent green sand, and a weathered spent green sand from a landfill were analyzed using diffractometry, electron microscopy, granulometry, spectrometry, and thermogravimetry. Our objective was to understand how the physicochemical properties of the green sands change from their o...

  18. TEST AND STUDY ON THE CONSTITUTIVE RELATIONSHIP OF DESERT SAND UNDER MOVING VEHICLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the sand of Takelamagan desert in Xinjiang under moving vehicle are studied by soil dynamic triaxial test apparatus. The nonlinear elastic constitutive model of the sand under moving vehicle is established first. These results lay the foundations for studying the interaction between vehicle running gear and the sand of Takelamagan desert in Xinjiang. and developing sand vehicle.

  19. Flow Dynamics of green sand in the DISAMATIC moulding process using Discrete element method (DEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovad, Emil; Larsen, P.; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2015-01-01

    The DISAMATIC casting process production of sand moulds is simulated with DEM (discrete element method). The main purpose is to simulate the dynamics of the flow of green sand, during the production of the sand mould with DEM. The sand shot is simulated, which is the first stage of the DISAMATIC...

  20. Evaluation of an Innovative Sand Filter for Small System Drinking Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results of evaluation of an innovative sand filter that uses the concepts of both slow and rapid sand filtration are presented in this article. The system uses a low-cost “Drum Sand Filter” (DSF) that consists of a 55-gallon drum filled with layers of sand of varying size. A low-...

  1. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  2. The properties of sand-lime bricks manufactured with the use of waste moulding and core sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Pytel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises the laboratory research data on potential applications of selected mould and core mix wastes and dusts fromregeneration processes as alternative or supplementary materials to be added to natural silica sands used in manufacturing of sand-limebricks. The rational behind this solution is the large silica content in used moulding and core mix, their matrices being high-quality natural silica sands. The research program shall involve obtaining the series of silicate sample products, press-formed and made from mixtures containing the waste materials discussed here. In the course of laboratory tests autoclaved materials shall be manufactured, including sand-lime bricks. Apart from conventional components: natural silica sand and quicklime, the prepared mixture shall contain pre-processed mould and core mix and dusts from regeneration processes, depending on the type of applied binder. The previously mentioned wastes from the foundry processes were introduced to the basic composition mix as substitutes for silica sand, ranging from 0-100 % (by weight. Potential applications of these wastes were explored using the comparative analysis, covering the basic functional parameters of two types of materials: the reference material made from conventional constituents and several experimental formulas containing additives, differing in qualitative and quantitative composition. Characteristics of thus obtained materials are supported by selected SEM+EDS test results.

  3. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of bituminous coals from the Ostrava-Karvina Coal District, Upper Silesian Basin, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weniger, P.; Busch, A.; Krooss, B. M.; Francu, J.; Francu, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of a joint Czech-German project, experimental and analytical methods are being applied to improve the understanding of compositional variation of coal-related gas in the SW part of the Upper Silesian Basin (Czech Republic). According to present understanding, the gas composition is controlled by generation (thermal vs. microbial), migration and adsorption/desorption processes. In particular the effects of the sorption processes on the chemical and isotopic composition of coal gases are only poorly explored. During the first stage of this project, the gas adsorption capacity has been determined for coal samples representing the paralic Ostrava Formation (Namurian A) and the limnic Karviná Formation (Namurian B-C). For this purpose, high pressure adsorption isotherms have been measured for methane and carbon dioxide on medium and low volatile bituminous coal (VRr 1.2-1.8%) from the production face of two collieries in the study area. Adsorption isotherms have been measured for pressures up to 25 MPa for CO2 and up to 17 MPa for methane at 20˚ C and 45˚ C. Isotherms were measured on dry, moisture-equilibrated and "as received" samples (moisture content: 0.5-1.7%, mineral-matter-free) using a manometric method. Sorption capacities for CH4 at 45˚ C ranged from 18 to 27 Std. cm3/g (0.7 to 1.1 mmol/g) coal, dry ash-free (daf), showing an increase of sorption capacity with increasing coal rank. For CO2, sorption capacities were generally higher than for methane, ranging from 35-40 Std. cm3/g (1.4-1.7 mmol/g) coal (daf). Equilibrium moisture contents, determined by a modified ASTM method, were significantly higher than the "as received" moisture. Sorption capacities measured on moisture-equilibrated samples were generally lower than those measured on dry or "as received" samples. Methane excess sorption isotherms show a type I Langmuir form and could be approximated using the Langmuir function. Excess sorption isotherms for CO2 show a decrease in

  4. Parametric and dynamic studies of an iron-based 25-kWth coal direct chemical looping unit using sub-bituminous coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Integrated, moving bed chemical looping reactor with iron-oxide based oxygen carrier. • Coal carbon conversion from 84.8% to 99.9%, thermal capacity 7.4 to 27.7 kWth, O2 demand less than 1.3%. • Dynamic temperature of moving bed reducer is established and tracked during coal injection. • CH4 and CO present at initial coal injection, eliminated after oxygen carrier activated. • Lower coal injection had higher volatiles residence time and conversion. - Abstract: The iron-based Coal-Direct Chemical Looping (CDCL) combustion process is an alternative to conventional oxy-combustion technologies, where the oxygen used for fuel conversion in the CDCL process is provided by an iron-oxide based oxygen carrier instead of an air separation unit. The iron oxide is reduced using coal in the reducer reactor, producing highly-pure CO2 in the flue gas, and the reduced iron oxide is regenerated in a separate combustor reactor using air. The CDCL process at Ohio State has been developed and demonstrated in a 25 kWth sub-pilot unit, and it is the first chemical looping demonstration unit with a circulating moving bed reactor for solid fuel conversion. To date, the CDCL sub-pilot unit at OSU has been operated for more than 680 h, with a 200-h continuous operation, providing important data on long term operability as well as parametric optimization. This paper discusses recent parametric operational experience with sub-bituminous coal as the fuel, where dynamic changes in variables were performed to observe the effects on the unit itself. Measurements included temperature, pressure, and gas concentrations from the reducer and combustor. Furthermore, effects of different variables, such as flue gas recycle ratios (enhancer gas flow rates), feed port injection, and temperature, were observed. Tests confirmed high coal conversions with high purity of CO2 achieved in the flue gas. Overall, the moving bed design of the reducer results in nearly full coal conversion

  5. Geology, Surficial - SAND_ILITH_IN: Total Thickness of Sand and Gravel in Indiana, Derived from the iLITH Water-Well Database (Indiana Geological Survey, Grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — SAND_ILITH_IN is a grid that shows total thickness of sand, as derived from logs of water wells in the state of Indiana. (It presents the same data as shown in a...

  6. Simulating Sand Behavior through Terrain Subdivision and Particle Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, M.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in computer graphics, GPUs, and parallel processing hardware have provided researchers with new methods to visualize scientific data. In fact, these advances have spurred new research opportunities between computer graphics and other disciplines, such as Earth sciences. Through collaboration, Earth and planetary scientists have benefited by using these advances in hardware technology to process large amounts of data for visualization and analysis. At Oregon State University, we are collaborating with the Oregon Space Grant and IGERT Ecosystem Informatics programs to investigate techniques for simulating the behavior of sand. In addition, we have also been collaborating with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's DARTS Lab to exchange ideas on our research. The DARTS Lab specializes in the simulation of planetary vehicles, such as the Mars rovers. One aspect of their work is testing these vehicles in a virtual "sand box" to test their performance in different environments. Our research builds upon this idea to create a sand simulation framework to allow for more complex and diverse environments. As a basis for our framework, we have focused on planetary environments, such as the harsh, sandy regions on Mars. To evaluate our framework, we have used simulated planetary vehicles, such as a rover, to gain insight into the performance and interaction between the surface sand and the vehicle. Unfortunately, simulating the vast number of individual sand particles and their interaction with each other has been a computationally complex problem in the past. However, through the use of high-performance computing, we have developed a technique to subdivide physically active terrain regions across a large landscape. To achieve this, we only subdivide terrain regions where sand particles are actively participating with another object or force, such as a rover wheel. This is similar to a Level of Detail (LOD) technique, except that the density of subdivisions are determined by

  7. Biological CO2 conversion to acetate in subsurface coal-sand formation using a high-pressure reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtomo, Y.; Ijiri, A.; Ikegawa, Y.; Tsutsumi, M.; Imachi, H.; Uramoto, G.; Hoshino, T.; Morono, Y.; Tanikawa, W.; Hirose, T.; Inagaki, F.

