WorldWideScience

Sample records for biotic interactions electronic

  1. Biotic Interaction in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Andreas Kelager

    further enhance the risk of extinction. Maculinea alcon is selected as an umbrella for conservation and numerous aspects of its biology has been studied extensively. This thesis explores the spatio-temporal impact of the tight biotic dependence in this tritrophic interaction system and integrates...... the large body of research with novel methods such as spatial population genetics and macroecological modelling. The results presented in this PhD thesis suggest that inclusion of biotic interactions in macrecological models may completely alter predictions of species’ response to environmental change...... in host ant use as expected, and is an example of a genetic barrier operating on a temporal scale rather than spatial. In chapter II, we developed habitat suitability models for M. alcon and G. pneumonanthe potentially useful in locating undocumented populations and for improving management of them...

  2. Calcium Signalling in Plant Biotic Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Aldon

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium (Ca2+ is a universal second messenger involved in various cellular processes, leading to plant development and to biotic and abiotic stress responses. Intracellular variation in free Ca2+ concentration is among the earliest events following the plant perception of environmental change. These Ca2+ variations differ in their spatio-temporal properties according to the nature, strength and duration of the stimulus. However, their conversion into biological responses requires Ca2+ sensors for decoding and relaying. The occurrence in plants of calmodulin (CaM but also of other sets of plant-specific Ca2+ sensors such as calmodulin-like proteins (CMLs, Ca2+-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs and calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs indicate that plants possess specific tools and machineries to convert Ca2+ signals into appropriate responses. Here, we focus on recent progress made in monitoring the generation of Ca2+ signals at the whole plant or cell level and their long distance propagation during biotic interactions. The contribution of CaM/CMLs and CDPKs in plant immune responses mounted against bacteria, fungi, viruses and insects are also presented.

  3. Biotic Interaction in Space and Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Andreas Kelager

    it is highly sensitive to the ongoing environmental change caused by humans. The main drivers for its decline are changed land-use and associated habitat loss or fragmentation, and (in more recent times) drainage, increased eutrophication and lack of appropriate management, but future climate change may...... further enhance the risk of extinction. Maculinea alcon is selected as an umbrella for conservation and numerous aspects of its biology has been studied extensively. This thesis explores the spatio-temporal impact of the tight biotic dependence in this tritrophic interaction system and integrates....... The cross-methodological approaches offer new insight into the conservation of Maculinea alcon and thus aid the future management of this unique butterfly. In chapter I we found two syntopic populations of M. alcon to be genetically differentiated caused by their host plant flower phenology, not differences...

  4. Biotic interactions mediate soil microbial feedbacks to climate change

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Crowther, T. W.; Thomas, S.M.; Maynard, D.S.; Baldrian, Petr; Covey, K.; Frey, S. D.; van Diepen, L. T. A.; Bradford, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 112, č. 22 (2015), s. 7033-7038 ISSN 0027-8424 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : global change * soil feedback * biotic interaction Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.423, year: 2015

  5. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant biotic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Claudia; Durner, Jörg; Astier, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants. Recent progress has been made in defining their role during plant biotic interactions. Over the last decade, their function in disease resistance has been highlighted and focused a lot of investigations. Moreover, NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players of defense responses after herbivore attacks. Besides their role in plant adaptive response development, NO and ROS have been demonstrated to be involved in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Here we review recent data concerning these three sides of NO and ROS functions in plant biotic interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How plants cope with biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, N.M.

    2009-01-01

    In their natural environment, plants interact with many different organisms. The nature of these interactions may range from positive, for example interactions with pollinators, to negative, such as interactions with pathogens and herbivores. In this special issue, the contributors provide several

  7. The interactions of ants with their biotic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomicki, Guillaume; Renner, Susanne S

    2017-03-15

    This s pecial feature results from the symposium 'Ants 2016: ant interactions with their biotic environments' held in Munich in May 2016 and deals with the interactions between ants and other insects, plants, microbes and fungi, studied at micro- and macroevolutionary levels with a wide range of approaches, from field ecology to next-generation sequencing, chemical ecology and molecular genetics. In this paper, we review key aspects of these biotic interactions to provide background information for the papers of this s pecial feature After listing the major types of biotic interactions that ants engage in, we present a brief overview of ant/ant communication, ant/plant interactions, ant/fungus symbioses, and recent insights about ants and their endosymbionts. Using a large molecular clock-dated Formicidae phylogeny, we map the evolutionary origins of different ant clades' interactions with plants, fungi and hemiptera. Ants' biotic interactions provide ideal systems to address fundamental ecological and evolutionary questions about mutualism, coevolution, adaptation and animal communication. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Legumes affect alpine tundra community composition via multiple biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudzilovskaia, N.A.; Aksenova, A.A.; Makarov, M.I.; Onipchenko, V.G.; Logvinenko, O.A.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The soil engineering function of legumes in natural ecosystems is paramount but associated solely with soil nitrogen (N) subsidies, ignoring concomitant biotic interactions such as competitive or inhibitory effects and exchange between mycorrhizas and rhizobia. We aim to (1) disentangle legume

  9. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences betw...

  10. Biotic interactions govern genetic adaptation to toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jeremias Martin; Liess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The genetic recovery of resistant populations released from pesticide exposure is accelerated by the presence of environmental stressors. By contrast, the relevance of environmental stressors for the spread of resistance during pesticide exposure has not been studied. Moreover, the consequences of interactions between different stressors have not been considered. Here we show that stress through intraspecific competition accelerates microevolution, because it enhances fitness differences between adapted and non-adapted individuals. By contrast, stress through interspecific competition or predation reduces intraspecific competition and thereby delays microevolution. This was demonstrated in mosquito populations (Culex quinquefasciatus) that were exposed to the pesticide chlorpyrifos. Non-selective predation through harvesting and interspecific competition with Daphnia magna delayed the selection for individuals carrying the ace-1R resistance allele. Under non-toxic conditions, susceptible individuals without ace-1R prevailed. Likewise, predation delayed the reverse adaptation of the populations to a non-toxic environment, while the effect of interspecific competition was not significant. Applying a simulation model, we further identified how microevolution is generally determined by the type and degree of competition and predation. We infer that interactions with other species—especially strong in ecosystems with high biodiversity—can delay the development of pesticide resistance. PMID:25833856

  11. Biotic-Abiotic Nanoscale Interactions in Biological Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-28

    such as ATP. This strategy, called oxidative phosphorylation, is embraced by all respiratory microorganisms. Most eukaryotes and many prokaryotes are...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0087 (YIP-10) BIOTIC-ABIOTIC NANOSCALE INTERACTIONS IN BIOLOGICAL FUEL CELLS Mohamed El-Naggar UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA...Interactions in Biological Fuel Cells Award Number: FA9550-10-1-0144 Start Date: 04/15/2010 Program Manager: Patrick O. Bradshaw, PhD Air

  12. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastman, Erik K; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W; Cosetta, Casey M; Dutton, Rachel J; Wolfe, Benjamin E

    2016-10-18

    Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. Decades of culture-based studies and more recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that bacterial species in agriculture, medicine, industry, and nature are unevenly distributed across time and space. The ecological processes and molecular mechanisms that shape these distributions are not well understood because it is challenging to connect in situ patterns of diversity with mechanistic in vitro studies in the laboratory. Using tractable cheese rind biofilms and a focus on coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS

  13. Interactive Biophysics with Microswimmers: Education, Cloud Experimentation, Programmed Swarms, and Biotic Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar

    Modern biotechnology gets increasingly powerful to manipulate and measure microscopic biophysical processes. Nevertheless, no platform exists to truly interact with these processes, certainly not with the convenience that we are accustomed to from our electronic smart devices. In my talk I will provide the rational for such Interactive Biotechnology and conceptualize its core component, the BPU (biotic processing unit), which is then connected to an according user interface. The biophysical phenomena currently featured on these platforms utilize the phototactic response of motile microorganisms, e.g., Euglena gracilis, resulting in spatio-temporal dynamics from the single cell to the self-organized multi-cellular scale. I will demonstrate multiple platforms, such as scalable biology cloud experimentation labs, tangible museum exhibits, biotic video games, low-cost interactive DIY kits using smartphones, and programming languages for swarm robotics. I will discuss applications for education as well as for professional and citizen science. Hence, we turn traditionally observational microscopy into an interactive experience. I was told that presenting in the educational section does not count against the ''one author - one talk policy'' - so I submit two abstracts. In case of conflict - please contact me: ingmar@stanford.edu.

