WorldWideScience

Sample records for bis beam image

  1. CEBAF beam viewer imaging software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowling, B.A.; McDowell, C.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the various software used in the analysis of beam viewer images at CEBAF. This software, developed at CEBAF, includes a three-dimensional viewscreen calibration code which takes into account such factors as multiple camera/viewscreen rotations and perspective imaging, and maintaining a calibration database for each unit. Additional software allows single-button beam spot detection, with determination of beam location, width, and quality, in less than three seconds. Software has also been implemented to assist in the determination of proper chopper RF control parameters from digitized chopper circles, providing excellent results

  2. Simultaneous Power Deposition Detection of Two EC Beams with the BIS Analysis in Moving TCV Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curchod, L.; Pochelon, A.; Decker, J.; Felici, F.; Goodman, T. P.; Moret, J.-M.; Paley, J. I.

    2009-11-01

    Modulation of power amplitude is a widespread to determine the radial absorption profile of externally launched power in fusion plasmas. There are many techniques to analyze the plasma response to such a modulation. The break-in-slope (BIS) analysis can draw an estimated power deposition profile for each power step up. In this paper, the BIS analysis is used to monitor the power deposition location of one or two EC power beams simultaneously in a non-stationary plasma being displaced vertically in the TCV tokamak vessel. Except from radial discrepancies, the results have high time resolution and compare well with simulations from the R2D2-C3PO-LUKE ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck code suite.

  3. DTPA: Bis benzimidazole as multi model imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vikas; Tiwari, A.K.; Sharma, H.; Sharma, R.; Mishra, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The DTPA bis benzimidazole analogue has been tested for radiopharmaceutical efficacy. The radiolabelling was found more then 98% after 8 hrs and blood kinetics was fast. The compound was also tested for optical imaging agent. The Eu 3+ ion has an absorption band in the visible spectrum (578-582 nm) whose wavelength is very sensitive to even small changes in the coordination environment. Although the intensity of this 7F0 → 5D0 transition is low, the bands are relatively narrow, which allows distinguishing different coordination states of the metal. For Eu 3+ complexes which have two differently hydrated forms in aqueous solution, one observes two absorption bands belonging to the two species. High-resolution UV-visible spectra were recorded in aqueous solutions which show a temperature invariant absorption with two distinct, temperature-dependent absorption bands. The intensity ratio of these two bands changes with temperature: the band at shorter wavelengths is decreasing very slightly, while that at longer wavelengths is increasing with the temperature. The ratio of the integrals of the two bands is related to the equilibrium constant, and its temperature dependence yields the reaction enthalpy and entropy

  4. Edge imaging in intense beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bernal

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of rings of charge observed near the edge of beams from high-perveance guns is described with a simple ray tracing technique inspired by the particle-core model. We illustrate the technique, which has no analog in light optics, with examples from experiments employing solenoid focusing of an electron beam. The rings of charge result from the combined effects of external focusing and space-charge forces acting on paraxial fringe particles with relatively large initial transverse velocities. The model is independent of the physical mechanisms responsible for the fringe particles. Furthermore, the focal length for edge imaging in a uniform focusing channel is derived using a linearized trajectory equation for the motion of fringe particles. Counterintuitively, the focal length decreases as the beam current increases.

  5. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-01

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented

  6. Ion-beam Plasma Neutralization Interaction Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward Startsev; S. Klasky; Ronald C. Davidson

    2002-04-09

    Neutralization of the ion beam charge and current is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because the excitation of nonlinear plasma waves may occur. Computer simulation images of plasma neutralization of the ion beam pulse are presented.

  7. A systematic review of the measurement properties of the Body Image Scale (BIS) in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissant, Heleen C; Neijenhuijs, Koen I; Jansen, Femke; Aaronson, Neil K; Groenvold, Mogens; Holzner, Bernhard; Terwee, Caroline B; van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Cuijpers, Pim; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2018-06-01

    Body image is acknowledged as an important aspect of health-related quality of life in cancer patients. The Body Image Scale (BIS) is a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to evaluate body image in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to systematically review measurement properties of the BIS among cancer patients. A search in Embase, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Web of Science was performed to identify studies that investigated measurement properties of the BIS (Prospero ID 42017057237). Study quality was assessed (excellent, good, fair, poor), and data were extracted and analyzed according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) methodology on structural validity, internal consistency, reliability, measurement error, hypothesis testing for construct validity, and responsiveness. Evidence was categorized into sufficient, insufficient, inconsistent, or indeterminate. Nine studies were included. Evidence was sufficient for structural validity (one factor solution), internal consistency (α = 0.86-0.96), and reliability (r > 0.70); indeterminate for measurement error (information on minimal important change lacked) and responsiveness (increasing body image disturbance in only one study); and inconsistent for hypothesis testing (conflicting results). Quality of the evidence was moderate to low. No studies reported on cross-cultural validity. The BIS is a PROM with good structural validity, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability, but good quality studies on the other measurement properties are needed to optimize evidence. It is recommended to include a wider variety of cancer diagnoses and treatment modalities in these future studies.

  8. Scattered radiation in fan beam imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, P.C.; Yaffe, M.

    1982-01-01

    Scatter-to-primary energy fluence ratios (S/P) have been studied for fan x-ray beams as used in CT scanners and slit projection radiography systems. The dependence of S/P on phantom diameter, distance from phantom to image receptor, and kilovoltage is presented. An empirical equation is given that predicts S/P over a wide range of fan beam imaging configurations. For CT body scans on a 4th-generation machine, S/P is approximately 5%. Scattered radiation can produce a significant cupping artefact in CT images which is similar to that due to beam hardening. When multiple slices are used in scanned slit radiography, they can be arranged such that the increase in S/P is negligible. Calculations of scatter-to-primary ratios for first order scattering showed that for fan beams the contribution of coherent scatter is comparable to or greater than that of incoherent first scatter

  9. Beam imaging sensor and method for using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAninch, Michael D.; Root, Jeffrey J.

    2017-01-03

    The present invention relates generally to the field of sensors for beam imaging and, in particular, to a new and useful beam imaging sensor for use in determining, for example, the power density distribution of a beam including, but not limited to, an electron beam or an ion beam. In one embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other items, a circumferential slit that is either circular, elliptical or polygonal in nature. In another embodiment, the beam imaging sensor of the present invention comprises, among other things, a discontinuous partially circumferential slit. Also disclosed is a method for using the various beams sensor embodiments of the present invention.

  10. Proton beam writing for producing holographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ow, Y.S.; Breese, M.B.H.; Bettiol, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports on the writing of computer generated hologram diffraction patterns using focused 2 MeV proton beam irradiation. These patterns were designed using a ray tracing algorithm and written directly into a thick polymethylmethacrylate layer. When the developed holographic pattern was illuminated with a 650 nm laser it produced a good reconstructed image. This work provides means of forming high-resolution, high aspect ratio holographic images in polymers for applications in data storage using switchable holography.

  11. Neutron beam imaging with GEM detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albani, G.; Cazzaniga, C.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.; Croci, G.; Muraro, A.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Cavenago, M.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2015-01-01

    Neutron GEM-based detectors represent a new frontier of devices in neutron physics applications where a very high neutron flux must be measured such as future fusion experiments (e.g. ITER Neutral beam Injector) and spallation sources (e.g. the European Spallation source). This kind of detectors can be properly adapted to be used both as beam monitors but also as neutron diffraction detectors that could represent a valid alternative for the 3 He detectors replacement. Fast neutron GEM detectors (nGEM) feature a cathode composed by one layer of polyethylene and one of aluminium (neutron scattering on hydrogen generates protons that are detected in the gas) while thermal neutron GEM detectors (bGEM) are equipped with a borated aluminium cathode (charged particles are generated through the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction). GEM detectors can be realized in large area (1 m 2 ) and their readout can be pixelated. Three different prototypes of nGEM and one prototype of bGEM detectors of different areas and equipped with different types of readout have been built and tested. All the detectors have been used to measure the fast and thermal neutron 2D beam image at the ISIS-VESUVIO beamline. The different kinds of readout patterns (different areas of the pixels) have been compared in similar conditions. All the detectors measured a width of the beam profile consitent with the expected one. The imaging property of each detector was then tested by inserting samples of different material and shape in the beam. All the samples were correctly reconstructed and the definition of the reconstruction depends on the type of readout anode. The fast neutron beam profile reconstruction was then compared to the one obtained by diamond detectors positioned on the same beamline while the thermal neutron one was compared to the imaged obtained by cadmium-coupled x-rays films. Also efficiency and the gamma background rejection have been determined. These prototypes represent the first step towards

  12. Real-time beam profile imaging system for actinotherapy accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Yong; Wang Jingjin; Song Zheng; Zheng Putang; Wang Jianguo

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a real-time beam profile imaging system for actinotheraphy accelerator. With the flash X-ray imager and the technique of digital image processing, a real-time 3-dimension dosage image is created from the intensity profile of the accelerator beam in real time. This system helps to obtain all the physical characters of the beam in any section plane, such as FWHM, penumbra, peak value, symmetry and homogeneity. This system has been used to acquire a 3-dimension dosage distribution of dynamic wedge modulator and the transient process of beam dosage. The system configure and the tested beam profile images are also presented

  13. Beam hardening correction algorithm in microtomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sales, Erika S.; Lima, Inaya C.B.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Assis, Joaquim T. de

    2009-01-01

    Quantification of mineral density of bone samples is directly related to the attenuation coefficient of bone. The X-rays used in microtomography images are polychromatic and have a moderately broad spectrum of energy, which makes the low-energy X-rays passing through a sample to be absorbed, causing a decrease in the attenuation coefficient and possibly artifacts. This decrease in the attenuation coefficient is due to a process called beam hardening. In this work the beam hardening of microtomography images of vertebrae of Wistar rats subjected to a study of hyperthyroidism was corrected by the method of linearization of the projections. It was discretized using a spectrum in energy, also called the spectrum of Herman. The results without correction for beam hardening showed significant differences in bone volume, which could lead to a possible diagnosis of osteoporosis. But the data with correction showed a decrease in bone volume, but this decrease was not significant in a confidence interval of 95%. (author)

  14. Beam hardening correction algorithm in microtomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sales, Erika S.; Lima, Inaya C.B.; Lopes, Ricardo T., E-mail: esales@con.ufrj.b, E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Assis, Joaquim T. de, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico. Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2009-07-01

    Quantification of mineral density of bone samples is directly related to the attenuation coefficient of bone. The X-rays used in microtomography images are polychromatic and have a moderately broad spectrum of energy, which makes the low-energy X-rays passing through a sample to be absorbed, causing a decrease in the attenuation coefficient and possibly artifacts. This decrease in the attenuation coefficient is due to a process called beam hardening. In this work the beam hardening of microtomography images of vertebrae of Wistar rats subjected to a study of hyperthyroidism was corrected by the method of linearization of the projections. It was discretized using a spectrum in energy, also called the spectrum of Herman. The results without correction for beam hardening showed significant differences in bone volume, which could lead to a possible diagnosis of osteoporosis. But the data with correction showed a decrease in bone volume, but this decrease was not significant in a confidence interval of 95%. (author)

  15. Bis-pyridinium quadrupolar derivatives. High Stokes shift selective probes for bio-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salice, Patrizio; Versari, Silvia; Bradamante, Silvia; Meinardi, Francesco; Macchi, Giorgio; Pagani, Giorgio A.; Beverina, Luca

    2013-11-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of five high Stokes shift quadrupolar heteroaryl compounds suitable as fluorescent probes in bio-imaging. In particular, we characterize the photophysical properties and the intracellular localization in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) and Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HMSCs) for each dye. We show that, amongst all of the investigated derivatives, the 2,5-bis[1-(4-N-methylpyridinium)ethen-2-yl)]- N-methylpyrrole salt is the best candidates as selective mitochondrial tracker. Finally, we recorded the full emission spectrum of the most performing - exclusively mitochondrial selective - fluorescent probe directly from HUVEC stained cells. The emission spectrum collected from the stained mitochondria shows a remarkably more pronounced vibronic structure with respect to the emission of the free fluorophore in solution.

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic imaging in orthodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, W C; Azevedo, B; Toghyani, S; Farman, A G

    2017-03-01

    Over the last 15 years, cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) imaging has emerged as an important supplemental radiographic technique for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning, especially in situations which require an understanding of the complex anatomic relationships and surrounding structures of the maxillofacial skeleton. CBCT imaging provides unique features and advantages to enhance orthodontic practice over conventional extraoral radiographic imaging. While it is the responsibility of each practitioner to make a decision, in tandem with the patient/family, consensus-derived, evidence-based clinical guidelines are available to assist the clinician in the decision-making process. Specific recommendations provide selection guidance based on variables such as phase of treatment, clinically-assessed treatment difficulty, the presence of dental and/or skeletal modifying conditions, and pathology. CBCT imaging in orthodontics should always be considered wisely as children have conservatively, on average, a three to five times greater radiation risk compared with adults for the same exposure. The purpose of this paper is to provide an understanding of the operation of CBCT equipment as it relates to image quality and dose, highlight the benefits of the technique in orthodontic practice, and provide guidance on appropriate clinical use with respect to radiation dose and relative risk, particularly for the paediatric patient. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Assessment of flatness and symmetry of megavoltage x-ray beam with an electronic portal imaging device

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, G; Bezak, E

    2002-01-01

    The input/output characteristics of the Wellhofer BIS 710 electronic portal imaging device (EPID) have been investigated to establish its efficacy for periodic quality assurance (QA) applications. Calibration curves have been determined for the energy fluence incident on the detector versus the pixel values. The effect of the charge coupled device (CCD) camera sampling time and beam parameters (such as beam field size, dose rate, photon energy) on the calibration have been investigated for a region of interest (ROI) around the central beam axis. The results demonstrate that the pixel output is a linear function of the incident exposure, as expected for a video-based electronic portal imaging system. The field size effects of the BIS 710 are similar to that of an ion chamber for smaller field sizes up to 10 x 10 cm sup 2. However, for larger field sizes the pixel value increases more rapidly. Furthermore, the system is slightly sensitive to dose rate and is also energy dependent. The BIS 710 has been used in t...

  18. Image-projection ion-beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.A.

    1989-01-01

    Image-projection ion-beam lithography is an attractive alternative for submicron patterning because it may provide high throughput; it uses demagnification to gain advantages in reticle fabrication, inspection, and lifetime; and it enjoys the precise deposition characteristics of ions which cause essentially no collateral damage. This lithographic option involves extracting low-mass ions (e.g., He + ) from a plasma source, transmitting the ions at low voltage through a stencil reticle, and then accelerating and focusing the ions electrostatically onto a resist-coated wafer. While the advantages of this technology have been demonstrated experimentally by the work of IMS (Austria), many difficulties still impede extension of the technology to the high-volume production of microelectronic devices. We report a computational study of a lithography system designed to address problem areas in field size, telecentricity, and chromatic and geometric aberration. We present a novel ion-column-design approach and conceptual ion-source and column designs which address these issues. We find that image-projection ion-beam technology should in principle meet high-volume-production requirements. The technical success of our present relatively compact-column design requires that a glow-discharge-based ion source (or equivalent cold source) be developed and that moderate further improvement in geometric aberration levels be obtained. Our system requires that image predistortion be employed during reticle fabrication to overcome distortion due to residual image nonlinearity and space-charge forces. This constitutes a software data preparation step, as do correcting for distortions in electron lithography columns and performing proximity-effect corrections. Areas needing further fundamental work are identified

  19. Coincidence Imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yang-jian; ZHU Shi-yao

    2006-01-01

    we present a theoretical study of coincidence imaging and interference with coherent Gaussian beams The equations for the coincidence image formation and interference fringes are derived,from which it is clear that the imaging is due to the corresponding focusing in the two paths .The quality and visibility of the images and fringes can be high simultaneously.The nature of the coincidence imaging and interference between quantum entangled photon pairs and coherent Gaussian beams are different .The coincidence image with coherent Gaussian beams is due to intensity-intensity correspondence,a classical nature,while that with entangled photon pairs is due to the amplitude correlation a quantum nature.

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteosarcoma using a bis(alendronate)-based bone-targeted contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Pingju; Sheng, Fugeng; Jin, Yiguang; Tong, Li; Du, Lina; Zhang, Lei; Tian, Ning; Li, Gongjie

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) is currently used for diagnosis of osteosarcoma but not well even though contrast agents are administered. Here, we report a novel bone-targeted MR imaging contrast agent, Gd 2 -diethylenetriaminepentaacetate-bis(alendronate) (Gd 2 -DTPA-BA) for the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. It is the conjugate of a bone cell-seeking molecule (i.e., alendronate) and an MR imaging contrast agent (i.e., Gd-DTPA). Its physicochemical parameters were measured, including pK a , complex constant, and T 1 relaxivity. Its bone cell-seeking ability was evaluated by measuring its adsorption on hydroxyapatite. Hemolysis was investigated. MR imaging and biodistribution of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA and Gd-DTPA were studied on healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing nude mice. Gd 2 -DTPA-BA showed high adsorption on hydroxyapatite, the high MR relaxivity (r 1 ) of 7.613mM -1 s -1 (2.6 folds of Gd-DTPA), and no hemolysis. The MR contrast effect of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA was much higher than that of Gd-DTPA after intravenous injection to the mice. More importantly, the MR imaging of osteosarcoma was significantly improved by Gd 2 -DTPA-BA. The signal intensity of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA reached 120.3% at 50min, equal to three folds of Gd-DTPA. The bone targeting index (bone/blood) of Gd 2 -DTPA-BA in the osteosarcoma-bearing mice was very high to 130 at 180min. Furthermore, the contrast enhancement could also be found in the lung due to metastasis of osteosarcoma. Gd 2 -DTPA-BA plays a promising role in the diagnoses of osteosacomas, including the primary bone tumors and metastases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Cone-beam and fan-beam image reconstruction algorithms based on spherical and circular harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Gengsheng L; Gullberg, Grant T

    2004-01-01

    A cone-beam image reconstruction algorithm using spherical harmonic expansions is proposed. The reconstruction algorithm is in the form of a summation of inner products of two discrete arrays of spherical harmonic expansion coefficients at each cone-beam point of acquisition. This form is different from the common filtered backprojection algorithm and the direct Fourier reconstruction algorithm. There is no re-sampling of the data, and spherical harmonic expansions are used instead of Fourier expansions. As a special case, a new fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm is also derived in terms of a circular harmonic expansion. Computer simulation results for both cone-beam and fan-beam algorithms are presented for circular planar orbit acquisitions. The algorithms give accurate reconstructions; however, the implementation of the cone-beam reconstruction algorithm is computationally intensive. A relatively efficient algorithm is proposed for reconstructing the central slice of the image when a circular scanning orbit is used

  2. Talbot self-imaging phenomenon under Bessel beam illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rijuparna; Chowdhury, Subhajit Dutta; Chakraborty, Ajoy Kumar

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our theoretical studies on the phenomenon of self-imaging of periodic object under the illumination of zero-order Bessel beam. Our theoretical analysis indicates that the self-images are visible only after the walk-off distance of the Bessel beam used. It is also observed that the self-images bend around the optical axis of the setup. Besides, the present study justifies the importance of the conditions stipulated by Montgomery.

  3. Production of an {sup 15}O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Akram, E-mail: mohammadi.akram@qst.go.jp; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-21

    In advanced ion therapy, the {sup 15}O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an {sup 15}O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable {sup 16}O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors’ group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of {sup 15}O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of {sup 15}O fragments. The highest production rate of {sup 15}O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the {sup 15}O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the {sup 16}O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is

  4. Production of an 15O beam using a stable oxygen ion beam for in-beam PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Akram; Yoshida, Eiji; Tashima, Hideaki; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inaniwa, Taku; Kitagawa, Atsushi; Yamaya, Taiga

    2017-03-01

    In advanced ion therapy, the 15O ion beam is a promising candidate to treat hypoxic tumors and simultaneously monitor the delivered dose to a patient using PET imaging. This study aimed at production of an 15O beam by projectile fragmentation of a stable 16O beam in an optimal material, followed by in-beam PET imaging using a prototype OpenPET system, which was developed in the authors' group. The study was carried out in three steps: selection of the optimal target based on the highest production rate of 15O fragments; experimental production of the beam using the optimal target in the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator Chiba (HIMAC) secondary beam course; and realization of in-beam PET imaging for the produced beam. The optimal target evaluations were done using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS. The fluence and mean energy of the secondary particles were simulated and the optimal target was selected based on the production rate of 15O fragments. The highest production rate of 15O was observed for a liquid hydrogen target, 3.27% for a 53 cm thick target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u. Since liquid hydrogen is not practically applicable in the HIMAC secondary beam course a hydrogen-rich polyethylene material, which was the second optimal target from the simulation results, was selected as the experimental target. Three polyethylene targets with thicknesses of 5, 11 or 14 cm were used to produce the 15O beam without any degrader in the beam course. The highest production rate was measured as around 0.87% for the 11 cm thick polyethylene target from the 16O beam of 430 MeV/u when the angular acceptance and momentum acceptance were set at ±13 mrad and ±2.5%, respectively. The purity of the produced beam for the three targets were around 75%, insufficient for clinical application, but it was increased to 97% by inserting a wedge shape aluminum degrader with a thickness of 1.76 cm into the beam course and that is sufficiently high. In-beam PET imaging was also

  5. Fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Tingliang; Leng Shuai; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a new image reconstruction scheme is presented based on Tuy's cone-beam inversion scheme and its fan-beam counterpart. It is demonstrated that Tuy's inversion scheme may be used to derive a new framework for fan-beam and cone-beam image reconstruction. In this new framework, images are reconstructed via filtering the backprojection image of differentiated projection data. The new framework is mathematically exact and is applicable to a general source trajectory provided the Tuy data sufficiency condition is satisfied. By choosing a piece-wise constant function for one of the components in the factorized weighting function, the filtering kernel is one dimensional, viz. the filtering process is along a straight line. Thus, the derived image reconstruction algorithm is mathematically exact and efficient. In the cone-beam case, the derived reconstruction algorithm is applicable to a large class of source trajectories where the pi-lines or the generalized pi-lines exist. In addition, the new reconstruction scheme survives the super-short scan mode in both the fan-beam and cone-beam cases provided the data are not transversely truncated. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction scheme for the fan-beam case

  6. Imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis by electron beam tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, K C S; Ferrett, C G; Tandon, R; Paul, B; Herold, J; Liu, C S C

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To describe the experience of using electron beam tomography (EBT) in imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) to identify early bone and dentine loss which may threaten the viability of the eye.

  7. Neutron beams. Tracks analysis, imaging and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepy, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal neutron beams can supply informations about the arrangement of atoms and molecules and about their movement inside the matter. This article treats of the preparation of thermal neutron beams and of the applications that use their penetration and matter activation properties: 1 - thermal neutrons production; 2 - basic properties of thermal neutrons: neutrons scattering, absorbing materials, activating materials, transparent materials, preparation of a neutron beam; 3 - tracks measurement by activation: activation method, measurement of marine pollution by heavy elements, historical evolution of glass composition; 4 - neutron radiography: neutronography, neutronoscopy: viscosity measurement; 5 - cancer treatment. (J.S.)

  8. Noninterferometric phase imaging of a neutral atomic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, P.J.; Mackin, T.R.; Turner, L.D.; Colton, I.; Nugent, K.A.; Scholten, R.E.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate quantitative phase imaging of a neutral atomic beam by using a noninterferometric technique. A collimated thermal atomic beam is phase shifted by an off-resonant traveling laser beam with both a Gaussian and a TEM 01 profile and with both red and blue detuning of as much as 50 GHz. Phase variations of more than 1000 rad were recovered from velocity-selective measurements of the propagation of the atomic beam and were found to be in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions based on independently measured phase object intensity profiles and detunings

  9. Generalized Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuang-Ren; Jiang, Dazong; Yang, Kevin; Yang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    The cone-beam reconstruction theory has been proposed by Kirillov in 1961, Tuy in 1983, Feldkamp in 1984, Smith in 1985, Pierre Grangeat in 1990. The Fourier slice theorem is proposed by Bracewell 1956, which leads to the Fourier image reconstruction method for parallel-beam geometry. The Fourier slice theorem is extended to fan-beam geometry by Zhao in 1993 and 1995. By combining the above mentioned cone-beam image reconstruction theory and the above mentioned Fourier slice theory of fan-beam geometry, the Fourier slice theorem in cone-beam geometry is proposed by Zhao 1995 in short conference publication. This article offers the details of the derivation and implementation of this Fourier slice theorem for cone-beam geometry. Especially the problem of the reconstruction from Fourier domain has been overcome, which is that the value of in the origin of Fourier space is 0/0. The 0/0 type of limit is proper handled. As examples, the implementation results for the single circle and two perpendicular circle source orbits are shown. In the cone-beam reconstruction if a interpolation process is considered, the number of the calculations for the generalized Fourier slice theorem algorithm is O(N^4), which is close to the filtered back-projection method, here N is the image size of 1-dimension. However the interpolation process can be avoid, in that case the number of the calculations is O(N5).

  10. A gamma beam profile imager for ELI-NP Gamma Beam System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, P.; Paternò, G.; Di Domenico, G.; Consoli, E.; Marziani, M.; Andreotti, M.; Evangelisti, F.; Squerzanti, S.; Gambaccini, M.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Tricomi, A.; Veltri, M.; Adriani, O.; Borgheresi, R.; Graziani, G.; Passaleva, G.; Serban, A.; Starodubtsev, O.; Variola, A.; Palumbo, L.

    2018-06-01

    The Gamma Beam System of ELI-Nuclear Physics is a high brilliance monochromatic gamma source based on the inverse Compton interaction between an intense high power laser and a bright electron beam with tunable energy. The source, currently being assembled in Magurele (Romania), is designed to provide a beam with tunable average energy ranging from 0.2 to 19.5 MeV, rms energy bandwidth down to 0.5% and flux of about 108 photons/s. The system includes a set of detectors for the diagnostic and complete characterization of the gamma beam. To evaluate the spatial distribution of the beam a gamma beam profile imager is required. For this purpose, a detector based on a scintillator target coupled to a CCD camera was designed and a prototype was tested at INFN-Ferrara laboratories. A set of analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations were carried out to optimize the imager design and evaluate the performance expected with ELI-NP gamma beam. In this work the design of the imager is described in detail, as well as the simulation tools used and the results obtained. The simulation parameters were tuned and cross-checked with the experimental measurements carried out on the assembled prototype using the beam from an x-ray tube.

  11. Time-resolved tomographic images of a relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, H.A.; Jacoby, B.A.; Nelson, M.

    1984-07-01

    We obtained a sequential series of time-resolved tomographic two-dimensional images of a 4.5-MeV, 6-kA, 30-ns electron beam. Three linear fiber-optic arrays of 30 or 60 fibers each were positioned around the beam axis at 0 0 , 61 0 , and 117 0 . The beam interacting with nitrogen at 20 Torr emitted light that was focused onto the fiber arrays and transmitted to a streak camera where the data were recorded on film. The film was digitized, and two-dimensional images were reconstructed using the maximum-entropy tomographic technique. These images were then combined to produce an ultra-high-speed movie of the electron-beam pulse

  12. Comparative evaluation of Bis(thiosemicarbazone)- Biotin and Met-ac-TE3A for tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sweta; Tiwari, Anjani K.; Varshney, Raunak; Mathur, R.; Shukla, Gauri; Bag, N.; Singh, B.; Mishra, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    2,2‧,2″-(11-(2-((4-mercapto-1-methoxy-1-oxobutan-2-yl)amino)-2-oxoethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraaza cyclotetradecane-1,4,8-triyl)triacetic acid, Met-ac-TE3A and (E)-N-methyl-2-((E)-3-(2-(2-(5-((3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl)pentanoyl)hydrazinecarbono-thioyl)hydrazonobutan-2-ylidene)hydrazinecarbothioamide, Bis(thiosemicarbazone)- Biotin were synthesized and evaluated for imaging application. The pharmacokinetics of these ligands were determined by tracer methods. In vitro human serum stability of 99mTc Met-ac-TE3A/99mTc Bis(thiosemicarbazone)-Biotin after 24 h was found to be 96.5% and 97.0% respectively. Blood kinetics of both ligands in normal rabbits showed biphasic clearance pattern. Ex vivo biodistribution study revealed significant initial tumor uptake and high tumor/muscles ratio which is a pre-requisite condition for a ligand to work as SPECT-radiopharmaceutical for tumor imaging.

  13. Analysis of contour images using optics of spiral beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, V. G.; Kishkin, S. A.; Kotova, S. P.

    2018-03-01

    An approach is outlined to the recognition of contour images using computer technology based on coherent optics principles. A mathematical description of the recognition process algorithm and the results of numerical modelling are presented. The developed approach to the recognition of contour images using optics of spiral beams is described and justified.

  14. Fundamental limits to imaging resolution for focused ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, J.; Swanson, L.W.; Utlaut, M.

    1996-01-01

    This article investigates the limitations on the formation of focused ion beam images from secondary electrons. We use the notion of the information content of an image to account for the effects of resolution, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio and show that there is a competition between the rate at which small features are sputtered away by the primary beam and the rate of collection of secondary electrons. We find that for small features, sputtering is the limit to imaging resolution, and that for extended small features (e.g., layered structures), rearrangement, redeposition, and differential sputtering rates may limit the resolution in some cases. copyright 1996 American Vacuum Society

  15. Spiral Light Beams and Contour Image Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishkin, Sergey A.; Kotova, Svetlana P.; Volostnikov, Vladimir G.

    Spiral beams of light are characterized by their ability to remain structurally unchanged at propagation. They may have the shape of any closed curve. In the present paper a new approach is proposed within the framework of the contour analysis based on a close cooperation of modern coherent optics, theory of functions and numerical methods. An algorithm for comparing contours is presented and theoretically justified, which allows convincing of whether two contours are similar or not to within the scale factor and/or rotation. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are considered; the results of numerical modeling are presented.

  16. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zacharias Fourie; Janalt Damstra; Yijin Ren

    2012-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years.Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines,particularly in the fields of orthodontics,maxillofacial surgery,plastic and reconstructive surgery,neurosurgery and forensic sciences.In most cases,3D facial imaging overcomes the limitations of traditional 2D methods and provides the clinician with more accurate information regarding the soft-tissues and the underlying skeleton.The aim of this study was to review the types of imaging methods used for facial imaging.It is important to realize the difference between the types of 3D imaging methods as application and indications thereof may differ.Since 3D cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging will play an increasingly importanl role in orthodontics and orthognathic surgery,special emphasis should be placed on discussing CBCT applications in facial evaluations.

  17. An ion beam analysis software based on ImageJ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalagama, C.; Chen, X.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F.

    2013-01-01

    The suit of techniques (RBS, STIM, ERDS, PIXE, IL, IF,…) available in ion beam analysis yields a variety of rich information. Typically, after the initial challenge of acquiring data we are then faced with the task of having to extract relevant information or to present the data in a format with the greatest impact. This process sometimes requires developing new software tools. When faced with such situations the usual practice at the Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA) in Singapore has been to use our computational expertise to develop ad hoc software tools as and when we need them. It then became apparent that the whole ion beam community can benefit from such tools; specifically from a common software toolset that can be developed and maintained by everyone with freedom to use and allowance to modify. In addition to the benefits of readymade tools and sharing the onus of development, this also opens up the possibility for collaborators to access and analyse ion beam data without having to depend on an ion beam lab. This has the virtue of making the ion beam techniques more accessible to a broader scientific community. We have identified ImageJ as an appropriate software base to develop such a common toolset. In addition to being in the public domain and been setup for collaborative tool development, ImageJ is accompanied by hundreds of modules (plugins) that allow great breadth in analysis. The present work is the first step towards integrating ion beam analysis into ImageJ. Some of the features of the current version of the ImageJ ‘ion beam’ plugin are: (1) reading list mode or event-by-event files, (2) energy gates/sorts, (3) sort stacks, (4) colour function, (5) real time map updating, (6) real time colour updating and (7) median and average map creation

  18. An ion beam analysis software based on ImageJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udalagama, C., E-mail: chammika@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117 542 (Singapore); Chen, X.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117 542 (Singapore)

    2013-07-01

    The suit of techniques (RBS, STIM, ERDS, PIXE, IL, IF,…) available in ion beam analysis yields a variety of rich information. Typically, after the initial challenge of acquiring data we are then faced with the task of having to extract relevant information or to present the data in a format with the greatest impact. This process sometimes requires developing new software tools. When faced with such situations the usual practice at the Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA) in Singapore has been to use our computational expertise to develop ad hoc software tools as and when we need them. It then became apparent that the whole ion beam community can benefit from such tools; specifically from a common software toolset that can be developed and maintained by everyone with freedom to use and allowance to modify. In addition to the benefits of readymade tools and sharing the onus of development, this also opens up the possibility for collaborators to access and analyse ion beam data without having to depend on an ion beam lab. This has the virtue of making the ion beam techniques more accessible to a broader scientific community. We have identified ImageJ as an appropriate software base to develop such a common toolset. In addition to being in the public domain and been setup for collaborative tool development, ImageJ is accompanied by hundreds of modules (plugins) that allow great breadth in analysis. The present work is the first step towards integrating ion beam analysis into ImageJ. Some of the features of the current version of the ImageJ ‘ion beam’ plugin are: (1) reading list mode or event-by-event files, (2) energy gates/sorts, (3) sort stacks, (4) colour function, (5) real time map updating, (6) real time colour updating and (7) median and average map creation.

  19. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin

    2010-07-01

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the `Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1—monochromatic and white—to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  20. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  1. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  2. Ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, Andrew A.; Mi, Zhaohong; Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Chen, Ce-belle; Tao, Ye; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Imaging fluorescence generated by MeV ions in biological systems such as cells and tissue sections requires a high resolution beam (<100 nm), a sensitive detection system and a fluorescent probe that has a high quantum efficiency and low bleaching rate. For cutting edge applications in bioimaging, the fluorescence imaging technique needs to break the optical diffraction limit allowing for sub-cellular structure to be visualized, leading to a better understanding of cellular function. In a nuclear microprobe this resolution requirement can be readily achieved utilizing low beam current techniques such as Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM). In recent times, we have been able to extend this capability to fluorescence imaging through the development of a new high efficiency fluorescence detection system, and through the use of new novel fluorescent probes that are resistant to ion beam damage (bleaching). In this paper we demonstrate ion beam induced fluorescence imaging in several biological samples, highlighting the advantages and challenges associated with using this technique

  3. Thermal imaging experiments on ANACONDA ion beam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Weihua; Yatsui, Kiyoshi [Nagaoka University of Technology (Japan). Lab. of Beam Technology; Olson, C J; Davis, H A [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The thermal imaging technique was used in two experimental measurements. First, the ion intensity distribution on the anode surface was observed from different angles by using a multi-pinhole camera. Second, the plume from a target intercepting the beam was visualized by observing the distribution of temperature increase on a thin plate hit by the plume. (author). 6 figs., 4 refs.

  4. Prior image constrained scatter correction in cone-beam computed tomography image-guided radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Stephen; Nett, Brian E; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-02-21

    X-ray scatter is a significant problem in cone-beam computed tomography when thicker objects and larger cone angles are used, as scattered radiation can lead to reduced contrast and CT number inaccuracy. Advances have been made in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by incorporating a high quality prior image into the image reconstruction process. In this paper, we extend this idea to correct scatter-induced shading artifacts in cone-beam CT image-guided radiation therapy. Specifically, this paper presents a new scatter correction algorithm which uses a prior image with low scatter artifacts to reduce shading artifacts in cone-beam CT images acquired under conditions of high scatter. The proposed correction algorithm begins with an empirical hypothesis that the target image can be written as a weighted summation of a series of basis images that are generated by raising the raw cone-beam projection data to different powers, and then, reconstructing using the standard filtered backprojection algorithm. The weight for each basis image is calculated by minimizing the difference between the target image and the prior image. The performance of the scatter correction algorithm is qualitatively and quantitatively evaluated through phantom studies using a Varian 2100 EX System with an on-board imager. Results show that the proposed scatter correction algorithm using a prior image with low scatter artifacts can substantially mitigate scatter-induced shading artifacts in both full-fan and half-fan modes.

  5. Cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging: feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Biao; Ning, Ruola

    2001-06-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality for early detection of breast cancer currently available. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect in the occultation case or in dense breasts, resulting in a high false positive biopsy rate. The cone-beam x-ray projection based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) makes it possible to obtain three-dimensional breast images. This may benefit diagnosis of the structure and pattern of the lesion while eliminating hard compression of the breast. This paper presents a novel cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging protocol based on the above techniques. Through computer simulation, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissues, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality, are addressed. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed cone-beam volume CT mammographic imaging modality in respect to feasibility and practicability for mammography. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current two-view mammography and would not be a prominent problem for this imaging protocol. Compared to traditional mammography, the proposed imaging protocol with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions.

  6. Cone Beam CT vs. Fan Beam CT: A Comparison of Image Quality and Dose Delivered Between Two Differing CT Imaging Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Lawrence; Weidlich, Georg A

    2016-09-12

    A comparison of image quality and dose delivered between two differing computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities-fan beam and cone beam-was performed. A literature review of quantitative analyses for various image quality aspects such as uniformity, signal-to-noise ratio, artifact presence, spatial resolution, modulation transfer function (MTF), and low contrast resolution was generated. With these aspects quantified, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) shows a superior spatial resolution to that of fan beam, while fan beam shows a greater ability to produce clear and anatomically correct images with better soft tissue differentiation. The results indicate that fan beam CT produces superior images to that of on-board imaging (OBI) cone beam CT systems, while providing a considerably less dose to the patient.

  7. Adaptive radiotherapy based on contrast enhanced cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soevik, Aaste; Skogmo, Hege K.; Roedal, Jan; Lervaag, Christoffer; Eilertsen, Karsten; Malinen, Eirik

    2010-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging has become an integral part of radiation therapy, with images typically used for offline or online patient setup corrections based on bony anatomy co-registration. Ideally, the co-registration should be based on tumor localization. However, soft tissue contrast in CBCT images may be limited. In the present work, contrast enhanced CBCT (CECBCT) images were used for tumor visualization and treatment adaptation. Material and methods. A spontaneous canine maxillary tumor was subjected to repeated cone beam CT imaging during fractionated radiotherapy (10 fractions in total). At five of the treatment fractions, CECBCT images, employing an iodinated contrast agent, were acquired, as well as pre-contrast CBCT images. The tumor was clearly visible in post-contrast minus pre-contrast subtraction images, and these contrast images were used to delineate gross tumor volumes. IMRT dose plans were subsequently generated. Four different strategies were explored: 1) fully adapted planning based on each CECBCT image series, 2) planning based on images acquired at the first treatment fraction and patient repositioning following bony anatomy co-registration, 3) as for 2), but with patient repositioning based on co-registering contrast images, and 4) a strategy with no patient repositioning or treatment adaptation. The equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and tumor control probability (TCP) calculations to estimate treatment outcome for each strategy. Results. Similar translation vectors were found when bony anatomy and contrast enhancement co-registration were compared. Strategy 1 gave EUDs closest to the prescription dose and the highest TCP. Strategies 2 and 3 gave EUDs and TCPs close to that of strategy 1, with strategy 3 being slightly better than strategy 2. Even greater benefits from strategies 1 and 3 are expected with increasing tumor movement or deformation during treatment. The non-adaptive strategy 4 was clearly inferior to all three adaptive strategies

  8. Expanded beam (macro-imaging) ellipsometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fried, M., E-mail: fried@mfa.kfki.h [Res. Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Juhasz, G.; Major, C.; Petrik, P.; Polgar, O. [Res. Inst. for Technical Physics and Materials Science (MFA), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Horvath, Z. [Res. Inst. for Solid State Physics and Optics (SZFKI), H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Nutsch, A. [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Integrierte Systeme und Bauelementetechnologie IISB, Schottkystr. 10, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-02-28

    Our aim was to make possible to use spectroscopic ellipsometry for mapping purposes during one measuring cycle (minimum one rotation period of polarizer or analyzer) on many sample points. Our new technique uses non-collimated (non-parallel, mostly diffuse) illumination with an angle of incidence sensitive pinhole camera detector system and it works as an unusual kind of imaging ellipsometry. Adding multicolour supplemets, it provides spectral (a few wavelengths on a 2D image or a full spectrum along a line) information from rapid measurements of many points on a large (several dm2) area. This technique can be expanded by upscaling the geometry (upscaling the dimensions of the instrument, and characteristic imaging parameters such as focal lengths, distances, etc.). The lateral resolution is limited by the minimum resolved-angle determined by the detector system, mainly by the diameter of the pinhole. (The diameter of the pinhole is a compromise between the light intensity and the lateral resolution.) Small-aperture (25 mm diameter) polarizers are incorporated into both the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state detection (PSD) components of the instrument. The detection is almost without background because the pinhole serves as a filter against the scattered light. One rapid measuring cycle (less than 10 s) is enough to determine the polarization state at all the points inside the illuminated area. The collected data can be processed very fast (seconds) providing nearly real-time thicknesses and/or refractive index maps over many points of the sample surface even in the case of multilayer samples. The speed of the measuring system makes it suitable for using even on production lines. The necessary (in each sample-point different) angle-of-incidence and the mirror-effect calibration are made via well-known and optimized structures such as silicon/silicon-dioxide samples. The precision is suitable for detecting sub-nanometer thickness and a

  9. Expanded beam (macro-imaging) ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fried, M.; Juhasz, G.; Major, C.; Petrik, P.; Polgar, O.; Horvath, Z.; Nutsch, A.

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to make possible to use spectroscopic ellipsometry for mapping purposes during one measuring cycle (minimum one rotation period of polarizer or analyzer) on many sample points. Our new technique uses non-collimated (non-parallel, mostly diffuse) illumination with an angle of incidence sensitive pinhole camera detector system and it works as an unusual kind of imaging ellipsometry. Adding multicolour supplemets, it provides spectral (a few wavelengths on a 2D image or a full spectrum along a line) information from rapid measurements of many points on a large (several dm2) area. This technique can be expanded by upscaling the geometry (upscaling the dimensions of the instrument, and characteristic imaging parameters such as focal lengths, distances, etc.). The lateral resolution is limited by the minimum resolved-angle determined by the detector system, mainly by the diameter of the pinhole. (The diameter of the pinhole is a compromise between the light intensity and the lateral resolution.) Small-aperture (25 mm diameter) polarizers are incorporated into both the polarization state generator (PSG) and polarization state detection (PSD) components of the instrument. The detection is almost without background because the pinhole serves as a filter against the scattered light. One rapid measuring cycle (less than 10 s) is enough to determine the polarization state at all the points inside the illuminated area. The collected data can be processed very fast (seconds) providing nearly real-time thicknesses and/or refractive index maps over many points of the sample surface even in the case of multilayer samples. The speed of the measuring system makes it suitable for using even on production lines. The necessary (in each sample-point different) angle-of-incidence and the mirror-effect calibration are made via well-known and optimized structures such as silicon/silicon-dioxide samples. The precision is suitable for detecting sub-nanometer thickness and a

  10. Image quality of cone beam CT on respiratory motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke; Li Minghui; Dai Jianrong; Wang Shi

    2011-01-01

    In this study,the influence of respiratory motion on Cone Beam CT (CBCT) image quality was investigated by a motion simulating platform, an image quality phantom, and a kV X-ray CBCT. A total of 21 motion states in the superior-inferior direction and the anterior-posterior direction, separately or together, was simulated by considering different respiration amplitudes, periods and hysteresis. The influence of motion on CBCT image quality was evaluated with the quality indexes of low contrast visibility, geometric accuracy, spatial resolution and uniformity of CT values. The results showed that the quality indexes were affected by the motion more prominently in AP direction than in SI direction, and the image quality was affected by the respiration amplitude more prominently than the respiration period and the hysteresis. The CBCT image quality and its characteristics influenced by the respiration motion, and may be exploited in finding solutions. (authors)

  11. Absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam-Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used *van der Meer scan* method (VDM). The technique has been used in 10 LHC fills during 2012 including and also provided a first luminosity measurement for proton-lead collisions. This talk presents the principles of the gas injection and the improvements reached with the increased pressure. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch. Those uncertainties are becoming the dominating factor because the uncertainty on the total beam current have been reduced.

  12. Automated planning of breast radiotherapy using cone beam CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit, Guy; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Develop and clinically validate a methodology for using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging in an automated treatment planning framework for breast IMRT. Methods: A technique for intensity correction of CBCT images was developed and evaluated. The technique is based on histogram matching of CBCT image sets, using information from “similar” planning CT image sets from a database of paired CBCT and CT image sets (n = 38). Automated treatment plans were generated for a testing subset (n = 15) on the planning CT and the corrected CBCT. The plans generated on the corrected CBCT were compared to the CT-based plans in terms of beam parameters, dosimetric indices, and dose distributions. Results: The corrected CBCT images showed considerable similarity to their corresponding planning CTs (average mutual information 1.0±0.1, average sum of absolute differences 185 ± 38). The automated CBCT-based plans were clinically acceptable, as well as equivalent to the CT-based plans with average gantry angle difference of 0.99°±1.1°, target volume overlap index (Dice) of 0.89±0.04 although with slightly higher maximum target doses (4482±90 vs 4560±84, P < 0.05). Gamma index analysis (3%, 3 mm) showed that the CBCT-based plans had the same dose distribution as plans calculated with the same beams on the registered planning CTs (average gamma index 0.12±0.04, gamma <1 in 99.4%±0.3%). Conclusions: The proposed method demonstrates the potential for a clinically feasible and efficient online adaptive breast IMRT planning method based on CBCT imaging, integrating automation

  13. Noise simulation in cone beam CT imaging with parallel computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, S.-J.; Shaw, Chris C; Chen, Lingyun

    2006-01-01

    We developed a computer noise simulation model for cone beam computed tomography imaging using a general purpose PC cluster. This model uses a mono-energetic x-ray approximation and allows us to investigate three primary performance components, specifically quantum noise, detector blurring and additive system noise. A parallel random number generator based on the Weyl sequence was implemented in the noise simulation and a visualization technique was accordingly developed to validate the quality of the parallel random number generator. In our computer simulation model, three-dimensional (3D) phantoms were mathematically modelled and used to create 450 analytical projections, which were then sampled into digital image data. Quantum noise was simulated and added to the analytical projection image data, which were then filtered to incorporate flat panel detector blurring. Additive system noise was generated and added to form the final projection images. The Feldkamp algorithm was implemented and used to reconstruct the 3D images of the phantoms. A 24 dual-Xeon PC cluster was used to compute the projections and reconstructed images in parallel with each CPU processing 10 projection views for a total of 450 views. Based on this computer simulation system, simulated cone beam CT images were generated for various phantoms and technique settings. Noise power spectra for the flat panel x-ray detector and reconstructed images were then computed to characterize the noise properties. As an example among the potential applications of our noise simulation model, we showed that images of low contrast objects can be produced and used for image quality evaluation

  14. Cone-beam volume CT breast imaging: Feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Biao; Ning Ruola

    2002-01-01

    X-ray projection mammography, using a film/screen combination, or digital techniques, has proven to be the most effective imaging modality currently available for early detection of breast cancer. However, the inherent superimposition of structures makes a small carcinoma (a few millimeters in size) difficult to detect when it is occult or in dense breasts, leading to a high false-positive biopsy rate. Cone-beam x-ray-projection-based volume imaging using flat panel detectors (FPDs) may allow obtaining three-dimensional breast images, resulting in more accurate diagnosis of structures and patterns of lesions while eliminating the hard compression of breasts. This article presents a novel cone-beam volume computed tomographic breast imaging (CBVCTBI) technique based on the above techniques. Through a variety of computer simulations, the key issues of the system and imaging techniques were addressed, including the x-ray imaging geometry and corresponding reconstruction algorithms, x-ray characteristics of breast tissue and lesions, x-ray setting techniques, the absorbed dose estimation, and the quantitative effect of x-ray scattering on image quality. The preliminary simulation results support the proposed CVBCTBI modality for breast imaging in respect to its feasibility and practicability. The absorbed dose level is comparable to that of current mammography and will not be a prominent problem for this imaging technique. Compared to conventional mammography, the proposed imaging technique with isotropic spatial resolution will potentially provide significantly better low-contrast detectability of breast tumors and more accurate location of breast lesions

  15. Image quality improvement in megavoltage cone beam CT using an imaging beam line and a sintered pixelated array system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Maltz, Jonathan S.; Gangadharan, Bijumon; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Anderson, Carryn M.; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Stiles, Jared; Edwards, Drake S.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify the improvement in megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) image quality enabled by the combination of a 4.2 MV imaging beam line (IBL) with a carbon electron target and a detector system equipped with a novel sintered pixelated array (SPA) of translucent Gd 2 O 2 S ceramic scintillator. Clinical MVCBCT images are traditionally acquired with the same 6 MV treatment beam line (TBL) that is used for cancer treatment, a standard amorphous Si (a-Si) flat panel imager, and the Kodak Lanex Fast-B (LFB) scintillator. The IBL produces a greater fluence of keV-range photons than the TBL, to which the detector response is more optimal, and the SPA is a more efficient scintillator than the LFB. Methods: A prototype IBL + SPA system was installed on a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator equipped with the MVision TM image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) system. A SPA strip consisting of four neighboring tiles and measuring 40 cm by 10.96 cm in the crossplane and inplane directions, respectively, was installed in the flat panel imager. Head- and pelvis-sized phantom images were acquired at doses ranging from 3 to 60 cGy with three MVCBCT configurations: TBL + LFB, IBL + LFB, and IBL + SPA. Phantom image quality at each dose was quantified using the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and modulation transfer function (MTF) metrics. Head and neck, thoracic, and pelvic (prostate) cancer patients were imaged with the three imaging system configurations at multiple doses ranging from 3 to 15 cGy. The systems were assessed qualitatively from the patient image data. Results: For head and neck and pelvis-sized phantom images, imaging doses of 3 cGy or greater, and relative electron densities of 1.09 and 1.48, the CNR average improvement factors for imaging system change of TBL + LFB to IBL + LFB, IBL + LFB to IBL + SPA, and TBL + LFB to IBL + SPA were 1.63 (p -8 ), 1.64 (p -13 ), 2.66 (p -9 ), respectively. For all imaging doses, soft tissue contrast was more

  16. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Minjie

    2012-05-15

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  17. Suppression of COTR in electron beam imaging diagnosis at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Minjie

    2011-12-01

    The Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) demands electron beams with high peak current to generate high-brilliant, coherent X-ray pulses. Magnetic chicanes are used for longitudinal compression of the electron bunches to achieve the required high peak current. During bunch compression process, microstructures with a modulation length comparable to the visible light can be induced inside the bunch. This leads to coherent emission of optical transition radiation (OTR), which may impede the widely used beam diagnostic based on OTR imaging. In this thesis, two methods of using incoherent scintillation light are proposed to circumvent the problem of coherence effects in beam imaging diagnostics. The method of temporal separation has been proved experimentally to have successfully suppressed coherence effects. The longitudinal beam profiles measured using this method are in good agreement with reference measurements, verifying further the reliability of the method. The method of spatial separation has been investigated in preparation studies, from which an improved experimental setup has been designed.

  18. Digital pulse processor for ion beam microprobe imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogovac, M.; Jaksic, M.; Wegrzynek, D.; Markowicz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Capabilities of spectroscopic ion beam analysis (IBA) techniques that are available in ion microprobe facilities can be greatly improved by the use of digital pulse processing. We report here development of a digital multi parameter data acquisition system suitable for IBA imaging applications. Input signals from charge sensitive preamplifier are conditioned by using a simple circuit and digitized with fast ADCs. The digitally converted signals are processed in real time using FPGA. Implementation of several components of the system is presented.

  19. Fan beam image reconstruction with generalized Fourier slice theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuangren; Yang, Kang; Yang, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    For parallel beam geometry the Fourier reconstruction works via the Fourier slice theorem (or central slice theorem, projection slice theorem). For fan beam situation, Fourier slice can be extended to a generalized Fourier slice theorem (GFST) for fan-beam image reconstruction. We have briefly introduced this method in a conference. This paper reintroduces the GFST method for fan beam geometry in details. The GFST method can be described as following: the Fourier plane is filled by adding up the contributions from all fanbeam projections individually; thereby the values in the Fourier plane are directly calculated for Cartesian coordinates such avoiding the interpolation from polar to Cartesian coordinates in the Fourier domain; inverse fast Fourier transform is applied to the image in Fourier plane and leads to a reconstructed image in spacial domain. The reconstructed image is compared between the result of the GFST method and the result from the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. The major differences of the GFST and the FBP methods are: (1) The interpolation process are at different data sets. The interpolation of the GFST method is at projection data. The interpolation of the FBP method is at filtered projection data. (2) The filtering process are done in different places. The filtering process of the GFST is at Fourier domain. The filtering process of the FBP method is the ramp filter which is done at projections. The resolution of ramp filter is variable with different location but the filter in the Fourier domain lead to resolution invariable with location. One advantage of the GFST method over the FBP method is in short scan situation, an exact solution can be obtained with the GFST method, but it can not be obtained with the FBP method. The calculation of both the GFST and the FBP methods are at O(N^3), where N is the number of pixel in one dimension.

  20. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated

  1. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Toshio; Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro; Aoki, Takaaki; Ishihara, Akihiko; Matsuo, Jiro

    2014-01-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi 3 -keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi 3 ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis

  2. A simple multipurpose double-beam optical image analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popowicz, A., E-mail: adam.popowicz@polsl.pl [Institute of Automatic Control, Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka Str. 16, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Blachowicz, T. [Institute of Physics - Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, S. Konarskiego 22B Str., 44-100 Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-07-15

    In the paper we present a low cost optical device which splits the light in the focal plane into two separate optical paths and collimates it back into a single image plane, and where a selective information processing can be carried out. The optical system is straightforward and easily implementable as it consists of only three lenses and two mirrors. The system is dedicated for imaging in low-light-level conditions in which widely used optical devices, based on beam splitters or dichroic mirrors, suffer from light loss. We expose examples of applications of our device, using a prototype model. The proposed optical system may be employed for: monitoring the objects located at different distances from observer (1), creating regions of different magnification within a single image plane (2), high dynamic range photometry (3), or imaging in two wavelength bands simultaneously (4).

