WorldWideScience

Sample records for bite mark injuries

  1. Bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischman, Stuart L

    2002-12-01

    A simple and practical method for the evaluation of bite mark evidence has been described. There are many other methods, some quite complicated, using overlays, computer analysis and mathematical formulae. This author prefers to adhere to the "KISS principle: "Keep It Simple, Stupid." A jury is generally more willing to accept the positioning of a study model on a one-to-one life-size photograph rather than be led through a complicated analytical procedure. If the juror can hold the model and photograph in his/her hand and see that the teeth and bite mark match (or do not match), data summation can be much more direct. Numerous publications describe more complex matching procedures should circumstances warrant.

  2. Are they dermatological lesions, bottle top burns or bite mark injuries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratna, Jayanie B

    2014-07-01

    Bite marks can be considered as a patterned injury where identification of the causative tool will lead to the identification of the perpetrator. When patterned injuries resembling bite marks are seen on the victim or an assailant of a potential crime, all efforts must be made to carry out an immediate and proper investigation. The classical human bite mark pattern will appear as an oval or circular injury. However there are several dermatological lesions which can be misinterpreted or confused with bite marks. Similarly scars left as a result of contact with hot objects can sometimes bear a resemblance to bite marks. To the untrained eye, identification of bite mark injuries is not an easy task. Since bite marks are common in cases of child abuse and neglect, it is recommended that dental surgeons with forensic background become members of the child abuse and neglect management teams. During investigation of bite marks in alleged cases of child abuse and neglect, it is imperative to compare the injury with dentition of all the persons who have direct access to the child including siblings and playmates. Information revealed through the forensic analysis of bite marks not only helps in the criminal investigation but also in the clinical management of the persons concern.

  3. [Identification from bite marks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, P

    1980-02-01

    Criteria to be considered for establishing the guilt or innocence of a possible offender on the basis of bite marks on the skin of the murder victim were presented using four analyses of bite marks on murder victims. The bite marks must be identifiable; a clear 1:1 photograph should be made which is then compared with impression of a model of the suspect's bite. These impressions are made with graphite on, for example, the surface of a balloon or modelling clay. The evidence provided by a distinct bite mark is almost as conclusive as a fingerprint. Using only the bite mark photographs, the forensic-stomatologic evaluation influenced the course of argumentation in the legal proceedings of three of the four cases discussed; the evaluation was central for the proceedings in one case.

  4. Bite Mark Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    SK Padmakumar; VT Beena; N Salmanulfaris; Ashith B Acharya; G Indu; Sajai J Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Bite mark analysis plays an important role in personal identi- fi cation in forensic odontology. They are commonly seen in violent crimes such as sexual assaults, homicides, child abuse, etc. Human bites are common on the face and are usually seen on prominent locations of the face such as the ears, nose and lips. Individual characteristics recorded in the bite marks such as fractures, rotations, attrition, and congenital malformations are helpful in identifying the in...

  5. Principles of forensic dentistry: 2. Non-accidental injury, bite marks and archaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, D K

    1990-11-01

    From time to time the general dental practitioner may become involved in forensic cases, when he or she will need to be aware of the general principles involved and the increasing variety of modern techniques available. This two-part article reviews those principles and techniques. In Part 1 the principal procedures used in identifying bodies were discussed. Part 2 now reviews the role of the forensic dentist with respect to non-accidental injury to children, analysis of bite marks, and archaeological investigations.

  6. Forensic dentistry and human bite marks: issues for doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Iain A; Hall, Rachel C

    2002-08-01

    The human dentition can be used as a weapon of attack or defence. Bite mark injuries are common in cases of sexual assault, child abuse and homicide. Many bite injuries are first seen in casualty departments where quick and proper recovery of evidence can assist in analysing these injuries. This article describes different bite injuries, collection of evidence and comparative analysis methods.

  7. Analysis and identification of bite marks in forensic casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sandeep; Krishan, Kewal; Chatterjee, Preetika M; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of bite marks plays an important role in personal identification in forensic casework. Bite marks can be recorded in violent crimes such as sexual offences, homicides, child abuse cases, and during sports events. The arrangement, size and alignment of human teeth are individualistic to each person. Teeth, acting as tools leave recognizable marks depending on tooth arrangement, malocclusion, habits, occupation, tooth fracture, and missing or extra teeth. Bite mark identification is based on the individuality of a dentition, which is used to match a bite mark to a suspect. Bite marks are often considered as valuable alternative to fingerprinting and DNA identification in forensic examinations. The present review describes the classification, characteristics, mechanism of production, and appearance of bite mark injuries, collection of evidence, comparison techniques, and technical aids in the analysis of the bite marks.

  8. Bite mark analysis in forensic routine case work

    OpenAIRE

    Lessig, R.; Weber, M.; Wenzel, V.

    2006-01-01

    The individuality of the human dentition frequently allows the Forensic Odonto-Stomatologist (FOS) to reach a strong opinion of association in cases of identification and bite mark analy-sis. Such analysis can often be useful during the investigation of violent crimes, especially those involving sexual assault. Bites from animals are rarely the object of bite mark analysis. The teeth of animals leave patterned injuries that appear quite different from those created by human teeth. This is esp...

  9. Is current bite mark analysis a misnomer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J G; Blackwell, S A

    2010-09-10

    Four human-to-human bite mark cases in which forensic odontological opinion was found to be in error, or at best deeply divided between experts, are described. These are used to illustrate that there is a growing awareness on the part of the legal profession that bite mark opinions by experts may often be little more than that and that these opinions often cannot be substantiated given the paucity of rigorous scientific evaluation, and will therefore be increasingly challenged. This may not best serve justice and so it is argued that forensic odontology needs to bring more scientific rigour to the evaluation of bite marks. This may threaten to disenfranchise some of the current practitioners and there may be some resistance to change. Forensic odontology is not the only identification science facing such problems, but nevertheless a paradigm shift is predicted in the way bite mark evidence will have to be gathered and evaluated in the future. Some new scientific approaches are described that strive to unravel some of the most basic problems confronting our profession when we attempt to make morphometric comparisons between injuries and the dentition of the biter. A need to capture the actions and consequences of biting in 3D dimensions and simultaneously in real-time is proposed as a path of investigation highly likely to bring some clarity to a confused situation. There is also an urgent need for the ongoing controversy between some of our eminent peers relating to the assumed uniqueness, or otherwise, of the human anterior dentition to be resolved. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Forensic odontology, part 4. Human bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, J

    2011-04-23

    The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of bite mark analysis: its usefulness and limitations. The study and analysis of such injuries is challenging and complex. The correct protocols for collection, management, preservation, analysis and interpretation of this evidence should be employed if useful information is to be obtained for the courts. It is now possible, with advances in digital technology, to produce more accurate and reproducible comparison techniques which go some way to preventing and reducing problems such as photographic distortions. Research needs to be continued to increase our knowledge of the behaviour of skin when bitten. However, when presented with a high quality bite mark showing good dental detail, and a limited, accessible number of potential biters, it can be extremely useful in establishing a link between the bitten person and the biter or excluding the innocent.

  11. A general review of bite-mark evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, J

    1981-03-01

    Bite-mark evidence has been used as an aid in the identification of criminals in many instances. The author, a forensic odontologist in Liverpool, England, during his lifetime, personally investigated the cases presented which include instances of rape and battery. It is shown how perpetrators of violent injuries were detected from bite marks on the victim or the perpetrator, or on foodstuffs found at the scene of the crime, when the marks were compared to dental impressions taken subsequently.

  12. Evaluation and treatment of patients with human bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M H; Roenigk, H H; Smith, E S; Pierce, L J

    1989-06-01

    Physicians and other health care workers who care for patients who have sustained human bite marks need a working protocol to ensure that these patients receive proper care. This protocol involves taking a thorough history and performing a physical examination, approximately determining the bite mark age, and administering proper therapy. The history will help to determine whether a criminal act has been committed and which agencies need to be notified. The American Board of Forensic Odontology published criteria for bite mark analysis in 1984 that included a description of the bite mark including its size, shape, and color, along with techniques for collection of evidence from both the victim and suspect. To determine bite mark age, tissue response to injury (inflammation, granulation tissue formation, and matrix formation and remodeling) is reviewed. Finally, the bacteria that are found in these wounds and the proper use of antimicrobial agents are expanded upon.

  13. Methods for the Analysis of Human Bite Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naru, A S

    1997-12-01

    The comparison of features within a bite mark injury with the dentition of a suspect may be required during the course of a criminal investigation. A review of the literature regarding bite mark analysis has been undertaken to determine the value of this evidence. Bite marks in skin are complex injuries consisting of abrasions, lacerations, and contusions, caused by the crushing action of the teeth and related structures. Front-line investigators need to recognize and interpret these features, but no standard method of information collection or comparison has been agreed. Many classifications of bite mark types have been proposed, but do not appear to aid mark analysis. Investigations of bite strengths and sucking forces have been inconclusive. Insufficient information exists as to the accuracy and reproducibility of the representation of the dentition by tissue pathology. Histological analysis and collagen staining techniques have attempted to define the area of injury in detail, but have limited application. The quality of the mark is determined by numerous intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Distortion and shrinkage of the tissues introduce dimensional disturbances that require elimination before a comparison can be undertaken. No method exists to quantify and correct these distortions. The investigator must be aware that self-inflicted marks often occur among children and that other events may replicate bite mark injuries. The most common bite mark comparison methods employ an intermediate template produced from the suspect dentition that, when overlaid onto a scale photograph of the injury, demonstrates correspondence. No agreement exists regarding the individuality of human dentition, minimum level of correspondence required to positively identify the assailant, and the accuracy to which tissue pathology can represent these details. It is concluded that bite mark comparison can only exclude a suspect and should not be used for positive identification. Copyright

  14. The Evidentiary Value of Bite Mark Analysis in Criminal Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail H. Al-Amad

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the comparison between a bite mark injury and a suspect’s teeth was considered evidence linking the suspect to the victim. However, in recent years, many convictions were re-assessed by a legal initiative in the United States called the “Innocence Project”. The outcome of this project was the exoneration of many wrongfully convicted inmates. Some of those exonerations were of prisoners who had been convicted based on bite mark evidence. Consequently, the admissibility and evidentiary value of bite mark evidence came under profound scrutiny. On the other hand, proponents of bite mark evidence advocate the use of bite mark evidence in courts as an evidence of approximation, rather than conclusion. This paper will discuss the genesis and history of bite mark evidence, as well as the modern analysis of bite marks that is based on metric and non-metric digital assessment. The evidentiary value of bite  marks and the weight they should carry in today’s courts will be discussed.

  15. The Evidentiary Value of Bite Mark Analysis in Criminal Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Suhail H. Al-Amad

    2016-01-01

    For decades, the comparison between a bite mark injury and a suspect’s teeth was considered evidence linking the suspect to the victim. However, in recent years, many convictions were re-assessed by a legal initiative in the United States called the “Innocence Project”. The outcome of this project was the exoneration of many wrongfully convicted inmates. Some of those exonerations were of prisoners who had been convicted based on bite mark evidence. Consequently, the admissibility and evident...

  16. Court presentation of bite mark evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinnan, A J; Melton, M J

    1985-12-01

    The uniqueness of an individual's bite mark is generally accepted. The use of bite mark analysis to identify or exclude those suspected of crimes is now a well established activity in forensic dentistry. Although the techniques for evaluating bite mark evidence are extremely sophisticated, it is important that the courtroom presentation of such evidence should be as simple as possible and be directed towards those who must judge it. Dentists likely to be involved in the courtroom presentation of bite mark evidence should: be certain that their local law enforcement personnel are frequently updated on the techniques to be used for producing the optimum evidence needed to evaluate bite marks; become acquainted with the current techniques of evaluating bite mark evidence and understand their difficulties and pitfalls; meet with the lawyers (prosecution or defence) before a courtroom appearance, briefing them on the significance of the particular findings; prepare clear and easily understandable visual aids to present to the court the techniques used in the analysis and the bases for the conclusion reached; and offer conclusions derived from the bite mark investigation.

  17. Bite-marks on battered children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trube-Becker, E

    1977-01-21

    Instances of human bites are generally rare, although it does sometimes occur that people use their teeth as a means of attack of defence. When looking into cases of the ill-treatment of children we often find bite-marks in addition to other signs of abusement. Eleven cases from the Institute of Forensic Medicine at Düsseldorf University are presented out of a total of 48 cases of ill-treatment of children followed by death in which human bite-marks as well as other haematomas on the victims could be proved. In all cases the cause of death was a subdural haematoma. All but three of the offenders were female, and all were young and subject to excess stress so that the act could eventually be regarded as the result of a disintegration of emotional status. The combination of bite-marks with haematomas and other signs of ill-treatment support with sufficient certainty the conclusion that a criminal action of a third person is involved.

  18. Bite marks on skin and clay: A comparative analysis

    OpenAIRE

    R.K. Gorea; O.P. Jasuja; Abdulwahab Ali Abuderman; Abhinav Gorea

    2014-01-01

    Bite marks are always unique because teeth are distinctive. Bite marks are often observed at the crime scene in sexual and in physical assault cases on the skin of the victims and sometimes on edible leftovers in burglary cases. This piece of evidence is often ignored, but if properly harvested and investigated, bite marks may prove useful in apprehending and successfully prosecuting the criminals. Due to the importance of bite marks, we conducted a progressive randomised experimental study c...

  19. Bite marks on skin and clay: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Gorea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bite marks are always unique because teeth are distinctive. Bite marks are often observed at the crime scene in sexual and in physical assault cases on the skin of the victims and sometimes on edible leftovers in burglary cases. This piece of evidence is often ignored, but if properly harvested and investigated, bite marks may prove useful in apprehending and successfully prosecuting the criminals. Due to the importance of bite marks, we conducted a progressive randomised experimental study conducted on volunteers. A total of 188 bite marks on clay were studied. Based on these findings, 93.34% of the volunteers could be identified from the bite marks on the clay. In addition, 201 impressions on skin were studied, and out of these cases, 41.01% of the same volunteers could be identified based on the bite mark impressions on the skin.

  20. Recognition of bite marks in child abuse cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, S A

    1994-01-01

    Health professionals must be attentive to any and all signs of child maltreatment. Bite marks are one of several visual expressions of active child abuse. The efforts of forensic odontologists, in conjunction with recent technical advancements in bite mark analysis, support the uniqueness of the human dentition and have contributed to the conviction of numerous child abusers. Through recognition, proper documentation, and reporting dentists can help the forensic community use bite marks to solve cases of child maltreatment.

  1. Heridas por Mordedura / Bites Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coturel A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Injuries for animal bites are a common cause of consultation to emergency services. However there are still controversies about some aspects of their treatment. It is not recommended to brush the wound area but to flush the surface with isoosmolar saline. The primary wound closure is justified when improves the cosmetic outcome and has no increase risk of infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is allways indicated in cats or humans bites. The drug of choice is amoxicillin clavulanate.The tetanus vaccine should be indicated when the patient has not full vaccination scheme and rabies vaccine in cases of suspected or confirmed infected animals.

  2. Identification of a person with the help of bite mark analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anoop K.; Kumar, Sachil; Bhattacharya, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Background Forensic dentistry is an essential part of Forensic science, mainly involves the identification of an assailant by comparing a record of their dentition (set of teeth) with a record of a bite mark left on a victim. Other uses in law for dentists include the identification of human remains, medico-legal assessment of trauma to oral tissues, and testimony about dental malpractice. While the practice of human identification is well established, validated and proven to be accurate, the practice of bite mark analysis is less well accepted. The principle of identifying an injury as a bite mark is complex and, depending on severity and anatomical location, highly subjective. Following the identification of an injury as a bite mark, the comparison of the pattern produced to a suspect's dentition is even more contentious and an area of great debate within contemporary odontological practice. Like fingerprints and DNA, bite marks are unique to an individual – such as distance and angles between teeth, missing teeth, fillings and dental work. This type of impression evidence can be left in the skin of a victim and also can be in food, chewing gum and other miscellaneous items such as pens and pencils. The advent of DNA analysis and its recovery from bite marks has offered an objective method of bite mark analysis. PMID:25737891

  3. Acquaintance of bite mark identification procedures in Forensic Odontology

    OpenAIRE

    Yuti Malinda; Dewi Zakiawati

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Bite mark analysis casework strives to connect a biter to the teeth pattern present on the object linked in some way to crime or event. This analysis requiring an immediate response by the forensic odontologist since the marks fade rapidly in the living and the dead in a matter of hours. The aim of this article is to help the dentist to know and understand the procedures of bite mark identification in forensic odontology field. Literature review: Bite marks may be present th...

  4. Microbial analysis of bite marks by sequence comparison of streptococcal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darnell M Kennedy

    Full Text Available Bite mark injuries often feature in violent crimes. Conventional morphometric methods for the forensic analysis of bite marks involve elements of subjective interpretation that threaten the credibility of this field. Human DNA recovered from bite marks has the highest evidentiary value, however recovery can be compromised by salivary components. This study assessed the feasibility of matching bacterial DNA sequences amplified from experimental bite marks to those obtained from the teeth responsible, with the aim of evaluating the capability of three genomic regions of streptococcal DNA to discriminate between participant samples. Bite mark and teeth swabs were collected from 16 participants. Bacterial DNA was extracted to provide the template for PCR primers specific for streptococcal 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS and RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB. High throughput sequencing (GS FLX 454, followed by stringent quality filtering, generated reads from bite marks for comparison to those generated from teeth samples. For all three regions, the greatest overlaps of identical reads were between bite mark samples and the corresponding teeth samples. The average proportions of reads identical between bite mark and corresponding teeth samples were 0.31, 0.41 and 0.31, and for non-corresponding samples were 0.11, 0.20 and 0.016, for 16S rRNA, ITS and rpoB, respectively. The probabilities of correctly distinguishing matching and non-matching teeth samples were 0.92 for ITS, 0.99 for 16S rRNA and 1.0 for rpoB. These findings strongly support the tenet that bacterial DNA amplified from bite marks and teeth can provide corroborating information in the identification of assailants.

  5. Effects of skin elasticity on bite mark distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cheri; Marroquin, Leonor A

    2015-12-01

    Bite marks have been reported to have an evidentiary value similar to fingerprints. We believed bite mark distortion would impact the accuracy and reliability of bite mark interpretation. Inked denture-stamps were substituted for actual bite marks and were placed onto 40 participating volunteers' shoulders. Four changes in arm position were photographed using an ABFO #2 reference scale. The measurements of individual tooth widths and intercanine distances in each position were compared. The maximum tooth width distortion observed was 53.8%, whereas the maximum intercanine distance distortion was 41.9%. Distortion was found to increase with age and weight and was non-uniform across a dental arch. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Two bite mark cases with inadequate scale references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, M L

    1985-07-01

    Most literature addressing comparisons between epidermal bite marks and the perpetrator's bite pattern mandates fastidious coordination between the size of the compared reproductions. While ideal, this is not possible in every case and inability to control this variable in selected cases may not necessarily invalidate the comparison. The first case involves a known perpetrator. All photographic measurements were recorded with acceptable techniques to discover a serious discrepancy in arch size. The second case was degraded by the absence of a ruler in a tangentially made photograph of a bite mark. In both cases, the weight of the conclusions were lessened by these problems but the impartial handling of the evidence and explanation of discrepancies offered credibility to the analyses. Both cases illustrate that a technical infraction in processing and recording bite marks, though serious, need not automatically preempt the analysis.

  7. Bite Injuries to the Hand - Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Pradyumna; Khan, Wasim; Haddad, Behrooz; Mahapatra, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Patients presenting to the emergency department with bite injuries to the hand sustain them through a number of causes including domesticated as well as stray animal bites, and human bites commonly sustained as a result of violence. The nature of the injuries sustained can be very deceptive. A small tooth mark on the exterior can be a fulminant infection in the tissues deeper down. Tendon injuries, fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges and management of the wound are critical issues faced by a surgeon in dealing with such patients. Similarly the less common bite injuries to the hand, often with disastrous and sometimes fatal complications, do also present to the emergency department. A high incidence of suspicion is needed in dealing with these injuries effectively. In our article we discuss the common as well as uncommon causes of bite injuries to the hand and their management. In addition to reviewing the literature to ascertain the management of such injuries, we also discuss interesting and rare case reports. PMID:25097675

  8. An integrated technique for the analysis of skin bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, Herman; Owen, Johanna H; van Heerden, Willie F P; Solheim, Tore

    2008-01-01

    The high number of murder, rape, and child abuse cases in South Africa has led to increased numbers of bite mark cases being heard in high courts. Objective analysis to match perpetrators to bite marks at crime scenes must be able to withstand vigorous cross-examination to be of value in conviction of perpetrators. An analysis technique is described in four stages, namely determination of the mark to be a human bite mark, pattern association analysis, metric analysis and comparison with the population data, and illustrated by a real case study. New and accepted techniques are combined to determine the likelihood ratio of guilt expressed as one of a range of conclusions described in the paper. Each stage of the analysis adds to the confirmation (or rejection) of concordance between the dental features present on the victim and the dentition of the suspect. The results illustrate identification to a high degree of certainty.

  9. Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamede, Rodrigo K; McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna

    2013-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil is threatened with extinction by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a unique infectious cancer in which the tumour cells themselves, which derive from a single long-dead host devil, are the infective agent and the tumour is an infectious parasitic cell line. Transmission is thought to occur via direct inoculation of tumour cells when susceptible and infected individuals bite each other or by fomitic transfer of tumour cells. The nature of transmission and the extent to which biting behaviour and devil ecology is associated with infection risk remains unclear. Until our recent study in north-west Tasmania showed reduced population and individual impacts, DFTD had caused massive population declines in all populations monitored. In this paper, we investigate seasonal patterns of injuries resulting from bites between individuals, DFTD infection status and tumour location in two populations to determine whether the number of bites predicts the acquisition of DFTD and to explore the possibility that the reduced impacts of DFTD in north-west Tasmania are attributed to reduced bite rates. Devils with fewer bites were more likely to develop DFTD and primary tumours occurred predominantly inside the oral cavity. These results are not consistent with transmission occurring from the biter to the bitten animal but suggest that dominant individuals delivering bites, possibly by biting the tumours of other devils, are at higher risk of acquiring infection than submissive individuals receiving bites. Bite rates, which were higher during autumn and winter, did not differ between sites, suggesting that the reduced population impacts in north-west Tasmania cannot be explained by lower bite rates. Our study emphasizes the importance of longitudinal studies of individually marked animals for understanding the ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and parasites in wild populations. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2012 British

  10. The examination and identification of bite marks in foods using 3D scanning and 3D comparison methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naether, Silvio; Buck, Ursula; Campana, Lorenzo; Breitbeck, Robert; Thali, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bite mark analysis offers the opportunity to identify the biter based on the individual characteristics of the dentitions. Normally, the main focus is on analysing bite mark injuries on human bodies, but also, bite marks in food may play an important role in the forensic investigation of a crime. This study presents a comparison of simulated bite marks in different kinds of food with the dentitions of the presumed biter. Bite marks were produced by six adults in slices of buttered bread, apples, different kinds of Swiss chocolate and Swiss cheese. The time-lapse influence of the bite mark in food, under room temperature conditions, was also examined. For the documentation of the bite marks and the dentitions of the biters, 3D optical surface scanning technology was used. The comparison was performed using two different software packages: the ATOS modelling and analysing software and the 3D studio max animation software. The ATOS software enables an automatic computation of the deviation between the two meshes. In the present study, the bite marks and the dentitions were compared, as well as the meshes of each bite mark which were recorded in the different stages of time lapse. In the 3D studio max software, the act of biting was animated to compare the dentitions with the bite mark. The examined food recorded the individual characteristics of the dentitions very well. In all cases, the biter could be identified, and the dentitions of the other presumed biters could be excluded. The influence of the time lapse on the food depends on the kind of food and is shown on the diagrams. However, the identification of the biter could still be performed after a period of time, based on the recorded individual characteristics of the dentitions.

  11. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kashyap, Bina; Anand, Sanjeev; Reddy, Sudhakara; Sahukar, Shruthi Basavaradhya; Supriya, Naga; Pasupuleti, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog) bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. Aim: To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog) using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontolog...

  12. Bite injuries at Bugando Medical Centre, Mwanza, Tanzania: A five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bite injuries constitute a continuing challenge to trauma or general surgeons practicing in developing countries. Little work has been done on bite injuries in our setting. This study describes our experience in the management of bite injuries, outlining the etiological spectrum, injury patterns and results of ...

  13. Role of bite mark characteristics and localizations in finding an assailant

    OpenAIRE

    Afsin, Huseyin; Karadayi, Beytullah; Cagdir, Sadi A.; Ozaslan, Abdi

    2014-01-01

    The location, size, and number of bite marks can be used as a beneficial indicator of the crime type and feasible group of suspects. This study aims to present information about the bite mark locations, the bite mark characteristics, and the perpetrator′s profile based on three cases which were carried out by the same biter. The attack bites, which observed in all of the three cases, were characterized by serious wounds and tissue loss. Analysis of bite mark characteristics and bite mark loca...

  14. A suggested classification of bite marks in foodstuffs in forensic dental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, G

    1982-01-01

    Bite marks have been reported in flesh, foodstuffs and inanimate objects. Those in foodstuffs occur widely in cases of larceny but also occur in serious crimes such as murder. Evaluation of distinctive characteristics in food bites differs from the corresponding assessment of flesh bite marks in that the assessment is made on the impression made by the labial aspect of the teeth and not on the biting edge, because the teeth penetrate the bitten foods to different depths. The terminology used to describe food bite marks is very varied and a classification of food bites has been formulated in an effort to bring a degree of uniformity to the analysis of such marks.

  15. [Bite mark analysis. Part 1. Methods and overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Valck, E

    1995-06-01

    Criminal cases in which a suspect or a victim has left his or her teeth marks on another person or on an inanimate object such as a candy bar, an apple, cheese or even a beer can seem to occur more frequently. Testifying to the similarity or dissimilarity of a suspect's dentition to the bite mark in question is probably the most unique contribution that forensic dentistry makes to the judicial inquiry. This is a grave responsibility because a defendant's life or freedom may depend on the testimony given by the forensic odontologist in court.

  16. Computer-based production of comparison overlays from 3D-scanned dental casts for bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-de las Heras, Stella; Valenzuela, Aurora; Ogayar, Carlos; Valverde, A Javier; Torres, Juan Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Bite mark analysis assumes the uniqueness of the dentition can be accurately recorded on skin or an object. However, biting is a dynamic procedure involving three moving systems, the maxilla, the mandible, and the victim's reaction. Moreover, bite marks can be distorted by the anatomic location of the injury or the elasticity of the skin tissue. Therefore, the same dentition can produce bite marks that exhibit variations in appearance. The complexity of this source of evidence emphasizes the need for new 3D imaging technologies in bite mark analysis. This article presents a new software package, DentalPrint (2004, University of Granada, Department of Forensic Medicine and Forensic Odontology, Granada, Spain) that generates different comparison overlays from 3D dental cast images depending on the pressure of the bite or the distortion caused by victim-biter interaction. The procedure for generating comparison overlays is entirely automatic, thus avoiding observer bias. Moreover, the software presented here makes it impossible for third parties to manipulate or alter the 3D images, making DentalPrint suitable for bite mark analyses to be used in court proceedings.

  17. An examination of the psychological aspects of bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, R A

    1984-03-01

    The intent of this paper is to present some psychological threads which appear to be operative for the perpetrator of bite marks. In the catalogue of multiple motivations, there appears to be a current theme of power, control, potency, and the attempt to have a psychological symbolization of the perpetrator's omniscient capacity for absorbing life essences. In an examination of these highly complex needs, the modern perpetrator appears to act out consistently with cultural biases coupled with immediate psychological needs which have pressed for expression. Due to a pattern of psychologically expressed ritualism, the perpetrator will often inadvertently leave important psychological clues at the crime scene. The attack style, mode of death, characteristics of the victim, etc.--these components reveal the information on the type of psychological needs that the perpetrator is trying to satisfy. In the cases of bite marks associated with violent crime, it becomes crucial to an "investigator" what type of personality characteristics are welded together to form this kind of need complex. After reviewing cases reported in the literature and after conducting psychological interviews with perpetrators, three major groups of perpetrators seem to be apparent. The first group is motivated out of an anger track, the second group is motivated out of sadistic biting, and the third is out of the more traditional "cannibal complex" motif.

  18. Injurious tail biting in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Eath, R.B.; Amott, G.; Turner, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible...... and prevention of tail damage. However, there is a lack of scientific studies on how best to respond to outbreaks: the effectiveness of, for example, removing biters and/or bitten pigs, increasing enrichment, or applying substances to tails should be investigated. Finally, some breeding companies are exploring...

  19. The use of videotape to demonstrate the dynamics of bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M H; Frair, J

    1989-01-01

    Traditionally, bite mark photographs have been used to study statically a dynamic event. With the advent of the compact video camcorder, odontologists can now document bite marks on video tape and, in some instances, with the model of the suspect's dentition, may be able to record the dynamics of a bite on human flesh. A review of two cases and equipment used is discussed.

  20. Role of bite mark characteristics and localizations in finding an assailant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsin, Huseyin; Karadayi, Beytullah; Cagdir, Sadi A; Ozaslan, Abdi

    2014-09-01

    The location, size, and number of bite marks can be used as a beneficial indicator of the crime type and feasible group of suspects. This study aims to present information about the bite mark locations, the bite mark characteristics, and the perpetrator's profile based on three cases which were carried out by the same biter. The attack bites, which observed in all of the three cases, were characterized by serious wounds and tissue loss. Analysis of bite mark characteristics and bite mark localizations of these three cases by the relevant experts provided helpful information for the police units which searched for the assailant. But, in order to conduct criminal profiling from bite marks objectively, the number of case series is advised to be expanded.

  1. Quantitative forensic evaluation of bite marks with the aid of a shape analysis computer program: Part 2; "SCIP" and bite marks in skin and foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, P; Bridges, T E; Brown, K A

    1995-12-01

    In a previous paper 1, we have shown that the use of an interactive shape analysis computer program ("SCIP") and the derivation of a quantitative Similarity Index 1 greatly facilitated the comparison of experimental flat wax bite marks with the dentition of various 'suspects' and the identification of the agent producing the bite. In this study, "SCIP" was employed in an attempt to quantify the comparison, in the form of the Similarity Index (S.I.), between the "offender's" teeth and the bite marks produced on foodstuffs and on human skin, under experimental conditions. The use of "SCIP" and the S.I. is recommended as a routine means of eliminating suspects in bite mark cases. If a reasonable number of reference points have been registered in the bitten material and particularly if the perpetrator has any unusual features in the anterior dentition, the matching of the bite mark with the actual offender is a possibility with this method.

  2. Quantitative forensic evaluation of bite marks with the aid of a shape analysis computer program: Part 2; 'SCIP' and bite marks in skin and foodstuffs

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, P.; Bridges, T. E.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    In a previous paper, we have shown that the use of an interactive shape analysis computer program ('SCIP') and the derivation of a quantitative Similarity Index greatly facilitated the comparison of experimental flat wax bite marks with the dentition of various 'suspects' and the identification of the agent producing the bite. In this study, 'SCIP' was employed in an attempt to quantify the comparison, in the form of the Similarity Index (S.I.), between the 'offender's' teeth and the bite mar...

  3. Snake-bite-induced Acute Kidney Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients presenting to a tertiary care kidney center, developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after snake-bite. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Nephrology Department, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT), Karachi, from January 1990 to December 2014. Methodology: All patients coming to SIUT identified as having AKI after snake-bite during the study period were included. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria with sudden rise in creatinine or decline in urine output or both. Demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory profile, and final outcome was noted. Result: During the studied period, 115 cases of AKI, secondary to snake-bite, were registered at this institution. Median age of patients was 35.92 ±15.04 (range: 6 - 70) years and male to female ratio was 1.6:1. Time from bite and referral to this hospital ranged from 2 to 28 days (mean: 8.77 ±5.58 days). Oligo-anuria was the most common presentation, being found in 98 (93.90 percentage) patients. Bleeding diathesis was reported in 75 (65.21 percentage) patients on presentation. All patients had normal sized, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, with no previous comorbids. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was required in 106 (92.17 percentage) patients. Complete recovery was seen in 59 (51.30 percentage), while 15 (13.04 percentage) patients expired during acute phase of illness, 4 (3.47 percentage) developed CKD, 11 (9.56 percentage) required dialysis beyond 90 days, and 26 (22.60 percentage) were lost to long-term follow-up. Conclusion: Snake-bite, leading to multiple complications including renal failure and death, is a major health issue in tropical countries. Late referral of these patients to specialized centres Result in undesirable outcome. (author)

  4. Bite marks in forensic dentistry: a review of legal, scientific issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, B R

    1995-02-01

    Bite marks are an important and sometimes controversial aspect of forensic odontology. The discipline has recently received considerable attention in the media and in scientific realms. Although there are many cases in which bite mark evidence has been critical to the conviction or exoneration of criminal defendants, there is continuing dispute over its interpretation and analysis. This article explores the legal and scientific basis of bite mark evidence.

  5. Anatomical distribution of human bite marks in a series of 67 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, G L; Noguchi, T T

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the anatomical distribution of human bite marks, as well as their distribution by age of victim and type of crime involved. Bite marks in this study occurred primarily in sex-related crimes, child abuse cases, and cases involving other types of physical altercations. Bite marks were found on virtually all areas of the body, with more than one bite mark on 40% of the victims. Female victims were most commonly bitten on the breasts, arms, and legs, while male victims were most commonly bitten on the arms and shoulders.

  6. Mammalian Bite Injuries to the Hand and Their Management

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Shilpa; Khan, Wasim S; Siddiqui, Nashat A

    2014-01-01

    Bite wounds are a common form of hand injury with the potential to lead to severe local and systemic sequelae and permanent functional impairment. Mammalian bite wounds may be caused by a variety of animal class and species; injuries resulting from dogs, cats and humans are the most widely discussed and reported in the literature. Bite wounds may be contaminated with aggressive pathogens and the anatomical vulnerability of structures within the hand means that without early recognition and tr...

  7. Distinguishing butchery cut marks from crocodile bite marks through machine learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Rodrigo, Manuel; Baquedano, Enrique

    2018-04-10

    All models of evolution of human behaviour depend on the correct identification and interpretation of bone surface modifications (BSM) on archaeofaunal assemblages. Crucial evolutionary features, such as the origin of stone tool use, meat-eating, food-sharing, cooperation and sociality can only be addressed through confident identification and interpretation of BSM, and more specifically, cut marks. Recently, it has been argued that linear marks with the same properties as cut marks can be created by crocodiles, thereby questioning whether secure cut mark identifications can be made in the Early Pleistocene fossil record. Powerful classification methods based on multivariate statistics and machine learning (ML) algorithms have previously successfully discriminated cut marks from most other potentially confounding BSM. However, crocodile-made marks were marginal to or played no role in these comparative analyses. Here, for the first time, we apply state-of-the-art ML methods on crocodile linear BSM and experimental butchery cut marks, showing that the combination of multivariate taphonomy and ML methods provides accurate identification of BSM, including cut and crocodile bite marks. This enables empirically-supported hominin behavioural modelling, provided that these methods are applied to fossil assemblages.

  8. Seven hundred seventy eight bite marks: analysis by anatomic location, victim and biter demographics, type of crime, and legal disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Adam J; Senn, David R; Arendt, Douglas M

    2005-11-01

    A study of the etiology, anatomic location, victim demographics and legal disposition of bite mark cases was made with the purpose of updating and augmenting previous research in the field. The information may be of interest to a myriad of professional disciplines including Forensic Odontologists, Medical Examiners, Detectives, Profilers, Emergency Room Personnel, Coroners, Psychologists, and Family Service Counselors, as bite marks provide both physical and biological data. While bite marks were found on all anatomic regions of the body some sites are significantly more likely to receive bites, and the frequency that an area is bitten may vary with the type of crime. Sex and age of the victim may also impact the resulting location and frequency of bites. A survey form for bite mark cases was created and mailed to all Diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Odontology. The survey form was also included in the American Society of Forensic Odontology newsletter. The survey requested that the recipient fill out a separate form for each case for which the recipient was the primary investigator of a patterned injury. The data from the resulting surveys were entered into a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. The responses detailed two hundred thirty two (259) bite mark cases that included seven hundred (778) individual bite marks. Harvey (1976) and Sweet and Pretty (2000) published studies finding the highest percentage of bites to the breasts. In 1983 Vale and Noguchi published the paper indicating that the most frequently bitten area was the upper extremities. The survey forms were sent to approximately 1100 forensic dentist in 26 countries. The forensic experience level of the dentists varied from neophyte to very experienced. The data were analyzed and the results reported and organized in the following categories; Victim Distribution by Gender, Victim Distribution by Age, Child Abuse Distribution by Age and Gender, Sexual Assault Distribution by age and Gender

  9. A comparison between direct and indirect methods available for human bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouble, Roland F; Craig, Geoffrey T

    2004-01-01

    Comparison techniques used in bite mark analysis are many and varied, the choice of technique depending largely on personal preference. Until recently, no one technique has been shown to be better than the others, and very little research has been carried out to compare different methods. This study evaluates and compares the accuracy of direct comparisons between suspects' models and bite marks with indirect comparisons in the form of conventional traced overlays of suspects' models or a new method using photocopier-generated overlays. Artificial bite marks in pigskin were made using standardized sets of models and recorded as photographs and fingerprint powder lifts on tape. The bite mark photographs and fingerprint lifts were coded and randomized so that a blind comparison could be made with the models, traced overlays, and photocopier-generated overlays using a modified version of the American Board of Forensic Odontology Scoring (ABFO) System for Bite Marks. It was found that the photocopier-generated overlays were significantly more accurate at matching the correct bite mark to the correct models irrespective of whether the bite mark was recorded photographically or as a fingerprint lift. The photocopier-generated overlays were also found to be more sensitive at matching the correct bite marks to the correct models than the other two methods used. The modified ABFO scoring system was able to discriminate between a correct match and several incorrect matches by awarding a high score to the correct match.

  10. Horse Bite Injury to the Lip – A Case Report | Donkor | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bite injuries to the face are commonly caused by pets and humans. Bite injury by horse is uncommon. A case of horse bite injury and its management is reported. Patient and method: A 12-year-old boy sustained a full-thickness avulsion injury to the lower lip following a bite by a horse. The lip was reconstructed ...

  11. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Bina; Anand, Sanjeev; Reddy, Sudhakara; Sahukar, Shruthi Basavaradhya; Supriya, Naga; Pasupuleti, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog) bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog) using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontology. 40 samples including 20 humans (10 males and 10 females) and 20 dogs of different breed were included in the study. Bite registration of all the samples were obtained on modeling wax and intercanine distance were measured. Data were analyzed and results were tabulated. Arch size and intercanine distance showed variable differences among humans and on average dogs showed more intercanine distance and arch size. Among dog breeds larger dogs showed larger variables when compared to smaller dogs. Assessment of bite marks evidences made by animals needs further investigation so that it can be a tool to assist the justice system to answer crucial questions.

  12. Contrast enhancement of bite mark images using the grayscale mixer in ACR in Photoshop®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sam; Noorbhai, Suzanne; Lawson, Zoe; Stacey-Jones, Seren; Carabott, Romina

    2013-05-01

    Enhanced images may improve bite mark edge definition, assisting forensic analysis. Current contrast enhancement involves color extraction, viewing layered images by channel. A novel technique, producing a single enhanced image using the grayscale mix panel within Adobe Camera Raw®, has been developed and assessed here, allowing adjustments of multiple color channels simultaneously. Stage 1 measured RGB values in 72 versions of a color chart image; eight sliders in Photoshop® were adjusted at 25% intervals, all corresponding colors affected. Stage 2 used a bite mark image, and found only red, orange, and yellow sliders had discernable effects. Stage 3 assessed modality preference between color, grayscale, and enhanced images; on average, the 22 survey participants chose the enhanced image as better defined for nine out of 10 bite marks. The study has shown potential benefits for this new technique. However, further research is needed before use in the analysis of bite marks. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Bite marks in mink—Induced experimentally and as reflection of aggressive encounters between mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen W; Møller, Steen Henrik; Damgaard, Birthe Marie

    2014-01-01

    by an artificial tooth. Before pressure wasapplied, each mink was anaesthetized and pain treated.In order to investigate when bite marks from cage mates are inflicted and to what extendthey accumulate over time, 120 brown and 40 white juvenile mink were placed in groupsof four in climbing cages after weaning....... Every second week (at the age of 20, 22, 24, 26 and28 weeks) group housed mink were moved to single housing in standard cages in order toprevent further bites from cage mates.At the age of 29 weeks, all mink were killed individually by CO2and the pelts wereexamined for bite marks.The results showed that...