  14. STRESS ECOLOGY IN FUCUS : ABIOTIC, BIOTIC AND GENETIC INTERACTIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahl, Martin; Jormalainen, Veijo; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Coyer, James A.; Molis, Markus; Schubert, Hendrik; Dethier, Megan; Karez, Rolf; Kruse, Inken; Lenz, Mark; Pearson, Gareth; Rohde, Sven; Wikstrom, Sofia A.; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Lesser, M

    2011-01-01

    Stress regimes defined as the synchronous or sequential action of abiotic and biotic stresses determine the performance and distribution of species. The natural patterns of stress to which species are more or less well adapted have recently started to shift and alter under the influence of global

  15. Linking macroecology and community ecology: refining predictions of species distributions using biotic interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniczenko, Phillip P A; Sivasubramaniam, Prabu; Suttle, K Blake; Pearson, Richard G

    2017-06-01

    Macroecological models for predicting species distributions usually only include abiotic environmental conditions as explanatory variables, despite knowledge from community ecology that all species are linked to other species through biotic interactions. This disconnect is largely due to the different spatial scales considered by the two sub-disciplines: macroecologists study patterns at large extents and coarse resolutions, while community ecologists focus on small extents and fine resolutions. A general framework for including biotic interactions in macroecological models would help bridge this divide, as it would allow for rigorous testing of the role that biotic interactions play in determining species ranges. Here, we present an approach that combines species distribution models with Bayesian networks, which enables the direct and indirect effects of biotic interactions to be modelled as propagating conditional dependencies among species' presences. We show that including biotic interactions in distribution models for species from a California grassland community results in better range predictions across the western USA. This new approach will be important for improving estimates of species distributions and their dynamics under environmental change. © 2017 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Biotic interactions mediate the expansion of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) into salt marshes under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongyu; Zhang, Yihui; Lan, Zhenjiang; Pennings, Steven C

    2013-09-01

    Many species are expanding their distributions to higher latitudes due to global warming. Understanding the mechanisms underlying these distribution shifts is critical for better understanding the impacts of climate changes. The climate envelope approach is widely used to model and predict species distribution shifts with changing climates. Biotic interactions between species, however, may also influence species distributions, and a better understanding of biotic interactions could improve predictions based solely on climate envelope models. Along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, USA, subtropical black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) at the northern limit of its distribution grows sympatrically with temperate salt marsh plants in Florida, Louisiana, and Texas. In recent decades, freeze-free winters have led to an expansion of black mangrove into salt marshes. We examined how biotic interactions between black mangrove and salt marsh vegetation along the Texas coast varied across (i) a latitudinal gradient (associated with a winter-temperature gradient); (ii) the elevational gradient within each marsh (which creates different marsh habitats); and (iii) different life history stages of black mangroves (seedlings vs. juvenile trees). Each of these variables affected the strength or nature of biotic interactions between black mangrove and salt marsh vegetation: (i) Salt marsh vegetation facilitated black mangrove seedlings at their high-latitude distribution limit, but inhibited black mangrove seedlings at lower latitudes; (ii) mangroves performed well at intermediate elevations, but grew and survived poorly in high- and low-marsh habitats; and (iii) the effect of salt marsh vegetation on black mangroves switched from negative to neutral as black mangroves grew from seedlings into juvenile trees. These results indicate that the expansion of black mangroves is mediated by complex biotic interactions. A better understanding of the impacts of climate change on ecological

  17. Tree invasion of a montane meadow complex: temporal trends, spatial patterns, and biotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Halpern; Joseph A. Antos; Janine M. Rice; Ryan D. Haugo; Nicole L. Lang

    2010-01-01

    We combined spatial point pattern analysis, population age structures, and a time-series of stem maps to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of conifer invasion over a 200-yr period in three plots totaling 4 ha. In combination, spatial and temporal patterns of establishment suggest an invasion process shaped by biotic interactions, with facilitation promoting...

  18. Identifying biotic interactions which drive the spatial distribution of a mosquito community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, Nick; Nunn, Miles A; Purse, Bethan V

    2015-07-14

    Spatial variation in the risk of many mosquito-borne pathogens is strongly influenced by the distribution of communities of suitable vector mosquitoes. The spatial distributions of such communities have been linked to the abiotic habitat requirements of each constituent mosquito species, but the biotic interactions between mosquitoes and other species are less well understood. Determining which fauna restrict the presence and abundance of key mosquito species in vector communities may identify species which could be employed as natural biological control agents. Whilst biotic interactions have been studied in the laboratory, a lack of appropriate statistical methods has prohibited the identification of key interactions which influence mosquito distributions in the field. Joint species distribution models (JSDMs) have recently been developed to identify biotic interactions influencing the distributions of species from empirical data. We apply a JSDM to field data on the spatial distribution of mosquitoes in a UK wetland to identify both abiotic factors and biotic interactions driving the composition of the community. As expected, mosquito larval distributions in this wetland habitat are strongly driven by environmental covariates including water depth, temperature and oxidation-reduction potential. By factoring out these environmental variables, we are able to identify species (ditch shrimp of the genus Palaemonetes and fish) as predators which appear to restrict mosquito distributions. JSDMs offer vector ecologists a way to identify potentially important biotic interactions influencing the distributions of disease vectors from widely available field data. This information is crucial to understand the likely effects of habitat management for vector control and to identify species with the potential for use in biological control programmes. We provide an R package BayesComm to enable the wider application of these models.

  19. The role of reproductive plant traits and biotic interactions in the dynamics of semi-arid plant communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pueyo, Y.; Kefi, S.; Diaz-Sierra, R.; Alados, C.L. y; Rietkerk, M.G.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of semi-arid plant communities are determined by the interplay between competition and facilitation among plants. The sign and strength of these biotic interactions depend on plant traits. However, the relationships between plant traits and biotic interactions, and the consequences for

  20. Effects of biotic interactions and dispersal on the presence-absence of multiple species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, Mohd Hafiz; Murray, Rua; Plank, Michael J.; Godsoe, William

    2017-01-01

    One of the important issues in ecology is to predict which species will be present (or absent) across a geographical region. Dispersal is thought to have an important influence on the range limits of species, and understanding this problem in a multi-species community with priority effects (i.e. initial abundances determine species presence-absence) is a challenging task because dispersal also interacts with biotic and abiotic factors. Here, we propose a simple multi-species model to investigate the joint effects of biotic interactions and dispersal on species presence-absence. Our results show that dispersal can substantially expand species ranges when biotic and abiotic forces are present; consequently, coexistence of multiple species is possible. The model also exhibits ecologically interesting priority effects, mediated by intense biotic interactions. In the absence of dispersal, competitive exclusion of all but one species occurs. We find that dispersal reduces competitive exclusion effects that occur in no-dispersal case and promotes coexistence of multiple species. These results also show that priority effects are still prevalent in multi-species communities in the presence of dispersal process. We also illustrate the existence of threshold values of competitive strength (i.e. transcritical bifurcations), which results in different species presence-absence in multi-species communities with and without dispersal.

  1. Biotic interactions overrule plant responses to climate, depending on the species' biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welk, Astrid; Welk, Erik; Bruelheide, Helge

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an experimental approach to assess the relative importance of climatic and biotic factors as determinants of species' geographical distributions. We asked to what extent responses of grassland plant species to biotic interactions vary with climate, and to what degree this variation depends on the species' biogeography. Using a gradient from oceanic to continental climate represented by nine common garden transplant sites in Germany, we experimentally tested whether congeneric grassland species of different geographic distribution (oceanic vs. continental plant range type) responded differently to combinations of climate, competition and mollusc herbivory. We found the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate to vary between the different components of plant performance. While survival and plant height increased with precipitation, temperature had no effect on plant performance. Additionally, species with continental plant range type increased their growth in more benign climatic conditions, while those with oceanic range type were largely unable to take a similar advantage of better climatic conditions. Competition generally caused strong reductions of aboveground biomass and growth. In contrast, herbivory had minor effects on survival and growth. Against expectation, these negative effects of competition and herbivory were not mitigated under more stressful continental climate conditions. In conclusion we suggest variation in relative importance of climate and biotic interactions on broader scales, mediated via species-specific sensitivities and factor-specific response patterns. Our results have important implications for species distribution models, as they emphasize the large-scale impact of biotic interactions on plant distribution patterns and the necessity to take plant range types into account.