  3. Dehydration process of fish analyzed by neutron beam imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoi, K.; Hamada, Y.; Seyama, S.; Saito, T.; Iikura, H.; Nakanishi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    Since regulation of water content of the dried fish is an important factor for the quality of the fish, water-losing process during drying (squid and Japanese horse mackerel) was analyzed through neutron beam imaging. The neutron image showed that around the shoulder of mackerel, there was a part where water content was liable to maintain high during drying. To analyze water-losing process more in detail, spatial image was produced. From the images, it was clearly indicated that the decrease of water content was regulated around the shoulder part. It was suggested that to prevent deterioration around the shoulder part of the dried fish is an important factor to keep quality of the dried fish in the storage.

  4. Cone beam computed tomography: A boon for maxillofacial imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivas Rao Ghali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In day to day practice, the radiographic techniques used individually or in combination suffer from some inherent limits of all planar two-dimensional (2D projections such as magnification, distortion, superimposition, and misrepresentation of anatomic structures. The introduction of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, specifically dedicated to imaging the maxillofacial region, heralds a major shift from 2D to three-dimensional (3D approach. It provides a complete 3D view of the maxilla, mandible, teeth, and supporting structures with relatively high resolution allowing a more accurate diagnosis, treatment planning and monitoring, and analysis of outcomes than conventional 2D images, along with low radiation exposure to the patient. CBCT has opened up new vistas for the use of 3D imaging as a diagnostic and treatment planning tool in dentistry. This paper provides an overview of the imaging principles, underlying technology, dental applications, and in particular focuses on the emerging role of CBCT in dentistry.

  5. Initial patient imaging with an optimised radiotherapy beam for portal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flampouri, Stella; McNair, Helen A.; Donovan, Ellen M.; Evans, Philip M.; Partridge, Mike; Verhaegen, Frank; Nutting, Christopher M.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To investigate the feasibility and the advantages of a portal-imaging mode on a medical accelerator, consisting of a thin low-Z bremsstrahlung target and a thin Gd 2 O 2 S/film detector, for patient imaging. Patients and methods: The international code of practice for high-energy photon dosimetry was used to calibrate dosimetry instruments for the imaging beam produced by 4.75 MeV electrons hitting a 6 mm thick aluminium target. Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom were taken with a mammography film system and the dose in the phantom was measured with TLDs calibrated for this beam. The first head and neck patient images are compared with conventional images (taken with the treatment beam on a film radiotherapy verification detector). Visibility of structures for six patients was evaluated. Results: Images of the head and neck of a humanoid phantom, taken with both imaging systems showed that the contrast increased dramatically for the new system while the dose required to form an image was less than 10 -2 Gy. The patient images taken with the new and the conventional systems showed that air-tissue interfaces were better defined in the new system image. Anatomical structures, visible on both films, are clearer with the new system. Additionally, bony structures, such as vertebrae, were clearly visible only with the new system. The system under evaluation was significantly better for all features in lateral images and most features in anterior images. Conclusions: This pilot study of the new portal imaging system showed the image quality is significantly improved

  6. Images of Complex Interactions of an Intense Ion Beam with Plasma Electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Startsev, Edward; Davidson, Ronald C.

    2004-01-01

    Ion beam propagation in a background plasma is an important scientific issue for many practical applications. The process of ion beam charge and current neutralization is complex because plasma electrons move in strong electric and magnetic fields of the beam. Computer simulation images of plasma interaction with an intense ion beam pulse are presented

  7. Image reconstruction from multiple fan-beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelinek, J.; Overton, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Special-purpose third-generation fan-beam CT systems can be greatly simplified by limiting the number of detectors, but this requires a different mode of data collection to provide a set of projections appropriate to the required spatial resolution in the reconstructed image. Repeated rotation of the source-detector fan, combined with shift of the detector array and perhaps offset of the source with respect to the fan's axis after each 360 0 rotation(cycle), provides a fairly general pattern of projection space filling. The authors' investigated the problem of optimal data-collection geometry for a multiple-rotation fan-beam scanner and of corresponding reconstruction algorithm

  8. Biomaterial imaging with MeV-energy heavy ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Toshio, E-mail: seki@sakura.nucleng.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Wakamatsu, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Shunichiro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Aoki, Takaaki [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto Univ., Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ishihara, Akihiko [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Life Science, Graduate School of Human and Environmental Studies, Kyoto Univ., Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Matsuo, Jiro [Quantum Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    The spatial distribution of several chemical compounds in biological tissues and cells can be obtained with mass spectrometry imaging (MSI). In conventional secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) with keV-energy ion beams, elastic collisions occur between projectiles and atoms of constituent molecules. The collisions produce fragments, making the acquisition of molecular information difficult. In contrast, ion beams with MeV-energy excite near-surface electrons and enhance the ionization of high-mass molecules; hence, SIMS spectra of fragment-suppressed ionized molecules can be obtained with MeV-SIMS. To compare between MeV and conventional SIMS, we used the two methods based on MeV and Bi{sub 3}-keV ions, respectively, to obtain molecular images of rat cerebellum. Conventional SIMS images of m/z 184 were clearly observed, but with the Bi{sub 3} ion, the distribution of the molecule with m/z 772.5 could be observed with much difficulty. This effect was attributed to the low secondary ion yields and we could not get many signal counts with keV-energy beam. On the other hand, intact molecular ion distributions of lipids were clearly observed with MeV-SIMS, although the mass of all lipid molecules was higher than 500 Da. The peaks of intact molecular ions in MeV-SIMS spectra allowed us to assign the mass. The high secondary ion sensitivity with MeV-energy heavy ions is very useful in biomaterial analysis.

  9. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  10. SU-F-J-54: Towards Real-Time Volumetric Imaging Using the Treatment Beam and KV Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M; Rozario, T; Liu, A; Jiang, S; Lu, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Existing real-time imaging uses dual (orthogonal) kV beam fluoroscopies and may result in significant amount of extra radiation to patients, especially for prolonged treatment cases. In addition, kV projections only provide 2D information, which is insufficient for in vivo dose reconstruction. We propose real-time volumetric imaging using prior knowledge of pre-treatment 4D images and real-time 2D transit data of treatment beam and kV beam. Methods: The pre-treatment multi-snapshot volumetric images are used to simulate 2D projections of both the treatment beam and kV beam, respectively, for each treatment field defined by the control point. During radiation delivery, the transit signals acquired by the electronic portal image device (EPID) are processed for every projection and compared with pre-calculation by cross-correlation for phase matching and thus 3D snapshot identification or real-time volumetric imaging. The data processing involves taking logarithmic ratios of EPID signals with respect to the air scan to reduce modeling uncertainties in head scatter fluence and EPID response. Simulated 2D projections are also used to pre-calculate confidence levels in phase matching. Treatment beam projections that have a low confidence level either in pre-calculation or real-time acquisition will trigger kV beams so that complementary information can be exploited. In case both the treatment beam and kV beam return low confidence in phase matching, a predicted phase based on linear regression will be generated. Results: Simulation studies indicated treatment beams provide sufficient confidence in phase matching for most cases. At times of low confidence from treatment beams, kV imaging provides sufficient confidence in phase matching due to its complementary configuration. Conclusion: The proposed real-time volumetric imaging utilizes the treatment beam and triggers kV beams for complementary information when the treatment beam along does not provide sufficient

  11. Metal Artifact Suppression in Dental Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images Using Image Processing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Masoumeh; Abdollahzadeh, Milad; Esmaeili, Farzad; Sakhamanesh, Vahideh

    2018-01-01

    Dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images suffer from severe metal artifacts. These artifacts degrade the quality of acquired image and in some cases make it unsuitable to use. Streaking artifacts and cavities around teeth are the main reason of degradation. In this article, we have proposed a new artifact reduction algorithm which has three parallel components. The first component extracts teeth based on the modeling of image histogram with a Gaussian mixture model. Striking artifact reduction component reduces artifacts using converting image into the polar domain and applying morphological filtering. The third component fills cavities through a simple but effective morphological filtering operation. Finally, results of these three components are combined into a fusion step to create a visually good image which is more compatible to human visual system. Results show that the proposed algorithm reduces artifacts of dental CBCT images and produces clean images.

  12. Geometric and dosimetric verification of step-and-shoot modulated fields with a new fast and high resolution beam imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindoni, Luca

    2005-01-01

    A technique for geometric and dosimetric pretreatment verification of step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments (IMRT) using a beam imaging system (BIS) made up of a charge-coupled device (CCD) digital camera optically coupled with a metal-plate/phosphor screen is described. Some physical properties of BIS were investigated in order to demonstrate its capability to perform measurements with a high spatial resolution and a high sampling rate. High-speed imaging, with a minimum charge integration time on the CCD of 120 ms, can be performed. The study of the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of sampling time is presented. In-plane and cross-line pixel size was measured to be 0.368±0.004 mm/pixel, which agrees within 0.5% of the manufacturer value of 0.366 mm. Spatial linearity results are very good and there are no detectable image distortions on whole 30x30 cm 2 detector area. A software routine was written to automatically extract positions of the collimator leaves from the images of the field shaped by the multileaf collimator (MLC) and also to compare them with the coordinates from the treatment planning system (TPS), thus directly testing both the MLC positioning and the treatment parameters transfer from TPS to the linear accelerator in a fast and precise way. The dosimetric capabilities (characteristics) of the imaging device for photon beams with energies of 6 and 15 MV were studied. Additional plexiglass buildup layers, depending on x-ray energy, were needed to reach maximum efficiency. The energy dependence of the BIS response versus dose and dose rate was found to be linear over a wide range. Relative output factors of BIS as a function of field size, compared with values measured with an ionization chamber, were in good accord for smaller field sizes ≤10x10 cm 2 but showed differences up to 4% for all the energies at the respective buildup depth for bigger fields. Square field profiles at water-equivalent buildup depths, extracted

  13. Imaging and Measuring Electron Beam Dose Distributions Using Holographic Interferometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    Holographic interferometry was used to image and measure ionizing radiation depth-dose and isodose distributions in transparent liquids. Both broad and narrowly collimated electron beams from accelerators (2–10 MeV) provided short irradiation times of 30 ns to 0.6 s. Holographic images...... and measurements of absorbed dose distributions were achieved in liquids of various densities and thermal properties and in water layers thinner than the electron range and with backings of materials of various densities and atomic numbers. The lowest detectable dose in some liquids was of the order of a few k......Rad. The precision limits of the measurement of dose were found to be ±4%. The procedure was simple and the holographic equipment stable and compact, thus allowing experimentation under routine laboratory conditions and limited space....

  14. Rf-synchronized imaging for particle and photon beam characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    The usefulness of imaging electro-optics for rf-driven accelerators can be enhanced by synchronizing the instruments to the system fundamental frequency or an appropriate subharmonic. This step allows one to obtain micropulse bunch length and phase during a series of linac bunches or storage ring passes. Several examples now exist of the use of synchroscan and dual-sweep streak cameras and/or image dissector tubes to access micropulse scale phenomena (10 to 30 ps) during linac and storage ring operations in the US, Japan, and Europe. As space permits, selections will be presented from the list of phase stability phenomena on photoelectric injectors, micropulse length during a macropulse, micropulse elongation effects, transverse Wakefield effects within a micropulse, and submicropulse phenomena on a stored beam. Potential applications to the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be briefly addressed.

  15. An electron beam imaging system for quality assurance in IORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, F.; Rossi, M.; Morigi, M. P.; Brancaccio, R.; Paltrinieri, E.; Bettuzzi, M.; Romani, D.; Ciocca, M.; Tosi, G.; Ronsivalle, C.; Vignati, M.

    2004-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy is a special radiotherapy technique, which enables a high dose of radiation to be given in a single fraction during oncological surgery. The major stumbling block to the large-scale application of the technique is the transfer of the patient, with an open wound, from the operating room to the radiation therapy bunker, with the consequent organisational problems and the increased risk of infection. To overcome these limitations, in the last few years a new kind of linear accelerator, the Novac 7, conceived for direct use in the surgical room, has become available. Novac 7 can deliver electron beams of different energies (3, 5, 7 and 9 MeV), with a high dose rate (up to 20 Gy/min). The aim of this work, funded by ENEA in the framework of a research contract, is the development of an innovative system for on-line measurements of 2D dose distributions and electron beam characterisation, before radiotherapy treatment with Novac 7. The system is made up of the following components: (a) an electron-light converter; (b) a 14 bit cooled CCD camera; (c) a personal computer with an ad hoc written software for image acquisition and processing. The performances of the prototype have been characterised experimentally with different electron-light converters. Several tests have concerned the assessment of the detector response as a function of impulse number and electron beam energy. Finally, the experimental results concerning beam profiles have been compared with data acquired with other dosimetric techniques. The achieved results make it possible to say that the developed system is suitable for fast quality assurance measurements and verification of 2D dose distributions.

  16. Scattering calculation and image reconstruction using elevation-focused beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, David P; Astheimer, Jeffrey P; Waag, Robert C

    2009-05-01

    Pressure scattered by cylindrical and spherical objects with elevation-focused illumination and reception has been analytically calculated, and corresponding cross sections have been reconstructed with a two-dimensional algorithm. Elevation focusing was used to elucidate constraints on quantitative imaging of three-dimensional objects with two-dimensional algorithms. Focused illumination and reception are represented by angular spectra of plane waves that were efficiently computed using a Fourier interpolation method to maintain the same angles for all temporal frequencies. Reconstructions were formed using an eigenfunction method with multiple frequencies, phase compensation, and iteration. The results show that the scattered pressure reduces to a two-dimensional expression, and two-dimensional algorithms are applicable when the region of a three-dimensional object within an elevation-focused beam is approximately constant in elevation. The results also show that energy scattered out of the reception aperture by objects contained within the focused beam can result in the reconstructed values of attenuation slope being greater than true values at the boundary of the object. Reconstructed sound speed images, however, appear to be relatively unaffected by the loss in scattered energy. The broad conclusion that can be drawn from these results is that two-dimensional reconstructions require compensation to account for uncaptured three-dimensional scattering.

  17. Method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiotherapy beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA; Macey, Daniel J [Birmingham, AL; Weisenberger, Andrew G [Yorktown, VA

    2011-11-01

    A method and apparatus for real time imaging and monitoring of radiation therapy beams is designed to preferentially distinguish and image low energy radiation from high energy secondary radiation emitted from a target as the result of therapeutic beam deposition. A detector having low sensitivity to high energy photons combined with a collimator designed to dynamically image in the region of the therapeutic beam target is used.

  18. Surgical stent for dental implant using cone beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Soo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a surgical stent for dental implant procedure that can be easily applied and affordable by using cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT). Aluminum, Teflon-PFA (perfluoroalkoxy), and acetal (polyoxymethylene plastic) were selected as materials for the surgical stent. Among these three materials, the appropriate material was chosen using the CBCT images. The surgical stent, which could be easily placed into an oral cavity, was designed with chosen material. CBCT images of the new surgical stent on mandible were obtained using Alphard-3030 dental CT system (Asahi Roentgen Co., Ltd., Kyoto, Japan). The point of insertion was prescribed on the surgical stent with the multiplanar reconstruction software of OnDemand3D (CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). Guide holes were made at the point of insertion on the surgical stent using newly designed guide jig. CBCT scans was taken for the second time to verify the accuracy of the newly designed surgical stent. Teflon-PFA showed radiologically excellent image characteristics for the surgical stent. High accuracy and reproducibility of implantation were confirmed with the surgical stent. The newly designed surgical stent can lead to the accurate implantation and achieve the clinically predictable result.

  19. Megavoltage planar and cone-beam imaging with low-Z targets: dependence of image quality improvement on beam energy and patient separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robar, James L; Connell, Tanner; Huang, Weihong; Kelly, Robin G

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the improvement of megavoltage planar and cone-beam CT (CBCT) image quality with the use of low atomic number (Z) external targets in the linear accelerator. In this investigation, two experimental megavoltage imaging beams were generated by using either 3.5 or 7.0 MeV electrons incident on aluminum targets installed above the level of the carousel in a linear accelerator (2100EX, Varian Medical, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). Images were acquired using an amorphous silicon detector panel. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in planar and CBCT images was measured as a function of dose and a comparison was made between the imaging beams and the standard 6 MV therapy beam. Phantoms of variable diameter were used to examine the loss of contrast due to beam hardening. Porcine imaging was conducted to examine qualitatively the advantages of the low-Z target approach in CBCT. In CBCT imaging CNR increases by factors as high as 2.4 and 4.3 for the 7.0 and 3.5 MeV/Al beams, respectively, compared to images acquired with 6 MV. Similar factors of improvement are observed in planar imaging. For the imaging beams, beam hardening causes a significant loss of the contrast advantage with increasing phantom diameter; however, for the 3.5 MeV/Al beam and a phantom diameter of 25 cm, a contrast advantage remains, with increases of contrast by factors of 1.5 and 3.4 over 6 MV for bone and lung inhale regions, respectively. The spatial resolution is improved slightly in CBCT images for the imaging beams. CBCT images of a porcine cranium demonstrate qualitatively the advantages of the low-Z target approach, showing greater contrast between tissues and improved visibility of fine detail. The use of low-Z external targets in the linear accelerator improves megavoltage planar and CBCT image quality significantly. CNR may be increased by a factor of 4 or greater. Improvement of the spatial resolution is also apparent.

  20. Metal artefact reduction for a dental cone beam CT image using image segmentation and backprojection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Mahdi; Khotanlou, Hassan; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Due to low dose delivery and fast scanning, the dental Cone Beam CT (CBCT) is the latest technology being implanted for a range of dental imaging. The presence of metallic objects including amalgam or gold fillings in the mouth produces an intuitive image for human jaws. The feasibility of a fast and accurate approach for metal artefact reduction for dental CBCT is investigated. The current study investigates the metal artefact reduction using image segmentation and modification of several sinigrams. In order to reduce metal effects such as beam hardening, streak artefact and intense noises, the application of several algorithms is evaluated. The proposed method includes three stages: preprocessing, reconstruction and post-processing. In the pre-processing stage, in order to reduce the noise level, several phase and frequency filters were applied. At the second stage, based on the specific sinogram achieved for each segment, spline interpolation and weighting backprojection filters were applied to reconstruct the original image. A three-dimensional filter was then applied on reconstructed images, to improve the image quality. Results showed that compared to other available filters, standard frequency filters have a significant influence in the preprocessing stage (ΔHU = 48 ± 6). In addition, with the streak artefact, the probability of beam hardening artefact increases. t e post-processing stage, the application of three-dimensional filters improves the quality of reconstructed images (See Fig. I). Conclusion The proposed method reduces metal artefacts especially where there are more than one metal implanted in the region of interest.

  1. Objective specific beam generation for image guided robotic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlaefer, A.; Jungmann, O.; Schweikard, A.; Kilby, W.

    2007-01-01

    Robotic radiosurgery enables precise dose delivery throughout the body. Planning for robotic radiosurgery comprises of finding a suitable set of beams and beam weights. The problem can be addressed by generating a large set of candidate beams, and selection of beams with nonzero weight by mathematical programming. We propose to use different randomized beam generation methods depending on the type of lesion and the clinical objective. Results for three patient cases indicate that this can improve the plan quality. (orig.)

  2. Objective specific beam generation for image guided robotic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaefer, A.; Jungmann, O.; Schweikard, A. [Inst. for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, Univ. of Luebeck (Germany); Kilby, W. [Accuray Inc., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Robotic radiosurgery enables precise dose delivery throughout the body. Planning for robotic radiosurgery comprises of finding a suitable set of beams and beam weights. The problem can be addressed by generating a large set of candidate beams, and selection of beams with nonzero weight by mathematical programming. We propose to use different randomized beam generation methods depending on the type of lesion and the clinical objective. Results for three patient cases indicate that this can improve the plan quality. (orig.)

  3. Commercial CMOS image sensors as X-ray imagers and particle beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castoldi, A.; Guazzoni, C.; Maffessanti, S.; Montemurro, G.V.; Carraresi, L.

    2015-01-01

    CMOS image sensors are widely used in several applications such as mobile handsets webcams and digital cameras among others. Furthermore they are available across a wide range of resolutions with excellent spectral and chromatic responses. In order to fulfill the need of cheap systems as beam monitors and high resolution image sensors for scientific applications we exploited the possibility of using commercial CMOS image sensors as X-rays and proton detectors. Two different sensors have been mounted and tested. An Aptina MT9v034, featuring 752 × 480 pixels, 6μm × 6μm pixel size has been mounted and successfully tested as bi-dimensional beam profile monitor, able to take pictures of the incoming proton bunches at the DeFEL beamline (1–6 MeV pulsed proton beam) of the LaBeC of INFN in Florence. The naked sensor is able to successfully detect the interactions of the single protons. The sensor point-spread-function (PSF) has been qualified with 1MeV protons and is equal to one pixel (6 mm) r.m.s. in both directions. A second sensor MT9M032, featuring 1472 × 1096 pixels, 2.2 × 2.2 μm pixel size has been mounted on a dedicated board as high-resolution imager to be used in X-ray imaging experiments with table-top generators. In order to ease and simplify the data transfer and the image acquisition the system is controlled by a dedicated micro-processor board (DM3730 1GHz SoC ARM Cortex-A8) on which a modified LINUX kernel has been implemented. The paper presents the architecture of the sensor systems and the results of the experimental measurements

  4. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meng, C.; Janssen, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the

  5. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, A.N.; Yoshida, K.; Tanaka, N.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar. -- Highlights: ► ETEM images with point resolution of 0.12 nm in 4 mbar of nitrogen gas. ► Clear Si lattice imaging with 16 mbar of nitrogen gas. ► ETEM image resolution in gas can be much improved by decreasing total beam current. ► Beam current density (beam convergence) has no effect on the image resolution.

  6. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  7. Bis(1,3-dithiole) Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jan Rud; Engler, E. M.; Green, D. C.

    1977-01-01

    There is described the preparation of bis-1,3-dithiole compounds (I) which are key synthetic precursors for the preparation of new polymeric metal bis(dithiolene) (i.e., II) and tetrathiafulvalene compounds (i.e., III): (Image Omitted)...

  8. An ImageJ plugin for ion beam imaging and data processing at AIFIRA facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devès, G.; Daudin, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bessy, A.; Buga, F.; Ghanty, J.; Naar, A.; Sommar, V. [Univ. Bordeaux, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Michelet, C.; Seznec, H.; Barberet, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2015-04-01

    Quantification and imaging of chemical elements at the cellular level requires the use of a combination of techniques such as micro-PIXE, micro-RBS, STIM, secondary electron imaging associated with optical and fluorescence microscopy techniques employed prior to irradiation. Such a numerous set of methods generates an important amount of data per experiment. Typically for each acquisition the following data has to be processed: chemical map for each element present with a concentration above the detection limit, density and backscattered maps, mean and local spectra corresponding to relevant region of interest such as whole cell, intracellular compartment, or nanoparticles. These operations are time consuming, repetitive and as such could be source of errors in data manipulation. In order to optimize data processing, we have developed a new tool for batch data processing and imaging. This tool has been developed as a plugin for ImageJ, a versatile software for image processing that is suitable for the treatment of basic IBA data operations. Because ImageJ is written in Java, the plugin can be used under Linux, Mas OS X and Windows in both 32-bits and 64-bits modes, which may interest developers working on open-access ion beam facilities like AIFIRA. The main features of this plugin are presented here: listfile processing, spectroscopic imaging, local information extraction, quantitative density maps and database management using OMERO.

  9. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  10. X-ray luminescence computed tomography imaging via multiple intensity weighted narrow beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Huijuan; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce and study a novel x-ray beam irradiation pattern for X-ray Luminescence Computed Tomography (XLCT), termed multiple intensity-weighted narrow-beam irradiation. The proposed XLCT imaging method is studied through simulations of x-ray and diffuse lights propagation. The emitted optical photons from X-ray excitable nanophosphors were collected by optical fiber bundles from the right-side surface of the phantom. The implementation of image reconstruction is based on the simulated measurements from 6 or 12 angular projections in terms of 3 or 5 x-ray beams scanning mode. The proposed XLCT imaging method is compared against the constant intensity weighted narrow-beam XLCT. From the reconstructed XLCT images, we found that the Dice similarity and quantitative ratio of targets have a certain degree of improvement. The results demonstrated that the proposed method can offer simultaneously high image quality and fast image acquisition.

  11. LHCb: A novel method for an absolute luminosity measurement at LHCb using beam-gas imaging

    CERN Multimedia

    Barschel, C

    2013-01-01

    A novel technique to measure the absolute luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using beam-gas interactions has been successfully used in the LHCb experiment. A gas injection device (SMOG) has been installed in the LHCb experiment to increase the pressure around the interaction point during dedicated fills. The Beam Gas Imaging method (BGI) has now the potential to surpass the accuracy of the commonly used van der Meer scan method (VDM). This poster presents the principles of the Beam Gas Imaging method used to measure the beam overlap integral. Furthermore the gas injection increased the accuracy measurement of the so-called ghost charges and also intensities per bunch.

  12. Imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis by electron beam tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, K C S; Ferrett, C G; Tandon, R; Paul, B; Herold, J; Liu, C S C

    2005-08-01

    To describe the experience of using electron beam tomography (EBT) in imaging of osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis (OOKP) to identify early bone and dentine loss which may threaten the viability of the eye. Seven patients with an OOKP in one eye underwent EBT. The OOKP lamina dimensions were measured on EBT and compared to the manual measurements at the time of surgery. There was a high degree of resolution of the OOKP lamina noted with EBT. In particular, it identified three patients with a marked degree of thinning of the lamina edges. Two of these patients had OOKP that were allografts. The mean time from surgery to examination was 3.6 years (range 1.2-5 years) while the mean age of the patients was 56 years (range 31-79 years). It is important to monitor regularly the dimensions and stability of the OOKP lamina as it will help detect cases that are at risk of extrusion of the optical cylinder and consequent endophthalmitis. Prophylactic measures can then be taken to prevent such serious complications from occurring. In this series, the authors found EBT to have excellent resolution and speed and they would support regular scanning of the OOKP lamina in all patients.

  13. Imagescope to photodiode beam-profile imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlin, D.D.; Hollabaugh, J.S.; Stump, C.J. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Transverse beam-distribution measurements of high-current cw accelerators must be obtained from noninterceptive sensors. For the 100-mA H 2 or D beam of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Tst (FMIT) accelerator, these transverse properties may be obtained by detecting the visible radiation resulting from beam interactions with residual gas. A system of mirrors, intensified TV cameras, digitizers, and topographic reconstruction codes has been reported previously. This report describes a new technique for sensing and digitizing the light projected transversely from the beam of the FMIT accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory

  14. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Opalka, Lukas [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakubek, Jan [Advacam, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-07-07

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  15. Imaging and characterization of primary and secondary radiation in ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granja, Carlos; Opalka, Lukas; Martisikova, Maria; Gwosch, Klaus; Jakubek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in ion beam therapy is an essential and increasingly significant tool for treatment planning and radiation and dose deposition verification. Efforts aim at providing precise radiation field characterization and online monitoring of radiation dose distribution. A review is given of the research and methodology of quantum-imaging, composition, spectral and directional characterization of the mixed-radiation fields in proton and light ion beam therapy developed by the IEAP CTU Prague and HIT Heidelberg group. Results include non-invasive imaging of dose deposition and primary beam online monitoring.

  16. Influence of total beam current on HRTEM image resolution in differentially pumped ETEM with nitrogen gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, A N; Yoshida, K; Tanaka, N

    2013-01-01

    Environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) enables the study of catalytic and other reaction processes as they occur with Angstrom-level resolution. The microscope used is a dedicated ETEM (Titan ETEM, FEI Company) with a differential pumping vacuum system and apertures, allowing aberration corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging to be performed with gas pressures up to 20 mbar in the sample area and with significant advantages over membrane-type E-cell holders. The effect on image resolution of varying the nitrogen gas pressure, electron beam current density and total beam current were measured using information limit (Young's fringes) on a standard cross grating sample and from silicon crystal lattice imaging. As expected, increasing gas pressure causes a decrease in HRTEM image resolution. However, the total electron beam current also causes big changes in the image resolution (lower beam current giving better resolution), whereas varying the beam current density has almost no effect on resolution, a result that has not been reported previously. This behavior is seen even with zero-loss filtered imaging, which we believe shows that the drop in resolution is caused by elastic scattering at gas ions created by the incident electron beam. Suitable conditions for acquiring high resolution images in a gas environment are discussed. Lattice images at nitrogen pressures up to 16 mbar are shown, with 0.12 nm information transfer at 4 mbar. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Congsen [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Janssen, Maurice H. M. [LaserLaB Amsterdam, VU University Amsterdam, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-02-15

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude.

  18. Study of the tomographic image quality provided by a conical beam system kilo voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garayoa Roca, J.; Castro Tejero, P.

    2011-01-01

    Imaging systems play an increasingly important role in radiotherapy, and to ensure the quality of the process, you must know the characteristics and limitations of available imaging systems. In this study we sought to evaluate the image quality of an IGRT system based on a kilo voltage cone beam.

  19. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance-fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Feng-Wei; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Ma, Chen-Chi M; Chen, Ju-Yu; Feng, Li-Ying; Yang, Hung-Wei

    To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles (NPs) with dual magnetic resonance (MR) and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs) to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2). These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1) of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM(-1) s(-1), which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM(-1) s(-1)). The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy.

  20. Imaging with a multiplane multiwire proportional chamber using heavy ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, W.T.; Alonso, J.R.; Tobias, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    A 16-plane multiwire proportional chamber has been developed to accurately map intensity profiles of heavy ion beams at the Bevalac. The imaging capability of the system has been tested for reconstruction of 3-dimensional representation of a canine thorax region using heavy ion beams

  1. Synthesis and Biodistribution of Lipophilic Monocationic Gallium Radiopharmaceuticals Derived from N,N′-bis(3-aminopropyl)-N,N′-dimethylethylenediamine: Potential Agents for PET Myocardial Imaging with 68Ga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yui-May; Mathias, Carla J.; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction In locations that lack nearby cyclotron facilities for radionuclide production, generator-based 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals might have clinical utility for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of myocardial perfusion and other physiologic processes. Methods The lipophilic, monocationic 67Ga-labeled gallium chelates of five novel hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands, the bis(salicylaldimine), bis(3-methoxysalicylaldimine), bis(4-methoxysalicylaldimine), bis(6-methoxysalicylaldimine), and bis(4,6-dimethoxysalicylaldimine) of N,N′-bis(3-aminopropyl)-N,N′-dimethylethylenediamine (BAPDMEN), were prepared. The structure of the unlabeled [Ga(4-MeOsal)2BAPDMEN]+PF6− salt was determined by X-ray crystallography, and the biodistribution of each of the 67Ga-labeled gallium chelates determined in rats following i.v. administration and compared to the biodistribution of [86Rb]rubidium chloride. Results The [Ga(4-MeOsal)2BAPDMEN]+PF6− complex exhibits the expected pseudo-octahedral N4O22− coordination sphere about the Ga3+ center with a trans-disposition of the phenolate oxygen atoms. All five of the 67Ga-radiopharmaceuticals were found to afford the desired myocardial retention of the radiogallium. The [67/68Ga][Ga(3-MeOsal)2BAPDMEN]1+ radiopharmaceutical appears to have the best properties for myocardial imaging, exhibiting 2% of the injected dose in the heart at both 1-minute and 2-hours post-injection and very high heart/non-target ratios (heart/blood ratios of 7.6 ± 1.0 and 54 ± 10 at 1-min and 120-min, respectively; heart/liver ratios of 1.8 ± 0.4 and 39 ± 3 at 1-min and 120-min, respectively). Conclusions Most of these new agents, particularly [67/68Ga][Ga(3-MeOsal)2BAPDMEN]1+, would appear superior to previously reported bis(salicyaldimines) of N,N′-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine as candidates for PET imaging of the heart with 68Ga. PMID:19181267

  2. Synthesis and biodistribution of lipophilic and monocationic gallium radiopharmaceuticals derived from N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)-N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine: potential agents for PET myocardial imaging with 68Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiao, Y.-M.; Mathias, Carla J.; Wey, S.-P.; Fanwick, Phillip E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In locations that lack nearby cyclotron facilities for radionuclide production, generator-based 68 Ga radiopharmaceuticals might have clinical utility for positron emission tomography (PET) studies of myocardial perfusion and other physiological processes. Methods: The lipophilic and monocationic 67 Ga-labeled gallium chelates of five novel hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands the bis(salicylaldimine), bis(3-methoxysalicylaldimine), bis(4-methoxysalicylaldimine), bis(6-meth,oxysalicylaldimine), and bis(4,6-dimethoxysalicylaldimine) of N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)-N,N'-dimethylethylenediamine (BAPDMEN), were prepared. The structure of the unlabeled [Ga(4-MeOsal) 2 BAPDMEN] + PF 6 - salt was determined by X-ray crystallography, and the biodistribution of each of the 67 Ga-labeled gallium chelates was determined in rats following intravenous administration and compared with the biodistribution of [ 86 Rb]rubidium chloride. Results: The [Ga(4-MeOsal) 2 BAPDMEN] + PF 6 - complex exhibited the expected pseudo-octahedral N 4 O 2 2- coordination sphere about the Ga 3+ center with a trans disposition of the phenolate oxygen atoms. All five 67 Ga radiopharmaceuticals were found to afford the desired myocardial retention of the radiogallium. The [ 67/68 Ga][Ga(3-MeOsal) 2 BAPDMEN] 1+ radiopharmaceutical appears to have the best properties for myocardial imaging, exhibiting 2% of the injected dose in the heart 1 min and 2 h postinjection and very high heart/nontarget ratios (heart/blood ratios of 7.6±1.0 and 54±10 at 1 and 120 min, respectively; heart/liver ratios of 1.8±0.4 and 39±3 at 1 and 120 min, respectively). Conclusions: Most of these new agents, particularly [ 67/68 Ga][Ga(3-MeOsal) 2 BAPDMEN] 1+ , would appear superior to previously reported bis(salicylaldimine) ligands of N,N'-bis(3-aminopropyl)ethylenediamine as candidates for PET imaging of the heart with 68 Ga

  3. New method of contour image processing based on the formalism of spiral light beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volostnikov, Vladimir G.; Kishkin, S. A.; Kotova, S. P.

    2013-07-01

    The possibility of applying the mathematical formalism of spiral light beams to the problems of contour image recognition is theoretically studied. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are evaluated; the results of numerical modelling are presented.

  4. Automated Area Beam Equalization Mammography for Improved Imaging of Dense Breasts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molloi, Sabee

    2005-01-01

    ...) because of degraded contrast from large scatter intensities and relatively high noise. Area x-ray beam equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to underpenetrated regions without increasing the exposure to the breast regions...

  5. Minimizing image noise in on-board CT reconstruction using both kilovoltage and megavoltage beam projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Junan; Yin Fangfang

    2007-01-01

    We studied a recently proposed aggregated CT reconstruction technique which combines the complementary advantages of kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray imaging. Various phantoms were imaged to study the effects of beam orientations and geometry of the imaging object on image quality of reconstructed CT. It was shown that the quality of aggregated CT was correlated with both kV and MV beam orientations and the degree of this correlation depended upon the geometry of the imaging object. The results indicated that the optimal orientations were those when kV beams pass through the thinner portion and MV beams pass through the thicker portion of the imaging object. A special preprocessing procedure was also developed to perform contrast conversions between kV and MV information prior to image reconstruction. The performance of two reconstruction methods, one filtered backprojection method and one iterative method, were compared. The effects of projection number, beam truncation, and contrast conversion on the CT image quality were investigated

  6. A method of combining STEM image with parallel beam diffraction and electron-optical conditions for diffractive imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Haifeng; Nelson, Chris

    2007-01-01

    We describe a method of combining STEM imaging functionalities with nanoarea parallel beam electron diffraction on a modern TEM. This facilitates the search for individual particles whose diffraction patterns are needed for diffractive imaging or structural studies of nanoparticles. This also lays out a base for 3D diffraction data collection

  7. A BPF-FBP tandem algorithm for image reconstruction in reverse helical cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Seungryong; Xia, Dan; Pellizzari, Charles A.; Pan Xiaochuan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Reverse helical cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a scanning configuration for potential applications in image-guided radiation therapy in which an accurate anatomic image of the patient is needed for image-guidance procedures. The authors previously developed an algorithm for image reconstruction from nontruncated data of an object that is completely within the reverse helix. The purpose of this work is to develop an image reconstruction approach for reverse helical CBCT of a long object that extends out of the reverse helix and therefore constitutes data truncation. Methods: The proposed approach comprises of two reconstruction steps. In the first step, a chord-based backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm reconstructs a volumetric image of an object from the original cone-beam data. Because there exists a chordless region in the middle of the reverse helix, the image obtained in the first step contains an unreconstructed central-gap region. In the second step, the gap region is reconstructed by use of a Pack-Noo-formula-based filteredbackprojection (FBP) algorithm from the modified cone-beam data obtained by subtracting from the original cone-beam data the reprojection of the image reconstructed in the first step. Results: The authors have performed numerical studies to validate the proposed approach in image reconstruction from reverse helical cone-beam data. The results confirm that the proposed approach can reconstruct accurate images of a long object without suffering from data-truncation artifacts or cone-angle artifacts. Conclusions: They developed and validated a BPF-FBP tandem algorithm to reconstruct images of a long object from reverse helical cone-beam data. The chord-based BPF algorithm was utilized for converting the long-object problem into a short-object problem. The proposed approach is applicable to other scanning configurations such as reduced circular sinusoidal trajectories.

  8. 1,3-Bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles with dual magnetic resonance–fluorescence imaging for tracking of chemotherapeutic agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei KC

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Chen Wei,1 Feng-Wei Lin,2 Chiung-Yin Huang,1 Chen-Chi M Ma,3 Ju-Yu Chen,1 Li-Ying Feng,1 Hung-Wei Yang2 1Department of Neurosurgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, School of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, 2Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, 3Department of Chemical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: To date, knowing how to identify the location of chemotherapeutic agents in the human body after injection is still a challenge. Therefore, it is urgent to develop a drug delivery system with molecular imaging tracking ability to accurately understand the distribution, location, and concentration of a drug in living organisms. In this study, we developed bovine serum albumin (BSA-based nanoparticles (NPs with dual magnetic resonance (MR and fluorescence imaging modalities (fluorescein isothiocyanate [FITC]-BSA-Gd/1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea [BCNU] NPs to deliver BCNU for inhibition of brain tumor cells (MBR 261-2. These BSA-based NPs are water dispersible, stable, and biocompatible as confirmed by XTT cell viability assay. In vitro phantoms and in vivo MR and fluorescence imaging experiments show that the developed FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs enable dual MR and fluorescence imaging for monitoring cellular uptake and distribution in tumors. The T1 relaxivity (R1 of FITC-BSA-Gd/BCNU NPs was 3.25 mM-1 s-1, which was similar to that of the commercial T1 contrast agent (R1 =3.36 mM-1 s-1. The results indicate that this multifunctional drug delivery system has potential bioimaging tracking of chemotherapeutic agents ability in vitro and in vivo for cancer therapy. Keywords: drug tracking, fluorescence imaging, MR imaging, BSA nanoparticles, cancer therapy

  9. Image-rotating cavity designs for improved beam quality in nanosecond optical parametric oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Bowers, Mark S.

    2001-01-01

    We show by computer simulation that high beam quality can be achieved in high-energy, nanosecond optical parametric oscillators by use of image-rotating resonators. Lateral walk-off between the signal and the idler beams in a nonlinear crystal creates correlations across the beams in the walk off direction, or equivalently, creates a restricted acceptance angle. These correlations can improve the beam quality in the walk-off plane. We show that image rotation or reflection can be used to improve beam quality in both planes. The lateral walk-off can be due to birefringent walk-off in type II mixing or to noncollinear mixing in type I or type II mixing

  10. Propagation stability of self-reconstructing Bessel beams enables contrast-enhanced imaging in thick media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, Florian O; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2012-01-17

    Laser beams that can self-reconstruct their initial beam profile even in the presence of massive phase perturbations are able to propagate deeper into inhomogeneous media. This ability has crucial advantages for light sheet-based microscopy in thick media, such as cell clusters, embryos, skin or brain tissue or plants, as well as scattering synthetic materials. A ring system around the central intensity maximum of a Bessel beam enables its self-reconstruction, but at the same time illuminates out-of-focus regions and deteriorates image contrast. Here we present a detection method that minimizes the negative effect of the ring system. The beam's propagation stability along one straight line enables the use of a confocal line principle, resulting in a significant increase in image contrast. The axial resolution could be improved by nearly 100% relative to the standard light-sheet techniques using scanned Gaussian beams, while demonstrating self-reconstruction also for high propagation depths.

  11. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.

    1995-01-01

    In the case of very low emittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  12. Optical and x-ray imaging of electron beams using synchrotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    In the case of very low eniittance electron and positron storage ring beams, it is impossible to make intrusive measurements of beam properties without increasing the emittance and possibly disrupting the beam. In cases where electron or positron beams have high average power densities (such as free electron laser linacs), intrusive probes such as wires and optical transition radiation screens or Cherenkov emitting screens can be easily damaged or destroyed. The optical and x-ray emissions from the bends in the storage rings and often from linac bending magnets can be used to image the beam profile to obtain emittance information about the beam. The techniques, advantages and limitations of using both optical and x-ray synchrotron emission to measure beam properties are discussed and the possibility of single bunch imaging is considered. The properties of suitable imagers and converters such as phosphors are described. Examples of previous, existing and planned applications are given where available, including a pinhole imaging system currently being designed for the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory

  13. Image-guided radiotherapy in near real time with intensity-modulated radiotherapy megavoltage treatment beam imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing, Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-10-01

    To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  14. Image-Guided Radiotherapy in Near Real Time With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Megavoltage Treatment Beam Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Weihua; Hsu, Annie; Riaz, Nadeem; Lee, Louis; Wiersma, Rodney; Luxton, Gary; King, Christopher; Xing Lei; Solberg, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To utilize image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in near real time by obtaining and evaluating the online positions of implanted fiducials from continuous electronic portal imaging device (EPID) imaging of prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery. Methods and Materials: Upon initial setup using two orthogonal images, the three-dimensional (3D) positions of all implanted fiducial markers are obtained, and their expected two-dimensional (2D) locations in the beam's-eye-view (BEV) projection are calculated for each treatment field. During IMRT beam delivery, EPID images of the megavoltage treatment beam are acquired in cine mode and subsequently analyzed to locate 2D locations of fiducials in the BEV. Simultaneously, 3D positions are estimated according to the current EPID image, information from the setup portal images, and images acquired at other gantry angles (the completed treatment fields). The measured 2D and 3D positions of each fiducial are compared with their expected 2D and 3D setup positions, respectively. Any displacements larger than a predefined tolerance may cause the treatment system to suspend the beam delivery and direct the therapists to reposition the patient. Results: Phantom studies indicate that the accuracy of 2D BEV and 3D tracking are better than 1 mm and 1.4 mm, respectively. A total of 7330 images from prostate treatments were acquired and analyzed, showing a maximum 2D displacement of 6.7 mm and a maximum 3D displacement of 6.9 mm over 34 fractions. Conclusions: This EPID-based, real-time IGRT method can be implemented on any external beam machine with portal imaging capabilities without purchasing any additional equipment, and there is no extra dose delivered to the patient.

  15. Phase-preserving beam expander for biomedical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Bassey, Bassey; Gomez, Ariel; Chapman, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Building on previous work, a phase-preserving bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator was developed with the capability of performing live animal phase contrast dynamic imaging at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source are used by many researchers to capture phase-based imaging data. These experiments have so far been limited by the small vertical beam size, requiring vertical scanning of biological samples in order to image their full vertical extent. Previous work has been carried out to develop a bent Laue beam-expanding monochromator for use at these beamlines. However, the first attempts exhibited significant distortion in the diffraction plane, increasing the beam divergence and eliminating the usefulness of the monochromator for phase-related imaging techniques. Recent work has been carried out to more carefully match the polychromatic and geometric focal lengths in a so-called ‘magic condition’ that preserves the divergence of the beam and enables full-field phase-based imaging techniques. The new experimental parameters, namely asymmetry and Bragg angles, were evaluated by analysing knife-edge and in-line phase images to determine the effect on beam divergence in both vertical and horizontal directions, using the flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator at the beamline as a baseline. The results show that by using the magic condition, the difference between the two monochromator types is less than 10% in the diffraction plane. Phase fringes visible in test images of a biological sample demonstrate that this difference is small enough to enable in-line phase imaging, despite operating at a sub-optimal energy for the wafer and asymmetry angle that was used

  16. A new crossed molecular beam apparatus using time-sliced ion velocity imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guorong; Zhang Weiqing; Pan Huilin; Shuai Quan; Jiang Bo; Dai Dongxu; Yang Xueming

    2008-01-01

    A new crossed molecular beam apparatus has been constructed for investigating polyatomic chemical reactions using the time-sliced ion velocity map imaging technique. A unique design is adopted for one of the two beam sources and allows us to set up the molecular beam source either horizontally or vertically. This can be conveniently used to produce versatile atomic or radical beams from photodissociation and as well as electric discharge. Intensive H-atom beam source with high speed ratio was produced by photodissociation of the HI molecule and was reacted with the CD 4 molecule. Vibrational-state resolved HD product distribution was measured by detecting the CD 3 product. Preliminary results were also reported on the F+SiH 4 reaction using the discharged F atom beam. These results demonstrate that this new instrument is a powerful tool for investigating chemical dynamics of polyatomic reactions.

  17. Point spread function modeling and image restoration for cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hua; Shi Yikai; Huang Kuidong; Xu Zhe

    2015-01-01

    X-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CT) has such notable features as high efficiency and precision, and is widely used in the fields of medical imaging and industrial non-destructive testing, but the inherent imaging degradation reduces the quality of CT images. Aimed at the problems of projection image degradation and restoration in cone-beam CT, a point spread function (PSF) modeling method is proposed first. The general PSF model of cone-beam CT is established, and based on it, the PSF under arbitrary scanning conditions can be calculated directly for projection image restoration without the additional measurement, which greatly improved the application convenience of cone-beam CT. Secondly, a projection image restoration algorithm based on pre-filtering and pre-segmentation is proposed, which can make the edge contours in projection images and slice images clearer after restoration, and control the noise in the equivalent level to the original images. Finally, the experiments verified the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods. (authors)

  18. An index of beam hardening artifact for two-dimensional cone-beam CT tomographic images: establishment and preliminary evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fusong; Lv, Peijun; Yang, Huifang; Wang, Yong; Sun, Yuchun

    2015-07-01

    Objectives: Based on the pixel gray value measurements, establish a beam-hardening artifacts index of the cone-beam CT tomographic image, and preliminarily evaluate its applicability. Methods: The 5mm-diameter metal ball and resin ball were fixed on the light-cured resin base plate respectively, while four vitro molars were fixed above and below the ball, on the left and right respectively, which have 10mm distance with the metal ball. Then, cone beam CT was used to scan the fixed base plate twice. The same layer tomographic images were selected from the two data and imported into the Photoshop software. The circle boundary was built through the determination of the center and radius of the circle, according to the artifact-free images section. Grayscale measurement tools were used to measure the internal boundary gray value G0, gray value G1 and G2 of 1mm and 20mm artifacts outside the circular boundary, the length L1 of the arc with artifacts in the circular boundary, the circumference L2. Hardening artifacts index was set A = (G1 / G0) * 0.5 + (G2 / G1) * 0.4 + (L2 / L1) * 0.1. Then, the A values of metal and resin materials were calculated respectively. Results: The A value of cobalt-chromium alloy material is 1, and resin material is 0. Conclusion: The A value reflects comprehensively the three factors of hardening artifacts influencing normal oral tissue image sharpness of cone beam CT. The three factors include relative gray value, the decay rate and range of artifacts.

  19. PBFA II lithium beam characterization from inner-shell x-ray images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moats, A.R.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.; Dukart, R.J.; Haill, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA II) is not driving targets with ICF-relevant lithium ion beams. During the most recent lithium beam target series, time-integrated x-ray pinhole cameras viewed the ion-induced inner-shell x-ray fluorescence from the central gold cone target and a titanium-coated strip. Ion beam profiles at a nominal 10 mm radius and fixed azimuthal direction were obtained from images of the Ti K α , fluorescence of a Ti-coated Al diagnostic wire. The gold cone gave us beam profiles at a nominal 3 mm radius and at all azimuthal angles from the Au L α fluorescence. From these profiles, we obtained the ion beam vertical focus position, full-width-at-half-maximum, and the degree of azimuthal uniformity for the lithium target shots. For these initial results, beam steering problems were evident. Azimuthal uniformity was measured from the ion beam footprint on the outer Au case (predominantly Au L α ) of the hohlraum target and were found to be in the same range (up to 30%) as for previous proton beam target series. We then present plans for Li beam diagnostics for an upcoming target experimental series

  20. Dose calculation based on Cone Beam CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot Thing, Rune

    in the pursuit of personalised adaptive radiotherapy. The main limiting factor in the extended use of CBCT imaging for personalised radiotherapy is the relatively poor CBCT image quality. The limited image quality of CBCT images is mainly caused by contamination from scattered radiation. There are, however......, several other factors contributing to the image quality degradation, and while one should, theoretically, be able to obtain CT-like image quality from CBCT scans, clinical image quality is often very far from this ideal realisation. The present thesis describes the investigation of potential image quality...... simulations to be performed prior to CBCT acquisition, and through optimisations of the simulation efficiency, simulations were performed in a time frame which allows a full clinical implementation of the method. In addition to the scatter estimation model, corrections for additional artefacts arising from...

  1. Development of an image intensifier-TV digital imaging system with a multiple-slit scanning x-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kume, Y.; Doi, K.

    1986-01-01

    The authors are developing a new digital x-ray imaging system employing a multiple-slit assembly (MSA) and an image intensifier (II)-TV digital system. The final image consisting of primary radiation is digitally reconstructed from multiple slit images obtained with the MSA. This system can significantly reduce the scattered radiation from an object and the veiling glare from II-TV system. The quality of the reconstructed image is related to many parameters, such as slit width, the number of image frames, and the image reconstruction algorithm. They present the effect of these various parameters on basic imaging properties and the practicability of the method in comparison with conventional wide beam imaging

  2. Application of cone beam computed tomography in facial imaging science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fourie, Zacharias; Damstra, Janalt; Ren, Yijin

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) methods for facial imaging has increased significantly over the past years. Traditional 2D imaging has gradually being replaced by 3D images in different disciplines, particularly in the fields of orthodontics, maxillofacial surgery, plastic and reconstructive

  3. New method of contour image processing based on the formalism of spiral light beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volostnikov, Vladimir G; Kishkin, S A; Kotova, S P

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of applying the mathematical formalism of spiral light beams to the problems of contour image recognition is theoretically studied. The advantages and disadvantages of the proposed approach are evaluated; the results of numerical modelling are presented. (optical image processing)

  4. Clinical introduction of image lag correction for a cone beam CT system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stankovic, Uros; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Image lag in the flat-panel detector used for Linac integrated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has a degrading effect on CBCT image quality. The most prominent visible artifact is the presence of bright semicircular structure in the transverse view of the scans, known also as radar artifact.

  5. Beam-hardening correction in CT based on basis image and TV model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qingliang; Yan Bin; Li Lei; Sun Hongsheng; Zhang Feng

    2012-01-01

    In X-ray computed tomography, the beam hardening leads to artifacts and reduces the image quality. It analyzes how beam hardening influences on original projection. According, it puts forward a kind of new beam-hardening correction method based on the basis images and TV model. Firstly, according to physical characteristics of the beam hardening an preliminary correction model with adjustable parameters is set up. Secondly, using different parameters, original projections are operated by the correction model. Thirdly, the projections are reconstructed to obtain a series of basis images. Finally, the linear combination of basis images is the final reconstruction image. Here, with total variation for the final reconstruction image as the cost function, the linear combination coefficients for the basis images are determined according to iterative method. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, the experiments are carried out on real phantom and industrial part. The results show that the algorithm significantly inhibits cup and strip artifacts in CT image. (authors)

  6. Chemical Reactions of Molecules Promoted and Simultaneously Imaged by the Electron Beam in Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowron, Stephen T; Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Besley, Elena; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2017-08-15

    The main objective of this Account is to assess the challenges of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of molecules, based on over 15 years of our work in this field, and to outline the opportunities in studying chemical reactions under the electron beam (e-beam). During TEM imaging of an individual molecule adsorbed on an atomically thin substrate, such as graphene or a carbon nanotube, the e-beam transfers kinetic energy to atoms of the molecule, displacing them from equilibrium positions. Impact of the e-beam triggers bond dissociation and various chemical reactions which can be imaged concurrently with their activation by the e-beam and can be presented as stop-frame movies. This experimental approach, which we term ChemTEM, harnesses energy transferred from the e-beam to the molecule via direct interactions with the atomic nuclei, enabling accurate predictions of bond dissociation events and control of the type and rate of chemical reactions. Elemental composition and structure of the reactant molecules as well as the operating conditions of TEM (particularly the energy of the e-beam) determine the product formed in ChemTEM processes, while the e-beam dose rate controls the reaction rate. Because the e-beam of TEM acts simultaneously as a source of energy for the reaction and as an imaging tool monitoring the same reaction, ChemTEM reveals atomic-level chemical information, such as pathways of reactions imaged for individual molecules, step-by-step and in real time; structures of illusive reaction intermediates; and direct comparison of catalytic activity of different transition metals filmed with atomic resolution. Chemical transformations in ChemTEM often lead to previously unforeseen products, demonstrating the potential of this method to become not only an analytical tool for studying reactions, but also a powerful instrument for discovery of materials that can be synthesized on preparative scale.