    2013-12-01

    The geological CO2 sequestration into subsurface unmineable oil/gas fields and coal formations has been considered as one of the possible ways to reduce dispersal of anthropogenic greenhouse gasses into the atmosphere. However, feasibility of CO2 injection largely depends on a variety of geological and economical settings, and its ecological consequences have remained largely unpredictable. To address these issues, we developed a new flow-through-type CO2 injection system designated as the 'geobio-reactor system' to examine possible geophysical, geochemical and microbiological impact caused by CO2 injection under in-situ pressure (0-100 MPa) and temperature (0-70°C) conditions. In this study, we investigated Eocene bituminous coal-sandstones in the northwestern Pacific coast, Hokkaido, Japan, using the geobio-reactor system. Anaerobic artificial fluid and CO2 (flow rate: 0.002 and 0.00001 mL/min, respectively) were continuously supplemented into the coal-sand column under the pore pressure of 40 MPa (confined pressure: 41 MPa) at 40°C for 56 days. Molecular analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes showed that predominant bacterial components were physically dispersed from coal to sand as the intact form during experiment. Cultivation experiments from sub-sampling fluids indicated that some terrestrial microbes could preserve their survival in subsurface condition. Molecular analysis of archaeal 16S rRNA genes also showed that no methanogens were activated during experiment. We also anaerobically incubated the coal sample using conventional batch-type cultivation technique with a medium for methanogens. After one year of the batch incubation at 20°C, methane could be detected from the cultures except for the acetate-fed culture. The sequence of archaeal 16S rRNA genes via PCR amplification obtained from the H2 plus formate-fed culture was affiliated with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen within the genus Methanobacterium, whereas the methanol plus trimethylamine culture

  8. Ecogeomorphology of Sand Dunes Shaped by Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoar, H.

    2014-12-01

    Two dune types associated with vegetation are known: Parabolic and Vegetated Linear Dunes (VLDs), the latters are the dominant dune type in the world deserts. Parabolic dunes are formed in humid, sub-humid and semi-arid environments (rather than arid) where vegetation is nearby. VLDs are known today in semiarid and arid lands where the average yearly rainfall is ≥100 mm, enough to support sparse cover of vegetation. These two dune types are formed by unidirectional winds although they demonstrate a different form and have a distinct dynamics. Conceptual and mathematical models of dunes mobility and stability, based on three control parameters: wind power (DP), average annual precipitation (p), and the human impact parameter (μ) show that where human impact is negligible the effect of wind power (DP) on vegetative cover is substantial. The average yearly rainfall of 60-80 mm is the threshold of annual average rainfall for vegetation growth on dune sand. The model is shown to follow a hysteresis path, which explains the bistability of active and stabilized dunes under the same climatic conditions with respect to wind power. We have discerned formation of parabolic dunes from barchans and transverse dunes in the coastal plain of Israel where a decrease in human activity during the second half of the 20th century caused establishment of vegetation on the crest of the dunes, a process that changed the dynamics of these barchans and transverse dunes and led to a change in the shape of the windward slope from convex to concave. These dunes gradually became parabolic. It seems that VLDs in Australia or the Kalahari have always been vegetated to some degree, though the shrubs were sparser in colder periods when the aeolian erosion was sizeable. Those ancient conditions are characterized by higher wind power and lower rainfall that can reduce, but not completely destroy, the vegetation cover, leading to the formation of lee (shadow) dunes behind each shrub. Formation of

  9. Economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands, volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2004, the international media recognized Alberta's oil sands as part of the global oil reserves, thereby establishing Canada as second to Saudi Arabia as potential oil producing nations. The economic impacts of Alberta's oil sands industry on economies were assessed at regional, provincial and international levels for the 2000 to 2020 period. A customized input-output model was used to assess economic impacts, which were measured in terms of changes in gross domestic product; employment and labour income; and, government revenues. Cumulative impacts on employment by sector and by jurisdiction were also presented. An investment of $100 billion is expected through 2020, resulting in production of crude bitumen and synthetic crude oil outputs valued at about $531 billion. The impact of the oil sands industry on local employment was also evaluated. It was shown that activities in the oil sands industry will lead to significant economic impact in Alberta, Ontario, Quebec and the rest of Canada. Alberta's local economy would be the main beneficiary of oil sands activities with nearly 3.6 million person years employment created in Alberta during the 2000 to 2020. Another 3 million person years employment would be created in other Canadian provinces and outside Canada during the same time period. A sensitivity analysis on the responsiveness to oil prices and the removal of various constraints incorporated in the main analysis was also presented. The federal government will be the largest recipient of revenues generated to to oil sands activities. The results of the study were compared with that of the National Task Force on Oil Sands Strategies. This first volume revealed the results of the study while the second volume includes the data and detailed results. 48 refs., 57 tabs., 28 figs

  10. Food web structure in oil sands reclaimed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, K E; Ciborowski, J J H; Daly, C; Dixon, D G; Farwell, A J; Foote, A L; Frederick, K R; Costa, J M Gardner; Kennedy, K; Liber, K; Roy, M C; Slama, C A; Smits, J E G

    2013-07-01

    Boreal wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance. However, their ecosystem function is threatened by direct anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Oil sands surface mining in the boreal regions of Western Canada denudes tracts of land of organic materials, leaves large areas in need of reclamation, and generates considerable quantities of extraction process-affected materials. Knowledge and validation of reclamation techniques that lead to self-sustaining wetlands has lagged behind development of protocols for reclaiming terrestrial systems. It is important to know whether wetlands reclaimed with oil sands process materials can be restored to levels equivalent to their original ecosystem function. We approached this question by assessing carbon flows and food web structure in naturally formed and oil sands-affected wetlands constructed in 1970-2004 in the postmining landscape. We evaluated whether a prescribed reclamation strategy, involving organic matter amendment, accelerated reclaimed wetland development, leading to wetlands that were more similar to their natural marsh counterparts than wetlands that were not supplemented with organic matter. We measured compartment standing stocks for bacterioplankton, microbial biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, and zoobenthos; concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and residual naphthenic acids; and microbial production, gas fluxes, and aquatic-terrestrial exports (i.e., aquatic insect emergence). The total biomass of several biotic compartments differed significantly between oil sands and reference wetlands. Submerged macrophyte biomass, macroinvertebrate trophic diversity, and predator biomass and richness were lower in oil sands-affected wetlands than in reference wetlands. There was insufficient evidence to conclude that wetland age and wetland amendment with peat-mineral mix mitigate effects of oil sands waste materials on the fully aquatic biota. Although high variability was observed within

  11. On the oxidation of the dissolved organic matter in Boom clay by NaNO3 and NaNO2 from disposed Eurobitum bituminized waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In Belgium, Boom Clay is studied as a potential host clay formation for the final disposal of EUROBITUM bituminized waste, which consists of 60 wt% hard bitumen (Mexphalt R85/40) and 40 wt% waste. The main salts that are present in the bituminized waste are NaNO3, 20-30 wt%, and CaSO4, 4-6 wt%. After disposal of the waste in the clay, an uptake of pore water by the embedded, dehydrated and hygroscopic salts will lead to a swelling of the waste and to a release of the salts into the Boom Clay. A possible consequence of the salt release is the oxidation of the clay by nitrate and, possibly, nitrite, resulting in a lower reducing capacity of the clay towards redox sensitive radionuclides, which in turn could have an impact on the migration behaviour of these radionuclides. The extent of oxidation of authigenic Boom Clay redox sensitive components, like organic matter and pyrite is studied at the SCK.CEN. As a first step in the study of the influence of nitrate and nitrite on the redoxactive Boom Clay components, we performed batch tests with dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM was exposed to different concentrations of nitrate and nitrite for more than one year in both biotic and abiotic conditions. This paper will discuss the results obtained by exposing DOM to nitrate and nitrite and comparing two methods for the determination of its redox capacity. NaNO3 or NaNO2, previously stored under inert atmosphere to remove all oxygen gas, was added to Boom Clay water collected from a piezometer to obtain final salt concentrations of 0.1 and 0.005 M NaNO3, or 0.05 and 0.005 M NaNO2. Sodium azide, also stored under inert atmosphere, was added (0.2 wt. %) to inhibit the microbial activity in the tests, creating abiotic conditions. All solutions were prepared in an anaerobic glove box. The nitrate and nitrite reduction by DOM was followed by analysing the concentrations of nitrate, nitrite and ammonium in the solutions and of

  12. Thermal relaxation of bituminous coal to improve donation ability of hydrogen radicals in flash pyrolysis; Sekitan kozo kanwa ni yoru suiso radical kyoyo noryoku no kojo wo mezashita netsubunkai mae shori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, T.; Isoda, T.; Kusakabe, K.; Morooka, S. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Hayashi, J. [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Technology

    1996-10-28

    In terms of coal conversion reaction, the behavior of bituminous coal heated beyond a glass transition point was examined on the basis of pyrolyzed products, and the effect of an increase in proton mobility on promotion of coal decomposition was evaluated. In experiment, after Illinois bituminous coal specimen was heated up to a specific temperature in N2 or He gas flow at a rate of 5K/min, the specimen was directly transferred to a pyrolyzer for instantaneous pyrolysis. As the experimental result, the glass transition temperature of the Illinois coal specimen was calculated to be 589K from a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) profile. From the pyrolysis result of the Illinois coal specimen heated up to 623K, the char yield decreased by 3kg as compared with that of the original coal, while the tar yield increased by 4kg up to 27kg per 100kg of the original coal. This tar increase was larger than that of cooled coal. These results suggested that the donation of hydrogen radicals to coal fragments is improved with an increase in proton mobility. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Study of stabilization/solidification processes (of solid porous wastes) based on hydraulic or bituminous binders; Etude des procedes de stabilisation/solidification (des dechets solides poreux) a base de liants hydrauliques ou de liants bitumineux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sing-Teniere, Ch.

    1998-02-01

    The first part of this thesis presents the regulatory framework and the technical context linked with the study of stabilized/solidified wastes and with the evaluation of stabilization/solidification processes. A presentation of the two type of ultimate wastes under study (a used catalyst and an activated charcoal) and an analysis of the processes is given. The second part is devoted to the experimental characterization of both types of porous wastes. The third part deals with the processing of such wastes using an hydraulic binder. The study stresses on both on the stabilization/solidification efficiency of the process and on the conditions of its implementation. The same work is made for a process that uses a bituminous binder. Some choice criteria for the selection of the better process are deduced from the examination of the overall data collected. The waste characterization methodology is applied six times: two times for the raw wastes, two times for the same wastes processed with an hydraulic binder, and two times for the same wastes processed with a bituminous binder. (J.S.)