  14. Error rates in bite mark analysis in an in vivo animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avon, S L; Victor, C; Mayhall, J T; Wood, R E

    2010-09-10

    Recent judicial decisions have specified that one foundation of reliability of comparative forensic disciplines is description of both scientific approach used and calculation of error rates in determining the reliability of an expert opinion. Thirty volunteers were recruited for the analysis of dermal bite marks made using a previously established in vivo porcine-skin model. Ten participants were recruited from three separate groups: dentists with no experience in forensics, dentists with an interest in forensic odontology, and board-certified diplomates of the American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO). Examiner demographics and measures of experience in bite mark analysis were collected for each volunteer. Each participant received 18 completely documented, simulated in vivo porcine bite mark cases and three paired sets of human dental models. The paired maxillary and mandibular models were identified as suspect A, suspect B, and suspect C. Examiners were tasked to determine, using an analytic method of their own choosing, whether each bite mark of the 18 bite mark cases provided was attributable to any of the suspect dentitions provided. Their findings were recorded on a standardized recording form. The results of the study demonstrated that the group of inexperienced examiners often performed as well as the board-certified group, and both inexperienced and board-certified groups performed better than those with an interest in forensic odontology that had not yet received board certification. Incorrect suspect attributions (possible false inculpation) were most common among this intermediate group. Error rates were calculated for each of the three observer groups for each of the three suspect dentitions. This study demonstrates that error rates can be calculated using an animal model for human dermal bite marks, and although clinical experience is useful, other factors may be responsible for accuracy in bite mark analysis. Further, this study demonstrates

  15. [Effectiveness assessment of 3-D cone beam CT used in human bite marks identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Chen, Xinmin; Shen, Yun; Yu, Jinhao; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Yiming; Zhu, Lei; Xu, Yuanzhi

    2013-02-01

    The present study was aimed to use the 3-D cone beam CT (CBCT) as a new method in human bite marks identification which was carried out in experimental pigskin to assess its effectiveness in our laboratory. Bite marks were digital photographed according to American Board of Forensic Odontology (ABFO) guidelines. In this study, the data of the suspect's dental casts were collected by scanning in two ways: one was after plate scanning, in which the comparison overlays were generated by Adobe Photoshop 8.0 software; the other was by CBCT, which generated comparison overlays automatically. The bite marks were blind identified with the two kinds of data of the suspect's dental casts respectively. ROC curve was used to analyze the sensitivity, specificity, and 95% confidence interval. The results showed that CBCT method got a larger area under the ROC curve: 0.784 (SE = 0.074, 95% CI = 0.639-0.929), and got a very high specificity (specificity 98.7%, 95% CI = 94.5%-99.8%). Thus, this study illustrates that the CBCT used in bite mark identification is an effective and accurate tool and has stronger ability to exclude suspects compared with the conventional method, but the comparison process needs further study to enhance its effectiveness in bite mark identification.

  16. DNA persistence of bite marks on food and its relevance for STR typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Céline M; Gass, Anja; Klein-Unseld, Rachel; Wiegand, Peter

    2017-09-01

    In forensic DNA analysis, salivary traces at crime scenes are a promising way to identify a person. However, crime scenes are oftentimes investigated a while after the crime and recovered samples might have been degraded leading to poor PCR amplification. Probably due to decomposition and negative visual impression of spoiled food, bite mark samples make up only a small part of our casework routine. In this study, bite marks on apples and chocolate bars as well as on an inert surface (microscope slide) were stored up to 3 weeks indoors and outdoors during different seasons and analyzed for amylase activity and DNA quantity and quality. The results underlined the stability of human nuclear DNA not only on inert but also on biological surfaces and their forensic usefulness even when bite marks are stored 21 days under adverse but realistic conditions at a crime scene. Overall, amylase activity as well as DNA quantity decreased over time depending on storage environment with a certain inter- and intrapersonal variation. But amylase activity testing was not found to be an appropriate screening tool for further analysis. Apple bite marks resulted in generally higher DNA amounts than chocolate bars and microscope slides. Although mold reduced the DNA quantity, complete STR profiles could be analyzed. High air humidity and cold temperatures were found to act preservative on raw food with high water content but caused loss of information over time for smooth inert surfaces and hygroscopic foods like sweets. Many factors are involved in the stability of DNA in bite marks and its resulting quality and quantity available for an STR analysis. However, since there was a substantial proportion of informative STR profiles even from bite marks stored for 21 days, the results encourage the analysis of those even if their visual appearance seems unfavorable.

  17. Dog bite injuries in children — a review of data from a South

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dog bite injuries in children — a review of data from a South. African paediatric trauma unit. I P Dwyer, T S Douglas, A B van As. Background and objective. Dog bites are a major cause of preventable traumatic injury in the paediatric population. We aimed to determine the epidemiology of dog bite injuries in a group of ...

  18. Acquaintance of bite mark identification procedures in Forensic Odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuti Malinda

    2017-08-01

    Conclution: Dentist should carefully determine the conclusion among these possibilities , the mark is “possible biter”, “probable biter”, or “with a high level of confidence, is the biter”

  19. Lizard Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the Professional version Home Injuries and Poisoning Bites and Stings Lizard Bites Medical Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) ... Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version Bites and Stings Introduction to Bites and Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and ...

  20. A comparative study between xerographic, computer-assisted overlay generation and animated-superimposition methods in bite mark analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Meng Wei; Chong, Zhen Feng; Asif, Muhammad Khan; Rahmat, Rabiah A; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran

    2016-09-01

    This study was to compare the suitability and precision of xerographic and computer-assisted methods for bite mark investigations. Eleven subjects were asked to bite on their forearm and the bite marks were photographically recorded. Alginate impressions of the subjects' dentition were taken and their casts were made using dental stone. The overlays generated by xerographic method were obtained by photocopying the subjects' casts and the incisal edge outlines were then transferred on a transparent sheet. The bite mark images were imported into Adobe Photoshop® software and printed to life-size. The bite mark analyses using xerographically generated overlays were done by comparing an overlay to the corresponding printed bite mark images manually. In computer-assisted method, the subjects' casts were scanned into Adobe Photoshop®. The bite mark analyses using computer-assisted overlay generation were done by matching an overlay and the corresponding bite mark images digitally using Adobe Photoshop®. Another comparison method was superimposing the cast images with corresponding bite mark images employing the Adobe Photoshop® CS6 and GIF-Animator©. A score with a range of 0-3 was given during analysis to each precision-determining criterion and the score was increased with better matching. The Kruskal Wallis H test showed significant difference between the three sets of data (H=18.761, p<0.05). In conclusion, bite mark analysis using the computer-assisted animated-superimposition method was the most accurate, followed by the computer-assisted overlay generation and lastly the xerographic method. The superior precision contributed by digital method is discernible despite the human skin being a poor recording medium of bite marks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparative study of three commonly used two-dimensional overlay generation methods in bite mark analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Pajnigara, Nilufer Gev; Balpande, Apeksha S; Motwani, Mukta B; Choudhary, Anuraag; Thakur, Samantha; Pajnigara, Natasha G

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present study attempts to compare the bite mark overlays generated by three different methods. The objectives of the study were to compare the three commonly used techniques for overlay generation and to evaluate the interobserver reliability in assessing bite marks by these methods. Materials and Methods: Overlays were produced from the biting surfaces of six upper and six lower anterior teeth of 30 dental study models using the following three methods: (a) Hand tracing from wax imp...

  2. An analysis of dental intercanine distance for use in court cases involving bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinprecht, Suzana; van Staden, Paul J; Jordaan, Joyce; Bernitz, Herman

    2017-03-01

    High levels of crime in South Africa and the resulting court cases requiring bite mark evidence have necessitated continuous research into the prevalence and interrelationship of recognisable dental features present in bite marks. This study represents the largest data set of descriptive statistics related to intercanine distance, in which the means, standard deviations, medians and interquartile ranges across four racial groups were determined. Intercanine distances were also statistically weighted by determining the common, uncommon and very uncommon values for each of the racial groups. The results of this research show that we can consider any maxillary intercanine distance more than 24.1 mm and less than 43.0 mm to represent a human bite mark. Black males had the largest mean (average) intercanine distance of 36.33 mm (standard deviation 2.49 mm) and white females the smallest mean intercanine distance of 33.4 mm (standard deviation 2.13 mm). The analyses showed statistically significant differences between the mean intercanine distances of different race and gender groupings. The authors do not advocate trying to determine the race or gender from intercanine distances determined, but rather the relevance of the intercanine distances in the specific race and gender groupings. This study makes a meaningful scientific contribution to the presentation of bite mark evidence at a time when subjective opinions need to be replaced with scientific data.

  3. The management of dog bite injuries of genitalia in paediatric age ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dog bite injuries are common in children and represent an important health-care problem. Most dog bite injuries involve the face or an extremity. Victims tend to seek medical care quickly. Dog bites to the external genitalia are rarely reported, but they potentially result in morbidity if improperly managed. Morbidity is also ...

  4. Scanning electron microscopy in the investigation of bite marks in foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solheim, T; Leidal, T I

    1975-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the value of utilizing SEM in the examination of bite marks in foodstuffs. Six students, whose front teeth showed no conspicuous irregularities, were asked to bite off a part of some selected foodstuff consisting of butter, cheese, Norwegian brown sweet cheese, apples, carrots, bananas, chocolate and chewing gum. The texture and the varying stickiness of the foodstuffs seemed to be of significance as far as the details of the bite marks were concerned. In butter, chewing gum and Norwegian brown sweet cheese, fine details were discerned, thus justifying the use of SEM. Both scratch marks of the front teeth and impression marks of the incisal edges were studied. Only the latter revealed details of value for the identification by means of the SEM. Often small enamel defects were found at the incisal edge of the front teeth. These defects showed a great number of individually characteristic details. Where dentin was exposed at the incisal edge, further characteristic details could also be found. Thus, the use of SEM seemed to be of value in special cases as a supplement to conventional investigation methods.

  5. Relevance of sampling and DNA extraction techniques for the analysis of salivary evidence from bite marks: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Briones, M L; Hernández-Cortés, R; Jaramillo-Rangel, G; Ortega-Martínez, M

    2015-08-21

    Bite mark evidence has been repeatedly found in criminal cases. Physical comparison of a bite mark to the teeth of available suspects may not always be possible. Experimental studies have shown that the analysis of DNA present in the saliva recovered from bite marks might help in the identification of individuals. However, the application of this approach to an actual criminal case has been reported only once before in forensic literature. Therefore, there is very limited scientific and technical information available on this subject. The current study focuses on a woman found dead in her home; the autopsy ruled the death to be a result of manual strangulation. A bite mark was found on each breast. The single swab technique was used to collect evidence from these bite marks, and an organic extraction method was employed for DNA isolation. Short tandem repeat (STR) sequence typing was performed using a commercially available kit, and the result was compared to the STR profile of a suspect. A full single-source STR profile was obtained from both bite marks, which matched the STR profile of the suspect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report on the analysis of DNA isolated from bite marks on the victim used to identify the crime perpetrator. Our results indicated that, contrary to most theoretical indications, a single swab technique for evidence collection and an organic method for DNA isolation could be very useful in solving this class of criminal cases.

  6. Use of benzidine for histological demonstration of haemoglobin in human bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, R T; Whittaker, D K

    1990-07-01

    Macroscopic evidence of bruising from human bite marks may be inconclusive and routine histochemical methods of showing extravasated erythrocytes can be unreliable. Leuco patent blue staining, for the presence of peroxidase, Amido black B, a tinctorial staining method for haemoglobin, Perls's reaction for ferric iron (haemosiderin), Masson-Fontana for melanin, Masson's trichrome, a connective tissue strain, and the benzidine reaction for haemoglobin peroxidase were carried out in three forensic cases and one experimental case. A modified benzidine method was the most reliable indicator of haemoglobin activity, especially where dispersion into extra-cellular tissues had occurred. The resilience of the erythrocyte peroxidase enzyme to temperature changes and fixation supports the concept of a "pseudo-peroxidase" in those cells. It is concluded that free haemoglobin from bite marks, or indeed other forms of blunt trauma, may best be shown by the benzidine reaction and that exemption certificates for use of this prohibited substance may be worth pursuing.

  7. Analytical pyrolysis of Streptococcus salivarius as an aid to identification in bite-mark investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, T R; Rogers, A H; Haverkamp, J R; Groothuis, D

    1984-10-01

    The use of pyrolysis mass spectrometry (Py-MS) and statistical analysis of mass spectra is introduced as a method for "finger-printing" strains of Streptococcus salivarius. The objective is to provide correlative evidence regarding the identity of suspects in cases of assault or rape involving bite-marks. The results of the analysis of isolates from two individuals are presented, illustrating the differentiation of S. salivarius at strain level according to the origin of the isolate.

  8. A Morphological and Morphometric Study of Bite Marks Caused by Mice (Mus Musculus) on Different Baits for Forensic Purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Víctor A; Fonseca, Gabriel M; González, Paula A; Ibarra, Luis; Torres, Francisco J; Sáez, Pedro L

    2017-03-01

    In animal bites, the dental attributes can be fundamental in identifying the marks made by various species on different matrices. Although rodent bite marks have been studied in the context of postmortem interference, little research has used different baits to analyze these marks linking not only specific behavior patterns but also the possibility of structural damage. Twenty mice (Mus musculus) were exposed to different baits to study their bite marks in a controlled model. The known pattern of parallel and multiple grooves has been seen in all baits, but polyvinyl chloride and fiber-optic cable were significantly different between each other and the other baits. Some baits showed patterns of anchorage of the upper incisors and space between the lower incisors when gnawing. This technical note represents a novel model of analysis where veterinarians and/or dentists may be asked to give an opinion on alleged animal bite marks. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. Domestic donkey (Equus africanus asinus bites: An unusual aetiology of severe scalp injuries in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Droussi

    2014-12-01

    Discussion: The bite of a donkey is rare aetiology of scalp injuries. Special features of these injuries, including a literature review, are discussed focusing on the care of these patients in the emergency centre, describing the surgical procedures required and antibiotic choice. Recommendations for the management of donkey bite scalp injuries are provided.

  10. Dog bite injuries among American Indian and Alaska Native children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Adam; Holman, Robert C; Callinan, Laura S; Hennessy, Thomas W; Cheek, James E; McQuiston, Jennifer H

    2013-06-01

    To examine dog bites among American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) children visiting Indian Health Service and tribal health facilities. We retrospectively analyzed hospitalizations and outpatient visits with a diagnosis of dog bite between 2001 and 2008 in AI/AN children aged bite hospitalizations and outpatient visits were estimated by age group, sex, region, and number and location of open wounds using Indian Health Service data. Analyses of hospitalizations for the general US population agedbite hospitalization rate was higher among AI/AN children in Alaska (6.1/100,000 population) and the Southwest region (5.3/100,000) compared with the general US child population (3.1/100,000; 95% CI, 2.9-3.3/100,000). The average annual outpatient visit rate in AI/AN children was highest in the Alaska (596.4/100,000), Southwest (540.0/100,000), and Northern Plains West (537.6/100,000) regions. The hospitalization rate was highest in both AI/AN and US males agedOpen wounds diagnoses were most commonly seen on the head, neck, and face in hospitalized children (45.5% of open wounds in AI/AN children, 59.3% in US children; SE, 1.0%) and on the leg in AI/AN outpatients (35.6%). Dog bites represent a significant public health threat in AI/AN children in the Alaska, the Southwest, and Northern Plains West regions of the US. Enhanced animal control and education efforts should reduce dog bite injuries and associated problems with pets and stray dogs, such as emerging infectious diseases. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  11. Bite Mark Analysis in Foodstuffs and Inanimate Objects and the Underlying Proofs for Validity and Judicial Acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Mendoza, Fernando; Martín-de-Las-Heras, Stella; Navarro-Cáceres, Pablo; Fonseca, Gabriel M

    2018-03-01

    Even though one of the first bite mark cases was Doyle v. State in 1954 (a bitten cheese case), the research has focused on bite marks inflicted in human skin. As published Papers, Case Reports, or Technical Notes can constitute precedents which are relied upon in making the legal arguments and a considerable amount of case law exists in this area, we present a systematic review on bite mark analysis in foodstuffs and inanimate objects and their underlying proofs for validity and judicial acceptance according to Daubert rulings. Results showed that there is vulnerability in these procedures, and it is essential to demand for focus scrutiny on the known error rates when such evidence is presented in trials. These kinds of bite marks are well documented; however, there has been little research in this field knowing that the protocols of analysis and comparison are the responsibility of the forensic odontologists. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. The management of dog bite injuries of genitalia in paediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bertozzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dog bite injuries are common in children and represent an important health-care problem. Most dog bite injuries involve the face or an extremity. Victims tend to seek medical care quickly. Dog bites to the external genitalia are rarely reported, but they potentially result in morbidity if improperly managed. Morbidity is also directly related to the severity of initial wound. Guidelines for the management of dog bites include irrigation, dιbridment, antibiotic therapy, consideration of tetanus and rabies immunisation and suture of wounds or surgical reconstruction. Literature review was conducted and focused to analyze the management of dog bite lesions involving external genitalia.

  13. A comparative study of three commonly used two-dimensional overlay generation methods in bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajnigara, Nilufer Gev; Balpande, Apeksha S; Motwani, Mukta B; Choudhary, Anuraag; Thakur, Samantha; Pajnigara, Natasha G

    2017-01-01

    The present study attempts to compare the bite mark overlays generated by three different methods. The objectives of the study were to compare the three commonly used techniques for overlay generation and to evaluate the interobserver reliability in assessing bite marks by these methods. Overlays were produced from the biting surfaces of six upper and six lower anterior teeth of 30 dental study models using the following three methods: (a) Hand tracing from wax impressions, (b) radiopaque impression method and (c) computer-based method. The computer-based method was found to be the most accurate method. Of the two hand tracing methods, radiopaque wax impression method was better than the wax impression method for overlay generation. It is recommended that forensic odontologists use computerized method, but the use of hand tracing overlays in bite mark comparison cases using radiopaque wax impression method can also be done where sophisticated software and trained persons in forensic odontology are not available.

  14. Upper face and orbit "degloving" dog bite injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Joseph; Lee, Ken; Klein, Richard; Slonim, Charles B

    2009-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman who attempted suicide lay unconscious on her floor for an unknown time period while her 2 pet dachshunds chewed her upper face and bilateral periorbital areas including all 4 eyelids, both lacrimal glands, all of the conjunctiva from both eyes, the extraocular muscles on the left side only, and anterior orbital fat from both sides. A subtotal exenteration was performed on her left orbit and a temporoparietal fasciocutaneous flap was used to reconstruct her right orbit with buccal mucosa replacing both the bulbar and palpebral conjunctiva. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of such extensive orbital injuries from dog bites.

  15. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  16. Dog bite injuries in children – a review of data from a South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background and objective. Dog bites are a major cause of preventable traumatic injury in the paediatric population. We aimed to determine the epidemiology of dog bite injuries in a group of South African children with a view to developing potential preventive strategies. Design, setting, subjects. A retrospective review was ...

  17. Compound posterior cruciate ligament and popliteal artery injury due to dog bite: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant Singh Tanwar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Injuries due to dog bites are a common occurrence and are mostly trivial. Severe dog bite injuries requiring hospitalization and complex reconstructive procedures are more common in children. We present the case of a five year old child with popliteal artery thrombosis and compound Posterior Cruciate ligament injury due to a dog bite. The child was managed by immediate thrombectomy, meticulous debridement and knee spanning external fixation followed by Skin Grafting. At one year post surgery range of motion was 10–110°, with no distal neurovascular deficit and no sign of instability.

  18. Dog Bite – A Rare Cause Of Oesophageal Injury | Arif | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Though rabies has been successfully controlled in some provinces, dog bite is a common problem encountered in the Accident and Emergency (A & E) departments of South Africa. In our experience, dog bites are usually from police dog units or a neighbour's dog. Oesophageal injury is very lethal if not treated early.

  19. The frequency and effect of shark-inflicted bite injuries to the reef ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shark bite injuries on reef manta rays Manta alfredi off the coast of Inhambane, Mozambique, were examined over a three-year period (2003–2006). The frequency and seasonality of attacks, the rate of wound healing, and the possible identities of attackers were explored. This study presents the first examination of bite ...

  20. Human and other mammalian bite injuries of the hand: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen A; Stoll, Laura E; Lauder, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The hand is the most common site for bite injuries. Because of specific characteristics of hand anatomy, bite mechanics, and organisms found in human and animal saliva, even small wounds can lead to aggressive infections. Failure to recognize and treat hand bites can result in significant morbidity. Human and animal bites most commonly lead to polymicrobial bacterial infections with a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Pasteurella species are commonly found in dog and cat bite wounds, and Eikenella is characteristic of human wounds. Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and anaerobic bacterial species are common to all mammals. Although public health measures in developed countries have been highly effective at reducing rabies transmission, dog bites remain the most common source of rabies infection worldwide. Human bites can transmit HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, especially when contaminated blood is exposed to an open wound. Appropriate management of any mammal bite requires recognition, early wound cleansing, evaluation of injured structures, and infection prophylaxis. Structural repair is performed as indicated by the severity and contamination of the injury, and wounds may require delayed closure. Wound infections typically require débridement, empiric antibiotics, and delayed repair or reconstruction. Copyright 2014 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  1. Evaluation of the accuracy, precision and validity of hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane impression material for bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sujatha S; Rakesh, N; Kaushik, Atul; Devaraju, D; Kumar, B S Nanda

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the accuracy, precision and validity of hydrophilic Vinyl Poly Siloxane [VPS] impression material for bite mark documentation and analysis. Medium body VPS impressions of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth among thirty subjects were taken and dental stone casts prepared. Hollow volume overlays were made and metric analysis was done using advanced imaging software like Adobe Photoshop - 9 and Image J. These values were compared to the measurements taken from bite mark impressions of the same 30 individuals on wax wafers using light body VPS material. The mean differences in the parameters measured by the different techniques were compared using Intra Class Correlation Coefficients [ICCC]. Additionally validity parameters such as sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value were computed.

  2. Horse Bite Injury to the Lip – A Case Report | Donkor | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient and method: A 12-year-old boy sustained a full-thickness avulsion injury to the lower lip following a bite by a horse. The lip was reconstructed at Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana, within 48 hours of injury under general anaesthesia , using a local flap. The patient had a full course of Amoxicillin and ...

  3. Facial dog bite injuries in children: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Leite Cavalcanti

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This case shows a case of a child patient victim of animal bite, with lesions limited to the region of the face. The patient was followed up for a month and showed good wound healing without any complications.

  4. Evaluation of the accuracy, precision and validity of hydrophilic vinyl polysiloxane impression material for bite mark analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Sujatha S.; Rakesh, N.; Kaushik, Atul; Devaraju, D.; Kumar, B.S. Nanda

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the accuracy, precision and validity of hydrophilic Vinyl Poly Siloxane [VPS] impression material for bite mark documentation and analysis. Medium body VPS impressions of maxillary and mandibular anterior teeth among thirty subjects were taken and dental stone casts prepared. Hollow volume overlays were made and metric analysis was done using advanced imaging software like Adobe Photoshop - 9 and Image J. These values were compared to the measu...

  5. The epidemiology of bite and scratch injuries by vertebrate animals in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matter, Hans C.

    1998-01-01

    Pet and wildlife populations are a potential source of various public health problems, and injuries and complications due to animal bites and scratches are the most obvious. As no population based data on the frequency of animal bites were available at a national level in Switzerland, a study was conducted by the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence of medical consultations due to bite and scratch injuries in humans caused by vertebrate animals, to identify possible risk factors, and to assess bite management habits in primary health care. An annual bite and scratch incidence rate of 325 per 100,000 population was estimated. Consultations peaked during the summer months and geographical differences in the reported incidence were observed. Dogs accounted for more than 60% and cats for about 25% of all cases reported. Animal bites and scratches were frequent in persons under 20 years of age. In most ages, the incidence was higher among women than among men, but not in children under the age of ten years. The incidence of cat bites was especially high in adult women. Bites to the head and neck were most frequent in infants and young children and accounted for approximately one third of the reported cases in this age group. Patients sought medical care principally for primary wound care (52.0%) and for vaccination advice (29.6%). Rabies postexposure prophylaxis was initiated in 1.1% of patients. Wound infection was reported in 10.9% of cases, with cat bites/scratches being more often infected than injuries due to dogs. Hospitalization was reported in 0.3% of patients. Data from the emergency department of two district hospitals showed that head and neck injuries were more frequent in out-patients and a higher proportion of persons presented with wound infections (14.1%). The hospitalization rate for emergency department visits was 4.7%. Animal bites and scratches are common events in Switzerland. They

  6. Airway injury associated with cervical bite wounds in dogs and cats: 56 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, C J; Halfacree, Z J; Tivers, M S

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the frequency of airway injury and damage to other vital structures associated with cervical bite wounds in dogs and cats and the implications for management and outcome. A retrospective search of electronic patient records was used to identify dogs and cats suffering cervical bite wounds that were presented to a large multidisciplinary veterinary hospital over a four year period. Complete records were available for 55 animals, with one animal suffering two separate injuries. Fourteen animals (25%) had injuries to vital structures, including airway injury in nine (17%) which was surgically confirmed and treated in six (11%). Airway injuries were associated with either subcutaneous or mediastinal emphysema in all affected animals. Other structures injured included the jugular vein, pharynx, oesophagus and spine. Airway injuries were treated with primary repair in five animals and a fasciomuscular patch in one. Temporary tracheostomy was performed in three animals. Median duration of hospitalisation was one day (0-19) with 53 animals (54 cases) (96%) surviving to discharge. Long-term follow-up (16-114 months) revealed that 43 of 49 animals were alive with six that died due to unrelated reasons. Cervical bite wounds are associated with significant injury to vital structures. Up to 17% of animals may have injury to their airway. Identification and treatment of airway injury is vital and was associated with an excellent outcome in six animals.

  7. Simplified digital infra red photography: an alternative tool in Bite mark forensic investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haryono Utomo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decades ago, documentation of forensics evidences such as bitemarks, bloodstains and others which required sophisticated photographic techniques and equipments such as infrared (IR and ultraviolet (UV photography, became a problem since they only use film that must be developed. Therefore, direct evaluation of the photographic result could not be directly visualized. The equipments prices were relatively high. Moreover, most of the equipments were still not available and relatively expensive; and converted IR digital camera could not use for regular photography. Recently, digital camera made image documentation and editing easier. Purpose: This review was aimed to explore the different characteristics and benefits of regular digital camera in IR forensic photography as well as to simplify the equipments needed. Reviews: IR photography becomes easier since certain digital cameras could capture the IR image by using IR filters or to be switched to IR camera. The regular non-SLR digital camera had certain advantages compared to SLRs, such in focusing. However, since not every digital camera has the ability to capture IR light, laser pointer or TV remote could be used as a tester. Conclusion: Knowledge about IR Bite mark photography, characteristics of regular digital camera and its accesories could reduce the budget for an ideal standard forensic photographic equipments by modifications.Latar belakang: Puluhan tahun silam, dokumentasi bukti forensik seperti teraan gigit, bercak darah dan sebagainya yang memerlukan teknik dan peralatan yang canggih seperti fotografi infra merah (IR dan ultraviolet (UV merupakan masalah karena memakai film yang harus diproses terlebih dahulu untuk mengetahui hasilnya. Akibatnya, hasil pemotretan tidak bisa langsung dievaluasi, selain itu harganya relatif mahal, kamera digital yang diubah menjadi kamera IR tidak bisa untuk pemotretan biasa. Saat ini kamera digital dan program komputer mempermudah

  8. Incidence of dog bite injuries in American Samoa and their impact on society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, Don; DePasquale, John M; Vargo, Agnes M

    2012-01-01

    In American Samoa, a US Territory in the South Pacific, over half of reported injuries are attributed to dog bites. Despite years of public outcry, little has been done to adequately address these preventable injuries that affect all age groups of both sexes. To describe a serious public health hazard in American Samoa that may plague other jurisdictions that tolerate a significant free-roaming dog population. A limited data set of outpatient records from 2004 through 2010 from the Territory's only emergency department listing an ICD-9-CM E-code of E906.0 ("dog bite") in the primary E-code field provided a record of dog bite injuries. A survey of 437 adolescents documented their experiences regarding unprovoked dog attacks during the 2010/2011 school year. The sex/age group with the highest incidence for dog bite treatment was males 55 to 59 years of age (73.1 per 10,000 population per year) followed closely by males 10 to 14 years of age (71.8 per 10,000 population per year). Males aged 5 to 14 years accounted for 23% of all emergency department visits for dog bites. About one-third of adolescents reported having been bitten by a dog between September 2010 and May 2011. About 10% of males and 16% of females attributed the fear of being bitten as a factor preventing them from getting more physical activity. Children, adolescents, and the elderly are the most vulnerable to dog bite injuries. Emergency room records may reflect only about a quarter of all such injuries. Unprovoked attacks by aggressive, free-roaming dogs degrade quality of life by placing an untenable burden on the health care system and imposing physical and psychological barriers toward a more healthful lifestyle that includes walking, jogging, and bicycling.

  9. Quantitative forensic evaluation of bite marks with the aid of a shape analysis computer program: Part 1; The development of "SCIP" and the similarity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, P; Bridges, T E; Brown, K A

    1995-12-01

    Bite marks left on human tissue and bitten material have become an important aspect of scientific evidence used for the conviction or acquittal of a suspect. Expert opinion has often been based on subjective comparisons rather than any objective metrical analysis and many experts will agree that there is a need to employ additional comparative tests to achieve unbiased objectivity in their investigation. In this study, an interactive shape analysis computer program ("SCIP"-Shape Comparison Interactive Program) has been employed in an attempt to derive experimentally a quantitative comparison, in the form of a Similarity Index (S.I.), between the "offender's" teeth and the bite marks produced on a standard flat wax form. The S.I. values obtained using "SCIP" were evaluated in a variety of experimental bite mark situations. It was found that in no case could the S.I. values produced by comparison of the bite mark with the dental casts from non-perpetrators be confused with the much lower S.I. from comparison of the bite mark with the dental cast of the perpetrator. The use of the Similarity Index derived using the "SCIP" program is recommended as a simple, accurate and objective means of comparing bite marks in suitable forensic cases.

  10. Venomous Snake Bite Injuries at Kitui District Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical findings and administration of polyvalent antivenin. This study sought to describe common presentation patterns and treatments offered for snake bites at Kitui District Hospital, and to characterize the causative venomous snakes. Patients and methods. This was a prospective case series carried out over a period of 8 ...

  11. Venomous Snake Bite Injuries at Kitui District Hospital | Kihiko ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    exists. Diagnostic tests for snake species identification are not available and management mainly relies on clinical findings and administration of polyvalent antivenin. This study sought to describe common presentation patterns and treatments offered for snake bites at Kitui District Hospital, and to characterize the causative ...

  12. A study of human bite injuries to the face | Obukwe | Central African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of human bite injuries to the face. O. N. Obukwe. Abstract. (Central African Journal of Medicine: 2002 48 (5-6): 68-71). AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News.

  13. Incidence of dog bite injuries and clinical rabies in a tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It is widely recognized that rabies is grossly under-reported even though it is a notifiable disease and a lack of accurate figures has rendered rabies a low public health and veterinary priority. This study aimed at determining the incidence of dog bite injuries and clinical rabies in a tertiary health care centre.

  14. Dog Bite Injuries: Primary and Secondary Emergency Department Presentations—A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. Pfortmueller

    2013-01-01

    therapy (27/47 patients, 57.4%. Patients with injuries to the hand were at increased risk of secondary presentations (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.21–3.55, P<0.006. Conclusion. Dog bite injuries to the hands are a major problem. They often lead to infectious complications. Immediate antibiotic therapy should carefully be evaluated for each patient.

  15. Reliability and Analysis of Changes in Bite Marks at Different Time Intervals and Temperature Ranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Khare Sinha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to assess time-dependent changes in the morphology of bitemarks and to investigate the utility of matching bitemarks on both perishable and non-perishable objects with the passage of time at different temperatures. Subjects and Methods: The study was conducted at Maharana Pratap College of Dentistry and Research Centre, Gwalior, India. 20 volunteers were asked to bite 6 items each. These included perishable and nonperishable items. Perishable items were apple, banana and Burfi, (a milk-based popular sweet confectionary while non-perishable items included wax, clay, and rubber. Photographs were taken with a digital camera at 0-hours and 24-hours after biting these objects at temperature ranges of 24 ºC to 28 ºC and 36 ºC to 40 ºC, respectively. Life-size photographs of these bitten objects were printed on transparent overlays and compared to hand drawn transparencies prepared from suspect dentition using an X-ray viewer. The comparison of all the 960 transparencies was done by two researchers, independently. Results: All objects gave a positive identification of the biter on matching just after biting. After24-hours, all items also showed positive matching except banana and apples. Conclusion: This proposed method is simple, reliable and less technique sensitive. It narrows down the subjectivity of interpretation. It highlights that due to decomposition changes occur in perishable food items and more so in apples and bananas, making bitemarks less reliable evidence.

  16. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Share Print Cat and dog bites are common injuries. A family pet or ... bites. Path to safety If a cat or dog bites you, you should: Wash the wound gently ...

  17. Geo(Im)pulseBite marks on early Holocene Tursiops truncatus fossils from the North Sea indicate scavenging by rays (Chondrichthyes, Rajidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, H.H. van; Reumer, J.W.F.

    A number of Tursiops truncatus mandibles in the collection of fossil marine mammals in the Rotterdam Natural History Museum have marks consisting of several parallel linear grooves. These marks are also found on four atlas complexes, a scapula and on one vertebra. The hypothesis that they are bite

  18. Human bite injuries to the head and neck: current trends and management protocols in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Glyndwr W; Isaac, Robert; Mustafa, Shakir

    2018-03-01

    Human bite injuries can be challenging in their presentation to the examining physician. In a study by Merchant et al., 18% of patients presenting with a human bite injury had suffered wounds to the head and neck region. Current trends in their initial management at presentation to emergency departments throughout England and Wales will be discussed in this paper. A postal survey was sent out to 100 A&E lead clinicians. This was followed up by telephone enquiries to improve the response rate. The collated results of the survey were entered onto a spreadsheet (Microsoft Excel©) for the purpose of statistical review. A 68% response rate from A&E departments throughout England and Wales demonstrated a lack of consensus in the initial management and subsequent treatment of human bite injuries. Written protocols are in place for human bite injuries in 54.4% of units. In 100% of units, initial management involves irrigation +/- debridement of the wound, though there is a lack of agreement on the surgical management of the wound. 77.9% of units follow 'needle stick protocols' when stratifying risk for blood-borne viruses. Human bites pose a number of unique problems, ranging from cellulitis to the transmission of communicable diseases. The maxillofacial surgeon has the added dilemmas surrounding subsequent repair and reconstruction. Appreciation of the complexity of human bite injuries will ensure optimal care for the patient. We propose a set of guidelines developed 'in-house' to assist in the management of human bite injuries.

  19. Dog bites in The Netherlands: A study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.M.R.; Hopster, H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of Dutch breed specific legislation, data were collected from dog bite victims (1078) and dog owners (6139) using Internet surveys. The incidence rate of dog bites and details of incidents (victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors) are reported and the justification

  20. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked

  1. Pigs suffering from injurious behaviours like flank biting and tail biting are more interested to manipulate a novel rope than uninjured control animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Ettema, K.

    2014-01-01

    Injurious behaviours in pigs may involve persistent or forceful biting in specific body parts and may result in wounds of the pigs’ tails, ears, flanks and legs. Such behaviours, which may lead to progressive tissue damage, are difficult to counteract. On a commercial farm 22 groups of pigs with

  2. Capybara Bites: Report of Human Injury Caused by a Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Vieira, Camille; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Azulay-Abulafia, Luna

    2015-12-01

    Health care demand due to animal bites is frequent, especially in the emergency department (ED). In addition to the physical trauma caused by bites, one should be concerned with infectious diseases that can be transmitted. The range of the lesions depends on the animal species. Bites of Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris (capybaras) in humans are relatively uncommon. Capybaras are docile animals; however, their large rodent incisive teeth could cause serious injury. Localized care, antibiotic therapy when necessary, careful examination of the structures, tetanus and rabies immunization as indicated, and follow-up are recommended for wild animal bites. The authors hereby describe and discuss the medical management of a case of multiple lesions from capybara bites on the right thigh of a man. A 54-year-old male patient was admitted to the ED with a compression bandage soaked with blood after being bitten by a capybara. At the clinical examination, the patient had two lacerating wounds and multiple abrasions on the anterior face of the right thigh. Rabies prophylaxis was administered and the wounds were irrigated and closed with sterile dressings. Oral amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium for 7 days was administered to the patient. The patient was followed up; 3 months after the attack he returned to his previous level of activity without any complication. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: We recommend that practitioners and physicians should provide prompt attention due to potentially significant morbidities, particularly rabies. The adequate care of the wound will allow better aesthetic and functional results to victims of wild animal bites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bite injuries of grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauniaux, Thierry; Garigliany, Mutien-Marie; Loos, Pauline; Bourgain, Jean-Luc; Bouveroux, Thibaut; Coignoul, Freddy; Haelters, Jan; Karpouzopoulos, Jacky; Pezeril, Sylvain; Desmecht, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Bite-like skin lesions on harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) have been suspected to be caused by grey seals (Halichoerus grypus), and a few field observations have been reported. Bite-like skin lesions observed on stranded animals were characterized by two main components: large flaps of loose or missing skin and blubber with frayed edges and puncture lesions. Definitive demonstration of predation by a grey seal was not reported so far in those stranded animals. In this study, five stranded porpoises with bite-like skin lesions were swabbed for genetic investigations. In addition, the head of a recently dead grey seal was used to mimic bite-like skin injuries on a porpoise carcass. Subsequently, the artificial skin injuries were swabbed, along with the gum of the seal used for inflicting them (positive controls). Total DNA was extracted from the swabs and was used to retrieve a fragment of mitochondrial DNA by PCR. Primers were designed to amplify a specific stretch of mitochondrial DNA known to differ between grey seals and porpoises. The amplicon targeted was successfully amplified from the positive control and from two of the stranded porpoises, and grey seal-specific mitochondrial DNA was retrieved from all those samples. We conclude that (1) it is possible to detect grey seal DNA from dead porpoises even after several days in seawater and (2) bite-like skin lesions found on dead porpoises definitively result from grey seals attacks. The attacks are most likely linked with predation although, in a number of cases, scavenging and aggressive behaviour cannot be excluded.

  4. Use of DNA from bite marks can determine species and individual animals that attack humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Sean; Talbot, Sandra L.; Sage, George K.; Sinnott, Rick; Coltrane, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    During the summer of 2008, 6 documented attacks and close encounters with brown bears (Ursus arctos) occurred in the greater Anchorage, Alaska (USA) area. We discuss findings from 2 incidents in which people were mauled within 2 km of each other over a 6-week period and in which it was assumed that a single animal was responsible. To ensure public safety, authorities killed a brown bear implicated in the attacks by circumstantial evidence, though it was not known a priori that the animal was responsible. We extracted DNA from hairs and bite sites on the clothing of both victims and determined species and individual identity of the animal(s) involved in both incidents. Genetic data indicated the brown bear killed by authorities was responsible for one of the maulings, but not both. This research demonstrates that DNA-based techniques, with appropriate sampling, can provide unambiguous identification of animals involved in attacks, as well as provide reasonable justification for excluding others. Because DNA-based techniques can unequivocally identify individual bears carrying out attacks, they should be considered a standard method employed in wildlife attack investigations.