  2. Untangling interactions: do temperature and habitat fragmentation gradients simultaneously impact biotic relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman-Fraser, Poppy; Ewers, Robert M

    2014-07-22

    Gaining insight into the impact of anthropogenic change on ecosystems requires investigation into interdependencies between multiple drivers of ecological change and multiple biotic responses. Global environmental change drivers can act simultaneously to impact the abundance and diversity of biota, but few studies have also measured the impact across trophic levels. We firstly investigated whether climate (using temperature differences across a latitudinal gradient as a surrogate) interacts with habitat fragmentation (measured according to fragment area and distance to habitat edges) to impact a New Zealand tri-trophic food chain (plant, herbivore and natural enemy). Secondly, we examined how these interactions might differentially impact both the density and biotic processes of species at each of the three trophic levels. We found evidence to suggest that these drivers act non-additively across trophic levels. The nature of these interactions however varied: location synergistically interacted with fragmentation measures to exacerbate the detrimental effects on consumer density; and antagonistically interacted to ameliorate the impact on plant density and on the interactions between trophic levels (herbivory and parasitoid attack rate). Our findings indicate that the ecological consequences of multiple global change drivers are strongly interactive and vary according to the trophic level studied and whether density or ecological processes are investigated. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Biotic interactions affect the colonization behavior of aquatic detritivorous macroinvertebrates in a heterogeneous environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschut, Thomas A.; Meineri, Eric; Basset, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    It has previously been suggested that macroinvertebrates actively search for suitable patches to colonize. However, it is not well understood how the spatial arrangement of patches can affect colonization rates. In this study, we determined the importance of the environmental factors (distance, connectivity and resource availability) for patch colonization in an experimental system using Gammarus aequicauda (Amphipoda), Lekanesphaera hookeri (Isopoda) and Ecrobia ventrosa (Gastropoda). Furthermore, we also assessed how the relative importance of each of these environmental factors differed in interactions between the three species. The single species experiments showed that distance was the most important factor for G. aequicauda and E. ventrosa. However, while E. ventrosa preferred patches close to the release point, G. aequicauda strongly preferred patches further from the release point. High resource availability was a strong determinant for the patch colonization of G. aequicauda and L. hookeri. Connectivity was only of moderate importance in the study system for L. hookeri and E. ventrosa. The effects of the environmental factors were strongly affected by interspecific interactions in the multispecies experiments. For G. aequicauda, the distance preference was lowered in the presence of E. ventrosa. Moreover, while for L. hookeri the effect of resource availability was ruled out by the species interactions, resource availability gained importance for E. ventrosa in the presence of any of the other species. Our results suggest a strong link between environmental factors and biotic interactions in the colonization of habitat patches and indicate that the effect of biotic interactions is especially important for species sharing similar traits.

  4. Effects of biotic and abiotic factors on the temporal dynamic of bat-fruit interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurindo, Rafael de Souza; Gregorin, Renato; Tavares, Davi Castro

    2017-08-01

    Mutualistic interactions between animals and plants vary over time and space based on the abundance of fruits or animals and seasonality. Little is known about this temporal dynamic and the influence of biotic and abiotic factors on the structure of interaction networks. We evaluated changes in the structure of network interactions between bats and fruits in relation to variations in rainfall. Our results suggest that fruit abundance is the main variable responsible for temporal changes in network attributes, such as network size, connectance, and number of interactions. In the same way, temperature positively affected the abundance of fruits and bats. An increase in temperature and alterations in rainfall patterns, due to human induced climate change, can cause changes in phenological patterns and fruit production, with negative consequences to biodiversity maintenance, ecological interactions, and ecosystem functioning.

  5. Metabolic regulation of leaf senescence: interactions of sugar signalling with biotic and abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingler, A; Roitsch, T

    2008-09-01

    Sugars are important signals in the regulation of plant metabolism and development. During stress and in senescing leaves, sugars often accumulate. In addition, both sugar accumulation and stress can induce leaf senescence. Infection by bacterial and fungal pathogens and attack by herbivores and gall-forming insects may influence leaf senescence via modulation of the sugar status, either by directly affecting primary carbon metabolism or by regulating steady state levels of plant hormones. Many types of biotic interactions involve the induction of extracellular invertase as the key enzyme of an apoplasmic phloem unloading pathway, resulting in a source-sink transition and an increased hexose/sucrose ratio. Induction of the levels of the phytohormones ethylene and jasmonate in biotic interactions results in accelerated senescence, whereas an increase in plant- or pathogen-derived cytokinins delays senescence and results in the formation of green islands within senescing leaves. Interactions between sugar and hormone signalling also play a role in response to abiotic stress. For example, interactions between sugar and abscisic acid (ABA) signalling may be responsible for the induction of senescence during drought stress. Cold treatment, on the other hand, can result in delayed senescence, despite sugar and ABA accumulation. Moreover, natural variation can be found in senescence regulation by sugars and in response to stress: in response to drought stress, both drought escape and dehydration avoidance strategies have been described in different Arabidopsis accessions. The regulation of senescence by sugars may be key to these different strategies in response to stress.

  6. Biotic interactions at hydrothermal vents: Recruitment inhibition by the mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenihan, H. S.; Mills, S. W.; Mullineaux, L. S.; Peterson, C. H.; Fisher, C. R.; Micheli, F.

    2008-12-01

    The structure and dynamics of marine communities are regulated in part by variation in recruitment. As in other ecosystems, recruitment at deep-sea hydrothermal vents is controlled by the interplay of propagule supply and behavior, gradients in physical-chemical conditions, and biotic interactions during pre- and post-settlement periods. Recent research along the East Pacific Rise indicates that inhibition of recently settled larvae by mobile predators (mainly limpets) influences patterns of recruitment and subsequent community succession. We conducted a manipulative experiment at the same sites (˜2510 m water depth) to test whether high-density assemblages of the mussel Bathymodiolus thermophilus also inhibit recruitment. In a preliminary study, recruitment of vent invertebrates within the faunal zone dominated by B. thermophilus was strikingly different at two sites, East Wall and Worm Hole. East Wall had high densities of mussels but very low total recruitment. In contrast, Worm Hole had few mussels but high recruitment. Using the submersible Alvin, we transplanted a large number of mussels from East Wall to Worm Hole and quantified recruitment on basalt blocks placed in three treatments: (1) naturally high densities of mussels at East Wall; (2) naturally low densities of mussels at Worm Hole; and (3) high densities of transplanted mussels at Worm Hole. After 11 months, a total of 24 taxa had recruited to the basalt blocks. Recruitment was 44-60% lower in the transplanted high-density mussel patch at Worm Hole and the natural high-density patch at East Wall than within the natural low-density patch at Worm Hole. Biotic processes that may have caused the pattern of recruitment observed included predation of larvae via water filtration by mussels, larval avoidance of superior competitors, interference competition, and enhanced predation by species within the mussel-bed community. Our results indicate that biotic interactions affecting recruitment must be

  7. Ecosystem development in roadside grasslands: Biotic control, plant-soil interactions, and dispersal limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Palacios, P.; Bowker, M.A.; Maestre, F.T.; Soliveres, S.; Valladares, F.; Papadopoulos, J.; Escudero, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roadside grasslands undergoing secondary succession are abundant, and represent ecologically meaningful examples of novel, human-created ecosystems. Interactions between plant and soil communities (hereafter plant-soil interactions) are of major importance in understanding the role of biotic control in ecosystem functioning, but little is known about these links in the context of ecosystem restoration and succession. The assessment of the key biotic communities and interactions driving ecosystem development will help practitioners to better allocate the limited resources devoted to roadside grassland restoration. We surveyed roadside grasslands from three successional stages (0-2, 7-9, and > 20 years) in two Mediterranean regions of Spain. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate how interactions between plants, biological soil crusts (BSCs), and soil microbial functional diversity (soil microorganisms) affect indicators of ecosystem development and restoration: plant similarity to the reference ecosystem, erosion control, and soil C storage and N accumulation. Changes in plant community composition along the successional gradient exerted the strongest influence on these indicators. High BSC cover was associated with high soil stability, and high soil microbial functional diversity from late-successional stages was associated with high soil fertility. Contrary to our expectations, the indirect effects of plants, mediated by either BSCs or soil microorganisms, were very weak in both regions, suggesting a minor role for plant-soil interactions upon ecosystem development indicators over long periods. Our results suggest that natural vegetation dynamics effectively improved ecosystem development within a time frame of 20 years in the grasslands evaluated. They also indicate that this time could be shortened if management actions focus on: (1) maintaining wellconserved natural areas close to roadsides to enhance plant compositional changes towards late

  8. Separating the role of biotic interactions and climate in determining adaptive response of plants to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiolo, Sara; Van der Putten, Wim H; Tielbörger, Katja

    2015-05-01

    Altered rainfall regimes will greatly affect the response of plant species to climate change. However, little is known about how direct effects of changing precipitation on plant performance may depend on other abiotic factors and biotic interactions. We used reciprocal transplants between climatically very different sites with simultaneous manipulation of soil, plant population origin, and neighbor conditions to evaluate local adaptation and possible adaptive response of four Eastern Mediterranean annual plant species to climate change. The effect of site on plant performance was negligible, but soil origin had a strong effect on fecundity, most likely due to differential water retaining ability. Competition by neighbors strongly reduced fitness. We separated the effects of the abiotic and biotic soil properties on plant performance by repeating the field experiment in a greenhouse under homogenous environmental conditions and including a soil biota manipulation treatment. As in the field, plant performance differed among soil origins and neighbor treatments. Moreover, we found plant species-specific responses to soil biota that may be best explained by the differential sensitivity to negative and positive soil biota effects. Overall, under the conditions of our experiment with two contrasting sites, biotic interactions had a strong effect on plant fitness that interacted with and eventually overrode climate. Because climate and biotic interactions covary, reciprocal transplants and climate gradient studies should consider soil biotic interactions and abiotic conditions when evaluating climate change effects on plant performance.