  14. Coastal geology and recent origins for Sand Point, Lake Superior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Krantz, David E.; Castaneda, Mario R.; Loope, Walter L.; Jol, Harry M.; Goble, Ronald J.; Higley, Melinda C.; DeWald, Samantha; Hansen, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Sand Point is a small cuspate foreland located along the southeastern shore of Lake Superior within Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore near Munising, Michigan. Park managers’ concerns for the integrity of historic buildings at the northern periphery of the point during the rising lake levels in the mid-1980s greatly elevated the priority of research into the geomorphic history and age of Sand Point. To pursue this priority, we recovered sediment cores from four ponds on Sand Point, assessed subsurface stratigraphy onshore and offshore using geophysical techniques, and interpreted the chronology of events using radiocarbon and luminescence dating. Sand Point formed at the southwest edge of a subaqueous platform whose base is probably constructed of glacial diamicton and outwash. During the post-glacial Nipissing Transgression, the base was mantled with sand derived from erosion of adjacent sandstone cliffs. An aerial photograph time sequence, 1939–present, shows that the periphery of the platform has evolved considerably during historical time, infl uenced by transport of sediment into adjacent South Bay. Shallow seismic refl ections suggest slump blocks along the leading edge of the platform. Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) and shallow seismic refl ections to the northwest of the platform reveal large sand waves within a deep (12 m) channel produced by currents fl owing episodically to the northeast into Lake Superior. Ground-penetrating radar profi les show transport and deposition of sand across the upper surface of the platform. Basal radiocarbon dates from ponds between subaerial beach ridges range in age from 540 to 910 cal yr B.P., suggesting that Sand Point became emergent during the last ~1000 years, upon the separation of Lake Superior from Lakes Huron and Michigan. However, optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages from the beach ridges were two to three times as old as the radiocarbon ages, implying that emergence of Sand Point may have begun

  15. Evaluation of Reclamability of Molding Sands with New Inorganic Binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Izdebska-Szanda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the purposes of the application of chemically modified inorganic binders is to improve knocking out properties and the related reclamability with previously used in foundry inorganic binder (water glass, which allowing the use of ecological binders for casting non- ferrous metals. Good knocking out properties of the sands is directly related to the waste sands reclamability, which is a necessary condition of effective waste management. Reclamation of moulding and core sands is a fundamental and effective way to manage waste on site at the foundry, in accordance with the Environmental Guidelines. Therefore, studies of reclamation of waste moulding and core sands with new types of inorganic binders (developed within the framework of the project were carried out. These studies allowed to determine the degree of recovery of useful, material, what the reclaimed sand is, and the degree of its use in the production process. The article presents these results of investigation. They are a part of broader research programme executed under the project POIG.01.01.02-00- 015/09 "Advanced materials and technologies".

  16. Physical Characterizations of Sands and Their Influence in Fall Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancun beach is one of the most important tourist resorts on the Mexican coast, and is of prime importance to the local and national economies. As a result of the intense use of the beach and the unavailability of sand reserves, the extreme weather events that occur in the region (hurricanes have permanently damaged the beach. Over the last two decades several strong hurricanes severely weakened the system, but hurricane Wilma, October 2005, caused devastating erosion to the beach. After Wilma, an emergency nourishment project was implemented pumping a volume of 2.7 million m3 of sand onto the beach. Clearly, the sand used for the nourishment has a different shape factor, diameter distribution and density property compared to the native sand. The main goal of this paper is to characterize and compare the fall velocities of sand samples taken in and around Cancun. The settling velocities obtained for several samples were compared with the empirical formulations proposed by various authors. The influence of several parameters measured in the laboratory is discussed and a new formulation is presented.

  17. Sulfur concrete haul roads at Suncor oil sands mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraha, D.; Sego, D.; Donahue, R.; Biggar, K. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Geotechnical Center

    2004-07-01

    Well constructed haul roads are necessary to ensure the efficient use of ultra large haul trucks used at oil sand mining operations in northern Alberta. Haul roads at Suncor are presently constructed with crushed limestone, gravel, lean oil sand and till, but they deteriorate severely during the summer due to material softening. Suncor conducted a study to determine the feasibility of building mine haul roads at their oil sand mines using concrete prepared from by-products and mine wastes such as sulfur, fly ash, coke and tailings sand. The physical and mechanical properties of different mixes of sulfur concrete were characterized in laboratory studies that involved compression measuring and split tensile and freeze thaw durability tests. The geochemical interaction of sulfur concrete with the near surface environment was also studied with reference to the operational life of the haul road and interaction of sulfur concrete with ground water. A haul road test section was designed based on the resilient modulus design method. A finite element analysis was used to calculate the stress and strain distributions in the road caused by truck tires. The pavement thickness was determined based on the truck loads, the resilient modulus and the strength of the sulfur concrete and subgrade material. It was concluded that sulfur concrete produced from mine wastes is much stronger and stiffer than the existing haul road material. Therefore, better haul roads can be constructed with reduced pavement thicknesses using tailing sand sulfur concrete. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 14 figs.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Utah tar sand research and development program is concerned with research and development on Utah is extensive oil sands deposits. The program has been intended to develop a scientific and technological base required for eventual commercial recovery of the heavy oils from oil sands and processing these oils to produce synthetic crude oil and other products such as asphalt. The overall program is based on mining the oil sand, processing the mined sand to recover the heavy oils and upgrading them to products. Multiple deposits are being investigated since it is believed that a large scale (approximately 20,000 bbl/day) plant would require the use of resources from more than one deposit. The tasks or projects in the program are organized according to the following classification: Recovery technologies which includes thermal recovery methods, water extraction methods, and solvent extraction methods; upgrading and processing technologies which covers hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and hydropyrolysis; solvent extraction; production of specialty products; and environmental aspects of the production and processing technologies. These tasks are covered in this report

  19. Efficiency of Micro-fine Cement Grouting in Liquefiable Sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of strong ground motion, liquefaction hazards are likely to occur in saturated cohesion-less soils. The risk of liquefaction and subsequent deformation can be reduced by various ground improvement methods including the cement grouting technique. The grouting method was proposed for non-disruptive mitigation of liquefaction risk at developed sites susceptible to liquefaction. In this research, a large-scale experiment was developed for assessment of micro-fine cement grouting effect on strength behavior and liquefaction potential of loose sand. Loose sand samples treated with micro-fine grout in multidirectional experimental model, were tested under cyclic and monotonic triaxial loading to investigate the influence of micro-fine grout on the deformation properties and pore pressure response. The behavior of pure sand was compared with the behavior of sand grouted with a micro-fine cement grout. The test results were shown that cement grouting with low concentrations significantly decreased the liquefaction potential of loose sand and related ground deformation

  20. Origin of Unliberated Bitumen in Athabasca Oil Sands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TuYun; J.B.O'Carroll; B.D.Sparks; L.S.Kotlyar; S.Ng; K.H.Chung; G.Cuddy

    2005-01-01

    Oil sands contain a so-called organic rich solids component (ORS), i.e., solids whose surfaces are strongly associated with toluene insoluble organic matter (TIOM). Typically, humic material is the major component of TIOM.It provides sites for adsorption and chemical fixation of bitumen. This bound bitumen is """"""""unliberated"""""""", and considerable mechanical or chemical energy may be required to release it. In order to establish a correlation between bitumen recovery and ORS content, a few selected oil sands were processed in a Batch Extraction Unit (BEU).Analysis of the middlings and coarse tailings streams from these tests indicated a relatively constant bitumen to ORS ratio of 2.8±0.7. This value allows the liberated-unliberated bitumen balance (LUBB) to be calculated for any given oil sands. The amounts of bitumen recovered as primary froth during the BEU experiments are close to the estimated liberated bitumen contents in each case tested. This observation indicates that the liberated-unliberated bitumen calculation is an important quantitative parameter for prediction of bitumen recovery under specific recovery conditions. Preliminary results indicate that the ORS content of an oil sands may be estimated from the carbon content of bitumen free oil sands solids.

  1. Biodegradation of MIB and geosmin with slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the biodegradation of MIB (2-methylisoborneol) and geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans- 9-decalol) in simulated slow sand filtration (SSF) columns and in batch reactors. The results showed that both MIB and geosmin were biodegradable in the two systems. In batch experiments, the overall removals for MIB and geosmin were 50% and 78%, respectively, after 7 days of contact time. Volatilization loss plays an important role for geosmin in batch systems. Simulated SSF column studies also showed that more than 50% of geosmin and MIB were degraded by the microbial on the sand surface of a slow sand filter. With a filtration rate of 5 m/day, the simulated SSF degraded MIB from 48% to 69% and geosmin from 87% to 96%. The rapid biodegradation of MIB and geosmin in SSF column tests was attributed to the use of filter sands from the SSF unit in the Kinmen water treatment plant, where the microbial had been acclimated to both MIB and geosmin. The results also showed that more than 70% of the geosmin was removed in the top portion of the filter ( approximately 10 cm); while the removal of MIB occurred throughout the entire column depth. The results of this study demonstrated that slow flow through preacclimated sand was effective for control of MIB and geosmin in drinking water.