  7. A novel image-domain-based cone-beam computed tomography enhancement algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiang; Li Tianfang; Yang Yong; Heron, Dwight E; Huq, M Saiful, E-mail: lix@upmc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 (United States)

    2011-05-07

    Kilo-voltage (kV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) plays an important role in image-guided radiotherapy. However, due to a large cone-beam angle, scatter effects significantly degrade the CBCT image quality and limit its clinical application. The goal of this study is to develop an image enhancement algorithm to reduce the low-frequency CBCT image artifacts, which are also called the bias field. The proposed algorithm is based on the hypothesis that image intensities of different types of materials in CBCT images are approximately globally uniform (in other words, a piecewise property). A maximum a posteriori probability framework was developed to estimate the bias field contribution from a given CBCT image. The performance of the proposed CBCT image enhancement method was tested using phantoms and clinical CBCT images. Compared to the original CBCT images, the corrected images using the proposed method achieved a more uniform intensity distribution within each tissue type and significantly reduced cupping and shading artifacts. In a head and a pelvic case, the proposed method reduced the Hounsfield unit (HU) errors within the region of interest from 300 HU to less than 60 HU. In a chest case, the HU errors were reduced from 460 HU to less than 110 HU. The proposed CBCT image enhancement algorithm demonstrated a promising result by the reduction of the scatter-induced low-frequency image artifacts commonly encountered in kV CBCT imaging.

  8. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Campus,UK (United Kingdom); Connolley, Thomas [Diamond Light Source, I12 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dolbnya, Igor P.; Malandain, Andrew; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, B16 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grant, Patrick S.; Liotti, Enzo; Lui, Andrew [Department of Materials, University of Oxford Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.

  9. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Matthew D.; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C.; Connolley, Thomas; Dolbnya, Igor P.; Malandain, Andrew; Sawhney, Kawal; Grant, Patrick S.; Liotti, Enzo; Lui, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm"2 with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm"2. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.

  10. A digital fluoroscopic imaging system for verification during external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Michikatsu

    1990-01-01

    A digital fluoroscopic (DF) imaging system has been constructed to obtain portal images for verification during external beam radiotherapy. The imaging device consists of a fluorescent screen viewed by a highly sensitive video camera through a mirror. The video signal is digitized and processed by an image processor which is linked on-line with a host microcomputer. The image quality of the DF system was compared with that of film for portal images of the Burger phantom and the Alderson anthropomorphic phantom using 10 MV X-rays. Contrast resolution of the DF image integrated for 8.5 sec. was superior to the film resolution, while spatial resolution was slightly inferior. The DF image of the Alderson phantom processed by the adaptive histogram equalization was better in showing anatomical landmarks than the film portal image. The DF image integrated for 1 sec. which is used for movie mode can show patient movement during treatment. (author)

  11. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-12-01

    The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as would be enabled by real

  12. Telerobotic system concept for real-time soft-tissue imaging during radiotherapy beam delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlosser, Jeffrey; Salisbury, Kenneth; Hristov, Dimitre

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The curative potential of external beam radiation therapy is critically dependent on having the ability to accurately aim radiation beams at intended targets while avoiding surrounding healthy tissues. However, existing technologies are incapable of real-time, volumetric, soft-tissue imaging during radiation beam delivery, when accurate target tracking is most critical. The authors address this challenge in the development and evaluation of a novel, minimally interfering, telerobotic ultrasound (U.S.) imaging system that can be integrated with existing medical linear accelerators (LINACs) for therapy guidance. Methods: A customized human-safe robotic manipulator was designed and built to control the pressure and pitch of an abdominal U.S. transducer while avoiding LINAC gantry collisions. A haptic device was integrated to remotely control the robotic manipulator motion and U.S. image acquisition outside the LINAC room. The ability of the system to continuously maintain high quality prostate images was evaluated in volunteers over extended time periods. Treatment feasibility was assessed by comparing a clinically deployed prostate treatment plan to an alternative plan in which beam directions were restricted to sectors that did not interfere with the transabdominal U.S. transducer. To demonstrate imaging capability concurrent with delivery, robot performance and U.S. target tracking in a phantom were tested with a 15 MV radiation beam active. Results: Remote image acquisition and maintenance of image quality with the haptic interface was successfully demonstrated over 10 min periods in representative treatment setups of volunteers. Furthermore, the robot's ability to maintain a constant probe force and desired pitch angle was unaffected by the LINAC beam. For a representative prostate patient, the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for a plan with restricted sectors remained virtually identical to the DVH of a clinically deployed plan. With reduced margins, as

  13. Iterative image-domain ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaokun; Zhang, Zhicheng; Niu, Tianye; Yu, Shaode; Wu, Shibin; Li, Zhicheng; Zhang, Huailing; Xie, Yaoqin

    2017-07-01

    Ring artifacts in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are caused by pixel gain variations using flat-panel detectors, and may lead to structured non-uniformities and deterioration of image quality. The purpose of this study is to propose a method of general ring artifact removal in CBCT images. This method is based on the polar coordinate system, where the ring artifacts manifest as stripe artifacts. Using relative total variation, the CBCT images are first smoothed to generate template images with fewer image details and ring artifacts. By subtracting the template images from the CBCT images, residual images with image details and ring artifacts are generated. As the ring artifact manifests as a stripe artifact in a polar coordinate system, the artifact image can be extracted by mean value from the residual image; the image details are generated by subtracting the artifact image from the residual image. Finally, the image details are compensated to the template image to generate the corrected images. The proposed framework is iterated until the differences in the extracted ring artifacts are minimized. We use a 3D Shepp-Logan phantom, Catphan©504 phantom, uniform acrylic cylinder, and images from a head patient to evaluate the proposed method. In the experiments using simulated data, the spatial uniformity is increased by 1.68 times and the structural similarity index is increased from 87.12% to 95.50% using the proposed method. In the experiment using clinical data, our method shows high efficiency in ring artifact removal while preserving the image structure and detail. The iterative approach we propose for ring artifact removal in cone-beam CT is practical and attractive for CBCT guided radiation therapy.

  14. Response analysis for an approximate 3-D image reconstruction in cone-beam SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hideo; Nohara, Norimasa

    1991-01-01

    Cone-beam single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers the potential for a large increase in sensitivity as compared with parallel hole or fan-beam collimation. Three-dimensional image reconstruction was approximately accomplished by backprojecting filtered projections using a two-dimensional fan-beam algorithm. The cone-beam projection data were formed from mathematical phantoms as analytically derived line integrals of the density. In order to reduce the processing time, the filtered projections were backprojected into each plane parallel to the circle on which the focal point moved. Discrepancy of source position and degradation of resolution were investigated by computer simulation in three-dimensional image space. The results obtained suggest that, the nearer to the central plane or the axis of rotation, the less image degradation is performed. By introducing a parameter of angular difference between the focal point and a fixed point in the image space during rotation, degradation of the reconstructed image can be estimated for any cone-beam SPECT system. (author)

  15. Conical refraction and formation of multiring focal image with Laguerre-Gauss light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Viktor

    2011-08-01

    For a light beam focused through a biaxial crystal along one of its optical axes, the effect of internal conical refraction in the crystal leads to the formation in the focal image plane of two bright rings separated by a dark ring. It is shown that, with circularly polarized Laguerre-Gauss LG(0)(ℓ) beams entering the crystal, this classical double-ring pattern is transformed into a multiring one consisting of ℓ+2 bright rings. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  16. A service for monitoring the quality of intraoperative cone beam CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heckel Frank

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, operating rooms (ORs have transformed into integrated operating rooms, where devices are able to communicate, exchange data, or even steer and control each other. However, image data processing is commonly done by dedicated workstations for specific clinical use-cases. In this paper, we propose a concept for a dynamic service component for image data processing on the example of automatic image quality assessment (AQUA of intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images. The service is build using the Open Surgical Communication Protocol (OSCP and the standard for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM. We have validated the proposed concept in an integrated demonstrator OR.

  17. Time-gated ballistic imaging using a large aperture switching beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Florian; Reddemann, Manuel A; Palmer, Johannes; Kneer, Reinhold

    2014-03-24

    Ballistic imaging commonly denotes the formation of line-of-sight shadowgraphs through turbid media by suppression of multiply scattered photons. The technique relies on a femtosecond laser acting as light source for the images and as switch for an optical Kerr gate that separates ballistic photons from multiply scattered ones. The achievable image resolution is one major limitation for the investigation of small objects. In this study, practical influences on the optical Kerr gate and image quality are discussed theoretically and experimentally applying a switching beam with large aperture (D = 19 mm). It is shown how switching pulse energy and synchronization of switching and imaging pulse in the Kerr cell influence the gate's transmission. Image quality of ballistic imaging and standard shadowgraphy is evaluated and compared, showing that the present ballistic imaging setup is advantageous for optical densities in the range of 8 ballistic imaging setup into a schlieren-type system with an optical schlieren edge.

  18. Color correction of projected image on color-screen for mobile beam-projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang-Hwan; Sung, Soo-Jin; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2008-01-01

    With the current trend of digital convergence in mobile phones, mobile manufacturers are researching how to develop a mobile beam-projector to cope with the limitations of a small screen size and to offer a better feeling of movement while watching movies or satellite broadcasting. However, mobile beam-projectors may project an image on arbitrary surfaces, such as a colored wall and paper, not on a white screen mainly used in an office environment. Thus, color correction method for the projected image is proposed to achieve good image quality irrespective of the surface colors. Initially, luminance values of original image transformed into the YCbCr space are changed to compensate for spatially nonuniform luminance distribution of arbitrary surface, depending on the pixel values of surface image captured by mobile camera. Next, the chromaticity values for each surface and white-screen image are calculated using the ratio of the sum of three RGB values to one another. Then their chromaticity ratios are multiplied by converted original image through an inverse YCbCr matrix to reduce an influence of modulating the appearance of projected image due to spatially different reflectance on the surface. By projecting corrected original image on a texture pattern or single color surface, the image quality of projected image can be improved more, as well as that of projected image on white screen.

  19. T2-weighted endorectal magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Cunha, Rui M.G.; Hsu, I-Chow; Kornak, John; Zhao, Shoujun; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the accuracy of T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy and to investigate the relationship between imaging accuracy and time since therapy. Materials and Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained and the study was HIPPA compliant. We identified 59 patients who underwent 1.5 Tesla endorectal MR imaging of the prostate between 1999 and 2006 after definitive external beam radiation therapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Two readers recorded the presence or absence of tumor on T2-weighted images. Logistic regression and Fisher's exact tests for 2x2 tables were used to determine the accuracy of imaging and investigate if accuracy differed between those imaged within 3 years of therapy (n = 25) and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (n = 34). Transrectal biopsy was used as the standard of reference for the presence or absence of recurrent cancer. Results: Thirty-four of 59 patients (58%) had recurrent prostate cancer detected on biopsy. The overall accuracy of T2-weighted MR imaging in the detection cancer after external beam radiation therapy was 63% (37/59) for reader 1 and 71% for reader 2 (42/59). For both readers, logistic regression showed no difference in accuracy between those imaged within 3 years of therapy and those imaged more than 3 years after therapy (p = 0.86 for reader 1 and 0.44 for reader 2). Conclusion: T2-weighted endorectal MR imaging has low accuracy in the detection of prostate cancer after external beam radiation therapy, irrespective of the time since therapy. (author)

  20. Neutron beam applications - A development of real-time imaging processing for neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Whoi Yul; Lee, Sang Yup; Choi, Min Seok; Hwang, Sun Kyu; Han, Il Ho; Jang, Jae Young [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-08-01

    This research is sponsored and supported by KAERI as a part of {sup A}pplication of Neutron Radiography Beam.{sup M}ain theme of the research is to develop a non-destructive inspection system for the task of studying the real-time behaviour of dynamic motion using neutron beam with the aid of a special purpose real-time image processing system that allows to capture an image of internal structure of a specimen. Currently, most off-the-shelf image processing programs designed for visible light or X-ray are not adequate for the applications that require neutron beam generated by the experimental nuclear reactor. In addition, study of dynamic motion of a specimen is severely constrained by such image processing systems. In this research, a special image processing system suited for such application is developed which not only supplements the commercial image processing system but allows to use neutron beam directly in the system for the study. 18 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  1. Optical image security using Stokes polarimetry of spatially variant polarized beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Areeba; Nishchal, Naveen K.

    2018-06-01

    We propose a novel security scheme that uses vector beam characterized by the spatially variant polarization distribution. A vector beam is so generated that its helical components carry tailored phases corresponding to the image/images that is/are to be encrypted. The tailoring of phase has been done by employing the modified Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm for phase retrieval. Stokes parameters for the final vector beam is evaluated and is used to construct the ciphertext and one of the keys. The advantage of the proposed scheme is that it generates real ciphertext and keys which are easier to transmit and store than complex quantities. Moreover, the known plaintext attack is not applicable to this system. As a proof-of-concept, simulation results have been presented for securing single and double gray-scale images.

  2. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  3. Characterization of beam dynamics in the APS injector rings using time-resolved imaging techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, B.X.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Borland, M.

    1997-01-01

    Images taken with streak cameras and gated intensified cameras with both time (longitudinal) and spatial (transverse) resolution reveal a wealth of information about circular accelerators. The authors illustrate a novel technique by a sequence of dual-sweep streak camera images taken at a high dispersion location in the booster synchrotron, where the horizontal coordinate is strongly correlated with the particle energy and the open-quotes top-viewclose quotes of the beam gives a good approximation to the particle density distribution in the longitudinal phase space. A sequence of top-view images taken fight after injection clearly shows the beam dynamics in the phase space. We report another example from the positron accumulator ring for the characterization of its beam compression bunching with the 12th harmonic rf

  4. Region-of-interest imaging in cone beam computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    Imaging a sectional region within an object with a detector just big enough to cover the sectional region-of-interest is analyzed. We show that with some suitable choice of scanning configuration and with an innovative method of data combination, all the Radon data can be obtained accurately. The algorithm is mathematically exact, and requires no iterations and no additional measurements. The method can be applied to inspect portions of large industrial objects in industrial imaging, as well as to image portions of human bodies in medical diagnosis

  5. Investigation of bulk electron densities for dose calculations on cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.; Parker, J.; Gupta, S.; Hatton, J.; Tang, C.; Capp, A.; Denham, J.W.; Wright, P.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: If cone-beam CT images are to be used for dose calculations, then the images must be able to provide accurate electron density information. Twelve patients underwent twice weekly cone-beam CT scans in addition to the planning CT scan. A standardised 5-field treatment plan was applied to 169 of the CBCT images. Doses were calculated using the original electron density values in the CBCT and with bulk electron densities applied. Bone was assigned a density of 288 HU, and all other tissue was assigned to be water equivalent (0 HU). The doses were compared to the dose calculated on the original planning CT image. Using the original HU values in the cone-beam images, the average dose del i vered by the plans from all 12 patients was I. I % lower than the intended 200 cOy delivered on the original CT plans (standard devia tion 0.7%, maximum difference -2.93%). When bulk electron densities were applied to the cone-beam images, the average dose was 0.3% lower than the original CT plans (standard deviation 0.8%, maximum difference -2.22%). Compared to using the original HU values, applying bulk electron densities to the CBCT images improved the dose calculations by almost I %. Some variation due to natural changes in anatomy should be expected. The application of bulk elec tron densities to cone beam CT images has the potential to improve the accuracy of dose calculations due to inaccurate H U values. Acknowledgements This work was partially funded by Cancer Council NSW Grant Number RG 07-06.

  6. Improved image quality for asymmetric double-focal cone-beam SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Z.J.; Tsui, B.M.W.

    1993-01-01

    To optimize both spatial resolution and detection efficiency in brain SPECT imaging using a rectangular camera, an asymmetric double-focal cone-beam collimator is proposed with the focal points located near the base plane of the patient's head. To fit the entire head into the field-of-view of the collimator with dimensions of 50cmx40cm and at a radius-of-rotation of 15 cm, the focal lengths of the collimator are 55 and 70 cm, respectively, in the transverse and axial directions. With this geometry, the artifacts in the reconstructed image produced by the Feldkamp algorithm are more severe compared to those in a symmetric cone-beam geometry, due to the larger vertex angle between the top of the head and the base plane. To improve the reconstructed image quality, a fully three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction algorithm developed previously for single-focal cone-beam SPECT was extended to the asymmetric double-focal cone-beam geometry. The algorithm involves nonstationary 2D filtering and a reprojection technique for estimation of the missing data caused by a single-orbit cone-beam geometry. The results from simulation studies with the 3D Defrise slab phantom demonstrated that the fully 3D algorithm provided a much improved image quality in terms of reduced slice-to-slice cross talks and shape elongation compared to that produced by the conventional Feldkamp algorithm

  7. Studies of scintillator response to 60 MeV protons in a proton beam imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rydygier Marzena

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A Proton Beam Imaging System (ProBImS is under development at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN. The ProBImS will be used to optimize beam delivery at IFJ PAN proton therapy facilities, delivering two-dimensional distributions of beam profiles. The system consists of a scintillator, optical tract and a sensitive CCD camera which digitally records the light emitted from the proton-irradiated scintillator. The optical system, imaging data transfer and control software have already been developed. Here, we report preliminary results of an evaluation of the DuPont Hi-speed thick back screen EJ 000128 scintillator to determine its applicability in our imaging system. In order to optimize the light conversion with respect to the dose locally deposited by the proton beam in the scintillation detector, we have studied the response of the DuPont scintillator in terms of linearity of dose response, uniformity of light emission and decay rate of background light after deposition of a high dose in the scintillator. We found a linear dependence of scintillator light output vs. beam intensity by showing the intensity of the recorded images to be proportional to the dose deposited in the scintillator volume.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography image guidance system for a dedicated intracranial radiosurgery treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschin, Mark; Komljenovic, Philip T; Ansell, Steve; Ménard, Cynthia; Bootsma, Gregory; Cho, Young-Bin; Chung, Caroline; Jaffray, David

    2013-01-01

    Image guidance has improved the precision of fractionated radiation treatment delivery on linear accelerators. Precise radiation delivery is particularly critical when high doses are delivered to complex shapes with steep dose gradients near critical structures, as is the case for intracranial radiosurgery. To reduce potential geometric uncertainties, a cone beam computed tomography (CT) image guidance system was developed in-house to generate high-resolution images of the head at the time of treatment, using a dedicated radiosurgery unit. The performance and initial clinical use of this imaging system are described. A kilovoltage cone beam CT system was integrated with a Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion radiosurgery unit. The X-ray tube and flat-panel detector are mounted on a translational arm, which is parked above the treatment unit when not in use. Upon descent, a rotational axis provides 210° of rotation for cone beam CT scans. Mechanical integrity of the system was evaluated over a 6-month period. Subsequent clinical commissioning included end-to-end testing of targeting performance and subjective image quality performance in phantoms. The system has been used to image 2 patients, 1 of whom received single-fraction radiosurgery and 1 who received 3 fractions, using a relocatable head frame. Images of phantoms demonstrated soft tissue contrast visibility and submillimeter spatial resolution. A contrast difference of 35 HU was easily detected at a calibration dose of 1.2 cGy (center of head phantom). The shape of the mechanical flex vs scan angle was highly reproducible and exhibited cone beam CT image guidance system was successfully adapted to a radiosurgery unit. The system is capable of producing high-resolution images of bone and soft tissue. The system is in clinical use and provides excellent image guidance without invasive frames. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative low-energy ion beam characterization by beam profiling and imaging via scintillation screens.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Germer, S.; Pietag, F.; Polák, Jaroslav; Arnold, T.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 11 (2016), č. článku 113301. ISSN 0034-6748. [Topical Conference on High-Temperature Plasma Diagnostics/21./. Madison, 05.06.2016-09.06.2016] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Current density * Etching * Faraday cups * Ion beam source s * Cameras Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 2.11 Other engineering and technologies Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2016 http://aip.scitation.org/doi/full/10.1063/1.4964701

  10. The rapid secondary electron imaging system of the proton beam writer at CIBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udalagama, C.N.B.; Bettiol, A.A.; Kan, J.A. van; Teo, E.J.; Watt, F.

    2007-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed a proliferation of research involving proton beam (p-beam) writing. This has prompted investigations into means of optimizing the process of p-beam writing so as to make it less time consuming and more efficient. One such avenue is the improvement of the pre-writing preparatory procedures that involves beam focusing and sample alignment which is centred on acquiring images of a resolution standard or sample. The conventional mode of imaging used up to now has utilized conventional nuclear microprobe signals that are of a pulsed nature and are inherently slow. In this work, we report the new imaging system that has been introduced, which uses proton induced secondary electrons. This in conjunction with software developed in-house that uses a National Instruments DAQ card with hardware triggering, facilitates large data transfer rates enabling rapid imaging. Frame rates as much as 10 frames/s have been achieved at an imaging resolution of 512 x 512 pixels

  11. Moisture imaging of a camphor tree by neutron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Tomoko M.; Karakama, Isamu; Sakura, Tsuguo; Matsubayashi, Masashi

    1998-01-01

    Moisture distribution of a camphor tree was presented. A 23 year old camphor tree was downed at university forest and a wood disk, about 1 cm in width, was lumbered out from the breast height of the tree. The wood disk as well as a newly developing branch of the tree were irradiated with thermal neutrons at an atomic reactor installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The total flux of thermal neutron was 3.0 x 10 9 n/cm 2 . Water specific images of the disk and a branch were presented with high resolution, which was estimated to be about 16 μm. In the case of wood disk, moisture decreasing manner while drying was also shown through neutron image. Neutron images showed that the moisture decreasing rate in sapwood was similar to that of heartwood. (author)

  12. Dedicated mobile volumetric cone-beam computed tomography for human brain imaging: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Jeong, Chang-Won; Jun, Hong-Young; Heo, Dong-Woon; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2015-01-01

    Mobile computed tomography (CT) with a cone-beam source is increasingly used in the clinical field. Mobile cone-beam CT (CBCT) has great merits; however, its clinical utility for brain imaging has been limited due to problems including scan time and image quality. The aim of this study was to develop a dedicated mobile volumetric CBCT for obtaining brain images, and to optimize the imaging protocol using a brain phantom. The mobile volumetric CBCT system was evaluated with regards to scan time and image quality, measured as signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR), spatial resolution (10% MTF), and effective dose. Brain images were obtained using a CT phantom. The CT scan took 5.14 s at 360 projection views. SNR and CNR were 5.67 and 14.5 at 120 kV/10 mA. SNR and CNR values showed slight improvement as the x-ray voltage and current increased (p < 0.001). Effective dose and 10% MTF were 0.92 mSv and 360 μ m at 120 kV/10 mA. Various intracranial structures were clearly visible in the brain phantom images. Using this CBCT under optimal imaging acquisition conditions, it is possible to obtain human brain images with low radiation dose, reproducible image quality, and fast scan time.

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    imaging in small- animal on-Medical Physics, Vol. 34, No. 12, December 2007cology models,” Mol. Imag. 3, 55–62 2004. 8E. B. Walters, K. Panda , J. A...publication 8 October 2007; published 28 November 2007 Cone-beam microcomputed tomography microCT is one of the most popular choices for small animal ...imaging which is becoming an important tool for studying animal models with transplanted diseases. Region-of-interest ROI imaging techniques in CT, which

  14. History of imaging in orthodontics from Broadbent to cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Mark G; Palomo, J Martin; Valiathan, Manish

    2015-12-01

    The history of imaging and orthodontics is a story of technology informing biology. Advances in imaging changed our thinking as our understanding of craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment deepened. This article traces the history of imaging in orthodontics from the invention of the cephalometer by B. Holly Broadbent in 1930 to the introduction of low-cost, low-radiation-dose cone-beam computed tomography imaging in 2015. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    The ability to deliver conformal dose distributions in radiation therapy through intensity modulation and the potential for tumor dose escalation to improve treatment outcome has necessitated an increase in localization accuracy of inter- and intra-fractional patient geometry. Megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging using the treatment beam and onboard electronic portal imaging device is one option currently being studied for implementation in image-guided radiation therapy. However, routine clinical use is predicated upon continued improvements in image quality and patient dose delivered during acquisition. The formal statement of hypothesis for this investigation was that the conformity of planned to delivered dose distributions in image-guided radiation therapy could be further enhanced through the application of kilovoltage scatter correction and intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging, and that normalized dose measurements could be acquired and inter-compared between multiple imaging geometries. The specific aims of this investigation were to: (1) incorporate the Feldkamp, Davis and Kress filtered backprojection algorithm into a program to reconstruct a voxelized linear attenuation coefficient dataset from a set of acquired megavoltage cone-beam CT projections, (2) characterize the effects on megavoltage cone-beam CT image quality resulting from the application of Intermediate View Interpolation and Intermediate View Reprojection techniques to limited-projection datasets, (3) incorporate the Scatter and Primary Estimation from Collimator Shadows (SPECS) algorithm into megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction and determine the set of SPECS parameters which maximize image quality and quantitative accuracy, and (4) evaluate the normalized axial dose distributions received during megavoltage cone-beam CT image acquisition using radiochromic film and thermoluminescent dosimeter measurements in anthropomorphic pelvic and head and

  16. Image acquisition and analysis for beam diagnostics, applications of the Taiwan photon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, C.Y.; Chen, J.; Cheng, Y.S.; Hsu, K.T.; Hu, K.H.; Kuo, C.H.; Wu, C.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Design and implementation of image acquisition and analysis is in proceeding for the Taiwan Photon Source (TPS) diagnostic applications. The optical system contains screen, lens, and lighting system. A CCD camera with Gigabit Ethernet interface (GigE Vision) will be a standard image acquisition device. Image acquisition will be done on EPICS IOC via PV channel and analysis the properties by using Matlab tool to evaluate the beam profile (sigma), beam size position and tilt angle et al. The EPICS IOC integrated with Matlab as a data processing system is not only could be used in image analysis but also in many types of equipment data processing applications. Progress of the project will be summarized in this report. (authors)

  17. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joshua; Zhang, Tiezhi; Lu, Weiguo

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source–dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10–15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source–dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented. (paper)

  18. Dual source and dual detector arrays tetrahedron beam computed tomography for image guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joshua; Lu, Weiguo; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2014-02-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an important online imaging modality for image guided radiotherapy. But suboptimal image quality and the lack of a real-time stereoscopic imaging function limit its implementation in advanced treatment techniques, such as online adaptive and 4D radiotherapy. Tetrahedron beam computed tomography (TBCT) is a novel online imaging modality designed to improve on the image quality provided by CBCT. TBCT geometry is flexible, and multiple detector and source arrays can be used for different applications. In this paper, we describe a novel dual source-dual detector TBCT system that is specially designed for LINAC radiation treatment machines. The imaging system is positioned in-line with the MV beam and is composed of two linear array x-ray sources mounted aside the electrical portal imaging device and two linear arrays of x-ray detectors mounted below the machine head. The detector and x-ray source arrays are orthogonal to each other, and each pair of source and detector arrays forms a tetrahedral volume. Four planer images can be obtained from different view angles at each gantry position at a frame rate as high as 20 frames per second. The overlapped regions provide a stereoscopic field of view of approximately 10-15 cm. With a half gantry rotation, a volumetric CT image can be reconstructed having a 45 cm field of view. Due to the scatter rejecting design of the TBCT geometry, the system can potentially produce high quality 2D and 3D images with less radiation exposure. The design of the dual source-dual detector system is described, and preliminary results of studies performed on numerical phantoms and simulated patient data are presented.

  19. Beam alignment based on two-dimensional power spectral density of a near-field image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenzhen; Yuan, Qiang; Zeng, Fa; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Junpu; Li, Kehong; Zhang, Xiaolu; Xue, Qiao; Yang, Ying; Dai, Wanjun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yuanchen; Zheng, Kuixing; Su, Jingqin; Hu, Dongxia; Zhu, Qihua

    2017-10-30

    Beam alignment is crucial to high-power laser facilities and is used to adjust the laser beams quickly and accurately to meet stringent requirements of pointing and centering. In this paper, a novel alignment method is presented, which employs data processing of the two-dimensional power spectral density (2D-PSD) for a near-field image and resolves the beam pointing error relative to the spatial filter pinhole directly. Combining this with a near-field fiducial mark, the operation of beam alignment is achieved. It is experimentally demonstrated that this scheme realizes a far-field alignment precision of approximately 3% of the pinhole size. This scheme adopts only one near-field camera to construct the alignment system, which provides a simple, efficient, and low-cost way to align lasers.

  20. Novel imaging and quality assurance techniques for ion beam therapy a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Jäkel, O; Mairani, A; Parodi, K

    2010-01-01

    Ion beams exhibit a finite and well defined range in matter together with an “inverted” depth-dose profile, the so-called Bragg peak. These favourable physical properties may enable superior tumour-dose conformality for high precision radiation therapy. On the other hand, they introduce the issue of sensitivity to range uncertainties in ion beam therapy. Although these uncertainties are typically taken into account when planning the treatment, correct delivery of the intended ion beam range has to be assured to prevent undesired underdosage of the tumour or overdosage of critical structures outside the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to define dedicated Quality Assurance procedures to enable in-vivo range verification before or during therapeutic irradiation. For these purposes, Monte Carlo transport codes are very useful tools to support the development of novel imaging modalities for ion beam therapy. In the present work, we present calculations performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and pr...

  1. Portal imaging improvement with a low energy un flattened beam in high energy medical accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutman, Y; Faermann, S; Tsechanski, A [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel)

    1996-12-01

    In this work we present a further improvement of the portal film option, for a Clinac 18 accelerator with a 10 MV therapeutic x-ray beam. This is done by lowering the nominal photon energy to 4 MV, therefore increasing the relative contribution of the low energy portion of the x-ray spectrum. Improvement of the image quality is demonstrated with a portal film scale tray, and with an anthropomorphic phantom, a graphical analysis demonstrates the improvement on image (authors).

  2. Analysis of intense beam instability in a general quadrupole focusing channel with image charge effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, A., E-mail: animesh@vecc.gov.in; Sing Babu, P., E-mail: psb@vecc.gov.in; Pandit, V.S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in

    2016-02-01

    The stability properties of transverse envelopes of mismatched intense continuous charge particle beam propagating in a general quadrupole focusing channel have been investigated in the presence of image charge effect due to a cylindrical conducting pipe. Phase shifts and growth factors of the envelope oscillations in the case of instability are calculated by numerical evaluation of the eigenvalues of linearly perturbed envelope equations for small deviations from the matched beam conditions. A detailed study on the region of instability and its dependence on the system parameters like occupancy of the quadrupole focusing field, syncopation factor, zero current phase advance, beam intensity etc. have been carried out. It has been found that the strength and regions of envelope instability due to the lattice and confluent resonances in the parametric space are affected by the presence of image charge.

  3. Motion tolerant iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Goto, Taiga; Hirokawa, Koichi; Miyazaki, Osamu [Hitachi Medical Corporation, Chiba-ken (Japan). CT System Div.

    2011-07-01

    We have developed a new advanced iterative reconstruction algorithm for cone-beam helical CT. The features of this algorithm are: (a) it uses separable paraboloidal surrogate (SPS) technique as a foundation for reconstruction to reduce noise and cone-beam artifact, (b) it uses a view weight in the back-projection process to reduce motion artifact. To confirm the improvement of our proposed algorithm over other existing algorithm, such as Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) or SPS algorithm, we compared the motion artifact reduction, image noise reduction (standard deviation of CT number), and cone-beam artifact reduction on simulated and clinical data set. Our results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm dramatically reduces motion artifacts compared with the SPS algorithm, and decreases image noise compared with the FDK algorithm. In addition, the proposed algorithm potentially improves time resolution of iterative reconstruction. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping; Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-01-01

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging

  5. In-beam PET imaging for on-line adaptive proton therapy: an initial phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yiping; Sun, Xishan; Lou, Kai; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Mirkovic, Dragon; Poenisch, Falk; Grosshans, David

    2014-07-01

    We developed and investigated a positron emission tomography (PET) system for use with on-line (both in-beam and intra-fraction) image-guided adaptive proton therapy applications. The PET has dual rotating depth-of-interaction measurable detector panels by using solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays and LYSO scintillators. It has a 44 mm diameter trans-axial and 30 mm axial field-of-view (FOV). A 38 mm diameter polymethyl methacrylate phantom was placed inside the FOV. Both PET and phantom axes were aligned with a collimated 179.2 MeV beam. Each beam delivered ˜50 spills (0.5 s spill and 1.5 s inter-spill time, 3.8 Gy at Bragg peak). Data from each beam were acquired with detectors at a given angle. Nine datasets for nine beams with detectors at nine different angles over 180° were acquired for full-tomographic imaging. Each dataset included data both during and 5 min after irradiations. The positron activity-range was measured from the PET image reconstructed from all nine datasets and compared to the results from simulated images. A 22Na disc-source was also imaged after each beam to monitor the PET system's performance. PET performed well except for slight shifts of energy photo-peak positions (<1%) after each beam, due mainly to the neutron exposure of SSPM that increased the dark-count noise. This minor effect was corrected offline with a shifting 350-650 keV energy window for each dataset. The results show a fast converging of activity-ranges measured by the prototype PET with high sensitivity and uniform resolution. Sub-mm activity-ranges were achieved with minimal 6 s acquisition time and three spill irradiations. These results indicate the feasibility of PET for intra-fraction beam-range verification. Further studies are needed to develop and apply a novel clinical PET system for on-line image-guided adaptive proton therapy.

  6. The AMS-02 RICH Imager Prototype - In-Beam Tests with 20 GeV/c per Nucleon Ions -

    CERN Document Server

    Buenerd, M.; Aguilar Benitez, M.; Arruda, L.; Barao, F.; Barrau, A.; Baret, B.; Belmont, E.; Berdugo, J.; Boudoul, G.; Borges, J.; Casadei, D.; Casaus, J.; Delgado, C.; Diaz, C.; Derome, L.; Eraud, L.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Giovacchini, F.; Goncalves, P.; Lanciotti, E.; Laurenti, G.; Malinine, A.; Mana, C.; Marin, J.; Martinez, G.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Palomares, C.; Pimenta, M.; Protasov, K.; Sanchez, E.; Seo, E-S.; Sevilla, I.; Torrento, A.; Vargas-Trevino, M.

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of the AMS Cherenkov imager (RICH) has been tested at CERN by means of a low intensity 20 GeV/c per nucleon ion beam obtained by fragmentation of a primary beam of Pb ions. Data have been collected with a single beam setting, over the range of nuclear charges 2beam conditions and using different radiators. The charge Z and velocity beta resolutions have been measured.

  7. Effect of area x-ray beam equalization on image quality and dose in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jerry; Xu Tong; Husain, Adeel; Le, Huy; Molloi, Sabee [Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2004-08-21

    In mammography, thick or dense breast regions persistently suffer from reduced contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) because of degraded contrast from large scatter intensities and relatively high noise. Area x-ray beam equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to under-penetrated regions without increasing the exposure to other breast regions. Optimal equalization parameters with respect to image quality and patient dose were determined through computer simulations and validated with experimental observations on a step phantom and an anthropomorphic breast phantom. Three parameters important in equalization digital mammography were considered: attenuator material (Z = 13-92), beam energy (22-34 kVp) and equalization level. A Mo/Mo digital mammography system was used for image acquisition. A prototype 16 x 16 piston driven equalization system was used for preparing patient-specific equalization masks. Simulation studies showed that a molybdenum attenuator and an equalization level of 20 were optimal for improving contrast, CNR and figure of merit (FOM = CNR{sup 2}/dose). Experimental measurements using these parameters showed significant improvements in contrast, CNR and FOM. Moreover, equalized images of a breast phantom showed improved image quality. These results indicate that area beam equalization can improve image quality in digital mammography.

  8. Ghost imaging and its visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Meilan; Zhu, Weiting; Zhao, Daomu

    2015-01-01

    The performances of the ghost image and the visibility with partially coherent elliptical Gaussian Schell-model beams have been studied. In that case we have derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. Furthermore, the visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source to find that the visibility reduces with the increase of the beam size, while it is a monotonic increasing function of the transverse coherence length. More specifically, it is found that the inequalities of the source sizes in x and y directions, as well as the transverse coherence lengths, play an important role in the ghost image and the visibility. - Highlights: • We studied the ghost image and visibility with partially coherent EGSM beams. • We derived the condition under which the goal ghost image is achievable. • The visibility is assessed in terms of the parameters related to the source. • The source sizes and coherence lengths play role in the ghost image and visibility.

  9. Prototype system for proton beam range measurement based on gamma electron vertex imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Rim [Neutron Utilization Technology Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111, Daedeok-daero 989beon-gil, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34057 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Hun; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Won Gyun [Heavy-ion Clinical Research Division, Korean Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Seoul 01812 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Hansang [Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 01897 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan Hyeong, E-mail: chkim@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-11

    In proton therapy, for both therapeutic effectiveness and patient safety, it is very important to accurately measure the proton dose distribution, especially the range of the proton beam. For this purpose, recently we proposed a new imaging method named gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI), in which the prompt gammas emitting from the nuclear reactions of the proton beam in the patient are converted to electrons, and then the converted electrons are tracked to determine the vertices of the prompt gammas, thereby producing a 2D image of the vertices. In the present study, we developed a prototype GEVI system, including dedicated signal processing and data acquisition systems, which consists of a beryllium plate (= electron converter) to convert the prompt gammas to electrons, two double-sided silicon strip detectors (= hodoscopes) to determine the trajectories of those converted electrons, and a plastic scintillation detector (= calorimeter) to measure their kinetic energies. The system uses triple coincidence logic and multiple energy windows to select only the events from prompt gammas. The detectors of the prototype GEVI system were evaluated for electronic noise level, energy resolution, and time resolution. Finally, the imaging capability of the GEVI system was tested by imaging a {sup 90}Sr beta source, a {sup 60}Co gamma source, and a 45-MeV proton beam in a PMMA phantom. The overall results of the present study generally show that the prototype GEVI system can image the vertices of the prompt gammas produced by the proton nuclear interactions.

  10. Phase space imaging of a beam of charged particles by frictional forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, H.

    1977-01-01

    In the case of frictional forces, defined by always acting opposite to the particle motion, Liouville's theorem does not apply. The effect of such forces on a beam of charged particles is calculated in closed form. Emphasis is given to the phase space imaging by a moderator. Conditions for an increase in phase space density are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Cone Beam Computed Tomography-Dawn of A New Imaging Modality in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Paul, Renji K; George, Merin; Anitha, J; Khanna, Bharti

    2015-01-01

    Today, we are in a world of innovations, and there are various diagnostics aids that help to take a decision regarding treatment in a well-planned way. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been a vital tool for imaging diagnostic tool in orthodontics. This article reviews case reports during orthodontic treatment and importance of CBCT during the treatment evaluation. PMID:26225116

  12. Automated Area Beam Equalization Mammography for Improved Imaging of Dense Breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molloi, Sabee

    2004-01-01

    ...) because of degraded contrast from large scatter intensities and relatively high noise. Area x-ray beam equalization can improve image quality by increasing the x-ray exposure to under-penetrated regions without increasing the exposure to other breast regions...

  13. Next Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue Specimens for Enhanced Clinical Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH- 14-1-0192 TITLE: Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer...DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Next-Generation Molecular Histology Using Highly Multiplexed Ion Beam Imaging (MIBI) of Breast Cancer Tissue

  14. Clinical introduction of image lag correction for a cone beam CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, Uros; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Herk, Marcel van

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Image lag in the flat-panel detector used for Linac integrated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has a degrading effect on CBCT image quality. The most prominent visible artifact is the presence of bright semicircular structure in the transverse view of the scans, known also as radar artifact. Several correction strategies have been proposed, but until now the clinical introduction of such corrections remains unreported. In November 2013, the authors have clinically implemented a previously proposed image lag correction on all of their machines at their main site in Amsterdam. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the effect of the correction on the quality of CBCT images and evaluate the required calibration frequency. Methods: Image lag was measured in five clinical CBCT systems (Elekta Synergy 4.6) using an in-house developed beam interrupting device that stops the x-ray beam midway through the data acquisition of an unattenuated beam for calibration. A triple exponential falling edge response was fitted to the measured data and used to correct image lag from projection images with an infinite response. This filter, including an extrapolation for saturated pixels, was incorporated in the authors’ in-house developed clinical CBCT reconstruction software. To investigate the short-term stability of the lag and associated parameters, a series of five image lag measurement over a period of three months was performed. For quantitative analysis, the authors have retrospectively selected ten patients treated in the pelvic region. The apparent contrast was quantified in polar coordinates for scans reconstructed using the parameters obtained from different dates with and without saturation handling. Results: Visually, the radar artifact was minimal in scans reconstructed using image lag correction especially when saturation handling was used. In patient imaging, there was a significant reduction of the apparent contrast from 43 ± 16.7 to

  15. Clinical introduction of image lag correction for a cone beam CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Uros; Ploeger, Lennert S; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-03-01

    Image lag in the flat-panel detector used for Linac integrated cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has a degrading effect on CBCT image quality. The most prominent visible artifact is the presence of bright semicircular structure in the transverse view of the scans, known also as radar artifact. Several correction strategies have been proposed, but until now the clinical introduction of such corrections remains unreported. In November 2013, the authors have clinically implemented a previously proposed image lag correction on all of their machines at their main site in Amsterdam. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the effect of the correction on the quality of CBCT images and evaluate the required calibration frequency. Image lag was measured in five clinical CBCT systems (Elekta Synergy 4.6) using an in-house developed beam interrupting device that stops the x-ray beam midway through the data acquisition of an unattenuated beam for calibration. A triple exponential falling edge response was fitted to the measured data and used to correct image lag from projection images with an infinite response. This filter, including an extrapolation for saturated pixels, was incorporated in the authors' in-house developed clinical cbct reconstruction software. To investigate the short-term stability of the lag and associated parameters, a series of five image lag measurement over a period of three months was performed. For quantitative analysis, the authors have retrospectively selected ten patients treated in the pelvic region. The apparent contrast was quantified in polar coordinates for scans reconstructed using the parameters obtained from different dates with and without saturation handling. Visually, the radar artifact was minimal in scans reconstructed using image lag correction especially when saturation handling was used. In patient imaging, there was a significant reduction of the apparent contrast from 43 ± 16.7 to 15.5 ± 11.9 HU without the

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Nagoya 462-8508 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  17. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy

  18. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between TrueBeam

  19. Generation of low KV x-ray portal images with mega-voltage electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, J.; Ebert, M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The increasing complexity of radiation therapy plans and reduced target margins, have made accurate localization of patients at treatment a crucial quality assurance issue. Mega-voltage portal images, the standard for treatment localization, are inherently low in contrast because x-ray attenuation at these energies is similar for most body tissues. Thus anatomical features are difficult to distinguish and match to features on a reference diagnostic image. This project investigates the possibly of using x-rays created by an external target placed in the path of a clinical mega-voltage electron beam. This target is optimised to produce a higher proportion of useful imaging x-rays in the range of 50-200kV. It is thought that a high efficiency Varian aSi500 amorphous silicon EPID will be sufficient to compensate for the very low efficiency of x-ray production. The project was undertaken with concurrent theoretical and experimental components. The former involved Monte Carlo models of low Z target design while in the later, experimental data was gathered to validate the model and explore the practical issues associated with electron mode image acquisition. A 6 MeV electron beam model for a Varian Clinac 21EX was developed with EGS4/BEAMnrc User Code and compared to measured beam data. Phase space data scored at the secondary collimator then became the input for simulations of a target placed in the accessory tray. Target materials were predominately low atomic number (Z) because a) production of high energy x-rays is minimized and, b) fewer low energy x-rays produced will be absorbed within the target. Photon and electron energy spectrums of the modified beam were evaluated for a range of target geometries. Ultimately, several materials were used in combination to optimise an x-ray yield for energies <200kV while removing electrons and very low energy x-rays, that contribute to patient dose but not to image formation. Low energy images of a PIPs EPID QA

  20. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  1. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  2. Verification of IMRT dose distributions using a water beam imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.S.; Boyer, Arthur L.; Ma, C.-M.

    2001-01-01

    A water beam imaging system (WBIS) has been developed and used to verify dose distributions for intensity modulated radiotherapy using dynamic multileaf collimator. This system consisted of a water container, a scintillator screen, a charge-coupled device camera, and a portable personal computer. The scintillation image was captured by the camera. The pixel value in this image indicated the dose value in the scintillation screen. Images of radiation fields of known spatial distributions were used to calibrate the device. The verification was performed by comparing the image acquired from the measurement with a dose distribution from the IMRT plan. Because of light scattering in the scintillator screen, the image was blurred. A correction for this was developed by recognizing that the blur function could be fitted to a multiple Gaussian. The blur function was computed using the measured image of a 10 cmx10 cm x-ray beam and the result of the dose distribution calculated using the Monte Carlo method. Based on the blur function derived using this method, an iterative reconstruction algorithm was applied to recover the dose distribution for an IMRT plan from the measured WBIS image. The reconstructed dose distribution was compared with Monte Carlo simulation result. Reasonable agreement was obtained from the comparison. The proposed approach makes it possible to carry out a real-time comparison of the dose distribution in a transverse plane between the measurement and the reference when we do an IMRT dose verification

  3. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisotzky, E.; Fast, M.F.; Nill, S.

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso registered beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76±6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images.

  4. Automated marker tracking using noisy X-ray images degraded by the treatment beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisotzky, E. [Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology (IPK), Berlin (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Fast, M.F.; Nill, S. [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; Oelfke, U. [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of automated marker tracking for the real-time detection of intrafractional target motion using noisy kilovoltage (kV) X-ray images degraded by the megavoltage (MV) treatment beam. The authors previously introduced the in-line imaging geometry, in which the flat-panel detector (FPD) is mounted directly underneath the treatment head of the linear accelerator. They found that the 121 kVp image quality was severely compromised by the 6 MV beam passing through the FPD at the same time. Specific MV-induced artefacts present a considerable challenge for automated marker detection algorithms. For this study, the authors developed a new imaging geometry by re-positioning the FPD and the X-ray tube. This improved the contrast-to-noise-ratio between 40% and 72% at the 1.2 mAs/image exposure setting. The increase in image quality clearly facilitates the quick and stable detection of motion with the aid of a template matching algorithm. The setup was tested with an anthropomorphic lung phantom (including an artificial lung tumour). In the tumour one or three Calypso {sup registered} beacons were embedded to achieve better contrast during MV radiation. For a single beacon, image acquisition and automated marker detection typically took around 76±6 ms. The success rate was found to be highly dependent on imaging dose and gantry angle. To eliminate possible false detections, the authors implemented a training phase prior to treatment beam irradiation and also introduced speed limits for motion between subsequent images.

  5. Cone beam volume tomography: an imaging option for diagnosis of complex mandibular third molar anatomical relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danforth, Robert A; Peck, Jerry; Hall, Paul

    2003-11-01

    Complex impacted third molars present potential treatment complications and possible patient morbidity. Objectives of diagnostic imaging are to facilitate diagnosis, decision making, and enhance treatment outcomes. As cases become more complex, advanced multiplane imaging methods allowing for a 3-D view are more likely to meet these objectives than traditional 2-D radiography. Until recently, advanced imaging options were somewhat limited to standard film tomography or medical CT, but development of cone beam volume tomography (CBVT) multiplane 3-D imaging systems specifically for dental use now provides an alternative imaging option. Two cases were utilized to compare the role of CBVT to these other imaging options and to illustrate how multiplane visualization can assist the pretreatment evaluation and decision-making process for complex impacted mandibular third molar cases.

  6. Slice image pretreatment for cone-beam computed tomography based on adaptive filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Kuidong; Zhang Dinghua; Jin Yanfang

    2009-01-01

    According to the noise properties and the serial slice image characteristics in Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) system, a slice image pretreatment for CBCT based on adaptive filter was proposed. The judging criterion for the noise is established firstly. All pixels are classified into two classes: adaptive center weighted modified trimmed mean (ACWMTM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by Gauss noise and adaptive median (AM) filter is used for the pixels corrupted by impulse noise. In ACWMTM filtering algorithm, the estimated Gauss noise standard deviation in the current slice image with offset window is replaced by the estimated standard deviation in the adjacent slice image to the current with the corresponding window, so the filtering accuracy of the serial images is improved. The pretreatment experiment on CBCT slice images of wax model of hollow turbine blade shows that the method makes a good performance both on eliminating noises and on protecting details. (authors)

  7. Image simulation and a model of noise power spectra across a range of mammographic beam qualities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair, E-mail: alistairmackenzie@nhs.net; Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Diaz, Oliver [Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom and Computer Vision and Robotics Research Institute, University of Girona, Girona 17071 (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to create a model to predict the noise power spectra (NPS) for a range of mammographic radiographic factors. The noise model was necessary to degrade images acquired on one system to match the image quality of different systems for a range of beam qualities. Methods: Five detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASEh), Carestream computed radiography CR900 (CRc), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream NIP (NIPc), and Siemens Inspiration (ASEs)] were characterized for this study. The signal transfer property was measured as the pixel value against absorbed energy per unit area (E) at a reference beam quality of 28 kV, Mo/Mo or 29 kV, W/Rh with 45 mm polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) at the tube head. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic at each spatial frequency of the NPS against E. A quantum noise correction factor which was dependent on beam quality was quantified using a set of images acquired over a range of radiographic factors with different thicknesses of PMMA. The noise model was tested for images acquired at 26 kV, Mo/Mo with 20 mm PMMA and 34 kV, Mo/Rh with 70 mm PMMA for three detectors (ASEh, CRc, and CSI) over a range of exposures. The NPS were modeled with and without the noise correction factor and compared with the measured NPS. A previous method for adapting an image to appear as if acquired on a different system was modified to allow the reference beam quality to be different from the beam quality of the image. The method was validated by adapting the ASEh flat field images with two thicknesses of PMMA (20 and 70 mm) to appear with the imaging characteristics of the CSI and CRc systems. Results: The quantum noise correction factor rises with higher beam qualities, except for CR systems at high spatial frequencies, where a flat response was found against mean photon energy. This is due to the dominance of secondary quantum noise

  8. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Jungjohann, Katherine L.; Evans, James E.; Arslan, Ilke; Ristenpart, William D.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment

  9. Experimental procedures to mitigate electron beam induced artifacts during in situ fluid imaging of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woehl, Taylor J., E-mail: tjwoehl@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jungjohann, Katherine L. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Evans, James E. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Arslan, Ilke [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ristenpart, William D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Browning, Nigel D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy of various fluid and hydrated nanomaterial samples has revealed multiple imaging artifacts and electron beam–fluid interactions. These phenomena include growth of crystals on the fluid stage windows, repulsion of particles from the irradiated area, bubble formation, and the loss of atomic information during prolonged imaging of individual nanoparticles. Here we provide a comprehensive review of these fluid stage artifacts, and we present new experimental evidence that sheds light on their origins in terms of experimental apparatus issues and indirect electron beam sample interactions with the fluid layer. A key finding is that many artifacts are a result of indirect electron beam interactions, such as production of reactive radicals in the water by radiolysis, and the associated crystal growth. The results presented here will provide a methodology for minimizing fluid stage imaging artifacts and acquiring quantitative in situ observations of nanomaterial behavior in a liquid environment.

  10. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2011-01-01

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  11. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: From image science to image-guided surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Traylor Building, Room 718, 720 Rutland Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2011-08-21

    The development of large-area flat-panel X-ray detectors (FPDs) has spurred investigation in a spectrum of advanced medical imaging applications, including tomosynthesis and cone-beam CT (CBCT). Recent research has extended image quality metrics and theoretical models to such applications, providing a quantitative foundation for the assessment of imaging performance as well as a general framework for the design, optimization, and translation of such technologies to new applications. For example, cascaded systems models of the Fourier domain metrics, such as noise-equivalent quanta (NEQ), have been extended to these modalities to describe the propagation of signal and noise through the image acquisition and reconstruction chain and to quantify the factors that govern spatial resolution, image noise, and detectability. Moreover, such models have demonstrated basic agreement with human observer performance for a broad range of imaging conditions and imaging tasks. These developments in image science have formed a foundation for the knowledgeable development and translation of CBCT to new applications in image-guided interventions-for example, CBCT implemented on a mobile surgical C-arm for intraoperative 3D imaging. The ability to acquire high-quality 3D images on demand during surgical intervention overcomes conventional limitations of surgical guidance in the context of preoperative images alone. A prototype mobile C-arm developed in academic-industry partnership demonstrates CBCT with low radiation dose, sub-mm spatial resolution, and soft-tissue visibility potentially approaching that of diagnostic CT. Integration of the 3D imaging system with real-time tracking, deformable registration, endoscopic video, and 3D visualization offers a promising addition to the surgical arsenal in interventions ranging from head-and-neck/skull base surgery to spine, orthopaedic, thoracic, and abdominal surgeries. Cadaver studies show the potential for significant boosts in surgical

  12. Patient positioning method based on binary image correlation between two edge images for proton-beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Akira; Yoda, Kiyoshi; Numano, Masumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Haruo; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Tsugami, Hironobu

    2005-01-01

    A new technique based on normalized binary image correlation between two edge images has been proposed for positioning proton-beam radiotherapy patients. A Canny edge detector was used to extract two edge images from a reference x-ray image and a test x-ray image of a patient before positioning. While translating and rotating the edged test image, the absolute value of the normalized binary image correlation between the two edge images is iteratively maximized. Each time before rotation, dilation is applied to the edged test image to avoid a steep reduction of the image correlation. To evaluate robustness of the proposed method, a simulation has been carried out using 240 simulated edged head front-view images extracted from a reference image by varying parameters of the Canny algorithm with a given range of rotation angles and translation amounts in x and y directions. It was shown that resulting registration errors have an accuracy of one pixel in x and y directions and zero degrees in rotation, even when the number of edge pixels significantly differs between the edged reference image and the edged simulation image. Subsequently, positioning experiments using several sets of head, lung, and hip data have been performed. We have observed that the differences of translation and rotation between manual positioning and the proposed method were within one pixel in translation and one degree in rotation. From the results of the validation study, it can be concluded that a significant reduction in workload for the physicians and technicians can be achieved with this method

  13. Foreign Object Detection by Sub-Terahertz Quasi-Bessel Beam Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyang Sook Chun

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Food quality monitoring, particularly foreign object detection, has recently become a critical issue for the food industry. In contrast to X-ray imaging, terahertz imaging can provide a safe and ionizing-radiation-free nondestructive inspection method for foreign object sensing. In this work, a quasi-Bessel beam (QBB known to be nondiffracting was generated by a conical dielectric lens to detect foreign objects in food samples. Using numerical evaluation via the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD method, the beam profiles of a QBB were evaluated and compared with the results obtained via analytical calculation and experimental characterization (knife edge method, point scanning method. The FDTD method enables a more precise estimation of the beam profile. Foreign objects in food samples, namely crickets, were then detected with the QBB, which had a deep focus and a high spatial resolution at 210 GHz. Transmitted images using a Gaussian beam obtained with a conventional lens were compared in the sub-terahertz frequency experimentally with those using a QBB generated using an axicon.