  5. STUDY OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SNAKE BITE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suma Dasaraju

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Snake venom is well known to cause toxic damage to the kidneys (Schreiner and Maher, 1965. This study is an attempt to evaluate the snakebite-induced Acute Kidney Injury (AKI. MATERIALS AND METHODS 50 patients with snakebite-induced acute kidney injury were selected randomly and their clinical profile was assessed. Acute kidney injury was evaluated using noninvasive laboratory methods. Inclusion Criteria- 1. History of snakebite; 2. Presence of AKI. Exclusion Criteria- Pre-existing renal diseases, after establishing the diagnosis, patients were started on conservative treatment including ASV, blood/blood products and haemodialysis as required. RESULTS Out of 50 patients included in the study, majority of them were males (62% with mean age of presentation 43.8 ± 12.63 years. The mean interval between snakebite and presentation to hospital was 15.37 hours. In them, 98% patients presented with local signs of inflammation, 52% of patients presented with coagulation abnormality and 60% with decreased urine output. Comparison between good outcome (recovered from AKI and poor outcome (not recovered from AKI shows significant pvalue for ‘lapse of time in hours’ in presenting to the hospital after snakebite (p value 0.005 and ‘alternative treatment taken’ before coming to the hospital (p value 0.001. CONCLUSION Poisonous snakebites have common manifestations of cellulitis, abnormal coagulation profile and decreased urine output. Overall mortality due to snakebite-induced AKI is 6%. Patients who did not recover from AKI had lapse of time in presenting to the hospital and abnormal coagulation profile.

  6. The development of a colorimetric scale as a visual aid for the bruise age determination of bite marks and blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzolese, E; Di Vella, G

    2012-12-01

    Medical examiners and forensic odontologists are frequently asked to establish the age of a bruise or bitemark on either a living and deceased subjects. The age of bruising has an important medico-legal significance and may be relevant in the investigations related to such crimes as child abuse, domestic violence and homicide. A colorimetric scale for forensic photography based on the colors of the bruise itself, has never been proposed due to the fact that photographic reproduction of color is unreliable and depends on several factors; the camera used, lighting, printer and photo-editing color calibration. The authors propose two colorimetric scales, both with and without linear measurements, and with 90° angulations, six bruise colors, and three circles with black and white calibrators, which are to be used for the forensic photography of injuries involving the epidermis of Caucasian subjects. The two scales could also be employed on living subjects during different stages of the healing process, or on cadavers in order to provide evidential documentation, image verification and analysis. Such an aid would provide a reliable standard condition and allow for color calibration. The colors represented on the scales would be an aid for the interpretation and objectivity required in estimating the age of the bruise, particularly when the analysis is made directly onto computer images prior to printing. The proposed colorimetric scales do not attempt to give a definitive account of the diverse scientific methods available for the assessment of the age of bruising. The observation of a large sample of blunt trauma and bite mark injuries employing the proposed colorimetric scales would be needed in order to verify and validate the use of these scales. It should be borne in mind that bruise age estimation requires an expert opinion with several degrees of accuracy and variability involved. The age of a bruise cannot be determined by color alone.

  7. Epidemiology of Pediatric Bite/Sting Injuries. One-Year Study of a Pediatric Emergency Department in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hemmo-Lotem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal bite/sting injuries are a known source of morbidity with a significantly higher incidence among children who are most often bitten in the face, head, and neck. The objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of bite/sting injuries treated at the pediatric emergency department in order to guide preventive efforts.The sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical data on all bite/sting injuries treated in one representative pediatric emergency department in Israel over a 1-year period were retrieved and analyzed. Two hundred of the 9,309 pediatric trauma cases treated in the emergency department were bite/sting injuries (2.1%. Non-Jewish patients were under-represented in this subgroup. The majority of patients were males (61.5%. Age distribution from 0–12 years was fairly even, except for an unexplained peak at 8 years. Dogs inflicted 56%, cats 11%, and hornets 9.5% of the injuries. Limbs were affected in 64% and the head and neck in 27%. Specialists, mostly plastic surgeons, were consulted in 42 cases (21%. The incidence rate for hospitalization (7% was similar to that seen in other types of injuries. Children with scorpion or hornet stings and young age were more likely to be hospitalized. Preventive and educational aspects are discussed.

  8. Dog bites in The Netherlands: a study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Jessica M R; Hopster, Hans

    2010-12-01

    As part of an evaluation of Dutch breed specific legislation, data were collected from dog bite victims (1078) and dog owners (6139) using Internet surveys. The incidence rate of dog bites and details of incidents (victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors) are reported and the justification for using breed specific measurements to deal with dog bites are considered. For aggressors, attack records for breed groups and popular breeds were established by calculating breed risk indices using a reference population. Several breeds and breed groups were over- and under-represented in the biting population and there was a mismatch between risk indices and the then-current legislation. Mitigation strategies should not be based on attack records (since this would lead to the rejection of a significant proportion of the canine population) but on the circumstances of the incidents. Preventative measures must focus on a better understanding of how to handle dogs. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative forensic evaluation of bite marks with the aid of a shape analysis computer program: Part 1; the development of 'SCIP' and the Similarity Index

    OpenAIRE

    Nambiar, P.; Bridges, T. E.; Brown, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Bite marks left on human tissue and bitten material have become an important aspect of scientific evidence used for the conviction or acquittal of a suspect. Expert opinion has often been based on subjective comparisons rather than any objective metrical analysis and many experts will agree that there is a need to employ additional comparative tests to achieve unbiased objectivity in their investigation. In this study, an interactive shape analysis computer program ('SCIP' - Shape Comparison ...

  10. Parotid duct injury secondary to shark bite injury: Repair with a Crawford stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallory Highstein

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Clinicians should have a high level of suspicion for parotid duct injury in a patient presenting with injury to the face, particularly with laceration type injuries. Our patient had a unique injury that required a novel Crawford stent repair over traditional silicone catheters.

  11. Geographic access to street food sources for dogs and its association with spatial patterns of animal bite injuries in Enugu, Nigeria, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olugasa, B O; Okeke, O S; Ishola, O O

    2014-12-01

    Accessibility of street food source to dogs in Enugu, the capital city of Enugu State, south-eastern Nigeria was examined in relation to spatial patterns of animal bite injuries in the city. Retrospective data on animal bite injuries were retrieved from records of selected hospitals in Enugu and its environs during the period 2005-2011. Victim's residence and street point where animal bite incidence occurred were geo-referenced. Street food sources, including garbage disposal points, meat markets, slaughter facilities and public vehicle terminals in the city were observed and geo-referenced. Thematic maps were designed usingArcGIS 10.1. Spatial scan statistics was used to identify cluster pattern of animal bite injuries and fatal rabies cases. Coefficient of area correspondence (Ca) in spatial cluster with selected variables was computed. One hundred and thirty one cases of animal bite injury cases were retrieved with traceable addresses. These comprised cat bites (n = 1, 0.76%), goat bites (n = 1, 0.76%), monkey bites (n = 2, 1.5%) and dog bites (n = 127, 96.98%). Fatal outcomes (n = 4, 3.15%) were recorded. Males within the age group, 0-15 (46.5%) were at the highest risk. A diffused spatial pattern showed that majority of the study area experienced animal bite injury during the study period. A primary cluster of 15.03km radius and a secondary cluster of 1.11 km radius traversed residential and non-residential areas were identified as rabies high- and low-risk areas. Interspecies bites from non-carnivores (goats and monkeys) and resultant deaths with neurologic signs were pathognomonic for rabies-like-illness in Enugu State. High Ca (0.8) showed a strong correlation between access to street food sources for dogs and the distribution of animal bite injuries on humans. While access to street food may support the population of free-roaming dogs, it was also shown to be partly explanatory to spatial patterns of dog bite injury. Public education about responsible pet

  12. Larynx Trauma and Hyoid Bone Fracture after Bite Injury in Dog: Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchi, George; Brunnberg, Mathias M.; Shahid, Muhammad; Al Aiyan, Ahmad; Brunnberg, Leo; Stein, Silke

    2016-01-01

    An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intraoperatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles, and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea that underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome. PMID:27579303

  13. Larynx trauma and hyoid bone fracture after bite injury in dog: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Manchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An 8-year-old male Jack Russell crossbreed dog was admitted to our hospital with dyspnoea and shock following a dog-bite injury on the ventral neck. Radiographs revealed subcutaneous emphysema and bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures. Intra-operatively, rupture of both sternohyoid muscles, both hyoepiglotticus muscles, both thyrohyoid muscles and a partial cranial rupture of the superficial sphincter colli muscle were detected. Part of the epiglottis was detached from the thyroid cartilage. The patient’s severed muscles and torn epiglottis were reattached using a simple interrupted suture pattern. Hyoepiglotticus muscles could not be identified. The bilateral thyrohyoid bone fractures were repaired with intraosseous wire suture. A temporary tracheostomy tube and an esophageal feeding tube were placed postoperatively. The dog was discharged after 8 days, re-examined at 2 and 6 months and laryngeal and pharyngeal function were evaluated as normal. To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report of a dog that presented with laryngeal trauma with hyoid bone fracture and acute dyspnea who underwent surgical treatment resulting in an acceptable outcome.

  14. White shark ( Carcharodon carcharias )-inflicted bite wounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    White shark ( Carcharodon carcharias )-inflicted bite wounds observed on Cape fur seals ( Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus ) at Black Rocks, Algoa Bay, South Africa. ... The low number of bite-inflicted injuries observed suggests that white sharks attack seals infrequently at Black Rocks. Key words: Algoa Bay, bite injuries, ...

  15. Death secondary to a donkey's bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Aloja, Ernesto; Grimaldi, Leonardo; Cascini, Fidelia; De Mercurio, Domenico; De-Giorgio, Fabio

    2011-06-01

    We present a unique case of death due to the assault and bites of a donkey on a 65-year-old man. The farmer, found dead in his farmyard, had a very deep wound in the anterior region of the neck, with a sharp transection of the trachea and severe bleeding by several minor vessels wall disruptions. The cause of death was established to be massive bleeding combined with asphyxia due to aspiration of the blood. Moreover, multiple contusions with associated skin abrasions and perforations were present. The general impression of the injuries was consistent with an animal's bite marks. Herbivorous or omnivorous bite attacks on humans are rare; instead, these animals attack by kicking, trampling, and kneeling, resulting in secondary blunt injuries. The donkey is usually a docile animal, but its behavior can be aggressive during the mating season, and the possibility of biting should not be underestimated, as illustrated by the 2 cases published previously as well as by the case presented here.

  16. Arthropod bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-12-15

    The phylum Arthropoda includes arachnids and insects. Although their bites typically cause only local reactions, some species are venomous or transmit disease. The two medically important spiders in the United States are widow spiders (Latrodectus), the bite of which causes intense muscle spasms, and the brown recluse (Loxosceles), which may cause skin necrosis. Widow bites usually respond to narcotics, benzodiazepines, or, when necessary, antivenom. Most recluse bites resolve uneventfully without aggressive therapy and require only wound care and minor debridement. Tick bites can transmit diseases only after prolonged attachment to the host. Treatment of clothing with permethrin and proper tick removal greatly reduce the risk of infection. Ticks of medical importance in the United States include the black-legged tick, the Lone Star tick, and the American dog tick. The prophylactic use of a single dose of doxycycline for Lyme disease may be justified in high-risk areas of the country when an attached, engorged black-legged tick is removed. Bites from fleas, bedbugs, biting flies, and mosquitoes present as nonspecific pruritic pink papules, but the history and location of the bite can assist with diagnosis. Flea bites are usually on ankles, whereas mosquito bites are on exposed skin, and chigger bites tend to be along the sock and belt lines. Antihistamines are usually the only treatment required for insect bites; however, severe mosquito reactions (skeeter syndrome) may require prednisone. Applying insect repellent containing diethyltoluamide (DEET) 10% to 35% or picaridin 20% is the best method for preventing bites.

  17. Lizard Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and Iguana Bites Animal Bites Bee, Wasp, Hornet, and Ant ... in Arizona, Sonora, Mexico, and adjacent areas. The venom of these lizards is somewhat similar in content ...

  18. Effectiveness of breed-specific legislation in decreasing the incidence of dog-bite injury hospitalisations in people in the Canadian province of Manitoba

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Malathi; Martens, Patricia J; Chateau, Dan; Burchill, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Background The city of Winnipeg was the first among several jurisdictions in Manitoba, Canada, to introduce breed specific legislation (BSL) by banning pit-bull type dogs in 1990. The objective of the present work was to study the effectiveness of BSL in Manitoba. Methods Temporal differences in incidence of dog-bite injury hospitalisations (DBIH) within and across Manitoba jurisdictions with and without BSL were compared. Incidence was calculated as the number of unique cases of DBIH divided...

  19. Spider Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t had one in the last five years. Black widow spider You can usually identify a black widow spider by the hourglass marking on its belly. In ... in the South. Signs and symptoms of a black widow spider bite may include: At first, slight swelling and ...

  20. Environmental hazards in Nepal: altitude illness, environmental exposures, injuries, and bites in travelers and expatriates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Kain, Kevin C; Pandey, Prativa

    2007-01-01

    Adventure travel necessarily places travelers at risk of environmental hazards. We assessed the burden of "environmental" hazards among a cohort of travelers and expatriates presenting to a large travel clinic in Nepal. Data on travelers and expatriates seen at the Canadian International Water and Energy Consultants (CIWEC) clinic in Kathmandu were prospectively collected and entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Data on individuals receiving predefined diagnoses related to environmental hazards were extracted and analyzed. Of 10,499 travelers and 4,854 expatriates in the database, 2,160 were diagnosed with 2,533 environment-related illnesses. Injuries were common among both travelers and expatriates [N= 788 (6.1%) and 328 (4.9%), respectively], while altitude illness was seen almost exclusively in travelers [N= 611 (4.7%) vs N= 8 (0.1%)]. Factors independently associated with environmental diagnoses include male gender (p tourism (p adventure travelers and expatriates. Current pre-travel interventions are missing certain risk groups entirely and failing to have the desired educational impact in others.

  1. Evaluation of Snake Bites with Bedside Ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef E Jolissaint

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: While watering his lawn, a 36-year-old man felt two sharp bites to his bilateral ankles. He reports that he then saw a light brown, 2-foot snake slither away from him. He came to the emergency department because of pain and swelling in his ankles and inability to bear weight. Physical examination revealed bilateral ankle swelling and puncture marks on his left lateral heel and medial right ankle. Palpation, passive flexion and extension elicited severe pain bilaterally. Blood work including prothrombin time (PT, partial thromboplastin time (PTT, international normalized ratio (INR, and fibrinogen were within normal limits. Consultation with Poison Control indicated the snake was likely a copperhead, which is a venomous snake whose bites rarely require antivenin. Significant findings: In this case, ultrasonography of the lateral surface of the left foot revealed soft tissue edema (red arrow and fluid collection (white asterisk adjacent to the extensor tendon (white arrow. The edematous area resembles cobblestones, with hypoechoic areas of fluid spanning relatively hyperechoic fat lobules. The tendon is surrounded by anechoic fluid, expanding the potential space in the sheath. No hyperechoic foreign objects were noted. Discussion: The patient was diagnosed with soft tissue injury and extensor tenosynovitis after a snake envenomation. Snake venom contains metalloproteinases and other enzymatic proteins that cause local tissue edema and necrosis.1 After a snake bite, ultrasound can be used to assess for retained fangs, soft tissue edema, tendon sheath fluid, muscle fasciculation, and injury to deeper musculature that may not be readily apparent on physical exam.2,3 Most patients with tenosynovitis will recover with immobilization of the joint and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications.4 Rarely, the tendon may become infected requiring antibiotics and surgical intervention.4 Topics: Ultrasound, snake envenomation

  2. A dog rabies vaccination campaign in rural Africa: impact on the incidence of dog rabies and human dog-bite injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaveland, S; Kaare, M; Tiringa, P; Mlengeya, T; Barrat, J

    2003-05-16

    Despite the availability of safe and effective rabies vaccines, the incidence of dog rabies has been increasing throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa. Here we describe a vaccination strategy that has resulted in successful control of rabies in a rural dog population of Northwestern Tanzania. From October 1996 to February 2001, four central-point dog vaccination campaigns were conducted in villages within Serengeti District with a mean interval between campaigns of 338, 319 and 456 days. Vaccination coverage of the dog population was estimated from household questionnaires as 64.5, 61.1, 70.6 and 73.7% following each of the four campaigns, respectively. The incidence of dog rabies declined significantly in Serengeti District falling by 70% after the first campaign and by 97% after the second campaign. Over the same period, the incidence of dog rabies did not differ significantly in unvaccinated control villages of Musoma District. The incidence of human bite injuries from suspected rabid dogs declined significantly in Serengeti District after dog vaccination but not in adjacent unvaccinated districts. Vaccination of 60-70% of dogs has been sufficient to control dog rabies in this area and to significantly reduce demand for human post-exposure rabies treatment. Dog-bite injuries can provide a valuable and accessible source of data for surveillance in countries where case incidence data are difficult to obtain.

  3. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  4. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  5. Animal and Human Bites in Children | Osaghae | West African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Mammals that live closely and interact with man and man himself can inflict injury on children in the home through bites. Previous reports on mammalian bites in Nigeria are few and mainly on dogs, though other mammals also inflict injuries on children. There are also no reports on the injuries arising from ...

  6. Cheek-biting disorder: another stereotypic movement disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhel, Sujit; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Akhtar, Sayeed

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent cheek biting, a form of self-injurious behavior is a rare entity which presents mostly to dentists and dermatologists. We report a case of recurrent severe cheek biting in an adult male leading to mucosal ulceration. The stereotypic pattern of cheek biting and associated behavior bears striking resemblance to other impulse control disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Guidelines for photography of cutaneous marks and injuries: a multi-professional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Sam; Baylis, Sonya; Carabott, Romina; Jones, Michael; Kelson, Zoe; Marsh, Nick; Payne-James, Jason; Ramadani, Jona; Vanezis, Peter; Kemp, Alison

    2014-05-01

    Investigators assessing the likelihood of physical abuse, must make a decision as to whether the injury seen matches the explanation given. In some instances the pattern of these injuries can give the investigator a possible link to the cause of the injury. Thus, matching an injury pattern to an implement or weapon used has forensic implications. The current method of capturing patterned injuries together with poor scale placement often result in some form of distortion that causes a change to the shape of the patterned injury. The aim of this guideline is to assist individuals dealing with the capture of photographic evidence for the investigation of suspected non-accidental patterned cutaneous injuries (PCI), and to ensure high standards of image quality are met for both evidential records and for forensic analysis. The technical equipment specified within these guidelines are recommended by the authors as a basic requirement for imaging best practice, due to their ability to capture detailed and critical data. For precise pattern matching analysis, it is vital that both the injury and the suspected implement are photographed in accordance with this guidance.

  8. Snake bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, David A

    2010-01-02

    Snake bite is a common and frequently devastating environmental and occupational disease, especially in rural areas of tropical developing countries. Its public health importance has been largely ignored by medical science. Snake venoms are rich in protein and peptide toxins that have specificity for a wide range of tissue receptors, making them clinically challenging and scientifically fascinating, especially for drug design. Although the full burden of human suffering attributable to snake bite remains obscure, hundreds of thousands of people are known to be envenomed and tens of thousands are killed or maimed by snakes every year. Preventive efforts should be aimed towards education of affected communities to use proper footwear and to reduce the risk of contact with snakes to a minimum through understanding of snakes' behaviour. To treat envenoming, the production and clinical use of antivenom must be improved. Increased collaboration between clinicians, epidemiologists, and laboratory toxinologists should enhance the understanding and treatment of envenoming. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A survey of dog bites in Salisbury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, H F; Voss, S

    1991-12-01

    A recent survey of patients attending an Accident and Emergency (A&E) department serving several economically depressed Thanet coastal towns found that around 3 per 1000 of the resident population attended each year for the treatment of dog bite injuries (Thomas and Banks, 1990). We report a study of dog bite injuries treated in the A&E department serving Salisbury, a small prosperous Cathedral city, and surrounding villages. In comparison with Thanet, age specific incidence rates for dog bites show a similar pattern but only about half the overall incidence. Some reasons for these findings are suggested and extrapolations for national treatment figures are made.

  10. Insect Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito and flea bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, ...

  11. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog Bite Emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  12. Total case of dog bites to humans and seasonal patterns of the bites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dog bites are poorly understood and often underestimated public health problem as it causes huge medico-social problem as these attacks result in millions of injuries and thousands of deaths all over the world due to risk of rabies transmission. Approximately 1 in 20 dogs bite a human being during the dogs' lifetime.

  13. Visible and invisible marks: facial injuries suffered by women as the result of acts of domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dourado, Suzana de Magalhães; Noronha, Ceci Vilar

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on female facial injuries caused by domestic partners in the light of the cultural assumption that the face is the most valued area of the human body. Through a quantitative/qualitative approach, the study aimed to estimate the prevalence of lesions on the face, head and neck of women abused by their partners. The intention is to comprehend the significance, from the victim's standpoint, of the marks originated in the violent episode and investigate issues concerning healthcare in the treatment of injuries. Statistical data were obtained from reports of the Special Police Department for Women in Salvador, Bahia, and the qualitative phase of research consisted of interviews with women who filed such reports. The results showed that, in 63.2% of studied cases, there were injuries to the face and/or head and/or neck of battered women. Speech analysis revealed that facial injuries, especially permanent ones, tend to result in feelings of low self-esteem, shame and humiliation in the victim, causing severe psychological distress. It was revealed that healthcare was limited to the physical aspects of victimization, without the perception of domestic violence as a health problem and the consequent lack of referral of patients to the centers for women in situations of violence.

  14. Incidence of dog bites in Milwaukee, wis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndon, J A; Jach, G J; Wehrenberg, W B

    1996-04-01

    Dogs are everywhere. The incidence of and injuries caused by dog bites have grown to such epidemic proportions in certain parts of the United States that they are now considered a major public health concern. Playful Rover is no longer a harmless pet. Uncontrolled, he now can be considered a public nuisance. In this study, we evaluated the epidemiology of dog bites recorded in Milwaukee, for calendar years 1989-1991. This assessment included anatomical location of bites, victims' ages, behavioral antecedents, leading up to the bite incidents, season of the year, and animal ownership. The evaluation also measured the correlation coefficient between the frequency of dog bite incidents and median household income distribution within the city. During the 3-year period, a total of 3,926 animal bites, including 3,244 (83%) dog bites, were reported to the City of Milwaukee Department of Health. Of all the dog bites reported, 60% were on the upper extremities. Children less than 15 years old sustained 44% of the injuries, mostly to the head and face. Provocation by the victim accounted for 19% of the cases. The majority of the incidents (67%) occurred during the spring and summer months. In 49% of all cases, the victims families or neighbors owned the animals involved in the biting. Researchers also observed a significant negative correlation between bites and median household income distribution. Study results suggest a need to educate the public about the magnitude of dog-bite problems, enforce leash laws and impound stray dogs as an integral part of prevention programs.

  15. Ward Round - Crocodile bites in Malawi: microbiology and surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case series of 5 patients admitted over 5 months to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital who had sustained injuries from a crocodile bite. Three patients required amputation of a limb. The severe soft tissue injury associated with a crocodile bite and the unusual normal oral flora of the crocodile create challenges ...

  16. Animal Bites: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid Animal bites: First aid Animal bites: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff These guidelines can help you care for a minor animal bite, such ... 26, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/first-aid/first-aid-animal-bites/basics/ART-20056591 . Mayo ...

  17. Which dogs bite?

    OpenAIRE

    Jarrett, P

    1991-01-01

    Young children (less than 11 years old) are a particular risk group for dog bites. Dog bites commonly occur from the family pet. Alsatian or alsatian mixes are the biggest group in the study causing dog bites. Alsations are a popular breed. By comparison Retrievers (Labrador and Golden), also a popular breed, caused few bites.

  18. Carnosine markedly ameliorates H9N2 swine influenza virus-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tong; Wang, Cunlian; Zhang, Ruihua; Xu, Mingju; Liu, Baojian; Wei, Dong; Wang, Guohua; Tian, Shufei

    2015-10-01

    Oxidative stress injury is an important pathogenesis of influenza virus in critically ill patients. The present study investigated the efficacy of carnosine, an antioxidant and free radical scavenger, on a model of acute lung injury (ALI) induced by H9N2 swine influenza virus. Female specific-pathogen-free BALB/c mice were randomized into four groups and treated as follows: (1) H9N2 group, (2) mock control group, (3) H9N2+carnosine group and (4) carnosine control group. The H9N2 group mice were inoculated intranasally with A/Swine/Hebei/012/2008/ (H9N2) virus (100 μl) in allantoic fluid (AF), whilst mock-infected animals were intranasally inoculated with non-infectious AF. Carnosine [10 mg (kg body mass)- 1] was administered orally (100 μl) for 7 days consecutively. The survival rate, lung water content, TNF-α and IL-1β levels, lung histopathology, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 levels were determined at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 14 days after inoculation. Carnosine treatment effectively decreased the mortality (43 versus 75 %, P lungs and decreased the lung wet/dry mass ratio (P lungs of infected mice (P < 0.05), which supported the use of carnosine for managing severe influenza cases.

  19. Snake bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin Convulsions Diarrhea Dizziness Excessive sweating Fainting Fang marks in the skin Fever Increased thirst Loss of ... Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 112. Norris RL. Venomous snakebites in ...

  20. Morphology of open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Karl-Friedrich; Dannhauer, Karl-Heinz; Hierl, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to define and illustrate the skeletal morphology of open-bite patients against the background of sagittal jaw relationships on the basis of lateral cephalograms. Lateral cephalograms of 197 untreated adults were analyzed in dental imaging software (Onyx Ceph 3™; Image Instruments, Chemnitz, Germany). Four groups were formed based on vertical (Index scores) and sagittal (individualized ANB values) parameters. Ninety-nine patients were defined as the control group due to their neutral sagittal and vertical relationships. The remaining patients were found by their vertical relationships to represent open-bite cases and were divided by their sagittal relationships into three study groups: neutral (Class I, n = 34), distal (Class II, n = 26), and mesial (Class III, n = 38). A geometric morphometric approach was used to analyze the x,y-coordinates of 28 skeletal landmarks on each cephalogram. Relative size was captured based on centroid size (CS). The shape-determining factors in the groups were compared by permutation testing after Procrustes transformation, and intergroup differences were visualized in the form of thin-plate splines. While size (CS) was significantly increased in the Class III group, the other two groups were not different from the control group. After Procrustes transformation, characteristic and invariably significant (p common that the mandibular ramus is compressed, but marked differences are seen in terms of vertical development of the maxilla. This differentiated view of open-bite cases should be taken into consideration during individual etiology assessment and treatment planning.

  1. Time series analysis and mortality model of dog bite victims presented for treatment at a referral clinic for rabies exposure in Monrovia, Liberia, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olarinmoye, Ayodeji O; Ojo, Johnson F; Fasunla, Ayotunde J; Ishola, Olayinka O; Dakinah, Fahnboah G; Mulbah, Charles K; Al-Hezaimi, Khalid; Olugasa, Babasola O

    2017-08-01

    We developed time trend model, determined treatment outcome and estimated annual human deaths among dog bite victims (DBVs) from 2010 to 2013 in Monrovia, Liberia. Data obtained from clinic records included victim's age, gender and site of bite marks, site name of residence of rabies-exposed patients, promptness of care sought, initial treatment and post-exposure-prophylaxis (PEP) compliance. We computed DBV time-trend plot, seasonal index and year 2014 case forecast. Associated annual human death (AHD) was estimated using a standardized decision tree model. Of the 775 DBVs enlisted, care seeking time was within 24h of injury in 328 (42.32%) DBVs. Victim's residential location, site of bite mark, and time dependent variables were significantly associated with treatment outcome (prabies implied urgent need for policy formulation on national programme for rabies prevention in Liberia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. K-9 Police Dog Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old male who was brought into the emergency department (ED by police officers after being bitten in the right lower extremity by a police German Shepard after attempting to flee authorities on foot. The patient stated that the dog immediately bit down on his right calf and proceeded to violently shake its head side to side without releasing its grip until police manually pulled the dog off of him. Upon arrival to the ED, he was tachycardic in the 120’s, complaining of severe, throbbing, sharp pain in the right lower extremity, and was neurovascular intact on exam. Significant findings: The photograph is of the anterior compartment of the right lower leg demonstrating multiple deep lacerations with exposed and torn muscle. X-ray showed no foreign body. Discussion: Police dog bites should be treated more cautiously than typical dog bites because these highly-trained dogs are generally larger breeds which are taught to subdue suspects with a bite-and-hold technique rather than bite and release. This can lead to extensive crush injuries, fractures, large caliber lacerations with associated muscle tissue injury and/or severe neurovascular compromise.1 Hence, police dog bites often require provocative diagnostic testing, specialist consultation for possible operative repair, and aggressive irrigation and ultimately admission for intravenous antibiotics.1 This patient’s wound was aggressively irrigated and evaluated by plastic surgery in the ED. He was ultimately admitted for intravenous antibiotics, pain control, wound care, and healing by secondary intention.

  3. Sound Bites that Bite Back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Lisa Storm

    2017-01-01

    In 2012 the Danish Minister for Economic Affairs and the Interior, Margrethe Vestager, spoke four words that would haunt her for weeks and months to come. At a press conference she concluded an answer to a touchy political question with the words: ‘That’s the way it is’ [Sådan er det jo]. This la......In 2012 the Danish Minister for Economic Affairs and the Interior, Margrethe Vestager, spoke four words that would haunt her for weeks and months to come. At a press conference she concluded an answer to a touchy political question with the words: ‘That’s the way it is’ [Sådan er det jo...... such massive rhetorical fallout, and I consider Vestager’s attempt at re-appropriating the sound bite as I engage ancient and contemporary rhetorical theory. In a time where a main concern is with the seeming triumph of emotion over reason in political debate, this case illustrates the dangers of over......-relying on reason alone in politics and speaks to the protean nature of rhetorical agency in the age of social media....

  4. [The Vulnerable Heel of Achilles: Intratendinous Abscess Following a Cat Bite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschin, David; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Seifert, Julia

    2017-06-01

    An 83-year-old patient suffered a cat bite dorsally to the Achilles tendon. In the further course, he developed an isolated intratendinous abscess of the Achilles tendon, which was surgically revised twice and subsequently healed with antibiotic treatment. In Germany, about 40,000 bite injuries of different origins occur annually. Most of these injuries are cat or dog bites, while human bites are rare. Although the course is often complicated, there are no standard recommendations for treatment. An intratendinous abscess after animal bite injury has not been described in the literature as yet. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Open Fracture of the Forearm Bones due to Horse Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Santoshi, John Ashutosh; Leshem, Lall

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Fractures have been described mainly following falling accidents in horse-related injuries. Horse bites are uncommon accidents. We present a case of open fracture of the forearm due to horse bite. Case Report: A 35-year-old male farm-worker presented to the emergency room with alleged history of horse bite to the right forearm about 2 hours prior to presentation while feeding the horse. There was deformity of the forearm with multiple puncture wounds, deep abrasions and small...

  6. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  7. Insect bites and stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Insect and spider bites cause more deaths from venom reactions than bites from snakes. ... Some people have severe, life-threatening reactions to bee stings ... or lightheadedness Abdominal pain or vomiting Rash or flushing

  8. Bug Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can carry other diseases, such as malaria and dengue fever. Spider Bites Most spider bites are minor, ... Clean the area with soap and water, and treat with an antiseptic or antibiotic cream to avoid ...

  9. Patients with thoracic trauma and concomitant spinal cord injury have a markedly decreased mortality rate compared to patients without spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertling, Maren; Suero, Eduardo; Aach, Mirko; Schildhauer, Thomas; Meindl, Renate; Citak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the clinical outcome, with special focus on the mortality rate of thoracic injuries, in patients with and without spinal cord injury. Patients who were treated for thoracic trauma at our institution between January 1998 and December 2007 were included in this retrospective cohort study. Patients were divided into two groups according to whether they had suffered a concomitant spinal cord injury (SCI) (N = 54) or not (N = 61). Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan-Meier function and the Cox proportional hazards model. Age, sex, injury severity score (ISS), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and infection with pneumonia were included as covariates in the final model. Patients with SCI have a 65 % reduction in the chance of dying compared to patients without SCI following thoracic trauma (HR = 0.35; 95%CI = 0.13-0.96; p = 0.041). Sex (HR = 0.67; 95 % CI: 0.26-1.71, P = 0.141), ISS > =25 (HR = 2.08 95 % CI: 0.58-7.49, P = 2.63) and a Charlson Comorbidity Index of 2 (HR = 1.82; 95 % CI: 0.58-7.22, P = 0.393) had no effect in the risk of dying. However, patients older than 60 years had four times the chance of dying than patients younger than 30 years (HR = 4.39; 95 % CI: 1.02-19, P = 0.048). Patients with pneumonia had a nonsignificant twofold increase in the risk of dying (HR = 2.28; 95 % CI: 0.97-5.34, P = 0.059). Our results demonstrate that patients with thoracic trauma and concomitant SCI had markedly decreased mortality compared to patients without SCI, even after adjusting for age, sex, injury severity, comorbidities and pneumonia infection.

  10. Bites and stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Janice; Fahridin, Salma; Britt, Helena

    2009-11-01

    Of the 426 bite or sting problems managed, 312 (73%) were caused by insects. There were 114 other types of bites recorded, the most common being dog and spider bites. There were five cases of toxicity from aquatic animal stings or adverse reactions to bee stings (Table 1).

  11. The Stages of Biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlowe, Dana

    1999-01-01

    Describes infant and toddler biting behavior as related to developmental differences in exploring the environment, learning cause-effect relationships, and using power to elicit a response. Discusses ways to deal with biting at each level, how to support parents dealing with the behavior at home, and the importance of taking biting related to…

  12. Exotic reptile bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J; Ehrlich, M; Henderson, S O

    1997-09-01

    Reptiles are a growing part of the exotic pet trade, and reptile bites have been considered innocuous in the emergency medicine literature. Two cases are reported of reptile bites, one from a green iguana and the other from a reticulated python. The treatment concerns associated with reptile bites are discussed.

  13. Dog bite-related fatalities: a 15-year review of Kentucky medical examiner cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Lisa B E; Bernstein, Mark L; Hunsaker, John C; Stewart, Donna M

    2009-09-01

    A human dog bite-related fatality generally refers to death proximately caused by trauma from a dog's teeth and jaws. According to The Humane Society of the United States, more than 300 individuals died of dog attacks in the United States between 1979 and 1996. Children 70 years represent the typical victims. Pit bull-type dogs, Rottweilers, and German Shepherds constitute the majority of canines implicated in these fatalities.This is a 15-year (1991-2005) retrospective review of dog bite-related fatalities undergoing medicolegal investigation in Kentucky. Of the 11 deaths, 10 consisted of multiple bite marks and blunt force injuries of the head and neck, trunk, and extremities. In 1 case, an asplenic victim's immediate cause of death was bacterial sepsis secondary to a dog bite. Individuals ranged between 14 months and 87 years; 7 (63.6%) were Forensic odontological examinations were performed on the dogs in 4 cases. The requisite multidisciplinary investigation includes a detailed assessment of the scene, the victim, and dog or dogs suspected in the attack.

  14. Animal Bites of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bites occur in the United States each year. Dogs cause most animal bites. Other biting animals include ... elbow or in the armpit Fever Tiredness Night sweats Shakes If these develop, you should seek emergency ...

  15. An Analytical Study of Mammalian Bite Wounds Requiring Inpatient Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Geun Lee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMammalian bite injuries create a public health problem because of their frequency, potential severity, and increasing number. Some researchers have performed fragmentary analyses of bite wounds caused by certain mammalian species. However, little practical information is available concerning serious mammalian bite wounds that require hospitalization and intensive wound management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to perform a general review of serious mammalian bite wounds.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of the medical charts of 68 patients who were referred to our plastic surgery department for the treatment of bite wounds between January 2003 and October 2012. The cases were analyzed according to the species, patient demographics, environmental factors, injury characteristics, and clinical course.ResultsAmong the 68 cases of mammalian bite injury, 58 (85% were caused by dogs, 8 by humans, and 2 by cats. Most of those bitten by a human and both of those bitten by cats were male. Only one-third of all the patients were children or adolescents. The most frequent site of injury was the face, with 40 cases, followed by the hand, with 16 cases. Of the 68 patients, 7 were treated with secondary intention healing. Sixty-one patients underwent delayed procedures, including delayed direct closure, skin graft, composite graft, and local flap.ConclusionsBased on overall findings from our review of the 68 cases of mammalian bites, we suggest practical guidelines for the management of mammalian bite injuries, which could be useful in the treatment of serious mammalian bite wounds.

  16. Bite through the tent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naue, Jana; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine; Pietsch, Klaus; Sänger, Timo; Schlauderer, Nicola; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-05-01

    The authors report on a young boy who was bitten into his face by an unknown animal while being asleep in a tent. Given the bite marks and the location of the scene, members of the mustelidae and canidae families were the first "suspects." Deoxyribunucleic acid (DNA) recovered from the tent's wall was analyzed with regard to parts of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal ribunucleic acid (12S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes as well as nuclear short tandem repeats (STRs). Since Sanger sequencing revealed a mixed sequence with a strong human component overlying the nonhuman contributor, an animal screening using a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with an intercalating dye and melt curve analysis was employed. The results were later confirmed by cloning. The applied commercial canine STR kit verified the animal family (canidae) but did not help in discriminating the species due to cross-species amplification. In the presented case, the real-time PCR assay offered the cheapest and fastest method for animal family determination, which then allowed for an appropriate and sample-saving strategy to characterize the causative animal species.

  17. Treatment for Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... find out where to take your child for treatment. If the wound is so large that the edges won’t ... above the bite Your pediatrician may recommend antibiotic therapy for a child who has: Moderate or severe bite wounds Puncture wounds, especially if the bone, tendon, or ...

  18. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  19. Dog and cat bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert; Ellis, Carrie

    2014-08-15

    Animal bites account for 1% of all emergency department visits in the United States and more than $50 million in health care costs per year. Most animal bites are from a dog, usually one known to the victim. Most dog bite victims are children. Bite wounds should be cleaned, copiously irrigated with normal saline using a 20-mL or larger syringe or a 20-gauge catheter attached to the syringe. The wound should be explored for tendon or bone involvement and possible foreign bodies. Wounds may be closed if cosmetically favorable, such as wounds on the face or gaping wounds. Antibiotic prophylaxis should be considered, especially if there is a high risk of infection, such as with cat bites, with puncture wounds, with wounds to the hand, and in persons who are immunosuppressed. Amoxicillin/clavulanate is the first-line prophylactic antibiotic. The need for rabies prophylaxis should be addressed with any animal bite because even domestic animals are often unvaccinated. Postexposure rabies prophylaxis consists of immune globulin at presentation and vaccination on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Counseling patients and families about animal safety may help decrease animal bites. In most states, physicians are required by law to report animal bites.

  20. All about Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisalli, Linda

    2008-01-01

    As directors of early learning programs, one deals with a myriad of issues on a daily basis. One of the more frustrating things that come up from time to time is biting. Biting is particularly problematic because it tends to elicit such a strong response from caregivers, parents, and other children. In this article, the author talks about biting…

  1. Managing the Biting Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claffey, Anne E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the causes of biting behavior and techniques that parents and educators can use to manage biting toddlers. Notes that solutions need to consider the developmental level and needs of the child, the influence of the child's environment, and the role of adults in the child's life. (MDM)

  2. Electrical Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... how quickly you get treatment. Causes of electrical injuries include Lightning strikes Faulty electrical appliances Work-related exposures Contact with household wiring or power lines Accidents in small children, when they bite or suck on electrical cords, ...