  9. The role of biotic interactions in shaping distributions and realised assemblages of species: implications for species distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisz, Mary Susanne; Pottier, Julien; Kissling, W Daniel; Pellissier, Loïc; Lenoir, Jonathan; Damgaard, Christian F; Dormann, Carsten F; Forchhammer, Mads C; Grytnes, John-Arvid; Guisan, Antoine; Heikkinen, Risto K; Høye, Toke T; Kühn, Ingolf; Luoto, Miska; Maiorano, Luigi; Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte; Normand, Signe; Öckinger, Erik; Schmidt, Niels M; Termansen, Mette; Timmermann, Allan; Wardle, David A; Aastrup, Peter; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Predicting which species will occur together in the future, and where, remains one of the greatest challenges in ecology, and requires a sound understanding of how the abiotic and biotic environments interact with dispersal processes and history across scales. Biotic interactions and their dynamics influence species' relationships to climate, and this also has important implications for predicting future distributions of species. It is already well accepted that biotic interactions shape species' spatial distributions at local spatial extents, but the role of these interactions beyond local extents (e.g. 10 km2 to global extents) are usually dismissed as unimportant. In this review we consolidate evidence for how biotic interactions shape species distributions beyond local extents and review methods for integrating biotic interactions into species distribution modelling tools. Drawing upon evidence from contemporary and palaeoecological studies of individual species ranges, functional groups, and species richness patterns, we show that biotic interactions have clearly left their mark on species distributions and realised assemblages of species across all spatial extents. We demonstrate this with examples from within and across trophic groups. A range of species distribution modelling tools is available to quantify species environmental relationships and predict species occurrence, such as: (i) integrating pairwise dependencies, (ii) using integrative predictors, and (iii) hybridising species distribution models (SDMs) with dynamic models. These methods have typically only been applied to interacting pairs of species at a single time, require a priori ecological knowledge about which species interact, and due to data paucity must assume that biotic interactions are constant in space and time. To better inform the future development of these models across spatial scales, we call for accelerated collection of spatially and temporally explicit species data. Ideally

  10. Electron Interactions in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Electrons confined in two dimensions (2D) can exhibit strongly correlated states. Recent experimental discovery of integer and fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene amplified interest in correlated 2D electronic systems, owning to presence of the unusual topological phase associated with zero effective mass of charge carriers. In this talk, we will discuss the role of the many-body effects due to the electron-electron interaction in graphene manifested in electron transport phenomena. In particular, we will discuss the nature unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking Landau levels graphene under the extreme quantum condition, the appearance of unique low density insulating states and fractional quantum Hall states. Employing extremely high quality samples obtained by suspending graphene and graphene on atomically flat defect free insulating substrate such as hexa-bron nitride, we now investigate various broken symmetry states under high magnetic field. The nature of these broken symmetry state can be explained generally considering underlying SU(4) symmetry in the single particle level of the Landau levels.

  11. Local shifts in floral biotic interactions in habitat edges and their effect on quantity and quality of plant offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenu, Giuseppe; Bernardo, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Spatial shifts in insect fauna due to ecological heterogeneity can severely constrain plant reproduction. Nonetheless, data showing effects of insect visit patterns and intensity of mutualistic and/or antagonistic plant–insect interactions on plant reproduction over structured ecological gradients remain scarce. We investigated how changes in flower-visitor abundance, identity and behaviour over a forest-open habitat gradient affect plant biotic interactions, and quantitative and qualitative fitness in the edge-specialist Dianthus balbisii. Composition and behaviour of the insects visiting flowers of D. balbisii strongly varied over the study gradient, influencing strength and patterns of plant biotic interactions (i.e. herbivory and pollination likelihood). Seed set comparison in free- and manually pollinated flowers suggested spatial variations in the extent of quantitative pollen limitation, which appeared more pronounced at the gradient extremes. Such variations were congruent to patterns of flower visit and plant biotic interactions. The analyses on seed and seedling viability evidenced that spatial variation in amount and type of pollinators, and frequency of herbivory affected qualitative fitness of D. balbisii by influencing selfing and outcrossing rates. Our work emphasizes the role of plant biotic interactions as a fine-scale mediator of plant fitness in ecotones, highlighting that optimal plant reproduction can take place into a restricted interval of the ecological gradients occurring at forest edges. Reducing the habitat complexity typical of such transition contexts can threat edge-adapted plants. PMID:28775831

  12. Past tree influence and prescribed fire mediate biotic interactions and community reassembly in a grassland-restoration experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Halpern; Joseph A. Antos; Donald McKenzie; Annette M. Olson; Lara Souza

    2016-01-01

    1. Woody plant encroachment of grasslands is occurring globally, with profound ecological consequences. Attempts to restore herbaceous dominance may fail if the woody state is resilient or if intervention leads to an alternate, undesirable state. Restoration outcomes often hinge on biotic interactions – particularly on priority effects that inhibit or promote community...

  13. Separating the role of biotic interactions and climate in determining adaptive response of plants to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomiolo, S.; Van der Putten, Wim; Tielborger, K.

    2015-01-01

    Altered rainfall regimes will greatly affect the response of plant species to climate change. However, little is known about how direct effects of changing precipitation on plant performance may depend on other abiotic factors and biotic interactions. We used reciprocal transplants between

  14. Causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection along an altitudinal gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquida, Eduardo T; Benkman, Craig W

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the causes of variation in biotic interaction strength and phenotypic selection remains one of the outstanding goals of evolutionary ecology. Here we examine the variation in strength of interactions between two seed predators, common crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) and European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris), and mountain pine (Pinus uncinata) at and below tree limit in the Pyrenees, and how this translates into phenotypic selection. Seed predation by crossbills increased whereas seed predation by squirrels decreased with increasing elevation and as the canopy became more open. Overall, seed predation by crossbills averaged about twice that by squirrels, and the intensity of selection exerted by crossbills averaged between 2.6 and 7.5 times greater than by squirrels. The higher levels of seed predation by crossbills than squirrels were related to the relatively open nature of most of the forests, and the higher intensity of selection exerted by crossbills resulted from their higher levels of seed predation. However, most of the differences in selection intensity between crossbills and squirrels were the result of habitat features having a greater effect on the foraging behavior of squirrels than of crossbills, causing selection to be much lower for squirrels than for crossbills. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Electron-electron interactions in disordered systems

    CERN Document Server

    Efros, AL

    1985-01-01

    ``Electron-Electron Interactions in Disordered Systems'' deals with the interplay of disorder and the Coulomb interaction. Prominent experts give state-of-the-art reviews of the theoretical and experimental work in this field and make it clear that the interplay of the two effects is essential, especially in low-dimensional systems.

  16. Annual grass invasion in sagebrush-steppe: The relative importance of climate, soil properties and biotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sheel; Sheley, Roger L.

    2016-01-01

    The invasion by winter-annual grasses (AGs) such as Bromus tectorum into sagebrush steppe throughout the western USA is a classic example of a biological invasion with multiple, interacting climate, soil and biotic factors driving the invasion, although few studies have examined all components together. Across a 6000-km2 area of the northern Great Basin, we conducted a field assessment of 100 climate, soil, and biotic (functional group abundances, diversity) factors at each of 90 sites that spanned an invasion gradient ranging from 0 to 100 % AG cover. We first determined which biotic and abiotic factors had the strongest correlative relationships with AGs and each resident functional group. We then used regression and structural equation modeling to explore how multiple ecological factors interact to influence AG abundance. Among biotic interactions, we observed negative relationships between AGs and biodiversity, perennial grass cover, resident species richness, biological soil crust cover and shrub density, whereas perennial and annual forb cover, tree cover and soil microbial biomass had no direct linkage to AG. Among abiotic factors, AG cover was strongly related to climate (increasing cover with increasing temperature and aridity), but had weak relationships with soil factors. Our structural equation model showed negative effects of perennial grasses and biodiversity on AG cover while integrating the negative effects of warmer climate and positive influence of belowground processes on resident functional groups. Our findings illustrate the relative importance of biotic interactions and climate on invasive abundance, while soil properties appear to have stronger relationships with resident biota than with invasives.