  2. The use of stable isotopes to trace oil sands constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farwell, A.J.; Nero, V.; Dixon, D.G. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2002-07-01

    A study was conducted to determine the biological effects of oil sands mining operations on aquatic ecosystems. The study focused on the Athabasca oil sand deposit, the largest of 4 deposits in northern Alberta. In particular, the study examined the cycling of oil sand constituents in Benthic invertebrates collected from test pits at Syncrude Canada Ltd.. The invertebrates were similar in size, but different in the quantity of process-affected water or mature fine tailings containing residual bitumen. Dragonflies and damselflies in particular, showed trends of depletion for the carbon 13 isotope and enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope in pits where levels of process affected water was high. The depletion of carbon 13 isotope suggests that oil sand constituents assimilate into the benthic food chain. The greatest carbon 13 depletion, which was approximately 27 per cent, was found to be in test pits with high turbidity. This implies that oil sands constituents degrade microbially instead of by photosynthetic production. All benthic invertebrate group demonstrated an incremental enrichment in nitrogen 15 isotope from the control pit to the pit with greatest levels of mature fine tailings.

  3. Formation mechanism and development pattern of aeolian sand landform in Yarlung Zangbo River valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李森; 董光荣; 申建友; 杨萍; 刘贤万; 王跃; 靳鹤龄; 王强

    1999-01-01

    Aeolian sand landforms in the Yarlung Zangbo River valley can be divided into 4 classes and 21 types. The river valley has favourable environment conditions for the development of aeolian sand landforms. Simulation of MM4 mid-scale climate model showed that the near-surface flow field and wind vector field during the winter half year in the fiver valley are generally favourable for the aeolian sand deposition and as a whole they also affect the distribution zones and sites of aeolian sand landforms. Sand dunes and sand dune groups in the fiver valley developed mainly in three ways, namely windward retarding deposition, leeward back flow deposition and bend circumfluence deposition. Through alternating positive-reverse processes of sand dune formation under wind actions and sand dune vanishing under water actions, sand dunes developed from primary zone through main-body zone then to vanishing zone where climbing dunes and falling dunes are declining and are even disappearing.

  4. Engaging Canadians: national oil sands dialogues - A background paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that the world's energy demand will grow significantly between now and the year 2050. Hydrocarbons will have an important role to play in meeting this increasing demand and unconventional sources such as oil sands will become more and more important. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) has been engaged in a dialogue process to examine the environmental, economic and social impacts of the oil sands industry and the aim of this background paper is to provide stakeholders with some context. The paper highlights the fact that although the oil sands industry gives rise to environmental issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, air pollutants, land disturbance and water use, the environmental performance of the industry has been improving in recent years thanks to new technologies.

  5. Sand shoal development on muddy Mississippi river delta shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penland, S.; Suter, J.R.; Moslow, T.F.

    1984-04-01

    Trinity and Ship Shoals are transgressive sand bodies on the Louisiana inner continental shelf, and they represent the reworked sands of the abandoned Holocene Teche and Maringouin deltas. The development of these shoals is initiated by an episode of delta abandonment followed by subsidence-enhanced sea level rise. Through the process of shoreface retreat, the abandoned delta lobe evolves from an erosional headland with flanking barrier islands to a barrier-island arch and finally into a submerged inner-shelf shoal system. Trinity and Ship Shoals represent the final stage in the Mississippi River delta barrier shoreline cycle and provide a possible modern analogue for some Cretaceous shelf sandstones of the Western Interior. More than 1000 km (620 mi) of high-resolution seismic profiles correlated with cores provide the data base for interpretation of the depositional history of sand-body development on the muddy Louisiana shelf.

  6. Shear band in sand with spatially varying density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Ronaldo I.; Song, Xiaoyu; Rechenmacher, Amy L.; Abedi, Sara; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Bifurcation theory is often used to investigate the inception of a shear band in a homogeneously deforming body. The theory predicts conjugate shear bands that have the same likelihood of triggering. For structures loaded symmetrically the choice of which of the two conjugate shear bands will persist is arbitrary. In this paper we show that spatial density variation could be a determining factor for the selection of the persistent shear band in a symmetrically loaded localizing sand body. We combine experimental imaging on rectangular sand specimens loaded in plane strain compression with mesoscale finite element modeling on symmetrically loaded sand specimens to show that spatial heterogeneity in density does have a profound impact on the persistent shear band.

  7. Reclamation and closure of an oil sands tailings facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobkowicz, J. [Thurber Engineering Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Morgenstern, N. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed methods of ensuring the successful reclamation of oil sands tailings facilities. Tailings should be reclaimed as mining proceeds in order to avoid an excessive accumulation of fluid fine tailings (FFT). The volume of mature fine tailings (MFT) in ponds should be limited in order to ensure effective tailings management. The reclaimed landforms should have good geotechnical stability and be comprised of self-sustaining native vegetation. Strength is needed to allow for timely capping and initial reclamation, and stiffness is required to minimize future settlement and to allow for the construction of a closure landscape. Reclamation strategies were presented for fines-dominated tailings; sand-depleted tailings; and sand-dominated tailings. Energy Resources Conservation Board (ERCB) criteria for tailings reclamation were discussed, and various monitoring and performance assessment strategies were presented. tabs., figs.

  8. Deep-bed sand filter at Savannah River Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A deep-bed sand filter was placed in service during June 1974 at the Savannah River Laboratory. This filter provides a back-up for HEPA filters in the primary exhaust system. HEPA filters can fail due to deterioration, faulty seating mechanisms, fire, and/or pressure excursions. The deep bed filter area is 103 ft by 140 ft and consists of layers of rock, gravel, and sand to a depth of 7 ft 6 in. Design flow is 74,000 cfm at 5.15 linear fpm. Most of the pressure drop occurs in the 36-in. layer of the ''G'' sand (sieve size No. 50 to No. 30) where the submicron particulates are captured. The filter is described, and operating characteristics are summarized, including pressure drops and filter efficiencies as determined with DOP. (U.S.)

  9. Sand moulds milling for one-of-a-kind pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A.; Calleja, A.; Olvera, D.; Peñafiel, F. J.; López de Lacalle, L. N.

    2012-04-01

    Time to market is a critical measurement for today's foundry market. Combining 3D digitizing and sand blocks milling is possible to reduce this time. Avoiding the use of a wood pattern, this technique is useful for art pieces or unique parts, when only one component is necessary. The key of the proposed methodology is to achieve enough tool life with conventional tool qualities, avoiding the risk of sand destruction or damage. A special study of tool wear is presented in this work, studying different tool materials and different sand types. Two examples of unique parts are also presented in this work following the proposed methodology in order to reduce time and cost for the rapid reproduction of very short batches.

  10. Theoretical analysis of transient heat conduction in sand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁新刚; 过增元; 徐云生

    1996-01-01

    A simplified two-phase system model, with the heat transfer between phases considered, is presented and applied to the transient heat conduction in sand. The analytical results show that the one-dimensional Fourier’s law is not applicable to the transient heat conduction at very short time and there is no thermal wave described by C-V equation in sand. The two-phase system model correlates with experimental data well. Each ?phase responds to heating at different speeds in composite material, and consequently results in a temperature difference between phases. This difference will cause heat transfer between phases, which can be regarded as a heat source or sink to other phase. It is certain that Fourier’s law cannot describe the transient heat conduction in sand if a one-dimensional problem with equivalent thermal diffusivity is assumed.

  11. Geologic map of Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madole, Richard F.; VanSistine, D. Paco; Romig, Joseph H.

    2016-10-20

    Geologic mapping was begun after a range fire swept the area of what is now the Great Sand Dunes National Park in April 2000. The park spans an area of 437 square kilometers (or about 169 square miles), of which 98 percent is blanketed by sediment of Quaternary age, the Holocene and Pleistocene Epochs; hence, this geologic map of the Great Sand Dunes National Park is essentially a surficial geologic map. These surficial deposits are diverse and include sediment of eolian (windblown), alluvial (stream and sheetwash), palustrine (wetlands and marshes), lacustrine (lake), and mass-wasting (landslides) origin. Sediment of middle and late Holocene age, from about 8,000 years ago to the present, covers about 80 percent of the park.Fluctuations in groundwater level during Holocene time caused wetlands on the nearby lowland that bounds the park on the west to alternately expand and contract. These fluctuations controlled the stability or instability of eolian sand deposits on the downwind (eastern) side of the lowland. When groundwater level rose, playas became lakes, and wet or marshy areas formed in many places. When the water table rose, spring-fed streams filled their channels and valley floors with sediment. Conversely, when groundwater level fell, spring-fed streams incised their valley floors, and lakes, ponds, and marshes dried up and became sources of windblown sand.Discharge in streams draining the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Range is controlled primarily by snowmelt and flow is perennial until it reaches the mountain front, beyond which streams begin losing water at a high rate as the water soaks into the creek beds. Even streams originating in the larger drainage basins, such as Sand and Medano Creeks, generally do not extend much more than 4 km (about 2.5 miles) beyond where they exit the mountains.The Great Sand Dunes contain the tallest dunes (maximum height about 750 feet, or 230 m) in North America. These dunes cover an area of 72 square kilometers

  12. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF SAND AND CHITOSAN AS DUAL FILTER MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHUKAR M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuisance due to suspended and colloidal particles causing turbidity has become widespread, severe problem due to urban population and industrial activities. The consequences of turbidity are presence of microorganisms,reduction of dissolved oxygen, etc. Consumption of such water is known to cause water borne diseases.Available water treatment methods for the removal of turbidity and pathogens are coagulation, filtration and disinfection. The common filter media used are sand, activated carbon etc. Chitosan has been used as acoagulant aid and adsorbent. Chitosan when used as a filter media causes the colloidal particles to bind together and is subsequently removed during the process. The column studies using Chitosan in combination with conventional sand filter was carried out in a borosilicate glass column. Chitosan was placed on top of sand layerand constant down flow pattern of 100mL/min was followed. Dual filter media was effective in the reducing turbidity by 93%.