  3. Cause, setting and ownership analysis of dog bites in Bay County, Florida from 2009 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, J; Templin, M; Jordan, M M; Stanek, D

    2015-02-01

    Emergency room and hospital discharge data have been used to describe the risk factors and public health impact of dog bites. These data sets are based on financial charges for severe bites and underestimates dog bite burdens within communities. This study expands both the source of information and risk factor data collected to provide demographic analysis of dog bite injury risk factors reported in Bay County, Florida in 2009-2010. Extended data for dog bites reported by various sources from January 1, 2009 to December 31, 2010 were collected by Florida Department of Health in Bay County. Data collected included bite victim's age and gender, primary reported cause of bite, setting, dog's restraint status and relationship between the victim and the dog. A total of 799 bites were reported. Most bites (55%) were reported first by healthcare practitioners, particularly bites involving childrendogs and dogs off the owner's property were more likely to be reported by other sources. Boys aged 6-14 years accounted for 2.24 times more bites than same-aged females (Pdog. Inappropriate behaviour management was the most common cause of bites (26%), followed by protective behaviour (24%). Bites of unknown cause were 2.5 times more likely in childrendog fights was the most common cause of bites for persons 15 years or older (24%); females were significantly more likely to be bit than males (P=0.01). Bites by unrestrained dogs off the owner's property (32% of all bites) most commonly involved males. Estimates based solely on healthcare discharge data significantly underestimate dog bite burden within a community. Characterizing these risks by age group or gender provides an opportunity to implement targeted interventions to prevent dog bites. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Dog bites to the upper extremity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Joshua; Showery, James; Abdou, Marwa; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A; Abdelgawad, Amr A

    2015-12-01

    Dog bites are common injuries in children. A large percentage of these dog bites affect the upper extremity. There is little information describing the results of treatment of upper extremity injuries in children. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records for all children less than 19 years old who presented to the emergency department in our level one trauma centre because of dog bites from 2005 to 2011. During the study period, there were 254 paediatric emergency department visits for animal bites, among these there were 118 dog bites, two were excluded because of inadequate documentation leaving 116 patients; 26 of them (22.4%) had bites to the upper extremity. Among the 26 children with dog bites to the upper extremity, 6 (23.1%) were admitted to the hospital for surgery (four patients) or parenteral antibiotics (two patients). Among the four surgeries, two were for extensive laceration and two were for abscess debridement. Of the 41 who presented with bites to the lower extremities, none were admitted to the hospital (P = 0.002). Compared with those who presented the same day they were injured, the relative risk of hospitalization or surgery in patients who presented 1 and 2 days after their injury was 3.5 and 7.0, respectively. Dog bites at the upper extremity are more prone to require surgical intervention and develop infection than those at the lower extremity, and delayed presentation of these injuries is associated with higher incidence of developing infection. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2015 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. Understanding and Preventing Toddler Biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Veronica

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the problem of toddler biting behavior in child care settings. Describes reasons for biting by toddlers, recommends caregiver responses to toddler biting, presents tips for observing children to identify the biter's patterns, and outlines ways to prevent biting in child care settings. (KB)

  6. Spider Bites (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body rash fever and chills fatigue Of a black widow spider bite: rigid, painful muscles within 8 hours no ... child was bitten by a brown recluse or black widow spider Think Prevention! Make sure garages, attics, and woodpiles ...

  7. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  8. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by either of 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are ...

  9. Dog bites in children treated in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, L M; Gardner, M J; O'Connor, J; Amon, N

    2000-01-01

    Unintentional injury is the leading cause of death and disability among children. This study sought to describe the characteristics of dog bite injuries to aid in promoting healthy environments for children. This descriptive, retrospective study of one hospital's 1997 emergency department records detailed dog bite injuries to children and adolescents and resultant emergency treatment (N = 204). Children dog's owner was generally a parent or neighbor. Only 2 children received rabies prophylaxis. Parents and children need information about safe interactions with dogs, including community leash laws and quarantine guidelines. Nurses should know the procedures for reporting dog bite injuries to local health authorities. Interested nurses can find many opportunities to assist with community safety campaigns.

  10. Management of vascular trauma from dog bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akingba, A George; Robinson, Eric A; Jester, Andrea L; Rapp, Brian M; Tsai, Anthony; Motaganahalli, Raghu L; Dalsing, Michael C; Murphy, Michael P

    2013-11-01

    Vascular trauma from large-dog bites present with a combination of crush and lacerating injuries to the vessel, as well as significant adjacent soft tissue injury and a high potential for wound complications. This retrospective case series evaluates our 15 years of experience in managing this uncommonly seen injury into suggested treatment recommendations. From our database, 371 adult patients presented with dog bites between July 1997 and June 2012. Twenty (5.4%) of those patients had vascular injuries requiring surgical intervention. Patient demographics, anatomic location of injury, clinical presentation, imaging modality, method of repair, and complication rates were reviewed to assess efficacy in preserving limb function. Pediatric patients were managed at the regional children's hospital and, therefore, not included in this study. Among the 20 surgically treated vascular injuries, there were 13 arterial-only injuries, two venous-only injuries, and five combination arterial and venous injuries. Seventeen patients (85%) had upper extremity injuries; three patients had lower extremity injuries (15%). The axillobrachial artery was the most commonly injured single vessel (n = 9/20; 45%), followed by the radial artery (n = 4/20; 20%). Surgical repair of vascular injuries consisted of resection and primary anastomosis (four), interposition bypass of artery with autogenous vein (13), and ligation (two), with (one) being a combination of bypass and ligation. All patients had debridement of devitalized tissue combined with pulse lavage irrigation and perioperative antibiotics. Associated injuries requiring repair included muscle and skin (n = 10/20; 50%), bone (n = 1/20; 5%), nerve (n = 1/20; 5%), and combinations of the three (n = 5/20; 25%). Postoperative antibiotic therapy was administered for 14.7 ± 8.2 days in all 20 patients. Four patients (20%) developed postoperative wound infections, although this did not compromise their vascular repair. Of the patients

  11. Habitual biting of oral mucosa: A conservative treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Kaur Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic biting of oral mucosa is an innocuous self inflicted injury, commonly seen in children suffering from developmental and psychological problems and has rarely been reported in normal unaffected individuals. The management strategies vary from counseling, prescription of sedatives to different prosthetic shields. The paper highlights the efficacy of a simple approach using soft mouth guard in the management of self inflicted lesions due to habitual biting of oral mucosa in two normal healthy children.

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some ...

  13. Gut mucosal injury in neonates is marked by macrophage infiltration in contrast to pleomorphic infiltrates in adult: evidence from an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MohanKumar, Krishnan; Kaza, Niroop; Jagadeeswaran, Ramasamy; Garzon, Steven A.; Bansal, Anchal; Kurundkar, Ashish R.; Namachivayam, Kopperuncholan; Remon, Juan I.; Bandepalli, C. Rekha; Feng, Xu; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is an inflammatory bowel necrosis of premature infants. In tissue samples of NEC, we identified numerous macrophages and a few neutrophils but not many lymphocytes. We hypothesized that these pathoanatomic characteristics of NEC represent a common tissue injury response of the gastrointestinal tract to a variety of insults at a specific stage of gut development. To evaluate developmental changes in mucosal inflammatory response, we used trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced inflammation as a nonspecific insult and compared mucosal injury in newborn vs. adult mice. Enterocolitis was induced in 10-day-old pups and adult mice (n = 25 animals per group) by administering TNBS by gavage and enema. Leukocyte populations were enumerated in human NEC and in murine TNBS-enterocolitis using quantitative immunofluorescence. Chemokine expression was measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Macrophage recruitment was investigated ex vivo using intestinal tissue-conditioned media and bone marrow-derived macrophages in a microchemotaxis assay. Similar to human NEC, TNBS enterocolitis in pups was marked by a macrophage-rich leukocyte infiltrate in affected tissue. In contrast, TNBS-enterocolitis in adult mice was associated with pleomorphic leukocyte infiltrates. Macrophage precursors were recruited to murine neonatal gastrointestinal tract by the chemokine CXCL5, a known chemoattractant for myeloid cells. We also demonstrated increased expression of CXCL5 in surgically resected tissue samples of human NEC, indicating that a similar pathway was active in NEC. We concluded that gut mucosal injury in the murine neonate is marked by a macrophage-rich leukocyte infiltrate, which contrasts with the pleomorphic leukocyte infiltrates in adult mice. In murine neonatal enterocolitis, macrophages were recruited to the inflamed gut mucosa by the chemokine CXCL5, indicating that CXCL5 and its cognate

  14. Peculiar circular and C-shaped injuries on a body from the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yoko; Tachihara, Katsunori; Ageda, Saori; Arao, Tomonori; Fuke, Chiaki; Miyazaki, Tetsuji

    2004-06-01

    A case where a body with unusual circular injuries was found in the sea is presented. The victim was a 60-year-old woman who had been depressed and had attempted suicide before. She was missing for 6 days before the corpse was found. The body had several almost perfectly circular injuries and C-shaped incision injuries with almost circular flaps of skin. We concluded that the cause of the peculiar circular injuries might be bite marks of Isistius spp. (I. brasiliensis and/or I. plutodus), commonly known as cookie-cutter shark because of its very unusual feeding style.

  15. Effect of a community-based pedestrian injury prevention program on driver yielding behavior at marked crosswalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandt, Laura S; Marshall, Stephen W; Rodriguez, Daniel A; Evenson, Kelly R; Ennett, Susan T; Robinson, Whitney R

    2016-08-01

    Few studies have comprehensively evaluated the effectiveness of multi-faceted interventions intended to improve pedestrian safety. "Watch for Me NC" is a multi-faceted, community-based pedestrian safety program that includes widespread media and public engagement in combination with enhanced law enforcement activities (i.e., police outreach and targeted pedestrian safety operations conducted at marked crosswalks) and low-cost engineering improvements at selected crossings. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of the law enforcement and engineering improvement components of the program on motor vehicle driver behavior, specifically in terms of increased driver yielding to pedestrians in marked crosswalks. The study used a pre-post design with a control group, comparing crossing locations receiving enforcement and low-cost engineering treatments (enhanced locations) with locations that did not (standard locations) to examine changes in driver yielding over a 6-month period from 2013 to 2014. A total of 24,941 drivers were observed in 11,817 attempted crossing events at 16 crosswalks in five municipalities that were participating in the program. Observations of real pedestrians attempting to use the crosswalks ("naturalistic" crossing) were supplemented by observations of trained research staff attempting the same crossings following an established protocol ("staged" crossings). Generalized estimating equations (GEE) were used to model driver yielding rates, accounting for repeated observations at the crossing locations and controlling other factors that affect driver behavior in yielding to pedestrians in marked crosswalks. At crossings that did not receive enhancements (targeted police operations or low-cost engineering improvements), driver yielding rates did not change from before to after the Watch for Me NC program. However, yielding rates improved significantly (between 4 and 7 percentage points on average) at the enhanced locations. This was

  16. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog bite prevention working as well as it should? In this novel, small scale qualitative study, the perceptions of victims regarding their dog bite experience were explored in-depth. The study recruited 8 female participants who had been bitten by a dog in the past 5 years. In-depth, one-to-one interviews were conducted, transcribed, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings indicate that dog bites may not be as easily preventable as previously presumed, and that education about dog body language may not prevent some types of dog bites. The reasons participants were bitten were multifaceted and complex. In some cases, there was no interaction with the dog before the bite so there was no opportunity to assess the situation and modify behavior around the dog accordingly. Identifying who was to blame, and had responsibility for preventing the bite, was straightforward for the participants in hindsight. Those bitten blamed themselves and/or the dog owner, but not the dog. Most participants already felt they had a theoretical knowledge that would allow them to recognize dog aggression before the dog bite, yet participants, especially those who worked regularly with dogs, routinely believed, "it would not happen to me." We also identified an attitude that bites were "just one of those things," which could also be a barrier prevention initiatives. Rather than being special to the human-canine relationship, the attitudes discovered mirror those found in other areas of injury

  17. Funnel-web spider bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002844.htm Funnel-web spider bite To use the sharing features on ... the effects of a bite from the funnel-web spider. Male funnel-web spiders are more poisonous ...

  18. Marine animal stings or bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stings - marine animals; Bites - marine animals ... Things you can do to prevent a marine animal sting or bite include: Swim near a lifeguard. Observe posted signs that may warn of danger from jellyfish or other hazardous marine life. ...

  19. Imaging spectrum of bites, stings, and their complications: pictorial review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Phillip M; Bancroft, Laura W; Peterson, Jeffrey J; Roberts, Catherine C; Liu, Patrick T; Zaleski, Christopher G

    2009-09-01

    Soft-tissue injuries from animal bites and insect stings are frequent causes of emergency department visits. Although many cases follow a short and benign clinical course, life-threatening complications can occur. Imaging can play an important role in guiding clinical care by revealing the scope of the injury and associated complications. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of the epidemiology of animal-related injuries, with a focus on imaging manifestations of soft-tissue injury using multiple techniques in a pictorial review format. This article reviews the imaging manifestations of soft-tissue injuries caused by animal bites and insect stings. After completing this article, the reader should have an improved ability to recognize complications of soft-tissue injuries and the role of advanced imaging in select cases.

  20. Human behavior preceding dog bites to the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezac, P; Rezac, K; Slama, P

    2015-12-01

    Facial injuries caused by dog bites pose a serious problem. The aims of this study were to determine human behavior immediately preceding a dog bite to the face and to assess the effects of victim age and gender and dog sex and size on the location of the bite to the face and the need for medical treatment. Complete data on 132 incidents of bites to the face were analysed. A human bending over a dog, putting the face close to the dog's face, and gazing between victim and dog closely preceded a dog bite to the face in 76%, 19% and 5% of cases, respectively. More than half of the bites were directed towards the central area of the victim's face (nose, lips). More than two thirds of the victims were children, none of the victims was an adult dog owner and only adult dogs bit the face. Victim's age and gender and dog's sex and size did not affect the location of the bite on the face. People who were bitten by large dogs sought medical treatment more often than people who were bitten by small dogs (P face close to the dog's face and gazing between human and dog should be avoided, and children should be carefully and constantly supervised when in the presence of dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Animal Bites - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish (español) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) HealthReach resources will open in a new window. Arabic (العربية) Expand Section Animal Bites and Scratches - العربية (Arabic) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

  2. Mosquito Bites are Bad!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-11

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the dangers of mosquito bites and how to prevent getting them.  Created: 8/11/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/11/2016.

  3. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most bites come from domesticated animals that the child knows, not from wild or unfamiliar animals. A major concern for parents ... some tips to keep in mind. Teach your child to avoid contact with wild animals. She also needs to stay away from ...

  4. Bug Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or sting. Handling Bee and Wasp Stings A bee will usually leave behind a stinger attached to a venom sac. Try to remove it as quickly as ... child has had an allergic reaction to a bee or wasp sting in the past, see your ... shape on its underbelly. The venom (a toxic substance) in a black widow bite ...

  5. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  6. Biting into Big Numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Maureen McCahan

    1996-01-01

    A mnemonic clue sentence--"He thinks mice bite trees"--is suggested for helping students with learning disabilities or mild mental retardation successfully identify up to 15 digit numbers by relating the sentence to the sequence of hundreds, thousands, millions, billions, and trillions. (DB)

  7. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  8. Bergeyella zoohelcum Associated with Abscess and Cellulitis After a Dog Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jumi; Humphries, Romney; Doerr, Laura; Jerris, Robert C; Westblade, Lars F

    2016-02-01

    Cat and dog bites are a common cause of injury in young children. Bergeyella zoohelcum is a rarely reported zoonotic pathogen that is a part of cat and dog oral flora. We present a case of a child with B. zoohelcum abscess and cellulitis after a dog bite and review previously reported cases.

  9. Tooth-marked small theropod bone: an extremely rare trace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland

    2001-01-01

    Tooth-marked dinosaur bones provide insight into feeding behaviours and biting strategies of theropod dinosaurs. The majority of theropod tooth marks reported to date have been found on herbivorous dinosaur bones, although some tyrannosaurid bones with tooth marks have also been reported. In 1988...

  10. Bites of Lists - mapping and filtering sublists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørmark, Kurt

    The idea of applying map and filter functions on consecutive sublists instead of on individual list elements is discussed and developed in this paper. A non-empty, consecutive sublist is called a bite. Both map and filter functions accept a function parameter - a bite function - which...... is responsible for returning a prefix bite of a list. We develop families of bite functions via a collection of higher-order bite generators. On top of the bite generators, a number of bite mapping and bite filtering functions are introduced. We illustrate the usefulness of bite mapping and filtering via...

  11. Food aroma affects bite size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... skin, hair, and nails Skin dictionary Camp Discovery Good Skin Knowledge lesson plans and activities Video library ... biting. Replace the nail-biting habit with a good habit: When you feel like biting your nails, ...

  13. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  14. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this safe, but awful-tasting formula discourages many people from biting their nails. Get regular manicures: Spending ... longer bite any of your nails. For some people, nail biting may be a sign of a ...

  15. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... public", "mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c How to stop biting your nails Nail biting typically ... to bite your nails, you can figure out how to avoid these situations and develop a plan ...

  16. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth. To help you stop biting your ... re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop biting your nails: Some ...

  17. Envelopment technique and topographic overlays in bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeapragassam, Parimala; Daniel, Mariappan Jonathan; Srinivasan, Subramanian Vasudevan; Ramadoss, Koliyan; Jimsha, Vannathan Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    The aims and objectives of our study were to compare four sequential overlays generated using the envelopment technique and to evaluate inter- and intraoperator reliability of the overlays obtained by the envelopment technique. Dental stone models were prepared from impressions made from healthy individuals; photographs were taken and computer-assisted overlays were generated. The models were then enveloped in a different-color dental stone. After this, four sequential cuts were made at a thickness of 1mm each. Each sectional cut was photographed and overlays were generated. Thus, 125 overlays were generated and compared. The scoring was done based on matching accuracy and the data were analyzed. The Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test was used to compare four sequential overlays and Spearman's rank correlation tests were used to evaluate the inter- and intraoperator reliability of the overlays obtained by the envelopment technique. Through our study, we conclude that the third and fourth cuts were the best among the four cuts and inter- and intraoperator reliability were found to be statistically significant at 5% level that is 95% confidence interval (P < 0.05).

  18. Reality Bites: Biting at the Center--Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Jim; Stonehouse, Anne Willis

    1994-01-01

    Examines the problem of biting in group child care, especially among toddlers. Discusses reasons for the behavior such as teething, impulsiveness and lack of self control, excitement and overstimulation, and frustration. Offers advice for child caregivers when biting occurs in their program. (TJQ)

  19. Pigeon tick bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolla, G; Heffler, E; Boita, M

    2018-01-01

    Anaphylaxis is a serious systemic allergic reaction with rapid onset and potentially life-threatening. We report in detail a case of severe nocturnal anaphylaxis due to pigeon tick bite showing the diagnostic value of the extract and the recombinant allergen in the diagnostic procedures (basophil...... reagents. Because of the growing number of pigeons in Middle and Southern Europe cities, some cases of idiopathic anaphylaxis could potentially be caused by A. reflexus in those countries. The identification of pigeon ticks as a trigger of anaphylaxis would greatly improve medical care and advice...

  20. Black widow spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobernick, M

    1984-05-01

    Latrodectus mactans has now invaded towns and cities. The spider's venom is a neurotoxin that causes little local reaction but produces pain and spasm in large skeletal muscle groups within 30 minutes to three hours after the bite. Severe envenomation may result in respiratory failure and coma. First aid is of no value. Muscle relaxants are useful in treatment, as is calcium gluconate. Antivenin is indicated for high-risk victims, such as those with hypertension and persons younger than 16 or older than 60 years of age.

  1. Esthetic correction in open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Parlani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious oral habits, which are persistent, can lead to poor esthetics of a beautiful face. Conventional treatment modalities for an open bite usually include orthodontic treatment and/or skeletal surgery. This article focuses on a different treatment modality for an anterior open bite.

  2. Animal bite - first aid - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100214.htm Animal bite - first aid - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 2 Go to slide 2 out of 2 Overview To treat a minor bite, first wash your hands thoroughly with soap to avoid ...

  3. Bites and Scratches (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tease or provoke any animals, even family pets. Animals should not be disturbed while they are eating or sleeping. If you own a pet, make sure it's properly immunized and licensed. Reviewed by: Larissa Hirsch, MD Date reviewed: January ... Safe Pets First Aid: Animal Bites Cat Scratch Disease Preventing Dog Bites Rabies ...

  4. Dog bites and maxillofacial surgery: what can we do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, C J; Graham, A; Shepherd, K; Greenberg, D

    2015-07-01

    The number of injuries caused by dog bites is increasing in the United Kingdom. We review patients admitted with dog bites to a single maxillofacial department in a district general hospital over a 21-month period. Data include patients' characteristics, and the site and severity of injury. The relationship of the victim to the animal and its breed and classification were added where possible. In total, 65 patients, mean age 22 years (range 1-71, median 14) were included. There were 84 wounds, and their site and severity were recorded according to the Lackmann classification. Twelve different breeds of dog were responsible for the bites. An appreciable proportion of those injured were young children. Educational strategies should aim to reduce the incidence of all dog bites, particularly in young children, as their needs after initial treatment are complex. We propose specific strategies to reduce the number of these injuries. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative injury, adipose fin mark quality, and tag retention of spring Chinook Salmon marked and coded wire tagged by an automated trailer and manual trailer at Carson National Fish Hatchery: October 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service’s Columbia River Fisheries Program Office has been marking and tagging salmon with automated trailers consistently since...

  6. Decline in human dog-bite cases during a street dog sterilisation programme in Jaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, J F; Chawla, S K; Hiby, A R

    2013-05-04

    Human dog-bite injuries are a major public health problem, particularly where there are large populations of free-roaming or street dogs. Dog bites are also the major source of human rabies infections. There is little information on the means to reduce these injuries. Monthly human animal-bite injury records from January 2003 to June 2011 were obtained from the main government hospital in Jaipur, India. The data were analysed and compared with records of pregnancy in street dogs in Jaipur obtained from a street dog sterilisation programme. Human animal-bite injuries showed a seasonal pattern which followed by approximately 10 weeks the seasonal peak of street dog breeding. The number of human animal bites has declined significantly since 2003. It is concluded that a street dog sterilisation programme can reduce human dog-bite injuries by reducing the maternal protective behaviour of the street dogs, as well as reducing the total size of the roaming dog population.

  7. Homicidal Snake Bite in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Melad G; Faheem, Ayman L

    2016-03-01

    Snake bites are common in many regions of the world. Snake envenomation is relatively uncommon in Egypt; such unfortunate events usually attract much publicity. Snake bite is almost only accidental, occurring in urban areas and desert. Few cases were reported to commit suicide by snake. Homicidal snake poisoning is so rare. It was known in ancient world by executing capital punishment by throwing the victim into a pit full of snakes. Another way was to ask the victim to put his hand inside a small basket harboring a deadly snake. Killing a victim by direct snake bite is so rare. There was one reported case where an old couple was killed by snake bite. Here is the first reported case of killing three children by snake bite. It appeared that the diagnosis of such cases is so difficult and depended mainly on the circumstantial evidences. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  8. Brain gene expression differences are associated with abnormal tail biting behavior in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunberg, E; Jensen, P; Isaksson, A; Keeling, L J

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge about gene expression in animals involved in abnormal behaviors can contribute to the understanding of underlying biological mechanisms. This study aimed to explore the motivational background to tail biting, an abnormal injurious behavior and severe welfare problem in pig production. Affymetrix microarrays were used to investigate gene expression differences in the hypothalamus and prefrontal cortex of pigs performing tail biting, pigs receiving bites to the tail and neutral pigs who were not involved in the behavior. In the hypothalamus, 32 transcripts were differentially expressed (P biting behavior as performers or receivers. Among these 19 transcripts were genes associated with production traits in pigs (PDK4), sociality in humans and mice (GTF2I) and novelty seeking in humans (EGF). These are in line with hypotheses linking tail biting with reduced back fat thickness and explorative behavior. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  9. Shrieking, Biting, and Licking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines examples of the monstrous-feminine in the form of abject female monsters in a selection of critically acclaimed and commercially successful video games. Various female monsters from CD Projekt RED’s The Witcher series (2007-2015, and Santa Monica Studio’s God of War series (2005-2013 are considered as examples of the abject monstrous-feminine which fall into a long tradition in horror media of making the female body and body movements into something horrific and repulsive. These female monsters use shrieking, biting, licking, and spreading disease as weapons against the male protagonist, who must slay them to restore symbolic order and progress in the games.

  10. [Protection against tick bites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, N; Lipsker, Dan

    2015-04-01

    There are numerous tick-borne infections, which include viral (TBE), parasitic (babesiosis) and bacterial diseases. Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis) is the most common tick-borne disease in France. In temperate climates such as in France, ticks bite humans between March and October. Prevention relies on adequate clothing and on repellents. The latter are reviewed in this work. Repellents may be natural, made from eucalyptus, tomato and coconut, or synthetic, among which the most widely used is DEET (N,N,-Diethyl-m-toluamide). Newer, synthetic repellents exist such as IR3535 which, as well as being less toxic, also exhibits greater efficacy against ticks. Some repellents are used on the skin, while others, like permethrin, which is actually an insecticide, may be applied to clothing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Animal Bites in Borujerd: An Overview of Animal Bites in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Rabies has been reported as the most important endemic zoonotic disease in Iran and still remains as a major public health problem. Objectives The main objective of the current research was to study the epidemiology of animal bites in Borujerd County in Iran and to compare its prevalence to other parts of Iran from April 2006 to September 2011. Patients and Methods The data were recorded in questionnaires and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-square test was performed to evaluate the relationship among variables and P value was set as 0.05. Results Dog bites were the most common (69.8%, followed by cat (17.2%, fox and wolf (1.4%, sheep and cow (2.8%, monkey and donkey (5%, mouse and squirrel (2.2% and other animals (1.6%. Leg was the most common bite site forming 46.6% of cases, followed by hands (41.8%, buttocks (4.6%, head (4% and body (2.9%. Most of the subjects belonged to the age group < 10 (175.2 per 100000 populations. The injury location was associated significantly with sex and the residential status. Conclusions This study strongly highlights a high priority goal for health authorities to develop educational programs, recommended for the general population to inform them about the benefits of continuing the medication. Vaccination of domestic dogs and also eradication of stray ones, in addition to educational programs should be prioritized by health authorities.

  12. Dog Bite Rates and Biting Dog Breeds in Texas, 1995-1997

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blocker, David

    2000-01-01

    .... The first aim of this study was to summarize descriptive characteristics of biting dogs and dog bite victims in Texas from 1995 through 1997 using the Texas Department of Health severe animal bite...

  13. Reversible myocarditis after spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Hasan; Ak, Ahmet; Bayir, Aysegul; Avci, Ahmet

    2013-04-08

    Black widow spiders (Latrodectus tredecimguttatus) are poisonous spiders endemic in Turkey. Latrodectus bites may cause myocarditis with increased cardiac enzymes. We treated two men (aged 20 and 33 years) who had myocarditis after black spider bites with leucocytosis and elevated levels of troponin I, creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB fraction. Both patients had normal results on an ECG, and one patient had abnormal echocardiography with minimal left ventricular wall movement disorder. Both patients were hospitalised in the intensive care unit and treated with intravenous fluids, analgesics, spasmolytic drugs, tetanus prophylaxis and cardiac monitoring. The levels of troponin I, creatine kinase and creatine kinase-MB fraction improved, and the patients were discharged home on the third and fifth hospital day without complications. Myocarditis after a Latrodectus bite is rare, but may be associated with serious complications. Therefore, in regions endemic with Latrodectus spiders, prudent treatment of spider bites may include cardiac evaluation and monitoring.

  14. Tips to Prevent Tick Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the right insect repellent and other preventive actions can discourage ticks, mosquitoes, and other biting insects from landing on you. Tips include avoiding tick habitats and minimizing exposed skin.

  15. Biting. ERIC/EECE Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesarone, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    This column summarizes recent ERIC documents and journal articles, and highlights some World Wide Web resources, that discuss issues related to the problem of children biting in preschool. (Contains 13 annotated summaries.) (SD)

  16. Defaming Rover: Error-Based Latent Rhetoric in the Medical Literature on Dog Bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arluke, Arnold; Cleary, Donald; Patronek, Gary; Bradley, Janis

    2017-10-25

    This article examines the accuracy and rhetoric of reports by human health care professionals concerning dog bite injuries published in the peer-reviewed medical literature, with respect to nonclinical issues, such as dog behavior. A qualitative content analysis examined 156 publications between 1966 and 2015 identified by terms such as "dog bite" or "dangerous dogs." The analysis revealed misinformation about human-canine interactions, the significance of breed and breed characteristics, and the frequency of dog bite-related injuries. Misinformation included clear-cut factual errors, misinterpretations, omissions, emotionally loaded language, and exaggerations based on misunderstood or inaccurate statistics or reliance on the interpretation by third parties of other authors' meaning. These errors clustered within one or more rhetorical devices including generalization, catastrophization, demonization, and negative differentiation. By constructing the issue as a social problem, these distortions and errors, and the rhetorical devices supporting them, mischaracterize dogs and overstate the actual risk of dog bites.

  17. Human bites of the face

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    involved (90.9%). This was also reported by Muguti et al.3. (29%) and Iregbulem4 (100%). The upper lip was not involved in the present study, and only few series have reported bites to this site - Muguti et al." (5%) and Venter" (7.0%). Iregbulem4 believes that trying to bite off the lip is a subconscious effort to attack and thus.

  18. Dog Bites in Humans and Estimating Human Rabies Mortality in Rabies Endemic Areas of Bhutan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzin; Dhand, Navneet K.; Gyeltshen, Tashi; Firestone, Simon; Zangmo, Chhimi; Dema, Chimi; Gyeltshen, Rawang; Ward, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Dog bites in humans are a public health problem worldwide. The issues of increasing stray dog populations, rabies outbreaks, and the risk of dogs biting humans have been frequently reported by the media in Bhutan. This study aimed to estimate the bite incidence and identify the risk factors for dog bites in humans, and to estimate human deaths from rabies in rabies endemic south Bhutan. Methods A hospital-based questionnaire survey was conducted during 2009–2010 among dog bites victims who visited three hospitals in Bhutan for anti-rabies vaccine injection. Decision tree modeling was used to estimate human deaths from rabies following dog bite injuries in two rabies endemic areas of south Bhutan. Results Three hundred and twenty four dog bite victims were interviewed. The annual incidence of dog bites differed between the hospital catchment areas: 869.8 (95% CI: 722.8–1022.5), 293.8 (240–358.2) and 284.8 (251.2–323) per 100,000 people in Gelephu, Phuentsholing and Thimphu, respectively. Males (62%) were more at risk than females (Pbites and rabies is necessary, particularly for children in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan. PMID:22132247

  19. Case report: compartment syndrome after a suspected black widow spider bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer; Bush, Sean

    2005-04-01

    Widow spider envenomations generally produce systemic neurologic syndromes without significant local injury. We report a patient who sustained a black widow spider bite to the left forearm and presented to the emergency department with rhabdomyolysis and compartment syndrome. We documented a decrease in symptoms and compartment pressure after administration of antivenom. No surgical intervention was performed. We believe this report to be the first documenting compartment syndrome associated with black widow spider bite.

  20. Poisonous animal bites in the Israel Defense Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviv, J; Huerta, M; Shpilberg, O; Klement, E; Ash, N; Grotto, I

    1998-01-01

    Soldiers in field units of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) are susceptible to injury by various poisonous animals during training and operations. Bites and envenomations by animals such as snakes, scorpions, and spiders can be painful and debilitating, and at times life-threatening. We have examined the extent of exposure of IDF soldiers to snake and arthropod bites and the morbidity resulting from these encounters. All reports of IDF soldiers who sought medical attention for snake or arthropod bites between the years 1993-1997 were reviewed at the IDF Medical Corps Headquarters. Monthly distribution of cases was noted for all years, and geographic distribution was studied for all 1997 cases. Over the period 1993-1997 there was a yearly rate of 32-52 physician visits per 100,000 soldiers due to snakebites (mean 43.6/100,000), and 1370-1729 physician visits per 100,000 soldiers due to arthropod bites (mean 1478/100,000). There is a clear overall increase in snake and arthropod bites during the spring and summer months, with a peak in snakebites in May and in arthropod bites in August. 58% of all snakebites in Israel were reported in the central region, with 33% occurring in the south, and 9% in the north of the country. No fatalities due to envenomations have been reported in the IDF in recent years. Poisonous animal species pose a significant threat to the soldiers of the IDF. Overall, envenomation is a common and widespread problem that has significant impact on the military medical system, especially during the spring and summer months. It is possible through institution of proper preventive measures to decrease the exposure of IDF personnel to this environmental hazard.

  1. Bites and stings: epidemiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krau, Stephen D

    2013-06-01

    Rapid and effective treatment of bites is a major variable in the overall outcome of a patient who is a victim of a bite. There are a wide range of animals that bite and sting, and the reactions vary depending on the individual and the animal involved. Although most bites are treated on an outpatient basis, patients who have severe complications related to bites become patients in critical care settings. An overview of potential bite and sting sources, with some general guidelines for what to expect and how to treat the patient, is presented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. MAXILLOFACIAL SOFT TISSUE INJURIES IN NAIROBI, KENYA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-09

    Sep 9, 2012 ... of the variation in the classification of injuries that are used. Many studies .... Distribution of the associated systemic injuries according to the aetiology. MVA. IPV. Falls from heights. Human and. Animal bites. Firearm. Injuries. Total. Head Injury. 24. 14. 3. 0. 0 ... Cases of child abuse resulting in MF-injuries ...

  3. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous ... one’s greatest efforts, bug bites still happen. Fortunately, most bug bites and stings can be safely treated ...

  4. Dog bites in humans and estimating human rabies mortality in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dog bites in humans are a public health problem worldwide. The issues of increasing stray dog populations, rabies outbreaks, and the risk of dogs biting humans have been frequently reported by the media in Bhutan. This study aimed to estimate the bite incidence and identify the risk factors for dog bites in humans, and to estimate human deaths from rabies in rabies endemic south Bhutan. METHODS: A hospital-based questionnaire survey was conducted during 2009-2010 among dog bites victims who visited three hospitals in Bhutan for anti-rabies vaccine injection. Decision tree modeling was used to estimate human deaths from rabies following dog bite injuries in two rabies endemic areas of south Bhutan. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty four dog bite victims were interviewed. The annual incidence of dog bites differed between the hospital catchment areas: 869.8 (95% CI: 722.8-1022.5, 293.8 (240-358.2 and 284.8 (251.2-323 per 100,000 people in Gelephu, Phuentsholing and Thimphu, respectively. Males (62% were more at risk than females (P<0.001. Children aged 5-9 years were bitten more than other age groups. The majority of victims (71% were bitten by stray dogs. No direct fatal injury was reported. In two hospital areas (Gelephu and Phuentsholing in south Bhutan the annual incidence of death from rabies was 3.14 (95% CI: 1.57-6.29 per 100,000 population. The decision tree model predicted an equivalent annual incidence of 4.67 (95% CI: 2.53-7.53 deaths/100,000 population at risk. In the absence of post exposure prophylaxis, the model predicted 19.24 (95% CI: 13.69-25.14 deaths/year in these two areas. CONCLUSIONS: Increased educational awareness of people about the risk of dog bites and rabies is necessary, particularly for children in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

  5. bite ofthe face

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-12-09

    Dec 9, 1992 ... and the return of sensation and function of the orbicularis oris muscle were obtained. SAfrMedJ1994; 84: 37-39. Case report. A 46-year-old WOIDart ... injury (1 hour of warm and 5 hours of cold ischaemia time). The replantation was performed under general anaesthesia. The avulsed tissue was rinsed in ...

  6. Epidemiology of dog bite, a potential source of rabies in Guilan, north of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Mohtasham-Amiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine epidemiological aspects of dog bite in Guilan Province, north of Iran. Methods: An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted on 1 643 cases of dog bites who presented at rabies vaccination centers in Guilan, Iran from June 2011 to May 2012. Data including demographic characteristics of dog bite cases, characteristics of biting dog, treatment and preventive measures carried out, and dog bite incident circumstances were collected. Independent t-test, ANOVA, Fisher exact test and chi-square test were used. Results: Dog bite incidences in men and women were 179.4 and 55 in 100 000 populations, respectively. Incidences in urban and rural were 72.8, and 181.9 in 100 000 population, respectively. The highest percentage of victims (20.1% was in 20-29 years old age group. Majority of dogs (92% were owned. Victims in the highest percentage (26.6% were dog owners. Most of dog bites were occurred in houses (58.5%. Entering to the dog’s guarding territory was the most common circumstances (27.6%. Injuries most commonly involved the lower extremities (51%. Rabies vaccine, rabies immunoglobulin, tetanus vaccine and tetanus immunoglobulin were administered for 100%, 23.2%, 74.8%, and 9.1%, respectively. There were significant differences between men and women in term of area and place of bite incidence and dog ownership (P < 0.05. Mean age differences among categories of dog ownership, dog bite circumstance, and bitted site of body were significant (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Designing comprehensive educational programs to reduce dog bite incidence based on gender and age of target groups can be useful.

  7. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... archive Advocacy Action Center News Advocacy priorities AADA Health ... biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ...

  8. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side ... Team Patients Patient advocates Media Advertisers Quick links About AAD Support AAD Donate Shop AAD Product catalog ...

  9. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spending money to keep your nails looking attractive may make you less likely to bite them. Alternatively, ... Just knowing when you’re inclined to bite may help solve the problem. Try to gradually stop ...

  10. First Aid: Insect Stings and Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a known severe allergy to a stinging or biting insect injectable epinephrine (EpiPen) was used the site ... Insect Repellents With DEET Safe for Kids? Bug Bites and Stings Can I Use Bug Killers and Repellents During ...

  11. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side ... set of nails, such as your thumb nails, first. When that’s successful, eliminate your pinky nails, pointer ...

  12. Zone 3 ruptured globe from a dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Benjamin P; Cavuoto, Kara; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra

    2015-02-01

    Periocular injuries from dog bites are relatively common in school-age children, but intraocular trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a 7-year-old boy who sustained a zone 3 ruptured globe injury after attack by a Perro de Presa Canario. At presentation, visual acuity in the injured eye was counting fingers. Surgical exploration revealed an inferotemporal corneoscleral laceration extending 15 mm posterior to the limbus, with protrusion of uveal tissue, which was repaired. Visual acuity improved to 20/40 by the first postoperative month. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Facial Dog Attack Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Wei; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2013-01-01

    The exposed position of the face makes it vulnerable to dog bite injuries. This fact combined with the short stature of children makes them a high-risk group for such attacks. In contrast to wounds inflicted by assaults and accidents, dog bite wounds are deep puncture type wounds compounded by the presence of pathologic bacteria from the saliva of the attacking dog. This, combined with the presence of crushed, devitalized tissue makes these wounds highly susceptible to infection. Key to succe...

  14. Venomous bites, stings, and poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, David A

    2012-06-01

    This article discusses the epidemiology, prevention, clinical features, first aid and medical treatment of venomous bites by snakes, lizards, and spiders; stings by fish, jellyfish, echinoderms, and insects; and poisoning by fish and molluscs, in all parts of the world. Of these envenoming and poisonings, snake bite causes the greatest burden of human suffering, killing 46,000 people each year in India alone and more than 100,000 worldwide and resulting in physical handicap in many survivors. Specific antidotes (antivenoms/antivenins) are available to treat envenoming by many of these taxa but supply and distribution is inadequate in many tropical developing countries. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. 21 CFR 882.5070 - Bite block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bite block. 882.5070 Section 882.5070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5070 Bite block. (a) Identification. A bite block...

  16. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for (var c = 0; c How to stop biting your nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through ... effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting can make the skin around your nails feel ...