  17. Understanding nutrient dynamics in an African savanna : Local biotic interactions outweigh a major regional rainfall gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Michiel P.; Hulshof, Anneleen; Fokkema, Wimke; Berg, Matty P.; Olff, Han

    Nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems has been found to vary along regional climatic and soil gradients and drive variation in plant community composition and vegetation structure. However, more local biotic feedbacks also affect nutrient availability, but their importance in determining

  18. Understanding nutrient dynamics in an African savanna: local biotic interactions outweigh a major regional rainfall gradient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, M.P.; Hulshof, A.; Fokkema, W.; Berg, M.P.; Olff, H.

    2016-01-01

    Nutrient availability in terrestrial ecosystems has been found to vary along regional climatic and soil gradients and drive variation in plant community composition and vegetation structure. However, more local biotic feedbacks also affect nutrient availability, but their importance in determining

  19. A framework for evaluating the influence of climate, dispersal limitation, and biotic interactions using fossil pollen associations across the late Quaternary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blois, Jessica L.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Behrensmeyer, Anna K.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions, dispersal lags, and interactions among species are major factors structuring communities through time and across space. Ecologists have emphasized the importance of biotic interactions in determining local patterns of species association. In contrast, abiotic limits, dis...

  20. Adding Biotic Interactions into Paleodistribution Models: A Host-Cleptoparasite Complex of Neotropical Orchid Bees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Paiva Silva

    Full Text Available Orchid bees compose an exclusive Neotropical pollinators group, with bright body coloration. Several of those species build their own nests, while others are reported as nest cleptoparasites. Here, the objective was to evaluate whether the inclusion of a strong biotic interaction, such as the presence of a host species, improved the ability of species distribution models (SDMs to predict the geographic range of the cleptoparasite species. The target species were Aglae caerulea and its host species Eulaema nigrita. Additionally, since A. caerulea is more frequently found in the Amazon rather than the Cerrado areas, a secondary objective was to evaluate whether this species is increasing or decreasing its distribution given South American past and current climatic conditions. SDMs methods (Maxent and Bioclim, in addition with current and past South American climatic conditions, as well as the occurrences for A. caerulea and E. nigrita were used to generate the distribution models. The distribution of A. caerulea was generated with and without the inclusion of the distribution of E. nigrita as a predictor variable. The results indicate A. caerulea was barely affected by past climatic conditions and the populations from the Cerrado savanna could be at least 21,000 years old (the last glacial maximum, as well as the Amazonian ones. On the other hand, in this study, the inclusion of the host-cleptoparasite interaction complex did not statistically improve the quality of the produced models, which means that the geographic range of this cleptoparasite species is mainly constrained by climate and not by the presence of the host species. Nonetheless, this could also be caused by unknown complexes of other Euglossini hosts with A. caerulea, which still are still needed to be described by science.

  1. Interactive influence of biotic and abiotic cues on the plasticity of preferred body temperatures in a predator–prey system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smolinský, Radovan; Gvoždík, Lumír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 1 (2012), s. 47-55 ISSN 0029-8549 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP506/10/2170; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60930519 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Aeshna * Biotic interactions * Preferred temperature * Reciprocal plasticity * Thermal acclimation * Triturus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.011, year: 2012

  2. The role of biotic interactions in plant community assembly: What is the community species pool?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Švamberková, E.; Vítová, A.; Lepš, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, NOV 01 (2017), s. 150-156 ISSN 1146-609X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : abiotic filter * biotic filter * competitive exclusion Subject RIV: EH - Ecology , Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 1.652, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1146609X16303757

  3. How do Humans interact with the Biotic Pump of South America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajar; Pande, Saket; Renata Cordeiro Ortigara, Angela; Uhlenbrook, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The negative effects of the deforestation have been both advertised and down played. However, the effects are far more tangible than what they seem to be. It has been shown that the change in forest cover causes the rainfall patterns to change as the forests work as so-called Biotic Pumps. This changes the water availability in the area by modifying the water balance. Local water balances affect the changes that may take longer to be visible on the larger scales. The Amazon rain forest, one of the most bio-diverse areas worldwide, is an essential part of the biosphere of South America. However, there are clear links between deforestation carried out for agricultural purposes, specifically, Soybean and Sugarcane and the variability in global food prices. Here we analyse the anthropogenic actions that may influence the biotic pump. Variables such as volatility in commodity prices, risk taking capacities, land availability, government subsidies are used to drive the decision making of farmers. These variables are embedded in a lumped biotic pump model made for Brazil, utilizing data from different sources including MODIS, Centro de Previsão do Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The biotic pump model essentially transports atmospheric moisture downwind, part of which falls as rain. The atmospheric moisture 'upwind' accounts for evaporation, incorporating land cover changes in response to land use decisions made by farmers and rainfall. The model is run for scenarios to demonstrate how rain downwind is affected by upwind land cover and provides first insights in to how much rain and productivity (agriculture) downwind is caused by the Amazonian rain forest upwind We then discuss the value of environmental conservation based on marginal productivity analysis, i.e., finding harmony between the conservation of rainforest and the economic growth of the country.

  4. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  5. Physical stress, not biotic interactions, preclude an invasive grass from establishing in forb-dominated salt marshes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available Biological invasions have become the focus of considerable concern and ecological research, yet the relative importance of abiotic and biotic factors in controlling the invasibility of habitats to exotic species is not well understood. Spartina species are highly invasive plants in coastal wetlands; however, studies on the factors that control the success or failure of Spartina invasions across multiple habitat types are rare and inconclusive.We examined the roles of physical stress and plant interactions in mediating the establishment of the smooth cordgrass, Spartina alterniflora, in a variety of coastal habitats in northern China. Field transplant experiments showed that cordgrass can invade mudflats and low estuarine marshes with low salinity and frequent flooding, but cannot survive in salt marshes and high estuarine marshes with hypersaline soils and infrequent flooding. The dominant native plant Suaeda salsa had neither competitive nor facilitative effects on cordgrass. A common garden experiment revealed that cordgrass performed significantly better when flooded every other day than when flooded weekly. These results suggest that physical stress rather than plant interactions limits cordgrass invasions in northern China.We conclude that Spartina invasions are likely to be constrained to tidal flats and low estuarine marshes in the Yellow River Delta. Due to harsh physical conditions, salt marshes and high estuarine marshes are unlikely to be invaded. These findings have implications for understanding Spartina invasions in northern China and on other coasts with similar biotic and abiotic environments.

  6. Predicting species distribution and abundance responses to climate change: why it is essential to include biotic interactions across trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Putten, Wim H; Macel, Mirka; Visser, Marcel E

    2010-07-12

    Current predictions on species responses to climate change strongly rely on projecting altered environmental conditions on species distributions. However, it is increasingly acknowledged that climate change also influences species interactions. We review and synthesize literature information on biotic interactions and use it to argue that the abundance of species and the direction of selection during climate change vary depending on how their trophic interactions become disrupted. Plant abundance can be controlled by aboveground and belowground multitrophic level interactions with herbivores, pathogens, symbionts and their enemies. We discuss how these interactions may alter during climate change and the resulting species range shifts. We suggest conceptual analogies between species responses to climate warming and exotic species introduced in new ranges. There are also important differences: the herbivores, pathogens and mutualistic symbionts of range-expanding species and their enemies may co-migrate, and the continuous gene flow under climate warming can make adaptation in the expansion zone of range expanders different from that of cross-continental exotic species. We conclude that under climate change, results of altered species interactions may vary, ranging from species becoming rare to disproportionately abundant. Taking these possibilities into account will provide a new perspective on predicting species distribution under climate change.