  14. Diffraction and depths-of-field effects in electron beam imaging at SURF III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arp, U.

    2001-01-01

    Imaging an electron beam with visible light is a common method of diagnostics applied to electron accelerators. It is a straightforward way to deduce the transverse electron distribution as well as its changes over time. The electrons stored in the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF) III at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) were studied over an extended period of time to characterize the upgraded accelerator. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical horizontal beam sizes at three different electron energies

  15. Quantitative analysis of CT brain images: a statistical model incorporating partial volume and beam hardening effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLoughlin, R.F.; Ryan, M.V.; Heuston, P.M.; McCoy, C.T.; Masterson, J.B.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct and evaluate a statistical model for the quantitative analysis of computed tomographic brain images. Data were derived from standard sections in 34 normal studies. A model representing the intercranial pure tissue and partial volume areas, with allowance for beam hardening, was developed. The average percentage error in estimation of areas, derived from phantom tests using the model, was 28.47%. We conclude that our model is not sufficiently accurate to be of clinical use, even though allowance was made for partial volume and beam hardening effects. (author)

  16. Rapid volumetric imaging with Bessel-Beam three-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingying; Huang, Xiaoshuai; Gou, Dongzhou; Zeng, Jianzhi; Chen, Guoqing; Pang, Meijun; Hu, Yanhui; Zhao, Zhe; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhuan; Wu, Haitao; Cheng, Heping; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chris; Li, Yulong; Chen, Liangyi; Wang, Aimin

    2018-01-01

    Owing to its tissue-penetration ability, multi-photon fluorescence microscopy allows for the high-resolution, non-invasive imaging of deep tissue in vivo; the recently developed three-photon microscopy (3PM) has extended the depth of high-resolution, non-invasive functional imaging of mouse brains to beyond 1.0 mm. However, the low repetition rate of femtosecond lasers that are normally used in 3PM limits the temporal resolution of point-scanning three-photon microscopy. To increase the volumetric imaging speed of 3PM, we propose a combination of an axially elongated needle-like Bessel-beam with three-photon excitation (3PE) to image biological samples with an extended depth of focus. We demonstrate the higher signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of the Bessel-beam 3PM compared to the two-photon version both theoretically and experimentally. Finally, we perform simultaneous calcium imaging of brain regions at different axial locations in live fruit flies and rapid volumetric imaging of neuronal structures in live mouse brains. These results highlight the unique advantage of conducting rapid volumetric imaging with a high SBR in the deep brain in vivo using scanning Bessel-3PM.

  17. Three-dimentional imaging of dentomaxillofacial region using electron beam tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takemasa; Kanda, Shigenobu; Muranaka, Toru

    1998-01-01

    Authors reported their results of the 3-D imaging of dentomaxillofacial region mainly for jaw deformity with electron beam tomography (EBT). The EBT apparatus used was Imatron C-100 (Imatron Corp.), with which, using bremsstrahlung radiation generated from the electron beam, CT is possible with rapid scanning rate at <0.1 sec. Imaging was done with those conditions as tube voltage: 130 kV, current: 610 mA, scanning rate: 0.1 sec/slice whose thickness was 1.5 mm, feeding rate: 1.5 mm and number of slices: 40-170. Patients were 15 cases with jaw deformity. Data were processed for 3-D image by Scribe Imaging Workstation (Multi-dimensional Imaging Inc.) which giving surface rendering and further by Power Macintosh 8500 (Apple Computer Inc.) with VoxBlast 1.1.0 (VayTec Inc.) software which giving volume rendering or with Image 1.60 (NIH) which allowing multi-planar reconstruction and re-analog projection. These actual images were presented in the report. (K.H.)

  18. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, R.M.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R.; Henderson, R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem for monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots each of diameter around 7nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation respectively in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, in which the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support, but great care is needed in practice and the problem of how best to image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film requires more work. PMID:21185452

  19. Imaging properties of scintillators for heavy-ion-beams and related model calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetlich, Eiko

    2011-08-01

    This thesis is treating the imaging properties of scintillating screens for high-current ion beams as delivered by the UNILAC at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt, Germany. Scintillating screens are mainly used to measure and rate the tansversal beam parameters in nearly every particle accelerator. During daily operation, scintillating screens can be used to determine and optimize the position of the beam inside the beam-pipe as well as the transversal intensity distribution. Although scintillating screens are widely used in many measurement systems, their imaging properties are not well characterized. Within the framework of this thesis, accelerator based experiments were planed and carried out which allowed to compare the results of beam profile measurements of the different materials with reference methods. Parameters such as the screen temperature and particle energies have been varied. Additionaly, possible image distortions within the optical system have been investigated. To determine the influence of the emission spectra of the screens onto the profile measurement a novel experimental setup for the spectroscopic investigations has been established. The setup allows to investigate the emission spectrum along one spatial axes on the beamspot. The investigations focus on ceramic materials such as zirconium oxide doped e.g. with Mg (ZrO 2 :Mg) or aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ). The materials have been irradiated with different ion species (e.g. Calcium and Uranium) with kinetic energies of 4.8 MeV/u (10% c) and 11.4 MeV (15% c). The results for different parameters are discussed and interpreted. The measured beam profiles show dependences of four parameters: - The material itself. - The screen temperature. - The accumulated fluence [ (Ions)/(cm 2 )]. - The excitation density [(Electron-Hole-Pairs)/(cm 3 )], which is proportional to the dose rate [(J)/(kg . s)] within the volume element. Among the above, the last one depends on the

  20. Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D N; Breese, M B.H.; Prawer, S; Dooley, S P; Allen, M G; Bettiol, A A; Saint, A [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Ryan, C G [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1994-12-31

    The technique of Nuclear Microscopy, utilizing a focused ion probe of typically MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions, can produce images where the contrast depends on typical Ion Beam Analysis (lBA) processes. The probe forming lens system usually utilizes strong focusing, precision magnetic quadrupole lenses and the probe is scanned over the target to produce images. Originally, this imaging technique was developed to utilize backscattered particles with incident beam currents typically of a few nA, and the technique became known as Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). Recently, the technique has been developed further to utilize the forward scattering of ions incident along a major crystal axis in thin crystals. This technique is known as Channeling Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (CSTIM). Since nearly all incident ions are detected, CSTIM is highly efficient and very low beam currents are sufficient for imaging, typically as low as a few fA. This allows probes as small as 50 nm to be used. In this paper we briefly review the recent applications of these emerging techniques to a variety of single crystal materials (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Applications of focused MeV light ion beams for high resolution channeling contrast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D.N.; Breese, M.B.H.; Prawer, S.; Dooley, S.P.; Allen, M.G.; Bettiol, A.A.; Saint, A. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics; Ryan, C.G. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Div. of Exploration Geoscience

    1993-12-31

    The technique of Nuclear Microscopy, utilizing a focused ion probe of typically MeV H{sup +} or He{sup +} ions, can produce images where the contrast depends on typical Ion Beam Analysis (lBA) processes. The probe forming lens system usually utilizes strong focusing, precision magnetic quadrupole lenses and the probe is scanned over the target to produce images. Originally, this imaging technique was developed to utilize backscattered particles with incident beam currents typically of a few nA, and the technique became known as Channeling Contrast Microscopy (CCM). Recently, the technique has been developed further to utilize the forward scattering of ions incident along a major crystal axis in thin crystals. This technique is known as Channeling Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (CSTIM). Since nearly all incident ions are detected, CSTIM is highly efficient and very low beam currents are sufficient for imaging, typically as low as a few fA. This allows probes as small as 50 nm to be used. In this paper we briefly review the recent applications of these emerging techniques to a variety of single crystal materials (authors). 13 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Focus detection by shearing interference of vortex beams for non-imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiongfeng; Zhan, Shichao; Liang, Yiyong

    2018-02-10

    In focus detection of non-imaging systems, the common image-based methods are not available. Also, interference techniques are seldom used because only the degree with hardly any direction of defocus can be derived from the fringe spacing. In this paper, we propose a vortex-beam-based shearing interference system to do focus detection for a focused laser direct-writing system, where a vortex beam is already involved. Both simulated and experimental results show that fork-like features are added in the interference patterns due to the existence of an optical vortex, which makes it possible to distinguish the degree and direction of defocus simultaneously. The theoretical fringe spacing and resolution of this method are derived. A resolution of 0.79 μm can be achieved under the experimental combination of parameters, and it can be further improved with the help of the image processing algorithm and closed-loop controlling in the future. Finally, the influence of incomplete collimation and the wedge angle of the shear plate is discussed. This focus detection approach is extremely appropriate for those non-imaging systems containing one or more focused vortex beams.

  3. Image reconstruction in circular cone-beam computed tomography by constrained, total-variation minimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidky, Emil Y; Pan Xiaochuan

    2008-01-01

    An iterative algorithm, based on recent work in compressive sensing, is developed for volume image reconstruction from a circular cone-beam scan. The algorithm minimizes the total variation (TV) of the image subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data is within a specified tolerance of the available data and that the values of the volume image are non-negative. The constraints are enforced by the use of projection onto convex sets (POCS) and the TV objective is minimized by steepest descent with an adaptive step-size. The algorithm is referred to as adaptive-steepest-descent-POCS (ASD-POCS). It appears to be robust against cone-beam artifacts, and may be particularly useful when the angular range is limited or when the angular sampling rate is low. The ASD-POCS algorithm is tested with the Defrise disk and jaw computerized phantoms. Some comparisons are performed with the POCS and expectation-maximization (EM) algorithms. Although the algorithm is presented in the context of circular cone-beam image reconstruction, it can also be applied to scanning geometries involving other x-ray source trajectories

  4. GPU-Based 3D Cone-Beam CT Image Reconstruction for Large Data Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, 3D cone-beam CT image reconstruction speed is still a severe limitation for clinical application. The computational power of modern graphics processing units (GPUs has been harnessed to provide impressive acceleration of 3D volume image reconstruction. For extra large data volume exceeding the physical graphic memory of GPU, a straightforward compromise is to divide data volume into blocks. Different from the conventional Octree partition method, a new partition scheme is proposed in this paper. This method divides both projection data and reconstructed image volume into subsets according to geometric symmetries in circular cone-beam projection layout, and a fast reconstruction for large data volume can be implemented by packing the subsets of projection data into the RGBA channels of GPU, performing the reconstruction chunk by chunk and combining the individual results in the end. The method is evaluated by reconstructing 3D images from computer-simulation data and real micro-CT data. Our results indicate that the GPU implementation can maintain original precision and speed up the reconstruction process by 110–120 times for circular cone-beam scan, as compared to traditional CPU implementation.

  5. Evaluation of Skin Dose and Image Quality on Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jong Ho; Hong, Chae Seon; Kim, Jin Man; Jang, Jun Young

    2008-01-01

    Cone-beam CT using linear accelerator attached to on-board imager is a image guided therapy equipment. Because it is to check the patient's set-up error, correction, organ and target movement. But imaging dose should be cause of the secondary cancer when taking a image. The aim of this study is investigation of appropriate cone beam CT scan mode to compare and estimate the image quality and skin dose. Measurement by Thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD-100, Harshaw) with using the Rando phantom are placed on each eight sites in separately H and N, thoracic, abdominal section. each 4 methods of scan modes of are measured the for skin dose in three time. Subsequently, obtained average value. Following image quality QA protocol of equipment manufacturers using the catphan 504 phantom, image quality of each scan mode is compared and analyzed. The results of the measured skin dose are described in here. The skin dose of Head and Neck are measured mode A: 8.96 cGy, mode B: 4.59 cGy, mode C: 3.46 cGy mode D: 1.76 cGy and thoracic mode A: 9.42 cGy, mode B: 4.58 cGy, mode C: 3.65 cGy, mode D: 1.85 cGy, and abdominal mode A: 9.97 cGy, mode B: 5.12 cGy, mode C: 4.03 cGy, mode D: 2.21 cGy. Approximately, dose of mode B are reduced 50%, mode C are reduced 60%, mode D are reduced 80% a point of reference dose of mode A. the results of analyzed HU reproducibility, low contrast resolution, spatial resolution (high contrast resolution), HU uniformity in evaluation item of image quality are within the tolerance value by recommended equipment manufacturer in all scan mode. Maintaining the image quality as well as reducing the image dose are very important in cone beam CT. In the result of this study, we are considered when to take mode A when interested in soft tissue. And we are considered to take mode D when interested in bone scan and we are considered to take mode B, C when standard scan. Increasing secondary cancer risk due to cone beam CT scan should be reduced by low m

  6. Multimodal backside imaging of a microcontroller using confocal laser scanning and optical-beam-induced current imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkeldey, Markus; Göring, Lena; Schellenberg, Falk; Brenner, Carsten; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Hofmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Microscopy imaging with a single technology is usually restricted to a single contrast mechanism. Multimodal imaging is a promising technique to improve the structural information that could be obtained about a device under test (DUT). Due to the different contrast mechanisms of laser scanning microscopy (LSM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and optical beam induced current microscopy (OBICM), a combination could improve the detection of structures in integrated circuits (ICs) and helps to reveal their layout. While OBIC imaging is sensitive to the changes between differently doped areas and to semiconductor-metal transitions, CLSM imaging is mostly sensitive to changes in absorption and reflection. In this work we present the implementation of OBIC imaging into a CLSM. We show first results using industry standard Atmel microcontrollers (MCUs) with a feature size of about 250nm as DUTs. Analyzing these types of microcontrollers helps to improve in the field of side-channel attacks to find hardware Trojans, possible spots for laser fault attacks and for reverse engineering. For the experimental results the DUT is placed on a custom circuit board that allows us to measure the current while imaging it in our in-house built stage scanning microscope using a near infrared (NIR) laser diode as light source. The DUT is thinned and polished, allowing backside imaging through the Si-substrate. We demonstrate the possibilities using this optical setup by evaluating OBIC, LSM and CLSM images above and below the threshold of the laser source.

  7. An Optimized Online Verification Imaging Procedure for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, David J.; Kron, Tomas; Chua, Boon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the capabilities of a kilovoltage (kV) on-board imager (OBI)-equipped linear accelerator in the setting of on-line verification imaging for external-beam partial breast irradiation. Available imaging techniques were optimized and assessed for image quality using a modified anthropomorphic phantom. Imaging dose was also assessed. Imaging techniques were assessed for physical clearance between patient and treatment machine using a volunteer. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs were identified as optimal in terms of image quality, clearance, and dose. After institutional review board approval, this approach was used for 17 patients receiving accelerated partial breast irradiation. Imaging was performed before every fraction verification with online correction of setup deviations >5 mm (total image sessions = 170). Treatment staff rated risk of collision and visibility of tumor bed surgical clips where present. Image session duration and detected setup deviations were recorded. For all cases, both image projections (n = 34) had low collision risk. Surgical clips were rated as well as visualized in all cases where they were present (n = 5). The average imaging session time was 6 min, 16 sec, and a reduction in duration was observed as staff became familiar with the technique. Setup deviations of up to 1.3 cm were detected before treatment and subsequently confirmed offline. Nonorthogonal kV image pairs allowed effective and efficient online verification for partial breast irradiation. It has yet to be tested in a multicenter study to determine whether it is dependent on skilled treatment staff.

  8. Observation of electron beam moiré fringes in an image conversion tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Long, Jing-hua [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Cai, Houzhi; Bai, Yanli [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Liu, Jinyuan, E-mail: ljy@szu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-11-15

    An image conversion tube with a magnetic lens was designed to observe electron beam moiré fringes. Electron beam moiré fringes result from the interference between the photocathode and the anode meshes. The photocathode had a strip line structure with a spatial frequency of 10 L/mm. The anode mesh had a fixed spatial frequency of 10 L/mm, and could be rotated around the axis of the image tube. The changes to the fringe direction and the spacing as a function of the rotation angle between the photocathode and the anode mesh were examined. The experimental results agreed with the theoretical analysis. Moiré fringes with a modulation of ~20% were obtained using a 3 keV electron beam. - Highlights: • Observe the electron beam moiré fringes in large angle of view. • The changes to the fringe direction and the spacing as a function of the rotation angle between the two gratings were examined. • Modulations of the moiré fringes in different rotation angle are recorded.

  9. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhan; Vanstalle, Marie; La Tessa, Chiara; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Durante, Marco

    2012-07-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1-10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery.

  10. Biophysical characterization of a relativistic proton beam for image-guided radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z.; Vanstalle, M.; La Tessa, C.; Durante, M.; Jiang Guoliang

    2012-01-01

    We measured the physical and radiobiological characteristics of 1 GeV protons for possible applications in stereotactic radiosurgery (image-guided plateau-proton radiosurgery). A proton beam was accelerated at 1 GeV at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (Upton, NY) and a target in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) was used. Clonogenic survival was measured after exposures to 1-10 Gy in three mammalian cell lines. Measurements and simulations demonstrate that the lateral scattering of the beam is very small. The lateral dose profile was measured with or without the 20-cm plastic target, showing no significant differences up to 2 cm from the axis A large number of secondary swift protons are produced in the target and this leads to an increase of approximately 40% in the measured dose on the beam axis at 20 cm depth. The relative biological effectiveness at 10% survival level ranged between 1.0 and 1.2 on the beam axis, and was slightly higher off-axis. The very low lateral scattering of relativistic protons and the possibility of using online proton radiography during the treatment make them attractive for image-guided plateau (non-Bragg peak) stereotactic radiosurgery. (author)

  11. Observation of electron beam moiré fringes in an image conversion tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Yunfei; Liao, Yubo; Long, Jing-hua; Cai, Houzhi; Bai, Yanli; Liu, Jinyuan

    2016-01-01

    An image conversion tube with a magnetic lens was designed to observe electron beam moiré fringes. Electron beam moiré fringes result from the interference between the photocathode and the anode meshes. The photocathode had a strip line structure with a spatial frequency of 10 L/mm. The anode mesh had a fixed spatial frequency of 10 L/mm, and could be rotated around the axis of the image tube. The changes to the fringe direction and the spacing as a function of the rotation angle between the photocathode and the anode mesh were examined. The experimental results agreed with the theoretical analysis. Moiré fringes with a modulation of ~20% were obtained using a 3 keV electron beam. - Highlights: • Observe the electron beam moiré fringes in large angle of view. • The changes to the fringe direction and the spacing as a function of the rotation angle between the two gratings were examined. • Modulations of the moiré fringes in different rotation angle are recorded.

  12. Investigation of cone-beam CT image quality trade-off for image-guided radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Junguo; Sharp, Gregory C.; Park, Yang-Kyun; Ouyang, Jinsong; Bortfeld, Thomas; El Fakhri, Georges

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that projections acquired over an angular range slightly over 180° (so-called short scan) are sufficient for fan-beam reconstruction. However, due to practical imaging conditions (projection data and reconstruction image discretization, physical factors, and data noise), the short-scan reconstructions may have different appearances and properties from the full-scan (scans over 360°) reconstructions. Nevertheless, short-scan configurations have been used in applications such as cone-beam CT (CBCT) for head-neck-cancer image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) that only requires a small field of view due to the potential reduced imaging time and dose. In this work, we studied the image quality trade-off for full, short, and full/short scan configurations with both conventional filtered-backprojection (FBP) reconstruction and iterative reconstruction algorithms based on total-variation (TV) minimization for head-neck-cancer IGRT. Anthropomorphic and Catphan phantoms were scanned at different exposure levels with a clinical scanner used in IGRT. Both visualization- and numerical-metric-based evaluation studies were performed. The results indicate that the optimal exposure level and number of views are in the middle range for both FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms and the optimization is object-dependent and task-dependent. The optimal view numbers decrease with the total exposure levels for both FBP and TV-based algorithms. The results also indicate there are slight differences between FBP and TV-based iterative algorithms for the image quality trade-off: FBP seems to be more in favor of larger number of views while the TV-based algorithm is more robust to different data conditions (number of views and exposure levels) than the FBP algorithm. The studies can provide a general guideline for image-quality optimization for CBCT used in IGRT and other applications.

  13. The accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ho Duk; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone defect healing in rat model. Sprague-Dawely strain rats weighing about 350 gms were selected. Then critical size bone defects were done at parietal bone with implantation of collagen sponge. The rats were divided into seven groups of 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks, 6 weeks, and 8 weeks. The healing of surgical defect was assessed by multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images and three-dimensional (3-D) images of cone beam computed tomography, compared with soft X-ray radiograph and histopathologic examination. MPR images and 3-D images showed similar reformation of the healing amount at 3 days, 1 week, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks, however, lower reformation at 3 weeks, 4 weeks, and 6 weeks. According to imaging-based methodologies, MPR images revealed similar reformation of the healing mount than 3-D images compare with soft X-ray image. Among the four threshold values for 3-D images, 400-500 HU revealed similar reformation of the healing amount. Histopathologic examination confirmed the newly formed trabeculation correspond with imaging-based mythologies. MPR images revealed higher accuracy of the imaging reformation of cone beam computed tomography and cone beam computed tomography is a clinically useful diagnostic tool for the assessment of bone defect healing

  14. Imaging high energy photons with PILATUS II at the tagged photon beam at MAX-lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, V. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)], E-mail: leev@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Peake, D.J.; Sobott, B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Schroeder, B. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); Broennimann, Ch. [DECTRIS Ltd., Baden (Switzerland); Henrich, B. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Hansen, K. [MAX-lab, Lund University, Lund (Sweden); O' Keefe, G.J. [Centre for PET, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria 3084 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Taylor, G.N. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Boland, M.J. [Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia); Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.P. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010 (Australia)

    2009-05-21

    In photonuclear experiments precise location of the photon beam relative to the experimental sample is critical. Previously used techniques such as using photographic film to identify the position, intensity and centroid of the beam is time-consuming and a faster method is required. PILATUS is a single-photon-counting pixel detector developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. It is a silicon-based, two-dimensional detector with a large dynamic range and zero readout noise. Designed as an X-ray detector, its optimal quantum efficiency is between 3 and 30 keV. This paper reports measurements carried out at the MAX-lab tagged photon facility in Lund, Sweden. The beam endpoint energy of approximately 200 MeV is far above the designed optimal energy detection range of PILATUS, and provides a critical test of the use of PILATUS under high energy conditions. The detector was placed in the photon beam and images were taken both downstream of other experiments, and in close range of a 19 mm collimator. The successful measurements demonstrate the versatility and robustness of the detector and provide an effective way of quickly and accurately monitoring beam position and profile in real time.

  15. Investigation of the imaging properties of inorganic scintillation screens using high energetic ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lieberwirth, Alice [TU Darmstadt (Germany); JWG Universitaet Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Forck, Peter; Sieber, Thomas [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Ensinger, Wolfgang; Lederer, Stephan [TU Darmstadt (Germany); Kester, Oliver [JWG Universitaet Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Inorganic scintillation screens are a common diagnostics tool in heavy ion accelerators. In order to investigate the imaging properties of various screen materials, four different material compositions were irradiated at GSI, using protons up to Uranium ions as projectiles. Beams were extracted from SIS18 with high energy (300 MeV/u) in slow and fast extraction mode. During irradiation the scintillation response of the screens was simultaneously recorded by two different optical setups to investigate light output, profile characteristics and emission spectra. It was observed, that fast extracted beams induce in general lower light output than slow extracted beams, while the light output per deposited energy decreases with atomic number. The analysis of the spectral emission as well as investigations with classical optical methods showed no significant defect-building in all materials, not even under irradiation with increasing beam intensity or over long time periods. The investigated scintillation screens can be considered as stable under irradiation with high energetic heavy ion pulses and are appropriate for beam diagnostics applications in future accelerator facilities like FAIR. Characteristic properties and application areas of the screens are presented in the poster.

  16. Initial Imaging of 7-GeV Electron Beams with OTR/ODR Techniques at APS

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H; Sereno, Nicholas S; Yao, Chihyuan

    2005-01-01

    The development of nonintercepting (NI) diagnostics continues to be of interest at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) as well as elsewhere. In the three rings of the APS facility we use optical synchrotron radiation generated as the electron beam transits the dipole magnetic fields as an NI mechanism to image the beam during top-up operations. However, in the straight transport lines an alternative method is needed. Optical diffraction radiation (ODR) is under investigation to monitor 7-GeV beam trajectory and potentially transverse shape in the booster-to-storage ring (BTS) beamline during top-up operations. We have performed our initial measurements with an Al blade/mirror that served as an optical transition radiation (OTR) monitor when fully inserted into the beam and as an ODR monitor when the beam passed near the edge. In the case of ODR, appreciable signal is emitted by the metal when gamma times the reduced ODR wavelength is comparable to the impact parameter, where gamma is the Lorentz factor. Visible ...

  17. Measuring multielectron beam imaging fidelity with a signal-to-noise ratio analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Maseeh; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Quoi, Kathy; Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad

    2016-07-01

    Java Monte Carlo Simulator for Secondary Electrons (JMONSEL) simulations are used to generate expected imaging responses of chosen test cases of patterns and defects with the ability to vary parameters for beam energy, spot size, pixel size, and/or defect material and form factor. The patterns are representative of the design rules for an aggressively scaled FinFET-type design. With these simulated images and resulting shot noise, a signal-to-noise framework is developed, which relates to defect detection probabilities. Additionally, with this infrastructure, the effect of detection chain noise and frequency-dependent system response can be made, allowing for targeting of best recipe parameters for multielectron beam inspection validation experiments. Ultimately, these results should lead to insights into how such parameters will impact tool design, including necessary doses for defect detection and estimations of scanning speeds for achieving high throughput for high-volume manufacturing.

  18. Poster — Thur Eve — 15: Improvements in the stability of the tomotherapy imaging beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belec, J [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Use of helical TomoTherapy based MVCT imaging for adaptive planning requires the image values (HU) to remain stable over the course of treatment. In the past, the image value stability was suboptimal, which required frequent change to the image value to density calibration curve to avoid dose errors on the order of 2–4%. The stability of the image values at our center was recently improved by stabilizing the dose rate of the machine (dose control servo) and performing daily MVCT calibration corrections. In this work, we quantify the stability of the image values over treatment time by comparing patient treatment image density derived using MVCT and KVCT. The analysis includes 1) MVCT - KVCT density difference histogram, 2) MVCT vs KVCT density spectrum, 3) multiple average profile density comparison and 4) density difference in homogeneous locations. Over two months, the imaging beam stability was compromised several times due to a combination of target wobbling, spectral calibration, target change and magnetron issues. The stability of the image values were analyzed over the same period. Results show that the impact on the patient dose calculation is 0.7% +− 0.6%.

  19. The application of image acquisition and processing technology in measurement of beam profile on particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie Zhenpeng; Zheng Yong; Shen Zhiqing; Wang Shaoming

    2000-01-01

    An introduction is given to the real-time measuring method which can measure the intensity and profile of the beam by a scintillator screen on HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility of Lanzhou). Hardware structure is described briefly, methods of the software design are mainly presented. The system can make a dynamic analysis on the faculae image and has many advantages, such as good reliability, high precision, intuitional measurement, friendly interface of the application software etc. Finally some results of measurement are given

  20. Parallel beam microradiography of dental hard tissue using synchrotron radiation and X-ray image magnification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, S.; Chow, L.C.; Brown, W.E.; Dobbyn, R.C.; Kuriyama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A novel technique utilizing a highly parallel beam of monochromatic synchrotron radiation combined with X-ray image magnification has been used to obtain microradiographs of caries lesions in relatively thick tooth sections. Preliminary results reveal structural features not previously reported. This technique holds the promise of allowing one to follow the structural changes accompanying the formation, destruction and chemical repair of mineralized tissue in real time. (orig.)

  1. Impact of large x-ray beam collimation on image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Damien; Ba, Alexandre; Ott, Julien G.; Bochud, François O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2016-03-01

    Large X-ray beam collimation in computed tomography (CT) opens the way to new image acquisition techniques and improves patient management for several clinical indications. The systems that offer large X-ray beam collimation enable, in particular, a whole region of interest to be investigated with an excellent temporal resolution. However, one of the potential drawbacks of this option might be a noticeable difference in image quality along the z-axis when compared with the standard helical acquisition mode using more restricted X-ray beam collimations. The aim of this project is to investigate the impact of the use of large X-ray beam collimation and new iterative reconstruction on noise properties, spatial resolution and low contrast detectability (LCD). An anthropomorphic phantom and a custom made phantom were scanned on a GE Revolution CT. The images were reconstructed respectively with ASIR-V at 0% and 50%. Noise power spectra, to evaluate the noise properties, and Target Transfer Functions, to evaluate the spatial resolution, were computed. Then, a Channelized Hotelling Observer with Gabor and Dense Difference of Gaussian channels was used to evaluate the LCD using the Percentage correct as a figure of merit. Noticeable differences of 3D noise power spectra and MTF have been recorded; however no significant difference appeared when dealing with the LCD criteria. As expected the use of iterative reconstruction, for a given CTDIvol level, allowed a significant gain in LCD in comparison to ASIR-V 0%. In addition, the outcomes of the NPS and TTF metrics led to results that would contradict the outcomes of CHO model observers if used for a NPWE model observer (Non- Prewhitening With Eye filter). The unit investigated provides major advantages for cardiac diagnosis without impairing the image quality level of standard chest or abdominal acquisitions.

  2. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frédéric

    2008-05-21

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction.

  3. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  4. A preliminary study on cone beam CT image based treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanaban, Sriram; Jeevanandham, Prakash; Boopathy, Raghavendiran; Sukumar, Prabakar; Syam Kumar, S.A.; Kunjithapatham, Bhuvana; Nagarajan, Vivekanandan

    2008-01-01

    Kilovolt Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) based on flat panel technology is primarily used for positioning verification. However it is required to evaluate the accuracy of dose calculation based on CBCT images for the purpose of re-planning in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). In this study, 3DCRT and IMRT plans were done using both the planning CT and CBCT images and the corresponding variations in dose and MUs were analyzed, hence evaluating the feasibility of using kilovolt CBCT for dose calculation and patient dose verification. (author)

  5. Image covariance and lesion detectability in direct fan-beam x-ray computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Adam; Noo, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    We consider noise in computed tomography images that are reconstructed using the classical direct fan-beam filtered backprojection algorithm, from both full- and short-scan data. A new, accurate method for computing image covariance is presented. The utility of the new covariance method is demonstrated by its application to the implementation of a channelized Hotelling observer for a lesion detection task. Results from the new covariance method and its application to the channelized Hotelling observer are compared with results from Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, the impact of a bowtie filter and x-ray tube current modulation on reconstruction noise and lesion detectability are explored for full-scan reconstruction

  6. Development of a bent Laue beam-expanding double-crystal monochromator for biomedical X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, Mercedes; Samadi, Nazanin; Belev, George; Bassey, Bassey; Lewis, Rob; Aulakh, Gurpreet; Chapman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    A bent Laue beam-expanding double-crystal monochromator was developed and tested at the Biomedical Imaging and Therapy beamline at the Canadian Light Source. The expander will reduce scanning time for micro-computed tomography and allow dynamic imaging that has not previously been possible at this beamline. The Biomedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamline at the Canadian Light Source has produced some excellent biological imaging data. However, the disadvantage of a small vertical beam limits its usability in some applications. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) imaging requires multiple scans to produce a full projection, and certain dynamic imaging experiments are not possible. A larger vertical beam is desirable. It was cost-prohibitive to build a longer beamline that would have produced a large vertical beam. Instead, it was proposed to develop a beam expander that would create a beam appearing to originate at a source much farther away. This was accomplished using a bent Laue double-crystal monochromator in a non-dispersive divergent geometry. The design and implementation of this beam expander is presented along with results from the micro-CT and dynamic imaging tests conducted with this beam. Flux (photons per unit area per unit time) has been measured and found to be comparable with the existing flat Bragg double-crystal monochromator in use at BMIT. This increase in overall photon count is due to the enhanced bandwidth of the bent Laue configuration. Whilst the expanded beam quality is suitable for dynamic imaging and micro-CT, further work is required to improve its phase and coherence properties

  7. Image and surgery-related costs comparing cone beam CT and panoramic imaging before removal of impacted mandibular third molars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Bo; Olsen, Kim Rose; Christensen, Jennifer Heather

    2014-01-01

    resource utilization. Differences in resources used for surgical and post-surgical management were calculated for each patient. Results: Converted to monetary units, the total costs for panoramic imaging equalized (sic)49.29 and for CBCT examination (sic)184.44. Modifying effects on this outcome......Objectives: The aim of this prospective clinical study was to derive the absolute and relative costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) and panoramic imaging before removal of an impacted mandibular third molar. Furthermore, the study aimed to analyse the influence of different cost-setting scenarios...... on the outcome of the absolute and relative costs and the incremental costs related to surgery. Methods: A randomized clinical trial compared complications following surgical removal of a mandibular third molar, where the pre-operative diagnostic method had been panoramic imaging or CBCT. The resources implied...

  8. A feasibility study for image guided radiotherapy using low dose, high speed, cone beam X-ray volumetric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Czajka, Jadwiga; Moore, Christopher J.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Image Guidance of patient set-up for radiotherapy can be achieved by acquiring X-ray volumetric images (XVI) with Elekta Synergy and registering these to the planning CT scan. This enables full 3D registration of structures from similar 3D imaging modalities and offers superior image quality, rotational set-up information and a large field of view. This study uses the head section of the Rando phantom to demonstrate a new paradigm of faster, lower dose XVI that still allows registration to high precision. Materials and methods: One high exposure XVI scan and one low exposure XVI scan were performed with a Rando Head Phantom. The second scan was used to simulate ultra low dose, fast acquisition, full and half scans by discarding a large number of projections before reconstruction. Dose measurements were performed using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLD) and an ion chamber. The reconstructed XVI scans were automatically registered with a helical CT scan of the Rando Head using the volumetric, grey-level, cross-correlation algorithm implemented in the Syntegra software package (Philips Medical Systems). Reproducibility of the registration process was investigated. Results: In both XVI scans the body surface, bone-tissue and tissue air interfaces were clearly visible. Although the subjective image quality of the low dose cone beam scan was reduced, registration of both cone beam scans with the planning CT scan agreed within 0.1 mm and 0.1 deg. Dose to the patient was reduced from 28 mGy to less than 1 mGy and the equivalent scan speed reduced to one minute or less. Conclusions: Automatic 3D registration of high speed, ultra low dose XVI scans with the planning CT scan can be used for precision 3D patient set-up verification/image guidance on a daily basis with out loss of accuracy when compared to higher dose XVI scans

  9. Quality control of a kV cone beam computed tomography imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marguet, M.; Bodez, V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This work presents the introduction of a quality assurance program for the On-Board Imager (O.B.I., Varian) kV cone beam computed tomography (kV C.B.C.T.) system, together with the results of 1 year monthly testing. Materials and methods: Firstly the geometric precision and stability of the equipment and of the associated software were evaluated using the Marker phantom. The coincidence of the accelerator isocenter and the imager isocenter was verified as well as the accuracy of the registration of kV cone beam computed tomography (kV C.B.C.T.) with reference CT images. Then, the kV C.B.C.T. image quality was evaluated using the Catphan 504 phantom and ArtiScan software (Aquilab) for both full-fan (F.F.) and half-fan (H.F.) imaging modes. Results: The kV C.B.C.T. isocenter and image registration with correction of the table position were found to be within a tolerance of 2.0 mm. Concerning the kV C.B.C.T. image quality, image noise and uniformity, the Hounsfield units (HU) stability and linearity, geometric distortion and high contrast resolution were all found to be within the manufacturer's recommendations for both F.F. and H.F. modes. However, the low contrast resolution for the HF mode did not meet the manufacturer's specifications. Conclusion: The quality assurance tests introduced have defined the initial system characteristics and their evolution during a period of 1 year, demonstrating the stability of the O.B.I.. (authors)

  10. Multi-image acquisition-based distance sensor using agile laser spot beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Nabeel A; Amin, M Junaid

    2014-09-01

    We present a novel laser-based distance measurement technique that uses multiple-image-based spatial processing to enable distance measurements. Compared with the first-generation distance sensor using spatial processing, the modified sensor is no longer hindered by the classic Rayleigh axial resolution limit for the propagating laser beam at its minimum beam waist location. The proposed high-resolution distance sensor design uses an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) in combination with an optical imaging device, such as a charged-coupled device (CCD), to produce and capture different laser spot size images on a target with these beam spot sizes different from the minimal spot size possible at this target distance. By exploiting the unique relationship of the target located spot sizes with the varying ECVFL focal length for each target distance, the proposed distance sensor can compute the target distance with a distance measurement resolution better than the axial resolution via the Rayleigh resolution criterion. Using a 30 mW 633 nm He-Ne laser coupled with an electromagnetically actuated liquid ECVFL, along with a 20 cm focal length bias lens, and using five spot images captured per target position by a CCD-based Nikon camera, a proof-of-concept proposed distance sensor is successfully implemented in the laboratory over target ranges from 10 to 100 cm with a demonstrated sub-cm axial resolution, which is better than the axial Rayleigh resolution limit at these target distances. Applications for the proposed potentially cost-effective distance sensor are diverse and include industrial inspection and measurement and 3D object shape mapping and imaging.

  11. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: Minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R.; Henderson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem in monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots, each of a diameter of around 7 nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, where the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support; however great care is needed in practice and the problem remains of how to best image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film. -- Research Highlights: →Three ideas were tested to improve the contrast of images of an organic specimen. →High-resolution images of paraffin on thick carbon films can have perfect contrast

  12. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: Minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Henderson, R., E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem in monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots, each of a diameter of around 7 nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, where the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support; however great care is needed in practice and the problem remains of how to best image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film. -- Research Highlights: {yields}Three ideas were tested to improve the contrast of images of an organic specimen. {yields}High-resolution images of paraffin on thick carbon films can have perfect

  13. The completeness condition and source orbits for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiping; Kang Kejun

    1997-01-01

    The completeness condition for exact image reconstruction in 3D cone-beam CT are carefully analyzed in theory, and discussions about some source orbits which fulfill the completeness condition are followed

  14. A local region of interest image reconstruction via filtered backprojection for fan-beam differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Zhihua; Chen Guanghong

    2007-01-01

    Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has been experimentally implemented using a conventional source combined with several gratings. Images were reconstructed using a parallel-beam reconstruction formula. However, parallel-beam reconstruction formulae are not directly applicable for a large image object where the parallel-beam approximation fails. In this note, we present a new image reconstruction formula for fan-beam DPC-CT. There are two major features in this algorithm: (1) it enables the reconstruction of a local region of interest (ROI) using data acquired from an angular interval shorter than 180 0 + fan angle and (2) it still preserves the filtered backprojection structure. Numerical simulations have been conducted to validate the image reconstruction algorithm. (note)

  15. Digital-image-correlation-based experimental stress analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened using carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jeffrey; Kurtz, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The strengthening of reinforced concrete beams through the use of epoxy-bonded carbon composites has been widely researched in the United States since 1991. Despite the widespread attention of researchers, however, there are no reliable methods of predicting the failure of the repaired and strengthened beams by peeling of the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material from the parent concrete. To better understand peeling failure, several investigators have presented analytical work to predict the distribution of stresses along the interface between the FRP and the concrete. Several closed-form solutions can be found in the literature to predict the levels of shear stress present between the bonded composite plate and the parent concrete beam. However, there has been very little experimental verification of these analytical predictions because few experiments on large-scale beams have had sufficient instrumentation to facilitate the comparison. Some experiments have been presented1 in which electrical resistance strain gages were placed along the length of the carbon plate in order to deduce the interfacial shear stress using first differences. This method, though very crude, demonstrated that there are substantial differences between the distributions of interfacial shear stresses in actual repaired beams versus the analytical predictions. This paper presents a new test program in which large-scale carbon-fiber-strengthened reinforced concrete beams are load-tested to failure, while employing digital image correlation (DIC) to record the strains in the carbon fiber plate. Relying on the linear elasticity of carbon fiber, the interfacial shear can be determined and compared with the analytical predictions of the literature. The focus of this paper is the presentation of the experimental shear stress distributions and comparisons of these distributions with previous results available in the literature.

  16. Quality assessment and enhancement for cone-beam computed tomography in dental imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Sung Chae

    2006-02-01

    Cone-beam CT will become increasingly important in diagnostic imaging modality in the dental practice over the next decade. For dental diagnostic imaging, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) system based on large area flat panel imager has been designed and developed for three-dimensional volumetric image. The new CBCT system can provide a 3-D volumetric image during only one circular scanning with relatively short times (20-30 seconds) and requires less radiation dose than that of conventional CT. To reconstruct volumetric image from 2-D projection images, FDK algorithm was employed. The prototype of our CBCT system gives the promising results that can be efficiently diagnosed. This dissertation deals with assessment, enhancement, and optimization for dental cone-beam computed tomography with high performance. A new blur estimation method was proposed, namely model based estimation algorithm. Based on the empirical model of the PSF, an image restoration is applied to radiological images. The accuracy of the PSF estimation under Poisson noise and readout electronic noise is significantly better for the R-L estimator than the Wiener estimator. In the image restoration experiment, the result showed much better improvement in the low and middle range of spatial frequency. Our proposed algorithm is more simple and effective method to determine 2-D PSF of the x-ray imaging system than traditional methods. Image based scatter correction scheme to reduce the scatter effects was proposed. This algorithm corrects scatter on projection images based on convolution, scatter fraction, and angular interpolation. The scatter signal was estimated by convolving a projection image with scatter point spread function (SPSF) followed by multiplication with scatter fraction. Scatter fraction was estimated using collimator which is similar to SPECS method. This method does not require extra x-ray dose and any additional phantom. Maximum estimated error for interpolation was less than 7

  17. Reconstruction of a cone-beam CT image via forward iterative projection matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, R. Scott; Docef, Alen; Murphy, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of reconstructing a cone-beam CT (CBCT) image by deformably altering a prior fan-beam CT (FBCT) image such that it matches the anatomy portrayed in the CBCT projection data set. Methods: A prior FBCT image of the patient is assumed to be available as a source image. A CBCT projection data set is obtained and used as a target image set. A parametrized deformation model is applied to the source FBCT image, digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) that emulate the CBCT projection image geometry are calculated and compared to the target CBCT projection data, and the deformation model parameters are adjusted iteratively until the DRRs optimally match the CBCT projection data set. The resulting deformed FBCT image is hypothesized to be an accurate representation of the patient's anatomy imaged by the CBCT system. The process is demonstrated via numerical simulation. A known deformation is applied to a prior FBCT image and used to create a synthetic set of CBCT target projections. The iterative projection matching process is then applied to reconstruct the deformation represented in the synthetic target projections; the reconstructed deformation is then compared to the known deformation. The sensitivity of the process to the number of projections and the DRR/CBCT projection mismatch is explored by systematically adding noise to and perturbing the contrast of the target projections relative to the iterated source DRRs and by reducing the number of projections. Results: When there is no noise or contrast mismatch in the CBCT projection images, a set of 64 projections allows the known deformed CT image to be reconstructed to within a nRMS error of 1% and the known deformation to within a nRMS error of 7%. A CT image nRMS error of less than 4% is maintained at noise levels up to 3% of the mean projection intensity, at which the deformation error is 13%. At 1% noise level, the number of projections can be reduced to 8 while maintaining

  18. Cone beam CT imaging with limited angle of projections and prior knowledge for volumetric verification of non-coplanar beam radiation therapy: a proof of concept study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bowen; Xing, Lei; Han, Bin; Koong, Albert; Chang, Daniel; Cheng, Jason; Li, Ruijiang

    2013-11-01

    Non-coplanar beams are important for treatment of both cranial and noncranial tumors. Treatment verification of such beams with couch rotation/kicks, however, is challenging, particularly for the application of cone beam CT (CBCT). In this situation, only limited and unconventional imaging angles are feasible to avoid collision between the gantry, couch, patient, and on-board imaging system. The purpose of this work is to develop a CBCT verification strategy for patients undergoing non-coplanar radiation therapy. We propose an image reconstruction scheme that integrates a prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) technique with image registration. Planning CT or CBCT acquired at the neutral position is rotated and translated according to the nominal couch rotation/translation to serve as the initial prior image. Here, the nominal couch movement is chosen to have a rotational error of 5° and translational error of 8 mm from the ground truth in one or more axes or directions. The proposed reconstruction scheme alternates between two major steps. First, an image is reconstructed using the PICCS technique implemented with total-variation minimization and simultaneous algebraic reconstruction. Second, the rotational/translational setup errors are corrected and the prior image is updated by applying rigid image registration between the reconstructed image and the previous prior image. The PICCS algorithm and rigid image registration are alternated iteratively until the registration results fall below a predetermined threshold. The proposed reconstruction algorithm is evaluated with an anthropomorphic digital phantom and physical head phantom. The proposed algorithm provides useful volumetric images for patient setup using projections with an angular range as small as 60°. It reduced the translational setup errors from 8 mm to generally <1 mm and the rotational setup errors from 5° to <1°. Compared with the PICCS algorithm alone, the integration of rigid

  19. Measuring linac photon beam energy through EPID image analysis of physically wedged fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawoud, S. M., E-mail: samir.dawoud@leedsth.nhs.uk; Weston, S. J.; Bond, I.; Ward, G. C.; Rixham, P. A.; Mason, J.; Huckle, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Sykes, J. R. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia and Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, St. James Institute of Oncology, St. James University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful tools for measuring several parameters of interest in linac quality assurance (QA). However, a method for measuring linac photon beam energy using EPIDs has not previously been reported. In this report, such a method is devised and tested, based on fitting a second order polynomial to the profiles of physically wedged beams, where the metric of interest is the second order coefficientα. The relationship between α and the beam quality index [percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth (PDD{sub 10})] is examined to produce a suitable calibration curve between these two parameters. Methods: Measurements were taken in a water-tank for beams with a range of energies representative of the local QA tolerances about the nominal value 6 MV. In each case, the beam quality was found in terms of PDD{sub 10} for 100 × 100 mm{sup 2} square fields. EPID images of 200 × 200 mm{sup 2} wedged fields were then taken for each beam and the wedge profile was fitted in MATLAB 2010b (The MathWorks, Inc., Natick, MA). α was then plotted against PDD{sub 10} and fitted with a linear relation to produce the calibration curve. The uncertainty in α was evaluated by taking five repeat EPID images of the wedged field for a beam of 6 MV nominal energy. The consistency of measuring α was found by taking repeat measurements on a single linac over a three month period. The method was also tested at 10 MV by repeating the water-tank crosscalibration for a range of energies centered approximately about a 10 MV nominal value. Finally, the calibration curve from the test linac and that from a separate clinical machine were compared to test consistency of the method across machines in a matched fleet. Results: The relationship betweenα and PDD{sub 10} was found to be strongly linear (R{sup 2} = 0.979) while the uncertainty in α was found to be negligible compared to that associated with measuring PDD{sub 10} in the water-tank (

  20. Improved compressed sensing-based cone-beam CT reconstruction using adaptive prior image constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho; Xing, Lei; Davidi, Ran; Li, Ruijiang; Qian, Jianguo; Lee, Rena

    2012-04-01

    Volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) images are acquired repeatedly during a course of radiation therapy and a natural question to ask is whether CBCT images obtained earlier in the process can be utilized as prior knowledge to reduce patient imaging dose in subsequent scans. The purpose of this work is to develop an adaptive prior image constrained compressed sensing (APICCS) method to solve this problem. Reconstructed images using full projections are taken on the first day of radiation therapy treatment and are used as prior images. The subsequent scans are acquired using a protocol of sparse projections. In the proposed APICCS algorithm, the prior images are utilized as an initial guess and are incorporated into the objective function in the compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction process. Furthermore, the prior information is employed to detect any possible mismatched regions between the prior and current images for improved reconstruction. For this purpose, the prior images and the reconstructed images are classified into three anatomical regions: air, soft tissue and bone. Mismatched regions are identified by local differences of the corresponding groups in the two classified sets of images. A distance transformation is then introduced to convert the information into an adaptive voxel-dependent relaxation map. In constructing the relaxation map, the matched regions (unchanged anatomy) between the prior and current images are assigned with smaller weight values, which are translated into less influence on the CS iterative reconstruction process. On the other hand, the mismatched regions (changed anatomy) are associated with larger values and the regions are updated more by the new projection data, thus avoiding any possible adverse effects of prior images. The APICCS approach was systematically assessed by using patient data acquired under standard and low-dose protocols for qualitative and quantitative comparisons. The APICCS method provides an

  1. CRionScan: A stand-alone real time controller designed to perform ion beam imaging, dose controlled irradiation and proton beam writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudin, L.; Barberet, Ph.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2013-07-01

    High resolution ion microbeams, usually used to perform elemental mapping, low dose targeted irradiation or ion beam lithography needs a very flexible beam control system. For this purpose, we have developed a dedicated system (called “CRionScan”), on the AIFIRA facility (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d'Ions en Région Aquitaine). It consists of a stand-alone real-time scanning and imaging instrument based on a Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (Compact RIO) device from National Instruments™. It is based on a real-time controller, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), input/output modules and Ethernet connectivity. We have implemented a fast and deterministic beam scanning system interfaced with our commercial data acquisition system without any hardware development. CRionScan is built under LabVIEW™ and has been used on AIFIRA's nanobeam line since 2009 (Barberet et al., 2009, 2011) [1,2]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) embedded in the Compact RIO as a web page is used to control the scanning parameters. In addition, a fast electrostatic beam blanking trigger has been included in the FPGA and high speed counters (15 MHz) have been implemented to perform dose controlled irradiation and on-line images on the GUI. Analog to Digital converters are used for the beam current measurement and in the near future for secondary electrons imaging. Other functionalities have been integrated in this controller like LED lighting using Pulse Width Modulation and a “NIM Wilkinson ADC” data acquisition.

  2. CRionScan: A stand-alone real time controller designed to perform ion beam imaging, dose controlled irradiation and proton beam writing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daudin, L., E-mail: daudin@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Université Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Barberet, Ph.; Serani, L.; Moretto, Ph. [Université Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2013-07-01

    High resolution ion microbeams, usually used to perform elemental mapping, low dose targeted irradiation or ion beam lithography needs a very flexible beam control system. For this purpose, we have developed a dedicated system (called “CRionScan”), on the AIFIRA facility (Applications Interdisciplinaires des Faisceaux d’Ions en Région Aquitaine). It consists of a stand-alone real-time scanning and imaging instrument based on a Compact Reconfigurable Input/Output (Compact RIO) device from National Instruments™. It is based on a real-time controller, a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), input/output modules and Ethernet connectivity. We have implemented a fast and deterministic beam scanning system interfaced with our commercial data acquisition system without any hardware development. CRionScan is built under LabVIEW™ and has been used on AIFIRA’s nanobeam line since 2009 (Barberet et al., 2009, 2011) [1,2]. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) embedded in the Compact RIO as a web page is used to control the scanning parameters. In addition, a fast electrostatic beam blanking trigger has been included in the FPGA and high speed counters (15 MHz) have been implemented to perform dose controlled irradiation and on-line images on the GUI. Analog to Digital converters are used for the beam current measurement and in the near future for secondary electrons imaging. Other functionalities have been integrated in this controller like LED lighting using Pulse Width Modulation and a “NIM Wilkinson ADC” data acquisition.

  3. Efficient second-harmonic imaging of collagen in histological slides using Bessel beam excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillemin, Nelly; Mahou, Pierre; Débarre, Delphine; Gacoin, Thierry; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Schanne-Klein, Marie-Claire; Supatto, Willy; Beaurepaire, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) is the most specific label-free indicator of collagen accumulation in widespread pathologies such as fibrosis, and SHG-based measurements hold important potential for biomedical analyses. However, efficient collagen SHG scoring in histological slides is hampered by the limited depth-of-field of usual nonlinear microscopes relying on focused Gaussian beam excitation. In this work we analyze theoretically and experimentally the use of Bessel beam excitation to address this issue. Focused Bessel beams can provide an axially extended excitation volume for nonlinear microscopy while preserving lateral resolution. We show that shaping the focal volume has consequences on signal level and scattering directionality in the case of coherent signals (such as SHG) which significantly differ from the case of incoherent signals (two-photon excited fluorescence, 2PEF). We demonstrate extended-depth SHG-2PEF imaging of fibrotic mouse kidney histological slides. Finally, we show that Bessel beam excitation combined with spatial filtering of the harmonic light in wave vector space can be used to probe collagen accumulation more efficiently than the usual Gaussian excitation scheme. These results open the way to SHG-based histological diagnoses.

  4. Efficient creation of electron vortex beams for high resolution STEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béché, A; Juchtmans, R; Verbeeck, J

    2017-07-01

    The recent discovery of electron vortex beams carrying quantised angular momentum in the TEM has led to an active field of research, exploring a variety of potential applications including the possibility of mapping magnetic states at the atomic scale. A prerequisite for this is the availability of atomic sized electron vortex beams at high beam current and mode purity. In this paper we present recent progress showing that by making use of the Aharonov-Bohm effect near the tip of a long single domain ferromagnetic Nickel needle, a very efficient aperture for the production of electron vortex beams can be realised. The aperture transmits more than 99% of all electrons and provides a vortex mode purity of up to 92%. Placing this aperture in the condenser plane of a state of the art Cs corrected microscope allows us to demonstrate atomic resolution HAADF STEM images with spatial resolution better than 1 Angström, in agreement with theoretical expectations and only slightly inferior to the performance of a non-vortex probe on the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Many-beam effects in electron microscope images of lattice defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izui, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Takahiko; Furuno, Shigemi; Otsu, Hitoshi

    1974-01-01

    Multi-beam effects in electron microscopic images were investigated. A computation program was developed on the basis of a matrix theory of the multi-beam effects. The matrix theory for a perfect crystal and an imperfect crystal is described, and expression for absorption coefficient is presented. The amplitude of electron wave penetrating through lattice defects is expressed by using scattering matrices which correspond to crystal slices. Calculation of extinction distance was performed, and compared with experimental results. In case of systematic reflection, the difference between two beams and from four to eight beams approximation was small, while a large effect was seen in case of accidental reflection. The intensity profile of bend contour was calculated for silicon and copper-aluminum alloy. Distance between submaxima becomes short with increase of thickness. The change in stacking fault fringes with diffraction condition was investigated. Samples were copper-aluminum alloy. Systematic behavior of the fringes was obtained, and the calculated results reproduced experimental ones. (Kato, T.)