  17. Prevalence of external injuries in small cetaceans in Aruban waters, southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksenburg, Jolanda A

    2014-01-01

    Aruba, located close to the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela, is one of the most densely populated islands in the Caribbean and supports a wide range of marine-related socio-economic activities. However, little is known about the impacts of human activities on the marine environment. Injuries in marine mammals can be used to examine interactions with human activities and identify potential threats to the survival of populations. The prevalence of external injuries and tooth rake marks were examined in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis) (n = 179), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) (n = 76) and false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) (n = 71) in Aruban waters using photo identification techniques. Eleven injury categories were defined and linked to either human-related activities or natural causes. All injury categories were observed. In total, 18.7% of all individuals had at least one injury. Almost half (41.7%) of the injuries could be attributed to human interactions, of which fishing gear was the most common cause (53.3%) followed by propeller hits (13.3%). Major disfigurements were observed in all three species and could be attributed to interactions with fishing gear. The results of this study indicate that fishing gear and propeller hits may pose threats to small and medium-sized cetaceans in Aruban waters. Thus, long-term monitoring of population trends is warranted. Shark-inflicted bite wounds were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin and bottlenose dolphin. Bite wounds of cookie cutter sharks (Isistius sp.) were recorded in all three species, and include the first documented record of a cookie cutter shark bite in Atlantic spotted dolphin. This is one of the few studies which investigates the prevalence of injuries in cetaceans in the Caribbean. Further study is necessary to determine to which extent the injuries observed in Aruba affect the health and survival of local populations.

  18. Prevalence of external injuries in small cetaceans in Aruban waters, southern Caribbean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanda A Luksenburg

    Full Text Available Aruba, located close to the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela, is one of the most densely populated islands in the Caribbean and supports a wide range of marine-related socio-economic activities. However, little is known about the impacts of human activities on the marine environment. Injuries in marine mammals can be used to examine interactions with human activities and identify potential threats to the survival of populations. The prevalence of external injuries and tooth rake marks were examined in Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis (n = 179, bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus (n = 76 and false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens (n = 71 in Aruban waters using photo identification techniques. Eleven injury categories were defined and linked to either human-related activities or natural causes. All injury categories were observed. In total, 18.7% of all individuals had at least one injury. Almost half (41.7% of the injuries could be attributed to human interactions, of which fishing gear was the most common cause (53.3% followed by propeller hits (13.3%. Major disfigurements were observed in all three species and could be attributed to interactions with fishing gear. The results of this study indicate that fishing gear and propeller hits may pose threats to small and medium-sized cetaceans in Aruban waters. Thus, long-term monitoring of population trends is warranted. Shark-inflicted bite wounds were observed in Atlantic spotted dolphin and bottlenose dolphin. Bite wounds of cookie cutter sharks (Isistius sp. were recorded in all three species, and include the first documented record of a cookie cutter shark bite in Atlantic spotted dolphin. This is one of the few studies which investigates the prevalence of injuries in cetaceans in the Caribbean. Further study is necessary to determine to which extent the injuries observed in Aruba affect the health and survival of local populations.

  19. Predictors of paediatric injury mortality

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    from falls, cuts, burns, road crashes, assaults (physical, including sexual), blunt injury, poisoning, drowning and near-drowning, gunshots, human or animal bites and nonspecific causes.3. Each patient was assessed and data on age, sex, social class, cause of injury, site of injury, symptoms and signs, radiological and other ...

  20. Mosquito Bite Prevention For Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bites. Here’s how: Keep mosquitoes out of your hotel room or lodging Š Choose a hotel or lodging with air conditioning or screens on ... percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection Some brand name examples* (Insect repellents may be sold under ...

  1. Open Fracture of the Forearm Bones due to Horse Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ashutosh Santoshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractures have been described mainly following falling accidents in horse-related injuries. Horse bites are uncommon accidents. We present a case of open fracture of the forearm due to horse bite. Case Report: A 35-year-old male farm-worker presented to the emergency room with alleged history of horse bite to the right forearm about 2 hours prior to presentation while feeding the horse. There was deformity of the forearm with multiple puncture wounds, deep abrasions and small lacerations on the distal-third of the forearm. Copious irrigation with normal saline was done and he was administered anti-tetanus and post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy was commenced. Radiographs revealed fracture of radius and ulna in the mid-shaft region. He underwent emergency wound debridement, and the ulna was stabilised with an intra-medullary square nail. Seventy-two hours later, he underwent re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis. He had an uneventful recovery and at three-month follow-up, the fractures had healed radiographically in anatomic alignment. At two-year follow-up, he is doing well, is pain free and has a normal range of motion compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion: Horse bites behave as compound fractures however rabies prophylaxis will be needed and careful observation is needed. Early radical debridement, preliminary skeletal stabilisation, re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis to plate, and antibiotic prophylaxis were the key to the successful management of our patient. Keywords: Horse; animal bite; forearm; open fracture

  2. Reliable quantification of bite-force performance requires use of appropriate biting substrate and standardization of bite out-lever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin, A Kristopher; Jones, Marc E H

    2014-12-15

    Bite-force performance is an ecologically important measure of whole-organism performance that shapes dietary breadth and feeding strategies and, in some taxa, determines reproductive success. It also is a metric that is crucial to testing and evaluating biomechanical models. We reviewed nearly 100 published studies of a range of taxa that incorporate direct in vivo measurements of bite force. Problematically, methods of data collection and processing vary considerably among studies. In particular, there is little consensus on the appropriate substrate to use on the biting surface of force transducers. In addition, the bite out-lever, defined as the distance from the fulcrum (i.e. jaw joint) to the position along the jawline at which the jaws engage the transducer, is rarely taken into account. We examined the effect of bite substrate and bite out-lever on bite-force estimates in a diverse sample of lizards. Results indicate that both variables have a significant impact on the accuracy of measurements. Maximum bite force is significantly greater using leather as the biting substrate compared with a metal substrate. Less-forceful bites on metal are likely due to inhibitory feedback from mechanoreceptors that prevent damage to the feeding apparatus. Standardization of bite out-lever affected which trial produced maximum performance for a given individual. Indeed, maximum bite force is usually underestimated without standardization because it is expected to be greatest at the minimum out-lever (i.e. back of the jaws), which in studies is rarely targeted with success. We assert that future studies should use a pliable substrate, such as leather, and use appropriate standardization for bite out-lever. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Human bite wounds: a swiss emergency department experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Malek; Hatzigianni, Panagiota; Fux, Christoph; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2012-04-01

     Human bites (HB) are the third most common bite wound diagnosed in emergency departments, after dog and cat bites. Management of HB can be challenging, given the high risk of infection associated with multiorganism-rich oral flora. Recognition and early aggressive treatment are essential steps in preventing infections and other associated complications. A retrospective, 10-year electronic chart review was performed, which identified 104 HB. Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome were noted for each case. Most of the patients were male, with a male:female ratio of 4:1. A majority of patients (n = 53, 51%) presented with finger and hand injuries. Only 13.8% were bitten on the head or neck, and 25% on the upper limbs. The remainder (35.2%) of patients sustained injuries to other body parts. Twelve operations were necessary and performed by plastic and hand surgeons. More than half of the patients (60.5%) received antibiotic therapy, and 84.6% of the patients had their tetanus prophylaxis administered or received a booster by the time of treatment. Only 40.4% of patients had a post-bite serology test to rule out bloodborne viral infections, none of whom tested positive. The viral status of the biter was known in two cases. The goals of HB management are to minimize infection risk and its complications, and to prevent the transmission of systemic infections, such as hepatitis B/C and HIV. Accurate documentation and a management algorithm should be instituted in emergency departments in order to achieve these goals. .

  4. Mandatory desexing of dogs: one step in the right direction to reduce the risk of dog bite? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onise, Katina; Hazel, Susan; Caraguel, Charles

    2017-06-01

    Preventing dog bites is an intractable problem given the complex dog bite injury environment. Desexing of dogs has the opportunity of creating a safer injury environment, given the potential links between desexing and behaviour change in dogs. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to examine the evidence for desexing of dogs to reduce dog bite risk within a population health paradigm. Medline and CAB Abstracts were searched for studies that reported data on the association of dog neuter status with the risk of dog bite. All definitions of dog bite were included and all empirical studies were included in the review, limited to those published in English. Quality appraisal and data extraction were based on the 2013 evidence-based practice and critical appraisal tool from the University of Auckland. Five out of six observational studies, from four study populations found evidence that intact dogs were associated with an increased risk of dog bite compared with desexed dogs. The effect sizes ranged across the studies and given the heterogeneity of the studies no single effect size on the association between desexing and dog bite risk could be estimated. There is consistent evidence that desexing dogs is associated with a reduced risk of dog bite, although the studies reflect association and may not be causal. Although recent publications have suggested desexing is associated with health and behavioural costs in some breeds, population level evidence supports desexed dogs having a longer lifespan, and being less likely to wander with the added benefit of reducing unwanted litters. Thus, mandatory desexing presents a possible opportunity for prevention of dog bites expanding dog bite prevention beyond an education-only approach. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Axillofemoral Bypass Markedly Improved Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Kidney Injury in a Patient with Severely Calcified Stenosis of Thoracoabdominal Aorta (Atypical Aortic Coarctation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Masato; Yamada, Shintaro; Maemura, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Takizawa, Masataka; Uozumi, Hiroki; Minegishi, Sachito; Kobayashi, Jotaro; Ikenouchi, Hiroshi

    2017-10-21

    Atypical aortic coarctation (AAC) has been reported to occur anywhere along the aorta, except for the ascending aorta. The associated symptoms include hypotension in the lower half of the body, secondary hypertension in the upper half of the body, and heart failure. Here we present an 80-year-old Asian woman complaining of progressive exertional dyspnea. She was diagnosed with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to severely calcified stenosis of the thoracoabdominal aorta, the so called AAC. She received hemodiafiltration, and pulmonary congestion improved in part. Generally, surgical treatments are quite invasive in elderly patients. Endovascular stent graft placement is less invasive, however, fracture and rupture should be considered at severely calcified lesions like this case. Therefore, we selected extra-anatomical axillofemoral bypass. Her recovery after the surgery was remarkable. In a few days, she became free from hemodiafiltration, intravenous diuretics, and oxygen administration. We thought the contributive factors are the increase in kidney blood flow and the correction of afterload mismatch. The decrease in pulse pressure may reflect the reduction in systemic arterial compliance by axillofemoral bypass. The operative mortality of axillofemoral bypass was reported to be acceptable, although the patency of the axillofemoral bypass graft was not high enough. In conclusion, axillofemoral bypass is effective and feasible for elderly patients with acute decompensated heart failure and kidney injury due to AAC.

  6. Management of human bites of the face in Enugu, Nigeria | Olaitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human bites of the face present to the surgeon sometimes with a dilemma as to the method and timing of surgery. Often patients present with soft tissue defects as a result of the injury sustained. Reconstruction therefore becomes absolutely necessary to avoid psychosocial complications. Objectives: The aim of ...

  7. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite | Sbai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead ...

  8. Epidemiological patterns of animal bites in the Babol County, North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Ghaffari-Fam

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Since the average age of the subjects with injuries on the head and upper organs was lower than that of victims with other organs injured and since that pet dogs were the major biter, structured monitoring programs that focus on specified target groups in collaboration with other organizations are essential to control the animal bites.

  9. Canine-specific STR typing of saliva traces on dog bite wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cordula; Berger, Burkhard; Reinhold, Maximilian; Lutz, Martin; Parson, Walther

    2004-12-01

    Forensic investigations in dog attacks usually involve the examination of bite marks and toothprints, the dog's stomach and pathological methods. For identification of the offending dog we evaluated canine STR typing of saliva traces on dog bite marks. The specificity of 15 canine-specific STRs was tested on human-canine DNA mixtures prior to an applied study in which 52 cases of dog bites were investigated. The first-aid wound bandages as well as swab samples from the surrounding area of the wound were used for DNA analyses. Generally, it was possible to obtain a canine-specific STR profile from the dog's saliva left on the wound area, even when high background of human DNA was present (blood). Interestingly, we found canine STR typing to be more successful when the bandages and swabs showed high amounts of human blood, i.e. when the dog bite was severe. Canine saliva was then sometimes visible as white-coloured secretion on the human blood surface. Less severe bite cases, which did not result in bleeding wounds, showed less success in obtaining useful STR results, probably due to the fact that the surface of the wounds may have been treated before the victims consulted medical aid which therefore removed the canine cells.

  10. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouth- and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 ml (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  11. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.A. de; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouthfeel and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 mL (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  12. Studies on CO 2 laser marking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Saitoh, Yoshikazu; Hachisuka, Hideki; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki; Gokoh, Yukihiro; Mantani, Hiroshi

    The nature of CO 2 laser marking was studied with a view to putting these lasers to practical use in the semiconductor industry. The marking is found to be due to surface spattering rather than burning, which is the main factor in YAG laser marking. The visibility greatly increases by the application of a surface treatment such as marker ink, varnish or poster color. The CO 2 laser may therefore be used in place of the YAG laser, now widely used for marking, with some merits: CO 2 laser marking is cheaper and faster, and in addition there is no danger of injury from irradiating laser light.

  13. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites ... take steps to reduce your risk. To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the following tips: Use ...

  14. Mortality and management of 96 shark attacks and development of a shark bite severity scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Ashley K; Burgess, George H; Perrin, Karen; Brown, Jennifer A; Mozingo, David W; Lottenberg, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Humans share a fascination and fear of sharks. We predict that most shark attacks are nonfatal but require skilled, timely medical intervention. The development of a shark bite severity scoring scale will assist communication and understanding of such an injury. We retrospectively reviewed records of the prospectively maintained International Shark Attack File (ISAF) at the University of Florida. The ISAF contains 4409 investigations, including 2979 documented attacks, 96 of which have complete medical records. We developed a Shark-Induced Trauma (SIT) Scale and calculated the level of injury for each attack. Medical records were reviewed for the 96 documented shark attack victims since 1921. Calculated levels of injury in the SIT Scale reveal 40 Level 1 injuries (41.7%), 16 Level 2 injuries (16.7%), 18 Level 3 injuries (18.8%), 14 Level 4 injuries (14.6%), and eight Level 5 injuries (8.3%). The overall mortality of shark attacks was 8.3 per cent. However, SIT Scale Level 1 injuries comprised the greatest percentage of cases at 41.7 per cent. Injury to major vascular structures increases mortality and necessitates immediate medical attention and definitive care by a surgeon. Shark bites deserve recognition with prompt resuscitation, washout, débridement, and follow up for prevention of infection and closure of more complex wounds.

  15. Talking to Patients about Preventing Tick Bites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-14

    This podcast will help health care providers identify patients who are at increased risk of getting tick bites and provide these patients with tick bite prevention and removal tips.  Created: 2/14/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  16. Tail-biting: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nina R; Main, David C J; Mendl, Mike; Edwards, Sandra A

    2010-11-01

    Tail-biting data from different studies are difficult to compare because a range of definitions of tail-biting behaviour and tail-biting lesions are used. Although records from abattoirs provide a large database, their usefulness is restricted as tail-biting is under-recorded and environmental and husbandry factors associated with the behaviour are unlikely to be known. Both farm and abattoir data provide no information on the number of pigs biting, only those bitten. Studying individual animals that tail-bite should give a better understanding of the pig's motivation to tail-bite and which of the components of its environment should be adjusted to improve welfare. This review examines the existing literature on tail-biting in pigs but considered from a new perspective using three different descriptive behavioural types, namely, 'two-stage', 'sudden-forceful' and 'obsessive', each of which may have different motivational bases. The article also considers the different environmental and husbandry factors which may affect each type of behaviour and discusses why this is such a complicated field and why it is often difficult to draw conclusions from available research. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Nail Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Watson, T. Steuart; Kazmerski, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    This study applied functional analysis methodology to nail biting exhibited by a 24-year-old female graduate student. Results from the brief functional analysis indicated variability in nail biting across assessment conditions. Functional analysis data were then used to guide treatment development and implementation. Treatment included a…

  18. Tick Bite Alopecia: A Report and Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael C; Milchak, Marissa A; Parnes, Herbert; Ioffreda, Michael D

    2016-11-01

    Tick bites can cause a number of local inflammatory reactions, which are often difficult to differentiate from those induced by other arthropod bites or stings. These include erythematous nodular or pustular lesions, erosive plaques, annular lesions of erythema chronicum migrans, and both scarring and nonscarring inflammatory alopecia. We report a case of nonscarring alopecia in a 21-year-old male who reported a recent history of tick bite to the scalp. The biopsy demonstrated a dense pseudolymphomatous inflammatory infiltrate with numerous eosinophils associated with hair follicle miniaturization and an elevated catagen-telogen count. Signs of external rubbing, including lichen simplex chronicus and the "hamburger sign", were also visualized and are indicative of the associated pruritus. To the authors' knowledge, this is the fifth report of nonscarring tick bite alopecia in the literature and the first in an adult patient. This text will review the classic clinical presentation, histologic findings, and proposed mechanism of tick bite alopecia.

  19. Iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although thousands of iguanas are kept as pets in the United States, information on their bites is limited. The intent of this investigation was to describe the pattern of iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers. Iguana bites reported during 1998-2008 were identified. The distribution of cases by various factors was determined. Of 59 total bites, 71% were managed on-site, 17% of the patients were at or en route to a health care facility when the poison center was contacted, and 10% were referred to a health care facility. The medical outcome was no effect in 9% of the cases, minor effect in 24%, moderate effect in 2%, not followed but minimal effects possible in 64%, and unable to follow but potentially toxic in 2%. Most iguana bites reported to Texas poison centers did not result in serious effects and were managed on-site. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Necrotizing fasciitis and cellulitis of the upper limb resulting from centipede bite: two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, A-P; Steinmann, G; Bertino, R; Korsaga, A

    2009-10-01

    Centipede bites occurring in tropical countries are rare, however vigilance must be exercised during activities in the open air and dwellings should be checked in the event of rain. The bite is very painful and can be accompanied by generalised signs. An initial wound disinfection and a check of antitetanus vaccination status is all that is usually needed to ensure an uneventful outcome. There are however, rare cases where local toxicity and a bacterial super-infection, often with Gram+ cocci, can lead to a cellulitis or even necrotizing fasciitis of the hand. The diagnosis of a centipede bite can be made by the double marks made by the fangs. Wound debridement and antibiotics led to a good outcome in both our cases.

  1. Barking up the wrong tree? A survey of dog bite wound management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M; Walker, A; Brenchley, J

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: Several trials have been published examining the role of antibiotics in dog bite wound management. A meta-analysis of these suggests that there is very little benefit to routine antibiotic prescription in these patients. All papers however incorporated rigorous wound care regimens involving large volume irrigation. Methods: The authors undertook a telephone survey to investigate wound care and prescribing practice in bite wound management in accident and emergency and minor injury units in the Yorkshire region. Results: Twenty one departments were contacted. Only 10% of departments routinely irrigate these wounds. Antibiotics are prescribed routinely in 71%. Conclusions: Management of dog bite wounds would not seem to be evidence based in most departments in this sample. PMID:12748142

  2. Dog and cat bite wounds: Epidemiological characteristics, forensic investigation and civil liability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjanski Vladimir Ž.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available People injuries after bites of a dog and/or cat are contemporary and all the time issue. The consequences that stem out of this relationship of people and dogs and/or cats are numerous - medical, utility-environmental, sociological, legal and economic. The subject of this paper is to analyze the epidemiological characteristics of wounds caused by dog and cat bites, their forensic examination and analysis of civil liability of subjects/entities responsible for damages resulting from bite of dogs and cats. Forensic examination is carried out by reconstruction of events, identification of the dog/cat, determination of pathological condition in the dog/cat and the injured party and the estimatimation of alternative explanations. Within the analysis of civil liability, legal basis of liability, the persons responsible for compensation, types of damages and reasons for the disclaimer are determined.

  3. Presentation and management of human lip bites at a Kenyan center: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, Kennedy J; Chindia, Mark L

    2010-11-01

    To describe the pattern of presentation and management of human lip bites. Data on patients who presented with human lip bites between 2005 and 2007 were recorded. There were 6 men and 4 women whose ages ranged from 25 to 60 years with varying degrees of lip loss that occurred in different circumstances. Reconstruction using local flaps was carried out in various stages to achieve satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes. Human lip bites can be repaired at any time of presentation using local flaps with acceptable results. Wound infection is not a major issue following these injuries. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get attention or express how they're feeling. Frustration, anger, and fear are strong emotions and toddlers ... in-progress, it's important to create a zero-tolerance culture at home, daycare, and elsewhere. Here are ...

  5. Talking tails : quantifying the development of tail biting in pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tail biting is an adverse behaviour characterised by manipulation of a pig’s tail by another pig resulting in tail damage and a possible tail biting outbreak. Tail biting is a common problem in the pig husbandry causing economic losses and reduced animal welfare worldwide. To prevent tail biting,

  6. Prospective medical evaluation of 7 dogs presented with fly biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Diane; Bélanger, Marie C; Bécuwe-Bonnet, Véronique; Parent, Joane

    2012-12-01

    Fly biting describes a syndrome in which dogs appear to be watching something and then snapping at it. Medical work-up of fly biting in dogs has never been reported. The aims of this case series were to characterize fly biting and perform a complete medical evaluation of dogs displaying fly biting.

  7. Prospective medical evaluation of 7 dogs presented with fly biting

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Diane; Bélanger, Marie C.; Bécuwe-Bonnet, Véronique; Parent, Joane

    2012-01-01

    Fly biting describes a syndrome in which dogs appear to be watching something and then snapping at it. Medical work-up of fly biting in dogs has never been reported. The aims of this case series were to characterize fly biting and perform a complete medical evaluation of dogs displaying fly biting.

  8. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule Managing a practice Prior authorization assistance Teledermatology Compliance HIT ... Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care ...

  9. [Bites of venomous snakes in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Andreas; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Schneemann, Markus

    2016-06-08

    Although snake bites are rare in Europe, there are a constant number of snake bites in Switzerland. There are two domestic venomous snakes in Switzerland: the aspic viper (Vipera aspis) and the common European adder (Vipera berus). Bites from venomous snakes are caused either by one of the two domestic venomous snakes or by an exotic venomous snake kept in a terrarium. Snake- bites can cause both a local and/or a systemic envenoming. Potentially fatal systemic complications are related to disturbances of the hemostatic- and cardiovascular system as well as the central or peripheral nervous system. Beside a symptomatic therapy the administration of antivenom is the only causal therapy to neutralize the venomous toxins.

  10. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Anti-aging skin care Kids’ zone About skin: Your body's ... biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care Kids’ zone Video library Find a ...

  11. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... nail biting can also leave you vulnerable to infection as you pass harmful bacteria and viruses from ... your nails and develop a skin or nail infection, consult a board-certified dermatologist . "); (function () { var a = "", ...

  12. Tarantula bite leads to death and gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Kalyan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilobrachys hardwikii-giant black hairy spider bite produced two deaths, one case of gangrene of the foot and urticarial rashes in another person in a remote village of Churulia 30 km from Asansol.

  13. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... board-certified dermatologist? Other conditions Diseases: A-Z index Skin, hair, and nail care Skin care Hair ... nails Nail biting typically begins in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can ...

  14. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Anti-aging skin care Kids’ zone About skin: Your ... Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care Kids’ zone Video library Find ...

  15. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ... 0; c Explore AAD Member resources Practice Tools Education Meetings & events Advocacy Public & patients AAD Resources For: ...

  16. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / ... Injured skin Nail care Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes ...

  17. Eosinophilic Fasciitis Induced by Fire Ant Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Mallepalli, Jyothi R.; Quinet, Robert J.; Sus, Rachana

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of eosinophilic fasciitis likely related to proximate fire ant bites and review the literature to summarize the etiology and clinical, laboratory, histopathological, and therapeutic aspects of eosinophilic fasciitis.

  18. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... figure out how to avoid these situations and develop a plan to stop. Just knowing when you’ ... a doctor. If you bite your nails and develop a skin or nail infection, consult a board- ...

  19. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care ... 0; c Explore AAD Member resources Practice Tools Education Meetings & events Advocacy Public & patients AAD Resources For: ...

  20. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Year Award Step therapy legislation Scope of practice Melanoma state reporting FSMB Interstate Compact Legislative Conference Position ... as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you to bite your nails, you can ...

  1. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... document.write(""); document.write(" Cart "); } else { document.write(" Sign in Cart "); } })(); AAD American Academy of Dermatology Excellence ... For some people, nail biting may be a sign of a more serious psychological or emotional problem. ...

  2. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments Acne and rosacea Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty ... and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ...

  3. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Part 2: Origin Part 3: Function Textbook Study notes Image library 3-D animated image library Board ... gradually stop biting your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try ...

  4. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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  5. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... programs & events Learn about skin cancer Get involved Free ... like biting your nails, try playing with a stress ball or silly putty instead. This will help keep your hands busy and away from ...

  6. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and ... and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting can make the skin around ...

  7. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Alternative payment models Fee schedule State policy State policy and ... recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting one set of nails, such as your thumb nails, ...

  8. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule Managing a practice Prior authorization assistance Evaluating practice models ... Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care ...

  9. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... like biting your nails, try playing with a stress ball or silly putty instead. This will help ... of hangnails, or other triggers, such as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you ...

  10. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

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    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... your nails: Some doctors recommend taking a gradual approach to break the habit. Try to stop biting ...

  11. Philodryas patagoniensis bite and local envenoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, S A; Silveira, P V

    1994-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy bitten by a specimen of Philodryas patagoniensis, a colubrid snake currently classified as nonvenomous, developed signs of local envenoming characterized by swelling and warmth on the bitten limb. This is the first time that local envenoming following Philodryas patagoniensis bite is recognized. Based on the clinical findings and misidentification of the snake, the patient was treated as a victim of Bothrops bite, having received unnecessarily the specific antivenom. Educational efforts to make doctors and health workers capable to identify correctly venomous snakes are necessary, to avoid inappropriate indication of antivenom and decrease the risk of its potentially harmful untoward effects. Examination of the bite site can be useful to the differential diagnosis between pit viper and colubrid bites.

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine ...

  13. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nails feel sore, and it can damage the tissue that makes nails grow, resulting in abnormal-looking ... as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you to bite your nails, you can ...

  14. Unusual Causes of Genital Injuries and their Management in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three cases of genital injuries caused by self-amputation, dog bite and cassava grating machine are presented. Accidental partial amputation of the penis through dog bite and de-gloving by cassava grating machine and unusual and, to our knowledge, have never been reported before. A previous report from this center ...

  15. Root surface areas of maxillary permanent teeth in anterior normal overbite and anterior open bite assessed using cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suteerapongpun, Piyadanai; Sirabanchongkran, Supassara; Wattanachai, Tanapan; Sriwilas, Patiyut; Jotikasthira, Dhirawat

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the root surface areas of the maxillary permanent teeth in Thai patients exhibiting anterior normal overbite and in those exhibiting anterior open bite, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images of maxillary permanent teeth from 15 patients with anterior normal overbite and 18 patients with anterior open bite were selected. Three-dimensional tooth models were constructed using Mimics Research version 17.0. The cementoenamel junction was marked manually. The root surface area was calculated automatically by 3-Matic Research version 9.0. The root surface areas of each tooth type from both types of bite were compared using the independent t-test ( P <.05). The intraclass correlation coefficient was used to assess intraobserver reliability. The mean root surface areas of the maxillary central and lateral incisors in individuals with anterior open bite were significantly less than those in those with normal bite. The mean root surface area of the maxillary second premolar in individuals with anterior open bite was significantly greater than in those with normal bite. Anterior open-bite malocclusion might affect the root surface area, so orthodontic force magnitudes should be carefully determined.

  16. Open bite treatment using clear aligners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarneri, Maria Paola; Oliverio, Teresa; Silvestre, Ivana; Lombardo, Luca; Siciliani, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    A 35-year-old female patient with dentoalveolar open bite of 4 mm, molar Class I malocclusion, centered midlines, moderate crowding, and labial inclination of the lower incisor was treated with clear aligners to reduce protrusion and close the anterior open bite. The result showed that clear aligners were an effective method with which to correct this malocclusion. The treatment was complete after 18 months. The patient was satisfied with her new appearance and function.

  17. Philodryas patagoniensis bite and local envenoming

    OpenAIRE

    Nishioka,Sérgio de Andrade; Silveira,Paulo Vitor Portella

    1994-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy bitten by a specimen of Philodryas patagoniensis, a colubrid snake currently classified as nonvenomous, developed signs of local envenoming characterized by swelling and warmth on the bitten limb. This is the first time that local envenoming following Philodryas patagoniensis bite is recognized. Based on the clinical findings and misidentification of the snake, the patient was treated as a victim of Bothrops bite, having received unnecessarily the specific antivenom. Educatio...

  18. Human bites of the face

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Zimbabwe, with other similar studies in respect of reasons for the assaults, age and sex of the patients, timespan between injury and treatment, surgical management and incidence of infection. Design. Prospective study. Setting. Department ...

  19. Anterior open bite: aetiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Paul Jonathan; Madahar, Arun K; Murray, Alison

    2011-10-01

    Anterior open bite has a multi-factorial aetiology comprising: genetically inherited skeletal pattern, soft tissue effect and digit-sucking habits. To formulate an appropriate treatment plan, accurate diagnosis is essential. Simple open bites may sometimes resolve completely during the transition from mixed to permanent dentition, if the digit-sucking habit is broken. More significant open bites, however, sometimes extending right back to the terminal molars, rarely resolve spontaneously and will often require complex orthodontic treatment, involving active molar intrusion or even major orthognathic surgery. Unfortunately, surgery has associated risks attached, including pain, swelling, bruising, altered nerve sensation and, occasionally, permanent anaesthesia, as well as involving significant costs, as with any major surgical procedure under general anaesthesia. The introduction of Temporary Anchorage Devices (TADs) has expanded the possibilities of orthodontic treatment, beyond traditional limitations of tooth movement. Molar intrusion can be successfully carried out without the need for major surgical intervention, thus avoiding all the attendant risks and disadvantages. This paper provides an overview of anterior open bite and uses an illustrative case where open bite was successfully treated with a combination of fixed appliance therapy and TADs. Anterior open bite is commonly seen in general practice. A knowledge of the possible aetiological factors and their potential management should be understood by general dental practitioners. The increased popularity of TADS allows a new and less invasive approach to management of these cases.

  20. Valiti maailma ilusaim mark

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Mai algul Nürnbergis toimunud filateelia maailmanäitusel valiti 1997. a. maailma kõige ilusam postmark. Konkursi võitis Ahvenamaa mark "75 aastat Ahvenamaa iseseisvust, II koht ئ Soome mark "Postmargipäev: Aino lugulaul", III ئ Saksamaal Heinrich von Stephani 100. surma-aastapäeva puhul välja antud mark.

  1. Reconfiguring trade mark law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsmore, Matthew James

    2013-01-01

    -border setting, with a particular focus on small business and consumers. The article's overall message is to call for a rethink of received wisdom suggesting that trade marks are effective trade-enabling devices. The case is made for reassessing how we think about European trade mark law.......First, this article argues that trade mark law should be approached in a supplementary way, called reconfiguration. Second, the article investigates such a reconfiguration of trade mark law by exploring the interplay of trade marks and service transactions in the Single Market, in the cross...

  2. Case Report of a Newborn Injured By Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ataoğlu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound received from the teeth of an animal, including humans. Human bites are third leading cause of all bites after dog and cat bites. Human bites are severe wounds due to the risk of contamination with mix oral flora and rapid tissue destruction. Bite wounds created by humans are seen in variety of circumstances including aggression, rape, murder, and child abuse. Oral cavity contains beta-hemolytic streptococci, anaerobes and other microorganisms. There have been reported cases of septicemia, severe necrotizing fasciitis, HIV infection, and death caused by human bites. Early reporting and treatment of bite wounds decrease the number and severity of wound infection. Here, we present the case of human bite in a nine-day-old girl and discuss the treatment approaches in the light of the relevant literature.

  3. A technique to capture, analyze, and quantify anterior teeth rotations for application in court cases involving tooth marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, Herman; van Heerden, Willie F P; Solheim, Tore; Owen, Johanna H

    2006-05-01

    Anterior teeth within the human dentition have a specific numerical rotation value. Bite marks show an array of angled indentations, abrasions, microlacerations, and contusions. These marks generally represent the incisal surfaces of the suspect's dentition reflecting the rotation values of the teeth in the dental arch. This study described a method for capturing and analyzing anterior dental rotations. The rotations of individual anterior teeth within the study population were categorized as common, uncommon, and very uncommon according to Allen's classification. In the absence of a large number of incisal patterns present in a bite mark, a single but heavily weighted tooth rotation could be of equal discriminatory potential to several common rotation values. No prevalence studies quantifying individual tooth rotations are available. The measurement of each individual tooth rotation together with its individual discrimination potential will enhance the evaluation of the concordant features observed in bite marks.

  4. Aerobic bacteria cultured from the mouth of the American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) with reference to bacteria associated with bite infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, J M; Dalsey, W C

    1990-01-01

    The American opossum inflicts bite injuries both when hunted for food and when accidentally provoked when handled in captivity. This study involved aerobically culturing organisms from the mouths of seven wild opossums (Didelphis virginiana). Isolates included streptococci, coagulase-positive and -negative staphylococci, Aeromonas spp., Citrobacter freundii, Eikenella corrodens, and Escherichia coli.

  5. Aerobic bacteria cultured from the mouth of the American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) with reference to bacteria associated with bite infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, J M; Dalsey, W C

    1990-01-01

    The American opossum inflicts bite injuries both when hunted for food and when accidentally provoked when handled in captivity. This study involved aerobically culturing organisms from the mouths of seven wild opossums (Didelphis virginiana). Isolates included streptococci, coagulase-positive and -negative staphylococci, Aeromonas spp., Citrobacter freundii, Eikenella corrodens, and Escherichia coli. PMID:2229365

  6. Analysis of cases caused by acute spider bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihni Sulaj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective study of 176 patients in the University Hospital Center of Tirana (Albania, during the period 2001–2011, admitted with the diagnosis of a suspected spider bite. Three fatalities were registered during this decade covered from our study, with a clinical picture of marked hypertension, tachycardia and acute cardiac failure leading to death within a minimum of 25 h and a maximum of 42 h from the occurrence. Out of the total of 176 patients, we had 59% (104 cases females, and 41% males. The overwhelming majority of the patients lived in rural areas (155 of the cases; extremities were mostly affected from the bites. A summary of clinical signs and a brief review of the available literature are made in the results and discussion section of this paper. Authors advocate that special precautions should be taken especially in severe forms of interesting autonomous nerve system, with aggressive fluid resuscitation, supportive therapy and close monitoring of vital signs.

  7. prevalence of biting and non-biting flies in relation to species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    ABSTRACT. Several Dipteran flies are vectors of diseases in the Afro-tropical region. The study was carried out to determine the species abundance of biting and non biting flies prevalent at the Jos Museum. Zoological Garden, north central Nigeria. The flies were trapped using Biconical traps during the raining season of ...

  8. The effects of food viscosity on bite size, bite effort and food intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.A. de; Zijlstra, N.; Mars, M.; Graaf, C. de; Prinz, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies investigated the effect of a food's viscosity on bite size, bite effort and food intake using a standardized protocol in which subjects sipped through a straw every 20 s for a period of 15 min from one of two products, a chocolate-flavored dairy drink and a chocolate-flavored dairy

  9. Shoplifter faces 27 years in prison for biting security guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-05

    A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 13.5 to 27 years in prison following a biting incident after he was caught shoplifting at a Wal-Mart. [Name removed] was convicted of aggravated assault for attempting to inflict serious bodily harm on a security guard by "knowingly exposing her to an infectious disease". [Name removed] bit the guard who detained him and told the guard repeatedly that he had AIDS. A blood test later confirmed his HIV status. The prosecution argued that the guard did not have to show that she had a serious injury, only that [name removed] had placed her at risk. The prosecutor and defense attorneys had earlier agreed to a plea bargain with a sentence of no more than 27 months, but the judge rejected the plea, citing the seriousness of the offense and the defendant's long criminal record. The guard has tested negative.

  10. Bone-breaking bite force of Basilosaurus isis (Mammalia, Cetacea from the late Eocene of Egypt estimated by finite element analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Snively

    Full Text Available Bite marks suggest that the late Eocence archaeocete whale Basilosaurus isis (Birket Qarun Formation, Egypt fed upon juveniles of the contemporary basilosaurid Dorudon atrox. Finite element analysis (FEA of a nearly complete adult cranium of B. isis enables estimates of its bite force and tests the animal's capabilities for crushing bone. Two loadcases reflect different biting scenarios: 1 an intitial closing phase, with all adductors active and a full condylar reaction force; and 2 a shearing phase, with the posterior temporalis active and minimized condylar force. The latter is considered probable when the jaws were nearly closed because the preserved jaws do not articulate as the molariform teeth come into occulusion. Reaction forces with all muscles active indicate that B. isis maintained relatively greater bite force anteriorly than seen in large crocodilians, and exerted a maximum bite force of at least 16,400 N at its upper P3. Under the shearing scenario with minimized condylar forces, tooth reaction forces could exceed 20,000 N despite lower magnitudes of muscle force. These bite forces at the teeth are consistent with bone indentations on Dorudon crania, reatract-and-shear hypotheses of Basilosaurus bite function, and seizure of prey by anterior teeth as proposed for other archaeocetes. The whale's bite forces match those estimated for pliosaurus when skull lengths are equalized, suggesting similar tradeoffs of bite function and hydrodynamics. Reaction forces in B. isis were lower than maxima estimated for large crocodylians and carnivorous dinosaurs. However, comparison of force estimates from FEA and regression data indicate that B. isis exerted the largest bite forces yet estimated for any mammal, and greater force than expected from its skull width. Cephalic feeding biomechanics of Basilosaurus isis are thus consistent with habitual predation.

  11. Animal bites and stings with anaphylactic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, John H; Klotz, Stephen A; Pinnas, Jacob L

    2009-02-01

    Anaphylaxis to animal bites and stings poses a significant medical risk of vascular or respiratory reactions that vary according to the patient's response and nature of the insult. Emergency Physicians frequently see patients who complain of an allergic reaction to an animal bite or sting. Although Hymenoptera stings, specifically those of wasps, bees, and hornets, account for the majority of these cases, other invertebrates and vertebrates are capable of causing allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Many of the causative animals are quite unusual, and their bites and stings are not commonly appreciated as potential causes of anaphylaxis. We conducted a literature review to identify documented reports of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions to animal bites and stings. This summary is meant to heighten awareness of the diversity of animals that may cause anaphylaxis, hopefully leading to more rapid diagnosis and treatment of this dangerous condition. A diverse group of animals was found whose bites and stings cause anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions. Some case summaries are presented. A potentially life-saving plan is to direct patients to proper follow-up care to prevent a future life-threatening reaction, including: prescribing epinephrine and antihistamines with proper instructions for their use; referral to an allergist to determine if skin testing, radioallergosorbent test, and immunotherapy are indicated; and reporting the case to state or local Poison Control Centers. In some cases it may be helpful to consult an entomologist or a pest control service for help in identification and elimination of certain offenders.

  12. On denture marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  13. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy Action Center News Advocacy priorities AADA Health System Reform Principles Drug pricing and availability CVS dermatologic ... Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous ...

  14. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... board-certified dermatologist? Other conditions Diseases: A-Z index Skin, hair, and nail care Skin care Hair ... bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme ...

  15. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a dermatologist Why see a board-certified dermatologist? Home Public and patients Skin, hair, and nail care ... bites and stings can be safely treated at home. To treat bug bites and stings at home, ...

  16. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... borne diseases, it’s important to take steps to reduce your risk. To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists ... take an over-the-counter oral antihistamine. To reduce swelling , apply an ice pack to the bite. ...

  17. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... correct dose. For bites that itch , apply an ice pack or an over-the-counter anti-itch ... counter oral antihistamine. To reduce swelling , apply an ice pack to the bite. If you experience any ...

  18. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... var c = 0; c Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease, and malaria. Particularly if you’re ...

  19. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... var c = 0; c Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease, and malaria. Particularly if you’re ...

  20. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%, and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage.

  1. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mehmet; Mete, Turkan; Ozer, Ismail; Yaman, Elif; Beton, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%), and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage.