  7. Biotic interactions mediate the influence of bird colonies on vegetation and soil chemistry at aggregation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natusch, Daniel James Deans; Lyons, Jessica Ann; Brown, Gregory P; Shine, Richard

    2017-02-01

    Colonial-nesting organisms can strongly alter the chemical and biotic conditions around their aggregation sites, with cascading impacts on other components of the ecosystem. In tropical Australia, Metallic Starlings (Aplonis metallica) nest in large colonies far above the forest canopy, in emergent trees. The ground beneath those trees is open, in stark contrast to the dense foliage all around. We surveyed the areas beneath 27 colony trees (and nearby randomly chosen trees lacking bird colonies) to quantify the birds' impacts on soil and vegetation characteristics, and to test alternative hypotheses about the proximate mechanisms responsible for the lack of live vegetation beneath colony trees. Nutrient levels were greatly elevated beneath colony trees (especially, those with larger colonies), potentially reaching levels toxic to older trees. However, seedlings thrived in the soil from beneath colony trees. The primary mechanism generating open areas beneath colony trees is disturbance by scavengers (feral pigs and native Turkeys) that are attracted in vast numbers to these nutrient hotspots. Seedlings flourished within exclosures inaccessible to vertebrate herbivores, but were rapidly consumed if unprotected. Our results contrast with previous studies of colonies of seabirds on remote islands, where a lack of large terrestrial herbivores results in bird colonies encouraging rather than eliminating vegetation in areas close to the nesting site. In our continental study system, scavengers may rapidly dilute the spatial heterogeneity generated by the massive nutrient subsidy from bird colonies. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  8. Interactive biotic and abiotic regulators of soil carbon cycling: evidence from controlled climate experiments on peatland and boreal soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, María Jesús I; McNamara, Niall P; Poskitt, Jan; Crow, Susan E; Ostle, Nicholas J

    2014-09-01

    Partially decomposed plant and animal remains have been accumulating in organic soils (i.e. >40% C content) for millennia, making them the largest terrestrial carbon store. There is growing concern that, in a warming world, soil biotic processing will accelerate and release greenhouse gases that further exacerbate climate change. However, the magnitude of this response remains uncertain as the constraints are abiotic, biotic and interactive. Here, we examined the influence of resource quality and biological activity on the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration under different soil moisture regimes. Organic soils were sampled from 13 boreal and peatland ecosystems located in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Spain, Finland and Sweden, representing a natural resource quality range of C, N and P. They were incubated at four temperatures (4, 10, 15 and 20 °C) at either 60% or 100% water holding capacity (WHC). Our results showed that chemical and biological properties play an important role in determining soil respiration responses to temperature and moisture changes. High soil C : P and C : N ratios were symptomatic of slow C turnover and long-term C accumulation. In boreal soils, low bacterial to fungal ratios were related to greater temperature sensitivity of respiration, which was amplified in drier conditions. This contrasted with peatland soils which were dominated by bacterial communities and enchytraeid grazing, resulting in a more rapid C turnover under warmer and wetter conditions. The unexpected acceleration of C mineralization under high moisture contents was possibly linked to the primarily role of fermented organic matter, instead of oxygen, in mediating microbial decomposition. We conclude that to improve C model simulations of soil respiration, a better resolution of the interactions occurring between climate, resource quality and the decomposer community will be required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Genetics Underlying Natural Variation in the Biotic Interactions of Arabidopsis thaliana: The Challenges of Linking Evolutionary Genetics and Community Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, F; Bergelson, J

    2016-01-01

    In the context of global change, predicting the responses of plant communities in an ever-changing biotic environment calls for a multipronged approach at the interface of evolutionary genetics and community ecology. However, our understanding of the genetic basis of natural variation involved in mediating biotic interactions, and associated adaptive dynamics of focal plants in their natural communities, is still in its infancy. Here, we review the genetic and molecular bases of natural variation in the response to biotic interactions (viruses, bacteria, fungi, oomycetes, herbivores, and plants) in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana as well as the adaptive value of these bases. Among the 60 identified genes are a number that encode nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-type proteins, consistent with early examples of plant defense genes. However, recent studies have revealed an extensive diversity in the molecular mechanisms of defense. Many types of genetic variants associate with phenotypic variation in biotic interactions, even among the genes of large effect that tend to be identified. In general, we found that (i) balancing selection rather than directional selection explains the observed patterns of genetic diversity within A. thaliana and (ii) the cost/benefit tradeoffs of adaptive alleles can be strongly dependent on both genomic and environmental contexts. Finally, because A. thaliana rarely interacts with only one biotic partner in nature, we highlight the benefit of exploring diffuse biotic interactions rather than tightly associated host-enemy pairs. This challenge would help to improve our understanding of coevolutionary quantitative genetics within the context of realistic community complexity. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotic interactions enhance survival and fitness in the caddisfly Micropterna sequax (Trichoptera

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westveer, Judith J.; Verdonschot, Piet F.M.; Verdonschot, Ralf C.M.

    2018-01-01

    Patches of coarse particulate organic matter in lowland streams are inhabited by many different macroinvertebrate species, yet knowledge of interactions among the members of these assemblages is scarce. In a mesocosm experiment we aimed to determine the effect of interspecific interactions on

  11. Regulation of copper homeostasis and biotic interactions by microRNA 398b in common bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreto Naya

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are recognized as important post-transcriptional regulators in plants. Information about the roles of miRNAs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., an agronomically important legume, is yet scant. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the conserved miRNA: miR398b and its target Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase 1 (CSD1 in common bean. We experimentally validated a novel miR398 target: the stress up-regulated Nodulin 19 (Nod19. Expression analysis of miR398b and target genes -CSD1 and Nod19- in bean roots, nodules and leaves, indicated their role in copper (Cu homeostasis. In bean plants under Cu toxicity miR398b was decreased and Nod19 and CSD1, that participates in reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, were up-regulated. The opposite regulation was observed in Cu deficient bean plants; lower levels of CSD1 would allow Cu delivery to essential Cu-containing proteins. Composite common bean plants with transgenic roots over-expressing miR398 showed ca. 20-fold higher mature miR398b and almost negligible target transcript levels as well as increased anthocyanin content and expression of Cu-stress responsive genes, when subjected to Cu deficiency. The down-regulation of miR398b with the consequent up-regulation of its targets was observed in common bean roots during the oxidative burst resulting from short-time exposure to high Cu. A similar response occurred at early stage of bean roots inoculated with Rhizobium tropici, where an increase in ROS was observed. In addition, the miR398b down-regulation and an increase in CSD1 and Nod19 were observed in bean leaves challenged with Sclerotinia scleortiorum fungal pathogen. Transient over-expression of miR398b in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum resulted in enhanced fungal lesions. We conclude that the miR398b-mediated up-regulation of CSD and Nod19 is relevant for common bean plants to cope with oxidative stress generated in abiotic and biotic

  12. Belowground abiotic and biotic heterogeneity shapes aboveground infection outcomes and spatial divergence in a host–parasite interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ayco J. M.; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Burdon, Jeremy J.; Bissett, Andrew; Thrall, Peter H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We investigated the impact of belowground and aboveground environmental heterogeneity on the ecology and evolution of a natural plant–pathogen interaction.We combined field measurements and a reciprocal inoculation experiment to investigate the potential for natural variation in abiotic and biotic factors to mediate infection outcomes in the association between the fungal pathogen Melampsora lini and its wild flax host, Linum marginale, where pathogen strains and plant lines originated from two ecologically distinct habitat types that occur in close proximity (‘bog’ and ‘hill’).The two habitat types differed strikingly in soil moisture and soil microbiota. Infection outcomes for different host–pathogen combinations were strongly affected by the habitat of origin of the plant lines and pathogen strains, the soil environment and their interactions. Our results suggested that trade-offs play a key role in explaining the evolutionary divergence in interaction traits among the two habitat types.Overall, we demonstrate that soil heterogeneity, by mediating infection outcomes and evolutionary divergence, can contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance and pathogenicity within a natural host-pathogen metapopulation. PMID:25872137

  13. Biotic interactions modify multiple-stressor effects on juvenile brown trout in an experimental stream food web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Andreas; Salis, Romana K; Jones, Peter E; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2017-09-01

    Agricultural land use results in multiple stressors affecting stream ecosystems. Flow reduction due to water abstraction, elevated levels of nutrients and chemical contaminants are common agricultural stressors worldwide. Concurrently, stream ecosystems are also increasingly affected by climate change. Interactions among multiple co-occurring stressors result in biological responses that cannot be predicted from single-stressor effects (i.e. synergisms and antagonisms). At the ecosystem level, multiple-stressor effects can be further modified by biotic interactions (e.g. trophic interactions). We conducted a field experiment using 128 flow-through stream mesocosms to examine the individual and combined effects of water abstraction, nutrient enrichment and elevated levels of the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) on survival, condition and gut content of juvenile brown trout and on benthic abundance of their invertebrate prey. Flow velocity reduction decreased fish survival (-12% compared to controls) and condition (-8% compared to initial condition), whereas effects of nutrient and DCD additions and interactions among these stressors were not significant. Negative effects of flow velocity reduction on fish survival and condition were consistent with effects on fish gut content (-25% compared to controls) and abundance of dominant invertebrate prey (-30% compared to controls), suggesting a negative metabolic balance driving fish mortality and condition decline, which was confirmed by structural equation modelling. Fish mortality under reduced flow velocity increased as maximal daily water temperatures approached the upper limit of their tolerance range, reflecting synergistic interactions between these stressors. Our study highlights the importance of indirect stressor effects such as those transferred through trophic interactions, which need to be considered when assessing and managing fish populations and stream food webs in multiple-stressor situations

  14. Hydrologic, abiotic and biotic interactions: plant density, windspeed, leaf size and groundwater all affect oak water use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin J. Law; Deborah M. Finch

    2011-01-01

    Plant water use in drylands can be complex due to variation in hydrologic, abiotic and biotic factors, particularly near ephemeral or intermittent streams. Plant use of groundwater may be important but is usually uncertain. Disturbances like fire contribute to complex spatiotemporal heterogeneity. Improved understanding of how such hydrologic, abiotic, and biotic...