  13. Experimental investigation on heat transport in gravel-sand materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maureschat, Gerald; Heller, Alfred

    1997-01-01

    out in a small size experiment. The experiment consists of a highly insulated box filled with two kinds of sand material crossed by a plastic heat pipe. Heat transfer is measured under dry and water satured conditions in a cross-section.The conclusions are clear. To obtain necessary heat conduction...... in sand-gravel material, the storage media is to be water satured. In this case, handling of such material on site is rather complex. The conduction is highly dependent on the thermal properties of the storage media and so is the overall thermal performance of a storage applying such media. For sandy...... media no convectional heat transport is found. It would be relevant to extend the investigation to media that enables convectional heat transport. A last conclusion is that such experiments, necessary for proper designing of sand-gravel storage types, are a very cheap form of collecting information...

  14. Oil sands tailings dewatering - can it be done?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, S.; Francoeur, R.; Labelle, M. [Golder Paste Technology Ltd (Canada); Wislesky, I. [Golder Associates Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The depletion of conventional energy resources and the rising energy demand are driving development of the oil sands industry. Oil sands operations generate large amounts of tailings and a new directive has been put in place by the Energy Resources Conservation Board to manage those tailings. The aim of this paper is to present research that has been carried out on dewatering the oil sands' multiple tailings streams. Laboratory and field experiments have been conducted on several tailings streams using different dewatering methods. Different dewatering technologies such as thickening, in-line flocculation, centrifuge, and co-mingling are presented herein as well as several deposition strategies such as thick lift, thin lift, cell structure, single end point discharge, and multiple spigot discharge. This paper provided useful information on the different dewatering and deposition methods available and demonstrated that each site has its unique solution and that all tailings streams can be dewatered to some extent.

  15. The gravel sand transition in a disturbed catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, A. David

    1999-03-01

    More than 40 million cubic metres of mining waste were supplied to the Ringarooma River between 1875 and 1984, leading to successive phases of aggradation and degradation. The natural bed material is gravel but, given the volume of introduced load and the fact that much of the input was less than 5 mm in diameter, the size composition of the bed changed from gravel to sand during the phase of downstream progressive aggradation. A very sharp gravel-sand transition developed in which median grain size decreased from over 30 mm to under 3 mm in less than 500 m. With upstream supplies of mining debris becoming depleted first, degradation followed the same downstream progressive pattern as aggradation, causing the transition to migrate downstream. By 1984, the river could be regarded as a series of zones, each characterized by a particular bed condition: a natural cobble-gravel bed, unaffected by mining inputs (0-32 km); pre-disturbance bed re-exposed by degradation over 35-40 years (32-53 km); sandy substrate with a gravel armour produced by differential transport during degradation (53-65 km); sand dominated but with developing surface patches of coarser material (65-75 km); sandy bed reflecting the size composition of the original mining input (75-118 km). Although the gravel-sand transition itself is sharp, the transitional zone is lengthy (53-75 km). As degradation continues, the gravel-sand transition is expected to progress downstream but it has remained in a stable position for 12 years. Indeed, two major floods during the period released large quantities of sand from the sub-armour layer and newly-formed banks of mine tailings, causing fining both above and below the transition. Surface grain size is an adjustable component in the transitional zone as the river strives to recover from a major anthropogenic disturbance.

  16. Predictive hydrogeochemical modelling of bauxite residue sand in field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmeier, Laurin; Barry, David A; Phillips, Ian R

    2011-07-15

    The suitability of residue sand (the coarse fraction remaining from Bayer's process of bauxite refining) for constructing the surface cover of closed bauxite residue storage areas was investigated. Specifically, its properties as a medium for plant growth are of interest to ensure residue sand can support a sustainable ecosystem following site closure. The geochemical evolution of the residue sand under field conditions, its plant nutrient status and soil moisture retention were studied by integrated modelling of geochemical and hydrological processes. For the parameterization of mineral reactions, amounts and reaction kinetics of the mineral phases natron, calcite, tricalcium aluminate, sodalite, muscovite and analcime were derived from measured acid neutralization curves. The effective exchange capacity for ion adsorption was measured using three independent exchange methods. The geochemical model, which accounts for mineral reactions, cation exchange and activity corrected solution speciation, was formulated in the geochemical modelling framework PHREEQC, and partially validated in a saturated-flow column experiment. For the integration of variably saturated flow with multi-component solute transport in heterogeneous 2D domains, a coupling of PHREEQC with the multi-purpose finite-element solver COMSOL was established. The integrated hydrogeochemical model was applied to predict water availability and quality in a vertical flow lysimeter and a cover design for a storage facility using measured time series of rainfall and evaporation from southwest Western Australia. In both scenarios the sand was fertigated and gypsum-amended. Results show poor long-term retention of fertilizer ions and buffering of the pH around 10 for more than 5 y of leaching. It was concluded that fertigation, gypsum amendment and rainfall leaching alone were insufficient to render the geochemical conditions of residue sand suitable for optimal plant growth within the given timeframe. The

  17. Analysis of the environmental control technology for tar sand development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Nevers, N.; Glenne, B.; Bryner, C.

    1979-06-01

    The environmental technology for control of air pollution, water pollution, and for the disposal, stabilization, and vegetation of the waste tar sand were thoroughly investigated. Although some difficulties may be encountered in any of these undertakings, it seems clear that the air and water pollution problems can be solved to meet any applicable standard. Currently there are two large-scale plants producing liquid fuels from tar sands in Alberta, Canada which use similar technology involving surface mining, hot water extraction, and surface disposal of waste sand. These projects all meet the Canadian environmental control regulations in force at the time they began. The largest US deposits of tar sands are much smaller than the Canadian; 95 percent are located in the state of Utah. Their economics do not appear as attractive as the Canadian deposits. The environmental control costs are not large enough to make an otherwise economic project uneconomic. The most serious environmental conflict likely to occur over the recovery of liquid fuels from the US deposits of tar sands is that caused by the proximity of the deposits to national parks, national monuments, and a national recreation area in Utah. These areas have very stringent air pollution requirements; and even if the air pollution control requirements can be met, there may still be adequate opposition to large-scale mining ventures in these areas to prevent their commercial exploitation. Another environmental constraint may be water rights availability.Essentially all of the water running in the Colorado river basin is now legally allocated. Barring new interpretations of the legality of water rights purchase, Utah tar sands developments should be able to obtain water by purchasing existing irrigation water rights.

  18. San Francisco Bay Sand Mining Resource Evaluation and Impact Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenical, S.; Tirindelli, M.; Sicular, D.; Gragg, J.; Huitt, C.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents results of the evaluation of potential future sand resources within certain Central San Francisco Bay (Central Bay) sand mining lease areas, as well as the potential impacts of further mining these areas for a ten-year period. The study consisted of morphological analysis using field measurements and hydrodynamic modeling, and covered a wide spectrum of physical processes including tidal and river circulation, salinity, sediment transport, and morphology. The study was conducted within the framework of an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) prepared by the California State Lands Commission (CSLC) as part of the discretionary approval process for issuing new mining leases. The results of the morphological analysis indicate a measurable depletion of sand resources in the Central Bay lease areas during the period 1997-2008, and that for the purposes of the proposed ten-year mining lease renewal, sand mining resources in Central Bay are largely limited to material already in place. The morphological analysis results also indicate that the proposed additional ten years of sand mining in the Central Bay lease areas are not likely to cause a significant impact on sediment transport and budgets in areas outside the vicinity of the lease areas, such as the San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc. Numerical modeling results, including particle tracking exercises, do indicate a net seaward transport of sand, and that a linkage exists between the mining areas and offshore areas (San Francisco Bar, Ocean Beach, etc). However, the modeling results demonstrate that the linkage is weak, and that any measurable changes in hydrodynamics, salinity and sediment transport/morphology caused by the mining activities are likely to be confined to the vicinity of the mining areas.

  19. Assessment of natural radioactivity of sand used in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, U; Damla, N; Kobya, A I; Celik, N; Celik, A; Van, A A

    2009-03-01

    The natural radioactivity due to the presence of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in sand samples used as building materials in Turkey was measured by gamma spectrometry. The measured activity in the sand samples ranged from 17 to 97 Bq kg(-1), 10 to 133 Bq kg(-1) and 116 to 955 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The concentrations of these natural radionuclides were compared with the reported data for other countries. The radium equivalent activity (Ra(eq)), the external hazard index (H(ex)), the internal hazard index (H(in)), the indoor absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose rate were evaluated to assess the radiation hazard for people living in dwellings made of the materials studied. The Ra(eq) values of sand samples are lower than the limit of 370 Bq kg(-1), equivalent to a gamma dose of 1.5 mSv yr(-1). This study shows that the measured sand samples do not pose any significant source of radiation hazard and are safe for use in building materials. Moreover, the experimental mass attenuation coefficients (mu/rho) of seven different sand samples were determined in the energy range 80-1332 keV photons by using the gamma ray transmission method. Experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient were compared with theoretical values obtained using the program XCOM. The calculated values and the experimental results of this work and the other results in the literature are found to be in good agreement. Chemical and structural analyses (XRD) of the sand samples were also undertaken. PMID:19225183

  20. Non-dune eolian sand in Indian mounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, William F.

    1980-02-01

    Indian mounds, near Careyville, Florida, about 2.0 m high, are located on hillsides and hilltops 10 to 20 m above the floodplain of the nearest river (Choctawhatchee). Each mound is composed largely of quartz sand, with a scattering of artefacts and stream pebbles (not in layers), but with no visible bedding. Probability plots showed 25 Gaussian distributions, 18 having the 'dune hump', three having the 'surf break' and nine being doubly-truncated or having other patterns of unknown or uncertain origin. The surf breaks probably were inherited from pre-Pleistocene marine terraces in the area. The pebbles and the sand were not introduced by the same agency. The sand probability plots, taken as a set, indicate an eolian origin. The rough symmetry of the mounds, and the lack of cross-bedding, argue against a migrating dune origin. On a variability plot (showing the variability of the means versus the variability of the standard deviations), one suite of samples fell clearly within the 'dune' number field, a second suite in the overlap area between 'dune' and 'beach', and a third suite, taken immediately adjacent to a creek bed, plotted in the overlap area between 'beach' and 'coastal plain stream'. The pebbles, of common Southern Appalachian types, are attributed to the activities of the inhabitants, perhaps children. The sand is thought to have been carried by the wind, perhaps from nearby river sand bars, or from areas burned either by lightning-set wildfires or as part of "slash-and-burn" agriculture. The mounds are thought to represent clearings (for huts), and hence good trapping devices for wind-borne sand.