  2. A Human Bite on the Scrotum: Case Report and Review of Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Dorothy; Chan, Thomas; Pothiawala, Sohil

    2018-02-10

    Human bites involving the genitalia rarely present to the emergency department (ED). They have the potential to cause life-threatening secondary infections as well as serious physical and functional damage. We report a case of an adult male who sustained a human bite to the scrotum, resulting in a ragged laceration on the anterior scrotum, with a devascularized flap and necrotic edges overlying the wound. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Human bites to the scrotum are rare and, hence, the experience of emergency physicians treating patients presenting with these injuries may be minimal. This puts patients at risk of underevaluation or suboptimal treatment. The rapid initiation of antibiotics in the ED and thorough wound debridement will prevent infections, aid healing, and lead to improved outcomes by preserving organ function and integrity. We therefore present a systematic approach to the management of patients with human bite to the scrotum in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidemiology of sea-snake bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, H A

    1975-05-01

    Epidemiological features as reflected by 101 patients with unequivocal sea-snake bite received in north-west Malaya are reviewed. Enhydrina schistosa caused over half the bites, including seven of the eight fatal bites. It is the most dangerous sea-snake to man. Over 90 per cent of the victims were male and 80 of the 101 patients were fishermen bitten at their job. Most victims were bitten on the lower limb through treading on the snake, and this resulted in more cases of serious poisoning than upper limb bites (caused through handling nets, sorting fish and so on). Only 14 cathers were bitten (through treading on the sea-snake; no bathers were bitten while swimming). In patients coming to hospital more than six hours after the bite, there was a four-fold increase in serious poisoning compared with patients coming within six hours of the bite. Thus, as time elapses after the bite, the victim is less likely to seek medical help unless poisoning is severe. Despite the lethal toxicity of sea-snake venom, in patients seen during 1957-61 before sea-snake antivenom became available, the mortality was only 10 per cent. Trivial or no poisoning followed in 80 per cent of the bites. On the other hand, of 11 patients (20 per cent) with serious poisoning, over half (six patients) died despite supportive hospital treatment. These epidemiological features observed in Malaya probably apply to most fishing folk along Asian coastlines where sea-snakes abound. If this is so, sea-snake bite must be a common hazard feared by millions of fishing folk, and a common cause of illness and death. But it is unlikely that the extent of this problem will be revealed to orthodox medicine for many decades because most fishing villages are far from medical centres; and even if hospitals or medical centres are available, fishing folk are usually reluctant to attend them. Only one species of sea-snake, Pelamis platurus, extends to the east coasts of Africa and west coasts of the tropical Americas

  4. Complex Regional Pain Syndrom Due to Cat Bite: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuncay Cakir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CPRS, is a painful and disabling disorder that can effect one or more extremities, characterized by a combination of vasomotor, sudomoto rand dystrophic alterations and may cause restriction in movements. The pain of this condition out of proportion to the severity of the initial injury. There are many aetiologic factors such as soft tissue injury, surgery, immobilization or myocardial ischemia. The pathophysiology of CPRS is not clear but peripheral and central sensitization resulting in neurogenic inflammation has been held responsible. This case report discribes the clinical condition of CPRS due to cat bite, and is presented to emphasize rare etiologic factors that may cause CPRS.

  5. Marks, Prof. Tobin J

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 2011 Honorary. Marks, Prof. Tobin J. Date of birth: 25 November 1944. Address: Prof. of Materials Sci. & Engg., Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145, Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208, USA Contact: Office: (+1-847) 491 5658. Email: t-marks@northwestern.edu. YouTube; Twitter ...

  6. Lujan Mark-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michael Jeffrey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavorka, Lukas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Koehler, Paul E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-13

    This is a review of Mark-IV target neutronics design. It involved the major redesign of the upper tier, offering harder neutron spectra for upper-tier FPs; a redesign of the high-resolution (HR) moderator; and a preservation of the rest of Mark-III features.

  7. Scrotal dog bite: unusual case and review of pediatric literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, M; Prestipino, M; Nardi, N; Falcone, F; Appignani, A

    2009-09-01

    Animal bites to human external genitalia are rare. Only a few cases of scrotal dog bite in children have been reported. We present an additional specific case of a scrotal dog bite in a child because the lesion and its repair have not been previously reported in published pediatric studies. A traumatic resection of the right testicular vas deferens was repaired by microsurgical vasoepididymal anastomosis. A review of the published data was also performed to analyze the management of scrotal dog bite lesions.

  8. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  9. The mechanics of the first bite.

    OpenAIRE

    Agrawal, Kalpana R; Lucas, Peter W

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the action of the incisor teeth in humans is presented in terms of the fracture of food particles. It is predicted that the resistance of foods with an essentially linear elastic response to an initial bite by the incisors will depend on the square root of the product of two food properties, Young's modulus and toughness. This quantity should be approximately equal to the product of the stress at cracking during a bite, and the square root of the length of a notch or indentatio...

  10. Black widow spider bite: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisford, Kristine; Kautz, Donald D

    2011-01-01

    This article is a case study of a patient cared for in the hours before her death. After the patient's death, we learned the patient died of a black widow spider bite. This article sheds light on the potential seriousness of this venom and allows for more rapid detection and treatment of those who are unfortunate enough to be bitten. The authors have documented the sequence of events for the patient, outlined the care the patient received, examined the pathophysiology of the body to a spider bite, and then made a passionate appeal for other nurses who work in critical care to do the same with patients in similar situations.

  11. Vine snake (Thelotornis capensis bite in a dog : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Otto

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A vine snake bite in a dog is reported. There was continued minor bleeding from the assumed nose bite site for 4 days. Currently manufactured snakebite antivenom is not effective against vine snake bites and treatment is supportive.

  12. Seasonal variations in the biting densities of Simulium damnosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seasonal variations in the biting densities of Simulium damnosum complex were studied in Uzo-Uwani Local Government Area of Enugu State, Nigeria, with the objectives of discovering the season with the highest biting densities and relating the seasonal biting densities with the farming seasons of the people. The study ...

  13. Major upper limb amputation after Snake Bite Gangrene | Ajibade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major lower limb amputations following snake bite gangrene have been reported from the savannah belt of Nigeria. In bites delivered to the upper limb, amputations are often of the digits (minor amputations). We report the case of a male farmer who had an above elbow amputation after a snake bite to the hand. Explanation ...

  14. Oral mark in the application of an individual identification: From ashes to truth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Anshul; Narwal, Anumeha

    2017-01-01

    Forensic odontology is the branch of dentistry which deals with the proper handling, examination, evaluation and presentation of dental findings in the interest of justice. After major disasters and perimortem assaults such as earthquakes, fires, severe head and neck trauma or gross decomposition, accurate and early identification of dead and injured becomes important. In the absence of other records in such cases, identification is based on restorations, missing teeth and prosthetic devices such as partial and complete removable/fixed prosthesis or implant retained devices. This brings out the major role of prosthodontics to investigate the identity of suspects in the criminal cases as well as the deceased human beings in traumatic injuries or in disasters. Denture identification systems are being used as means of postmortem identification of edentulous persons which has evolved from the inclusion of some form of printed label in a denture to more high-tech methods. The provision of implant retained complete lower denture, antemortem, and postmortem radiographs of edentulous persons and correlation of bite marks using special impression techniques provide another potential source of evidence for human identification. Hence, this literature review throws some light on the role played by prosthodontist in forensic odontology.

  15. Mark Raidpere portreefotod Kielis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    Kieli Linnagaleriis avatud 2. Ars Baltica fototriennaalil 'Can You Hear Me?' esindab Eestit Mark Raidpere seeriaga 'Portreed 1998'. Näituse Eesti-poolne kuraator Anu Liivak, kataloogiteksti kirjutas Anders Härm. Tuntumaid osalejaid triennaalil Wolfgang Tillmans

  16. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  17. Geometry of anterior open bite correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Zachary R; Susarla, Srinivas M; Lawler, Matthew E; Choudhri, Asim F; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-05-01

    Correction of anterior open bite is a frequently encountered and challenging problem for the craniomaxillofacial surgeon and orthodontist. Accurate clinical evaluation, including cephalometric assessment, is paramount for establishing the diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan. The purposes of this technical note were to discuss the basic geometric principles involved in the surgical correction of skeletal anterior open bites and to offer a simple mathematical model for predicting the amount of posterior maxillary impaction with concomitant mandibular rotation required to establish an adequate overbite. Using standard geometric principles, a mathematical model was created to demonstrate the relationship between the magnitude of the open bite and the magnitude of the rotational movements required for correction. This model was then validated using a clinical case. In summary, the amount of open bite closure for a given amount of posterior maxillary impaction depends on anatomic variables, which can be obtained from a lateral cephalogram. The clinical implication of this relationship is as follows: patients with small mandibles and steep mandibular occlusal planes will require greater amounts of posterior impaction.

  18. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for (var c = 0; c public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Skin, hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes ...

  19. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... library Basement Membrane Zone lecture Full lecture Part 1: Structure Part 2: Origin Part 3: Function Textbook ... biting "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid=aad-aad-1", "site=ehs.con.aad.aad", "size=160x600", "vpos= ...

  20. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... this safe, but awful-tasting formula discourages many people from biting their nails. Get regular manicures: Spending ...

  1. Non-biting Muscidae and control methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, G.; Jespersen, Jørgen B.

    1994-01-01

    Many non-biting muscids (filth flies) are characterised by the habit of visiting manure or rotting organic material to Seed and/or oviposit. As these flies also often have close associations with human beings, as well as human habitations and domestic animals, they are potentially both a nuisance...

  2. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and nail care Nail care Nail biting "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid=aad-aad-1", "site=ehs. ... t", "hpos=l", "zone=public", "mcat1=de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid= ...

  3. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Mohs AUC MyDermPath+ Psoriasis Patient education resources Practice Management Center Coding and reimbursement Coding MACRA Fee schedule ... Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Nail changes a dermatologist should examine Anti-aging skin care ...

  4. Simulation of a flow around biting teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusawa, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Eriko; Kuwahara, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    We simulated a flow around biting teeth. The decayed tooth is a disease that a majority of people are annoyed. These are often generated from a deep groove at occlusal surface. It is known that a person who bites well doesn't suffer from a decayed tooth easily. Biting forces reach as much as 60 kg/cm^2 by an adult male, and when chewing, upper and lower teeth approach to bite by those forces. The crushed food mixed with saliva becomes high viscosity fluid, and is pushed out of ditches of teeth in the direction of the cheek or the tongue. Teeth with complex three dimension curved surface are thought to form venturi at this time, and to generate big pressure partially. An excellent dental articulation will possibly help a natural generation of a flow to remove dental plaque, i.e. the cause of the decayed tooth. Moreover, the relation of this flow with the destruction of the filled metal or the polymer is doubted. In this research, we try to clarify the pressure distributions by this flow generation as well as its dynamics when chewing. One of our goals is to enable an objective design of the shape of the dental fillings and the artificial tooth. Tooth has a very small uneven ground and a bluff body. In this case, to calculate a computational numerical simulation to solve the Navier-Stokes equations three dimension Cartesian coordinate system is employed.

  5. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  6. COMPUTER HARDWARE MARKING

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe de protection des biens

    2000-01-01

    As part of the campaign to protect CERN property and for insurance reasons, all computer hardware belonging to the Organization must be marked with the words 'PROPRIETE CERN'.IT Division has recently introduced a new marking system that is both economical and easy to use. From now on all desktop hardware (PCs, Macintoshes, printers) issued by IT Division with a value equal to or exceeding 500 CHF will be marked using this new system.For equipment that is already installed but not yet marked, including UNIX workstations and X terminals, IT Division's Desktop Support Service offers the following services free of charge:Equipment-marking wherever the Service is called out to perform other work (please submit all work requests to the IT Helpdesk on 78888 or helpdesk@cern.ch; for unavoidable operational reasons, the Desktop Support Service will only respond to marking requests when these coincide with requests for other work such as repairs, system upgrades, etc.);Training of personnel designated by Division Leade...

  7. Comparison of posterior occlusion between patients with anterior open bite and scissor deep bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Kun; Xu, Yifei; Hou, Yuxia; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2018-01-01

    Objective A minor alteration in the posterior occlusal height elicits a large transformation in the anterior vertical dimension. Thus, the present study was performed to determine whether a posterior cusp-to-cusp relation that increases the posterior vertical dimension contributes to an anterior open bite. Methods Study casts were examined from orthodontic patients aged 10 to 27 years, 21 with an open bite and 28 with a scissor deep bite. A logistic regression model was used to analyze the contribution of various factors to these two anterior occlusal patterns. The dental arch width and number of worn cusps were compared between the two groups. Results Patients with an open bite had a significantly higher incidence of a posterior buccal-lingual cusp-to-cusp relation, wider mandibular arch in the molar region, and larger numbers of worn maxillary buccal cusps and mandibular lingual cusps than patients with a scissor deep bite. Conclusions A posterior buccal-lingual cusp-to-cusp relation is associated with a larger anterior vertical dimension, such as that in patients with an open bite.

  8. Compound mechanism of fatal neck injury: A case report of a tiger attack in a zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szleszkowski, Łukasz; Thannhäuser, Agata; Jurek, Tomasz

    2017-08-01

    Fatal injuries caused by attacks by large wild cats are extremely rare in forensic medical practice in Europe. There are very few cases described in the forensic medical literature concerning incidents in zoos similar to the tiger attack on a 58-year-old male zoo employee that we present here. While preparing a runway for tigers, the man was attacked by a male Sumatran tiger. Another zoo employee was an eyewitness to the accident; in his testimony he described the sequence of events in detail. The autopsy showed the injuries typical of a tiger attack: traces of claws and canine teeth indicating that the victim of the attack was knocked down from behind, along with deep and extensive fatal wounds to the neck. The injuries were inflicted by means of a compound mechanism: tissues were penetrated by the animal's canines, crushed with great force (transfixing injury), and violently distended. The skin revealed four characteristic deep wounds caused by canines as well as bite marks resulting from the action of six incisors. The neck area revealed extensive damage, including torn muscles, the esophagus and trachea, large blood vessels of the neck, and fractures of vertebrae C2 and C5 with internal channels resulting directly from penetration by the animal's canines. The mechanism of distension, as a result of the animal jerking its head after biting the victim in the neck, produced a complete tear of the spine and the vertebral arteries, as well as an intramural rupture of the carotid arteries which has never been described before. In the interests of a detailed assessment of bone damage, the cervical spine was macerated. The applied autopsy techniques and detailed analysis of injuries enabled us to demonstrate the compound mechanism that inflicted them, combining penetration of tissues by the canines, crushing, and distension. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Treatment and outcome of unusual animal bite injuries in young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2 Department of Pediatric Surgery and Paediatrics, Erasmus MC-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands. 3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. Corresponding author: P de Klerk (peterdeklerk@live.nl). Background.

  10. Pattern of presentation and management of lip injuries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-14

    Jun 14, 2011 ... was the most common cause of injury followed by electric burns (2 cases). The most (81.8%) .... Electric burns. Karapandzic flap. Satisfactory. 21. M. Lower lip. Human bite. V-shape wedge repair. Satisfactory. 34. M. Lower lip. Human bite ... that men and women in this age group drive are active and young ...

  11. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  12. A comparative study of overlay generation methods in bite mark analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mihir; Daniel, Mariappan Jonathan; Srinivasan, Subramanian Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the best method of overlay generation out of the three methods, i.e., manual, photocopying, and computer assisted method. Impressions of maxillary and mandibular arches of 25 individuals participating in the study were made and dental study models were prepared. Overlay production was done by manual, photocopying, and computer assisted methods. Finally, the overlays obtained by each method were compared. Kruskal Wallis ANOVA H test was used for the comparison of manual, photocopying, and computer assisted overlay generation methods. H value being highest in case of computer assisted overlays, thus, making it the best method of overlay generation out of the three methods. We conclude that the method of computer assisted overlay generation is the best among the three methods used in our study.

  13. Forensic studies of dog attacks on humans: a focus on bite mark analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Gabriel; Mora,Esther; Lucena,Joaquín; Cantín,Mario

    2015-01-01

    Gabriel M Fonseca,1 Esther Mora,2 Joaquin Lucena,3 Mario Cantin,4 1Faculty of Dentistry, Laboratory of Forensic Dentistry, University of La Frontera, Temuco, Chile; 2Dental Sinai Hospital & Research Center, 3Forensic Pathology Service, Institute of Legal Medicine, Seville, Spain; 4Faculty of Dentistry, Doctoral Program in Morphological Science, Universidad La Frontera, Temuco, Chile Abstract: The interaction between domestic animals and humans has not been free of conflicts, and dog ...

  14. Bite Forces and Their Measurement in Dogs and Cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Eun Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Bite force is generated by the interaction of the masticatory muscles, the mandibles and maxillae, the temporomandibular joints (TMJs, and the teeth. Several methods to measure bite forces in dogs and cats have been described. Direct in vivo measurement of a bite in dogs has been done; however, bite forces were highly variable due to animal volition, situation, or specific measurement technique. Bite force has been measured in vivo from anesthetized dogs by electrical stimulation of jaw adductor muscles, but this may not be reflective of volitional bite force during natural activity. In vitro bite forces have been estimated by calculation of the force produced using mechanical equations representing the jaw adductor muscles and of the mandible and skull structure Bite force can be estimated in silico using finite element analysis (FEA of the computed model of the anatomical structures. FEA can estimate bite force in extinct species; however, estimates may be lower than the measurements in live animals and would have to be validated specifically in domestic dogs and cats to be reliable. The main factors affecting the bite forces in dogs and cats are body weight and the skull’s morphology and size. Other factors such as oral pain, TMJ disorders, masticatory muscle atrophy, and malocclusion may also affect bite force. Knowledge of bite forces in dogs and cats is essential for various clinical and research fields such as the development of implants, materials, and surgical techniques as well as for forensic medicine. This paper is a summary of current knowledge of bite forces in dogs and cats, including the effect of measurement methods and of other factors.

  15. Identification markings for gemstones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreschhoff, G.A.M.; Zeller, E.J.

    1980-01-01

    A method is described of providing permanent identification markings to gemstones such as diamond crystals by irradiating the cooled gemstone with protons in the desired pattern. The proton bombardment results in a reaction limited to a defined plane and converting the bombarded area of the plane into a different crystal lattice from that of the preirradiated stone. (author)

  16. Mark, Prof. Herman Francis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Fellowship. Fellow Profile. Elected: 1949 Honorary. Mark, Prof. Herman Francis. Date of birth: 3 May 1895. Date of death: 6 April 1992. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  17. Teaching with Mark Dion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Mark Dion creates sculptures, installations, and interactive environments that sometimes seem contrary to what one expects from visual artists. Remarkable curiosity cabinets and carefully arranged artifacts from specific places and time periods make up a large part of his work. His work does not neatly fit into traditional lessons about elements…

  18. Effectiveness of a fixed anterior bite plane in Class II deep-bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deregibus, Andrea; Debernardi, Cesare Lorenzo; Persin, Leonid; Tugarin, Valery; Markova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic treatment of patients with distoclusion combined with dental deep bite and linguo version of the front upper teeth is one of the most difficult forms of malocclusion to treat to a functional and morphological optimum. Our objective was to analyze the efficacy of a fixed anterior bite plane appliance to disclude the teeth and correct this type of malocclusion. At the Department of Orthodontics MSUMD (Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry), we proposed the use of a fixed anterior bite plane for the effective treatment of patients with distoclusion combined to a dental deep bite. This appliance was used in 35 patients aged 11 to 15 years (13.2 +/- 1.2) with distoclusion combined with deep bite in a therapeutical approach that also involved an osteopathic correction. The appliance permitted the correction of the distoclusion by discluding the posterior teeth, allowing eruption of the molars and premolars which improved the occlusal plane line (Curve of Spee) and changed the inclination of the upper incisors which liberated the mandible from its retruded position. We also noted an effect on the postural status of the patient.

  19. [Venomous and poisonous animals. II. Viper bites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chippaux, J P

    2006-10-01

    Vipers are the main cause of the snake envenomations on all continents except Australia where they are none. Viper envenomation may lead to a minimal inflammatory syndrome with clinical (pain, edema) and biological (hyperleukocytosis, proteinuria) manifestations that may be accompanied by hypotension or shock. Emergency situations are due to hemorrhagic syndrome. In frequent cases in which envenomation is limited to a dramatic decrease in coagulation factors without clinical manifestations, severe local or systemic hemorrhage may occur especially if treatment is delayed. Necrotic complications around the bite or in distant vital organs are not uncommon and require careful medical and surgical surveillance. Intravenous antivenom therapy is the only effective treatment. It should be given as soon as possible but can be effective even when administered several days after the bite.

  20. Non-biting Muscidae and control methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, G.; Jespersen, Jørgen B.

    1994-01-01

    Many non-biting muscids (filth flies) are characterised by the habit of visiting manure or rotting organic material to Seed and/or oviposit. As these flies also often have close associations with human beings, as well as human habitations and domestic animals, they are potentially both a nuisance...... and a contributory factor in the transmission of diseases. The authors examine the biology, economic importance and control of four of the most important nonbiting muscids:...

  1. Profile of dog bite victims in Jos Plateau State, Nigeria: a review of dog bite records (2006-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Olaniran; Nguku, Patrick; Chukwukere, Silvester; Gaddo, Ayika; Nsubuga, Peter; Umoh, Joliath

    2014-01-01

    Dogs are the major reservoir of rabies virus in Nigeria; transmission to humans is via a bite by rabid dog. Between 2006 and 2008 National Veterinary Research Institute (NVRI) rabies laboratory reported increased numbers of rabies in dogs and human dog bites. The objective of the study was to use veterinary and health records to develop a profile of bite victims and recommend appropriate public health actions. We used the dog brain specimen result register of Rabies Laboratory of NVRI, from "January, 2006" to "December, 2008" and traced dog bite cases. Structured questionnaires were administered to persons who reported dog bite incident and could be traced. We reviewed records from Evangelical Churches of West Africa (ECWA) clinic from "January, 2006" to "December, 2008" to collect detailed profiles of bite victims. Bite victims linked to positive dog samples were traced to "ECWA clinic" from "January, 2006" to "December, 2008". Most bite victims were dogs were housed and unvaccinated. This study provided important information on the profile of dog bite victims and highlights the need for a sustained awareness and education of children on the dangers of dog bite. It has shown lack of enforcement of regulations for licensing of dogs and rabies vaccination.

  2. Flaccid skin protects hagfishes from shark bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggett, Sarah; Stiles, Jean-Luc; Summers, Adam P; Fudge, Douglas S

    2017-12-01

    Hagfishes defend themselves from fish predators by releasing large volumes of gill-clogging slime when they are attacked. Slime release is not anticipatory, but is only released after an attack has been initiated, raising the question of how hagfishes survive the initial attack, especially from biting predators such as sharks. We tested two hypotheses that could explain how hagfishes avoid damage from shark bites: puncture-resistant skin, and a loose and flaccid body design that makes it difficult for teeth to penetrate body musculature and viscera. Based on data from skin puncture tests from 22 fish species, we found that hagfish skin is not remarkably puncture resistant. Simulated shark bites on hagfish and their closest living relatives, lamprey, as well as whole animal inflation tests, revealed that the loose attachment of hagfish skin to the rest of the body and the substantial 'slack volume' in the subcutaneous sinus protect hagfish musculature and viscera from penetrating teeth. While recent work has found evidence that the capacious subcutaneous sinus in hagfishes is important for behaviours such as knot-tying and burrowing, our work demonstrates that it also plays a role in predator defence. © 2017 The Author(s).

  3. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin may have prolonged the typical two to three days’ incubation period commonly observed for tularemia after an animal bite and was not effective in preventing clinical signs in this child. Finally, it emphasizes again the importance of early and late serum samples for appropriate serodiagnostic.

  4. Biting back: BiTE antibodies as a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland B

    2014-06-01

    The experience with gemtuzumab ozogamicin has highlighted both the potential value and limitations of antibodies in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) antibodies have emerged as a means to harness polyclonal cytotoxic T-cells and cause highly efficient lysis of targeted tumor cells. Promising early results have been obtained with the CD19-directed BiTE antibody, blinatumomab, in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. A first candidate for AML is the CD33/CD3 molecule, AMG 330, for which several recent preclinical studies demonstrated high potency and efficacy in destroying CD33(+) human AML cells. Many questions remain to be addressed, but BiTE antibodies may offer an exciting new tool in a disease for which the outcomes in many patients remain unsatisfactory.

  5. Implant-Supported Bite Blocks for Open Bite Correction in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umal H Doshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altering the vertical dimension of the face remains one of the greatest clinical challenges with a multitude of orthodontic, orthopedic and surgical interventions recommended for the correction of associated skeletal, dental and neuromuscular abnormalities. Along with treatment, long-term stability of open bite corrections remains questionable, mainly because of weak musculature. Use of posterior bite blocks has been advocated to stretch the muscles and in turn increases the muscle strength. Muscle stretching also assists in posterior teeth intrusion. In adult patients, implants have been shown to be quite effective for active intrusion. This article highlights an innovative approach which essentially incorporates posterior bite block with active intruding component, i.e. implants. A specific protocol of treatment and retention with this approach is described.

  6. Interview with Mark Watson

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy Shaw

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Watson is a British comedian and novelist. His five novels to date – 'Bullet Points' (2004, 'A Light-Hearted Look At Murder' (2007, 'Eleven' (2010, 'The Knot' (2012 and 'Hotel Alpha' (2014 – explore human relationships and communities in contemporary society. His latest novel Hotel Alpha tells the story of an extraordinary hotel in London and two mysterious disappearances that raise questions no one seems willing to answer. External to the novel, readers can also discover more about the hotel and its inhabitants in one hundred extra stories that expand the world of the novel and can be found at http://www.hotelalphastories.com. In conversation here with Dr Katy Shaw, Mark offers some reflections on his writing process, the field of contemporary literature, and the vitality of the novel form in the twenty-first century.

  7. Approximate MAP Decoding on Tail-Biting Trellises

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu, A. S.; Shankar, Priti

    2005-01-01

    We propose two approximate algorithms for MAP decoding on tail-biting trellises. The algorithms work on a subset of nodes of the tail-biting trellis, judiciously selected. We report the results of simulations on an AWGN channel using the approximate algorithms on tail-biting trellises for the $(24,12)$ Extended Golay Code and a rate 1/2 convolutional code with memory 6.

  8. Mark III spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.; Bernstein, J.; Bunnell, K.; Burgueno, G.; Cassell, R.; Collins, B.; Coward, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisele, R.; Haber, B.

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and performance of the Mark III, a new general purpose large solid angle spectrometer at SPEAR, the SLAC 2-8 GeV e/sup +/e storage ring. The detector has been designed for the study of exclusive final states in e/sup +/e annihilation, which requires large solid angle coverage combined with charged particle momentum resolution, particle identification, and photon detection efficiency at low energies. (orig.).

  9. Mark III spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, D.; Bernstein, J.; Bunnell, K.; Burgueno, G.; Cassell, R.; Collins, B.; Coward, D.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisele, R.; Haber, B. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (USA))

    1984-10-01

    This paper describes the design, construction and performance of the Mark III, a new general purpose large solid angle spectrometer at SPEAR, the SLAC 2-8 GeV e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The detector has been designed for the study of exclusive final states in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, which requires large solid angle coverage combined with charged particle momentum resolution, particle identification, and photon detection efficiency at low energies.

  10. Water vapour and heat combine to elicit biting and biting persistence in tsetse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappuis, Charles J F; Béguin, Steve; Vlimant, Michèle; Guerin, Patrick M

    2013-08-19

    Tsetse flies are obligatory blood feeders, accessing capillaries by piercing the skin of their hosts with the haustellum to suck blood. However, this behaviour presents a considerable risk as landing flies are exposed to predators as well as the host's own defense reactions such as tail flicking. Achieving a successful blood meal within the shortest time span is therefore at a premium in tsetse, so feeding until replete normally lasts less than a minute. Biting in blood sucking insects is a multi-sensory response involving a range of physical and chemical stimuli. Here we investigated the role of heat and humidity emitted from host skin on the biting responses of Glossina pallidipes, which to our knowledge has not been fully studied in tsetse before. The onset and duration of the biting response of G. pallidipes was recorded by filming movements of its haustellum in response to rapid increases in temperature and/or relative humidity (RH) following exposure of the fly to two airflows. The electrophysiological responses of hygroreceptor cells in wall-pore sensilla on the palps of G. pallidipes to drops in RH were recorded using tungsten electrodes and the ultra-structure of these sensory cells was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Both latency and proportion of tsetse biting are closely correlated to RH when accompanied by an increase of 13.1°C above ambient temperature but not for an increase of just 0.2°C. Biting persistence, as measured by the number of bites and the time spent biting, also increases with increasing RH accompanied by a 13.1°C increase in air temperature. Neurones in wall-pore sensilla on the palps respond to shifts in RH. Our results show that temperature acts synergistically with humidity to increase the rapidity and frequency of the biting response in tsetse above the levels induced by increasing temperature or humidity separately. Palp sensilla housing hygroreceptor cells, described here for the first time in tsetse

  11. Amputation of finger by horse bite with complete avulsion of both flexor tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Lior; Stahl, Shalom; Rovitsky, Alexey; Peled, Eli

    2011-08-08

    Amputation of fingers with tendon avulsion occurs through a traction injury, and most occur through a ring avulsion mechanism. Usually the flexor digitorum profundus is torn out with the amputated finger. Replantation usually is recommended only when the amputation is distal to the flexor digitorum superficialis insertion. Animal bites are relatively common, with a decreasing order of frequency of dogs, cats, and humans. Horse bites are relatively infrequent but are associated with crush injuries and tissue loss when they occur. This article describes a 23-year-old man with amputation of his middle finger at the level of the proximal phalanx after being bitten by a horse. The amputated stump was avulsed with the middle finger flexor digitorum profundus and flexor digitorum superficialis torn from the muscle-tendon junction from approximately the middle of the forearm. The patient had no other injuries, and he was able to move his other 4 fingers with only mild pain. As the amputated digit was not suitable for replantation, the wound was irrigated and debrided. The edges of the phalanx were trimmed, and the edges of the wound were sutured. Tetanus toxoid and rabies vaccine were administered, along with intravenous amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The patient was discharged from the hospital 2 days later, with no sign of infection of the wound or compartment syndrome of the forearm. This case demonstrates the weakest point in the myotendinous junction and emphasizes the importance of a careful physical examination in patients with a traumatic amputation. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Cavernous hemangioma presenting marked hyperostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobata, Hitoshi; Miyake, Hiroji; Kitamura, Junji; Kajikawa, Hiroshi; Ohta, Tomio

    1988-01-01

    The authors report here a case of hemangioma of the left parietal bone which presented headache and papilledema. This patient is a 37-year-old female who had, prior to admission, complained of increasing headache for one year and blurred vision for three months. She had no history of head injury. Local physical examinations revealed a slight bulging in her left parietal region which was insensitive to palpation and not adherent to the overlying scalp. Neurological examinations revealed bilateral papilledema and an incongruous bitemporal upper quadrant defect in the visual field. All the other neurological and laboratory data were normal. A plain skull roentogenogram showed a 9 x 9 cm osteolytic and characteristic honeycomb lesion in the parietal region. Systemic bone survey revealed a similar lesion in the right tibia which was not histologically examined. A marked accumulation of isotopes was detected on the bone scintigrams at both lesions. Selective external carotid angiograms demonstrated a tumor stain fed by the superficial temporal, occipital, and middle meningial arteries. CT scans of the brain and skull clearly showed a local thickening of and structural changes in the skull bone and also a mass effect on the brain and lateral ventricle. The lesioned bone was removed en bloc and replaced by an artificial bone. It was highly vascular, but not adherent to the overlying dura. The post-operative course was uneventful, and the headache and papilledema disappeared. Hemangioma of the skull presenting marked hyperostosis, as reported above, seems to be rare. In addition, in this case, skeletal angioma without any clinical manifestation was detected. Clinical and radiological pictures of the hemangioma of the skull and other bones were briefly discussed. (author)

  13. Bite force measurement based on fiber Bragg grating sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, Srivani; Umesh, Sharath; Asokan, Sundarrajan; Srinivas, Talabattula

    2017-10-01

    The maximum level of voluntary bite force, which results from the combined action of muscle of mastication, joints, and teeth, i.e., craniomandibular structure, is considered as one of the major indicators for the functional state of the masticatory system. Measurement of voluntary bite force provides useful data for the jaw muscle function and activity along with assessment of prosthetics. This study proposes an in vivo methodology for the dynamic measurement of bite force employing a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor known as bite force measurement device (BFMD). The BFMD developed is a noninvasive intraoral device, which transduces the bite force exerted at the occlusal surface into strain variations on a metal plate. These strain variations are acquired by the FBG sensor bonded over it. The BFMD developed facilitates adjustment of the distance between the biting platform, which is essential to capture the maximum voluntary bite force at three different positions of teeth, namely incisor, premolar, and molar sites. The clinically relevant bite forces are measured at incisor, molar, and premolar position and have been compared against each other. Furthermore, the bite forces measured with all subjects are segregated according to gender and also compared against each other.

  14. Bite force and dental implant treatment: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flanagan D

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Flanagan1,2 1Department of Dental Medicine, Implantology LUdeS Foundation, Ricasoli, Malta; 2Private Practice, Willimantic, CT, USA Abstract: Dental implants are placed endosseously, and the bone is the ultimate bearer of the occlusal load. Patients are not uniform in the maximum bite force they can generate. The occlusal biting load in the posterior jaw is usually about three times of that found in the anterior. It is possible for supporting implants to be overloaded by the patients’ biting force, resulting in bone loss and failure of the fixture. Bite force measurement may be an important parameter when planning dental implant treatment. Some patients can generate extreme biting loads that may cause a luxation of the fixture and subsequent loss of osseointegration. A patient with low biting force may be able to have a successful long-term outcome even with poor anatomical bone qualities. Patients with a high bite force capability may have an increased risk for late component fracture or implant failure. There is no correlation of any bite force value that would indicate any overload of a given implant in a given osseous site. Nonetheless, after bite force measurement, a qualitative judgement may be made by the clinician for the selection of an implant diameter and length and prosthetic design. Keywords: occlusal load, newtons, oral function, force, sensor, software

  15. Paediatric open tibiofibular fractures following a donkey bite. A report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemdjo, H G; Coulibaly, T; Touré, A A

    2009-06-01

    Open tibiofibular fractures resulting from domestic animal bites are exceptional. We report two such cases, in patients of 11 and 13 years of age, and discuss the etiological, pathogenic, anatomic, and clinical aspects of these injuries. These were type III fractures according to the Cauchoix and Duparc classification. The fractures were treated with emergency wound care, wound dressing, and conservative orthopaedic treatment using a long leg cast for immobilization. Preventive parenteral antibiotics were also given. Evolution was favorable in both cases and the patients returned to their normal activities with no substantial disability. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in two horse populations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, A.; Wolc, A.; Ducro, B.J.; Frankena, K.; Garrick, D.J.; Dekkers, J.C.M.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Insect bite hypersensitivity is a common allergic disease in horse populations worldwide. Insect bite hypersensitivity is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. However, little is known about genes contributing to the genetic variance associated with insect bite

  17. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog ...

  18. Risk factors for high-grade envenomations after French viper bites in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, Isabelle; Maréchal, Céline; Gurrera, Emmanuel; Cordier, Laurie; Honorat, Raphaele; Grouteau, Erick

    2012-07-01

    Viper bites and subsequent evolution to severe envenomations are more frequent in children. The aims of this study were to describe the clinical, biological, and therapeutic characteristics of children bitten by vipers in France and to identify risk factors associated with severe envenomations. A retrospective study was conducted between 2001 and 2009 in the pediatric emergency department of a tertiary-level children hospital. Collected data were age and sex of children; day and time of admission; day, time, and circumstances of the accident; snake identification; bite location; envenomation severity; presence of fang marks; prehospital care; use of specific immunotherapy and associated treatments; length of stay; and hospital course. Fifty-eight children were included (43 boys, 15 girls). The mean age was 7.8 ± 4.1 years. Bites were most often located on the lower extremities (77%). The classification of envenomation was: 83% low grade (absence or minor envenomation) and 17% high-grade (moderate to severe envenomations). All high-grade envenomations received specific immunotherapy (Viperfav). Being bitten on an upper extremity (P level (P = 0.016) were associated with a significant risk of high-grade envenomation. In the multivariate analysis, 3 factors remained significant: upper-extremity location (relative risk [RR], 60.5 [3.5-1040]; P = 0.005), immediate violent pain (RR, 21.5 [1.3-364.5]; P = 0.03), and female sex (RR, 17.5 [0.9-320.3]; P = 0.053). A certain number of criteria seem related to more significant risk of progression to high-grade envenomation. Bites to the upper extremities should be carefully observed because of the risk of evolution to a high-grade envenomation.

  19. Estimating maximum bite performance in Tyrannosaurus rex using multi-body dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bates, K. T.; Falkingham, P. L.

    2012-01-01

    Bite mechanics and feeding behaviour in Tyrannosaurus rex are controversial. Some contend that a modest bite mechanically limited T. rex to scavenging, while others argue that high bite forces facilitated a predatory mode of life. We use dynamic musculoskeletal models to simulate maximal biting in T. rex. Models predict that adult T. rex generated sustained bite forces of 35 000–57 000 N at a single posterior tooth, by far the highest bite forces estimated for any terrestrial animal. Scaling ...

  20. Randomized Controlled Trial of Prophylactic Antibiotics for Dog Bites with Refined Cost Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn, James V

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the rate of infection at which it is cost-effective to treat dog bite wounds with antibiotics.Methods: Our study was composed of two parts. First we performed a randomized, doubleblind controlled trial (RCT to compare the infection rates of dog bite wounds in patients given amoxicillin-clavulanic acid versus placebo. Subjects were immunocompetent patients presenting to the emergency department (ED with dog bite wounds less than 12 hours old without suspected neurovascular, tendon, joint or bone injury, and who had structured follow-up after two weeks. Second, we developed a cost model with sensitivity analysis to determine thresholds for treatment.Results: In the RCT, primary outcomes were obtained in 94 patients with dog bites. The overall wound infection rate at two weeks was 2% [95% CI 0 to 7%]. Two of 46 patients (4% receiving no antibiotics developed infections, while none of the 48 patients (0% receiving prophylactic antibiotics developed an infection (absolute reduction 4% [95% CI -1.0 to 4.5%]. Using a sensitivity analysis across a rate of infections from 0-10%, our cost model determined that prophylactic antibiotics were cost effective if the risk of wound infection was greater than 5% and antibiotics could decrease that risk by greater than 3%.Conclusion: Our wound infection rate was lower than older studies and more in line with current estimates. Assuming that prophylactic antibiotics could provide an absolute risk reduction (ARR of 3%, it would not be cost effective to treat wounds with an infection rate of less than 3% and unlikely that the ARR would be achievable unless the baseline rate was greater than 5%, suggesting that only wounds with greater than 5% risk of infection should be treated. Future work should focus on identifying wounds at high-risk of infection that would benefit from antibiotic prophylaxis. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(5:435-441.

  1. Ceremony marking Einstein Year

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Sunday 13th November at 10:00amat Geneva's St. Peter's Cathedral To mark Einstein Year and the importance of the intercultural dialogue of which it forms a part, a religious service will take place on Sunday 13 November at 10 a.m. in St. Peter's Cathedral, to which CERN members and colleagues are warmly welcomed. Pastor Henry Babel, senior minister at the Cathedral, will speak on the theme: 'God in Einstein's Universe'. Diether Blechschmidt will convey a message on behalf of the scientific community.

  2. Habitual biting of a finger in a child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K N Sarveswari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old male child was brought by his parents with a nonhealing ulcer on the right middle finger having no significant history except for an injury sustained to the right elbow in December 2013. On further probing, the mother revealed that the child used to indulge in habitual biting of his right middle finger while watching TV. Initially he was investigated extensively by a vascular surgeon and no abnormality was detected. He was later referred to the dermatology department and on examination, the patient was attentive with normal behaviour. The right upper limb was slightly larger than left. There was no deformity of the right elbow. The right third fingertip was enlarged and mutilated. There was no nerve thickening or hypopigmented patch. There was loss of sensation on the right hand and arm. Differential diagnosis of Lesch–Nyhan syndrome and congenital sensory neuropathy were considered. The patient was referred to a neurologist who investigated further with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and the final diagnosis of syringomyelia was made based on MRI findings.