  6. Bowtie filter and water calibration in the improvement of cone beam CT image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minghui; Dai Jianrong; Zhang Ke

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the improvement of cone beam CT (CBCT) image quality by using bewtie filter (F 1 ) and water calibration. Methods: First the multi-level gain calibration of the detector panel with the method of Cal 2 calibration was performed, and the CT images of CATPHAN503 with F 0 and bowtie filter were collected, respectively. Then the detector panel using water calibration kit was calibrated, and images were acquired again. Finally, the change of image quality after using F 1 and (or) water calibration method was observed. The observed indexes included low contrast visibility, spatial uniformity, ring artifact, spatial resolution and geometric accuracy. Results: Comparing with the traditional combination of F 0 filter and Cal 2 calibration, the combination of bowtie filter F 1 and water calibration improves low contrast visibility by 13.71%, and spatial uniformity by 54. 42%. Water calibration removes ring artifacts effectively. However, none of them improves spatial resolution and geometric accuracy. Conclusions: The combination of F 1 and water calibration improves CBCT image quality effectively. This improvement is aid to the registration of CBCT images and localization images. (authors)

  7. Helium ion microscopy of graphene: beam damage, image quality and edge contrast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, D; Zhou, Y B; O’Neill, A; Wang, J J; Coleman, J N; Donegan, J F; Zhang, H Z; Kumar, S; Duesberg, G S

    2013-01-01

    A study to analyse beam damage, image quality and edge contrast in the helium ion microscope (HIM) has been undertaken. The sample investigated was graphene. Raman spectroscopy was used to quantify the disorder that can be introduced into the graphene as a function of helium ion dose. The effects of the dose on both freestanding and supported graphene were compared. These doses were then correlated directly to image quality by imaging graphene flakes at high magnification. It was found that a high magnification image with a good signal to noise ratio will introduce very significant sample damage. A safe imaging dose of the order of 10 13 He + cm −2 was established, with both graphene samples becoming highly defective at doses over 5 × 10 14 He + cm −2 . The edge contrast of a freestanding graphene flake imaged in the HIM was then compared with the contrast of the same flake observed in a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. Very strong edge sensitivity was observed in the HIM. This enhanced edge sensitivity over the other techniques investigated makes the HIM a powerful nanoscale dimensional metrology tool, with the capability of both fabricating and imaging features with sub-nanometre resolution. (paper)

  8. Image grating metrology using phase-stepping interferometry in scanning beam interference lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minkang; Zhou, Changhe; Wei, Chunlong; Jia, Wei; Lu, Yancong; Xiang, Changcheng; Xiang, XianSong

    2016-10-01

    Large-sized gratings are essential optical elements in laser fusion and space astronomy facilities. Scanning beam interference lithography is an effective method to fabricate large-sized gratings. To minimize the nonlinear phase written into the photo-resist, the image grating must be measured to adjust the left and right beams to interfere at their waists. In this paper, we propose a new method to conduct wavefront metrology based on phase-stepping interferometry. Firstly, a transmission grating is used to combine the two beams to form an interferogram which is recorded by a charge coupled device(CCD). Phase steps are introduced by moving the grating with a linear stage monitored by a laser interferometer. A series of interferograms are recorded as the displacement is measured by the laser interferometer. Secondly, to eliminate the tilt and piston error during the phase stepping, the iterative least square phase shift method is implemented to obtain the wrapped phase. Thirdly, we use the discrete cosine transform least square method to unwrap the phase map. Experiment results indicate that the measured wavefront has a nonlinear phase around 0.05 λ@404.7nm. Finally, as the image grating is acquired, we simulate the print-error written into the photo-resist.

  9. Turn-by-Turn Imaging of the Transverse Beam Profile in PEP-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Alan A.; Petree, Mark; /SLAC

    2006-12-18

    During injection or instability, the transverse profile of an individual bunch in a storage ring can change significantly in a few turns. However, most synchrotron-light imaging techniques are not designed for this time scale. We have developed a novel diagnostic that enhances the utility of a fast gated camera by adding, inexpensively, some features of a dual-axis streak camera, in order to watch the turn-by-turn evolution of the transverse profile, in both x and y. The beam's elliptical profile is reshaped using cylindrical lenses to form a tall and narrow ellipse--essentially the projection of the full ellipse onto one transverse axis. We do this projection twice, by splitting the beam into two paths at different heights, and rotating the ellipse by 90{sup o} on one path. A rapidly rotating mirror scans these vertical ''pencils'' of light horizontally across the photocathode of the camera, which is gated for 3 ns on every Nth ring turn. A single readout of the camera captures 100 images, looking like a stroboscopic photograph of a moving object. We have observed the capture of injected charge into a bunch and the rapid change of beam size at the onset of a fast instability.

  10. Visualization and analysis of pulsed ion beam energy density profile with infrared imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova, Y. I.; Pushkarev, A. I.

    2018-03-01

    Infrared imaging technique was used as a surface temperature-mapping tool to characterize the energy density distribution of intense pulsed ion beams on a thin metal target. The technique enables the measuring of the total ion beam energy and the energy density distribution along the cross section and allows one to optimize the operation of an ion diode and control target irradiation mode. The diagnostics was tested on the TEMP-4M accelerator at TPU, Tomsk, Russia and on the TEMP-6 accelerator at DUT, Dalian, China. The diagnostics was applied in studies of the dynamics of the target cooling in vacuum after irradiation and in the experiments with target ablation. Errors caused by the target ablation and target cooling during measurements have been analyzed. For Fluke Ti10 and Fluke Ti400 infrared cameras, the technique can achieve surface energy density sensitivity of 0.05 J/cm2 and spatial resolution of 1-2 mm. The thermal imaging diagnostics does not require expensive consumed materials. The measurement time does not exceed 0.1 s; therefore, this diagnostics can be used for the prompt evaluation of the energy density distribution of a pulsed ion beam and during automation of the irradiation process.

  11. Relationships between cone beam CT value and physical density in image guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiaoqin; Bai Sen; Zhong Renming; Tang Zhiquan; Jiang Qinfeng; Li Tao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the main factors affecting the relationship between physical density and CT value in cone-beam computed tomography(CBCT) for imaging guided radiation therapy(IGRT) by comparing the CT value in the image from cone-beam scanner and from fan-beam (FBCT) scanner of a reference phantom. Methods: A taking-park reference phantom with a set of tissue equivalent inserts was scanned at different energies different fields of view (FOV) for IGRT-CBCT and FBCT. The CT value of every insert was measured and compared. Results: The position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom, the FOV of scanner and different energies had more effect on the relationships between physical density and the CT value from IGRT-CBCT than those from the normal FBCT. The higher the energy was, the less effect of the position of inserts in phantom, the size of phantom and the FOV of scanner on CT value, and the poorer density contrast was observed. Conclusion: At present, the CT value of IGRT-CBCT is not in the true HU value since the manufacturer has not corrected its number. Therefore, we are not able to use the CT value of CBCT for dose calculation in TPS. (authors)

  12. High-fidelity artifact correction for cone-beam CT imaging of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Zbijewski, W.; Xu, J.; Dang, H.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Aygun, N.; Koliatsos, V.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2015-02-01

    CT is the frontline imaging modality for diagnosis of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI), involving the detection of fresh blood in the brain (contrast of 30-50 HU, detail size down to 1 mm) in a non-contrast-enhanced exam. A dedicated point-of-care imaging system based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) could benefit early detection of TBI and improve direction to appropriate therapy. However, flat-panel detector (FPD) CBCT is challenged by artifacts that degrade contrast resolution and limit application in soft-tissue imaging. We present and evaluate a fairly comprehensive framework for artifact correction to enable soft-tissue brain imaging with FPD CBCT. The framework includes a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based scatter estimation method complemented by corrections for detector lag, veiling glare, and beam hardening. The fast MC scatter estimation combines GPU acceleration, variance reduction, and simulation with a low number of photon histories and reduced number of projection angles (sparse MC) augmented by kernel de-noising to yield a runtime of ~4 min per scan. Scatter correction is combined with two-pass beam hardening correction. Detector lag correction is based on temporal deconvolution of the measured lag response function. The effects of detector veiling glare are reduced by deconvolution of the glare response function representing the long range tails of the detector point-spread function. The performance of the correction framework is quantified in experiments using a realistic head phantom on a testbench for FPD CBCT. Uncorrected reconstructions were non-diagnostic for soft-tissue imaging tasks in the brain. After processing with the artifact correction framework, image uniformity was substantially improved, and artifacts were reduced to a level that enabled visualization of ~3 mm simulated bleeds throughout the brain. Non-uniformity (cupping) was reduced by a factor of 5, and contrast of simulated bleeds was improved from ~7 to 49.7 HU, in good agreement

  13. Protocol of image guided off-line using cone beam CT megavoltage; Protocolo de imagen guiada off-line mediante Cone Beam CT de megavoltaje

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Ruiz-Zorrilla, J.; Fernandez Leton, J. P.; Perez Moreno, J. M.; Zucca Aparicio, D.; Minambres Moro, A.

    2013-07-01

    The goal of image guided protocols offline is to reduce systematic errors in positioning of the patient in the treatment unit, being more important than the random errors, since the systematic have one contribution in the margin of the CTV to the PTV. This paper proposes a protocol for image guided offline with the different actions to take with their threshold values evaluated previously by anatomic location in a sample of 474 patients and 4821Cone beam Megavoltaje CT (CBCT). (Author)

  14. Megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography using a high-efficiency image receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppi, Ed J.; Munro, Peter; Johnsen, Stan W.; Shapiro, Ed G.; Tognina, Carlo; Jones, Dan; Pavkovich, John M.; Webb, Chris; Mollov, Ivan; Partain, Larry D.; Colbeth, Rick E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an image receptor capable of forming high-quality megavoltage CT images using modest radiation doses. Methods and Materials: A flat-panel imaging system consisting of a conventional flat-panel sensor attached to a thick CsI scintillator has been fabricated. The scintillator consists of individual CsI crystals 8 mm thick by 0.38 mm x 0.38-mm pitch. Five sides of each crystal are coated with a reflecting powder/epoxy mixture, and the sixth side is in contact with the flat-panel sensor. A timing interface coordinates acquisition by the imaging system and pulsing of the linear accelerator. With this interface, as little as one accelerator pulse (0.023 cGy at the isocenter) can be used to form projection images. Different CT phantoms irradiated by a 6-MV X-ray beam have been imaged to evaluate the performance of the imaging system. The phantoms have been mounted on a rotating stage and rotated while 360 projection images are acquired in 48 s. These projections have been reconstructed using the Feldkamp cone-beam CT reconstruction algorithm. Results and Discussion: Using an irradiation of 16 cGy (360 projections x 0.046 cGy/projection), the contrast resolution is ∼1% for large objects. High-contrast structures as small as 1.2 mm are clearly visible. The reconstructed CT values are linear (R 2 =0.98) for electron densities between 0.001 and 2.16 g/cm 3 , and the reconstruction time for a 512 x 512 x 512 data set is 6 min. Images of an anthropomorphic phantom show that soft-tissue structures such as the heart, lung, kidneys, and liver are visible in the reconstructed images (16 cGy, 5-mm-thick slices). Conclusions: The acquisition of megavoltage CT images with soft-tissue contrast is possible with irradiations as small as 16 cGy

  15. Algorithm-enabled exploration of image-quality potential of cone-beam CT in image-guided radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xiao; Sidky, Emil Y; Pan, Xiaochuan; Pearson, Erik; Pelizzari, Charles; Al-Hallaq, Hania; Bian, Junguo

    2015-01-01

    Kilo-voltage (KV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) unit mounted onto a linear accelerator treatment system, often referred to as on-board imager (OBI), plays an increasingly important role in image-guided radiation therapy. While the FDK algorithm is currently used for reconstructing images from clinical OBI data, optimization-based reconstruction has also been investigated for OBI CBCT. An optimization-based reconstruction involves numerous parameters, which can significantly impact reconstruction properties (or utility). The success of an optimization-based reconstruction for a particular class of practical applications thus relies strongly on appropriate selection of parameter values. In the work, we focus on tailoring the constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction, an optimization-based reconstruction previously shown of some potential for CBCT imaging conditions of practical interest, to OBI imaging through appropriate selection of parameter values. In particular, for given real data of phantoms and patient collected with OBI CBCT, we first devise utility metrics specific to OBI-quality-assurance tasks and then apply them to guiding the selection of parameter values in constrained-TV-minimization-based reconstruction. The study results show that the reconstructions are with improvement, relative to clinical FDK reconstruction, in both visualization and quantitative assessments in terms of the devised utility metrics. (paper)

  16. Performance study of a fan beam collimator designed for a multi-modality small animal imaging device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabbir Ahmed, ASM; Kramer, Gary H.; Semmler, Wolfrad; Peter, Jorg

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology to design and conduct the performances of a fan beam collimator. This fan beam collimator was designed to use with a multi-modality small animal imaging device and the performance of the collimator was studied for a 3D geometry. Analytical expressions were formulated to calculate the parameters for the collimator. A Monte Carlo model was developed to analyze the scattering and image noises for a 3D object. The results showed that the performance of the fan beam collimator was strongly dependent on the source distribution and position. The fan beam collimator showed increased counting efficiency in comparison to a parallel hole collimator. Inside attenuating medium, the increased attenuating effect outweighed the fan beam increased counting efficiency.

  17. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M. -C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G., E-mail: giancarlo.rizza@polytechnique.edu [Commissariat à l' énergie atomique (CEA), Institut Rayonnement Matière de Saclay (IRaMIS), B.P. 52, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2010-07-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy.

  18. Synthesis of Specific Nanoparticles for Targeting and Imaging Tumor Angiogenesis Using Electron-Beam Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizza, G.; Deshayes, S.; Maurizot, V.; Clochard, M.-C.; Berthelot, T.; Baudin, C.; Déléris, G.

    2010-01-01

    We have succeeded to synthesize PVDF nanoparticles by nanoemulsion polymerization and their functionalization with a peptide that presents an anti-angiogenic activity. Resulted nanoparticles present a radius of 60 nm. From FESEM images and light scattering measurements, we deduced that they were spherical and monodisperse. The alkyl radicals induced from electron beam irradiation combine immediately with the oxygen to form peroxide radicals. Because of a high specific area and small crystallite size, the radical decay with time is evidenced from EPR measurements. Despite this radical decay, electron beam irradiation allows us to graft PAA by radical polymerization onto freshly irradiated PVDF nanoparticles and then to immobilize CBO-P11 by click chemistry via a spacer arm. Evidences of grafting were shown using HRMAS NMR and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Nanoparticles functionalized with an angiogenesis-targeting agent are an attractive option for anti-tumor therapy

  19. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revesz, Peter; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Pauling, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  20. New X-ray beam position monitors with submicron resolution utilizing imaging of scattered X-rays at CHESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revesz, Peter, E-mail: pr20@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Temnykh, Alexander B. [Cornell University, Laboratory for Elem-Particle Physics, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States); Pauling, Alan K. [Cornell University, Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Ithaca 14850, NY (United States)

    2011-09-01

    At CHESS' A, F and G wiggler beam lines three new video beam position monitors (VBPMs) have been commissioned. These new VBPMs utilize X-rays scattered from the graphite filter (A and F line) or from a beryllium window (G-line) as the white wiggler beam passes through them. As the X-rays scatter in all directions from the scattering medium, a slit camera creates an image of the beam's footprint on a fluorescent screen. This image is then viewed by a CCD camera and analyzed using a computer program to calculate the intensity centroid, the beam profile and integrated intensity. These data are delivered to the CHESS signal archiving system for storage and display. The new systems employ digital cameras. These cameras are free of the noise inherent to the analog systems with long video signal connections. As a result, the beam position data delivered by the new systems are more reliable and accurate as shown by beam position traces using different beam position monitors on the same beam line.

  1. Accuracy of Linear Measurements in Stitched Versus Non-Stitched Cone Beam Computed Tomography Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srimawong, P.; Krisanachinda, A.; Chindasombatjaroen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography images are useful in clinical dentistry. Linear measurements are necessary for accurate treatment planning.Therefore, the accuracy of linear measurements on CBCT images is needed to be verified. Current program called stitching program in Kodak 9000C 3D systems automatically combines up to three localized volumes to construct larger images with small voxel size.The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of linear measurements from stitched and non-stitched CBCT images in comparison to direct measurements.This study was performed in 10 human dry mandibles. Gutta-percha rods were marked at reference points to obtain 10 vertical and horizontal distances. Direct measurements by digital caliper were served as gold standard. All distances on CBCT images obtained by using and not using stitching program were measured, and compared with direct measurements.The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated.The ICC of direct measurements were 0.998 to 1.000.The ICC of intraobserver of both non-stitched CBCT images and stitched CBCT images were 1.000 indicated strong agreement made by a single observer.The intermethod ICC between direct measurements vs non-stitched CBCT images and direct measurements vs stitched CBCT images ranged from 0.972 to 1.000 and 0.967 to 0.998, respectively. No statistically significant differences between direct measurements and stitched CBCT images or non-stitched CBCT images (P > 0.05). The results showed that linear measurements on non-stitched and stitched CBCT images were highly accurate with no statistical difference compared to direct measurements. The ICC values in non-stitched and stitched CBCT images and direct measurements of vertical distances were slightly higher than those of horizontal distances. This indicated that the measurements in vertical orientation were more accurate than those in horizontal orientation. However, the differences were not statistically significant. Stitching

  2. Cherenkov imaging method for rapid optimization of clinical treatment geometry in total skin electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreozzi, Jacqueline M., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org; Glaser, Adam K. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J.; Williams, Benjamin B.; Jarvis, Lesley A., E-mail: Jacqueline.M.Andreozzi.th@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Lesley.A.Jarvis@hitchcock.org [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: A method was developed utilizing Cherenkov imaging for rapid and thorough determination of the two gantry angles that produce the most uniform treatment plane during dual-field total skin electron beam therapy (TSET). Methods: Cherenkov imaging was implemented to gather 2D measurements of relative surface dose from 6 MeV electron beams on a white polyethylene sheet. An intensified charge-coupled device camera time-gated to the Linac was used for Cherenkov emission imaging at sixty-two different gantry angles (1° increments, from 239.5° to 300.5°). Following a modified Stanford TSET technique, which uses two fields per patient position for full body coverage, composite images were created as the sum of two beam images on the sheet; each angle pair was evaluated for minimum variation across the patient region of interest. Cherenkov versus dose correlation was verified with ionization chamber measurements. The process was repeated at source to surface distance (SSD) = 441, 370.5, and 300 cm to determine optimal angle spread for varying room geometries. In addition, three patients receiving TSET using a modified Stanford six-dual field technique with 6 MeV electron beams at SSD = 441 cm were imaged during treatment. Results: As in previous studies, Cherenkov intensity was shown to directly correlate with dose for homogenous flat phantoms (R{sup 2} = 0.93), making Cherenkov imaging an appropriate candidate to assess and optimize TSET setup geometry. This method provided dense 2D images allowing 1891 possible treatment geometries to be comprehensively analyzed from one data set of 62 single images. Gantry angles historically used for TSET at their institution were 255.5° and 284.5° at SSD = 441 cm; however, the angles optimized for maximum homogeneity were found to be 252.5° and 287.5° (+6° increase in angle spread). Ionization chamber measurements confirmed improvement in dose homogeneity across the treatment field from a range of 24.4% at the initial

  3. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hyekyun; Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Keall, Paul J.; Cho, Seungryong; Cho, Byungchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  4. Reconstruction of implanted marker trajectories from cone-beam CT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hyekyun [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141, South Korea and Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Poulsen, Per Rugaard [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cho, Seungryong [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byungchul, E-mail: cho.byungchul@gmail.com, E-mail: bcho@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is a widely used imaging modality for image-guided radiotherapy. Most vendors provide CBCT systems that are mounted on a linac gantry. Thus, CBCT can be used to estimate the actual 3-dimensional (3D) position of moving respiratory targets in the thoracic/abdominal region using 2D projection images. The authors have developed a method for estimating the 3D trajectory of respiratory-induced target motion from CBCT projection images using interdimensional correlation modeling. Methods: Because the superior–inferior (SI) motion of a target can be easily analyzed on projection images of a gantry-mounted CBCT system, the authors investigated the interdimensional correlation of the SI motion with left–right and anterior–posterior (AP) movements while the gantry is rotating. A simple linear model and a state-augmented model were implemented and applied to the interdimensional correlation analysis, and their performance was compared. The parameters of the interdimensional correlation models were determined by least-square estimation of the 2D error between the actual and estimated projected target position. The method was validated using 160 3D tumor trajectories from 46 thoracic/abdominal cancer patients obtained during CyberKnife treatment. The authors’ simulations assumed two application scenarios: (1) retrospective estimation for the purpose of moving tumor setup used just after volumetric matching with CBCT; and (2) on-the-fly estimation for the purpose of real-time target position estimation during gating or tracking delivery, either for full-rotation volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in 60 s or a stationary six-field intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a beam delivery time of 20 s. Results: For the retrospective CBCT simulations, the mean 3D root-mean-square error (RMSE) for all 4893 trajectory segments was 0.41 mm (simple linear model) and 0.35 mm (state-augmented model). In the on-the-fly simulations, prior

  5. Balancing dose and image registration accuracy for cone beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) for breast patient setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winey, B. A.; Zygmanski, P.; Cormack, R. A.; Lyatskaya, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To balance dose reduction and image registration accuracy in breast setup imaging. In particular, the authors demonstrate the relationship between scan angle and dose delivery for cone beam tomosynthesis (CBTS) when employed for setup verification of breast cancer patients with surgical clips. Methods: The dose measurements were performed in a female torso phantom for varying scan angles of CBTS. Setup accuracy was measured using three registration methods: Clip centroid localization accuracy and the accuracy of two semiautomatic registration algorithms. The dose to the organs outside of the ipsilateral breast and registration accuracy information were compared to determine the optimal scan angle for CBTS for breast patient setup verification. Isocenter positions at the center of the patient and at the breast-chest wall interface were considered. Results: Image registration accuracy was within 1 mm for the CBTS scan angles θ above 20 deg. for some scenarios and as large as 80 deg. for the worst case, depending on the imaged breast and registration algorithm. Registration accuracy was highest based on clip centroid localization. For left and right breast imaging with the isocenter at the chest wall, the dose to the contralateral side of the patient was very low (<0.5 cGy) for all scan angles considered. For central isocenter location, the optimal scan angles were 30 deg. - 50 deg. for the left breast imaging and 40 deg. - 50 deg. for the right breast imaging, with the difference due to the geometric asymmetry of the current clinical imaging system. Conclusions: The optimal scan angles for CBTS imaging were found to be between 10 deg. and 50 deg., depending on the isocenter location and ipsilateral breast. Use of the isocenter at the breast-chest wall locations always resulted in greater accuracy of image registration (<1 mm) at smaller angles (10 deg. - 20 deg.) and at lower doses (<0.1 cGy) to the contralateral organs. For chest wall isocenters, doses

  6. Pictorial review: Electron beam computed tomography and multislice spiral computed tomography for cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lembcke, Alexander; Hein, Patrick A.; Dohmen, Pascal M.; Klessen, Christian; Wiese, Till H.; Hoffmann, Udo; Hamm, Bernd; Enzweiler, Christian N.H.

    2006-01-01

    Electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) revolutionized cardiac imaging by combining a constant high temporal resolution with prospective ECG triggering. For years, EBCT was the primary technique for some non-invasive diagnostic cardiac procedures such as calcium scoring and non-invasive angiography of the coronary arteries. Multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) on the other hand significantly advanced cardiac imaging through high volume coverage, improved spatial resolution and retrospective ECG gating. This pictorial review will illustrate the basic differences between both modalities with special emphasis to their image quality. Several experimental and clinical examples demonstrate the strengths and limitations of both imaging modalities in an intraindividual comparison for a broad range of diagnostic applications such as coronary artery calcium scoring, coronary angiography including stent visualization as well as functional assessment of the cardiac ventricles and valves. In general, our examples indicate that EBCT suffers from a number of shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and a low contrast-to-noise ratio. Thus, EBCT should now only be used in selected cases where a constant high temporal resolution is a crucial issue, such as dynamic (cine) imaging. Due to isotropic submillimeter spatial resolution and retrospective data selection MSCT seems to be the non-invasive method of choice for cardiac imaging in general, and for assessment of the coronary arteries in particular. However, technical developments are still needed to further improve the temporal resolution in MSCT and to reduce the substantial radiation exposure

  7. Bilateral and pseudobilateral tonsilloliths: Three dimensional imaging with cone-beam computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misirlioglu, Melda; Adisen, Mehmet Zahit; Yardimci, Selmi [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Kirikkale University, Kirikkale (Turkmenistan); Nalcaci, Rana [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2013-09-15

    Tonsilloliths are calcifications found in the crypts of the palatal tonsils and can be detected on routine panoramic examinations. This study was performed to highlight the benefits of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in the diagnosis of tonsilloliths appearing bilaterally on panoramic radiographs. The sample group consisted of 7 patients who had bilateral radiopaque lesions at the area of the ascending ramus on panoramic radiographs. CBCT images for every patient were obtained from both sides of the jaw to determine the exact locations of the lesions and to rule out other calcifications. The calcifications were evaluated on the CBCT images using Ez3D2009 software. Additionally, the obtained images in DICOM format were transferred to ITK SNAP 2.4.0 pc software for semiautomatic segmentation. Segmentation was performed using contrast differences between the soft tissues and calcifications on grayscale images, and the volume in mm{sup 3} of the segmented three dimensional models were obtained. CBCT scans revealed that what appeared on panoramic radiographs as bilateral images were in fact unilateral lesions in 2 cases. The total volume of the calcifications ranged from 7.92 to 302.5mm{sup 3}. The patients with bilaterally multiple and large calcifications were found to be symptomatic. The cases provided the evidence that tonsilloliths should be considered in the differential diagnosis of radiopaque masses involving the mandibular ramus, and they highlight the need for a CBCT scan to differentiate pseudo- or ghost images from true bilateral pathologies.

  8. Exact fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm for truncated projection data acquired from an asymmetric half-size detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng Shuai; Zhuang Tingliang; Nett, Brian E; Chen Guanghong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new algorithm designed for a specific data truncation problem in fan-beam CT. We consider a scanning configuration in which the fan-beam projection data are acquired from an asymmetrically positioned half-sized detector. Namely, the asymmetric detector only covers one half of the scanning field of view. Thus, the acquired fan-beam projection data are truncated at every view angle. If an explicit data rebinning process is not invoked, this data acquisition configuration will reek havoc on many known fan-beam image reconstruction schemes including the standard filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm and the super-short-scan FBP reconstruction algorithms. However, we demonstrate that a recently developed fan-beam image reconstruction algorithm which reconstructs an image via filtering a backprojection image of differentiated projection data (FBPD) survives the above fan-beam data truncation problem. Namely, we may exactly reconstruct the whole image object using the truncated data acquired in a full scan mode (2π angular range). We may also exactly reconstruct a small region of interest (ROI) using the truncated projection data acquired in a short-scan mode (less than 2π angular range). The most important characteristic of the proposed reconstruction scheme is that an explicit data rebinning process is not introduced. Numerical simulations were conducted to validate the new reconstruction algorithm

  9. Dynamic iterative beam hardening correction (DIBHC) in myocardial perfusion imaging using contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Philip; Schmidt, Bernhard; Allmendinger, Thomas; Flohr, Thomas; Kachelrie, Marc

    2010-06-01

    In cardiac perfusion examinations with computed tomography (CT) large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle and in the descending aorta cause beam hardening artifacts that can lead to incorrect perfusion parameters. The aim of this study is to reduce these artifacts by performing an iterative correction and by accounting for the 3 materials soft tissue, bone, and iodine. Beam hardening corrections are either implemented as simple precorrections which cannot account for higher order beam hardening effects, or as iterative approaches that are based on segmenting the original image into material distribution images. Conventional segmentation algorithms fail to clearly distinguish between iodine and bone. Our new algorithm, DIBHC, calculates the time-dependent iodine distribution by analyzing the voxel changes of a cardiac perfusion examination (typically N approximately 15 electrocardiogram-correlated scans distributed over a total scan time up to T approximately 30 s). These voxel dynamics are due to changes in contrast agent. This prior information allows to precisely distinguish between bone and iodine and is key to DIBHC where each iteration consists of a multimaterial (soft tissue, bone, iodine) polychromatic forward projection, a raw data comparison and a filtered backprojection. Simulations with a semi-anthropomorphic dynamic phantom and clinical scans using a dual source CT scanner with 2 x 128 slices, a tube voltage of 100 kV, a tube current of 180 mAs, and a rotation time of 0.28 seconds have been carried out. The uncorrected images suffer from beam hardening artifacts that appear as dark bands connecting large concentrations of iodine in the ventricle, aorta, and bony structures. The CT-values of the affected tissue are usually underestimated by roughly 20 HU although deviations of up to 61 HU have been observed. For a quantitative evaluation circular regions of interest have been analyzed. After application of DIBHC the mean values obtained deviate by

  10. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H; Cho, S [KAIST, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, K [Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Jung, J [East Carolina University Greenville, NC (United States); Jung, S [Samsung Medical Cener, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J [Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, I [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  11. SU-F-J-114: On-Treatment Imagereconstruction Using Transit Images of Treatment Beams Through Patient and Thosethrough Planning CT Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H; Cho, S; Cheong, K; Jung, J; Jung, S; Kim, J; Yeo, I

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To reconstruct patient images at the time of radiation delivery using measured transit images of treatment beams through patient and calculated transit images through planning CT images. Methods: We hypothesize that the ratio of the measured transit images to the calculated images may provide changed amounts of the patient image between times of planning CT and treatment. To test, we have devised lung phantoms with a tumor object (3-cm diameter) placed at iso-center (simulating planning CT) and off-center by 1 cm (simulating treatment). CT images of the two phantoms were acquired; the image of the off-centered phantom, unavailable clinically, represents the reference on-treatment image in the image quality of planning CT. Cine-transit images through the two phantoms were also acquired in EPID from a non-modulated 6 MV beam when the gantry was rotated 360 degrees; the image through the centered phantom simulates calculated image. While the current study is a feasibility study, in reality our computational EPID model can be applicable in providing accurate transit image from MC simulation. Changed MV HU values were reconstructed from the ratio between two EPID projection data, converted to KV HU values, and added to the planning CT, thereby reconstructing the on-treatment image of the patient limited to the irradiated region of the phantom. Results: The reconstructed image was compared with the reference image. Except for local HU differences>200 as a maximum, excellent agreement was found. The average difference across the entire image was 16.2 HU. Conclusion: We have demonstrated the feasibility of a method of reconstructing on-treatment images of a patient using EPID image and planning CT images. Further studies will include resolving the local HU differences and investigation on the dosimetry impact of the reconstructed image.

  12. Dose cone-beam CT alter treatment plans? Comparison of preoperative implant planning using panoramic versus cone-beam CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Norge, Jorge; Castro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The present study was performed to compare the planning of implant placement based on panoramic radiography (PAN) and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images, and to study the impact of the image dataset on the treatment planning. One hundred five partially edentulous patients (77 males, 28 females, mean age: 46 years, range: 26-67 years) seeking oral implant rehabilitation were referred for presurgical imaging. Imaging consisted of PAN and CBCT imaging. Four observers planned implant treatment based on the two-dimensional (2D) image datasets and at least one month later on the three-dimensional (3D) image dataset. Apart from presurgical diagnostic and dimensional measurement tasks, the observers needed to indicate the surgical confidence levels and assess the image quality in relation to the presurgical needs. All observers confirmed that both imaging modalities (PAN and CBCT) gave similar values when planning implant diameter. Also, the results showed no differences between both imaging modalities for the length of implants with an anterior location. However, significant differences were found in the length of implants with a posterior location. For implant dimensions, longer lengths of the implants were planned with PAN, as confirmed by two observers. CBCT provided images with improved scores for subjective image quality and surgical confidence levels. Within the limitations of this study, there was a trend toward PAN-based preoperative planning of implant placement leading towards the use of longer implants within the posterior jaw bone.

  13. Impurity mapping in sulphide minerals using Time-resolved Ion Beam Induced Current imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, Jamie S.; Johnson, Brett C.; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Kandasamy, Sasikaran; Davidson, Garry; Borg, Stacey; Ryan, Chris G.

    2010-01-01

    The semiconducting properties and charge transport within natural minerals like pyrite are postulated to drive certain geochemical processes which can lead to precious metal ore genesis. In this paper we outline electrical measurements on mineral samples and present spatio-temporally resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge or Current studies on a Schottky pyrite junction. Au-Schottky contacts were fabricated in regions selected by thermoelectric and 4-point probe resistivity measurements. The complexity in charge transport due to impurity variations results in imaging contrast which is deemed important for fluid electrochemistry. The relevance of understanding charge collection in pyrite in the context of complex geochemical processes is briefly discussed.

  14. Quality control beam of radiation through imaging system using a flat panel (ILD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benitez Serrano, J. A.; Gomez Barrado, A.; Sanchez-Reyes, A.

    2013-01-01

    The daily quality checks of the accelerator include, among others, checks of the daily calibration, symmetry and uniformity of the radiation beam. Usually verification systems daily are used for this purpose, which employ arrays of detectors of solid-state or ionization chambers. This paper intends to carry out the control of quality through the irradiation of a number of fields in the portal imaging system and its subsequent analysis in software's own creation, as well as the comparison of results with the daily verification system. (Author)

  15. Volume-of-change cone-beam CT for image-guided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Junghoon; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Schafer, Sebastian; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Khanna, A Jay; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Prince, Jerry L

    2012-01-01

    C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) can provide intraoperative 3D imaging capability for surgical guidance, but workflow and radiation dose are the significant barriers to broad utilization. One main reason is that each 3D image acquisition requires a complete scan with a full radiation dose to present a completely new 3D image every time. In this paper, we propose to utilize patient-specific CT or CBCT as prior knowledge to accurately reconstruct the aspects of the region that have changed by the surgical procedure from only a sparse set of x-rays. The proposed methods consist of a 3D–2D registration between the prior volume and a sparse set of intraoperative x-rays, creating digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) from the registered prior volume, computing difference images by subtracting DRRs from the intraoperative x-rays, a penalized likelihood reconstruction of the volume of change (VOC) from the difference images, and finally a fusion of VOC reconstruction with the prior volume to visualize the entire surgical field. When the surgical changes are local and relatively small, the VOC reconstruction involves only a small volume size and a small number of projections, allowing less computation and lower radiation dose than is needed to reconstruct the entire surgical field. We applied this approach to sacroplasty phantom data obtained from a CBCT test bench and vertebroplasty data with a fresh cadaver acquired from a C-arm CBCT system with a flat-panel detector. The VOCs were reconstructed from a varying number of images (10–66 images) and compared to the CBCT ground truth using four different metrics (mean squared error, correlation coefficient, structural similarity index and perceptual difference model). The results show promising reconstruction quality with structural similarity to the ground truth close to 1 even when only 15–20 images were used, allowing dose reduction by the factor of 10–20. (paper)

  16. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...

  17. A motion-compensated cone-beam CT using electrical impedance tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengpan, T; Smith, N D; Qiu, W; Yao, A; Mitchell, C N; Soleimani, M

    2011-01-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) is an imaging technique used in conjunction with radiation therapy. For example CBCT is used to verify the position of lung cancer tumours just prior to radiation treatment. The accuracy of the radiation treatment of thoracic and upper abdominal structures is heavily affected by respiratory movement. Such movement typically blurs the CBCT reconstruction and ideally should be removed. Hence motion-compensated CBCT has recently been researched for correcting image artefacts due to breathing motion. This paper presents a new dual-modality approach where CBCT is aided by using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) for motion compensation. EIT can generate images of contrasts in electrical properties. The main advantage of using EIT is its high temporal resolution. In this paper motion information is extracted from EIT images and incorporated directly in the CBCT reconstruction. In this study synthetic moving data are generated using simulated and experimental phantoms. The paper demonstrates that image blur, created as a result of motion, can be reduced through motion compensation with EIT

  18. Task-driven image acquisition and reconstruction in cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Grace J; Stayman, J Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Ehtiati, Tina

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces a task-driven imaging framework that incorporates a mathematical definition of the imaging task, a model of the imaging system, and a patient-specific anatomical model to prospectively design image acquisition and reconstruction techniques to optimize task performance. The framework is applied to joint optimization of tube current modulation, view-dependent reconstruction kernel, and orbital tilt in cone-beam CT. The system model considers a cone-beam CT system incorporating a flat-panel detector and 3D filtered backprojection and accurately describes the spatially varying noise and resolution over a wide range of imaging parameters in the presence of a realistic anatomical model. Task-based detectability index (d′) is incorporated as the objective function in a task-driven optimization of image acquisition and reconstruction techniques. The orbital tilt was optimized through an exhaustive search across tilt angles ranging ±30°. For each tilt angle, the view-dependent tube current and reconstruction kernel (i.e. the modulation profiles) that maximized detectability were identified via an alternating optimization. The task-driven approach was compared with conventional unmodulated and automatic exposure control (AEC) strategies for a variety of imaging tasks and anthropomorphic phantoms. The task-driven strategy outperformed the unmodulated and AEC cases for all tasks. For example, d′ for a sphere detection task in a head phantom was improved by 30% compared to the unmodulated case by using smoother kernels for noisy views and distributing mAs across less noisy views (at fixed total mAs) in a manner that was beneficial to task performance. Similarly for detection of a line-pair pattern, the task-driven approach increased d′ by 80% compared to no modulation by means of view-dependent mA and kernel selection that yields modulation transfer function and noise-power spectrum optimal to the task. Optimization of orbital tilt identified the

  19. Parallel-hierarchical processing and classification of laser beam profile images based on the GPU-oriented architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarovyi, Andrii A.; Timchenko, Leonid I.; Kozhemiako, Volodymyr P.; Kokriatskaia, Nataliya I.; Hamdi, Rami R.; Savchuk, Tamara O.; Kulyk, Oleksandr O.; Surtel, Wojciech; Amirgaliyev, Yedilkhan; Kashaganova, Gulzhan

    2017-08-01

    The paper deals with a problem of insufficient productivity of existing computer means for large image processing, which do not meet modern requirements posed by resource-intensive computing tasks of laser beam profiling. The research concentrated on one of the profiling problems, namely, real-time processing of spot images of the laser beam profile. Development of a theory of parallel-hierarchic transformation allowed to produce models for high-performance parallel-hierarchical processes, as well as algorithms and software for their implementation based on the GPU-oriented architecture using GPGPU technologies. The analyzed performance of suggested computerized tools for processing and classification of laser beam profile images allows to perform real-time processing of dynamic images of various sizes.

  20. Impact of field number and beam angle on functional image-guided lung cancer radiotherapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Bilal A.; Bragg, Chris M.; Wild, Jim M.; Swinscoe, James A.; Lawless, Sarah E.; Hart, Kerry A.; Hatton, Matthew Q.; Ireland, Rob H.

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the effect of beam angles and field number on functionally-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) normal lung avoidance treatment plans that incorporate hyperpolarised helium-3 magnetic resonance imaging (3He MRI) ventilation data. Eight non-small cell lung cancer patients had pre-treatment 3He MRI that was registered to inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy planning computed tomography. IMRT plans that minimised the volume of total lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (V20) were compared with plans that minimised 3He MRI defined functional lung receiving  ⩾20 Gy (fV20). Coplanar IMRT plans using 5-field manually optimised beam angles and 9-field equidistant plans were also evaluated. For each pair of plans, the Wilcoxon signed ranks test was used to compare fV20 and the percentage of planning target volume (PTV) receiving 90% of the prescription dose (PTV90). Incorporation of 3He MRI led to median reductions in fV20 of 1.3% (range: 0.2-9.3% p  =  0.04) and 0.2% (range: 0 to 4.1%; p  =  0.012) for 5- and 9-field arrangements, respectively. There was no clinically significant difference in target coverage. Functionally-guided IMRT plans incorporating hyperpolarised 3He MRI information can reduce the dose received by ventilated lung without comprising PTV coverage. The effect was greater for optimised beam angles rather than uniformly spaced fields.

  1. Effects of data sampling rate on image quality in fan-beam-CT system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Akira; Yamagishi, Nobutoshi; Suzumura, Nobuo; Horiba, Isao.

    1984-01-01

    Investigation was made into the relationship between spatial resolution or artifacts and data sampling rate in order to pursue the causes of the degradation of CT image quality by computer simulation. First the generation of projection data and reconstruction calculating process are described, and then the results are shown about the relation between angular sampling interval and spatical resolution or artifacts, and about the relation between projection data sampling interval and spatial resolution or artifacts. It was clarified that the formulation of the relationship between spatial resolution and data sampling rate performed so far for parallel X-ray beam was able to be applied to fan beam. As a conclusion, when other reconstruction parameters are the same in fan beam CT systems, spatial resolution can be determined by projection data sampling rate rather than angular sampling rate. The mechanism of artifact generation due to the insufficient number of angular samples was made clear. It was also made clear that there was a definite relationship among measuring region, angular sampling rate and projection data sampling rate, and the amount of artifacts depending upon projection data sampling rate was proportional to the amount of spatial frequency components (Aliasing components) of a test object above the Nyquist frequency of projection data. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  2. Improved spectral data unfolding for radiochromic film imaging spectroscopy of laser-accelerated proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schollmeier, M.; Geissel, M.; Sefkow, A. B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    An improved method to unfold the space-resolved proton energy distribution function of laser-accelerated proton beams using a layered, radiochromic film (RCF) detector stack has been developed. The method takes into account the reduced RCF response near the Bragg peak due to a high linear energy transfer (LET). This LET dependence of the active RCF layer has been measured, and published data have been re-interpreted to find a nonlinear saturation scaling of the RCF response with stopping power. Accounting for the LET effect increased the integrated particle yield by 25% after data unfolding. An iterative, analytical, space-resolved deconvolution of the RCF response functions from the measured dose was developed that does not rely on fitting. After the particle number unfold, three-dimensional interpolation is performed to determine the spatial proton beam distribution for proton energies in-between the RCF data points. Here, image morphing has been implemented as a novel interpolation method that takes into account the energy-dependent, changing beam topology.

  3. Ralicon anodes for image photon counting fabricated by electron beam lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, W.M.

    1982-01-01

    The Anger wedge and strip anode event location system developed for microchannel plate image photon detectors at the Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California, Berkeley, has been extended in the present work by the use of electron beam lithography (EBL). This method of fabrication can be used to produce optical patterns for the subsequent manufacture of anodes by conventional photo-etching methods and has also enabled anodes to be produced directly by EBL microfabrication techniques. Computer-aided design methods have been used to develop several types of RALICON (Readout Anodes of Lithographic Construction) for use in photon counting microchannel plate imaging detectors. These anodes are suitable for linear, two dimensional or radial position measurements and they incorporate novel design features made possible by the EBL fabrication technique which significantly extend their application relative to published wedge-strip anode designs. (author)

  4. Physical performance and image optimization of megavoltage cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Olivier; Aubry, Jean-Francois; Aubin, Michele; Chen, Josephine; Descovich, Martina; Hashemi, Ali-Bani; Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Siemens Oncology Care Systems, Concord, California 94520 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Helen Diller Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 and UCSF/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, San Francisco, California 94158 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Megavoltage cone-beam CT (MVCBCT) is the most recent addition to the in-room CT systems developed for image-guided radiation therapy. The first generation MVCBCT system consists of a 6 MV treatment x-ray beam produced by a conventional linear accelerator equipped with a flat panel amorphous silicon detector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical performance of MVCBCT in order to optimize the system acquisition and reconstruction parameters for image quality. MVCBCT acquisitions were performed with the clinical system but images were reconstructed and analyzed with a separate research workstation. The geometrical stability and the positioning accuracy of the system were evaluated by comparing geometrical calibrations routinely performed over a period of 12 months. The beam output and detector intensity stability during MVCBCT acquisition were also evaluated by analyzing in-air acquisitions acquired at different exposure levels. Several system parameters were varied to quantify their impact on image quality including the exposure (2.7, 4.5, 9.0, 18.0, and 54.0 MU), the craniocaudal imaging length (2, 5, 15, and 27.4 cm), the voxel size (0.5, 1, and 2 mm), the slice thickness (1, 3, and 5 mm), and the phantom size. For the reconstruction algorithm, the study investigated the effect of binning, averaging and diffusion filtering of raw projections as well as three different projection filters. A head-sized water cylinder was used to measure and improve the uniformity of MVCBCT images. Inserts of different electron densities were placed in a water cylinder to measure the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The spatial resolution was obtained by measuring the point-spread function of the system using an iterative edge blurring technique. Our results showed that the geometric stability and accuracy of MVCBCT were better than 1 mm over a period of 12 months. Beam intensity variations per projection of up to 35.4% were observed for a 2.7 MU MVCBCT acquisition

  5. Calibration and Stokes Imaging with Full Embedded Element Primary Beam Model for the Murchison Widefield Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowski, M.; Colegate, T.; Sutinjo, A. T.; Ung, D.; Wayth, R.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Lenc, E.; Pindor, B.; Morgan, J.; Kaplan, D. L.; Bell, M. E.; Callingham, J. R.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, Bi-Qing; Gaensler, B. M.; Hancock, P. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; McKinley, B.; Offringa, A. R.; Procopio, P.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.

    2017-11-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), located in Western Australia, is one of the low-frequency precursors of the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project. In addition to pursuing its own ambitious science programme, it is also a testbed for wide range of future SKA activities ranging from hardware, software to data analysis. The key science programmes for the MWA and SKA require very high dynamic ranges, which challenges calibration and imaging systems. Correct calibration of the instrument and accurate measurements of source flux densities and polarisations require precise characterisation of the telescope's primary beam. Recent results from the MWA GaLactic Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey show that the previously implemented Average Embedded Element (AEE) model still leaves residual polarisations errors of up to 10-20% in Stokes Q. We present a new simulation-based Full Embedded Element (FEE) model which is the most rigorous realisation yet of the MWA's primary beam model. It enables efficient calculation of the MWA beam response in arbitrary directions without necessity of spatial interpolation. In the new model, every dipole in the MWA tile (4 × 4 bow-tie dipoles) is simulated separately, taking into account all mutual coupling, ground screen, and soil effects, and therefore accounts for the different properties of the individual dipoles within a tile. We have applied the FEE beam model to GLEAM observations at 200-231 MHz and used false Stokes parameter leakage as a metric to compare the models. We have determined that the FEE model reduced the magnitude and declination-dependent behaviour of false polarisation in Stokes Q and V while retaining low levels of false polarisation in Stokes U.

  6. Registration of clinical volumes to beams-eye-view images for real-time tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jonathan H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Lewis, John H.; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors combine the registration of 2D beam’s eye view (BEV) images and 3D planning computed tomography (CT) images, with relative, markerless tumor tracking to provide automatic absolute tracking of physician defined volumes such as the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: During treatment of lung SBRT cases, BEV images were continuously acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operating in cine mode. For absolute registration of physician-defined volumes, an intensity based 2D/3D registration to the planning CT was performed using the end-of-exhale (EoE) phase of the four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). The volume was converted from Hounsfield units into electron density by a calibration curve and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for each beam geometry. Using normalized cross correlation between the DRR and an EoE BEV image, the best in-plane rigid transformation was found. The transformation was applied to physician-defined contours in the planning CT, mapping them into the EPID image domain. A robust multiregion method of relative markerless lung tumor tracking quantified deviations from the EoE position. Results: The success of 2D/3D registration was demonstrated at the EoE breathing phase. By registering at this phase and then employing a separate technique for relative tracking, the authors are able to successfully track target volumes in the BEV images throughout the entire treatment delivery. Conclusions: Through the combination of EPID/4DCT registration and relative tracking, a necessary step toward the clinical implementation of BEV tracking has been completed. The knowledge of tumor volumes relative to the treatment field is important for future applications like real-time motion management, adaptive radiotherapy, and delivered dose calculations.

  7. Micro-beam X-ray fluorescence and absorption imaging techniques at the IAEA Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegrzynek, Dariusz; Markowicz, A.; Bamford, S.; Chinea-Cano, E.; Bogovac, M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray tube based, micro-beam X-ray fluorescence scanning spectrometer has been equipped with two energy dispersive X-ray detectors. The two-detector configuration allows for simultaneous collection of X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and transmitted X-ray beam signals with a spatial resolution in the range of 10-50 μm, depending on the X-ray focussing element in use. The XRF signal is collected with a standard, liquid nitrogen cooled Si(Li) detector. The X-ray beam transmitted through the sample is acquired with a thermoelectrically cooled, silicon drift (SD) detector. The data acquisition is carried out in a fully automatic way under control of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR software. The software controls the scanning procedure and X-ray spectra acquisition during the scan. The energy dispersive X-ray spectra collected at every 'pixel' are stored for off-line processing. For selected regions of interest (ROI's), the element maps are constructed and displayed on-line. The spectrometer has been used for mapping elemental distributions and for performing 2D- and 3D-tomograpic imaging of minute objects in X-ray absorption and in X-ray fluorescence mode. A unique feature of the described system is simultaneous utilization of the two detectors, Si(Li) and SD, which adds new options for quantitative analysis and data interpretation. Examples of elemental mapping and 3D tomographic imaging as well as the advanced features of the SPECTOR-LOCATOR measurement control and data acquisition software are presented in this work

  8. Imaging and dosimetric considerations for titanium prosthesis implanted within the irradiated region by high photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indogo, V.

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this research was to observe dose distributions in the vicinity of titanium prosthetic implants during radiotherapy procedures. Data were obtained using a locally fabricated tissue equivalent phantom CT images, and in blue water phantom with titanium prosthesis which was irradiated with 60 Co gamma radiation and Elekta Platform photon beams. Images obtained were loaded into Prowess Panther and Oncentra treatment planning systems (TPSs) for dose simulations. Prowess TPS (1.25 MeV) estimated lesser errors whilst Oncentra (6 and 15 MV) dose simulations yielded large variations. Proximal ends of the metal recorded slight increase in doses as a rcsult of backscatter with dose increment below acceptable tolerance of ±3%. Doses measured decreases on the distal side of the prosthesis at a distance less than d max from the plate on each beam energy. Beyond certain depth along the axis, depth doses increased slightly mainly due to increase in electron fluence by portions receiving unperturbed dose. An increase in the plate thickness showed a corresponding decrease on percentage depth dose. A reduction in the above trend was also noticed with an increase in beam energy primarily because scattered photons are more forwardly directed. Prowess TPS (convolution superposition algorithm) was found to be better at reducing dose variation than OMP (collapse cone algorithm) when correction for artifact. Manual calculations on blue phantom data agree with results from Prowess. Oncentra is not capable of simulating dose around titanium prosthesis as its range of densities, 0.00121 to 2.83, excludes titanium density (rED for titanium is 3.74). (au)

  9. SU-E-P-41: Imaging Coordination of Cone Beam CT, On-Board Image Conjunction with Optical Image Guidance for SBRT Treatment with Respiratory Motion Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y; Campbell, J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To spare normal tissue for SBRT lung/liver patients, especially for patients with significant tumor motion, image guided respiratory motion management has been widely implemented in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate imaging coordination of cone beam CT, on-board X-ray image conjunction with optical image guidance for SBRT treatment with motion management. Methods: Currently in our clinic a Varian Novlis Tx was utilized for treating SBRT patients implementing CBCT. A BrainLAB X-ray ExacTrac imaging system in conjunction with optical guidance was primarily used for SRS patients. CBCT and X-ray imaging system were independently calibrated with 1.0 mm tolerance. For SBRT lung/liver patients, the magnitude of tumor motion was measured based-on 4DCT and the measurement was analyzed to determine if patients would be beneficial with respiratory motion management. For patients eligible for motion management, an additional CT with breath holding would be scanned and used as primary planning CT and as reference images for Cone beam CT. During the SBRT treatment, a CBCT with pause and continuing technology would be performed with patients holding breath, which may require 3–4 partially scanned CBCT to combine as a whole CBCT depending on how long patients capable of holding breath. After patients being setup by CBCT images, the ExactTrac X-ray imaging system was implemented with patients’ on-board X-ray images compared to breath holding CT-based DRR. Results: For breath holding patients SBRT treatment, after initially localizing patients with CBCT, we then position patients with ExacTrac X-ray and optical imaging system. The observed deviations of real-time optical guided position average at 3.0, 2.5 and 1.5 mm in longitudinal, vertical and lateral respectively based on 35 treatments. Conclusion: The respiratory motion management clinical practice improved our physician confidence level to give tighter tumor margin for sparing normal

  10. Cone Beam X-Ray Luminescence Tomography Imaging Based on KA-FEM Method for Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Fanzhen; Zhao, Fengjun; Xu, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography can realize fast X-ray luminescence tomography imaging with relatively low scanning time compared with narrow beam X-ray luminescence tomography. However, cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography suffers from an ill-posed reconstruction problem. First, the feasibility of experiments with different penetration and multispectra in small animal has been tested using nanophosphor material. Then, the hybrid reconstruction algorithm with KA-FEM method has been applied in cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography for small animals to overcome the ill-posed reconstruction problem, whose advantage and property have been demonstrated in fluorescence tomography imaging. The in vivo mouse experiment proved the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Cone beam computed tomographic imaging: perspective, challenges, and the impact of near-trend future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Marcelo Gusmão Paraiso

    2012-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be considered as a valuable imaging modality for improving diagnosis and treatment planning to achieve true guidance for several craniofacial surgical interventions. A new concept and perspective in medical informatics is the highlight discussion about the new imaging interactive workflow. The aim of this article was to present, in a short literature review, the usefulness of CBCT technology as an important alternative imaging modality, highlighting current practices and near-term future applications in cutting-edge thought-provoking perspectives for craniofacial surgical assessment. This article explains the state of the art of CBCT improvements, medical workstation, and perspectives of the dedicated unique hardware and software, which can be used from the CBCT source. In conclusion, CBCT technology is developing rapidly, and many advances are on the horizon. Further progress in medical workstations, engineering capabilities, and improvement in independent software-some open source-should be attempted with this new imaging method. The perspectives, challenges, and pitfalls in CBCT will be delineated and evaluated along with the technological developments.