  1. Migration and sorption of strontium in clay-sand mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The migration and sorption of Sr in clay-sand mixture were investigated by batch experiment, column experiments and numerical simulation. The results showed that as the clay content in clay-sand mixture increased, the effective porosity, absorption capacity and retardation factor of the mixture for Sr increased, but the dispersion coefficient and migration velocity decreased. The migration of Sr was influenced strongly when clay content was in range of 0-25 %, but influenced weakly when clay content was more than 25 %. The experimental data was consistent with the calculated results by CXTFIT program. (author)

  2. Characterization of Beach/River Sand for Foundry Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsina Christopher BALA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A detailed experimental investigation is been reported on the characterization of beach/river sand for foundry use. Bulk properties of the sand samples collected were evaluated. The experimental results were analyzed as per the American Foundry Society (AFS standard. The analyses show that samples from Ughelli River, Warri River and Ethiope River could be used effectively in the foundry. The sample from Lagos bar beach requires to be sieved properly to remove the coarse fractions in order to make it suitable for foundry use.

  3. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  4. SAND & FINES IN MULTIPHASE OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Udoh Richard

    2013-01-01

    This thesis work focuses on multiphase flow in the oil and gas industry. As differences in temperatures and pressures come to play from the reservoir to the surface, in tubing and in pipelines, gas tend to dissolve and evolve out from oil, with water and solid particles making their way into the production flow stream, giving rise to a multiphase gas-liquid-solid production and transportation. A review of sand and fines production worldwide was carried out and concluded that sand production i...

  5. Swelling characteristics of immersed sand-bentonite mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丰土根; 崔红斌; 孙德安; 杜冰

    2008-01-01

    A laboratory one-dimensional consolidation apparatus was employed to research the swelling stress and volume of the sand-bentonite mixture under immersed conditions. The stress-strain characteristics of mixtures under varied mixing ratios and loading statuses were analyzed. Based on the results of tests, the mechanism of mixture swelling and collapsing was further discussed. The results show that mixtures with low sand ratios are suitable as hydraulic barrier or containment barriers of general landfills, geological repository and other hydraulic infrastructure works.

  6. University of Utah Oil Sand Research and Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Dahlstrom, D.A.; Deo, M.D.; Fletcher, J.V.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1993-12-31

    An overview of the Oil Sand Research and Development Program at the University of Utah will be presented. It will include resource characterization of the Uinta Basin oils and deposits and bitumens and bitumen-derived liquid recovery and upgrading technology and product utilization. The characterization studies will include the Whiterocks and Asphalt Ridge oil sands. The discussion of recovery and upgrading technologies will include aqueous separation, thermal recovery processes; solvent extraction, and thermal and catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen-derived heavy oils. Product evaluation studies will include jet fuels, diesel fuel, asphalt and specialty chemicals. Plans for the future of the project will be discussed.

  7. Effect Of Sand Blasting On Soda Lime Glass Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Bousbaa, C.; Madjoubi, M. A.; Hamidouche, Z; N. BOUAOUADJA

    2003-01-01

    The present work is based on a simulation in laboratory of the erosion of a soda lime glass caused by sand blasting during sandstorms. It deals with the effects of sand blasting duration (from 0 to 60 min) and impact angle (from 0 to 90°) on the material and its properties. The principal erosion characteristics and properties of the material studied are the mass loss, the erosion rate, the surface roughness, the optical transmission and the mechanical strength. The influence of the optical tr...

  8. Pathogen removal using saturated sand colums supplemented with hydrochar

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, J.W

    2015-01-01

    This PhD study has evaluated hydrochars derived from biowastes as adsorbents for pathogen removal in water treatment. Pathogen removal experiments were conducted by carrying out breakthrough analysis using a simple sand filtration set-up. Glass columns packed by 10 cm sand bed supplemented with minor amount of hydrochar (1.5 %, w/w) were flushed with artificial ground water seeded with test microorganisms at an upward flow rate of 1 mL / min. Either back flushing or deionized water flushing w...

  9. Opportunities for CANDU for the Alberta oil sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alberta oil sands bitumen deposits comprise of one of the largest sources hydrocarbon in the world, and have emerged as the fastest growing, soon to be dominant, source of crude oil in Canada. The oil industry has made great strides in improving the effectiveness of gathering this resource. In particular, alternatives to open-pit mining have been developed which enable in-site recovery of underground deposits with a minimum of environmental disruption. The main challenge that remains is the large quantity of energy needed in the process of extracting the oil and upgrading it to commercial levels. For a typical in-situ extraction project, about 18% of the energy content of the oil produced is used up in the extraction process, while a further 5% is used in generating hydrogen to upgrade the bitumen to synthetic crude oil. Looking ahead, even as improvements in energy use efficiency, (and hydrocarbon use efficiency) counterbalance the increases in hydrocarbon demand from economic growth (particularly in the developing world), Canada and Alberta recognize that the oil sands resource will be needed, and both support the development of this resource in an environmentally responsible way. The large energy requirement for the oil sands extraction process represents a challenge with regard to both environmental impact and security of supply. The use of natural gas, the current energy supply, has impacts in terms of air quality (via NOX and other emissions) and also represents a large greenhouse gas emissions component. As the oil sands industry expands, the availability of natural gas also becomes a concern, as does price and price stability. With this background, the opportunity for nuclear reactors to provide an economical, reliable, virtually zero-emission source of energy for the oil sands becomes very important. Over the last few years, developments in oil sands extraction technology, and developments in CANDU technology through the Advanced CANDU Reactor, (ACR

  10. Reclamation of alkaline spent moulding sands of organic and inorganic type and their mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dańko

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of modern moulding sands with organic and inorganic binders requires the reclamation treatments in order to be able to reuse the matrices of spent sands. The spent sands, depending on the applied binding agent, are characterised by various abilities of the matrix reclamation. The results of investigations of the reclamation of spent moulding sands with the Rudal binder and spent sands with the Rezolit binder in the system of uniform sands and of mixed ones, are presented in the paper. Investigations were performed by means of the special experimental stands designed and built in the AGH University of Science and Technology, AGH, in Krakow.

  11. Effect of Fines on Liquefaction Resistance in Fine Sand and Silty Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meraj Ahmad Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is required to recognize the conditions that exist in a soil deposit before an earthquake in order to identify liquefaction. Soil is basically an assemblage of many soil particles which stay in contact with many neighboring soil. The contact forces produced by the weight of the overlying particles holds individual soil particle in its place and provide strength. Occurrence of liquefaction is the result of rapid load application and break down of the loose and saturated sand and the loosely-packed individual soil particles tries to move into a denser configuration. However, there is not enough time for the pore-water of the soil to be squeezed out in case of earthquake. Instead, the water is trapped and prevents the soil particles from moving closer together. Thus, there is an increase in water pressure which reduces the contact forces between the individual soil particles causing softening and weakening of soil deposit. In extreme conditions, the soil particles may lose contact with each other due to the increased pore-water pressure. In such cases, the soil will have very little strength, and will behave more like a liquid than a solid - hence, the name "liquefaction".

  12. Chewing sandpaper: grit, plant apparency, and plant defense in sand-entrapping plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresti, Eric F; Karban, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Sand entrapment on plant surfaces, termed psammophory or sand armor, is a phylogenetically and geographically widespread trait. The functional significance of this phenomenon has been poorly investigated. Sand and soil are nonnutritive and difficult for herbivores to process, as well as visually identical to the background. We experimentally investigated whether this sand coating physically protected the plant from herbivores or increased crypsis (e.g., decreased apparency to herbivores). We tested the former hypothesis by removing entrapped sand from stems, petioles, and leaves of the sand verbena Abronia latifolia and by supplementing natural sand levels in the honeyscented pincushion plant Navarretia mellita. Consistent with a physical defensive function, leaves with sand present or supplemented suffered less chewing herbivory than those with sand removed or left as is. To test a possible crypsis effect, we coated some sand verbena stems with green sand, matching the stem color, as well as others with brown sand to match the background color. Both suffered less chewing herbivory than controls with no sand and herbivory did not significantly differ between the colors, suggesting crypsis was not the driving resistance mechanism. Strong tests of plant apparency are rare; this experimental approach may be possible in other systems and represents one of few manipulative tests of this long-standing hypothesis. PMID:27220199

  13. Structural variations of sand-bearing airflow over dune at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi Eerdum

    2004-01-01

    From the analytical results of observed data on sand transport rates at different positions of dune surface at southeastern fringe of Tengger Desert, it has been found that the vertical distribution of blown sand flux exhibits a noticeable variation when sand grains move upslope and downslope of dune surface under the action of wind force. Within the height of 20 cm above the sand surface, the vertical distribution of mass flux at different positions from toe to dune crest of stoss slope of sand dunes coincides with a single exponentially decaying law; while the vertical distribution of mass flux over the lee slope occurs as two variable zones, with the height of 8—12 cm as the dividing line, the sand transport rate below this height exponentially decreases with increasing height, but above this height decreases in a power function law. On the stoss slope, the relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow tends to decrease with the increasing wind velocity and the total sand transport rate towards the dune crest due to the shortened trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving upslope. On the lee slope, the increase in lift-off height and trajectory length of saltation sand grains moving downslope leads to the increase in relative sand transport rate in the upper layer of sand flow.