  3. Bites, stings, and rigors: clinical considerations in African operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, James H; Verlo, April R; Givens, Melissa L; Munoz, Cesar E

    2014-01-01

    The natural health threats in Africa pose daunting clinical challenges for any provider, as evidenced by the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, but the threat is multiplied for the Special Operations provider on the continent who faces these challenges with limited resources and the tyranny of distance. The majority of operationally significant health risks can be mitigated by strict adherence to a comprehensive force health protection plan. The simplest, yet most effective, technique for preventing mosquito-borne diseases is the prevention of mosquito bites with repellent, bed nets, and appropriate clothing in addition to chemoprophylaxis. Some of the more likely or lethal infectious diseases encountered on the continent include malaria, Chikungunya, dengue, human immunodeficiency virus, and Ebola. Venomous snakes pose a particular challenge since the treatment can be as deadly as the injury. Providers supporting African operations should educate themselves on the clinical characteristics of possible envenomations in their area while promoting snake avoidance as the primary mitigation measure. To succeed in Africa, the Special Operations provider must consider how to meet these challenges in an environment where there may not be reliable evacuation, hospitalization, or logistics channels. 2014.

  4. Three-dimensional analyses of human bite-force magnitude and moment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijden, T M

    1991-01-01

    The effect of the three-dimensional orientation of occlusal force on maximal bite-force magnitude was examined in seven human subjects at three different unilateral anteroposterior bite positions (canine, second premolar and second molar). At each position, bite-force magnitude was registered in 17 precisely defined directions using a three-component force transducer and a feedback method. In addition, to assess the efficiency of transfer of muscle to bite force, for bites produced in the sagittal plane, moment-arm length was determined and the produced bite-force moment calculated. The results showed that the largest possible bite force was not always produced in a direction perpendicular to the occlusal plane. Generally, maximal bite force in medial and posterior directions was larger than that in, respectively, corresponding lateral and anterior directions. In each direction the produced force was larger at the posterior bite point than at the anterior bite point. The combined moment produced by the jaw muscles was largest for vertical bites, smallest for posteriorly directed bites and intermediate for anteriorly directed bites. In the case of vertically and anteriorly directed bites the produced moment did not vary significantly with the bite position. Hence, for these bite positions the jaw closing moment of the muscles must have kept constant. In the case of posteriorly directed bites the produced moment decreased when bite position changed from the anterior to the posterior side of the dentition. This indicated that jaw muscle activity had declined.

  5. Culicoides Biting Midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    Kibanga, Uganda Protectorate, A. D. Fraser , VIII- 10 (BMNH). n* _ ~~wnncic A mdilrm-Sized b ______ 5 __ ^_^--_-___ Aark hr~wn spcip. , ---- Females eyes...5,300 ft, S. A. Neave , biting hand at light (1930 hours), 21-28-V-11. Paratype: P, same data as holotype (BMNH). Culicoides julvtthorax (Austen...Intype: Q, vie, KI.uC, I_Jmiro; Uganda Protecto- rate, 3,700 ft elev., S. A. Neave , 1618-VIII-11 (BMNH). Culictides multiguttutu Goetghebuer 193.513

  6. [Reactions to insect stings and bites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubojević, Suzana; Lipozencić, Jasna

    2011-01-01

    Reaction to insect sting and bite may be local, such as erythema, edema and pruritus, or systemic, such as anaphylactic reaction. Diagnosis can be made by patient history, clinical picture, skin testing, total and specific IgE level, and provocation test. Local reactions are treated with cold compresses, topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. Oral and intramuscular antihistamines and corticosteroids are used for the treatment of mild systemic reactions, and in severe reaction epinephrine injections are added. Hyposensitization is indicated in patients with severe systemic reaction, positive skin tests and high level of specific IgE antibodies.

  7. Retrospective study of dog bite cases reported to ECWA Veterinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of dog bite cases reported to ECWA Veterinary Clinic Bukuru was carried out in Plateau State, Nigeria to understand the pattern of occurrence in this region. A total of two hundred and forty seven (247) dog bite cases were reported between May, 2009 and June, 2010. The dogs profile showed that ...

  8. Dog bite as a public health concern in Addis Ababa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Dog bite as a public health concern in Addis Ababa. Fasil Mengistu1, Kedir Hussen1, Abraham Ali1, Goroma Getahun1, Dessalegn Sifer1. Abstract. Introduction: Animal bites and scratches represent the most important public health issue related to dogs and cats because of the risk of rabies transmission associated with ...

  9. Human Bites of the Face with Tissue Losses in Cosmopolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. Milaki Asuku

    Uchendu 6 working in the same center a decade later reported a five-year series consisting of 37 cases of human bite to the lip and tissue loss. In the western world human bites are more frequently encountered in institutions for the care of the developmentally disabled individuals as reported by Lindsey and colleagues 7.

  10. Insect bite hypersensitivity in horses: genetic and epidemiological analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common allergic skin disease in horses and is caused by bites of Culicoides spp. IBH reduces welfare of affected horses and at present no effective preventive measure or cure exists. Aim of our research was to increase knowledge of the

  11. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  12. Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection following a tiger bite in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easow, J M; Tuladhar, Rashmi

    2007-09-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a rare human pathogen. Reports of zoonotic infection developing after large feline bites are even rarer. We are documenting the first case of human wound infection with A. hydrophila following a tiger bite. The patient responded well following wound debridement, secondary suturing and combination antibiotic therapy.

  13. Human bite and human immune deficiency virus (HIV) transmission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The concentration of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the saliva of a carrier is low. As a result, human bite is not considered the traditional route of HIV infection transmission. Aim: To report a case of HIV sero-positivity following a human bite. Setting: University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port ...

  14. Proximate determinants of bite force in Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittorski, Antoine; Losos, Jonathan B; Herrel, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Performance measures associated with the vertebrate jaw system may provide important insights into vertebrate ecology and evolution because of their importance in many ecologically relevant tasks. Previous studies have shown that in many taxa, evolution toward higher bite force has gone hand in hand with the evolution of larger body size. However, independent of differences in overall body size, bite force may vary depending on head size and shape as well. Moreover, the underlying musculature may also drive variation in bite force. Here, we investigate the proximate determinants of bite force in lizards of the genus Anolis. We dissected the jaw muscles and quantified muscle mass, fibre length, and cross-sectional area. Data were analysed for both sexes independently given the sexual dimorphism detected in the dataset. Our results show that the traits that explain bite force are similar in both males and females with overall body size and muscle mass being the principal determinants. Among the different muscles examined, the adductor externus and the pseudotemporalis groups were the best determinants of bite force. However, models run for males predicted the variation in bite force better than models for females, suggesting that selection on morphology improving bite force may be stronger in males. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  15. Classification of anterior open bite using individualized cephalometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Bock, Franziska; Böhm, Bernhard; Fuhrmann, Robert A

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the cephalometric characteristics of the open bite, and to classify the open bite according to individualized norms. The lateral cephalograms of 134 patients with an anterior open bite (min -0.5 mm) were analyzed. Patients were classified according to the inclination of the jaws, applying the principles of individualized cephalometry. The harmony box described by Hasund was used to define individualized norms for the inclination of the upper and lower jaws in each patient. The open bite was classified into four sub-types: (1) dental, (2) skeletal with enlarged ML-NSL angle, (3) skeletal with reduced ML-NSL angle, and (4) skeletal with deviations in upper and lower jaws. A skeletal open bite was found in 89 patients (66.4%). A dental open bite was found in 45 patients (33.6%). A number of significant differences were found between these four groups using single-factor variance analysis and the Bonferroni a posteriori test, (p < or = 0.05, p < or = 0.01, p < or = 0.001). The most prominent variables were index value of anterior facial hight, total facial height ratio, gonial angle, and Y-axis. No significant differences were found for overbite, however. It was possible to use individualized norms to classify the open bite into four sub-types. The demarcation between the four groups was supported statistically. The extent of the anterior open bite does not allow any conclusions as to the craniofacial pattern.

  16. Maintenance of a deep bite prior to surgical mandibular advancement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Coul, F. Op; Oosterkamp, B. C. M.; Jansma, Johan; Bierman, Michiel; Pruim, G. J.; Sandham, John

    The aim of this study was to compare, retrospectively, two orthodontic treatment approaches in patients treated by a BSSO. In one group (4 males, 20 females; mean age pre-surgery 29.3 years), the deep bite was maintained (deep bite group) while in the other (3 males, 10 females; mean age pre-surgery

  17. Factors Associated with Rabies Awareness and Attitude to Dog Bite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preponderance of stray dogs at the study site necessitated assessment of awareness on rabies and associated factors, attitude to dog bite and knowledge on rabies among students and staff members in a University community. We reviewed hospital records for dog bite cases from 2005 to 2010 and administered structured ...

  18. Individual piglets' contribution to the development of tail biting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.; Kemp, B.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Hartog, den L.A.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Conflicting hypotheses exist about the contribution of individual pigs to the development of a tail-biting outbreak, but there is limited quantitative information to support or dismiss them. This study aims to quantify the development of tail-biting behaviour at pen and individual piglet level,

  19. No Biting: Policy and Practice for Toddler Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Gretchen

    Noting that no single issue in programs for toddlers inflames parents and frustrates staff the way biting does, this book provides guidance on program policy and practice. The book is based upon discussions of a task force on biting comprised of caregivers and administrators from the child care centers and Early Head Start in Syracuse, New York,…

  20. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... Skin, hair, and nail care Injured skin Bug bites and stings "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid=aad-aad-1", " ... Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Blisters Bug bites and stings How to remove a tick When to see ...

  1. Bonded mandibular posterior bite plane: Fabrication, insertion and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bite planes are one of the most commonly used auxiliaries during orthodontic treatment. They can be used in different segments of the maxillary and mandibular arch depending upon the type of malocclusion. The present paper describes the requirements of the bonded mandibular posterior bite plane and its fabrication.

  2. Snake bite in Gombe | Mustapha | Highland Medical Research Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: Snake bite is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in Nigeria as in many parts of the tropics. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence and the clinical pattern of snake bite in Gombe. Methods: Two hundred and seven (207) cases of snakebite admitted at the State Specialist Hospital Gombe over ...

  3. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... correct dose. For bites that itch , apply an ice pack or an over-the-counter anti-itch cream, such as hydrocortisone. Another option is to take an over-the-counter oral antihistamine. To reduce swelling , apply an ice pack to the bite. If you experience any ...

  4. Mark Meigs. Mencken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Ollivier Mellios

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Ce volume fait partie de la collection ‘Clefs Concours’, une série d’ouvrages qui offre aux étudiants des repères sur les sujets de civilisation du CAPES et de l’agrégation, des synthèses, « des outils de révision », bref les clés nécessaires pour mieux cerner le programme de civilisation américaine, en l’occurrence la Chrestomathy de H.L. Mencken. L’ouvrage de Mark Meigs se compose d’une introduction et d’un chapitre liminaire sur l’historiographie existante, d’une première partie posant les...

  5. Case report: acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis following viper bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anyi; Shan, Renfei; Huang, Daochao; Zhou, Jiajia; Keenoo, Anaswasseem; Qin, Jie

    2016-11-01

    The most serious complications of the central nervous system that occur after venomous snake bite are intracranial hemorrhage and ischemic stroke.We present a rarely seen central nervous system complication, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, after a treated Deinagkistrodon's viper bite.On April 5, 2015, a 50-year-old male farmer was bitten on his right leg by a Deinagkistrodon's viper. The bite rendered the victim unconscious for 14 days, during which he was treated with tetanus toxoid and polyvalent antisnake venom. Acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis (ADEM) was suspected after magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. After a high dose of methylprednisolone was used as diagnostic treatment, the patient started recovering fast.ADEM is a rare complication after snake bite, and is triggered by venom or antivenin. Magnetic resonance imaging helps in the early diagnosis of ADEM, and high-dose corticosteroid therapy appears to be effective in ADEM after viper bite or antivenin management.

  6. Nail Biting; Etiology, Consequences and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ghanizadeh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nail biting (NB is a common, but unresolved, problem in psychiatry, psychology, medicine and dentistry. While it seems that NB is a simple behavior that can be stopped easily, many of the children with NB have already tried to stop it, but they have not been successful. The frustrations due to failed attempt involve others such as parents and siblings. The present review aims at providing an overview of prevalence, co-morbidities, education and counseling, and management for NB. Overall, the reviewed literatures suggest that co-morbidities of psychiatric disorders and other stereotypic behaviors in clinical sample of children with NB is more than 80%, and more than half of the parents suffer from psychiatric disorders mainly depression. Treatment of NB, however, is not as easy as it seems. The management of NB is much more complicated than just focusing on stopping it. Nail biting cannot be managed without considering its co-morbidities, antecedents and consequences. It might be concluded form the reviewed literature that children with NB, parents, siblings, and teachers should be educated about what to do and what not to do about NB. Punishment is not effective. Moreover, clinical randomized controlled trials are required to make available evidence-based behavioral and pharmacologic treatment protocols

  7. Are bruxism and the bite causally related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobbezoo, F; Ahlberg, J; Manfredini, D; Winocur, E

    2012-07-01

    In the dental profession, the belief that bruxism and dental (mal-)occlusion ('the bite') are causally related is widespread. The aim of this review was to critically assess the available literature on this topic. A PubMed search of the English-language literature, using the query 'Bruxism [Majr] AND (Dental Occlusion [Majr] OR Malocclusion [Majr])', yielded 93 articles, of which 46 papers were finally included in the present review*. Part of the included publications dealt with the possible associations between bruxism and aspects of occlusion, from which it was concluded that neither for occlusal interferences nor for factors related to the anatomy of the oro-facial skeleton, there is any evidence available that they are involved in the aetiology of bruxism. Instead, there is a growing awareness of other factors (viz. psychosocial and behavioural ones) being important in the aetiology of bruxism. Another part of the included papers assessed the possible mediating role of occlusion between bruxism and its purported consequences (e.g. tooth wear, loss of periodontal tissues, and temporomandibular pain and dysfunction). Even though most dentists agree that bruxism may have several adverse effects on the masticatory system, for none of these purported adverse effects, evidence for a mediating role of occlusion and articulation has been found to date. Hence, based on this review, it should be concluded that to date, there is no evidence whatsoever for a causal relationship between bruxism and the bite. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The Mark Coventry Award

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Anders; Madsen, Frank; Kristensen, Per Wagner

    2018-01-01

    [OKS], Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score [KOOS]) as well as complications and revisions. Four percent (two of 50) of patients died within the first 2 years in the PFA group (none in the TKA group), and 2% (one of 50) became ill and declined further participation after 1 year in the PFA group...... (none in the TKA group). The mean age at inclusion was 64 years (SD 8.9), and 77% (77 of 100) were women. RESULTS: The area under the curve (AUC) up to 2 years for SF-36 bodily pain of patients undergoing PFA and those undergoing TKA was 9.2 (SD 4.3) and 6.5 (SD 4.5) months, respectively (p = 0.......008). The SF-36 physical functioning, KOOS symptoms, and OKS also showed a better AUC up to 2 years for PFA compared with TKA (6.6 [SD 4.8] versus 4.2 [SD 4.3] months, p = 0.028; 5.6 [SD 4.1] versus 2.8 [SD 4.5] months, p = 0.006; 7.5 [SD 2.7] versus 5.0 [SD 3.6] months, p = 0.001; respectively). The SF-36...

  9. The development of a murine model for Forcipomyia taiwana (biting midge) allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mey-Fann; Yang, Kai-Jei; Wang, Nancy M; Chiu, Yung-Tsung; Chen, Pei-Chih; Chen, Yi-Hsing

    2014-01-01

    Forcipomyia taiwana (biting midge) allergy is the most prevalent biting insect allergy in Taiwan. An animal model corresponding to the human immuno-pathologic features of midge allergy is needed for investigating the mechanisms and therapies. This study successfully developed a murine model of Forcipomyia taiwana allergy. BALB/c mice were sensitized intra-peritoneally with midge extract on days 0, 7, 14, 21 then intra-dermally on days 28, 31 and 35. Serum midge-specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a were measured every 14 days by indirect ELISA. The mice were challenged intradermally with midge extract at day 40 and then sacrificed. Proliferation and cytokine production of splenocytes after stimulation with midge extract were determined by MTT assay and ELISA, respectively. The cytokine mRNA expression in response to midge stimulation was analyzed by RT-PCR. Serum IgE, total IgG, and IgG1 antibody levels against midge extract were significantly higher in the midge-sensitized mice than in the control mice. After the two-step sensitization, all mice in the midge-sensitized group displayed immediate itch and plasma extravasation reactions in response to challenge with midge extract. Skin histology from midge-sensitized mice showed marked eosinophil and lymphocyte infiltrations similar to that observed in humans. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with midge extract elicited significant proliferation, IL-4, IL-10, IL-13 and IFN-γ protein production, and up-regulation of mRNA in a dose-dependent manner in the midge-sensitized group, but not in the control group. A murine model of midge bite allergy has been successfully developed using a two-step sensitization protocol. The sensitized mice have very similar clinical and immunologic reactions to challenge with midge proteins as the reactions of human to midge bites. This murine model may be a useful platform for future research and the development of treatment strategies for insect bite allergy.

  10. Estimation of Dog-Bite Risk and Related Morbidity Among Personnel Working With Military Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermann, H; Eiges, N; Sabag, A; Kazum, E; Albagli, A; Salai, M; Shlaifer, A

    Soldiers serving in the Israel Defense Force Military Working Dogs (MWD) Unit spend many hours taming dogs' special skills, taking them on combat missions, and performing various dogkeeping activities. During this intensive work with the aggressive military dogs, bites are common, and some of them result in permanent disability. However, this phenomenon has not been quantified or reported as an occupational hazard. This was a retrospective cohort study based on self-administered questionnaires. Information was collected about soldiers' baseline demographics, duration of the experience of working with dogs, total number of bites they had, circumstances of bite events, and complications and medical treatment of each bite. Bite risk was quantified by incidence, mean time to first bite, and a Cox proportional hazards model. Rates of complications and the medical burden of bites were compared between combat soldiers and noncombat dogkeepers. Bite locations were presented graphically. Seventy-eight soldiers participated and reported on 139 bites. Mean time of working with dogs was 16 months (standard deviation, ±9.4 months). Overall bite incidence was 11 bites per 100 person-months; the mean time to first bite event was 6.3 months. The Cox proportional hazards model showed that none of baseline characteristics significantly increased bite hazard. About 90% of bites occurred during routine activities, and 3.3% occurred on combat missions. Only in 9% of bite events did soldiers observed the safety precautions code. Bite complications included fractures, need for intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical repair, prominent scarring, diminished sensation, and stiffness of proximal joints. Bite complications were similar between combat soldiers and dogkeepers. Most bites (57%) were located on hands and arms. MWD bites are an occupational hazard resulting in significant medical burden. Hands and arms were most common bite locations. Observance of safety precautions may be

  11. Snake bite in Northwest Iran: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Eslamian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: bite affects about 2 million people every year, with more than 100000 mortalities annually. A person bitten by a snake represents a variety of symptoms. Snake bite might be asymptomatic or with mild local symptoms or even could lead to tissue damage and rapid death. This study aimed to investigate characteristics of snake bite in Northwest Iran. Methods: In this retrospective study, medical records of all patients with final diagnosis of snake bite who were admitted to Sina Clinical-Educational Center, the referral center for envenomation in Northwest Iran were investigated from 2002 to 2012. Demographic information and laboratory findings were collected using a checklist. Results: During a 10 year period, 160 individuals with snake bite were admitted, of which 128 (77.6% were male. With regard to occupation, farmers accounted for the largest portion (n = 57, 34.6%. The most prevalent sites bitten by snakes were right hand (25.5% and left leg (24.8%. Fifty-seven patients (34.5% had leukocytosis and four (2.4% had coagulopathy. Pain and swelling were two main complaints, with vomiting, dizziness, and tingling in extremities coming afterwards. Conclusion: Because snake bite is one of the most important emergencies presenting to emergency department and Iran’s geographic status bears wide spectrum of poisonous snakes, this study was performed to further explore the clinical and epidemiologic details of snake bite.

  12. Biting Behaviors among Preschoolers: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguero de Atiles, Julia T.; Stegelin, Delores A.; Long, Janie K.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews research on biting among children in child care settings. Reports a study examining procedures established to handle biting by child care facilities in a southeastern state, which found that 60% of respondents (n=326) handled biting incidents, but only one third reported a policy on biting. Fewer than 3% understood the developmental nature…

  13. Biting rates and developmental substrates for biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Iquitos, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, David R; Spinelli, Gustavo R; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B

    2003-11-01

    Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected at 16 periurban and rural sites around Iquitos, Peru, between 17 October 1996 and 26 May 1997. Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi), the principal vector of Oropouche virus, was the most commonly collected species (9,086 flies) with Culicoides insinuatus Wirth & Blanton second (7,229 flies). Although both species were collected at all sampling sites (linear (distance surveyed approximately 25 km), C. paraensis dominated at northern collection sites (> 90%), whereas C. insinuatus prevailed at southern collection sites (> 60%). C. paraensis were collected from human sentinels at a constant rate throughout daylight hours, at similar rates during wet and dry months, and regardless of rainfall. Larval developmental substrates for C. paraensis included decaying platano (Musa x paradisiaca L. [Musaceae]) stems, stumps, flowers, fruits, and debris beneath platano trees as well as from soil beneath a fruiting mamay (Syzygium malaccense Merr. & Perry [Myrtaceae] ) tree and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline. C. insinuatus adults likewise emerged from decaying platano and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline, but also from debris accumulated in the axils of aguaje (Mauritia flexuosa L. [Palmae]) fronds and decaying citrus fruit. Despite high numbers of biting adults near putative substrates, adults of neither species emerged from other decomposing plant material, soil, phytotelmata, or artificial containers. Because both species of biting midges emerged in high numbers from all parts of platano (ubiquitous in Iquitos), it will be challenging to control them through sanitation.

  14. Afibrinogenemia following snake bite (Crotalus durissus terrificus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. S. Amaral

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports two cases of afibrinogenemia with normal platelet count following Crotalus durissus terrificus, snake bite Both patients presented high output acute renal failure and case two also had increased blood levels of CPK and LDH compatible with the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Case one was given an unknown amount of antivenom and was treated with epsilonaminocaproic acid and a fresh whole blood transfusion and showed recovery of the coagulation disturbance 40 hours following these measures. Case two was given an adequate amount of crotalide antivenom and the coagulation tests performed 12 hours later showed a normal partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen 86 mg/100ml. Case one presented no haemorrhagic disturbances. Case two presented persistent bleeding following venopuncture and after removal of impetigo crust in the legs. Acute renal failure was treated conservatively and both patients were discharged from the hospital with recovery of the renal function.

  15. Outbreak of vampire bat biting in a Venezuelan village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J. Caraballo H.

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of 154 cases of vampire bat biting in a four-month period in the gold mine of Payapal, a Venezuelan village, is reported. All patients were bitten during the night and the most bites were on their toes. No complication attributed to the bite was reported. Diagnoses of rabies virus made by means of immunofluorescence were negative. A possible reason for this outbreak may been the development of mining areas, with the inhabitants providing an alternative food source for the bats.

  16. Electron "bite-outs" in Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Hsu, S.; Kempf, S.

    2012-12-01

    The study of dusty plasmas is still an emerging new field that bridges a number of traditionally separate subjects, including for example, celestial mechanics, and plasma physics. Dust particles immersed in plasmas and UV radiation collect electrostatic charges and respond to electromagnetic forces in addition to all the other forces acting on uncharged grains. Simultaneously, dust can alter its plasma environment. Dust particles in plasmas are unusual charge carriers. They are many orders of magnitude heavier than any other plasma particles, and they can have many orders of magnitude larger (negative or positive) time-dependent charges. Dust particles can communicate non-electromagnetic effects (gravity, drag, radiation pressure) to the plasma that can represent new free energy sources. Their presence can influence the collective plasma behavior, for example, by altering the traditional plasma wave modes and by triggering new types of waves and instabilities. Dusty plasmas represent the most general form of space, laboratory, and industrial plasmas. Interplanetary space, comets, planetary rings, asteroids, the Moon, aerosols in the atmosphere, are all examples where electrons, ions, and dust particles coexist. This talk will focus on "electron bite-outs", the apparent reduction of the electron density due to dust charging in a plasma comprised of electrons, ions and dust particles We will compare the recent observations of the plasma conditions near Enceladus at Saturn to the decades old measurements in the Earth's mesosphere. We present model calculations of dust charging in a region where plasma is maintained by UV radiation, and present the time-dependent charge distribution of grains as function of dust density and size distribution. We will also make estimates for possible dusty plasma wave activities as function of the magnitude of the electron "bite-outs".

  17. Concepts to elucidate the pattern-associated analysis of tooth marks in court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, H

    2005-03-01

    Increased awareness by crime scene detectives has led to a rise in number of bite mark associated cases appearing before the South African courts. This has led to an increased number of dentists being subpoenaed to give forensic evidence. The purpose of this paper was to elucidate the presentation of evidence in pattern associated tooth mark analysis. Three aspects are discussed. They are the basic principle of pattern association, the effects of limited shrinkage and distortion on the pattern of the tooth marks, and finally how to overcome the difficulties that court personnel experience in visualising bite marks. The author has applied these basic concepts over the past six years. Judges and defence advocates have been able to understand the simple concepts and apply them to the more complex issues before them. The concepts described should be familiar to all dentists and forensic odontologists giving tooth mark evidence in the high court. They will assist in explaining all aspects of pattern association to the legal fraternity and aid in the presentation of the evidence. Their strength is in their simplicity.

  18. Self-harm by severe glossal injury in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-mutilation, the deliberate destruction occurs in a variety of psychiatric disorders.Many methods of self-destructive behavior have been described in literature. Patients of schizophrenia are known to attempt self-harm due to command hallucination, catatonic excitement or because of associated depression, however severe glossal injury by biting has not been reported so far.Authors report case of self-harm of glossal injury by biting in schizophrenia.Treatment and management issues are discussed.

  19. Mark Kostabi soovib muuta inimesi õnnelikumaks / Kalev Mark Kostabi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kostabi, Kalev Mark, 1960-

    2008-01-01

    Kalev Mark Kostabi oma sisekujunduslikest eelistustest, ameeriklaste ja itaallaste kodude sisekujunduse erinevustest, kunstist kui ruumikujunduse ühest osast, oma New Yorgi ja Rooma korterite kujundusest

  20. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and ... it’s important to take steps to reduce your risk. To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the ...

  1. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Anti-aging skin care ... hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Blisters Bug bites and stings How ...

  2. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... laws Quality DataDerm Quality measures Clinical guidelines Appropriate use criteria Choosing Wisely Education Online Learning Center MOC ... prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the following tips: Use insect repellent. To protect against mosquitoes, ticks and ...

  3. Dilemmas in Treatment of Recurrent Recalcitrant Dental Anterior Open Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    An anterior open bite is one of the most difficult occlusal abnormalities to treat. Quite often this aberration entails dental component and/or skeletal component. The skeletal open bite will require intrusion of the posterior sextants with the assistance of bite blocks, temporary anchorage devices, high pull headgear, and as a last resort - orthognathic surgery. The orthodontic treatment should be augmented with the orofacial myofunctional therapy. In this article, the author describes 3 different variations of treatment of the dental anterior open bite, first on acrylic models, and then on the actual patients. Consideration should be given to patients with a 'short upper lip," and in this case, surgical correction should be entertained.

  4. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... aging skin care Kids’ zone About skin: Your body's largest organ About hair: Not just on your ... bug bite, such as a rash, fever, or body aches, see your doctor or a board-certified ...

  5. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... Video library Find a dermatologist "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ ... most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease, and malaria. Particularly if you’ ...

  6. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... to remove a tick How to treat a bee sting When to see a dermatologist Burns Frostbite ... following tips: For painful bites , such as a bee sting, take an over-the-counter painkiller, such ...

  7. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... the mattress for maximum protection. Pay attention to outbreaks. Check the CDC Travel Health Notices website and ... that they can examine you for a transmitted disease. Additional related resources Bug bites and stings: When ...

  8. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... hours before wearing them. Use bed nets. If sleeping in the great outdoors, use bed nets to ... that they can examine you for a transmitted disease. Additional related resources Bug bites and stings: When ...

  9. Poisonous Spiders: Bites, Symptoms, and Treatment; an Educational Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farzad; Banan Khojasteh, Seyed Mahdi; Ebrahimi Bakhtavar, Hanieh; Rahmani, Farnaz; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous; Faridaalaee, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    More than 40,000 species of spiders have been identified in the world. Spider bites is a common problem among people, however few of them are harmful but delay in treatment can cause death. Since the spider bites are risk full to human, they should be taken seriously, especially in endemic areas. Our objective in this review was to study about poisonous spiders and find out treatments of them. Therefore, we collected related articles from PubMed database and Google Scholar. Three important syndromes caused by spider bites are loxoscelism, latrodectism and funnel web spider syndrome. Many treatments are used but much more studies should have done to decrease the mortality. In this review, we describes different venomous spiders according to their appearance, symptoms after their bites and available treatments.

  10. Poisonous Spiders: Bites, Symptoms, and Treatment; an Educational Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Rahmani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More than 40,000 species of spiders have been identified in the world. Spider bites is a common problem among people, however few of them are harmful but delay in treatment can cause death. Since the spider bites are risk full to human, they should be taken seriously, especially in endemic areas. Our objective in this review was to study about poisonous spiders and find out treatments of them. Therefore we collected related articles from PubMed database and Google Scholar. Three important syndromes caused by spider bites are loxoscelism, latrodectism and funnel web spider syndrome. Many treatments are used but much more studies should have done to decrease the mortality. In this review, we describes different venomous spiders according to their appearance, symptoms after their bites and available treatments. 

  11. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... Excellence in Dermatopathology™ Excellence in Pediatric Dermatology™ Donate Search Menu Donate Member resources and programs Member benefits ... to bites and stings FIND A DERMATOLOGIST Advanced Search "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid=aad-aad-6", " ...

  12. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... some can spread dangerous diseases like Zika virus, dengue, Lyme disease, and malaria. Particularly if you’re ... after a bug bite, such as a rash, fever, or body aches, see your doctor or a ...

  13. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

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    Full Text Available ... and Lectureship Clarence S. Livingood Award and Lectureship Marion B. Sulzberger Award and Lectureship Master Dermatologist Award Members ... skin Bug bites and stings "); (function () { var a = "", b = [ "adid=aad-aad-1", "site=ehs.con.aad. ...

  14. Insect Repellents: Protect Your Child from Insect Bites

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    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Choosing an Insect Repellent for Your Child Page Content Mosquitoes, biting ... sunscreen needs to be reapplied often. Reactions to Insect Repellents If you suspect that your child is ...

  15. Risk of Disease from Mosquito and Tick Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect repellents help reduce the risk of mosquito and tick bites, which can transmit diseases including West Nile Virus, malaria, encephalitis, yellow fever, dengue fever, chikungunya virus, Lyme disease, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and ehrlichiosis.

  16. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Choosing Wisely Education Online Learning Center MOC Recognized Credit Basic Derm Curriculum Teaching and learning guides Suggested ... it’s important to take steps to reduce your risk. To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the ...

  17. First report on human-biting Culex pipiens in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Jenny C; Schäfer, Martina; Lundström, Jan O

    2016-12-07

    Culex mosquitoes are vectors of several bird-hosted arboviruses that cause outbreaks in Europe, such as Sindbis virus and West Nile virus. Recently, the human-biting form of Culex pipiens, Cx. pipiens biotype molestus, was found causing big nuisance in a housing cooperative in Gothenburg in southern Sweden, confirmed by molecular identification. This is the first report of human-biting Culex in Scandinavia, signalling increased risk of arbovirus infection in northern Europe.

  18. Tail Biting Trellis Representation of Codes: Decoding and Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao. Rose Y.; Lin, Shu; Fossorier, Marc

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents two new iterative algorithms for decoding linear codes based on their tail biting trellises, one is unidirectional and the other is bidirectional. Both algorithms are computationally efficient and achieves virtually optimum error performance with a small number of decoding iterations. They outperform all the previous suboptimal decoding algorithms. The bidirectional algorithm also reduces decoding delay. Also presented in the paper is a method for constructing tail biting trellises for linear block codes.

  19. Deep bite malocclusion: exploration of the skeletal and dental factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhateja, N.K.; Fida, M.; Shaikh, A.

    2016-01-01

    Correction of deep bite is crucial for maintenance of dental hard and soft tissue structures and for prevention of temporomandibular joint disorders. Exploration of underlying skeletal and dental factors is essential for efficient and individualized treatment planning. To date etiological factors of dental and skeletal deep bite have not been explored in Pakistani orthodontic patients. The objectives of this study were to explore frequencies of dental and skeletal etiological factors in deep bite patients and to determine correlations amongst dental and skeletal etiological factors of deep bite. Methods: The study included a total of 113 subjects (males=35; females=78) with no craniofacial syndromes or prior orthodontic treatment. Pre-treatment orthodontic records were used to evaluate various dental and skeletal parameters. Descriptive statistics of each parameter were calculated. The various study parameters were correlated using Pearson's Correlation. Results: Deep curve of Spee was most frequently seen factor of dental deep bite (72.6%), followed by increased coronal length of upper incisors (28.3%), retroclined upper incisors (17.7%), retroclined lower incisors (8%) and increased coronal length of lower incisors (5.3%). Decreased gonial angle was most commonly found factor of skeletal deep bite (43.4%), followed by decreased mandibular plane angle (27.4%) and maxillary plane's clockwise rotation (26.5%). Frankfort mandibular plane angle and gonial angle showed a strong positive correlation (r=0.66, p=0.000). Conclusions: Reduced gonial angle is most frequently seen skeletal factor, signifying the importance of angulation and growth of ramus in development of deep bite. Deep curve of Spee is most frequently seen dental etiological component in deep bite subjects, hence signifying the importance of intruding the lower anterior teeth. (author)

  20. An Approach to Mark Arthropods for Mark Capture Type Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of studies were conducted to validate methods for marking a wide variety of arthropods with inexpensive proteins for mark-capture dispersal research. The markers tested included egg albumin protein in chicken egg whites and casein protein in bovine milk. The first study qualified the effec...

  1. Laser marking as environment technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotova, Lydia; Badida, Miroslav

    2017-11-01

    The contribution deals with the laser marking as one of the progressive and environment friendly technologies with utilisation in many branches of industry. Engraving and other types of laser marking of different types of materials are very actual technologies these days. Laser marking decreases the waste creation in comparison with the other classical marking technologies, which use paintings or created chips. In this experimental investigation the laser marking surface texturing of material AL99,7 according to STN 42 4003:1993-08 (STN EN 573) has been conducted. The laser marking machine TruMark 6020 and software TruTops Mark were used. Laser surface texturing after laser marking has been realised under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of engraving or annealing surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The evaluation of roughness of engraved surfaces has been realized according to STN EN ISO 4287 by using Surftest SJ 301. The aim of the contribution was to show how different laser parameters affect the surface texture and colour change of metallic materials while creating minimal waste.

  2. NotaMark industrial laser marking system: a new security marking technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Vincent G.

    2004-06-01

    Up until now, the only variable alphanumeric data which could be added to banknotes was the number, applied by means of impact typographical numbering boxes. As an additional process or an alternative to this mechanical method, a non-contact laser marking process can be used offering high quality and greater levels of flexibility. For this purpose KBA-GIORI propose an exclusive laser marking solution called NotaMark. The laser marking process NotaMark is the ideal solution for applying variable data and personalizing banknotes (or any other security documents) with a very high resolution, for extremely large production volumes. A completely integrated solution has been developed comprised of laser light sources, marking head units, and covers and extraction systems. NotaMark allows the marking of variable data by removing locally and selectively, specific printed materials leaving the substrate itself untouched. A wide range of materials has already been tested extensively. NotaMark is a new security feature which is easy to identify and difficult to counterfeit, and which complies with the standard mechanical and chemical resistance tests in the security printing industry as well as with other major soiling tests. The laser marking process opens up a whole new range of design possibilities and can be used to create a primary security feature such as numbering, or to enhance the value of existing features.

  3. Sensitivity to bites by the bedbug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, K; Kempke, D; Naylor, R A; Siva-Jothy, M T

    2009-06-01

    Bedbugs are a public health problem and can cause significant economic losses, but little is known about the effects of bites on humans. We reviewed case reports and published papers on bedbug bites to assess the empirical basis of the commonly cited figure that only approximately 80% of the population are sensitive to bedbug bites. We found the sensitivity estimate to be based on only one study carried out 80 years ago. However, this study did not account for the now well-established fact that only repeated exposure to external allergens leads to skin reactions. In our sample, 18 of 19 persons showed a skin reaction after bedbug exposure, but in most cases only after repeated controlled exposure. With repeated exposure, the latency between bite and skin reactions decreased from approximately 10 days to a few seconds. Our results are relevant for the hospitality industry, where apparently increasing infestation rates are likely to lead to an increase in the number of tourists and hotel employees exposed to bedbugs. Medical and public health professionals may expect to see an increase in the prevalence of people with bedbug bite sensitivity. The significance of the delayed reaction time of skin to bites may also have implications in litigation cases where people seek compensation.

  4. An investigation into the prevalence of dog bites to primary school children in Trinidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adesiyun Abiodun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To estimate the prevalence of dog bites to primary school children between the ages of 8–12 years using a semi-structured interview process. With the increase in the pet population and popularity of dangerous breeds of dog and a high stray dog population combined with a dearth of information on the risk of dog attacks to children in Trinidad, a semi-structured interview process was used to determine risk factors associated with dog attacks. Methods A questionnaire survey of 1109 primary school children between the ages of 8–12 years was conducted in Trinidad from November 2002 to September 2003. The survey was conducted to determine the risk factors such as age, gender, size of dog and relationship of dog and victim, in dog bite incidents. The chi-square statistic and odds ratios were used to estimate risk factors for a bite incident. Results Twenty-eight percent of children were bitten at least once by a dog. Gender (male and owning a dog were statistically significant risk factors (p = 0.003 and 0.008 respectively, χ2 df, 95% confidence. Most attacks occurred outside of the home (58.0% followed by the victims' home (42.0% and were by a dog known but not owned (54.6% by the victim. Many victims (33.0% were bitten without having any interaction with the dog and the majority (61.9% of victims did not receive professional medical assistance. Overall, the lower leg or foot was most often injured (39.3%. Conclusion A public educational campaign is needed on responsible pet ownership. In addition, children must be taught effective ways of avoiding attacks or reducing injury in the event of a dog attack. The Dangerous dogs Act 2000 must be proclaimed in parliament by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago to exert more pressure on pet owners to safeguard the public from the menace of dog attacks.

  5. Studying the effects of Bite plane application in intruding and extruding the teeth in patients with deep bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shirazi

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep bite is a major clinical problem manifested as higher than normal overbite in anterior region of the jaws. Various studies were conducted to identify the effects of using bite plan and its results. 14 subjects with deep bite were selected out of 400 students of a school who had not proximal caries and had not lost any permanent teeth with healthy periodontal condition. 8 patients were considered as case group and the 6 other as the control group. In case group, a simple labial arc with acrylic palate that caused a gap in occlusion was placed. 2 lateral radiographs were obtained both pre and post 14 months treatment period. After cephalometric analysis, due to bite plane application significant intrusion in mandibular  incisors were observed as well as elongation in both maxillary and mandibular molars.

  6. Transient Central Diabetes Insipidus and Marked Hypernatremia following Cardiorespiratory Arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Koubar, Sahar H.; Younes, Eliane

    2017-01-01

    Central Diabetes Insipidus is often an overlooked complication of cardiopulmonary arrest and anoxic brain injury. We report a case of transient Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI) following cardiopulmonary arrest. It developed 4 days after the arrest resulting in polyuria and marked hypernatremia of 199?mM. The latter was exacerbated by replacing the hypotonic urine by isotonic saline.