  12. Upper airway segmentation and dimensions estimation from cone-beam CT image datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Hongjian; Scarfe, W.C. [Louisville Univ., KY (United States). School of Dentistry; Farman, A.G. [Louisville Univ., KY (United States). School of Dentistry; Louisville Univ., KY (United States). Div. of Radiology and Imaging Science

    2006-11-15

    Objective: To segment and measure the upper airway using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). This information may be useful as an imaging biomarker in the diagnostic assessment of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and in the planning of any necessary therapy. Methods: With Institutional Review Board Approval, anonymous CBCT datasets from subjects who had been imaged for a variety of conditions unrelated to the airway were evaluated. DICOM images were available. A segmentation algorithm was developed to separate the bounded upper airway and measurements were performed manually to determine the smallest cross-sectional area and the anteriorposterior distance of the retropalatal space (RP-SCA and RP-AP, respectively) and retroglossal space (RG-SCA and RG-AP, respectively). A segmentation algorithm was developed to separate the bounded upper airway and it was applied to determine RP-AP, RG-AP, the smallest transaxial-sectional area (TSCA) and largest sagittal view airway area (LCSA). A second algorithm was created to evaluate the airway volume within this bounded upper airway. Results: Measurements of the airway segmented automatically by the developed algorithm agreed with those obtained using manual segmentation. The corresponding volumes showed only very small differences considered clinically insignificant. Conclusion: Automatic segmentation of the airway imaged using CBCT is feasible and this method can be used to evaluate airway cross-section and volume comparable to measurements extracted using manual segmentation. (orig.)

  13. Measurement of inter and intra fraction organ motion in radiotherapy using cone beam CT projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, T E; Amer, A M; Moore, C J

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for extraction of intra and inter fraction motion of seeds/markers within the patient from cone beam CT (CBCT) projection images. The position of the marker is determined on each projection image and fitted to a function describing the projection of a fixed point onto the imaging panel at different gantry angles. The fitted parameters provide the mean marker position with respect to the isocentre. Differences between the theoretical function and the actual projected marker positions are used to estimate the range of intra fraction motion and the principal motion axis in the transverse plane. The method was validated using CBCT projection images of a static marker at known locations and of a marker moving with known amplitude. The mean difference between actual and measured motion range was less than 1 mm in all directions, although errors of up to 5 mm were observed when large amplitude motion was present in an orthogonal direction. In these cases it was possible to calculate the range of motion magnitudes consistent with the observed marker trajectory. The method was shown to be feasible using clinical CBCT projections of a pancreas cancer patient

  14. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egbert, Nicholas [Private Practice, Reconstructive Dental Specialists of Utah, Salt Lake (United States); Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A. [Dept. of rosthodontics, University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Dentistry, Memphis (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  15. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Cagna, David R.; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A.

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  16. Accuracy and reliability of stitched cone-beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Nicholas; Cagna, David R; Ahuja, Swati; Wicks, Russell A

    2015-03-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the linear distance accuracy and reliability of stitched small field of view (FOV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructed images for the fabrication of implant surgical guides. Three gutta percha points were fixed on the inferior border of a cadaveric mandible to serve as control reference points. Ten additional gutta percha points, representing fiduciary markers, were scattered on the buccal and lingual cortices at the level of the proposed complete denture flange. A digital caliper was used to measure the distance between the reference points and fiduciary markers, which represented the anatomic linear dimension. The mandible was scanned using small FOV CBCT, and the images were then reconstructed and stitched using the manufacturer's imaging software. The same measurements were then taken with the CBCT software. The anatomic linear dimension measurements and stitched small FOV CBCT measurements were statistically evaluated for linear accuracy. The mean difference between the anatomic linear dimension measurements and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was found to be 0.34 mm with a 95% confidence interval of +0.24 - +0.44 mm and a mean standard deviation of 0.30 mm. The difference between the control and the stitched small FOV CBCT measurements was insignificant within the parameters defined by this study. The proven accuracy of stitched small FOV CBCT data sets may allow image-guided fabrication of implant surgical stents from such data sets.

  17. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography and multi-slice computed tomography in temporal bone imaging for surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erovic, Boban M; Chan, Harley H L; Daly, Michael J; Pothier, David D; Yu, Eugene; Coulson, Chris; Lai, Philip; Irish, Jonathan C

    2014-01-01

    Conventional computed tomography (CT) imaging is the standard imaging technique for temporal bone diseases, whereas cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging is a very fast imaging tool with a significant less radiation dose compared with conventional CT. We hypothesize that a system for intraoperative cone-beam CT provides comparable image quality to diagnostic CT for identifying temporal bone anatomical landmarks in cadaveric specimens. Cross-sectional study. University tertiary care facility. Twenty cadaveric temporal bones were affixed into a head phantom and scanned with both a prototype cone-beam CT C-arm and multislice helical CT. Imaging performance was evaluated by 3 otologic surgeons and 1 head and neck radiologist. Participants were presented images in a randomized order and completed landmark identification questionnaires covering 21 structures. CBCT and multislice CT have comparable performance in identifying temporal structures. Three otologic surgeons indicated that CBCT provided statistically equivalent performance for 19 of 21 landmarks, with CBCT superior to CT for the chorda tympani and inferior for the crura of the stapes. Subgroup analysis showed that CBCT performed superiorly for temporal bone structures compared with CT. The radiologist rated CBCT and CT as statistically equivalent for 18 of 21 landmarks, with CT superior to CBCT for the crura of stapes, chorda tympani, and sigmoid sinus. CBCT provides comparable image quality to conventional CT for temporal bone anatomical sites in cadaveric specimens. Clinical applications of low-dose CBCT imaging in surgical planning, intraoperative guidance, and postoperative assessment are promising but require further investigation.

  18. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsi, Wen C; Indelicato, Daniel J; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li, Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the posttreatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. The less than 2 degrees of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D(AP)) and superior-inferior (D(SI)) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D(AP) or D(SI)), 13 studies, referred as motion-after-Tx cases

  19. In vivo verification of proton beam path by using post-treatment PET/CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Indelicato, Daniel J.; Vargas, Carlos; Duvvuri, Srividya; Li Zuofeng; Palta, Jatinder [Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Boca Radiation Oncology Associates, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (United States); Proton Therapy Institute, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32610 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to establish the in vivo verification of proton beam path by using proton-activated positron emission distributions. Methods: A total of 50 PET/CT imaging studies were performed on ten prostate cancer patients immediately after daily proton therapy treatment through a single lateral portal. The PET/CT and planning CT were registered by matching the pelvic bones, and the beam path of delivered protons was defined in vivo by the positron emission distribution seen only within the pelvic bones, referred to as the PET-defined beam path. Because of the patient position correction at each fraction, the marker-defined beam path, determined by the centroid of implanted markers seen in the post-treatment (post-Tx) CT, is used for the planned beam path. The angular variation and discordance between the PET- and marker-defined paths were derived to investigate the intrafraction prostate motion. For studies with large discordance, the relative location between the centroid and pelvic bones seen in the post-Tx CT was examined. The PET/CT studies are categorized for distinguishing the prostate motion that occurred before or after beam delivery. The post-PET CT was acquired after PET imaging to investigate prostate motion due to physiological changes during the extended PET acquisition. Results: The less than 2 deg. of angular variation indicates that the patient roll was minimal within the immobilization device. Thirty of the 50 studies with small discordance, referred as good cases, show a consistent alignment between the field edges and the positron emission distributions from the entrance to the distal edge. For those good cases, average displacements are 0.6 and 1.3 mm along the anterior-posterior (D{sub AP}) and superior-inferior (D{sub SI}) directions, respectively, with 1.6 mm standard deviations in both directions. For the remaining 20 studies demonstrating a large discordance (more than 6 mm in either D{sub AP} or D{sub SI}), 13

  20. A hybrid reconstruction algorithm for fast and accurate 4D cone-beam CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Zhen, Xin; Folkerts, Michael; Li, Yongbao; Pan, Tinsu; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2014-07-01

    4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) has been utilized in radiation therapy to provide 4D image guidance in lung and upper abdomen area. However, clinical application of 4D-CBCT is currently limited due to the long scan time and low image quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new 4D-CBCT reconstruction method that restores volumetric images based on the 1-min scan data acquired with a standard 3D-CBCT protocol. The model optimizes a deformation vector field that deforms a patient-specific planning CT (p-CT), so that the calculated 4D-CBCT projections match measurements. A forward-backward splitting (FBS) method is invented to solve the optimization problem. It splits the original problem into two well-studied subproblems, i.e., image reconstruction and deformable image registration. By iteratively solving the two subproblems, FBS gradually yields correct deformation information, while maintaining high image quality. The whole workflow is implemented on a graphic-processing-unit to improve efficiency. Comprehensive evaluations have been conducted on a moving phantom and three real patient cases regarding the accuracy and quality of the reconstructed images, as well as the algorithm robustness and efficiency. The proposed algorithm reconstructs 4D-CBCT images from highly under-sampled projection data acquired with 1-min scans. Regarding the anatomical structure location accuracy, 0.204 mm average differences and 0.484 mm maximum difference are found for the phantom case, and the maximum differences of 0.3-0.5 mm for patients 1-3 are observed. As for the image quality, intensity errors below 5 and 20 HU compared to the planning CT are achieved for the phantom and the patient cases, respectively. Signal-noise-ratio values are improved by 12.74 and 5.12 times compared to results from FDK algorithm using the 1-min data and 4-min data, respectively. The computation time of the algorithm on a NVIDIA GTX590 card is 1-1.5 min per phase. High-quality 4D-CBCT imaging based

  1. A hybrid reconstruction algorithm for fast and accurate 4D cone-beam CT imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Hao; Folkerts, Michael; Jiang, Steve B., E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Jia, Xun, E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu, E-mail: steve.jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Zhen, Xin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510515 (China); Li, Yongbao [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 and Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Cervino, Laura [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: 4D cone beam CT (4D-CBCT) has been utilized in radiation therapy to provide 4D image guidance in lung and upper abdomen area. However, clinical application of 4D-CBCT is currently limited due to the long scan time and low image quality. The purpose of this paper is to develop a new 4D-CBCT reconstruction method that restores volumetric images based on the 1-min scan data acquired with a standard 3D-CBCT protocol. Methods: The model optimizes a deformation vector field that deforms a patient-specific planning CT (p-CT), so that the calculated 4D-CBCT projections match measurements. A forward-backward splitting (FBS) method is invented to solve the optimization problem. It splits the original problem into two well-studied subproblems, i.e., image reconstruction and deformable image registration. By iteratively solving the two subproblems, FBS gradually yields correct deformation information, while maintaining high image quality. The whole workflow is implemented on a graphic-processing-unit to improve efficiency. Comprehensive evaluations have been conducted on a moving phantom and three real patient cases regarding the accuracy and quality of the reconstructed images, as well as the algorithm robustness and efficiency. Results: The proposed algorithm reconstructs 4D-CBCT images from highly under-sampled projection data acquired with 1-min scans. Regarding the anatomical structure location accuracy, 0.204 mm average differences and 0.484 mm maximum difference are found for the phantom case, and the maximum differences of 0.3–0.5 mm for patients 1–3 are observed. As for the image quality, intensity errors below 5 and 20 HU compared to the planning CT are achieved for the phantom and the patient cases, respectively. Signal-noise-ratio values are improved by 12.74 and 5.12 times compared to results from FDK algorithm using the 1-min data and 4-min data, respectively. The computation time of the algorithm on a NVIDIA GTX590 card is 1–1.5 min per phase

  2. SU-E-I-59: Image Quality and Dose Measurement for Partial Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abouei, E; Ford, N [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize performance of cone beam CT (CBCT) used in dentistry investigating quantitatively the image quality and radiation dose during dental CBCT over different settings for partial rotation of the x-ray tube. Methods: Image quality and dose measurements were done on a variable field of view (FOV) dental CBCT (Carestream 9300). X-ray parameters for clinical settings were adjustable for 2–10 mA, 60–90 kVp, and two optional voxel size values, but time was fixed for each FOV. Image quality was assessed by scanning cylindrical poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) image quality phantom (SEDENTEXCT IQ), and then the images were analyzed using ImageJ to calculate image quality parameters such as noise, uniformity, and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). A protocol proposed by SEDENTEXCT, dose index 1 (DI1), was applied to dose measurements obtained using a thimble ionization chamber and cylindrical PMMA dose index phantom (SEDENTEXCT DI). Dose distributions were obtained using Gafchromic film. The phantoms were positioned in the FOV to imitate a clinical positioning. Results: The image noise was 6–12.5% which, when normalized to the difference of mean voxel value of PMMA and air, was comparable between different FOVs. Uniformity was 93.5ß 99.7% across the images. CNR was 1.7–4.2 and 6.3–14.3 for LDPE and Aluminum, respectively. Dose distributions were symmetric about the rotation angle's bisector. For large and medium FOVs at 4 mA and 80–90 kVp, DI1 values were in the range of 1.26–3.23 mGy. DI1 values were between 1.01–1.93 mGy for small FOV (5×5 cm{sup 2}) at 4–5 mA and 75–84 kVp. Conclusion: Noise decreased by increasing kVp, and the CNR increased for each FOV. When FOV size increased, image noise increased and CNR decreased. DI1 values were increased by increasing tube current (mA), tube voltage (kVp), and/or FOV. Funding for this project from NSERC Discovery grant, UBC Faculty of Dentistry Research Equipment Grant and UBC Faculty of

  3. SU-E-I-59: Image Quality and Dose Measurement for Partial Cone-Beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouei, E; Ford, N

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize performance of cone beam CT (CBCT) used in dentistry investigating quantitatively the image quality and radiation dose during dental CBCT over different settings for partial rotation of the x-ray tube. Methods: Image quality and dose measurements were done on a variable field of view (FOV) dental CBCT (Carestream 9300). X-ray parameters for clinical settings were adjustable for 2–10 mA, 60–90 kVp, and two optional voxel size values, but time was fixed for each FOV. Image quality was assessed by scanning cylindrical poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) image quality phantom (SEDENTEXCT IQ), and then the images were analyzed using ImageJ to calculate image quality parameters such as noise, uniformity, and contrast to noise ratio (CNR). A protocol proposed by SEDENTEXCT, dose index 1 (DI1), was applied to dose measurements obtained using a thimble ionization chamber and cylindrical PMMA dose index phantom (SEDENTEXCT DI). Dose distributions were obtained using Gafchromic film. The phantoms were positioned in the FOV to imitate a clinical positioning. Results: The image noise was 6–12.5% which, when normalized to the difference of mean voxel value of PMMA and air, was comparable between different FOVs. Uniformity was 93.5ß 99.7% across the images. CNR was 1.7–4.2 and 6.3–14.3 for LDPE and Aluminum, respectively. Dose distributions were symmetric about the rotation angle's bisector. For large and medium FOVs at 4 mA and 80–90 kVp, DI1 values were in the range of 1.26–3.23 mGy. DI1 values were between 1.01–1.93 mGy for small FOV (5×5 cm 2 ) at 4–5 mA and 75–84 kVp. Conclusion: Noise decreased by increasing kVp, and the CNR increased for each FOV. When FOV size increased, image noise increased and CNR decreased. DI1 values were increased by increasing tube current (mA), tube voltage (kVp), and/or FOV. Funding for this project from NSERC Discovery grant, UBC Faculty of Dentistry Research Equipment Grant and UBC Faculty of Dentistry

  4. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  5. Evaluation of Parallel and Fan-Beam Data Acquisition Geometries and Strategies for Myocardial SPECT Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yujin; Tsui, B. M. W.; Gilland, K. L.; Frey, E. C.; Gullberg, G. T.

    2004-06-01

    This study evaluates myocardial SPECT images obtained from parallel-hole (PH) and fan-beam (FB) collimator geometries using both circular-orbit (CO) and noncircular-orbit (NCO) acquisitions. A newly developed 4-D NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom was used to simulate the /sup 99m/Tc-sestamibi uptakes in human torso with myocardial defects in the left ventricular (LV) wall. Two phantoms were generated to simulate patients with thick and thin body builds. Projection data including the effects of attenuation, collimator-detector response and scatter were generated using SIMSET Monte Carlo simulations. A large number of photon histories were generated such that the projection data were close to noise free. Poisson noise fluctuations were then added to simulate the count densities found in clinical data. Noise-free and noisy projection data were reconstructed using the iterative OS-EM reconstruction algorithm with attenuation compensation. The reconstructed images from noisy projection data show that the noise levels are lower for the FB as compared to the PH collimator due to increase in detected counts. The NCO acquisition method provides slightly better resolution and small improvement in defect contrast as compared to the CO acquisition method in noise-free reconstructed images. Despite lower projection counts the NCO shows the same noise level as the CO in the attenuation corrected reconstruction images. The results from the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) study show that FB collimator is superior to PH collimator in myocardial defect detection, but the NCO shows no statistical significant difference from the CO for either PH or FB collimator. In conclusion, our results indicate that data acquisition using NCO makes a very small improvement in the resolution over CO for myocardial SPECT imaging. This small improvement does not make a significant difference on myocardial defect detection. However, an FB collimator provides better defect detection than a

  6. Cemento-Osseous Dysplasias: Imaging Features Based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Paulo Henrique Pereira; Nascimento, Eduarda Helena Leandro; Pontual, Maria Luiza Dos Anjos; Pontual, Andréa Dos Anjos; Marcelos, Priscylla Gonçalves Correia Leite de; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Ramos-Perez, Flávia Maria de Moraes

    2018-01-01

    Imaging exams have important role in diagnosis of cemento-osseous dysplasia (COD). Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) stands out for allowing three-dimensional image evaluation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of cases diagnosed as COD on CBCT scans, as well identify the main imaging features related to these lesions. An analysis was performed in a database containing 22,400 radiological reports, in which all cases showing some type of COD were initially selected. These CBCT exams were reevaluated to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and determine the prevalence and distribution of the types of COD with regard to gender, age and preferred location, while describing its most common imaging aspects. Data were presented using descriptive analyses. There were 82 cases diagnosed as COD in the CBCT images (prevalence of 0.4%). The distribution of patients was 11 (13.4%) male and 71 (86.6%) female, with a mean age of 49.8 years (age-range 17-85 years). There were 47 (57.3%) cases of periapical COD, 23 (28%) of focal COD and 12 (14.6%) of florid COD. The mandible was more affected than the maxilla. In most cases, the lesions were mixed or hyperdense. All COD had well-defined limits and there were no cases of tooth displacement. In conclusion, periapical COD was the most common type and the most affected bone was the mandible. Imaging evaluation is critical for diagnosis and dentists should bear in mind all possible radiographic presentations of COD in order to prevent misleading diagnoses and consequently, inadequate treatments.

  7. Automatic tracking of implanted fiducial markers in cone beam CT projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchant, T. E.; Skalski, A.; Matuszewski, B. J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper describes a novel method for simultaneous intrafraction tracking of multiple fiducial markers. Although the proposed method is generic and can be adopted for a number of applications including fluoroscopy based patient position monitoring and gated radiotherapy, the tracking results presented in this paper are specific to tracking fiducial markers in a sequence of cone beam CT projection images. Methods: The proposed method is accurate and robust thanks to utilizing the mean shift and random sampling principles, respectively. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated with qualitative and quantitative methods, using data from two pancreatic and one prostate cancer patients and a moving phantom. The ground truth, for quantitative evaluation, was calculated based on manual tracking preformed by three observers. Results: The average dispersion of marker position error calculated from the tracking results for pancreas data (six markers tracked over 640 frames, 3840 marker identifications) was 0.25 mm (at iscoenter), compared with an average dispersion for the manual ground truth estimated at 0.22 mm. For prostate data (three markers tracked over 366 frames, 1098 marker identifications), the average error was 0.34 mm. The estimated tracking error in the pancreas data was < 1 mm (2 pixels) in 97.6% of cases where nearby image clutter was detected and in 100.0% of cases with no nearby image clutter. Conclusions: The proposed method has accuracy comparable to that of manual tracking and, in combination with the proposed batch postprocessing, superior robustness. Marker tracking in cone beam CT (CBCT) projections is useful for a variety of purposes, such as providing data for assessment of intrafraction motion, target tracking during rotational treatment delivery, motion correction of CBCT, and phase sorting for 4D CBCT.

  8. Development of the microstrip silicon detector for imaging of fast processes at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulchenko, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Pruuel, E. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Shekhtman, L. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Ten, K. [Lavrentiev Institute of Hydrodynamics, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Tolochko, B. [Institute of Solid State chemistry and Mechanochemistry, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation); Zhulanov, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk, Russian Federtion (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-11

    In situ imaging of explosions allows to study material properties under very high pressures and temperatures. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is a powerful tool for such studies because of its unique time structure. Flashes of X-rays from individual bunches in a storage ring are so short that an object under study does not move more than 1–10 μm during exposure. If a detector is able to store images synchronously with bunches of an SR source the time resolution of such method will be determined by the duration of SR flash from individual bunch. New beam line at the VEPP-4M storage ring will allow to get X-Ray flux from each bunch close to 10{sup 6} photons/channel where channel area is 0.05×0.5 mm{sup 2} and average beam energy is about 30 keV. Bunches in the machine can be grouped into trains with 20 ns time gap. In order to meet these requirements a new detector development was started based on Si microstrip technology. The detector with a new dedicated front-end chip will be able to record images with maximum signal equivalent to 10{sup 6} photons/channel, with signal to noise ratio of ∼10{sup 3}, spatial resolution of 50 μm and maximum frame rate of 50 MHz. The detector has to drive very high peak and average currents without affecting the front-end chip, therefore a specific design of Si sensor should be developed. The front-end chip has to provide signal measurements with the dynamic range of about 10{sup 4} or more and recording of the signal to an analogue memory with the rate of 50 MHz. The concept of such detector is discussed in the paper. The results of the simulations of the main detector parameters and the results of the first measurements with the prototype sensors are presented.

  9. New developments of 11C post-accelerated beams for hadron therapy and imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto, R. S.; Mendonca, T. M.; Wenander, F.; Penescu, L.; Orecchia, R.; Parodi, K.; Ferrari, A.; Stora, T.

    2016-06-01

    Hadron therapy was first proposed in 1946 and is by now widespread throughout the world, as witnessed with the design and construction of the CNAO, HIT, PROSCAN and MedAustron treatment centres, among others. The clinical interest in hadron therapy lies in the fact that it delivers precision treatment of tumours, exploiting the characteristic shape (the Bragg peak) of the energy deposition in the tissues for charged hadrons. In particular, carbon ion therapy is found to be biologically more effective, with respect to protons, on certain types of tumours. Following an approach tested at NIRS in Japan [1], carbon ion therapy treatments based on 12C could be combined or fully replaced with 11C PET radioactive ions post-accelerated to the same energy. This approach allows providing a beam for treatment and, at the same time, to collect information on the 3D distributions of the implanted ions by PET imaging. The production of 11C ion beams can be performed using two methods. A first one is based on the production using compact PET cyclotrons with 10-20 MeV protons via 14N(p,α)11C reactions following an approach developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [2]. A second route exploits spallation reactions 19F(p,X)11C and 23Na(p,X)11C on a molten fluoride salt target using the ISOL (isotope separation on-line) technique [3]. This approach can be seriously envisaged at CERN-ISOLDE following recent progresses made on 11C+ production [4] and proven post-acceleration of pure 10C3/6+ beams in the REX-ISOLDE linac [5]. Part of the required components is operational in radioactive ion beam facilities or commercial medical PET cyclotrons. The driver could be a 70 MeV, 1.2 mA proton commercial cyclotron, which would lead to 8.1 × 10711C6+ per spill. This intensity is appropriate using 11C ions alone for both imaging and treatment. Here we report on the ongoing feasibility studies of such approach, using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA [6,7] to simulate

  10. New developments of {sup 11}C post-accelerated beams for hadron therapy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augusto, R.S., E-mail: r.s.augusto@cern.ch [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ludwig Maximilians – University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Mendonca, T.M.; Wenander, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Penescu, L. [MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Orecchia, R. [CNAO – Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica per il trattamento dei tumori, Pavia (Italy); Parodi, K. [Ludwig Maximilians – University of Munich, Munich (Germany); Ferrari, A.; Stora, T. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-06-01

    Hadron therapy was first proposed in 1946 and is by now widespread throughout the world, as witnessed with the design and construction of the CNAO, HIT, PROSCAN and MedAustron treatment centres, among others. The clinical interest in hadron therapy lies in the fact that it delivers precision treatment of tumours, exploiting the characteristic shape (the Bragg peak) of the energy deposition in the tissues for charged hadrons. In particular, carbon ion therapy is found to be biologically more effective, with respect to protons, on certain types of tumours. Following an approach tested at NIRS in Japan [1], carbon ion therapy treatments based on {sup 12}C could be combined or fully replaced with {sup 11}C PET radioactive ions post-accelerated to the same energy. This approach allows providing a beam for treatment and, at the same time, to collect information on the 3D distributions of the implanted ions by PET imaging. The production of {sup 11}C ion beams can be performed using two methods. A first one is based on the production using compact PET cyclotrons with 10–20 MeV protons via {sup 14}N(p,α){sup 11}C reactions following an approach developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [2]. A second route exploits spallation reactions {sup 19}F(p,X){sup 11}C and {sup 23}Na(p,X){sup 11}C on a molten fluoride salt target using the ISOL (isotope separation on-line) technique [3]. This approach can be seriously envisaged at CERN-ISOLDE following recent progresses made on {sup 11}C{sup +} production [4] and proven post-acceleration of pure {sup 10}C{sup 3/6+} beams in the REX-ISOLDE linac [5]. Part of the required components is operational in radioactive ion beam facilities or commercial medical PET cyclotrons. The driver could be a 70 MeV, 1.2 mA proton commercial cyclotron, which would lead to 8.1 × 10{sup 711}C{sup 6+} per spill. This intensity is appropriate using {sup 11}C ions alone for both imaging and treatment. Here we report on the ongoing feasibility

  11. Effects of hole tapering on cone-beam collimation for brain SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Mi-Ae; Kijewski, Marie Foley; Moore, Stephen C.

    2006-01-01

    New collimator manufacturing technologies, such as photoetching, electrical discharge machining, and stereolithography, expand the range of possible cone-beam collimator configurations. For example, it might now be possible for brain SPECT to make a short-focusing cone-beam collimator with tapered holes that increase in size with distance from the collimator surface; conventional lead-casting techniques produce holes of constant size and, consequently, varying septal thicknesses. Moreover, the changes in hole shape and loss of close packing due to focusing leads to thicker septa in the collimator periphery, especially for shorter focal lengths. We investigated the potential advantages of new cone-beam collimator manufacturing processes, and proposed a new design for very short focal-length collimators for brain SPECT imaging. We compared three cone-beam collimators, a conventional collimator manufactured using casting techniques (CC), a novel collimator with uniform hole sizes on the collimator surface and constant hole size through the collimator thickness (FC), and a novel collimator with uniform hole sizes and tapered holes (TC). We determined the resolution of each collimator analytically for focal lengths ranging from 20-50 cm, and adjusted the entrance hole sizes of FC and TC to equalize resolution of all collimators. Sensitivity was calculated at several locations by Monte Carlo simulation. Sensitivity was higher at all points for TC and FC than for CC, and higher for TC than for FC. The differences in sensitivity were larger for shorter focal lengths. For a point on the focal line at 10 cm in front of the collimator entrance surface, the sensitivity gain for TC compared to CC was 7% and 45% for focal lengths of 50 and 20 cm, respectively. The sensitivity gain for a 20-cm focal length, compared to CC, averaged over all locations, was 44% for TC and 23% for FC. We have shown that the new collimator designs made possible by new manufacturing techniques will

  12. Task-based statistical image reconstruction for high-quality cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hao; Webster Stayman, J.; Xu, Jennifer; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Sisniega, Alejandro; Mow, Michael; Wang, Xiaohui; Foos, David H.; Aygun, Nafi; Koliatsos, Vassilis E.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2017-11-01

    Task-based analysis of medical imaging performance underlies many ongoing efforts in the development of new imaging systems. In statistical image reconstruction, regularization is often formulated in terms to encourage smoothness and/or sharpness (e.g. a linear, quadratic, or Huber penalty) but without explicit formulation of the task. We propose an alternative regularization approach in which a spatially varying penalty is determined that maximizes task-based imaging performance at every location in a 3D image. We apply the method to model-based image reconstruction (MBIR—viz., penalized weighted least-squares, PWLS) in cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the head, focusing on the task of detecting a small, low-contrast intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), and we test the performance of the algorithm in the context of a recently developed CBCT prototype for point-of-care imaging of brain injury. Theoretical predictions of local spatial resolution and noise are computed via an optimization by which regularization (specifically, the quadratic penalty strength) is allowed to vary throughout the image to maximize local task-based detectability index ({{d}\\prime} ). Simulation studies and test-bench experiments were performed using an anthropomorphic head phantom. Three PWLS implementations were tested: conventional (constant) penalty; a certainty-based penalty derived to enforce constant point-spread function, PSF; and the task-based penalty derived to maximize local detectability at each location. Conventional (constant) regularization exhibited a fairly strong degree of spatial variation in {{d}\\prime} , and the certainty-based method achieved uniform PSF, but each exhibited a reduction in detectability compared to the task-based method, which improved detectability up to ~15%. The improvement was strongest in areas of high attenuation (skull base), where the conventional and certainty-based methods tended to over-smooth the data. The task-driven reconstruction method presents a

  13. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Wei, Chaochen [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Shao, Lin, E-mail: lshao@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate.

  14. In situ characterization of thermal conductivities of irradiated solids by using ion beam heating and infrared imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondrik, Nicholas; Gigax, Jonathan; Wang, Xuemei; Price, Lloyd; Wei, Chaochen; Shao, Lin

    2014-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize thermal properties of ion irradiated materials. This method uses an ion beam as a heating source to create a hot spot on sample surface. Infrared imaging is used as a surface temperature mapping tool to record hot zone spreading. Since ion energy, ion flux, and ion penetration depth can be precisely controlled, the beam heating data is highly reliable and repeatable. Using a high speed infrared camera to capture lateral spreading of the hot zone, thermal diffusivity can be readily extracted. The proposed method has advantages in studying radiation induced thermal property changes, for which radiation damage can be introduced by using an irradiating beam over a relatively large beam spot and beam heating can be introduced by using a focused testing beam over a relatively small beam spot. These two beams can be switched without breaking vacuum. Thus thermal conductivity changes can be characterized in situ with ion irradiation. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated on a single crystal quartz substrate

  15. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Evaluation of artifacts generated by zirconium implants in cone-beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Bechara, Boulos B; McMahan, Clyde Alex; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz; Noujeim, Marcel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate zirconium implant artifact production in cone beam computed tomography images obtained with different protocols. One zirconium implant was inserted in an edentulous mandible. Twenty scans were acquired with a ProMax 3D unit (Planmeca Oy, Helsinki, Finland), with acquisition settings ranging from 70 to 90 peak kilovoltage (kVp) and voxel sizes of 0.32 and 0.16 mm. A metal artifact reduction (MAR) tool was activated in half of the scans. An axial slice through the middle region of the implant was selected for each dataset. Gray values (mean ± standard deviation) were measured in two regions of interest, one close to and the other distant from the implant (control area). The contrast-to-noise ratio was also calculated. Standard deviation decreased with greater kVp and when the MAR tool was used. The contrast-to-noise ratio was significantly higher when the MAR tool was turned off, except for low resolution with kVp values above 80. Selection of the MAR tool and greater kVp resulted in an overall reduction of artifacts in images acquired with low resolution. Although zirconium implants do produce image artifacts in cone-bean computed tomography scans, the setting that best controlled artifact generation by zirconium implants was 90 kVp at low resolution and with the MAR tool turned on. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of digital rainbow holograms and 3-D imaging using SEM based e-beam lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, An; Firsov, A; Loechel, B; Erko, A; Svintsov, A; Zaitsev, S

    2014-11-17

    Here we present an approach for creating full-color digital rainbow holograms based on mixing three basic colors. Much like in a color TV with three luminescent points per single screen pixel, each color pixel of initial image is presented by three (R, G, B) distinct diffractive gratings in a hologram structure. Change of either duty cycle or area of the gratings are used to provide proper R, G, B intensities. Special algorithms allow one to design rather complicated 3D images (that might even be replacing each other with hologram rotation). The software developed ("RainBow") provides stability of colorization of rotated image by means of equalizing of angular blur from gratings responsible for R, G, B basic colors. The approach based on R, G, B color synthesis allows one to fabricate gray-tone rainbow hologram containing white color what is hardly possible in traditional dot-matrix technology. Budgetary electron beam lithography based on SEM column was used to fabricate practical examples of digital rainbow hologram. The results of fabrication of large rainbow holograms from design to imprinting are presented. Advantages of the EBL in comparison to traditional optical (dot-matrix) technology is considered.

  18. Beam Characterisation of the Australian Synchrotron Imaging and medical beamline for microbeam radiotherapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagliardi, F.M.; Midgley, S.; Lewis, R.A.; Ackerly, T.L.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Microbeam radiotherapy (MRT) has been developed at synchrotrons around the world over the last two decades. Previous studies have shown normal tissue to be extremely tolerant to MRT at doses normally considered toxic in conventional radiotherapy whilst having a palliative and even curative effect on animal tumours. Our MRT research team has attempted to characterise the beam spectrum of the imaging and medical beamline (TMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron. We also carried out film dosimetry to quantify the peak-to-valley dose ratio for three fixed geometry MRT collimators. The source of X-rays on the IMBL is a 1.4 T wiggler at a distance of 20 m from the sample stage. In vacuo and in-air metal absorbers were used to remove soft X-rays hardening the beam to between 30 and 160 keY. Filters used were 1.5 mm C, 2.5 mm AI, 0.5 mm Be and 0.75 mm Cu. Free air ion chamber measurements and half value layer measurements in conjunction with predictions from a theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean energy of the microbeam of 57 keV with a half value layer of approximately 0.29 mm Cu. The measured air kerma rate was 120 Gy/s. Measurements of the MRT beams created with tungsten/kapton multi-slit collimators on radiographic films were compared with Monte Carlo simulations of the microbeam arrays. The peak-to-valley-dose ratios were found to be 3-4 times lower than predicted by the Monte Carlo model. Imperfections in the manufacturing of the collimators may explain the observed discrepancy. (author)

  19. Accelerated fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithms for sparsity-regularized cone-beam CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.; Yang, Deshan; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) remains an active and important research area. Even with hardware acceleration, the overwhelming majority of the available 3D iterative algorithms that implement nonsmooth regularizers remain computationally burdensome and have not been translated for routine use in time-sensitive applications such as image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, two variants of the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) are proposed and investigated for accelerated iterative image reconstruction in CBCT. Methods: Algorithm acceleration was achieved by replacing the original gradient-descent step in the FISTAs by a subproblem that is solved by use of the ordered subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART). Due to the preconditioning matrix adopted in the OS-SART method, two new weighted proximal problems were introduced and corresponding fast gradient projection-type algorithms were developed for solving them. We also provided efficient numerical implementations of the proposed algorithms that exploit the massive data parallelism of multiple graphics processing units. Results: The improved rates of convergence of the proposed algorithms were quantified in computer-simulation studies and by use of clinical projection data corresponding to an IGRT study. The accelerated FISTAs were shown to possess dramatically improved convergence properties as compared to the standard FISTAs. For example, the number of iterations to achieve a specified reconstruction error could be reduced by an order of magnitude. Volumetric images reconstructed from clinical data were produced in under 4 min. Conclusions: The FISTA achieves a quadratic convergence rate and can therefore potentially reduce the number of iterations required to produce an image of a specified image quality as compared to first-order methods. We have proposed and investigated

  20. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayan, Ahmet S; Lin Haibo; Yeager, Caitlyn; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Zhu, Timothy C; Anderson, Nathan; Ad, Voichita Bar; Both, Stefan; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose–volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery. (paper)

  1. Accelerated fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithms for sparsity-regularized cone-beam CT image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Yang, Deshan; Tan, Jun; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) remains an active and important research area. Even with hardware acceleration, the overwhelming majority of the available 3D iterative algorithms that implement nonsmooth regularizers remain computationally burdensome and have not been translated for routine use in time-sensitive applications such as image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, two variants of the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) are proposed and investigated for accelerated iterative image reconstruction in CBCT. Methods: Algorithm acceleration was achieved by replacing the original gradient-descent step in the FISTAs by a subproblem that is solved by use of the ordered subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART). Due to the preconditioning matrix adopted in the OS-SART method, two new weighted proximal problems were introduced and corresponding fast gradient projection-type algorithms were developed for solving them. We also provided efficient numerical implementations of the proposed algorithms that exploit the massive data parallelism of multiple graphics processing units. Results: The improved rates of convergence of the proposed algorithms were quantified in computer-simulation studies and by use of clinical projection data corresponding to an IGRT study. The accelerated FISTAs were shown to possess dramatically improved convergence properties as compared to the standard FISTAs. For example, the number of iterations to achieve a specified reconstruction error could be reduced by an order of magnitude. Volumetric images reconstructed from clinical data were produced in under 4 min. Conclusions: The FISTA achieves a quadratic convergence rate and can therefore potentially reduce the number of iterations required to produce an image of a specified image quality as compared to first-order methods. We have proposed and investigated

  2. Should image rotation be addressed during routine cone-beam CT quality assurance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayan, Ahmet S.; Lin, Haibo; Yeager, Caitlyn; Deville, Curtiland; McDonough, James; Zhu, Timothy C.; Anderson, Nathan; Bar Ad, Voichita; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Both, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether quality assurance (QA) for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image rotation is necessary in order to ensure the accuracy of CBCT based image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) and adaptive radiotherapy (ART). Misregistration of angular coordinates during CBCT acquisition may lead to a rotated reconstructed image. If target localization is performed based on this image, an under- or over-dosage of the target volume (TV) and organs at risk (OARs) may occur. Therefore, patient CT image sets were rotated by 1° up to 3° and the treatment plans were recalculated to quantify changes in dose-volume histograms. A computer code in C++ was written to model the TV displacement and overlap area of an ellipse shape at the target and dose prescription levels corresponding to the image rotation. We investigated clinical scenarios in IGRT and ART in order to study the implications of image rotation on dose distributions for: (1) lateral TV and isocenter (SBRT), (2) central TV and isocenter (IMRT), (3) lateral TV and isocenter (IMRT). Mathematical analysis showed the dose coverage of TV depends on its shape, size, location, and orientation relative to the isocenter. Evaluation of three first scenario for θ = 1° showed variations in TV D95 in the context of IGRT and ART when compared to the original plan were within 2.7 ± 2.6% and 7.7 ± 6.9% respectively while variations in the second and third scenarios were less significant (<0.5%) for the angular range evaluated. However a larger degree of variation was found in terms of minimum and maximum doses for target and OARs. The rotation of CBCT image data sets may have significant dosimetric consequences in IGRT and ART. The TV's location relative to isocenter and shape determine the extent of alterations in dose indicators. Our findings suggest that a CBCT QA criterion of 1° would be a reasonable action level to ensure accurate dose delivery.

  3. TH-E-17A-10: Markerless Lung Tumor Tracking Based On Beams Eye View EPID Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, T; Kearney, V; Liu, H; Jiang, L; Foster, R; Mao, W [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Rozario, T; Bereg, S [University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas (United States); Klash, S [Premier Cancer Centers, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Dynamic tumor tracking or motion compensation techniques have proposed to modify beam delivery following lung tumor motion on the flight. Conventional treatment plan QA could be performed in advance since every delivery may be different. Markerless lung tumor tracking using beams eye view EPID images provides a best treatment evaluation mechanism. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of the online markerless lung tumor motion tracking method. Methods: The lung tumor could be located on every frame of MV images during radiation therapy treatment by comparing with corresponding digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR). A kV-MV CT corresponding curve is applied on planning kV CT to generate MV CT images for patients in order to enhance the similarity between DRRs and MV treatment images. This kV-MV CT corresponding curve was obtained by scanning a same CT electron density phantom by a kV CT scanner and MV scanner (Tomotherapy) or MV CBCT. Two sets of MV DRRs were then generated for tumor and anatomy without tumor as the references to tracking the tumor on beams eye view EPID images. Results: Phantom studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam linac. MV treatment images were acquired continuously during each treatment beam delivery at 12 gantry angles by iTools. Markerless tumor tracking was applied with DRRs generated from simulated MVCT. Tumors were tracked on every frame of images and compared with expected positions based on programed phantom motion. It was found that the average tracking error were 2.3 mm. Conclusion: This algorithm is capable of detecting lung tumors at complicated environment without implanting markers. It should be noted that the CT data has a slice thickness of 3 mm. This shows the statistical accuracy is better than the spatial accuracy. This project has been supported by a Varian Research Grant.

  4. New developments of 11C post-accelerated beams for hadron therapy and imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Augusto, R S; Wenander, F; Penescu, L; Orecchia, R; Parodi, K; Ferrari, A; Stora, T

    2016-01-01

    Hadron therapy was first proposed in 1946 and is by now widespread throughout the world, as witnessed with the design and construction of the CNAO, HIT, PROSCAN and MedAustron treatment centres, among others. The clinical interest in hadron therapy lies in the fact that it delivers precision treatment of tumours, exploiting the characteristic shape (the Bragg peak) of the energy deposition in the tissues for charged hadrons. In particular, carbon ion therapy is found to be biologically more effective, with respect to protons, on certain types of tumours. Following an approach tested at NIRS in Japan [1], carbon ion therapy treatments based on 12C could be combined or fully replaced with 11C PET radioactive ions post-accelerated to the same energy. This approach allows providing a beam for treatment and, at the same time, to collect information on the 3D distributions of the implanted ions by PET imaging. The production of 11C ion beams can be performed using two methods. A first one is based on the production...

  5. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziani, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France); Delmotte, F., E-mail: Franck.Delmotte@InstitutOptique.fr [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Le Paven-Thivet, C. [Institut d' Electronique et de Télécommunications de Rennes (IETR) UMR-CNRS 6164, Université de Rennes 1, UEB, IUT Saint Brieuc, 18 rue Henri Wallon, 22004 Saint Brieuc cedex France (France); Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Roulliay, M. [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay UMR 8214, Univ Paris Sud, 91405 Orsay France (France); Bridou, F. [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, Institut d' Optique, CNRS, Univ Paris Sud, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Gasc, K. [Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 18 Avenue E. Belin, 31401 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-03

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B{sub 4}C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source.

  6. Ion beam sputtered aluminum based multilayer mirrors for extreme ultraviolet solar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziani, A.; Delmotte, F.; Le Paven-Thivet, C.; Meltchakov, E.; Jérome, A.; Roulliay, M.; Bridou, F.; Gasc, K.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the design, synthesis and characterization of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors for solar imaging applications in the spectral range 17 nm–34 nm. This research is carried out in the context of the preparation of the European Space Agency Solar Orbiter mission. The purpose of this study consists in optimizing the deposition of Al-based multilayers by ion beam sputtering according to several parameters such as the ion beam current and the sputtering angle. After optimization of Al thin films, several kinds of Al-based multilayer mirrors have been compared. We have deposited and characterized bi-material and also tri-material periodic multilayers: aluminum/molybdenum [Al/Mo], aluminum/molybdenum/boron carbide [Al/Mo/B 4 C] and aluminum/molybdenum/silicon carbide [Al/Mo/SiC]. Best experimental results have been obtained on Al/Mo/SiC samples: we have measured reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm and 27.5% at 28.2 nm on a synchrotron radiation source. - Highlights: • Design and synthesis of extreme ultraviolet interferential mirrors. • Optimization of aluminum thin films by adjusting several deposition parameters. • Comparison of results obtained with different types of Al-based multilayer mirrors. • Reflectivity up to 48% at 17.3 nm on a synchrotron radiation source

  7. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M; Toshito, T; Watabe, H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  8. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP1-03: Luminescence Imaging of Water During Proton Beam Irradiation for Range Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, S; Komori, M [Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Toshito, T [Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Watabe, H [Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Since proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to a target tumor, the dose distribution should be accurately measured. A precise and efficient method to evaluate the dose distribution is desired. We found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and thought this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: For this purpose, we placed water phantoms set on a table with a spot-scanning proton-therapy system, and luminescence images of these phantoms were measured with a high-sensitivity cooled charge coupled device (CCD) camera during proton-beam irradiation. We also conducted the imaging of phantoms of pure-water, fluorescein solution and acrylic block. We made three dimensional images from the projection data. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms during the proton-beam irradiations showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. The image of the pure-water phantom also showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom was relatively matched with the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 sec. Three dimensional images were successfully obtained which have more quantitative information. Conclusion: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation has the potential to be a new method for range estimations in proton therapy.

  9. New imaging technique based on diffraction of a focused x-ray beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazimirov, A [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kohn, V G [Russian Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Cai, Z-H [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: ayk7@cornell.edu

    2009-01-07

    We present first experimental results from a new diffraction depth-sensitive imaging technique. It is based on the diffraction of a focused x-ray beam from a crystalline sample and recording the intensity pattern on a high-resolution CCD detector positioned at a focal plane. Structural non-uniformity inside the sample results in a region of enhanced intensity in the diffraction pattern. The technique was applied to study silicon-on-insulator thin layers of various thicknesses which revealed a complex strain profile within the layers. A circular Fresnel zone plate was used as a focusing optic. Incoherent diffuse scattering spreads out of the diffraction plane and results in intensity recorded outside of the focal spot providing a new approach to separately register x-rays scattered coherently and incoherently from the sample. (fast track communication)

  10. Determination of neutron beam quality and evaluation of image quality (neutron radiography technique)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Muhammad Saridan Wan Hassan; Manan Munhamad Jaib; Ng Sook Kien; Lai Zhong Yuan; Azali Muhammad; Abd Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Rawi Abdullah

    2005-01-01

    The following topics were presented: beam purity Indicator (BPI) and sensitivity indicator (SI) test objects (ASTM E545-91); No Numbra (NU) test object (ASTM E803-91); MTF and Noise; parameters used in calculation; results of the experiments; summary of analysis. The resulting data consisted exposure contributors and sensitivity levels for films that were radiographed along with 0.25 and 0.5 mm Gd converters; visibility of holes and gaps on the image of the sensitivity indicator using both 0.25 and 0.5 mm Gd converters; qualitative data obtained from observation of the blurring effect on the lower boron nitride disc for both 0.25 and 0.5 mm Gd converters

  11. A technique for transferring a patient's smile line to a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S

    2014-08-01

    Fixed implant-supported prosthodontic treatment for patients requiring a gingival prosthesis often demands that bone and implant levels be apical to the patient's maximum smile line. This is to avoid the display of the prosthesis-tissue junction (the junction between the gingival prosthesis and natural soft tissues) and prevent esthetic failures. Recording a patient's lip position during maximum smile is invaluable for the treatment planning process. This article presents a simple technique for clinically recording and transferring the patient's maximum smile line to cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images for analysis. The technique can help clinicians accurately determine the need for and amount of bone reduction required with respect to the maximum smile line and place implants in optimal positions. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of the beam divergence on the quality neutron radiographic images improved by Richardson-Lucy deconvolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Silvani, Maria Ines; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Images produced by radiation transmission, as many others, are affected by disturbances caused by random and systematic uncertainties. Those caused by noise or statistical dispersion can be diminished by a filtering procedure which eliminates high-frequencies associated to the noise, but unfortunately also those belonging to the signal itself. Systematic uncertainties, in principle, could be more effectively removed if one knows the spoiling convolution function causing the degradation of the image. This function depends upon the detector resolution and the non-punctual character of the source employed in the acquisition, which blur the image making a single point to appear as a spot with a vanishing edge. For an extended source, exhibiting however a reasonable parallel beam, the penumbra degrading the image would be caused by the unavoidable beam divergence. In both cases, the essential information to improve the degraded image is the law of transformation of a single point into a blurred spot, known as point spread function-PSF. Even for an isotropic system, where this function would have a symmetric bell-like shape, it is very difficult to obtain experimentally and to apply it to the data processing. For this reason it is usually replaced by an approximated analytical function such as a Gaussian or Lorentzian. In this work, the Richardson-Lucy deconvoultion has been applied to ameliorate thermal neutron radiographic images acquired with imaging plates using a Gaussian PSF as deconvolutor. Due to the divergence of the neutron beam, reaching 1 deg 16', the penumbra affecting the final image depends upon the gap object-detector. Moreover, even if the object were placed in direct contact with the detector the non-zero dimension of the object along the beam path would produce penumbrae of different magnitudes, i.e., the spatial resolution of the system would be dependent upon the object-detector arrangement. This means that the width of the PSF increases

  13. A robotic C-arm cone beam CT system for image-guided proton therapy: design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Chiaho; Yao, Weiguang; Kidani, Takao; Tomida, Kazuo; Ozawa, Saori; Nishimura, Takenori; Fujisawa, Tatsuya; Shinagawa, Ryousuke; Merchant, Thomas E

    2017-11-01

    A ceiling-mounted robotic C-arm cone beam CT (CBCT) system was developed for use with a 190° proton gantry system and a 6-degree-of-freedom robotic patient positioner. We report on the mechanical design, system accuracy, image quality, image guidance accuracy, imaging dose, workflow, safety and collision-avoidance. The robotic CBCT system couples a rotating C-ring to the C-arm concentrically with a kV X-ray tube and a flat-panel imager mounted to the C-ring. CBCT images are acquired with flex correction and maximally 360° rotation for a 53 cm field of view. The system was designed for clinical use with three imaging locations. Anthropomorphic phantoms were imaged to evaluate the image guidance accuracy. The position accuracy and repeatability of the robotic C-arm was high (robotic CBCT system provides high-accuracy volumetric image guidance for proton therapy. Advances in knowledge: Ceiling-mounted robotic CBCT provides a viable option than CT on-rails for partial gantry and fixed-beam proton systems with the added advantage of acquiring images at the treatment isocentre.

  14. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Uros; van Herk, Marcel; Ploeger, Lennert S; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-06-01

    Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different acquisition

  15. Improved image quality of cone beam CT scans for radiotherapy image guidance using fiber-interspaced antiscatter grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankovic, Uros; Herk, Marcel van; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Medical linear accelerator mounted cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner provides useful soft tissue contrast for purposes of image guidance in radiotherapy. The presence of extensive scattered radiation has a negative effect on soft tissue visibility and uniformity of CBCT scans. Antiscatter grids (ASG) are used in the field of diagnostic radiography to mitigate the scatter. They usually do increase the contrast of the scan, but simultaneously increase the noise. Therefore, and considering other scatter mitigation mechanisms present in a CBCT scanner, the applicability of ASGs with aluminum interspacing for a wide range of imaging conditions has been inconclusive in previous studies. In recent years, grids using fiber interspacers have appeared, providing grids with higher scatter rejection while maintaining reasonable transmission of primary radiation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of one such grid on CBCT image quality. Methods: The grid used (Philips Medical Systems) had ratio of 21:1, frequency 36 lp/cm, and nominal selectivity of 11.9. It was mounted on the kV flat panel detector of an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator and tested in a phantom and a clinical study. Due to the flex of the linac and presence of gridline artifacts an angle dependent gain correction algorithm was devised to mitigate resulting artifacts. Scan reconstruction was performed using XVI4.5 augmented with inhouse developed image lag correction and Hounsfield unit calibration. To determine the necessary parameters for Hounsfield unit calibration and software scatter correction parameters, the Catphan 600 (The Phantom Laboratory) phantom was used. Image quality parameters were evaluated using CIRS CBCT Image Quality and Electron Density Phantom (CIRS) in two different geometries: one modeling head and neck and other pelvic region. Phantoms were acquired with and without the grid and reconstructed with and without software correction which was adapted for the different

  16. Fast kilovoltage/megavoltage (kVMV) breathhold cone-beam CT for image-guided radiotherapy of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertz, Hansjoerg; Stsepankou, Dzmitry; Blessing, Manuel; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Hesser, Juergen; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik; Rossi, Michael; Gros, Uwe; Knox, Chris; Brown, Kevin; Walter, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Long image acquisition times of 60-120 s for cone-beam CT (CBCT) limit the number of patients with lung cancer who can undergo volume image guidance under breathhold. We developed a low-dose dual-energy kilovoltage-megavoltage-cone-beam CT (kVMV-CBCT) based on a clinical treatment unit reducing imaging time to ≤15 s. Simultaneous kVMV-imaging was achieved by dedicated synchronization hardware controlling the output of the linear accelerator (linac) based on detector panel readout signals, preventing imaging artifacts from interference of the linac's MV-irradiation and panel readouts. Optimization was performed to minimize the imaging dose. Single MV-projections, reconstructed MV-CBCT images and images of simultaneous 90 0 kV- and 90 0 MV-CBCT (180 0 kVMV-CBCT) were acquired with different parameters. Image quality and imaging dose were evaluated and compared to kV-imaging. Hardware-based kVMV synchronization resulted in artifact-free projections. A combined 180 0 kVMV-CBCT scan with a total MV-dose of 5 monitor units was acquired in 15 s and with sufficient image quality. The resolution was 5-6 line pairs cm -1 (Catphan phantom). The combined kVMV-scan dose was equivalent to a kV-radiation scan dose of ∼33 mGy. kVMV-CBCT based on a standard linac is promising and can provide ultra-fast online volume image guidance with low imaging dose and sufficient image quality for fast and accurate patient positioning for patients with lung cancer under breathhold.

  17. BIS-2 spectrometer for search and investigation of narrow resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleev, A.N.; Aref'ev, V.A.; Balandin, V.P.