  14. Visualization of sand structures surrounding a horizontal well slot during cold production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meza, B.I. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Tremblay, B. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Doan, Q. [Computer Modelling Group, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Cold-water processes are used by oil producers in Alberta and Saskatchewan to recover oil from vertical wells, but large volumes of sand are produced along with the oil. Cold production has not been as successful for horizontal wells because of the high costs associated with sand clean out. Sand production can be controlled using a well completion technique called sand arching, in which a curved structure spans an opening to support a load by resolving external stresses into tangential and radial stresses. In order to optimize production, it is necessary to fully understand the flow of sand and oil into slotted horizontal well liners for both thermal and non-thermal oil production. A study was conducted to examine the structures that form in and around a slot when sand production stops. It was shown that sand production through slots can be controlled. Sand grain sorting plays a bigger role in production than the morphology of the grains or their diameters. A sufficient amount of sand is produced to enhance the porosity and permeability around the slots before sand production in stopped. Slot plugging by the higher fractions of a given sand could decrease sand production, so the occurrence of large grains of sand should be taken into consideration when selecting the slots. 22 refs., 6 tabs., 25 figs.

  15. Textural and compositional variations in beach sands along Karachi coast

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, N. (Nicolás); Muhammad, M.J.; Zaidi, S.M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The texture of clastic sediments is a fairly reliable index of the erosional history and energy conditions of the depositional environment, while its mineralogy reflects the composition of the source rocks. The beach sands of Clifton, Sandspit, Hawkesbay and Paradise Point were studied to determine their erosional history, depositional environment and their source

  16. René Sand (Belgium, President 1946 – 1953

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary significance of the life and work of René Sand lies in his central position as a mediator, promoter and coordinator of social work on an increasingly international level during the interwar-period and it can hardly be overestimated.

  17. Thermal analysis of moulding sands with a polyacrylic binding agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grabowska

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Heating of materials causes their physical or chemical changes accompanied by thermal clfccts. Thcrmnl cfrccts of plymcrs an: rclarcd totheir structural changes. such as: melting, crystallization, polymorphous transformations, vitrification. dcgradnlion, dcstmct ion as wcll nsintramolecular or intermolecular reactions. Samples of sodium ptyacrylatc (uscd as a binding agcnr, high-silica sand (grain matrix andsamplcs of moulding sands with a potyacrylic binder aftcr hardening were tcsted derivatographically. Samplcs For thcrmal analysis wcrctaken from sham blocks aRer pcrrorming strcnglh tcsts. Invcstigations wcrc done within the tcmpcmturc rangc: 25-1000°C.Mct hds of thcrmal analysis (DTA,T G} were uscd to dacminc thc thcrmal stability of thc tcstcd snmplcs by cstablisbing rhc tcmpcsaturcand thermal effccts of transformations occurring during hcating. In addition, the invcstigations wcrc to dctcsminc changcs raking placcinside moulding sands whcn in contact with molten mctal. On the basis of differences in Ihermograms of moulding sand samptcs withpolyacrylic binding agcnt. hdcncd cithcr by Ca(Olll and C0: or by microwaves, onc cnn infcr that significant strucrural changesoccurrcd aftcr cross-linking. Thosc changes are rclatcd to intra- and intermolecular rcactions and thc way of hardcning influcnccs thccross-linking reaction - which was also confirmed by mcws of thc spectroscopic investigations (IT-IR. Rarnan, NMR.

  18. HIGH PERFORMANCE CONCRETE WITH GGBS AND ROBO SAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VENU MALAGAVELLI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is a mixture of cement, fine aggregate, coarse aggregate and water. Concrete plays a vital role in the development of infrastructure Viz., buildings, industrial structures, bridges and highways etc. leading to utilization of large quantity of concrete. High Performance Concrete (HPC is a concrete meeting special combinations of performance and uniformity requirements that cannot be always achieved routinely by using conventional constituents and normal mixing. This leads to examine the admixtures to improve the performance of the concrete. On the other side, cost of concrete is attributed to the cost of its ingredients which is scarce and expensive, this leading to usage of economically alternative materials in its production. This requirement is drawn the attention of investigators to explore new replacements of ingredients of concrete. The present paper focuses on investigating characteristics of M30 concrete with partial replacement of cement with Ground Granulated Blastfurnace Slag (GGBS and sand with the ROBO sand (crusher dust. The cubes and cylinders are tested for both compressive and tensile strengths. It is found that by the partial replacement of cement with GGBS and sand with ROBO sand helped in improving the strength of the concrete substantially compared tonormal mix concrete.

  19. Cluster analysis of radionuclide concentrations in beach sand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; James, I.; Jennings, P.J.; Keoyers, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a method in which natural radionuclide concentrations of beach sand minerals are traced along a stretch of coast by cluster analysis. This analysis yields two groups of mineral deposit with different origins. The method deviates from standard methods of following dispersal of rad

  20. Drilling deeper : the in situ oil sands report card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moorhouse, J.; Huot, M.; Dyer, S. [Pembina Institute, Drayton Valley, AB (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    In situ extraction techniques are increasingly being used to develop deep oil sands deposits in Alberta despite the fact that little is currently known about the potential impacts of the technology on the surrounding environment. This report presented an initial attempt to evaluate and compare the environmental performance of various in situ oil sands operations. Oil sands companies responded to surveys with questions related to the following 5 main categories: (1) general environmental management, (2) land, (3) air emissions, (4) water, and (5) climate change. The study showed that few projects have established reduction targets for air emissions, water use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that exceed government requirements. In situ projects emitted more GHGs and sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) than other mining technologies. Very few companies have invested in biodiversity offsets to compensate for the impacts of in situ developments. Only 2 companies have third party accredited environmental management systems for in site projects. The study also demonstrated that there is little publicly available data related to in site environmental performance. Companies must be encouraged to establish public reduction targets. Policies must be developed to mitigate the terrestrial impacts of in situ oil sands development. 124 refs., 18 tabs., 16 figs.

  1. Time-independent compaction behavior of quartz sands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzesowsky, R. H.; Spiers, C. J.; Peach, C. J.; Hangx, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Mechanisms such as grain rearrangement, coupled with elastic deformation and grain breakage, are believed to play an important role in the time-independent compaction of sands, controlling porosity and permeability reduction during burial of clastic sediments and during depletion of highly porous re

  2. Oil sands tailings : reclamation goals and the state of technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyndman, A. [Magnus Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Sobkowicz, J. [Thurber Engineering, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the challenges facing the oil sands industry regarding the management of fluid fine tails (FFT). Three main FFT treatment methods are being scaled up to commercial implementation, notably sand-mature fine tailings (MFT) mixture or consolidated tailings (CT); water-capped, in-pit lake disposal; and sand-capping and surface reclamation. Additional fines-dewatering methods are needed for MFT to gain sufficient geotechnical strength. MFT accumulation incurs substantial construction, technical-monitoring, and maintenance costs. The goals are to avoid the need for ongoing maintenance, to attain geotechnically stable landforms, and to establish self-sustaining land and water features. The challenges related to achieving geotechnical stability in the reclaimed landscape with respect to both in-pit and out-of-pit deposits were discussed. De-watering should allow MFT to develop strength at a rate sufficient to allow for timely capping and low compressibility to minimize post-closure settlement. The time frame for achieving sufficient de-watering is a critical parameter. The 3 fundamental approaches to remediating fine tailings include enriching sand with fines; separately treating MFT or Thickened Tailings (TT) to attain sufficient dewatering; and sequestering fines under water in a geotechnically secure pit. It was concluded that mine reclamation and closure plans will require a suite of reclamation methods that can be tailored to specific site conditions. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs.

  3. The Lot Sizing and Scheduling of Sand Casting Operations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Erwin; Velde, van de Steef

    2010-01-01

    We describe a real world case study that involves the monthly planning and scheduling of the sand-casting department in a metal foundry. The problem can be characterised as a single-level multi-item capacitated lot-sizing model with a variety of additional process-specific constraints. The main obje

  4. Geoenvironmental behavior of foundry sand amended mixtures for highway subbases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Yucel; Aydilek, Ahmet H; Demirkan, M Melih

    2006-01-01

    The high cost of landfilling and the potential uses of waste foundry sands have prompted research into their beneficial reuse. Roadways have a high potential for large volume usage of the foundry sands. A laboratory testing program was conducted on soil-foundry sand mixtures amended with cement and lime to assess their applicability as highway subbase materials. The mixtures were compacted in the laboratory at a variety of moisture contents and compactive efforts and subjected to unconfined compression, California bearing ratio, and hydraulic conductivity tests. The environmental suitability of the prepared mixtures was evaluated by analyzing the effluent collected during hydraulic conductivity tests. Finally, required subbase thicknesses were calculated using the laboratory-based strength parameters. The results of the study show that the strength of a mixture is highly dependent on the curing period, compactive energy, lime or cement presence, and water content at compaction. The resistance of foundry sand-based specimens to winter conditions is generally better than that of a typical subbase reference material. Laboratory leaching tests indicated that if these mixtures later come in contact with water that has been discharged directly to the environment (e.g., drainage through asphalt pavement), the quality of water will not be affected. PMID:16111882

  5. 1g Model Tests with Foundations in Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Clausen, Johan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a series 1g model tests with both a circular and a strip foundation on dense sand. The test results have been compared with the results from finite element calculations based on a non linear Mohr-Coulomb yield criterion taking into account the dependence...