  7. Transient Central Diabetes Insipidus and Marked Hypernatremia following Cardiorespiratory Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar H. Koubar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Central Diabetes Insipidus is often an overlooked complication of cardiopulmonary arrest and anoxic brain injury. We report a case of transient Central Diabetes Insipidus (CDI following cardiopulmonary arrest. It developed 4 days after the arrest resulting in polyuria and marked hypernatremia of 199 mM. The latter was exacerbated by replacing the hypotonic urine by isotonic saline.

  8. High velocity missile injuries of the liver

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    large exit wounds or evidence of cavitating injury to the liver or all of the above. Bomb blast fragment injury with marked tissue destruction with burns of the surrounding tissue was also considered as high velocity inissile injury. Demographic data and mechanisms of injury were noted. A policy of mandatory laparotomy was ...

  9. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks - Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunberg, Emma; Jensen, Per; Isaksson, Anders; Keeling, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these 'neutral' pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause or a consequence of them not being involved in the outbreak of tail biting, behaviour and brain gene expression was compared with 'control' pigs housed in pens with no tail biting. It was shown that the pigs housed in control pens performed a wider variety of pig-directed abnormal behaviour (belly nosing 0.95±1.59, tail in mouth 0.31±0.60 and 'other' abnormal 1.53±4.26; mean±S.D) compared to the neutral pigs (belly nosing 0.30±0.62, tail in mouth 0.13±0.50 and "other" abnormal 0.42±1.06). With Affymetrix gene expression arrays, 107 transcripts were identified as differently expressed (pbiting in the same pen in an earlier study. Hence, the different expression of these genes cannot be a consequence of the neutral pigs not being involved in tail biting behaviour, but rather linked to the cause contributing to why they were not involved in tail biting interactions. These neutral pigs seem to have a genetic and behavioural profile that somehow contributes to them being resistant to performing or receiving pig-directed abnormal behaviour, such as tail biting, even when housed in an environment that elicits that behaviour in other pigs.

  10. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks – Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunberg, Emma; Jensen, Per; Isaksson, Anders; Keeling, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these ‘neutral’ pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause or a consequence of them not being involved in the outbreak of tail biting, behaviour and brain gene expression was compared with ‘control’ pigs housed in pens with no tail biting. It was shown that the pigs housed in control pens performed a wider variety of pig-directed abnormal behaviour (belly nosing 0.95±1.59, tail in mouth 0.31±0.60 and ‘other‘ abnormal 1.53±4.26; mean±S.D) compared to the neutral pigs (belly nosing 0.30±0.62, tail in mouth 0.13±0.50 and “other“ abnormal 0.42±1.06). With Affymetrix gene expression arrays, 107 transcripts were identified as differently expressed (pbiting in the same pen in an earlier study. Hence, the different expression of these genes cannot be a consequence of the neutral pigs not being involved in tail biting behaviour, but rather linked to the cause contributing to why they were not involved in tail biting interactions. These neutral pigs seem to have a genetic and behavioural profile that somehow contributes to them being resistant to performing or receiving pig-directed abnormal behaviour, such as tail biting, even when housed in an environment that elicits that behaviour in other pigs. PMID:23824700

  11. Estimating maximum bite performance in Tyrannosaurus rex using multi-body dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, K T; Falkingham, P L

    2012-08-23

    Bite mechanics and feeding behaviour in Tyrannosaurus rex are controversial. Some contend that a modest bite mechanically limited T. rex to scavenging, while others argue that high bite forces facilitated a predatory mode of life. We use dynamic musculoskeletal models to simulate maximal biting in T. rex. Models predict that adult T. rex generated sustained bite forces of 35 000-57 000 N at a single posterior tooth, by far the highest bite forces estimated for any terrestrial animal. Scaling analyses suggest that adult T. rex had a strong bite for its body size, and that bite performance increased allometrically during ontogeny. Positive allometry in bite performance during growth may have facilitated an ontogenetic change in feeding behaviour in T. rex, associated with an expansion of prey range in adults to include the largest contemporaneous animals.

  12. Risk factors for dog bites occurring during and outside of play: are they different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messam, Locksley L McV; Kass, Philip H; Chomel, Bruno B; Hart, Lynette A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the effects of selected human-canine interaction/environmental factors on bites occurring when the victim was and was not playing with the dog differed from each other. A veterinary clinic-based retrospective cohort study was conducted in Kingston, Jamaica (709), and San Francisco, USA (513) to compare the effects of selected exposures on non-play bites (161) relative to bites preceded by play with the dog (110) as reported by veterinary clients. Additionally, 951 non-biting dogs were used for a risk factor analysis of bites occurring during play. Using directed acyclic graphs and the change-in-estimate procedure to select and adjust for confounders, modified Poisson regression was used to estimate (a) the ratios of proportions of non-play bites out of all bites comparing exposed to unexposed dogs (proportionate bite ratios) and (b) risk ratios for bites occurring during play for each factor of interest. Proportionate bite ratios ranged from 0.84 to 1.29, with most 95% confidence intervals including one, thus implying a lack of specificity of effects of the examined factors on non-play bites relative to bites occurring during play with the dog. Consistent with this lack of specificity, risk ratios for bites occurring during play were similar in magnitude and direction to risk ratios previously published for non-play bites using the same non-biting dogs as a reference group. No country-specific differences in proportionate bite ratios were detected. Each human-canine environmental factor showed similar levels of association with both types of bites. One possible explanation is that both types of bites have a common causal pathway leading from each factor up to the point of human-canine contact. If the human-canine contact then leads to either play or non-play interactions with dogs and subsequently to both types of bites, the presence of such a common pathway would make the factor non-specific to either type of bite. As

  13. Black widow spider and brown recluse spider bites in Texas from 1998 through 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B; Stanley, Sharilyn K

    2003-10-01

    Black widow spiders and brown recluse spiders are of medical importance to humans in the US. However, these spiders differ in their habits, habitat, and the clinical effects and treatment of their bite. This study used data from human exposure calls to poison centers in Texas to compare the epidemioloy of bites from these 2 spiders. During 1998-2002, 760 black widow spider bites and 1,369 brown recluse spider bites were reported. Black widow spider bite penetrance demonstrated no secular trend during this time period while the penetrance of brown recluse spider bites increased. A higher percentage of black widow spider bites occurred among males, while a higher proportion of brown recluse spider bites were reported for females. Black widow spider bites most frequently had mild outcomes while brown recluse spider bites most often had moderate outcomes. The majority of reported bites for both types of spider occurred at the patient's own residence, although the percentage was lower for black widow spiders. Seasonal trends were noted for both black widow and brown recluse spiders. The highest penetrance of black widow spider bites was observed in western Texas while the highest penetrance of brown recluse spider bites was observed in central Texas. This information is useful for identifying those populations at greatest risk for the respective spider bites.

  14. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Askari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin, which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; that stopped with leech removal. A 24-year-old man was presented to Al-Zahra hospital with left otorrhagia and otalgia from 2 days ago. After suction of ear a small soft foreign body was seen in the external ear near the tympanic membrane, then the ear filled with glycerine phenice, the patient explained decreased movement of foreign body. Four hours later the bloody discharge stopped and otalgia decreased. After suction of clots, a leech was extruded from external auditory canal by alligator. Leech infestation is a rare cause of otorrhagia and should be suspected in the endemic region in all of unusual bleeding; it can be diagnosed and treated by exact inspection and removal.

  15. Characteristics of farm injuries in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexe, D M; Petridou, E; Dessypris, N; Skenderis, N; Trichopoulos, D

    2003-08-01

    To assess the characteristics of occupational and leisure farm injuries in Greece. During a five-year period (1996-2000), 4,326 unintentional farm injuries have been recorded by the Emergency Department Injury Surveillance System in Greece. Data concerning demographic variables, accident conditions, and injury characteristics were collected by in person interviews. The data were analyzed by simple cross-tabulation and hierarchical cluster analysis. Injuries from falls on the same level are mainly lower-limb fractures and occur during the winter among older women. Falls from higher level concern migrant workers, who also tend to suffer severe multiple injuries, including concussions, particularly during autumn. Injuries resulting from cutting and piercing instruments, as well as from machinery, are generally open wounds in the upper-limbs, suffered by young migrant workers. Head injuries resulting from striking against an object are more generally spread across socio-demographic variables. Overexertion is the dominant mechanism for dislocations and sprains in the lower limbs. Snake and insect bites are common among younger migrant workers during summer, and they affect the upper limbs during manual work close to the ground. Non-traffic injuries from vehicles are frequently severe, involving head concussion of generally young individuals. In Greece, farm injuries are frequently serious and require hospitalization. These injuries show distinct patterns among older women (lower-limb fractures), young individuals (non-traffic vehicle-related injuries) and migrant workers (injuries from cutting and piercing instruments, falls from high level, and bites). Prevention strategies should give priority to these population groups. These prevention strategies should include guidance for poorly educated workers, including migrants, enforcement of safety regulations concerning farming machinery, and discouragement of risky farming activities among elderly individuals, particularly

  16. Chewing pattern and muscular activation in open bite patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piancino, Maria Grazia; Isola, Gaetano; Merlo, Andrea; Dalessandri, Domenico; Debernardi, Cesare; Bracco, Pietro

    2012-04-01

    Different studies have indicated, in open bite patients, that masticatory muscles tend to generate a small maximum bite force and to show a reduced cross-sectional area with a lower EMG activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the kinematics parameters of the chewing cycles and the activation of masseters and anterior temporalis muscles of patients with anterior dental open bite malocclusion. There have been no previous reports evaluating both kinematic values and EMG activity of patients with anterior open bite during chewing. Fifty-two young patients (23 boys and 29 girls; mean age±SD 11.5±1.2 and 10.2±1.6years, respectively) with anterior open bite malocclusion and 21 subjects with normal occlusion were selected for the study. Kinematics parameters and surface electromyography (EMG) were simultaneously recorded during chewing a hard bolus with a kinesiograph K7-I Myotronics-Usa. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the open bite patients and the control group for a narrower chewing pattern, a shorter total and closing duration of the chewing pattern, a lower peak of both the anterior temporalis and the masseter of the bolus side. In this study, it has been observed that open bite patients, lacking the inputs from the anterior guidance, that are considered important information for establishing the motor scheme of the chewing pattern, show narrower chewing pattern, shorter lasting chewing cycles and lower muscular activation with respect to the control group. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effect of Postnatal Myostatin Inhibition on Bite Mechanics in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan H Williams

    Full Text Available As a negative regulator of muscle size, myostatin (Mstn impacts the force-production capabilities of skeletal muscles. In the masticatory system, measures of temporalis-stimulated bite forces in constitutive myostatin KOs suggest an absolute, but not relative, increase in jaw-muscle force. Here, we assess the phenotypic and physiologic impact of postnatal myostatin inhibition on bite mechanics using an inducible conditional KO mouse in which myostatin is inhibited with doxycycline (DOX. Given the increased control over the timing of gene inactivation in this model, it may be more clinically-relevant for developing interventions for age-associated changes in the musculoskeletal system. DOX was administered for 12 weeks starting at age 4 months, during which time food intake was monitored. Sex, age and strain-matched controls were given the same food without DOX. Bite forces were recorded just prior to euthanasia after which muscle and skeletal data were collected. Food intake did not differ between control or DOX animals within each sex. DOX males were significantly larger and had significantly larger masseters than controls, but DOX and control females did not differ. Although there was a tendency towards higher absolute bite forces in DOX animals, this was not significant, and bite forces normalized to masseter mass did not differ. Mechanical advantage for incisor biting increased in the DOX group due to longer masseter moment arms, likely due to a more anteriorly-placed masseter insertion. Despite only a moderate increase in bite force in DOX males and none in DOX females, the increase in masseter mass in males indicates a potentially positive impact on jaw muscles. Our data suggest a sexual dimorphism in the role of mstn, and as such investigations into the sex-specific outcomes is warranted.

  18. Use of clear aligners in open bite cases: an unexpected treatment option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancotti, Aldo; Garino, Francesco; Mampieri, Gianluca

    2017-06-01

    In open bite case treatments, a proper diagnostic differentiation is essential in determining the appropriate corrective procedures. Dental open bites are generally more responsive to treatment with orthodontics alone, whereas skeletal open bites often require a combination of orthodontics and orthognathic surgery. Patient selection and treatment principles for non-surgical open bite treatment routinely include fixed appliances both labial or lingual. However, removable clear aligners have gained a consistent popularity in the treatment of complex cases including open bite malocclusions. In this article, the authors describe three different clinical cases in which open bite cases had been satisfactorily treated by using clear aligners.

  19. Selective mutism due to a dog bite trauma in a 4-year-old girl: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anyfantakis Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction A child experiencing an event of threatening or catastrophic nature may experience considerable post-traumatic psychological distress. Dog bites present an important public health problem and are a frequent cause of physical trauma in children. Physicians who manage paediatric trauma may not be vigilant of the high risk of psychological stress in children exposed to a physical injury. Case presentation A 4-year-old white girl of Greek origin, with a dog-bite related trauma was admitted to the University Hospital of Crete, Greece, for surgical repair and intravenous antibiotic therapy due to extensive lesions. Exposure to the traumatic event triggered the onset of an unusual psychological response, selective mutism and acute post-traumatic stress disorder. Conclusion There is limited literature discussing the psychological effect of dog bites in children. Parents and physicians involved in pediatric physical trauma need to be more familiar with post-traumatic behavioral reactions. Awareness of the potential development of such reactions may result in early detection and effective management of children at risk.

  20. Selective mutism due to a dog bite trauma in a 4-year-old girl: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A child experiencing an event of threatening or catastrophic nature may experience considerable post-traumatic psychological distress. Dog bites present an important public health problem and are a frequent cause of physical trauma in children. Physicians who manage paediatric trauma may not be vigilant of the high risk of psychological stress in children exposed to a physical injury. Case presentation A 4-year-old white girl of Greek origin, with a dog-bite related trauma was admitted to the University Hospital of Crete, Greece, for surgical repair and intravenous antibiotic therapy due to extensive lesions. Exposure to the traumatic event triggered the onset of an unusual psychological response, selective mutism and acute post-traumatic stress disorder. Conclusion There is limited literature discussing the psychological effect of dog bites in children. Parents and physicians involved in pediatric physical trauma need to be more familiar with post-traumatic behavioral reactions. Awareness of the potential development of such reactions may result in early detection and effective management of children at risk. PMID:19946578

  1. Machete‑cut injuries are occurring in the maxillofacial region in Zaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-10-18

    Oct 18, 2014 ... The injuries presented in our review resulted from battery and included soft tissue lacerations, transection of nerves and vessels, and in some cases .... human and animal bite, the degree of wound contamination in machete‑cut injuries is usually low. Therefore, definitive soft tissue reconstruction in these ...

  2. Temporalis and masseter muscle activity in patients with anterior open bite and craniomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L

    1991-01-01

    Activity in temporalis and masseter muscles, and traits of facial morphology and occlusal stability were studied in 22 patients (19 women, 3 men; 15-45 yr of age) with anterior open bite and symptoms and signs of craniomandibular disorders. Facial morphology was assessed by profile radiographs......, occlusal stability by tooth contacts, and craniomandibular function by clinical and radiological examination. Electromyographic activity was recorded by surface electrodes after primary treatment with a reflex-releasing, stabilizing splint. Maximal voluntary contraction was reduced compared to reference....... Relative loading of the muscles was markedly increased during resting posture. It was concluded that reduced occlusal stability and long-face morphology were associated with weak elevator muscle activity with disposition overload and tenderness. The results also indicated that increase of occlusal...

  3. Eesti vajab riigiarhitekti / Mark Soosaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soosaar, Mark, 1946-

    2006-01-01

    Linnade tekkimisest Eestis, linnaehitusest ja linnaplaneerimisest. Pärnu muinsuskaitsealast ja uute korruselamute ehitamisest. Arhitektuuriameti loomise ja riigiarhitekti ametikoha vajalikkusest. Kommenteerivad Ülar Mark, Triin Ojari, Harry Liivrand, Karin Paulus

  4. Epidemiological study of insect bite reactions from Central India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The physical effects of the arthropod bites on human skin receive less attention, especially in the rural areas where the per capita income is less. Ours is a rural-based hospital, the vicinity having more of plants, trees, and forests; we undertook the study to find out the relation of insect bite dermatitis in a rural area. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in the Dermatology outpatient department of our institute on 100 subjects of insect bite dermatitis who were questioned retrospectively about the sequence of events besides their environmental and living conditions. They were examined thoroughly and the relevant clinical findings were noted, also taking into account the prior treatment taken by them, if any. Results and Conclusions: It was found that insect bite dermatitis has no age or gender preponderance, and the protective factors for the same are use of full sleeve clothes and keeping the doors and windows closed at night. On the contrary, the risk factors are residence in areas of heavy insect infestation, use of perfumes and colognes, warm weather in spring and summer and the lack of protective measures. However, there was no direct association of atopy with increased risk of developing insect bite dermatitis.

  5. Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: Open bite evolution after tongue reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Rodriguez, E; Gómez, E; Martín, M; Muñoz, J-M; Hernández-Godoy, J; Burgueño, M

    2018-03-01

    Macroglossia causes functional deficits such as airway obstruction, drooling, phonation difficulties, and leads to protrusion of dentoalveolar structures resulting in an anterior open bite and a prognathic mandibular appearance. Macroglossia is present in the majority of patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) and surgical treatment may be indicated. A retrospective review was conducted including BWS patients who underwent surgical tongue reduction between 2000 and 2015 at the Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid. Out of 16 patients with BWS, surgery was performed in 11 cases. Tongue protrusion with open bite was the main indication for surgical treatment. Reduction glossectomy was performed using the keyhole technique. We analysed the relationship between age at surgery and evolution of open bite. Complications were minimal and satisfactory outcomes were observed with a decrease in anterior open bite. In this study we have observed that surgical treatment in patients with BWS and open bite accompanied by macroglossia seems to provide positive results with a satisfactory outcome in dentoskeletal alterations.

  6. Kissing Bug ( spp. Intrusion into Homes: Troublesome Bites and Domiciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Klotz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kissing bugs ( Triatoma spp. frequently enter homes and bite human and pet occupants. Bites may lead to severe allergic reactions and, in some cases, death. Kissing bugs are also vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi , the cause of Chagas disease. In general, modern houses in the United States are not conducive to domiciliation of kissing bugs (bugs living out their entire life within the home with the presence of eggs, nymphs, adults, and exuviae. Construction features such as concrete foundations, solid walls and ceilings, window screens, tight thresholds for doors and windows, and other measures impede bug entry into homes, and air conditioning reduces the need for open doors and windows. Where Chagas disease is endemic in Mexico and Central and South America, homes often have thatch roofs, adobe walls, and open doors and windows. We investigated numerous instances of kissing bug intrusions into homes in Southern Arizona, California, and Louisiana and documented the reactions to kissing bug bites. Our work confirms the importance of modern home construction in limiting kissing bug intrusions. Older homes, especially those lacking modern screening, caulking, and weather stripping to reduce air leakage, may be subject to kissing bug intrusions and domiciliation. We describe a community in Southern Arizona where domiciliation of homes by Triatoma recurva is common. We also provide recent data regarding kissing bug bites and allergic reactions to the bites.

  7. Civilsamfundets ABC: M for Marked

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anker Brink; Meyer, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    Bogstaveligt talt: Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til M for Marked.......Bogstaveligt talt: Hvad er civilsamfundet? Anker Brink Lund og Gitte Meyer fra CBS Center for Civil Society Studies gennemgår civilsamfundet bogstav for bogstav. Vi er nået til M for Marked....

  8. Marks on the petroleum fiscality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-02-01

    This document offers some marks on the petroleum fiscality in France: the taxes as the 'accises' and the 'TVA', the part of the taxes in the sale price at the service station, the comparison with other countries of Europe, the tax revenues and the Government budget. It provides also marks on the fuels prices formation (margins), the world petroleum markets (supply and demand) and the part of the petroleum companies on the petroleum market. (A.L.B.)

  9. Primary closure versus non-closure of dog bite wounds. a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K; Makris, Eleftherios A; Gantsos, Apostolos; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2014-01-01

    Dog bite wounds represent a major health problem. Despite their importance, their management and especially the role of primary closure remain controversial. In this randomised controlled trial, the outcome between primary suturing and non-closure was compared. 168 consecutive patients with dog bite injuries were included in this study. The wounds were allocated randomly in two treatment approaches: Group 1, consisting of eighty-two patients, had their wound sutured, whilst Group 2, consisting of eighty-six patients, did not have their wounds sutured. All wounds were cleansed using high-pressure irrigation and povidone iodine. All patients received the same type of antibiotic treatment. Our measured outcomes included presence of infection and cosmetic appearance. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Wound and patient characteristics, such as time of management, wound location and size, and patient age, were recorded and analysed for their potential role in the resulting outcome. The overall infection rate was 8.3%. No difference in the infection rate between primary suturing and non-suturing group was detected in the present study. The cosmetic appearance of the sutured wounds was significantly better (mean score 1.74) compared to the wounds that were left open (mean score 3.05) (p=0.0001). The infection rate was comparable among all age groups. Wounds treated within 8h of injury demonstrated an infection rate of 4.5%, which is lower compared to the 22.2% rate observed in wounds treated later than 8h. The wounds located at the head and neck exhibited better results in both infection rate and cosmetic outcome. Additionally, wounds >3 cm negatively affected the cosmetic appearance of the outcome. Primary suturing of wounds caused by dog bites resulted in similar infection rate compared to non-suturing. However, primary suturing exhibited improved cosmetic appearance. Time of management appeared to be critical, as early treatment

  10. BWR Mark I pressure suppression study: bench mark experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-01-01

    Computer simulations representative of the wetwell of Mark I BWR's have predicted pressures and related phenomena. However, calculational predictions for purposes of engineering decision will be possible only if the code can be verified, i.e., shown to compute in accord with measured values. Described in the report is a set of single downcomer spherical flask bench mark experiments designed to produce quantitative data to validate various air-water dynamic computations; the experiments were performed since relevant bench mark data were not available from outside sources. Secondary purposes of the study were to provide a test bed for the instrumentation and post-experiment data processing techniques to be used in the Laboratory's reactor safety research program and to provide additional masurements for the air-water scaling study

  11. Anterior open bite treated with myofunctional therapy and palatal crib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiry, Moshabab A

    2015-03-01

    This case report demonstrates the treatment effects of palatal crib combined with the myofunctional therapy in a child with anterior open bite (AOB) due to thumb sucking and habitual anterior and low tongue position. The patient, an 11-year-old boy, had an anterior open bite and flared and spaced upper and lower incisors. Palatal cribs in conjunction with myofunctional therapy were used to discourage sucking habit and to adapt normal tongue position. Successful correction of the AOB with adequate overjet and overbite were achieved with total treatment time of 7 months. The importance of myofunctional therapy in adopting normal tongue position and in maintaining the stability of open bite correction is emphasized.

  12. Biting disrupts integration to spur skull evolution in eels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, David C; Wainwright, Peter C; Alfaro, Michael E; Revell, Liam J; Mehta, Rita S

    2014-11-17

    The demand that anatomical structures work together to perform biological functions is thought to impose strong limits on morphological evolution. Breakthroughs in diversification can occur, however, when functional integration among structures is relaxed. Although such transitions are expected to generate variation in morphological diversification across the tree of life, empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. Here we show that transitions between suction-based and biting modes of prey capture, which require different degrees of coordination among skull components, are associated with shifts in the pattern of skull diversification in eels (Anguilliformes). Biting eels have experienced greater independence of the jaws, hyoid and operculum during evolution and exhibit more varied morphologies than closely related suction feeders, and this pattern reflects the weakened functional integration among skull components required for biting. Our results suggest that behavioural transitions can change the evolutionary potential of the vertebrate skeleton by altering functional relationships among structures.

  13. Open bite as a risk factor for orthodontic root resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motokawa, Masahide; Terao, Akiko; Kaku, Masato; Kawata, Toshitsugu; Gonzales, Carmen; Darendeliler, M Ali; Tanne, Kazuo

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the prevalence and degree of root resorption induced by orthodontic treatment in patients with and without open bite. One hundred and eleven patients treated with multibracket appliances were retrospectively selected from the patients and divided into non-open bite (NOB) and open bite (OB) groups. The severity of root resorption and the root shape were classified into five groups on periapical radiographs before and after treatment. Moreover, only in the OB group, all teeth were sub-divided into functional and hypofunctional ones that are occluding and non-occluding. As the results of multiple linear regression analysis of patient characteristics and clinical variables with the number of overall root resorption, the independent variables that were found to contribute significantly to root resorption were bite and abnormal root shape. The prevalences of root resorption evaluated in the number of patients were significantly higher in OB group than in NOB group, and those in the number of teeth were significantly higher in OB group than in NOB group, in particular anterior and premolar teeth. The prevalence of resorbed teeth with abnormal root shapes was also significantly higher in OB group than in NOB group. On the other hand, in OB group, the prevalences of root resorption and teeth with abnormal root shape were significantly greater in hypofunctional teeth than in normal functional teeth. There are more teeth with root resorption and abnormal root shape in open bite cases than in normal bite cases, and more teeth with abnormal root shapes and root resorption in hypofunctional teeth than in functional teeth.

  14. Perawatan Maloklusi Klas III Skeletal disertai Open Bite dengan Teknik Begg

    OpenAIRE

    Anggaraeni, Putu Ika; Suparwitri, Sri; H, Soekarsono; SP, Pinandi

    2015-01-01

    Overjet negatif pada maloklusi klas III dapat terjadi karena penyimpangan hubungan incisivus atas dan bawah, adanya malrelasi antara maksila dan mandibula, atau kombinasi keduanya. Maloklusi klas III dapat disertai dengan crowding, deep bite, maupun open bite. Tujuan perawatan adalah untuk mengoreksi cross bite dan open bite, memperoleh overjet dan overbite normal serta hubungan oklusal yang stabil. Pasien laki-laki usia 15 tahun dengan maloklusi Angle klas III dan relasi skeletal klas III, m...

  15. Mass awareness regarding snake bite induced early morning neuroparalysis can prevent many deaths in North India

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Rupinder; Dogra, Varundeep; Sharma, Gurudutt; Chauhan, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In North India snake bite deaths are predominantly seen with neurotoxic envenomations (NEs) whereas in South India the hemotoxic envenomation (HE) is more common. Krait is responsible for most deaths in North India. It bites people sleeping on the floors, mostly at night. We describe the profile of venomous snake bites over 1 year in 2013. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital in North India. Demographics, circumstances of bite, envenom...

  16. Prevention of tick bites: an evaluation of a smartphone app

    OpenAIRE

    Antonise-Kamp, L.; Beaujean, D. J. M. A.; Crutzen, R.; van Steenbergen, J. E.; Ruwaard, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Lyme borreliosis (LB) is the most common reported tick-borne infection in Europe, and involves transmission of Borrelia by ticks. As long as a vaccine is not available and effective measures for controlling tick populations are insufficient, LB control is focused on preventive measures to avoid tick bites. To inform citizens about the risk of ticks, motivate them to check for tick bites, and encourage them to remove any attached tick as quickly as possible, a mobile app called ‘Tek...

  17. Chronic Osteomyelitis Secondary to Human Bite: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Tan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a human bite that was initially inadequately treated and progressed to chronic osteomyelitis, finally resulting in digital amputation. Human bites are seemingly innocuous, but if neglected, may lead to subsequent infection and morbidity. Persistence of symptoms should alert the practitioner to the possibility of infection extending to the soft tissue or bone. Bacteriological studies commonly yield mixed aerobic and anaerobic flora. Early debridement and antibiotic treatment may prevent development of severe soft tissue or bone infection.

  18. Mathematical model of the human jaw system simulating static biting and movements after unloading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, GEC; Otten, E; van Eijden, TMGJ; van Willigen, JD

    1997-01-01

    When the resistance to a forceful isometric bite is suddenly removed in unloading experiments, the bite force drops to zero and the mandible reaches a constant velocity. This occurs at an initial bite force of 100 N after similar to 12 ms when the incisors have moved 4.5 mm. Reflex activity is far

  19. Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture in preorthodontic patients with anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Phong; Sarauw, Martin Toft; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2014-03-01

    Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture were examined and related to craniofacial morphology in preorthodontic children and adolescents with anterior open bite. One hundred eleven patients (ages, 6-18 years) with an anterior open bite of more than 0 mm were divided into 2 groups of skeletal or dentoalveolar open bite. The skeletal open-bite group comprised 38 subjects (19 girls, 19 boys). The dentoalveolar open-bite group comprised 73 subjects (43 girls, 30 boys). Visual assessment of the cervical column and measurements of craniofacial morphology and head posture were made on profile radiographs. Deviations in the cervical vertebral column morphology occurred in 23.7% of the subjects in the skeletal open-bite group and in 19.2% in the dentoalveolar open-bite group, but the difference was not significant. Head posture was significantly more extended in the skeletal open-bite group compared with the dentoalveolar open-bite group (craniovertical angle [Mx/VER], P open bite. No significant differences in the cervical vertebral column's morphologic deviations were found between the skeletal and the dentoalveolar open-bite groups. Significant differences were found in head posture between the groups and with regard to associations with craniofacial dimensions. This might indicate a respiratory etiologic component in children with anterior open bite. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Age-related changes in the propensity of dogs to bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messam, L L McV; Kass, P H; Chomel, B B; Hart, L A

    2013-08-01

    This retrospective cohort study was aimed at describing the effects of age at acquisition, age, and duration of ownership of dogs on the risk of (1) bites during play and (2) non-play bites to humans. Data were collected on 110 dogs that had bitten during play with a person, 161 dogs that had bitten outside of play and 951 non-biting dogs from veterinary clients in Kingston (KGN), Jamaica and San Francisco (SF), USA. Modified Poisson regression was employed to model the relationships of both types of bites to each variable separately. Effects of the variables on dog bite risk (1) during and (2) outside of play with the dog, differed from each other and by type of bite. Effects varied with the dog's age and age-related associations were strongest in dogs younger than 1 year old. Ages at acquisition of dogs at highest risk for bites during play were substantially lower than those at risk for non-play bites. Ages and durations of ownership of dogs at highest risk for bites during play were also lower than those of dogs at highest risk for non-play bites. The propensity of a dog to bite changes as it ages and relationships between dog bites occurring during and outside of play and the dog's age at acquisition, current age, and duration of ownership, differ from each other. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pattern of First-Aid Measures Used by Snake-bite Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of first aid measures in the management of snake bite by patients in rural communities in Africa is a popular practice. Records of 103 snake bite patients admitted at Zamko Comprehensive Health Centre, were retrieved and reviewed. 84 (81.6%) of the 103 cases with snake bite used first aid measures. Common first ...

  2. Vastab Mark Lubotski / Mark Lubotski ; interv. Toomas Velmet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lubotski, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Hamburgi Muusikakõrgkooli viiuliprofessor Mark Lubotskist, kes viibis Tallinnas oktoobris 2008 ja oli IV rahvusvahelise Heino Elleri nimelise viiuldajate konkursi žürii esimeheks. Tema sidemetest Eesti muusikutega, pagemisest Läände, Heino Elleri nimelisest konkursist ja tööst žüriis

  3. Mark Napier / Mark Napier ; interv. Tilman Baumgärtel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Napier, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Ameerika kunstnikust Mark Napierist (sünd. 1961) ja tema loomingust, 2001. a. tehtud meiliintervjuu kunstnikuga. Võrguteosest "The Digital Landfill" (1998), koos Andy Deckiga loodud tööst "GrafficJam" (1999), töödest "Shredder" (1998), "Feed", "Riot", "P-Soup" (2000), võrgukunstist ja muust

  4. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  5. Epidemiology of childhood injuries in rural Puducherry, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalakshmy, T; Dongre, Amol R; Kalaiselvan, Ganapathy

    2011-07-01

    To study the epidemiology of injuries among children (level Anganwadi workers (AWW) or Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM) were not consulted for the treatment. Falls were the leading cause of injury. Fall on ground from height, burns, bite by scorpion/insect/snake/dogs, and road traffic accidents were the four leading causes of injury among children. There is a need for community based health education intervention for mothers, caregivers, school teacher and capacity building of village level health workers such as ANM and AWW. Health education message should include preventive measures for the leading causes of childhood injuries.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Biting Rates of Simulium damnosum sensu lato, Vector of Onchocerca volvulus, in Two Sudanese Foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarroug, Isam M A; Hashim, Kamal; Elaagip, Arwa H; Samy, Abdallah M; Frah, Ehab A; ElMubarak, Wigdan A; Mohamed, Hanan A; Deran, Tong Chor M; Aziz, Nabil; Higazi, Tarig B

    2016-01-01

    was a significant difference in mean monthly density of S. damnosum s.l. across the two foci in 2007-2008 (df = 3, F = 3.91, P = 0.011). Minimum temperature showed significant correlation with adult flies counts in four areas sampled; the adult counts were increased in Nady village (rs = 0.799) and were decreased in Kalasecal (rs = -0.676), Gumaiza (rs = -0.585), and Hilat Khateir (rs = -0.496). Maximum temperature showed positive correlation with black fly counts only in Galabat focus. Precipitation was significantly correlated with adult flies counts in Nady village, Abu-Hamed, but no significance was found in the rest of the sampled villages in both foci. Hourly-based distribution of black flies showed a unimodal pattern in Abu-Hamed with one peak (10:00-18:00), while a bimodal pattern with two peaks (07:00-10:00) and (14:00-18:00) was exhibited in Galabat. Transmission of onchocerciasis in both foci showed marked differences in seasonality, which may be attributed to ecology, microclimate and proximity of breeding sites to collection sites. The seasonal shifts between the two foci might be related to variations in climate zones. This information on black fly vector seasonality, ecology, distribution and biting activity has obvious implications in monitoring transmission levels to guide the national and regional onchocerciasis elimination programs in Sudan.

  7. Pattern of Animal-Related Injuries in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Moini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Animal related injuries as most common causes of human morbidity have different pattern by geographical zones. We aimed to explore the main descriptive epidemiology of animal-related injuries in both rural and urban areas in Iran. Between 2000 and 2004, we collected the data of all the cases of animal related trauma hospitalized for more than 24 hours in eight cities (Tehran, Mashhad, Ahwaz, Shiraz, Tabriz, Qom, Kermanshah, and Babol. Further evaluations were conducted on 17753 eligible subjects. Of 17753 traumatic patients, 40 subjects (0.2%, had animal-related injuries. The highest rate was seen in Tabriz with 11 cases. Upper and lower extremities were the most frequent sites of trauma and they were injured in 13 and 11 cases respectively. Dog bite and cow-related injuries were responsible for 40% and 32.5% of injuries respectively. Amputation of the phalanx was done in 2 cases due to dog bite and bull gore occurred. One thoracotomy, one laparatomy and one craniotomy were done. One patient needed fasciatomy due to snake bite. Educating the patients could decrease the incidence of morbidity of these injuries.

  8. A Case of Biting Humans by Nabis americoferus (Heteroptera: Nabidae), With Comments on Bites by Other Species of the Genus Nabis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faúndez, Eduardo I

    2016-01-01

    A case of biting humans by the common damsel bug Nabis americoferus Carayon, 1961 is reported for an adult male in Fargo, ND. The symptoms and evolution of the bite are described. A compilation of cases of other Nabis spp. biting humans in the United States is provided and discussed. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Human Bites of the Face with Tissue Losses in Cosmopolitan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective series of thirty-six cases of human bites to the face with tissue losses requiring reconstruction during a five-year period, January 1999 to December 2003 is presented. The unmarried female in her third decade dominated both as victim and assailant in incidences related to love affairs and love gone sour.

  10. Amelogenesis Imperfecta with Anterior Open Bite: A Rare Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Ruchi; Pathak, Anuradha; Goenka, Puneet

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment plan for a young patient affected by amelogenesis imperfecta with anterior open bite. The objectives of the treatment were to eliminate tooth sensitivity while enhancing esthetics and restoring masticatory function. Treatment included resin composite laminate veneers on maxillary anterior teeth and stainless steel crowns for posterior teeth.

  11. The ecology and biting activity of blackflies (Simuliidae) and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field studies on the ecology and biting activity of blackflies (Simuliidae), as well as an assessment of the prevalence status of Onchocerciasis diseases were conducted in a rural forest area of Ghana. It was observed that the blackfly vector Simulium damnosum s.l was the most abundant and widely distributed of the species ...

  12. April / May 2006. 102 Warm-Blooded Animal Bites

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the individual. But a large percentage of these felines may be wild or stray cats taken in for care. Other. Other domesticated or semi-domesticated animals that cause bites include pets such as ferrets, gerbils, hamsters or rabbits. The occasional wild animal brought into the home as a pet, such as the raccoon, squirrel, skunk.

  13. Etiology and pathogenesis of anterior open bite: A review | Wanjau ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the etiology and pathogenesis of anterior open bite malocclusion. Data source: Review of literature was affected through Pubmed, Google scholar and Science direct. References identified from articles found from the primary search were also reviewed. Study selection: Published data on etiology and ...

  14. Knowledge and management of snake bite by general practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge of general practitioners in the rural areas of the Free State and Northern Cape regarding snake bites and their treatment. Methods: Telephonic interviews using structured questionnaires were conducted with a random sample of 50 general practitioners from ...

  15. Extreme skeletal open bite correction with vertical elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Escalante, Marco Antonio; Aliaga-Del Castillo, Aron; Soldevilla, Luciano; Janson, Guilherme; Yatabe, Marilia; Zuazola, Ricardo Voss

    2017-11-01

    Severe skeletal open bites may be ideally treated with a combined surgical-orthodontic approach. Alternatively, compensations may be planned to camouflage the malocclusion with orthodontics alone. This case report describes the treatment of an 18-year-old man who presented with a severe open bite involving the anterior and posterior teeth up to the first molars, increased vertical dimension, bilateral Class III molar relationship, bilateral posterior crossbite, dental midline deviation, and absence of the maxillary right canine and the mandibular left first premolar. A treatment plan including the extraction of the mandibular right first premolar and based on uprighting and vertical control of the posterior teeth, combined with extrusion of the anterior teeth using multiloop edgewise archwire mechanics and elastics was chosen. After 6 months of alignment and 2 months of multiloop edgewise archwire mechanics, the open bite was significantly reduced. After 24 months of treatment, anterior teeth extrusion, posterior teeth intrusion, and counterclockwise mandibular rotation were accomplished. Satisfactory improvement of the overbite, overjet, sagittal malocclusion, and facial appearance were achieved. The mechanics used in this clinical case demonstrated good and stable results for open-bite correction at the 2-year posttreatment follow-up.

  16. Epidemiology of Snake Bites among Selected Communities in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snake is one of the major group of games feared by people in many localities because of their venoms, yet snakes are equally afraid of human beings. This balance of terror apart from affecting both man and snakes has also led to their deaths. Epidemiology of snake bites among selected communities in the enclave of ...

  17. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a snake bite victim: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurs in patients with severe emotional or physiologic stress. The prognosis is usually favorable, and the left ventricular wall motion dyskinesis normalizes within days to weeks. In this paper we report a case of snake bite complicated by takotsubo cardiomyopathy. We advise physicians to ...

  18. Innovation in prediction planning for anterior open bite correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzian, Mohammed; Almukhtar, Anas; O'Neil, Michael; Benington, Philip; Al Anezi, Thamer; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2015-05-01

    This study applies recent advances in 3D virtual imaging for application in the prediction planning of dentofacial deformities. Stereo-photogrammetry has been used to create virtual and physical models, which are creatively combined in planning the surgical correction of anterior open bite. The application of these novel methods is demonstrated through the surgical correction of a case.

  19. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 0; c public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Skin, hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Blisters Bug bites and stings How to remove a tick When to see a dermatologist Burns Frostbite Splinters Treating sunburn Wound care Nail care Anti-aging skin care Kids’ ...

  20. Bite frequency measured by head pitch movements in grazing experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudshoorn, Frank W.; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2010-01-01

    sensors placed on the head of the cows, bite frequency was registered manually by noting the rip off sound during a specified time bout. Sward registrations comprised grass length measurement by rising plate meter , grass quality by laboratory analysis of hand harvested grass simulating the cows grazing...