  15. Synergistic interactions of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Ianina; McLeod, Anne M; Colbourne, John K; Yan, Norman D; Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-03-01

    Understanding the response of organisms to multiple stressors is critical for predicting if populations can adapt to rapid environmental change. Natural and anthropogenic stressors often interact, complicating general predictions. In this study, we examined the interactive and cumulative effects of two common environmental stressors, lowered calcium concentration, an anthropogenic stressor, and predator presence, a natural stressor, on the water flea Daphnia pulex. We analyzed expression changes of five genes involved in calcium homeostasis - cuticle proteins (Cutie, Icp2), calbindin (Calb), and calcium pump and channel (Serca and Ip3R) - using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) in a full factorial experiment. We observed strong synergistic interactions between low calcium concentration and predator presence. While the Ip3R gene was not affected by the stressors, the other four genes were affected in their transcriptional levels by the combination of the stressors. Transcriptional patterns of genes that code for cuticle proteins (Cutie and Icp2) and a sarcoplasmic calcium pump (Serca) only responded to the combination of stressors, changing their relative expression levels in a synergistic response, while a calcium-binding protein (Calb) responded to low calcium stress and the combination of both stressors. The expression pattern of these genes (Cutie, Icp2, and Serca) were nonlinear, yet they were dose dependent across the calcium gradient. Multiple stressors can have complex, often unexpected effects on ecosystems. This study demonstrates that the dominant interaction for the set of tested genes appears to be synergism. We argue that gene expression patterns can be used to understand and predict the type of interaction expected when organisms are exposed simultaneously to natural and anthropogenic stressors.

  16. Electron-molecule interactions and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Christophorou, L G

    1984-01-01

    Electron-Molecule Interactions and Their Applications, Volume 2 provides a balanced and comprehensive account of electron-molecule interactions in dilute and dense gases and liquid media. This book consists of six chapters. Chapter 1 deals with electron transfer reactions, while Chapter 2 discusses electron-molecular positive-ion recombination. The electron motion in high-pressure gases and electron-molecule interactions from single- to multiple-collision conditions is deliberated in Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, knowledge on electron-molecule interactions in gases is linked to that on similar proc

  17. Study of toxicity and uptake of nanoparticles towards understanding biotic-abiotic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaraju, Karshak

    With the rapid growth in nanotechnology and tremendous applications the engineered nanomaterials (ENs) offer, there is increase in usage of ENs which increases their likelihood of coming in contact with biological systems which include complex beings like humans and other relatively simpler organism like bacteria and other microorganisms. The interaction between the nanomaterials (NMs) and biological systems includes the formation of protein coronas, particle wrapping, intracellular uptake and bio catalytic processes which could have biocompatible or bio adverse outcomes. Understanding these interactions allows the development of predictive relationships between structure and activity that are mainly determined by NM properties such as size, shape, surface chemistry, aggregation, and surface functionality among many others. This understanding will also provide insight towards the design and development of benign nanomaterials. The overarching goal of this dissertation is to understand the influence of the physicochemical characteristics of the NMs and their influence on their uptake and toxicity when they interact with the biological systems (cells and organs). For this purpose, thoroughly characterized NMs will be exposed to a cellular model, A549 cells (alveolar lung epithelial cells), and a mice model (CD-1 mice) through inhalational administration. The effects of NMs on the in vitro and in vivo models will be evaluated by bio- and immuno-chemical methods to understand toxicity, and a combination of analytical spectroscopic and microscopic tools to study uptake. In vivo toxicity assessment will also be performed by using electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements as a tool to study the effects of inhalation of NMs on cardiac response in mice. Through in vivo studies, a novel non-invasive method, Reserve of Refractoriness (RoR), will be introduced as a tool to study cardiotoxicity.

  18. Fire, floods and woody debris: Interactions between biotic and geomorphic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, Jacob; Cowell, C. Mark

    2010-04-01

    Fire and floods interact in the riparian zone as processes that structure plant communities and landforms. Although much of the immediate impact of fire is on the vegetation, fire-related changes in runoff, sediment supply, riparian vegetation, and woody debris volume have ongoing geomorphic impacts on the valley floor. Consequent hydrogeomorphic changes, in turn, affect the composition and distribution of vegetation. This paper reviews these interactions, and provides an example of how fires and floods intersect to supply burnt trees as woody debris. Because the temporal and spatial distribution of woody debris is initially controlled by patterns of tree mortality, ecological disturbances, like fire, can be an important source for pulses of woody debris in riparian systems. To understand these interactions, we examine woody debris inputs 3 years after a wildfire in the riparian gallery forests of the western Transverse Ranges, California. Within our sample of 339 burned stems, snags fell in distinctive patterns: species were variable in susceptibility to falling, and fell at greater rates at sites with greater subsequent flooding. Discordance between the species composition of fallen snags and that of overall burned stems indicates that variability in forest composition must be considered in predicting post-disturbance inputs of woody debris. Variation in snagfall timing among species suggests that woody debris inputs are likely to occur in multiple, sequential pulses after wildfire. The role of flooding is superimposed on this ecological influence, as the timing and spatial variability of floods affect the recruitment of woody debris from the supply of snags created by fire.

  19. Evolutionary history and novel biotic interactions determine plant responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Wooliver

    Full Text Available A major frontier in global change research is predicting how multiple agents of global change will alter plant productivity, a critical component of the carbon cycle. Recent research has shown that plant responses to climate change are phylogenetically conserved such that species within some lineages are more productive than those within other lineages in changing environments. However, it remains unclear how phylogenetic patterns in plant responses to changing abiotic conditions may be altered by another agent of global change, the introduction of non-native species. Using a system of 28 native Tasmanian Eucalyptus species belonging to two subgenera, Symphyomyrtus and Eucalyptus, we hypothesized that productivity responses to abiotic agents of global change (elevated CO2 and increased soil N are unique to lineages, but that novel interactions with a non-native species mediate these responses. We tested this hypothesis by examining productivity of 1 native species monocultures and 2 mixtures of native species with an introduced hardwood plantation species, Eucalyptus nitens, to experimentally manipulated soil N and atmospheric CO2. Consistent with past research, we found that N limits productivity overall, especially in elevated CO2 conditions. However, monocultures of species within the Symphyomyrtus subgenus showed the strongest response to N (gained 127% more total biomass in elevated CO2 conditions, whereas those within the Eucalyptus subgenus did not respond to N. Root:shoot ratio (an indicator of resource use was on average greater in species pairs containing Symphyomyrtus species, suggesting that functional traits important for resource uptake are phylogenetically conserved and explaining the phylogenetic pattern in plant response to changing environmental conditions. Yet, native species mixtures with E. nitens exhibited responses to CO2 and N that differed from those of monocultures, supporting our hypothesis and highlighting that both

  20. Diversification and coevolution in brood pollination mutualisms: Windows into the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembry, David H; Althoff, David M

    2016-10-01

    Brood pollination mutualisms-interactions in which specialized insects are both the pollinators (as adults) and seed predators (as larvae) of their host plants-have been influential study systems for coevolutionary biology. These mutualisms include those between figs and fig wasps, yuccas and yucca moths, leafflowers and leafflower moths, globeflowers and globeflower flies, Silene plants and Hadena and Perizoma moths, saxifrages and Greya moths, and senita cacti and senita moths. The high reciprocal diversity and species-specificity of some of these mutualisms have been cited as evidence that coevolution between plants and pollinators drives their mutual diversification. However, the mechanisms by which these mutualisms diversify have received less attention. In this paper, we review key hypotheses about how these mutualisms diversify and what role coevolution between plants and pollinators may play in this process. We find that most species-rich brood pollination mutualisms show significant phylogenetic congruence at high taxonomic scales, but there is limited evidence for the processes of both cospeciation and duplication, and there are no unambiguous examples known of strict-sense contemporaneous cospeciation. Allopatric speciation appears important across multiple systems, particularly in the insects. Host-shifts appear to be common, and widespread host-shifts by pollinators may displace other pollinator lineages. There is relatively little evidence for a "coevolution through cospeciation" model or that coevolution promotes speciation in these systems. Although we have made great progress in understanding the mechanisms by which brood pollination mutualisms diversify, many opportunities remain to use these intriguing symbioses to understand the role of biotic interactions in generating biological diversity. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  1. Application of the biotic ligand model to explain potassium interaction with thallium uptake and toxicity to plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Christel S; Chafin, Ryan D; Klinger, Mary Beth; Twiss, Michael R