    1989-01-01

    The configuration and main characteristics of the BIS-2 spectrometer are described. The spectrometer was intended to search for and to investigate charmed particles and narrow resonances produced in neutron-nucleus interactions. It was placed on a neutron beam of the Serpukhov accelerator. The Monte-Carlo simulated and experimentally measured characteristics of individual elements and the spectrometer as a whole are described. A brief review of the principal results based on the analysis of more than 10 7 neutron-nucleus interactions registered by means of the BIS-2 spectrometer is given. 34 refs.; 8 figs.; 5 tabs

  18. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz, E-mail: tataventorini@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia

    2015-03-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  19. Soft-tissue imaging with C-arm cone-beam CT using statistical reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Adam S; Stayman, J Webster; Otake, Yoshito; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Vogt, Sebastian; Gallia, Gary L; Khanna, A Jay

    2014-01-01

    The potential for statistical image reconstruction methods such as penalized-likelihood (PL) to improve C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT) soft-tissue visualization for intraoperative imaging over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) is assessed in this work by making a fair comparison in relation to soft-tissue performance. A prototype mobile C-arm was used to scan anthropomorphic head and abdomen phantoms as well as a cadaveric torso at doses substantially lower than typical values in diagnostic CT, and the effects of dose reduction via tube current reduction and sparse sampling were also compared. Matched spatial resolution between PL and FBP was determined by the edge spread function of low-contrast (∼40–80 HU) spheres in the phantoms, which were representative of soft-tissue imaging tasks. PL using the non-quadratic Huber penalty was found to substantially reduce noise relative to FBP, especially at lower spatial resolution where PL provides a contrast-to-noise ratio increase up to 1.4–2.2× over FBP at 50% dose reduction across all objects. Comparison of sampling strategies indicates that soft-tissue imaging benefits from fully sampled acquisitions at dose above ∼1.7 mGy and benefits from 50% sparsity at dose below ∼1.0 mGy. Therefore, an appropriate sampling strategy along with the improved low-contrast visualization offered by statistical reconstruction demonstrates the potential for extending intraoperative C-arm CBCT to applications in soft-tissue interventions in neurosurgery as well as thoracic and abdominal surgeries by overcoming conventional tradeoffs in noise, spatial resolution, and dose. (paper)

  20. Vertical bone measurements from cone beam computed tomography images using different software packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcelos, Taruska Ventorini; Neves, Frederico Sampaio; Moraes, Livia Almeida Bueno; Freitas, Deborah Queiroz

    2015-01-01

    This article aimed at comparing the accuracy of linear measurement tools of different commercial software packages. Eight fully edentulous dry mandibles were selected for this study. Incisor, canine, premolar, first molar and second molar regions were selected. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained with i-CAT Next Generation. Linear bone measurements were performed by one observer on the cross-sectional images using three different software packages: XoranCat®, OnDemand3D® and KDIS3D®, all able to assess DICOM images. In addition, 25% of the sample was reevaluated for the purpose of reproducibility. The mandibles were sectioned to obtain the gold standard for each region. Intraclass coefficients (ICC) were calculated to examine the agreement between the two periods of evaluation; the one-way analysis of variance performed with the post-hoc Dunnett test was used to compare each of the software-derived measurements with the gold standard. The ICC values were excellent for all software packages. The least difference between the software-derived measurements and the gold standard was obtained with the OnDemand3D and KDIS3D (‑0.11 and ‑0.14 mm, respectively), and the greatest, with the XoranCAT (+0.25 mm). However, there was no statistical significant difference between the measurements obtained with the different software packages and the gold standard (p > 0.05). In conclusion, linear bone measurements were not influenced by the software package used to reconstruct the image from CBCT DICOM data. (author)

  1. Cone-beam computed tomography imaging: therapeutic staff dose during chemoembolisation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Vogl, Thomas J; Chacko, Annamma; Mbalisike, Emmanuel C

    2014-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is an important requirement to perform real-time therapeutic image-guided procedures on patients. The purpose of this study is to estimate the personal-dose-equivalent and annual-personal-dose from CBCT imaging during transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE). Therapeutic staff doses (therapeutic and assistant physician) were collected during 200 patient (65  ±  15 years, range: 40–86) CBCT examinations over six months. Absorbed doses were assessed using thermo-luminescent dosimeters during patient hepatic TACE therapy. We estimated personal-dose-equivalent (PDE) and annual-personal-dose (APD) from absorbed dose based on international atomic energy agency protocol. APD for therapeutic procedure was calculated (therapeutic physician: 5.6 mSv; assistant physician: 5.08 mSv) based on institutional work load. Regarding PDE, the hands of the staff members received a greater dose compared to other anatomical locations (therapeutic physician: 56 mSv, 72 mSv; assistant physician: 12 mSv, 14 mSv). Annual radiation doses to the eyes and hands of the staff members were lower compared to the prescribed limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). PDE and APD of both therapeutic staff members were within the recommended ICRP-103 annual limit. Dose to the assistant physician was lower than the dose to the therapeutic physician during imaging. Annual radiation doses to eye-lenses and hands of both staff members were lower than prescribed limits. (paper)

  2. Accuracy of image guidance using free-breathing cone-beam computed tomography for stereotactic lung radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Takeshi; Monzen, Hajime; Nakayama, Shinichi; Mizote, Rika; Oonishi, Yuuichi; Kaneshige, Soichiro; Sakamoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Movement of the target object during cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) leads to motion blurring artifacts. The accuracy of manual image matching in image-guided radiotherapy depends on the image quality. We aimed to assess the accuracy of target position localization using free-breathing CBCT during stereotactic lung radiotherapy. The Vero4DRT linear accelerator device was used for the examinations. Reference point discrepancies between the MV X-ray beam and the CBCT system were calculated using a phantom device with a centrally mounted steel ball. The precision of manual image matching between the CBCT and the averaged intensity (AI) images restructured from four-dimensional CT (4DCT) was estimated with a respiratory motion phantom, as determined in evaluations by five independent operators. Reference point discrepancies between the MV X-ray beam and the CBCT image-guidance systems, categorized as left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI), were 0.33 ± 0.09, 0.16 ± 0.07, and 0.05 ± 0.04 mm, respectively. The LR, AP, and SI values for residual errors from manual image matching were -0.03 ± 0.22, 0.07 ± 0.25, and -0.79 ± 0.68 mm, respectively. The accuracy of target position localization using the Vero4DRT system in our center was 1.07 ± 1.23 mm (2 SD). This study experimentally demonstrated the sufficient level of geometric accuracy using the free-breathing CBCT and the image-guidance system mounted on the Vero4DRT. However, the inter-observer variation and systematic localization error of image matching substantially affected the overall geometric accuracy. Therefore, when using the free-breathing CBCT images, careful consideration of image matching is especially important.

  3. Reduction of Cone-Beam CT scan time without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Jonas; Jensen, Henrik R; Bertelsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    In modern radiotherapy accelerators are equipped with 3D cone-beam CT (CBCT) which is used to verify patient position before treatment. The verification is based on an image registration between the CBCT acquired just before treatment and the CT scan made for the treatment planning. The purpose...... of this study is to minimise the scan time of the CBCT without compromising the accuracy of the image registration in IGRT....

  4. Scatter kernel estimation with an edge-spread function method for cone-beam computed tomography imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heng; Mohan, Radhe; Zhu, X Ronald

    2008-01-01

    The clinical applications of kilovoltage x-ray cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have been compromised by the limited quality of CBCT images, which typically is due to a substantial scatter component in the projection data. In this paper, we describe an experimental method of deriving the scatter kernel of a CBCT imaging system. The estimated scatter kernel can be used to remove the scatter component from the CBCT projection images, thus improving the quality of the reconstructed image. The scattered radiation was approximated as depth-dependent, pencil-beam kernels, which were derived using an edge-spread function (ESF) method. The ESF geometry was achieved with a half-beam block created by a 3 mm thick lead sheet placed on a stack of slab solid-water phantoms. Measurements for ten water-equivalent thicknesses (WET) ranging from 0 cm to 41 cm were taken with (half-blocked) and without (unblocked) the lead sheet, and corresponding pencil-beam scatter kernels or point-spread functions (PSFs) were then derived without assuming any empirical trial function. The derived scatter kernels were verified with phantom studies. Scatter correction was then incorporated into the reconstruction process to improve image quality. For a 32 cm diameter cylinder phantom, the flatness of the reconstructed image was improved from 22% to 5%. When the method was applied to CBCT images for patients undergoing image-guided therapy of the pelvis and lung, the variation in selected regions of interest (ROIs) was reduced from >300 HU to <100 HU. We conclude that the scatter reduction technique utilizing the scatter kernel effectively suppresses the artifact caused by scatter in CBCT.

  5. Deep inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy for lung cancer: impact on image quality and registration uncertainty in cone beam CT image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte F; Bangsgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the impact of deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and tumour baseline shifts on image quality and registration uncertainty in image-guided DIBH radiotherapy (RT) for locally advanced lung cancer. METHODS: Patients treated with daily cone beam CT (CBCT)-guided free...... for the craniocaudal direction in FB, where it was >3 mm. On the 31st fraction, the intraobserver uncertainty increased compared with the second fraction. This increase was more pronounced in FB. Image quality scores improved in DIBH compared with FB for all parameters in all patients. Simulated tumour baseline shifts...... ≤2 mm did not affect the CBCT image quality considerably. CONCLUSION: DIBH CBCT improved image quality and reduced registration uncertainty in the craniocaudal direction in image-guided RT of locally advanced lung cancer. Baseline shifts ≤2 mm in DIBH during CBCT acquisition did not affect image...

  6. Simulations of x-ray speckle-based dark-field and phase-contrast imaging with a polychromatic beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdora, Marie-Christine, E-mail: marie-christine.zdora@diamond.ac.uk [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Thibault, Pierre [Department of Physics & Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Pfeiffer, Franz [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zanette, Irene [Lehrstuhl für Biomedizinische Physik, Physik-Department & Institut für Medizintechnik, Technische Universität München, 85748 Garching (Germany); Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    Following the first experimental demonstration of x-ray speckle-based multimodal imaging using a polychromatic beam [I. Zanette et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112(25), 253903 (2014)], we present a simulation study on the effects of a polychromatic x-ray spectrum on the performance of this technique. We observe that the contrast of the near-field speckles is only mildly influenced by the bandwidth of the energy spectrum. Moreover, using a homogeneous object with simple geometry, we characterize the beam hardening artifacts in the reconstructed transmission and refraction angle images, and we describe how the beam hardening also affects the dark-field signal provided by speckle tracking. This study is particularly important for further implementations and developments of coherent speckle-based techniques at laboratory x-ray sources.

  7. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, Praha 8, CZ-18221 (Czech Republic); Rigaku, Novodvorská 994, Praha 4, CZ-14221 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-11-21

    A new configuration of diffractive–refractive optics for beam splitting is investigated. The set-up can be applied to perform imaging with two beams simultaneously. It brings advantages toward dynamic studies using image guided diffraction or fluorescence spectroscopy. The optimal energy range of operation for the beam-splitter is between 7 keV and 24 keV, reaching best efficiency at an energy of 10 keV. Due to the long focusing distances (several tens of meters) created by the diffractive–refractive optics and the higher refraction efficiency in the softer energy range, the presented set-ups are ideal for hard X-ray FEL sources.

  8. Time resolved, 2-D hard X-ray imaging of relativistic electron-beam target interactions on ETA-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crist, C.E.; Sampayan, S.; Westenskow, G.; Caporaso, G.; Houck, T.; Weir, J.; Trimble, D.; Krogh, M.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced radiographic applications require a constant source size less than 1 mm. To study the time history of a relativistic electron beam as it interacts with a bremsstrahlung converter, one of the diagnostics they use is a multi-frame time-resolved hard x-ray camera. They are performing experiments on the ETA-II accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to investigate details of the electron beam/converter interactions. The camera they are using contains 6 time-resolved images, each image is a 5 ns frame. By starting each successive frame 10 ns after the previous frame, they create a 6-frame movie from the hard x-rays produced from the interaction of the 50-ns electron beam pulse

  9. TH-EF-207A-05: Feasibility of Applying SMEIR Method On Small Animal 4D Cone Beam CT Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Y; Zhang, Y; Shao, Y; Wang, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Small animal cone beam CT imaging has been widely used in preclinical research. Due to the higher respiratory rate and heat beats of small animals, motion blurring is inevitable and needs to be corrected in the reconstruction. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) method, which uses projection images of all phases, proved to be effective in motion model estimation and able to reconstruct motion-compensated images. We demonstrate the application of SMEIR for small animal 4D cone beam CT imaging by computer simulations on a digital rat model. Methods: The small animal CBCT imaging system was simulated with the source-to-detector distance of 300 mm and the source-to-object distance of 200 mm. A sequence of rat phantom were generated with 0.4 mm 3 voxel size. The respiratory cycle was taken as 1.0 second and the motions were simulated with a diaphragm motion of 2.4mm and an anterior-posterior expansion of 1.6 mm. The projection images were calculated using a ray-tracing method, and 4D-CBCT were reconstructed using SMEIR and FDK methods. The SMEIR method iterates over two alternating steps: 1) motion-compensated iterative image reconstruction by using projections from all respiration phases and 2) motion model estimation from projections directly through a 2D-3D deformable registration of the image obtained in the first step to projection images of other phases. Results: The images reconstructed using SMEIR method reproduced the features in the original phantom. Projections from the same phase were also reconstructed using FDK method. Compared with the FDK results, the images from SMEIR method substantially improve the image quality with minimum artifacts. Conclusion: We demonstrate that it is viable to apply SMEIR method to reconstruct small animal 4D-CBCT images.

  10. Tilting the jaw to improve the image quality or to reduce the dose in cone-beam computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckow, Marlen; Deyhle, Hans; Beckmann, Felix; Dagassan-Berndt, Dorothea; Müller, Bert

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The image quality in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) should be improved tilting the mandible that contains two dental titanium implants, within the relevant range of motion. Materials and methods: Using the mandible of a five-month-old pig, CBCT was performed varying the accelerating voltage, beam current, the starting rotation angle of the mandible in the source-detector plane and the tilt angles of the jaw with respect to the source-detector plane. The different datasets were automatically registered with respect to micro CT data to extract the common volume and the deviance to the pre-defined standard that characterizes the image quality. Results: The variations of the accelerating voltage, beam current and the rotation within the source-detection plane provided the expected quantitative behavior indicating the appropriate choice of the imaging quality factor. The tilting of the porcine mandible by about 14° improves the image quality by almost a factor of two. Conclusions: The tilting of the mandible with two dental implants can be used to significantly reduce the artifacts of the strongly X-ray absorbing materials in the CBCT images. The comparison of 14° jaw tilting with respect to the currently recommended arrangement in plane with the teeth demonstrates that the applied exposure time and the related dose can be reduced by a factor of four without decreasing the image quality.

  11. 1x3 beam splitter based on self-imaging phenomena in air-slab photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ming; Kristensen, Martin; Malureanu, Radu

    A 1 x 3 beam splitter using multi-mode interference based on self-imaging is demonstrated theoretically and experimentally in PhCWs. The total transmission of the 1 x 3 splitter is almost equal to the corresponding length of W1 PhCW. The input power is distributed equally between the output ports...

  12. Evaluation of imaging reformation with cone beam computed tomography for the assessment of bone density and shape in mandible

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Sang Woo; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwan, Eui Hwan

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic estimation of destruction and formation of bone has the typical limit according to capacity of x-ray generator and image detector. So the aim of this study was to find out how much it can reproduce the shape and the density of bone in the case of using recently developed dental type of cone beam computed tomography, and which image is applied by new detector and mathematic calculation. Cone beam computed tomography (PSR 9000N, Asahi Roentgen Ind. Co., Ltd., Japan) and soft x-ray radiography were executed on dry mandible that was already decalcified during 5 hours, 10 hours, 15 hours, 20 hours, and 25 hours. Estimating and comparing of those came to the following results. The change of inferior border of mandible and anterior border of ramous in the region of cortical bone was observed between first 5 and 10 hours of decalcification. The reproduction of shape and density in the region of cortical bone and cancellous bone can be hardly observed at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. The difference of decrease of bone density according to hours of decalcification increase was not reproduced at cone beam computed tomography compared with soft x-ray radiography. CBCT images revealed higher spatial resolution. However, contrast resolution in region of low contrast sensitivity is the inferiority of images' property.

  13. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10 –9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×10 13 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al

  14. Deformable image registration for cone-beam CT guided transoral robotic base-of-tongue surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reaungamornrat, S; Liu, W P; Otake, Y; Uneri, A; Siewerdsen, J H; Taylor, R H; Wang, A S; Nithiananthan, S; Schafer, S; Tryggestad, E; Richmon, J; Sorger, J M

    2013-01-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) offers a minimally invasive approach to resection of base-of-tongue tumors. However, precise localization of the surgical target and adjacent critical structures can be challenged by the highly deformed intraoperative setup. We propose a deformable registration method using intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to accurately align preoperative CT or MR images with the intraoperative scene. The registration method combines a Gaussian mixture (GM) model followed by a variation of the Demons algorithm. First, following segmentation of the volume of interest (i.e. volume of the tongue extending to the hyoid), a GM model is applied to surface point clouds for rigid initialization (GM rigid) followed by nonrigid deformation (GM nonrigid). Second, the registration is refined using the Demons algorithm applied to distance map transforms of the (GM-registered) preoperative image and intraoperative CBCT. Performance was evaluated in repeat cadaver studies (25 image pairs) in terms of target registration error (TRE), entropy correlation coefficient (ECC) and normalized pointwise mutual information (NPMI). Retraction of the tongue in the TORS operative setup induced gross deformation >30 mm. The mean TRE following the GM rigid, GM nonrigid and Demons steps was 4.6, 2.1 and 1.7 mm, respectively. The respective ECC was 0.57, 0.70 and 0.73, and NPMI was 0.46, 0.57 and 0.60. Registration accuracy was best across the superior aspect of the tongue and in proximity to the hyoid (by virtue of GM registration of surface points on these structures). The Demons step refined registration primarily in deeper portions of the tongue further from the surface and hyoid bone. Since the method does not use image intensities directly, it is suitable to multi-modality registration of preoperative CT or MR with intraoperative CBCT. Extending the 3D image registration to the fusion of image and planning data in stereo-endoscopic video is anticipated to

  15. The current status of cone beam computed tomography imaging in orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapila, S; Conley, R S; Harrell, W E

    2011-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) has become an increasingly important source of three dimensional (3D) volumetric data in clinical orthodontics since its introduction into dentistry in 1998. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight the current understanding of, and evidence for, the clinical use of CBCT in orthodontics, and to review the findings to answer clinically relevant questions. Currently available information from studies using CBCT can be organized into five broad categories: 1, the assessment of CBCT technology; 2, its use in craniofacial morphometric analyses; 3, incidental and missed findings; 4, analysis of treatment outcomes; and 5, efficacy of CBCT in diagnosis and treatment planning. The findings in these topical areas are summarized, followed by current indications and protocols for the use of CBCT in specific cases. Despite the increasing popularity of CBCT in orthodontics, and its advantages over routine radiography in specific cases, the effects of information derived from these images in altering diagnosis and treatment decisions has not been demonstrated in several types of cases. It has therefore been recommended that CBCT be used in select cases in which conventional radiography cannot supply satisfactory diagnostic information; these include cleft palate patients, assessment of unerupted tooth position, supernumerary teeth, identification of root resorption and for planning orthognathic surgery. The need to image other types of cases should be made on a case-by-case basis following an assessment of benefits vs risks of scanning in these situations. PMID:21159912

  16. Turbulence imaging and applications using beam emission spectroscopy on DIII-D (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, G. R.; Fenzi, C.; Fonck, R. J.; Jakubowski, M.

    2003-03-01

    Two-dimensional measurements of density fluctuations are obtained in the radial and poloidal plane of the DIII-D tokamak with the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostic system. The goals are to visualize the spatial structure and time evolution of turbulent eddies, as well as to obtain the 2D statistical properties of turbulence. The measurements are obtained with an array of localized BES spatial channels configured to image a midplane region of the plasma. 32 channels have been deployed, each with a spatial resolution of about 1 cm in the radial and poloidal directions, thus providing measurements of turbulence in the wave number range 0movies have broad application to a wide variety of fundamental turbulence studies: imaging of the highly complex, nonlinear turbulent eddy interactions, measurement of the 2D correlation function, and S(kr,kθ) wave number spectra, and direct measurement of the equilibrium and time-dependent turbulence flow field. The time-dependent, two-dimensional turbulence velocity flow-field is obtained with time-delay-estimation techniques.

  17. Incidental dentomaxillofacial findings on cone beam computed tomography images of Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Khojastepour

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: The present study aimed to assess the nature and prevalence of incidental findings in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT images of oral and maxillofacial patients. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 773 CBCT samples were retrieved from archives of a private oral and maxillofacial radiology center. Any findings that were not related to the reason of CBCT request was recorded in forms designed originally for this study. RESULTS: 475 patients out of 773 had at least one incidental finding. It composed about 60% of the patients. The largest frequency of incidental findings were cases of periapical lesions. (n = 189, followed by mucous thickening of maxillary sinus (n = 170, retained root (n = 32, impaction and 3rd molar (n = 26. Other incidental findings were torus (n = 25, dental anomalies (n = 13, vertical root fracture (n = 5, intra bony lesion and periapical pathosis (n = 4 and the lowest frequency was sialoliths (n = 1. CONCLUSION: About half of the subjects have had at least one incidental finding, so the precise review of the CBCT images seems to be necessary.

  18. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  19. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4D-CBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).Methods: The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: (1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and (2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and backprojection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The quality of reconstructed 4D images and the accuracy of tumor motion trajectory are assessed by comparing with those resulting from conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstructions (FDK and total variation minimization) and motion estimation (demons algorithm). The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is further evaluated by reconstructing a lung cancer patient 4D-CBCT.Results: Image quality of 4D-CBCT is greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm in both phantom and patient studies. When all projections are used to reconstruct a 3D-CBCT by FDK, motion

  20. Image-based motion compensation for high-resolution extremities cone-beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Cao, Q.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) of the extremities provides high spatial resolution, but its quantitative accuracy may be challenged by involuntary sub-mm patient motion that cannot be eliminated with simple means of external immobilization. We investigate a two-step iterative motion compensation based on a multi-component metric of image sharpness. Methods: Motion is considered with respect to locally rigid motion within a particular region of interest, and the method supports application to multiple locally rigid regions. Motion is estimated by maximizing a cost function with three components: a gradient metric encouraging image sharpness, an entropy term that favors high contrast and penalizes streaks, and a penalty term encouraging smooth motion. Motion compensation involved initial coarse estimation of gross motion followed by estimation of fine-scale displacements using high resolution reconstructions. The method was evaluated in simulations with synthetic motion (1-4 mm) applied to a wrist volume obtained on a CMOS-based CBCT testbench. Structural similarity index (SSIM) quantified the agreement between motion-compensated and static data. The algorithm was also tested on a motion contaminated patient scan from dedicated extremities CBCT. Results: Excellent correction was achieved for the investigated range of displacements, indicated by good visual agreement with the static data. 10-15% improvement in SSIM was attained for 2-4 mm motions. The compensation was robust against increasing motion (4% decrease in SSIM across the investigated range, compared to 14% with no compensation). Consistent performance was achieved across a range of noise levels. Significant mitigation of artifacts was shown in patient data. Conclusion: The results indicate feasibility of image-based motion correction in extremities CBCT without the need for a priori motion models, external trackers, or fiducials.

  1. High resolution laser beam induced current images under trichromatic laser radiation: approximation to the solar irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, F J; Alcántara, R; Fernández-Lorenzo, C; Martín-Calleja, J

    2010-03-01

    A laser beam induced current (LBIC) map of a photoactive surface is a very useful tool when it is necessary to study the spatial variability of properties such as photoconverter efficiency or factors connected with the recombination of carriers. Obtaining high spatial resolution LBIC maps involves irradiating the photoactive surface with a photonic beam with Gaussian power distribution and with a low dispersion coefficient. Laser emission fulfils these characteristics, but against it is the fact that it is highly monochromatic and therefore has a spectral distribution different to solar emissions. This work presents an instrumental system and procedure to obtain high spatial resolution LBIC maps in conditions approximating solar irradiation. The methodology developed consists of a trichromatic irradiation system based on three sources of laser excitation with emission in the red, green, and blue zones of the electromagnetic spectrum. The relative irradiation powers are determined by either solar spectrum distribution or Planck's emission formula which provides information approximate to the behavior of the system if it were under solar irradiation. In turn, an algorithm and a procedure have been developed to be able to form images based on the scans performed by the three lasers, providing information about the photoconverter efficiency of photovoltaic devices under the irradiation conditions used. This system has been checked with three photosensitive devices based on three different technologies: a commercial silicon photodiode, a commercial photoresistor, and a dye-sensitized solar cell. These devices make it possible to check how the superficial quantum efficiency has areas dependent upon the excitation wavelength while it has been possible to measure global incident photon-to-current efficiency values approximating those that would be obtained under irradiation conditions with sunlight.

  2. Multi-beam backscatter image data processing techniques employed to EM 1002 system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, W.A.; Chakraborty, B.

    to compensate outer-beam backscatter strength data in such a way that the effect of angular backscatter strength is removed. In this work we have developed backscatter data processing techniques for EM1002 multi-beam system...

  3. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Ehtiati, T; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM = 0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE = 0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p < 0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional

  4. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D-2D image registration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouadah, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Gang, G. J.; Ehtiati, T.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is applicable to situations where conventional calibration is not feasible

  5. Self-calibration of cone-beam CT geometry using 3D–2D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouadah, S; Stayman, J W; Gang, G J; Siewerdsen, J H; Ehtiati, T

    2016-01-01

    Robotic C-arms are capable of complex orbits that can increase field of view, reduce artifacts, improve image quality, and/or reduce dose; however, it can be challenging to obtain accurate, reproducible geometric calibration required for image reconstruction for such complex orbits. This work presents a method for geometric calibration for an arbitrary source-detector orbit by registering 2D projection data to a previously acquired 3D image. It also yields a method by which calibration of simple circular orbits can be improved. The registration uses a normalized gradient information similarity metric and the covariance matrix adaptation-evolution strategy optimizer for robustness against local minima and changes in image content. The resulting transformation provides a ‘self-calibration’ of system geometry. The algorithm was tested in phantom studies using both a cone-beam CT (CBCT) test-bench and a robotic C-arm (Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare) for circular and non-circular orbits. Self-calibration performance was evaluated in terms of the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the point spread function in CBCT reconstructions, the reprojection error (RPE) of steel ball bearings placed on each phantom, and the overall quality and presence of artifacts in CBCT images. In all cases, self-calibration improved the FWHM—e.g. on the CBCT bench, FWHM  =  0.86 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.65 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Similar improvements were measured in RPE—e.g. on the robotic C-arm, RPE  =  0.73 mm for conventional calibration compared to 0.55 mm for self-calibration (p  <  0.001). Visible improvement was evident in CBCT reconstructions using self-calibration, particularly about high-contrast, high-frequency objects (e.g. temporal bone air cells and a surgical needle). The results indicate that self-calibration can improve even upon systems with presumably accurate geometric calibration and is

  6. Reconstruction-of-difference (RoD) imaging for cone-beam CT neuro-angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P.; Stayman, J. W.; Mow, M.; Zbijewski, W.; Sisniega, A.; Aygun, N.; Stevens, R.; Foos, D.; Wang, X.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2018-06-01

    Timely evaluation of neurovasculature via CT angiography (CTA) is critical to the detection of pathology such as ischemic stroke. Cone-beam CTA (CBCT-A) systems provide potential advantages in the timely use at the point-of-care, although challenges of a relatively slow gantry rotation speed introduce tradeoffs among image quality, data consistency and data sparsity. This work describes and evaluates a new reconstruction-of-difference (RoD) approach that is robust to such challenges. A fast digital simulation framework was developed to test the performance of the RoD over standard reference reconstruction methods such as filtered back-projection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) over a broad range of imaging conditions, grouped into three scenarios to test the trade-off between data consistency, data sparsity and peak contrast. Two experiments were also conducted using a CBCT prototype and an anthropomorphic neurovascular phantom to test the simulation findings in real data. Performance was evaluated primarily in terms of normalized root mean square error (NRMSE) in comparison to truth, with reconstruction parameters chosen to optimize performance in each case to ensure fair comparison. The RoD approach reduced NRMSE in reconstructed images by up to 50%–53% compared to FBP and up to 29%–31% compared to PL for each scenario. Scan protocols well suited to the RoD approach were identified that balance tradeoffs among data consistency, sparsity and peak contrast—for example, a CBCT-A scan with 128 projections acquired in 8.5 s over a 180°  +  fan angle half-scan for a time attenuation curve with ~8.5 s time-to-peak and 600 HU peak contrast. With imaging conditions such as the simulation scenarios of fixed data sparsity (i.e. varying levels of data consistency and peak contrast), the experiments confirmed the reduction of NRMSE by 34% and 17% compared to FBP and PL, respectively. The RoD approach demonstrated superior performance in 3D angiography

  7. Motion compensation in extremity cone-beam CT using a penalized image sharpness criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisniega, A.; Stayman, J. W.; Yorkston, J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Zbijewski, W.

    2017-05-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) for musculoskeletal imaging would benefit from a method to reduce the effects of involuntary patient motion. In particular, the continuing improvement in spatial resolution of CBCT may enable tasks such as quantitative assessment of bone microarchitecture (0.1 mm-0.2 mm detail size), where even subtle, sub-mm motion blur might be detrimental. We propose a purely image based motion compensation method that requires no fiducials, tracking hardware or prior images. A statistical optimization algorithm (CMA-ES) is used to estimate a motion trajectory that optimizes an objective function consisting of an image sharpness criterion augmented by a regularization term that encourages smooth motion trajectories. The objective function is evaluated using a volume of interest (VOI, e.g. a single bone and surrounding area) where the motion can be assumed to be rigid. More complex motions can be addressed by using multiple VOIs. Gradient variance was found to be a suitable sharpness metric for this application. The performance of the compensation algorithm was evaluated in simulated and experimental CBCT data, and in a clinical dataset. Motion-induced artifacts and blurring were significantly reduced across a broad range of motion amplitudes, from 0.5 mm to 10 mm. Structure similarity index (SSIM) against a static volume was used in the simulation studies to quantify the performance of the motion compensation. In studies with translational motion, the SSIM improved from 0.86 before compensation to 0.97 after compensation for 0.5 mm motion, from 0.8 to 0.94 for 2 mm motion and from 0.52 to 0.87 for 10 mm motion (~70% increase). Similar reduction of artifacts was observed in a benchtop experiment with controlled translational motion of an anthropomorphic hand phantom, where SSIM (against a reconstruction of a static phantom) improved from 0.3 to 0.8 for 10 mm motion. Application to a clinical dataset of a lower extremity showed dramatic reduction

  8. The impact of reorienting cone-beam computed tomographic images in varied head positions on the coordinates of anatomical landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hun; Jeong, Ho Gul; Hwang, Jae Joon; Lee, Jung Hee; Han, Sang Sun [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Yonsei University, College of Dentistry, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the coordinates of anatomical landmarks on cone-beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images in varied head positions before and after reorientation using image analysis software. CBCT images were taken in a normal position and four varied head positions using a dry skull marked with 3 points where gutta percha was fixed. In each of the five radiographic images, reference points were set, 20 anatomical landmarks were identified, and each set of coordinates was calculated. Coordinates in the images from the normally positioned head were compared with those in the images obtained from varied head positions using statistical methods. Post-reorientation coordinates calculated using a three-dimensional image analysis program were also compared to the reference coordinates. In the original images, statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. However, post-reorientation, no statistically significant differences were found between coordinates in the normal-position and varied-position images. The changes in head position impacted the coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in three-dimensional images. However, reorientation using image analysis software allowed accurate superimposition onto the reference positions.

  9. High energy electron radiography system design and simulation study of beam angle-position correlation and aperture effect on the images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Quantang; Cao, S.C.; Liu, M.; Sheng, X.K.; Wang, Y.R.; Zong, Y.; Zhang, X.M.; Jing, Y.; Cheng, R.; Zhao, Y.T.; Zhang, Z.M.; Du, Y.C.; Gai, W.

    2016-01-01

    A beam line dedicated to high-energy electron radiography experimental research with linear achromat and imaging lens systems has been designed. The field of view requirement on the target and the beam angle-position correlation correction can be achieved by fine-tuning the fields of the quadrupoles used in the achromat in combination with already existing six quadrupoles before the achromat. The radiography system is designed by fully considering the space limitation of the laboratory and the beam diagnostics devices. Two kinds of imaging lens system, a quadruplet and an octuplet system are integrated into one beam line with the same object plane and image plane but with different magnification factor. The beam angle-position correlation on the target required by the imaging lens system and the aperture effect on the images are studied with particle tracking simulation. It is shown that the aperture position is also correlated to the beam angle-position on the target. With matched beam on the target, corresponding aperture position and suitable aperture radius, clear pictures can be imaged by both lens systems. The aperture is very important for the imaging. The details of the beam optical requirements, optimized parameters and the simulation results are presented.

  10. Image quality assessment of three limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography devices in endodontics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) in dento-maxillo-facial radiology, many CBCT devices with different technical aspects and characteristics were produced. Technical variations between CBCT and acquisition settings could involve image quality differences. In order to compare the performance of three limited field-of-view CBCT devices, an objective and subjective evaluation of image quality was carried out using an ex-vivo phantom, which combines both diagnostic and technical features. A significant difference in image quality was found between the five acquisition protocols of the study. (author) [fr

  11. Avaliação da simetria craniana através de imagens de TC cone beam = Cranial symmetry assessment through cone-beam CT images

    OpenAIRE

    Vilella, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos; Rothier, Eduardo Kant Colunga; Vilella, Beatriz de Souza

    2014-01-01

    Objetivo: O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar os lados direito e esquerdo de indivíduos que apresentavam simetria craniana através de 2 imagens geradas pela tomografia computadorizada cone beam (TCCB). Métodos: A amostra consistiu de 35 imagens obtidas pelo tomógrafo 3D-i-CAT (Imaging Sciences International Inc. , Hatfield, USA), sendo 13 de indivíduos do gênero masculino e 22 do gênero feminino, com idades variando de 8 a 64 anos, que apresentavam simetria facial aceitável. As imagens...

  12. Half-Fan-Based Intensity-Weighted Region-of-Interest Imaging for Low-Dose Cone-Beam CT in Image-Guided Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Boyeol; Son, Kihong; Pua, Rizza; Kim, Jinsung; Solodov, Alexander; Cho, Seungryong

    2016-10-01

    With the increased use of computed tomography (CT) in clinics, dose reduction is the most important feature people seek when considering new CT techniques or applications. We developed an intensity-weighted region-of-interest (IWROI) imaging method in an exact half-fan geometry to reduce the imaging radiation dose to patients in cone-beam CT (CBCT) for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). While dose reduction is highly desirable, preserving the high-quality images of the ROI is also important for target localization in IGRT. An intensity-weighting (IW) filter made of copper was mounted in place of a bowtie filter on the X-ray tube unit of an on-board imager (OBI) system such that the filter can substantially reduce radiation exposure to the outer ROI. In addition to mounting the IW filter, the lead-blade collimation of the OBI was adjusted to produce an exact half-fan scanning geometry for a further reduction of the radiation dose. The chord-based rebinned backprojection-filtration (BPF) algorithm in circular CBCT was implemented for image reconstruction, and a humanoid pelvis phantom was used for the IWROI imaging experiment. The IWROI image of the phantom was successfully reconstructed after beam-quality correction, and it was registered to the reference image within an acceptable level of tolerance. Dosimetric measurements revealed that the dose is reduced by approximately 61% in the inner ROI and by 73% in the outer ROI compared to the conventional bowtie filter-based half-fan scan. The IWROI method substantially reduces the imaging radiation dose and provides reconstructed images with an acceptable level of quality for patient setup and target localization. The proposed half-fan-based IWROI imaging technique can add a valuable option to CBCT in IGRT applications.

  13. WE-AB-207A-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (IMAGING): Advanced Scatter Correction and Iterative Reconstruction for Improved Cone-Beam CT Imaging On the TrueBeam Radiotherapy Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, A; Paysan, P; Brehm, M; Maslowski, A; Lehmann, M; Messmer, P; Munro, P; Yoon, S; Star-Lack, J; Seghers, D [Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To improve CBCT image quality for image-guided radiotherapy by applying advanced reconstruction algorithms to overcome scatter, noise, and artifact limitations Methods: CBCT is used extensively for patient setup in radiotherapy. However, image quality generally falls short of diagnostic CT, limiting soft-tissue based positioning and potential applications such as adaptive radiotherapy. The conventional TrueBeam CBCT reconstructor uses a basic scatter correction and FDK reconstruction, resulting in residual scatter artifacts, suboptimal image noise characteristics, and other artifacts like cone-beam artifacts. We have developed an advanced scatter correction that uses a finite-element solver (AcurosCTS) to model the behavior of photons as they pass (and scatter) through the object. Furthermore, iterative reconstruction is applied to the scatter-corrected projections, enforcing data consistency with statistical weighting and applying an edge-preserving image regularizer to reduce image noise. The combined algorithms have been implemented on a GPU. CBCT projections from clinically operating TrueBeam systems have been used to compare image quality between the conventional and improved reconstruction methods. Planning CT images of the same patients have also been compared. Results: The advanced scatter correction removes shading and inhomogeneity artifacts, reducing the scatter artifact from 99.5 HU to 13.7 HU in a typical pelvis case. Iterative reconstruction provides further benefit by reducing image noise and eliminating streak artifacts, thereby improving soft-tissue visualization. In a clinical head and pelvis CBCT, the noise was reduced by 43% and 48%, respectively, with no change in spatial resolution (assessed visually). Additional benefits include reduction of cone-beam artifacts and reduction of metal artifacts due to intrinsic downweighting of corrupted rays. Conclusion: The combination of an advanced scatter correction with iterative reconstruction

  14. Position sensitive detection coupled to high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry: Imaging for molecular beam deflection experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El Rahim, M.; Antoine, R.; Arnaud, L.; Barbaire, M.; Broyer, M.; Clavier, Ch.; Compagnon, I.; Dugourd, Ph.; Maurelli, J.; Rayane, D.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed and tested a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a position sensitive detector for molecular beam deflection experiments. The major achievement of this new spectrometer is to provide a three-dimensional imaging (X and Y positions and time-of-flight) of the ion packet on the detector, with a high acquisition rate and a high resolution on both the mass and the position. The calibration of the experimental setup and its application to molecular beam deflection experiments are discussed

  15. Penetration depth measurement of a 6 MeV electron beam in water by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. E. Hammer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization of a 6 MeV electron beam in ferrous-doped water; a 25 mm penetration depth was measured. Time domain nuclear magnetic resonance was used to investigate the effect of generated free radicals on the free induction decay (FID in nondoped water; no apparent effects to the FID were observed. We show that MRI visualization of charged particle beams used in medical applications will require exogenous agents to provide contrast enhancement.

  16. Measurement of cone beam CT coincidence with megavoltage isocentre and image sharpness using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, J R; Lindsay, R; Dean, C J; Brettle, D S; Magee, D R; Thwaites, D I

    2008-10-07

    For image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) systems based on cone beam CT (CBCT) integrated into a linear accelerator, the reproducible alignment of imager to x-ray source is critical to the registration of both the x-ray-volumetric image with the megavoltage (MV) beam isocentre and image sharpness. An enhanced method of determining the CBCT to MV isocentre alignment using the QUASAR Penta-Guide phantom was developed which improved both precision and accuracy. This was benchmarked against our existing method which used software and a ball-bearing (BB) phantom provided by Elekta. Additionally, a method of measuring an image sharpness metric (MTF(50)) from the edge response function of a spherical air cavity within the Penta-Guide phantom was developed and its sensitivity was tested by simulating misalignments of the kV imager. Reproducibility testing of the enhanced Penta-Guide method demonstrated a systematic error of <0.2 mm when compared to the BB method with near equivalent random error (s=0.15 mm). The mean MTF(50) for five measurements was 0.278+/-0.004 lp mm(-1) with no applied misalignment. Simulated misalignments exhibited a clear peak in the MTF(50) enabling misalignments greater than 0.4 mm to be detected. The Penta-Guide phantom can be used to precisely measure CBCT-MV coincidence and image sharpness on CBCT-IGRT systems.

  17. Cone-beam CT image contrast and attenuation-map linearity improvement (CALI) for brain stereotactic radiosurgery procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Sayed Masoud; Lee, Young; Eriksson, Markus; Nordström, Hâkan; Mainprize, James; Grouza, Vladimir; Huynh, Christopher; Sahgal, Arjun; Song, William Y.; Ruschin, Mark

    2017-03-01

    A Contrast and Attenuation-map (CT-number) Linearity Improvement (CALI) framework is proposed for cone-beam CT (CBCT) images used for brain stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). The proposed framework is used together with our high spatial resolution iterative reconstruction algorithm and is tailored for the Leksell Gamma Knife ICON (Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden). The incorporated CBCT system in ICON facilitates frameless SRS planning and treatment delivery. The ICON employs a half-cone geometry to accommodate the existing treatment couch. This geometry increases the amount of artifacts and together with other physical imperfections causes image inhomogeneity and contrast reduction. Our proposed framework includes a preprocessing step, involving a shading and beam-hardening artifact correction, and a post-processing step to correct the dome/capping artifact caused by the spatial variations in x-ray energy generated by bowtie-filter. Our shading correction algorithm relies solely on the acquired projection images (i.e. no prior information required) and utilizes filtered-back-projection (FBP) reconstructed images to generate a segmented bone and soft-tissue map. Ideal projections are estimated from the segmented images and a smoothed version of the difference between the ideal and measured projections is used in correction. The proposed beam-hardening and dome artifact corrections are segmentation free. The CALI was tested on CatPhan, as well as patient images acquired on the ICON system. The resulting clinical brain images show substantial improvements in soft contrast visibility, revealing structures such as ventricles and lesions which were otherwise un-detectable in FBP-reconstructed images. The linearity of the reconstructed attenuation-map was also improved, resulting in more accurate CT#.

  18. Estimation of rectal dose using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography and deformable image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Fukuda, Shoichi; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Takahashi, Yutaka; Yagi, Masashi; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    The actual dose delivered to critical organs will differ from the simulated dose because of interfractional organ motion and deformation. Here, we developed a method to estimate the rectal dose in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy with consideration to interfractional organ motion using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT). Under exemption status from our institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed 231 series of MVCBCT of 8 patients with prostate cancer. On both planning CT (pCT) and MVCBCT images, the rectal contours were delineated and the CT value within the contours was replaced by the mean CT value within the pelvis, with the addition of 100 Hounsfield units. MVCBCT images were rigidly registered to pCT and then nonrigidly registered using B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) with Velocity AI software. The concordance between the rectal contours on MVCBCT and pCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The dose distributions normalized for 1 fraction were also deformed and summed to estimate the actual total dose. The DSC of all treatment fractions of 8 patients was improved from 0.75±0.04 (mean ±SD) to 0.90 ±0.02 by DIR. Six patients showed a decrease of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from total dose compared with treatment plans. Although the rectal volume of each treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the change in gEUD (R(2)=0.18±0.13), the displacement of the center of gravity of rectal contours in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction showed an intermediate relationship (R(2)=0.61±0.16). We developed a method for evaluation of rectal dose using DIR and MVCBCT images and showed the necessity of DIR for the evaluation of total dose. Displacement of the rectum in the AP direction showed a greater effect on the change in rectal dose compared with the rectal volume. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Estimation of Rectal Dose Using Daily Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography and Deformable Image Registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Fukuda, Shoichi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka General Medical Center, Osaka (Japan); Maruoka, Shintaroh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Takahashi, Yutaka [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Yagi, Masashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Mizuno, Hirokazu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: The actual dose delivered to critical organs will differ from the simulated dose because of interfractional organ motion and deformation. Here, we developed a method to estimate the rectal dose in prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy with consideration to interfractional organ motion using daily megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MVCBCT). Methods and Materials: Under exemption status from our institutional review board, we retrospectively reviewed 231 series of MVCBCT of 8 patients with prostate cancer. On both planning CT (pCT) and MVCBCT images, the rectal contours were delineated and the CT value within the contours was replaced by the mean CT value within the pelvis, with the addition of 100 Hounsfield units. MVCBCT images were rigidly registered to pCT and then nonrigidly registered using B-Spline deformable image registration (DIR) with Velocity AI software. The concordance between the rectal contours on MVCBCT and pCT was evaluated using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). The dose distributions normalized for 1 fraction were also deformed and summed to estimate the actual total dose. Results: The DSC of all treatment fractions of 8 patients was improved from 0.75±0.04 (mean ±SD) to 0.90 ±0.02 by DIR. Six patients showed a decrease of the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) from total dose compared with treatment plans. Although the rectal volume of each treatment fraction did not show any correlation with the change in gEUD (R{sup 2}=0.18±0.13), the displacement of the center of gravity of rectal contours in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction showed an intermediate relationship (R{sup 2}=0.61±0.16). Conclusion: We developed a method for evaluation of rectal dose using DIR and MVCBCT images and showed the necessity of DIR for the evaluation of total dose. Displacement of the rectum in the AP direction showed a greater effect on the change in rectal dose compared with the rectal volume.

  20. Robust methods for automatic image-to-world registration in cone-beam CT interventional guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, H.; Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Kleinszig, G.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time surgical navigation relies on accurate image-to-world registration to align the coordinate systems of the image and patient. Conventional manual registration can present a workflow bottleneck and is prone to manual error and intraoperator variability. This work reports alternative means of automatic image-to-world registration, each method involving an automatic registration marker (ARM) used in conjunction with C-arm cone-beam CT (CBCT). The first involves a Known-Model registration method in which the ARM is a predefined tool, and the second is a Free-Form method in which the ARM is freely configurable. Methods: Studies were performed using a prototype C-arm for CBCT and a surgical tracking system. A simple ARM was designed with markers comprising a tungsten sphere within infrared reflectors to permit detection of markers in both x-ray projections and by an infrared tracker. The Known-Model method exercised a predefined specification of the ARM in combination with 3D-2D registration to estimate the transformation that yields the optimal match between forward projection of the ARM and the measured projection images. The Free-Form method localizes markers individually in projection data by a robust Hough transform approach extended from previous work, backprojected to 3D image coordinates based on C-arm geometric calibration. Image-domain point sets were transformed to world coordinates by rigid-body point-based registration. The robustness and registration accuracy of each method was tested in comparison to manual registration across a range of body sites (head, thorax, and abdomen) of interest in CBCT-guided surgery, including cases with interventional tools in the radiographic scene. Results: The automatic methods exhibited similar target registration error (TRE) and were comparable or superior to manual registration for placement of the ARM within ∼200 mm of C-arm isocenter. Marker localization in projection data was robust across all

  1. Automatic prostate localization on cone-beam CT scans for high precision image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Bois, Josien de; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Betgen, Anja; Zijp, Lambert J.; Jaffray, David A.; Lebesque, Joos V.; Herk, Marcel van

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Previously, we developed an automatic three-dimensional gray-value registration (GR) method for fast prostate localization that could be used during online or offline image-guided radiotherapy. The method was tested on conventional computed tomography (CT) scans. In this study, the performance of the algorithm to localize the prostate on cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans acquired on the treatment machine was evaluated. Methods and Materials: Five to 17 CBCT scans of 32 prostate cancer patients (332 scans in total) were used. For 18 patients (190 CBCT scans), the CBCT scans were acquired with a collimated field of view (FOV) (craniocaudal). This procedure improved the image quality considerably. The prostate (i.e., prostate plus seminal vesicles) in each CBCT scan was registered to the prostate in the planning CT scan by automatic 3D gray-value registration (normal GR) starting from a registration on the bony anatomy. When these failed, registrations were repeated with a fixed rotation point locked at the prostate apex (fixed apex GR). Registrations were visually assessed in 3D by one observer with the help of an expansion (by 3.6 mm) of the delineated prostate contours of the planning CT scan. The percentage of successfully registered cases was determined from the combined normal and fixed apex GR assessment results. The error in gray-value registration for both registration methods was determined from the position of one clearly defined calcification in the prostate gland (9 patients, 71 successful registrations). Results: The percentage of successfully registered CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV was about 10% higher than for CBCT scans that were acquired with an uncollimated FOV. For CBCT scans that were acquired with a collimated FOV, the percentage of successfully registered cases improved from 65%, when only normal GR was applied, to 83% when the results of normal and fixed apex GR were combined. Gray-value registration mainly failed (or

  2. Comparison between cone beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biology, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    To compare and evaluate the diagnostic ability of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). CBCT and MRI of 46 TMJs of 23 patients with TMJ disorders were evaluated. They were divided into 3 groups according to the position of the articular disc of the TMJ at closed mouth position and the reduction of the disc during open mouth position on MRI: no disc displacement group (NDD), disc displacement with reduction group (DDR), and disc displacement without reduction group (DDWR). With PACS viewing software, position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa, osseous change of mandibular condyle, shape of articular fossa, and mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of mandibular condyle were evaluated on CBCT and MRI. Each value was tested statistically. The position of mandibular condyle in the articular fossa were concentric in the NDD, DDR, and DDWR of CBCT and NDD of MRI. However, condyle was positioned posteriorly in DDR and DDWR of MRI. Flattening, sclerosis and osteophyte of the mandibular condyle were much more apparent on DDR of CBCT than MRI. And the erosion of the condyle was much more apparent on DDWR of MRI than CBCT. Box and Sigmoid types of articular fossa were found most frequently in DDR of MRI. Flattened type was found most frequently in DDR of CBCT and deformed type was found most frequently in DDWR of CBCT. No significant difference in mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions were shown on CBCT and MRI. Since MRI and CBCT has unique diagnostic imaging ability, both modalities should be used together to supplement each other to evaluate TMJ.

  3. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Image Guidance for Lung Cancer Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Purdie, Thomas G.; Higgins, Jane A.; Li, Winnie; Bezjak, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the geometric accuracy of lung cancer radiotherapy using daily volumetric, cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance and online couch position adjustment. Methods and Materials: Initial setup accuracy using localization CBCT was analyzed in three lung cancer patient cohorts. The first (n = 19) involved patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). The second (n = 48) and third groups (n = 20) involved patients with locally advanced NSCLC adjusted with manual and remote-controlled couch adjustment, respectively. For each group, the couch position was adjusted when positional discrepancies exceeded ±3 mm in any direction, with the remote-controlled couch correcting all three directions simultaneously. Adjustment accuracy was verified with a second CBCT. Population-based setup margins were derived from systematic (Σ) and random (σ) positional errors for each group. Results: Localization imaging demonstrates that 3D positioning errors exceeding 5 mm occur in 54.5% of all delivered fractions. CBCT reduces these errors; post-correction Σ and σ ranged from 1.2 to 1.9 mm for Group 1, with 82% of all fractions within ±3 mm. For Group 2, Σ and σ ranged between 0.8 and 1.8 mm, with 76% of all treatment fractions within ±3 mm. For Group 3, the remote-controlled couch raised this to 84%, and Σ and σ were reduced to 0.4 to 1.7 mm. For each group, the postcorrection setup margins were 4 to 6 mm, 3 to 4 mm, and 2 to 3 mm, respectively. Conclusions: Using IGRT, high geometric accuracy is achievable for NSCLC patients, potentially leading to reduced PTV margins, improved outcomes and empowering adaptive radiation therapy for lung cancer

  4. Diaphragm motion quantification in megavoltage cone-beam CT projection images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingqing; Siochi, R Alfredo

    2010-05-01

    To quantify diaphragm motion in megavoltage (MV) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections. User identified ipsilateral hemidiaphragm apex (IHDA) positions in two full exhale and inhale frames were used to create bounding rectangles in all other frames of a CBCT scan. The bounding rectangle was enlarged to create a region of interest (ROI). ROI pixels were associated with a cost function: The product of image gradients and a gradient direction matching function for an ideal hemidiaphragm determined from 40 training sets. A dynamic Hough transform (DHT) models a hemidiaphragm as a contour made of two parabola segments with a common vertex (the IHDA). The images within the ROIs are transformed into Hough space where a contour's Hough value is the sum of the cost function over all contour pixels. Dynamic programming finds the optimal trajectory of the common vertex in Hough space subject to motion constraints between frames, and an active contour model further refines the result. Interpolated ray tracing converts the positions to room coordinates. Root-mean-square (RMS) distances between these positions and those resulting from an expert's identification of the IHDA were determined for 21 Siemens MV CBCT scans. Computation time on a 2.66 GHz CPU was 30 s. The average craniocaudal RMS error was 1.38 +/- 0.67 mm. While much larger errors occurred in a few near-sagittal frames on one patient's scans, adjustments to algorithm constraints corrected them. The DHT based algorithm can compute IHDA trajectories immediately prior to radiation therapy on a daily basis using localization MVCBCT projection data. This has potential for calibrating external motion surrogates against diaphragm motion.

  5. Interface debonding characterization by image correlation integrated with Double Cantilever Beam kinematics

    KAUST Repository

    Blaysat, Benoît

    2015-03-01

    A procedure is proposed for the identification of spatial interfacial traction profiles of peel loaded Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) samples, from which the corresponding traction-separation relation is extracted. The procedure draws upon recent developments in the area of non-contact optical techniques and makes use of so-called Integrated Digital Image Correlation (I-DIC) concepts. The distinctive feature of the I-DIC approach proposed herein is that the unknown degrees of freedom are not displacements or rotations, but the set of interfacial fracture properties describing the traction profile. A closed-form theoretical model is developed to reconstruct a mechanically admissible displacement field representing the deformation of the adhering layers during debonding in the DCB fracture test. The proposed modeling accounts for the spatial traction profile along the interface between the adherends using few degrees of freedom, i.e. crack tip position, maximum stress and size of the process zone. By minimizing the correlation residual with respect to the degrees of freedom, the full set of interfacial fracture properties is obtained through a one-step algorithm, revealing a substantial gain in terms of computational efficiency and robustness. It is shown that the identified traction profile can be effectively combined with the crack opening displacement to extract the corresponding traction-separation relation, i.e. the key input data for any cohesive zone model (CZM). The proposed procedure is validated by post-processing virtually deformed images generated through the finite element method. The robustness with respect to noisy data, as well as the low sensitivity to the initial guess, are demonstrated.