  6. Interaction between graphene oxide nanoparticles and quartz sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotirelis, Nikolaos P.; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the influence of pH, ionic strength (IS), and temperature on graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles adsorption onto quartz sand were investigated. Batch experiments were conducted at three controlled temperatures (4, 12, and 25 °C) in solutions with different pH values (pH=4, 7, and 10), and ionic strengths (IS=1.4, 6.4, and 21.4 mM), under static and dynamic conditions. The surface properties of GO nanoparticles and quartz sand were evaluated by electrophoretic mobility measurements. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO), and extended-DLVO (XDLVO) potential energy profiles were constructed for the experimental conditions, using measured zeta potentials. The experimental results shown that GO nanoparticles were very stable under the experimental conditions. Both temperature and pH did not play a significant role in the adsorption of GO nanoparticles onto quartz sand. In contrast, IS was shown to influence adsorption. Increasing the IS, dramatically increased. The adsorption of GO particles onto quartz sand increased dramatically with increasing IS, mainly due to secondary-minimum deposition, as indicated by the XDLVO interaction energy profiles. Furthermore, the experimental data were fitted nicely with a Langmuir type sorption isotherm, and the adsorption kinetics were satisfactorily described with a pseudo-second-order model.

  7. Dependence of sand soil compressibility on soil physical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    I.S.Vakhrin; G.P.Kuzmin

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between soil physical properties and its compressibility has been analyzed. The formulae to determine soil density and porosity have been substantiated in compression tests. The regularity of changes in compressibility of thawed sand soils with various degrees of water content has been experimentally identified.

  8. Pyrolysis of Carbonaceous Foundry Sand Additives: Seacoal and Gilsonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacoal and gilsonite are used by the foundry industry as carbonaceous additives in green molding sands. In this study, pyrolysis was used to simulate the heating conditions that the carbonaceous additives would experience during metal casting. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to tent...

  9. Marketing opportunities and challenges for Canada's oil sands industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report demonstrated that effective marketing of Canadian oil sands products has been vital to the success of the industry in the past. Future success was expected to depend on having efficient transportation systems for the industry's products, unrestricted access to markets, and a range of products can competitively meet the needs of specific markets and customs. 9 ills

  10. Hydrostratigraphy of a Sand Aquifer from Combined ERT and GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitrios, K. S.; Ferris, G.; Bank, C.

    2015-12-01

    Overlapping resistivity and ground-penetrating radar transects were collected on a shallow sand aquifer. The study area covers about 150 by 150 m, and the water table depth in that area ranges from as shallow as 30 cm to over 2m. Electric resistivity tomography shows layers of resistances which we relate to the vadose zone (above 1200 Ohm.m), the saturated zone (approx. 300 Ohm.m), and underlying aquitard (above 1200 Ohm.m, made of glacial till). The resistivity sections fail to capture the topography of the sand-till boundary seen in collected radargrams (e.g., from 80 to 120 ns over a 30 m horizontal distance). Converting radar travel times to thickness of the aquifer requires knowledge of water table depth as well as radar velocity in both the saturated and unsaturated sands. Water table depth can be taken from resistivity pseudosections as well as local piezometers. Radar velocities can be estimated based on the properties of the local sand and assuming 100% saturation. In merging the results from the two datasets we are able to map local hydrostratigraphy and aquifer geometry.

  11. The field enhancement factor of sand-blasted electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson; Vibholm (fratrådt), Svend

    1992-01-01

    A sample of six sand-blasted electrodes has been subjected to both mechanical and electrical investigations. When the surfaces of a series of conductors are mechanically treated, the resultant microscopic surface geometries will be similar, but not identical. As a consequence of this spread in the...

  12. Identifying and dating buried micropodzols in Subatlantic polycyclic drift sands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Wallinga; J.M. van Mourik; M.L.M. Schilder

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic soil sequences provide valuable archives of alternating unstable periods (sand drifting) and stable periods (soil formation) in NW-European coversand landscapes during the Subatlantic. Here we study six polycyclic soil sequences at the Weerterbergen (The Netherlands) to investigate how to

  13. Sand fly evolution and its relationship to Leishmania transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PD Ready

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary relationships of sand flies and Leishmania are discussed in this report, which draws distinctions between co-association, co-evolution and co-speciation (or co-cladogenesis. Examples focus on Phlebotomus vectors of Le. infantum and Le. major in the Mediterranean subregion.

  14. Sampling strategies for phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alten, B; Ozbel, Y; Ergunay, K; Kasap, O E; Cull, B; Antoniou, M; Velo, E; Prudhomme, J; Molina, R; Bañuls, A-L; Schaffner, F; Hendrickx, G; Van Bortel, W; Medlock, J M

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of phlebotomine sand flies is widely reported to be changing in Europe. This can be attributed to either the discovery of sand flies in areas where they were previously overlooked (generally following an outbreak of leishmaniasis or other sand fly-related disease) or to true expansion of their range as a result of climatic or environmental changes. Routine surveillance for phlebotomines in Europe is localized, and often one of the challenges for entomologists working in non-leishmaniasis endemic countries is the lack of knowledge on how to conduct, plan and execute sampling for phlebotomines, or how to adapt on-going sampling strategies for other haematophagous diptera. This review brings together published and unpublished expert knowledge on sampling strategies for European phlebotomines of public health concern in order to provide practical advice on: how to conduct surveys; the collection and interpretation of field data; suitable techniques for the preservation of specimens obtained by different sampling methods; molecular techniques used for species identification; and the pathogens associated with sand flies and their detection methods.

  15. Second quarter technical progress report for Thermally Modified Sand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-14

    The objective was to have the Alaska Department of Transportation & Public Facilities Operation & Maintenance Section use Thermally Modified Sand (TMS) for treatment of icy state roadways. The project included the evaluation on the workability of a large stockpile of TMS material left undisturbed throughout the 1993/94 winter season.

  16. Effects of sand burial on dune plants:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Qu; HaLin Zhao; RuiLian Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Burial of different growth stages of plants (e.g., adult plants, seedlings and seeds) is frequent in dune ecosystems. The soil micro-environment, which differs from surface conditions, influences the survival and growth of dune plants. To sum up knowledge about the survival mechanisms of plants under sand burial and to promote practical rehabilitation of dune vegetation, we reviewed relevant published literature and concluded that:(1) Focus in recent years has been on impacts of sand burial on seed germination and seedling emergence. Generally, shallow burial increased seed germination and seed-ling emergence, but deeper burial was negative. Buried at the same depth, large seeds showed higher germination and seedling emergence rates, attributed to larger energy reserves. (2) Survival, growth and reproduction rates of dune plants show plasticity in response to sand burial. Long-term deep burial is fatal because it creates a physical barrier which overcomes the vertical growth of plants, reduces photosynthetic leaf area, and limits oxygen availability to roots. Modest burial, on the other hand, is advantageous for growth and reproduction of many dune plants, due to protection from ex-cessive temperature and drought. (3) There are few reports concerning effects of sand burial on plant physiology, but a limited number of studies indicate that partial burial increases water use efficiency, chlorophyll content, transpiration rate and net photosynthetic rates. The antioxidant protective enzyme system and osmolyte balance were reported to be involved in the mechanisms of dune plant resistance to burial.

  17. Drained True Triaxial Tests on Aalborg University Sand No 0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praastrup, U.

    The paper presents the first series of true triaxial tests carried out on air-pluviated unfrozen and frozen specimens of Aalborg University Sand No O. The specimens have been tested in the newly improved version of the Danish rigid boundary true triaxial apparatus to optimise the preparation and ...

  18. Aeolian sediment flux derived from a natural sand trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van der A.J.; Wijnberg, K.M.

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, a mega-nourishment (the ‘Sand Motor’) was constructed along the Dutch Coast. Since it is a pilot project, its evolution is closely monitored. This paper presents first results on the temporal variation in aeolian sediment transport across the nourishment, based on (a) the rate of infill ove

  19. Pilot Study on Carbon-sand Filter for Sedimentation Effluent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of dual function of integrating with activated carbon adsorption and quartz sand filtration in the carbon-sand filter can collaboratively remove organic matters and turbidity and also protect the bio-security, and the pilot test is carried out to optimize the process parameters. The pilot test results show that the thickness of the filter materials is preferably 1,300mm of the activated carbon, 500mm of uniform quartz sand; filtration rate can be 8-12m/h; filter cycle is 24-48h; when the water temperature is 21°C to 29°C, the biofilm formation period in the carbon-sand filter is 15 to 20 days; removal of the organic matters and nitrogen runs through the entire filter bed, and the nitrite is mainly oxidized on the upper side; when the operation is mature, the layer of filter materials can form the biofilm and zoogloea, with the dual function of micro-biological degradation and activated carbon adsorption.

  20. A Scientific World in a Grain of Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2011-01-01

    Students investigate local sand samples on a shoestring budget. This investigation reveals a fascinating Earth history that can address various interdisciplinary scientific topics, provide rich inquiry experiences, and move beyond the science classroom to integrate history, culture, and art. (Contains 3 figures and 14 online resources.)