  6. Effect of beam hardening on transmural myocardial perfusion quantification in myocardial CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Rachid; Eck, Brendan L.; Levi, Jacob; Fares, Anas; Wu, Hao; Vembar, Mani; Dhanantwari, Amar; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.

    2016-03-01

    The detection of subendocardial ischemia exhibiting an abnormal transmural perfusion gradient (TPG) may help identify ischemic conditions due to micro-vascular dysfunction. We evaluated the effect of beam hardening (BH) artifacts on TPG quantification using myocardial CT perfusion (CTP). We used a prototype spectral detector CT scanner (Philips Healthcare) to acquire dynamic myocardial CTP scans in a porcine ischemia model with partial occlusion of the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery guided by pressure wire-derived fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurements. Conventional 120 kVp and 70 keV projection-based mono-energetic images were reconstructed from the same projection data and used to compute myocardial blood flow (MBF) using the Johnson-Wilson model. Under moderate LAD occlusion (FFR~0.7), we used three 5 mm short axis slices and divided the myocardium into three LAD segments and three remote segments. For each slice and each segment, we characterized TPG as the mean "endo-to-epi" transmural flow ratio (TFR). BH-induced hypoenhancement on the ischemic anterior wall at 120 kVp resulted in significantly lower mean TFR value as compared to the 70 keV TFR value (0.29+/-0.01 vs. 0.55+/-0.01 pvalues on segments moderately affected or unaffected by BH. In the entire ischemic LAD territory, 120 kVp mean endocardial flow was significantly reduced as compared to mean epicardial flow (15.80+/-10.98 vs. 40.85+/-23.44 ml/min/100g; p<1e-04). At 70 keV, BH was effectively minimized resulting in mean endocardial MBF of 40.85+/-15.3407 ml/min/100g vs. 74.09+/-5.07 ml/min/100g (p=0.0054) in the epicardium. We also found that BH artifact in the conventional 120 kVp images resulted in falsely reduced MBF measurements even under non-ischemic conditions.

  7. On-line cone beam CT image guidance for vocal cord tumor targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, Sarah O.S.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Gangsaas, Anne; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We are developing a technique for highly focused vocal cord irradiation in early glottic carcinoma to optimally treat a target volume confined to a single cord. This technique, in contrast with the conventional methods, aims at sparing the healthy vocal cord. As such a technique requires sub-mm daily targeting accuracy to be effective, we investigate the accuracy achievable with on-line kV-cone beam CT (CBCT) corrections. Materials and methods: CBCT scans were obtained in 10 early glottic cancer patients in each treatment fraction. The grey value registration available in X-ray volume imaging (XVI) software (Elekta, Synergy) was applied to a volume of interest encompassing the thyroid cartilage. After application of the thus derived corrections, residue displacements with respect to the planning CT scan were measured at clearly identifiable relevant landmarks. The intra- and inter-observer variations were also measured. Results: While before correction the systematic displacements of the vocal cords were as large as 2.4 ± 3.3 mm (cranial-caudal population mean ± SD Σ), daily CBCT registration and correction reduced these values to less than 0.2 ± 0.5 mm in all directions. Random positioning errors (SD σ) were reduced to less than 1 mm. Correcting only for translations and not for rotations did not appreciably affect this accuracy. The residue random displacements partly stem from intra-observer variations (SD = 0.2-0.6 mm). Conclusion: The use of CBCT for daily image guidance in combination with standard mask fixation reduced systematic and random set-up errors of the vocal cords to <1 mm prior to the delivery of each fraction dose. Thus, this facilitates the high targeting precision required for a single vocal cord irradiation.

  8. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  9. Prostate image-guided radiotherapy by megavolt cone-beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucca, Sergio; Carau, Barbara; Solla, Ignazio; Garibaldi, Elisabetta; Farace, Paolo; Lay, Giancarlo; Meleddu, Gianfranco; Gabriele, Pietro [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To test megavolt cone-beam CT (MV-CBCT) in order to evaluate setup errors in prostate radiotherapy. The setup of 9 patients was verified weekly by electronic portal imaging (EPI) and MV-CBCT, both performed in the same treatment session. EPI were compared with digitally reconstructed radiographies (DRRs). MV-CBCTs were matched to simulation CTs by manual registration based on bone markers (BMR), by manual registration based on soft tissues (STR) - rectum, bladder, and seminal vesicles - and by automatic registration (AR) performed by a mutual information algorithm. Shifts were evaluated along the three main axes: anteroposterior (AP), craniocaudal (CC), and laterolateral (LL). Finally, in 4 additional patients showing intraprostatic calcifications, the calcification mismatch error was used to evaluate the three MV-CBCT matching methods. A total of 50 pairs of orthogonal EPIs and 50 MV-CBCTs were analyzed. Assuming an overall tolerance of 2 mm, no significant differences were observed comparing EPI vs BMR in any axis. A significant difference (p < 0.001) was observed along the AP axis comparing EPI vs AR and EPI vs STR. On the calcification data set (22 measures), the calcification mismatch along the AP direction was significantly lower (p < 0.05) after STR than after BMR or AR. Bone markers were not an effective surrogate of the target position and significant differences were observed comparing EPI or BMR vs STR, supporting the assessment of soft tissue position by MVCBs to verify and correct patient setup in prostate radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. 3D tumor measurement in cone-beam CT breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Ning, Ruola

    2004-05-01

    Cone-beam CT breast imaging provides a digital volume representation of a breast. With a digital breast volume, the immediate task is to extract the breast tissue information, especially for suspicious tumors, preferably in an automatic manner or with minimal user interaction. This paper reports a program for three-dimensional breast tissue analysis. It consists of volumetric segmentation (by globally thresholding), subsegmentation (connection-based separation), and volumetric component measurement (volume, surface, shape, and other geometrical specifications). A combination scheme of multi-thresholding and binary volume morphology is proposed to fast determine the surface gradients, which may be interpreted as the surface evolution (outward growth or inward shrinkage) for a tumor volume. This scheme is also used to optimize the volumetric segmentation. With a binary volume, we decompose the foreground into components according to spatial connectedness. Since this decomposition procedure is performed after volumetric segmentation, it is called subsegmentation. The subsegmentation brings the convenience for component visualization and measurement, in the whole support space, without interference from others. Upon the tumor component identification, we measure the following specifications: volume, surface area, roundness, elongation, aspect, star-shapedness, and location (centroid). A 3D morphological operation is used to extract the cluster shell and, by delineating the corresponding volume from the grayscale volume, to measure the shell stiffness. This 3D tissue measurement is demonstrated with a tumor-borne breast specimen (a surgical part).

  11. Elaboration and implementation of standard operational procedure for quality assurance of cone beam CT image in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonatto, Larisse N.; Estacio, Daniela R.; Lopes, Juliane S.; Sansson, Angela; Duarte, Lucas O.; Sbaraini, Patricia; Silva, Ana M. Marques da; Streck, Elaine E.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to present the implementation of the quality Control of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) image, generated by the On-Board Imager, integrated with the linear accelerator Trilogy. Standard operating procedures (POPs) have been developed based on the literature and manuals of the simulator object Catphan 504 and the On-Board Imager. The following POPs were developed: acquisition of the CBCT image; linearity of CT number; uniformity; spatial resolution; low contrast resolution; spatial linearity; thickness of the cut. The validation of the elaborated procedures was done from an experimental acquisition of the simulator object. The results obtained in the validation of the POPs are in compliance with the parameters established by the manufacturer of the simulator object, as well as those obtained in the acceptance of the On-Board Imager device.

  12. Overview of the Conceptual Design of the Future VENUS Neutron Imaging Beam Line at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilheux, Hassina; Herwig, Ken; Keener, Scott; Davis, Larry

    VENUS (Versatile Neutron Imaging Beam line at the Spallation Neutron Source) will be a world-class neutron-imaging instrument that will uniquely utilize the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) time-of-flight (TOF) capabilities to measure and characterize objects across several length scales (mm to μm). When completed, VENUS will provide academia, industry and government laboratories with the opportunity to advance scientific research in areas such as energy, materials, additive manufacturing, geosciences, transportation, engineering, plant physiology, biology, etc. It is anticipated that a good portion of the VENUS user community will have a strong engineering/industrial research focus. Installed at Beam line 10 (BL10), VENUS will be a 25-m neutron imaging facility with the capability to fully illuminate (i.e., umbra illumination) a 20 cm x 20 cm detector area. The design allows for a 28 cm x 28 cm field of view when using the penumbra to 80% of the full illumination flux. A sample position at 20 m will be implemented for magnification measurements. The optical components are comprised of a series of selected apertures, T0 and bandwidth choppers, beam scrapers, a fast shutter to limit sample activation, and flight tubes filled with Helium. Techniques such as energy selective, Bragg edge and epithermal imaging will be available at VENUS.

  13. Observer Evaluation of a Metal Artifact Reduction Algorithm Applied to Head and Neck Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpics, Mark; Surucu, Murat; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Alite, Fiori; Block, Alec M.; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman; Harkenrider, Matthew M.; Solanki, Abhishek A.; Roeske, John C., E-mail: jroeske@lumc.edu

    2016-11-15

    Purpose and Objectives: To quantify, through an observer study, the reduction in metal artifacts on cone beam computed tomographic (CBCT) images using a projection-interpolation algorithm, on images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants in patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods and Materials: An interpolation-substitution algorithm was applied to H&N CBCT images containing metal artifacts from dental fillings and implants. Image quality with respect to metal artifacts was evaluated subjectively and objectively. First, 6 independent radiation oncologists were asked to rank randomly sorted blinded images (before and after metal artifact reduction) using a 5-point rating scale (1 = severe artifacts; 5 = no artifacts). Second, the standard deviation of different regions of interest (ROI) within each image was calculated and compared with the mean rating scores. Results: The interpolation-substitution technique successfully reduced metal artifacts in 70% of the cases. From a total of 60 images from 15 H&N cancer patients undergoing image guided radiation therapy, the mean rating score on the uncorrected images was 2.3 ± 1.1, versus 3.3 ± 1.0 for the corrected images. The mean difference in ranking score between uncorrected and corrected images was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.2, P<.05). The standard deviation of each ROI significantly decreased after artifact reduction (P<.01). Moreover, a negative correlation between the mean rating score for each image and the standard deviation of the oral cavity and bilateral cheeks was observed. Conclusion: The interpolation-substitution algorithm is efficient and effective for reducing metal artifacts caused by dental fillings and implants on CBCT images, as demonstrated by the statistically significant increase in observer image quality ranking and by the decrease in ROI standard deviation between uncorrected and corrected images.

  14. Progress towards a semiconductor Compton camera for prompt gamma imaging during proton beam therapy for range and dose verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, A.; Baker, C.; Boston, H.; Chung, S.; Judson, D. S.; Kacperek, A.; Le Crom, B.; Moss, R.; Royle, G.; Speller, R.; Boston, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to test a new semiconductor Compton camera for prompt gamma imaging. Our device is composed of three active layers: a Si(Li) detector as a scatterer and two high purity Germanium detectors as absorbers of high-energy gamma rays. We performed Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 toolkit to characterise the expected gamma field during proton beam therapy and have made experimental measurements of the gamma spectrum with a 60 MeV passive scattering beam irradiating a phantom. In this proceeding, we describe the status of the Compton camera and present the first preliminary measurements with radioactive sources and their corresponding reconstructed images.

  15. Comparison of Volumes between Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Images using Dynamic Phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seong Eun; Won, Hui Su; Hong, Joo Wan; Chang, Nam Jun; Jung, Woo Hyun; Choi, Byeong Don [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The aim of this study was to compare the differences between the volumes acquired with four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT)images with a reconstruction image-filtering algorithm and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with dynamic phantom. The 4DCT images were obtained from the computerized imaging reference systems (CIRS) phantom using a computed tomography (CT) simulator. We analyzed the volumes for maximum intensity projection (MIP), minimum intensity projection (MinIP) and average intensity projection (AVG) of the images obtained with the 4DCT scanner against those acquired from CBCT images with CT ranger tools. Difference in volume for node of 1, 2 and 3 cm between CBCT and 4DCT was 0.54⁓2.33, 5.16⁓8.06, 9.03⁓20.11 ml in MIP, respectively, 0.00⁓1.48, 0.00⁓8.47, 1.42⁓24.85 ml in MinIP, respectively and 0.00⁓1.17, 0.00⁓2.19, 0.04⁓3.35 ml in AVG, respectively. After a comparative analysis of the volumes for each nodal size, it was apparent that the CBCT images were similar to the AVG images acquired using 4DCT.

  16. Scattered image artifacts from cone beam computed tomography and its clinical potential in bone mineral density estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hoon; Jeong, Kwanmoon; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Jun, Hong Young; Jeong, Changwon; Lee, Myeung Su; Nam, Yunyoung; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Lee, Jinseok

    2016-01-01

    Image artifacts affect the quality of medical images and may obscure anatomic structure and pathology. Numerous methods for suppression and correction of scattered image artifacts have been suggested in the past three decades. In this paper, we assessed the feasibility of use of information on scattered artifacts for estimation of bone mineral density (BMD) without dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or quantitative computed tomographic imaging (QCT). To investigate the relationship between scattered image artifacts and BMD, we first used a forearm phantom and cone-beam computed tomography. In the phantom, we considered two regions of interest-bone-equivalent solid material containing 50 mg HA per cm(-3) and water-to represent low- and high-density trabecular bone, respectively. We compared the scattered image artifacts in the high-density material with those in the low-density material. The technique was then applied to osteoporosis patients and healthy subjects to assess its feasibility for BMD estimation. The high-density material produced a greater number of scattered image artifacts than the low-density material. Moreover, the radius and ulna of healthy subjects produced a greater number of scattered image artifacts than those from osteoporosis patients. Although other parameters, such as bone thickness and X-ray incidence, should be considered, our technique facilitated BMD estimation directly without DXA or QCT. We believe that BMD estimation based on assessment of scattered image artifacts may benefit the prevention, early treatment and management of osteoporosis.

  17. Dual wavelength imaging of a scrape-off layer in an advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osin, D.; Schindler, T., E-mail: dosin@trialphaenergy.com [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688-7010 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A dual wavelength imaging system has been developed and installed on C-2U to capture 2D images of a He jet in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) of an advanced beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma. The system was designed to optically split two identical images and pass them through 1 nm FWHM filters. Dual wavelength images are focused adjacent on a large format CCD chip and recorded simultaneously with a time resolution down to 10 μs using a gated micro-channel plate. The relatively compact optical system images a 10 cm plasma region with a spatial resolution of 0.2 cm and can be used in a harsh environment with high electro-magnetic noise and high magnetic field. The dual wavelength imaging system provides 2D images of either electron density or temperature by observing spectral line pairs emitted by He jet atoms in the SOL. A large field of view, combined with good space and time resolution of the imaging system, allows visualization of macro-flows in the SOL. First 2D images of the electron density and temperature observed in the SOL of the C-2U FRC are presented.

  18. SU-E-I-72: First Experimental Study of On-Board CBCT Imaging Using 2.5MV Beam On a Radiotherapy Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Q [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Institute of Image Processing and Pattern Recognition, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Li, R; Yang, Y; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Varian TrueBeam version 2.0 comes with a new inline 2.5MV beam modality for image guided patient setup. In this work we develop an iterative volumetric image reconstruction technique specific to the beam and investigate the possibility of obtaining metal artifact free CBCT images using the new imaging modality. Methods: An iterative reconstruction algorithm with a sparse representation constraint based on dictionary learning is developed, in which both sparse projection and low dose rate (10 MU/min) are considered. Two CBCT experiments were conducted using the newly available 2.5MV beam on a Varian TrueBeam linac. First, a Rando anthropomorphic head phantom with and without a copper bar inserted in the center was scanned using both 2.5MV and kV (100kVp) beams. In a second experiment, an MRI phantom with many coils was scanned using 2.5MV, 6MV, and kV (100kVp) beams. Imaging dose and the resultant image quality is studied. Results: Qualitative assessment suggests that there were no visually detectable metal artifacts in MV CBCT images, compared with significant metal artifacts in kV CBCT images, especially in the MRI phantom. For a region near the metal object in the head phantom, the 2.5MV CBCT gave a more accurate quantification of the electron density compared with kV CBCT, with a ∼50% reduction in mean HU error. As expected, the contrast between bone and soft-tissue in 2.5MV CBCT decreased compared with kV CBCT. Conclusion: On-board CBCT imaging with the new 2.5MV beam can effectively reduce metal artifacts, although with a reduced softtissue contrast. Combination of kV and MV scanning may lead to metal artifact free CBCT images with uncompromised soft-tissue contrast.

  19. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso-González, F.; Golnik, C.; Berthel, M.; Dreyer, A.; Enghardt, W.; Fiedler, F.; Heidel, K.; Kormoll, T.; Rohling, H.; Schöne, S.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Pausch, G.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu2SiO5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  20. Test of Compton camera components for prompt gamma imaging at the ELBE bremsstrahlung beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hueso-González, F; Golnik, C; Berthel, M; Dreyer, A; Enghardt, W; Kormoll, T; Rohling, H; Pausch, G; Fiedler, F; Heidel, K; Schöne, S; Schwengner, R; Wagner, A

    2014-01-01

    In the context of ion beam therapy, particle range verification is a major challenge for the quality assurance of the treatment. One approach is the measurement of the prompt gamma rays resulting from the tissue irradiation. A Compton camera based on several position sensitive gamma ray detectors, together with an imaging algorithm, is expected to reconstruct the prompt gamma ray emission density map, which is correlated with the dose distribution. At OncoRay and Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), a Compton camera setup is being developed consisting of two scatter planes: two CdZnTe (CZT) cross strip detectors, and an absorber consisting of one Lu 2 SiO 5 (LSO) block detector. The data acquisition is based on VME electronics and handled by software developed on the ROOT framework. The setup has been tested at the linear electron accelerator ELBE at HZDR, which is used in this experiment to produce bunched bremsstrahlung photons with up to 12.5 MeV energy and a repetition rate of 13 MHz. Their spectrum has similarities with the shape expected from prompt gamma rays in the clinical environment, and the flux is also bunched with the accelerator frequency. The charge sharing effect of the CZT detector is studied qualitatively for different energy ranges. The LSO detector pixel discrimination resolution is analyzed and it shows a trend to improve for high energy depositions. The time correlation between the pulsed prompt photons and the measured detector signals, to be used for background suppression, exhibits a time resolution of 3 ns FWHM for the CZT detector and of 2 ns for the LSO detector. A time walk correction and pixel-wise calibration is applied for the LSO detector, whose resolution improves up to 630 ps. In conclusion, the detector setup is suitable for time-resolved background suppression in pulsed clinical particle accelerators. Ongoing tasks are the quantitative comparison with simulations and the test of imaging algorithms. Experiments at proton

  1. Accuracy of cranial coplanar beam therapy using an oblique, stereoscopic x-ray image guidance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinci, Justin P.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Neck, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    A system for measuring two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in orthogonal anatomical planes in the cranium was developed and used to evaluate the accuracy of coplanar conformal therapy using ExacTrac image guidance. Dose distributions were measured in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes using a CIRS (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc.) anthropomorphic head phantom with a custom internal film cassette. Sections of radiographic Kodak EDR2 film were cut, processed, and digitized using custom templates. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy and precision of the film system were assessed. BrainScan planned a coplanar-beam treatment to conformally irradiate a 2-cm-diameterx2-cm-long cylindrical planning target volume. Prior to delivery, phantom misalignments were imposed in combinations of ±8 mm offsets in each of the principal directions. ExacTrac x-ray correction was applied until the phantom was within an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (first two measurement sets) or 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. (last two measurement sets). Measured dose distributions from film were registered to the treatment plan dose calculations and compared. Alignment errors, displacement between midpoints of planned and measured 70% isodose contours (Δc), and positional errors of the 80% isodose line were evaluated using 49 2D film measurements (98 profiles). Comparison of common, but independent measurements of Δc showed that systematic errors in the measurement technique were 0.2 mm or less along all three anatomical axes and that random error averaged (σ±σ σ ) 0.29±0.06 mm for the acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. and 0.15±0.02 mm for the acceptance criteria of 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. . The latter was consistent with independent estimates that showed the precision of the measurement system was 0.3 mm (2σ). Values of Δc were as great as 0.9, 0.3, and 1.0 mm along the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively. Variations in Δc along the P-A axis were correlated to misalignments between laser

  2. Aging of imaging properties of a CMOS flat-panel detector for dental cone-beam computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D. W.; Han, J. C.; Yun, S.; Kim, H. K.

    2017-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated the long-term stability of imaging properties of a flat-panel detector in conditions used for dental x-ray imaging. The detector consists of a CsI:Tl layer and CMOS photodiode pixel arrays. Aging simulations were carried out using an 80-kVp x-ray beam at an air-kerma rate of approximately 5 mGy s-1 at the entrance surface of the detector with a total air kerma of up to 0.6 kGy. Dark and flood-field images were periodically obtained during irradiation, and the mean signal and noise levels were evaluated for each image. We also evaluated the modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The aging simulation showed a decrease in both the signal and noise of the gain-offset-corrected images, but there was negligible change in the signal-to-noise performance as a function of the accumulated dose. The gain-offset correction for analyzing images resulted in negligible changes in MTF, NPS, and DQE results over the total dose. Continuous x-ray exposure to a detector can cause degradation in the physical performance factors such the detector sensitivity, but linear analysis of the gain-offset-corrected images can assure integrity of the imaging properties of a detector during its lifetime.

  3. Analysis of the priority of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic task in cone-beam computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jin Woo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Dankook University College of Dentistry, Chunan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    This study was designed to evaluate differences in the required visibility of anatomic structures according to the diagnostic tasks of implant planning and periapical diagnosis. Images of a real skull phantom were acquired under 24 combinations of different exposure conditions in a cone-beam computed tomography scanner (60, 70, 80, 90, 100, and 110 kV and 4, 6, 8, and 10 mA). Five radiologists evaluated the visibility of anatomic structures and the image quality for diagnostic tasks using a 6-point scale. The visibility of the periodontal ligament space showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for periapical diagnosis in both jaws. The visibility of the sinus floor and canal wall showed the closest association with the ability to use an image for implant planning. Variations in tube voltage were associated with significant differences in image quality for all diagnostic tasks. However, tube current did not show significant associations with the ability to use an image for implant planning. The required visibility of anatomic structures varied depending on the diagnostic task. Tube voltage was a more important exposure parameter for image quality than tube current. Different settings should be used for optimization and image quality evaluation depending on the diagnostic task.

  4. Evaluation of patient dose using a virtual CT scanner: Applications to 4DCT simulation and Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMarco, J J; Agazaryan, N; McNitt-Gray, M F; Cagnon, C H; Angel, E; Zankl, M

    2008-01-01

    This work evaluates the effects of patient size on radiation dose from simulation imaging studies such as four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) and kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kV-CBCT). 4DCT studies are scans that include temporal information, frequently incorporating highly over-sampled imaging series necessary for retrospective sorting as a function of respiratory phase. This type of imaging study can result in a significant dose increase to the patient due to the slower table speed as compared with a conventional axial or helical scan protocol. Kilovoltage cone-beam imaging is a relatively new imaging technique that requires an on-board kilovoltage x-ray tube and a flat-panel detector. Instead of porting individual reference fields, the kV tube and flat-panel detector are rotated about the patient producing a cone-beam CT data set (kV-CBCT). To perform these investigations, we used Monte Carlo simulation methods with detailed models of adult patients and virtual source models of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. The GSF family of three-dimensional, voxelized patient models, were implemented as input files using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. The adult patient models represent a range of patient sizes and have all radiosensitive organs previously identified and segmented. Simulated 4DCT scans of each voxelized patient model were performed using a multi-detector CT source model that includes scanner specific spectra, bow-tie filtration, and helical source path. Standard MCNPX tally functions were applied to each model to estimate absolute organ dose based upon an air-kerma normalization measurement for nominal scanner operating parameters

  5. SU-F-I-06: Evaluation of Imaging Dose for Modulation Layer Based Dual Energy Cone-Beam CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Eunbin [Department of Medical Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, SoHyun; Cho, Samju; Keum, Ki Chang [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Yonsei Univeristy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Rena [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dual energy cone beam CT system is finding a variety of promising applications in diagnostic CT, both in imaging of endogenous materials and exogenous materials across a range of body sites. Dual energy cone beam CT system to suggest in this study acquire image by rotating 360 degree with half of the X-ray window covered using copper modulation layer. In the region that covered by modulation layer absorb the low energy X-ray by modulation layer. Relative high energy X-ray passes through the layer and contributes to image reconstruction. Dose evaluation should be carried out in order to utilize such an imaging acquirement technology for clinical use. Methods: For evaluating imaging dose of modulation layer based dual energy cone beam CT system, Prototype cone beam CT that configured X-ray tube (D054SB, Toshiba, Japan) and detector (PaxScan 2520V, Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) is used. A range of 0.5–2.0 mm thickness of modulation layer is implemented in Monte Carlo simulation (MCNPX, ver. 2.6.0, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA) with half of X-ray window covered. In-house phantom using in this study that has 3 cylindrical phantoms configured water, Teflon air with PMMA covered for verifying the comparability the various material in human body and is implemented in Monte Carlo simulation. The actual dose with 2.0 mm copper covered half of X-ray window is measured using Gafchromic EBT3 film with 5.0 mm bolus for compared with simulative dose. Results: Dose in phantom reduced 33% by copper modulation layer of 2.0 mm. Scattering dose occurred in modulation layer by Compton scattering effect is 0.04% of overall dose. Conclusion: Modulation layer of that based dual energy cone beam CT has not influence on unnecessary scatter dose. This study was supported by the Radiation Safety Research Programs (1305033) through the Nuclear Safety and Security Commission.

  6. Image-guided small animal radiation research platform: calibration of treatment beam alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matinfar, Mohammad; Iordachita, Iulian; Kazanzides, Peter; Ford, Eric; Wong, John

    2009-01-01

    Small animal research allows detailed study of biological processes, disease progression and response to therapy with the potential to provide a natural bridge to the clinical environment. The small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) is a portable system for precision irradiation with beam sizes down to approximately 0.5 mm and optimally planned radiation with on-board cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance. This paper focuses on the geometric calibration of the system for high-precision irradiation. A novel technique for the calibration of the treatment beam is presented, which employs an x-ray camera whose precise positioning need not be known. Using the camera system we acquired a digitally reconstructed 3D 'star shot' for gantry calibration and then developed a technique to align each beam to a common isocenter with the robotic animal positioning stages. The calibration incorporates localization by cone-beam CT guidance. Uncorrected offsets of the beams with respect to the calibration origin ranged from 0.4 mm to 5.2 mm. With corrections, these alignment errors can be reduced to the sub-millimeter range. The calibration technique was used to deliver a stereotactic-like arc treatment to a phantom constructed with EBT Gafchromic films. All beams were shown to intersect at a common isocenter with a measured beam (FWHM) of approximately 1.07 mm using the 0.5 mm collimated beam. The desired positioning accuracy of the SARRP is 0.25 mm and the results indicate an accuracy of 0.2 mm. To fully realize the radiation localization capabilities of the SARRP, precise geometric calibration is required, as with any such system. The x-ray camera-based technique presented here provides a straightforward and semi-automatic method for system calibration.

  7. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  8. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Bücherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-09-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  9. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.; Buecherl, T.; Zou, Y.; Guo, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  10. Study on beam geometry and image reconstruction algorithm in fast neutron computerized tomography at NECTAR facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Buecherl, T. [Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching 80748 (Germany); Zou, Y., E-mail: zouyubin@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China); Guo, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology and School of Physics, Peking University, 5 Yiheyuan Lu, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2011-09-21

    Investigations on the fast neutron beam geometry for the NECTAR facility are presented. The results of MCNP simulations and experimental measurements of the beam distributions at NECTAR are compared. Boltzmann functions are used to describe the beam profile in the detection plane assuming the area source to be set up of large number of single neutron point sources. An iterative algebraic reconstruction algorithm is developed, realized and verified by both simulated and measured projection data. The feasibility for improved reconstruction in fast neutron computerized tomography at the NECTAR facility is demonstrated.

  11. Image quality and absorbed dose comparison of single- and dual-source cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Okazue, Toshiya; Kawakubo, Atsushi; Yamada, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2018-04-17

    Dual-source cone-beam computed tomography (DCBCT) is currently available in the Vero4DRT image-guided radiotherapy system. We evaluated the image quality and absorbed dose for DCBCT and compared the values with those for single-source CBCT (SCBCT). Image uniformity, Hounsfield unit (HU) linearity, image contrast, and spatial resolution were evaluated using a Catphan phantom. The rotation angle for acquiring SCBCT and DCBCT images is 215° and 115°, respectively. The image uniformity was calculated using measurements obtained at the center and four peripheral positions. The HUs of seven materials inserted into the phantom were measured to evaluate HU linearity and image contrast. The Catphan phantom was scanned with a conventional CT scanner to measure the reference HU for each material. The spatial resolution was calculated using high-resolution pattern modules. Image quality was analyzed using ImageJ software ver. 1.49. The absorbed dose was measured using a 0.6-cm 3 ionization chamber with a 16-cm-diameter cylindrical phantom, at the center and four peripheral positions of the phantom, and calculated using weighted cone-beam CT dose index (CBCTDI w ). Compared with that of SCBCT, the image uniformity of DCBCT was slightly reduced. A strong linear correlation existed between the measured HU for DCBCT and the reference HU, although the linear regression slope was different from that of the reference HU. DCBCT had poorer image contrast than did SCBCT, particularly with a high-contrast material. There was no significant difference between the spatial resolutions of SCBCT and DCBCT. The absorbed dose for DCBCT was higher than that for SCBCT, because in DCBCT, the two x-ray projections overlap between 45° and 70°. We found that the image quality was poorer and the absorbed dose was higher for DCBCT than for SCBCT in the Vero4DRT. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of

  12. SU-G-IeP4-06: Feasibility of External Beam Treatment Field Verification Using Cherenkov Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, P; Na, Y; Wuu, C [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cherenkov light emission has been shown to correlate with ionizing radiation (IR) dose delivery in solid tissue. In order to properly correlate Cherenkov light images with real time dose delivery in a patient, we must account for geometric and intensity distortions arising from observation angle, as well as the effect of monitor units (MU) and field size on Cherenkov light emission. To test the feasibility of treatment field verification, we first focused on Cherenkov light emission efficiency based on MU and known field size (FS). Methods: Cherenkov light emission was captured using a PI-MAX4 intensified charge coupled device(ICCD) system (Princeton Instruments), positioned at a fixed angle of 40° relative to the beam central axis. A Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (linac) was operated at 6MV and 600MU/min to deliver an Anterior-Posterior beam to a 5cm thick block phantom positioned at 100cm Source-to-Surface-Distance(SSD). FS of 10×10, 5×5, and 2×2cm{sup 2} were used. Before beam delivery projected light field images were acquired, ensuring that geometric distortions were consistent when measuring Cherenkov field discrepancies. Cherenkov image acquisition was triggered by linac target current. 500 frames were acquired for each FS. Composite images were created through summation of frames and background subtraction. MU per image was calculated based on linac pulse delay of 2.8ms. Cherenkov and projected light FS were evaluated using ImageJ software. Results: Mean Cherenkov FS discrepancies compared to light field were <0.5cm for 5.6, 2.8, and 8.6 MU for 10×10, 5×5, and 2×2cm{sup 2} FS, respectably. Discrepancies were reduced with increasing field size and MU. We predict a minimum of 100 frames is needed for reliable confirmation of delivered FS. Conclusion: Current discrepancies in Cherenkov field sizes are within a usable range to confirm treatment delivery in standard and respiratory gated clinical scenarios at MU levels appropriate to

  13. Accuracy of radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT: comparison of deformable registration and image correction based methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, T. E.; Joshi, K. D.; Moore, C. J.

    2018-03-01

    Radiotherapy dose calculations based on cone-beam CT (CBCT) images can be inaccurate due to unreliable Hounsfield units (HU) in the CBCT. Deformable image registration of planning CT images to CBCT, and direct correction of CBCT image values are two methods proposed to allow heterogeneity corrected dose calculations based on CBCT. In this paper we compare the accuracy and robustness of these two approaches. CBCT images for 44 patients were used including pelvis, lung and head & neck sites. CBCT HU were corrected using a ‘shading correction’ algorithm and via deformable registration of planning CT to CBCT using either Elastix or Niftyreg. Radiotherapy dose distributions were re-calculated with heterogeneity correction based on the corrected CBCT and several relevant dose metrics for target and OAR volumes were calculated. Accuracy of CBCT based dose metrics was determined using an ‘override ratio’ method where the ratio of the dose metric to that calculated on a bulk-density assigned version of the same image is assumed to be constant for each patient, allowing comparison to the patient’s planning CT as a gold standard. Similar performance is achieved by shading corrected CBCT and both deformable registration algorithms, with mean and standard deviation of dose metric error less than 1% for all sites studied. For lung images, use of deformed CT leads to slightly larger standard deviation of dose metric error than shading corrected CBCT with more dose metric errors greater than 2% observed (7% versus 1%).

  14. Registration area and accuracy when integrating laser-scanned and maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, LiJun; Hwang, Hyeon-Shik; Lee, Kyung-Min

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in registration accuracy after including occlusal surface and incisal edge areas in addition to the buccal surface when integrating laser-scanned and maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) dental images. CBCT scans and maxillary dental casts were obtained from 30 patients. Three methods were used to integrate the images: R1, only the buccal and labial surfaces were used; R2, the incisal edges of the anterior teeth and the buccal and distal marginal ridges of the second molars were used; and R3, labial surfaces, including incisal edges of anterior teeth, and buccal surfaces, including buccal and distal marginal ridges of the second molars, were used. Differences between the 2 images were evaluated by color-mapping methods and average surface distances by measuring the 3-dimensional Euclidean distances between the surface points on the 2 images. The R1 method showed more discrepancies between the laser-scanned and CBCT images than did the other methods. The R2 method did not show a significant difference in registration accuracy compared with the R3 method. The results of this study indicate that accuracy when integrating laser-scanned dental images into maxillofacial CBCT images can be increased by including occlusal surface and incisal edge areas as registration areas. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Physics-based optimization of image quality in 3D X-ray flat-panel cone-beam imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeren, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the techniques for modeling and control of 3D X-ray cardiovascular systems in terms of Image Quality and patient dose, aiming at optimizing the diagnostic quality. When aiming at maximum Image Quality (IQ), a cascaded system constituted from inter-dependent imaging components,

  16. Comparison of Online 6 Degree-of-Freedom Image Registration of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac X-Ray for Intracranial Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Shi, Wenyin; Andrews, David; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Lu, Bo; Yu, Yan; Dicker, Adam; Liu, Haisong

    2017-06-01

    The study was aimed to compare online 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam computed tomography and BrainLab ExacTrac X-ray imaging systems for intracranial radiosurgery. Phantom and patient studies were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (version 2.5), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (version 6.1.1). The phantom study was based on a Rando head phantom and was designed to evaluate isocenter location dependence of the image registrations. Ten isocenters at various locations representing clinical treatment sites were selected in the phantom. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken when the phantom was located at each isocenter. The patient study included 34 patients. Cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac X-ray images were taken at each patient's treatment position. The 6 degree-of-freedom image registrations were performed on cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac, and residual errors calculated from cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac were compared. In the phantom study, the average residual error differences (absolute values) between cone-beam computed tomography and ExacTrac image registrations were 0.17 ± 0.11 mm, 0.36 ± 0.20 mm, and 0.25 ± 0.11 mm in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.34° ± 0.08°, 0.13° ± 0.09°, and 0.12° ± 0.10°, respectively. In the patient study, the average residual error differences in the vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions were 0.20 ± 0.16 mm, 0.30 ± 0.18 mm, 0.21 ± 0.18 mm, respectively. The average residual error differences in the rotation, roll, and pitch were 0.40°± 0.16°, 0.17° ± 0.13°, and 0.20° ± 0.14°, respectively. Overall, the average residual error differences were cone-beam computed tomography image registration in intracranial treatments.

  17. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Anas, Emran Mohammad; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol; Kamrul Hasan, Md

    2011-10-01

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  18. High-quality 3D correction of ring and radiant artifacts in flat panel detector-based cone beam volume CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anas, Emran Mohammad Abu; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Kim, Jae Gon; Lee, Soo Yeol

    2011-01-01

    The use of an x-ray flat panel detector is increasingly becoming popular in 3D cone beam volume CT machines. Due to the deficient semiconductor array manufacturing process, the cone beam projection data are often corrupted by different types of abnormalities, which cause severe ring and radiant artifacts in a cone beam reconstruction image, and as a result, the diagnostic image quality is degraded. In this paper, a novel technique is presented for the correction of error in the 2D cone beam projections due to abnormalities often observed in 2D x-ray flat panel detectors. Template images are derived from the responses of the detector pixels using their statistical properties and then an effective non-causal derivative-based detection algorithm in 2D space is presented for the detection of defective and mis-calibrated detector elements separately. An image inpainting-based 3D correction scheme is proposed for the estimation of responses of defective detector elements, and the responses of the mis-calibrated detector elements are corrected using the normalization technique. For real-time implementation, a simplification of the proposed off-line method is also suggested. Finally, the proposed algorithms are tested using different real cone beam volume CT images and the experimental results demonstrate that the proposed methods can effectively remove ring and radiant artifacts from cone beam volume CT images compared to other reported techniques in the literature.

  19. Polarimetric imaging of turbid inhomogeneous slab media based on backscattering using a pencil beam for illumination: Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Soichi

    2018-04-01

    Polarimetric imaging of absorbing, strongly scattering, or birefringent inclusions is investigated in a negligibly absorbing, moderately scattering, and isotropic slab medium. It was proved that the reduced effective scattering Mueller matrix is exactly calculated from experimental or simulated raw matrices even if the medium is anisotropic and/or heterogeneous, or the outgoing light beam exits obliquely to the normal of the slab surface. The calculation also gives a reasonable approximation of the reduced matrix using a light beam with a finite diameter for illumination. The reduced matrix was calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation and was factorized in two dimensions by the Lu-Chipman polar decomposition. The intensity of backscattered light shows clear and modestly clear differences for absorbing and strongly scattering inclusions, respectively, whereas it shows no difference for birefringent inclusions. Conversely, some polarization parameters, for example, the selective depolarization coefficients exhibit only a slight difference for the absorbing inclusions, whereas they showed clear difference for the strongly scattering or birefringent inclusions. Moreover, these quantities become larger with increasing the difference in the optical properties of the inclusions relative to the surrounding medium. However, it is difficult to recognize inclusions that buried at the depth deeper than 3 mm under the surface. Thus, the present technique can detect the approximate shape and size of these inclusions, and considering the depth where inclusions lie, estimate their optical properties. This study reveals the possibility of the polarization-sensitive imaging of turbid inhomogeneous media using a pencil beam for illumination.

  20. A Micromegas Detector for Neutron Beam Imaging at the n_TOF Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Calviani, M; Chiaveri, E; Colonna, N; Giomataris, Y; Guerrero, C; Gunsing, F; Iguaz, F J; Kebbiri, M; Pancin, J; Papaevangelou, T; Tsinganis, A; Vlachoudis, V; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Bečvář, F; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Cortés, G; Corté-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dzysiuk, N; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Fraval, K; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gómez-Hornillos, M B; Gonçalves, I F; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Gurusamy, P; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Langer, C; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Marítnez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Meaze, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A J M; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Roman, F; Rubbia, C; Sarmento, R; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Valenta, S; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Vermeulen, M J; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiss, C; Wright, T J; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas (Micro-MEsh Gaseous Structure) detectors are gas detectors consisting of a stack of one ionization and one proportional chamber. A micromesh separates the two communicating regions, where two different electric fields establish respectively a charge drift and a charge multiplication regime. The n\\_TOF facility at CERN provides a white neutron beam (from thermal up to GeV neutrons) for neutron induced cross section measurements. These measurements need a perfect knowlodge of the incident neutron beam, in particular regarding its spatial profile. A position sensitive micromegas detector equipped with a B-10 based neutron/charged particle converter has been extensively used at the n\\_TOF facility for characterizing the neutron beam profile and extracting the beam interception factor for samples of different size. The boron converter allowed to scan the energy region of interest for neutron induced capture reactions as a function of the neutron energy, determined by the time of flight. Experimental ...

  1. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S; Miften, Moyed

    2008-01-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins

  2. X-ray diffraction imaging with the Multiple Inverse Fan Beam topology: Principles, performance and potential for security screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, G., E-mail: Geoffrey.Harding@Morphodetection.com [Morpho Detection Germany GmbH, Heselstuecken 3, 22453 Hamburg (Germany); Fleckenstein, H.; Kosciesza, D.; Olesinski, S.; Strecker, H.; Theedt, T.; Zienert, G. [Morpho Detection Germany GmbH, Heselstuecken 3, 22453 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    The steadily increasing number of explosive threat classes, including home-made explosives (HMEs), liquids, amorphous and gels (LAGs), is forcing up the false-alarm rates of security screening equipment. This development can best be countered by increasing the number of features available for classification. X-ray diffraction intrinsically offers multiple features for both solid and LAGs explosive detection, and is thus becoming increasingly important for false-alarm and cost reduction in both carry-on and checked baggage security screening. Following a brief introduction to X-ray diffraction imaging (XDI), which synthesizes in a single modality the image-forming and material-analysis capabilities of X-rays, the Multiple Inverse Fan Beam (MIFB) XDI topology is described. Physical relationships obtaining in such MIFB XDI components as the radiation source, collimators and room-temperature detectors are presented with experimental performances that have been achieved. Representative X-ray diffraction profiles of threat substances measured with a laboratory MIFB XDI system are displayed. The performance of Next-Generation (MIFB) XDI relative to that of the 2nd Generation XRD 3500{sup TM} screener (Morpho Detection Germany GmbH) is assessed. The potential of MIFB XDI, both for reducing the exorbitant cost of false alarms in hold baggage screening (HBS), as well as for combining 'in situ' liquid and solid explosive detection in carry-on luggage screening is outlined. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray diffraction imaging (XDI) synthesizes analysis and imaging in one x-ray modality. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel XDI beam topology comprising multiple inverse fan-beams (MIFB) is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MIFB topology is technically easy to realize and has high photon collection efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applications are envisaged in checkpoint, hold baggage and cargo screening.

  3. A new approximate algorithm for image reconstruction in cone-beam spiral CT at small cone-angles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, S.; Flohr, T.; Steffen, P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new approximate algorithm for image reconstruction with cone-beam spiral CT data at relatively small cone-angles. Based on the algorithm of Wang et al., our method combines a special complementary interpolation with filtered backprojection. The presented algorithm has three main advantages over Wang's algorithm: (1) It overcomes the pitch limitation of Wang's algorithm. (2) It significantly improves z-resolution when suitable sampling schemes are applied. (3) It avoids the waste of applied radiation dose inherent to Wang's algorithm. Usage of the total applied dose is an important requirement in medical imaging. Our method has been implemented on a standard workstation. Reconstructions of computer-simulated data of different phantoms, assuming sampling conditions and image quality requirements typical to medical CT, show encouraging results

  4. Automated classification of maxillofacial cysts in cone beam CT images using contourlet transformation and Spherical Harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolali, Fatemeh; Zoroofi, Reza Aghaeizadeh; Otake, Yoshito; Sato, Yoshinobu

    2017-02-01

    Accurate detection of maxillofacial cysts is an essential step for diagnosis, monitoring and planning therapeutic intervention. Cysts can be of various sizes and shapes and existing detection methods lead to poor results. Customizing automatic detection systems to gain sufficient accuracy in clinical practice is highly challenging. For this purpose, integrating the engineering knowledge in efficient feature extraction is essential. This paper presents a novel framework for maxillofacial cysts detection. A hybrid methodology based on surface and texture information is introduced. The proposed approach consists of three main steps as follows: At first, each cystic lesion is segmented with high accuracy. Then, in the second and third steps, feature extraction and classification are performed. Contourlet and SPHARM coefficients are utilized as texture and shape features which are fed into the classifier. Two different classifiers are used in this study, i.e. support vector machine and sparse discriminant analysis. Generally SPHARM coefficients are estimated by the iterative residual fitting (IRF) algorithm which is based on stepwise regression method. In order to improve the accuracy of IRF estimation, a method based on extra orthogonalization is employed to reduce linear dependency. We have utilized a ground-truth dataset consisting of cone beam CT images of 96 patients, belonging to three maxillofacial cyst categories: radicular cyst, dentigerous cyst and keratocystic odontogenic tumor. Using orthogonalized SPHARM, residual sum of squares is decreased which leads to a more accurate estimation. Analysis of the results based on statistical measures such as specificity, sensitivity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value is reported. The classification rate of 96.48% is achieved using sparse discriminant analysis and orthogonalized SPHARM features. Classification accuracy at least improved by 8.94% with respect to conventional features. This study

  5. A performance comparison of flat-panel imager-based MV and kV cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groh, B.A.; Siewerdsen, J.H.; Drake, D.G.; Wong, J.W.; Jaffray, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been proposed for guiding the delivery of radiation therapy, and investigators have examined the use of both kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray beams in the development of such CBCT systems. In this paper, the inherent contrast and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance for a variety of existing and hypothetical detectors for CBCT are investigated analytically as a function of imaging dose and object size. Theoretical predictions are compared to the results of experimental investigations employing large-area flat-panel imagers (FPIs) at kV and MV energies. Measurements were performed on two different FPI-based CBCT systems: a bench-top prototype incorporating an FPI and kV x-ray source (100 kVp x rays), and a system incorporating an FPI mounted on the gantry of a medical linear accelerator (6 MV x rays). The SNR in volume reconstructions was measured as a function of dose and found to agree reasonably with theoretical predictions. These results confirm the theoretically predicted advantages of employing kV energy x rays in imaging soft-tissue structures found in the human body. While MV CBCT may provide a valuable means of correcting 3D setup errors and may offer an advantage in terms of simplicity of mechanical integration with a linear accelerator (e.g., implementation in place of a portal imager), kV CBCT offers significant performance advantages in terms of image contrast and SNR per unit dose for visualization of soft-tissue structures. The relatively poor SNR performance at MV energies is primarily a result of the low x-ray quantum efficiencies (∼a few percent or less) that are currently achieved with FPIs at high energies. Furthermore, kV CBCT with an FPI offers the potential of combined volumetric and radiographic/fluoroscopic imaging using the same device

  6. In vivo evaluation of [{sup 123}I]-4-(2-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy)ethyl)-1-(4-iodobenzyl)piperidine, an iodinated SPECT tracer for imaging the P-gp transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bruyne, Sylvie; Wyffels, Leonie [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boos, Terrence L. [Chemical Biology Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Staelens, Steven; Deleye, Steven [IBITECH-Medisip, Ghent University-IBBT, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Rice, Kenner C. [Chemical Biology Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse and National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); De Vos, Filip [Laboratory for Radiopharmacy, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: filipx.devos@ugent.be

    2010-05-15

    Introduction: P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an energy-dependent transporter that contributes to the efflux of a wide range of xenobiotics at the blood-brain barrier playing a role in drug-resistance or therapy failure. In this study, we evaluated [{sup 123}I]-4-(2-(bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy)ethyl)-1-(4-iodobenzyl)piperidine ([{sup 123}I]-FMIP) as a novel single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracer for imaging P-gp at the brain in vivo. Methods: The tissue distribution and brain uptake as well as the metabolic profile of [{sup 123}I]-FMIP in wild-type and mdr1a (-/-) mice after pretreatment with physiological saline or cyclosporin A (CsA) (50 mg/kg) was investigated. The influence of increasing doses CsA on brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]-FMIP was explored. {mu}SPECT images of mice brain after injection of 11.1 MBq [{sup 123}I]-FMIP were obtained for different treatment strategies thereby using the Milabs U-SPECT-II. Results: Modulation of P-gp with CsA (50 mg/kg) as well as mdr1a gene depletion resulted in significant increase in cerebral uptake of [{sup 123}I]-FMIP with only minor effect on blood activity. [{sup 123}I]-FMIP is relative stable in vivo with >80% intact [{sup 123}I]-FMIP in brain at 60 min p.i. in the different treatment regiments. A dose-dependent sigmoidal increase in brain uptake of [{sup 123}I]-FMIP with increasing doses of CsA was observed. In vivo region of interest-based SPECT measurements correlated well with the observations of the biodistribution studies. Conclusions: These findings indicate that [{sup 123}I]-FMIP can be applied to assess the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators. It is also suggested that [{sup 123}I]-FMIP is a promising SPECT tracer for imaging P-gp at the blood-brain barrier.

  7. WE-DE-207A-02: Advances in Cone Beam CT Anatomical and Functional Imaging in Angio-Suite to Enable One-Stop-Shop Stroke Imaging Workflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, G. [University of Wisconsin (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  8. WE-DE-207A-02: Advances in Cone Beam CT Anatomical and Functional Imaging in Angio-Suite to Enable One-Stop-Shop Stroke Imaging Workflow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, G.

    2016-01-01

    1. Parallels in the evolution of x-ray angiographic systems and devices used for minimally invasive endovascular therapy Charles Strother - DSA, invented by Dr. Charles Mistretta at UW-Madison, was the technology which enabled the development of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. As DSA became widely available and the potential benefits for accessing the cerebral vasculature from an endovascular approach began to be apparent, industry began efforts to develop tools for use in these procedures. Along with development of catheters, embolic materials, pushable coils and the GDC coils there was simultaneous development and improvement of 2D DSA image quality and the introduction of 3D DSA. Together, these advances resulted in an enormous expansion in the scope and numbers of minimally invasive endovascular procedures. The introduction of flat detectors for c-arm angiographic systems in 2002 provided the possibility of the angiographic suite becoming not just a location for vascular imaging where physiological assessments might also be performed. Over the last decade algorithmic and hardware advances have been sufficient to now realize this potential in clinical practice. The selection of patients for endovascular treatments is enhanced by this dual capability. Along with these advances has been a steady reduction in the radiation exposure required so that today, vascular and soft tissue images may be obtained with equal or in many cases less radiation exposure than is the case for comparable images obtained with multi-detector CT. Learning Objectives: To understand the full capabilities of today’s angiographic suite To understand how c-arm cone beam CT soft tissue imaging can be used for assessments of devices, blood flow and perfusion. Advances in real-time x-ray neuro-endovascular image guidance Stephen Rudin - Reacting to the demands on real-time image guidance for ever finer neurovascular interventions, great improvements in imaging chains are being

  9. Utility of the computed tomography indices on cone beam computed tomography images in the diagnosis of osteoporosis in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, Kwang Joon; Kim, Kyung A

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential use of the computed tomography indices (CTI) on cone beam CT (CBCT) images for an assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal osteoporotic women. Twenty-one postmenopausal osteoporotic women and 21 postmenopausal healthy women were enrolled as the subjects. The BMD of the lumbar vertebrae and femur were calculated by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) using a DXA scanner. The CBCT images were obtained from the unilateral mental foramen region using a PSR-9000N Dental CT system. The axial, sagittal, and coronal images were reconstructed from the block images using OnDemend3D. The new term 'CTI' on CBCT images was proposed. The relationship between the CT measurements and BMDs were assessed and the intra-observer agreement was determined. There were significant differences between the normal and osteoporotic groups in the computed tomography mandibular index superior (CTI(S)), computed tomography mandibular index inferior (CTI(I)), and computed tomography cortical index (CTCI). On the other hand, there was no difference between the groups in the computed tomography mental index (CTMI: inferior cortical width). CTI(S), CTI(I), and CTCI on the CBCT images can be used to assess the osteoporotic women.

  10. Application of a newly developed software program for image quality assessment in cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcus Vinicius Linhares; Santos, António Carvalho; Paulo, Graciano; Campos, Paulo Sergio Flores; Santos, Joana

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply a newly developed free software program, at low cost and with minimal time, to evaluate the quality of dental and maxillofacial cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images. A polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantom, CQP-IFBA, was scanned in 3 CBCT units with 7 protocols. A macro program was developed, using the free software ImageJ, to automatically evaluate the image quality parameters. The image quality evaluation was based on 8 parameters: uniformity, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), noise, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), spatial resolution, the artifact index, geometric accuracy, and low-contrast resolution. The image uniformity and noise depended on the protocol that was applied. Regarding the CNR, high-density structures were more sensitive to the effect of scanning parameters. There were no significant differences between SNR and CNR in centered and peripheral objects. The geometric accuracy assessment showed that all the distance measurements were lower than the real values. Low-contrast resolution was influenced by the scanning parameters, and the 1-mm rod present in the phantom was not depicted in any of the 3 CBCT units. Smaller voxel sizes presented higher spatial resolution. There were no significant differences among the protocols regarding artifact presence. This software package provided a fast, low-cost, and feasible method for the evaluation of image quality parameters in CBCT.

  11. Properties of image intensifier-related halation artifact in limited volume cone-beam CT for dental use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Akiko; Okumura, Shinji; Matsuo, Ayae; Yokoi, Midori; Gotoh, Kenichi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Naitoh, Munetaka; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2006-01-01

    Artifacts due to halation from an image intensifier (I.I.)/charge coupled device (CCD) system appear on limited-volume cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Regarding anterior tooth imaging, properties of this artifact in the geometrical relationships between field of view (FOV) and objective jaw region were studied. A water-filled plastic cylinder was used as a phantom of the head. A test object was constructed as a bone-equivalent phantom to be imaged. The test object was set in the phantom at positions corresponding to the anterior tooth arch. Position of the test object was shifted to simulate individual variations in the thickness of the labial soft tissue. Limited-volume CBCT images were acquired using a 3DX system in the various offset FOV position. The affection of an artifact was evaluated by the size of the object's image. The position of the test object in the phantom, i.e. the thickness of the labial soft tissue contributes to the intensity of artifact. However, even when the labial soft tissue was thick, affection from artifact was prominent when the FOV was set so that the image of the test object was depicted near the margin of FOV. (author)

  12. Tailoring four-dimensional cone-beam CT acquisition settings for fiducial marker-based image guidance in radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)