    2007-06-01

    Competitive interaction between TI(I) and K was successfully predicted by the biotic ligand model (BLM) for the microalga Chlorella sp. (Chlorophyta; University of Toronto Culture Collection strain 522) during 96-h toxicity tests. Because of a greater affinity of T1(I) (log K = 7.3-7.4) as compared to K (log K = 5.3-6.3) for biologically sensitive sites, an excess of 40- to 160-fold of K is required to suppress T1(I) toxic effects on Chlorella sp., regardless of [T1(I)] in solution. Similar excess of K is required to suppress T1(I) toxicity to Synechococcus leopoliensis (Cyanobacteria; University of Texas Culture Collection strain 625) and Brachionus calyciflorus (Rotifera; strain AB-RIF). The mechanism for the mitigating effect of K on T1(I) toxicity was investigated by measuring 204T1(I) cellular uptake flux and efflux in Chlorella sp. Potassium shows a competitive effect on T1(I) uptake fluxes that could be modeled using the BLM-derived stability constants and a Michaelis-Menten relationship. A strong T1 efflux dependent only on the cellular T1 concentration was measured. Although T1 efflux does not explain the effect of K on T1(I) toxicity and uptake, it is responsible for a high turnover of the cellular T1 pool (intracellular half-life = 12-13.5 min). No effect of Na+, Mg2+, or Ca2+ was observed on T1+ uptake, whereas the absence of trace metals (Cu, Co, Mo, Mn, Fe, and Zn) significantly increased T1 uptake and decreased the mitigating effect of K+. The importance of K+ in determining the aquatic toxicity of T1+ underscores the use of ambient K+ concentration in the establishment of T1 water-quality guidelines and the need to consider K in predicting biogeochemical fates of T1 in the aquatic environment.

  2. Interactions among biotic and abiotic factors affect the reliability of tungsten microneedles puncturing in vitro and in vivo peripheral nerves: A hybrid computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergi, Pier Nicola; Jensen, Winnie; Yoshida, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten is an elective material to produce slender and stiff microneedles able to enter soft tissues and minimize puncture wounds. In particular, tungsten microneedles are used to puncture peripheral nerves and insert neural interfaces, bridging the gap between the nervous system and robotic devices (e.g., hand prostheses). Unfortunately, microneedles fail during the puncture process and this failure is not dependent on stiffness or fracture toughness of the constituent material. In addition, the microneedles' performances decrease during in vivo trials with respect to the in vitro ones. This further effect is independent on internal biotic effects, while it seems to be related to external biotic causes. Since the exact synergy of phenomena decreasing the in vivo reliability is still not known, this work explored the connection between in vitro and in vivo behavior of tungsten microneedles through the study of interactions between biotic and abiotic factors. A hybrid computational approach, simultaneously using theoretical relationships and in silico models of nerves, was implemented to model the change of reliability varying the microneedle diameter, and to predict in vivo performances by using in vitro reliability and local differences between in vivo and in vitro mechanical response of nerves. - Highlights: • We provide phenomenological Finite Element (FE) models of peripheral nerves to study the interactions with W microneedles • We provide a general interaction-based approach to model the reliability of slender microneedles • We evaluate the reliability of W microneedels to puncture in vivo nerves • We provide a novel synergistic hybrid approach (theory + simulations) involving interactions among biotic and abiotic factors • We validate the hybrid approach by using experimental data from literature

  3. Interactions among biotic and abiotic factors affect the reliability of tungsten microneedles puncturing in vitro and in vivo peripheral nerves: A hybrid computational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, Pier Nicola, E-mail: p.sergi@sssup.it [Translational Neural Engineering Laboratory, The Biorobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, Pontedera, 56025 (Italy); Jensen, Winnie [Department of Health Science and Technology, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Yoshida, Ken [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, 723 W. Michigan St., SL220, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten is an elective material to produce slender and stiff microneedles able to enter soft tissues and minimize puncture wounds. In particular, tungsten microneedles are used to puncture peripheral nerves and insert neural interfaces, bridging the gap between the nervous system and robotic devices (e.g., hand prostheses). Unfortunately, microneedles fail during the puncture process and this failure is not dependent on stiffness or fracture toughness of the constituent material. In addition, the microneedles' performances decrease during in vivo trials with respect to the in vitro ones. This further effect is independent on internal biotic effects, while it seems to be related to external biotic causes. Since the exact synergy of phenomena decreasing the in vivo reliability is still not known, this work explored the connection between in vitro and in vivo behavior of tungsten microneedles through the study of interactions between biotic and abiotic factors. A hybrid computational approach, simultaneously using theoretical relationships and in silico models of nerves, was implemented to model the change of reliability varying the microneedle diameter, and to predict in vivo performances by using in vitro reliability and local differences between in vivo and in vitro mechanical response of nerves. - Highlights: • We provide phenomenological Finite Element (FE) models of peripheral nerves to study the interactions with W microneedles • We provide a general interaction-based approach to model the reliability of slender microneedles • We evaluate the reliability of W microneedels to puncture in vivo nerves • We provide a novel synergistic hybrid approach (theory + simulations) involving interactions among biotic and abiotic factors • We validate the hybrid approach by using experimental data from literature.

  4. The net effect of abiotic conditions and biotic interactions in a semi-arid ecosystem NE Spain: implications for the management and restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, Yolanda; Arroyo, Antonio I.; Saiz, Hugo; Alados, Concepción L.

    2014-05-01

    Degradation in arid and semiarid lands can be irreversible without human intervention, due to a positive plant-soil feedback where the loss of vegetation cover leads to soil degradation, which in turn hampers plant establishment. Human intervention in restoration actions usually involves the amendment of the degraded abiotic conditions, revegetation of bare areas, or both. However, abiotic amelioration is often expensive and too intrusive, and revegetation is not successful in many cases. Biotic interactions between plants, and more specifically facilitation by a "nurse" plant, have been proposed as a new via to take profit of improved abiotic conditions without intervention, and to increase the success rate of revegetation actions. But "nurse" plants can also interfere with others (i.e. by competition for resources or the release of allelopathic compounds), and the net balance between facilitation and interference could depend on plant types involved. We present recent observational and experimental studies performed in the semiarid ecosystems of the Middle Ebro Valley (NE Spain) about the role of abiotic conditions and biotic interactions in the productivity, dynamics and diversity of plant communities under different stress conditions (aridity and grazing). We found that all plant types studied (shrubs and perennial grasses) improved abiotic conditions (soil temperature and water availability for plants) with respect to open areas. However, only some shrubs (mainly Salsola vermiculata) had a positive net balance in the biotic interactions between plants, while other shrubs (Artemisia herba-alba) and perennial grasses (Lygeum spartum) showed interference with other plants. Moreover, the net balance between facilitation and interference among plants in the community shifted from competitive to neutral or from neutral to facilitative with increasing aridity. Grazing status did not strongly change the net biotic interactions between plants. Our results suggest that

  5. A family of null models to distinguish between environmental filtering and biotic interactions in functional diversity patterns

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chalmandrier, L.; Münkemüller, T.; Gallien, L.; de Bello, Francesco; Mazel, F.; Lavergne, S.; Thuiller, W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2013), 853-864 ISSN 1100-9233 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP505/12/1296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Nullmodels * Simulated communities * Biotic and abiotic filtering Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.372, year: 2013

  6. Electron-phonon interactions from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustino, Feliciano

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews the theory of electron-phonon interactions in solids from the point of view of ab initio calculations. While the electron-phonon interaction has been studied for almost a century, predictive nonempirical calculations have become feasible only during the past two decades. Today it is possible to calculate from first principles many materials properties related to the electron-phonon interaction, including the critical temperature of conventional superconductors, the carrier mobility in semiconductors, the temperature dependence of optical spectra in direct and indirect-gap semiconductors, the relaxation rates of photoexcited carriers, the electron mass renormalization in angle-resolved photoelectron spectra, and the nonadiabatic corrections to phonon dispersion relations. In this article a review of the theoretical and computational framework underlying modern electron-phonon calculations from first principles as well as landmark investigations of the electron-phonon interaction in real materials is given. The first part of the article summarizes the elementary theory of electron-phonon interactions and their calculations based on density-functional theory. The second part discusses a general field-theoretic formulation of the electron-phonon problem and establishes the connection with practical first-principles calculations. The third part reviews a number of recent investigations of electron-phonon interactions in the areas of vibrational spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, optical spectroscopy, transport, and superconductivity.

  7. The Electron Transport Chain: An Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Chris; Choun, James

    2014-01-01

    This activity provides students an interactive demonstration of the electron transport chain and chemiosmosis during aerobic respiration. Students use simple, everyday objects as hydrogen ions and electrons and play the roles of the various proteins embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane to show how this specific process in cellular…

  8. Noncovalent Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Ravva, Mahesh Kumar

    2017-06-29

    In this chapter, we provide an overview of how noncovalent interactions, determined by the chemical structure of π-conjugated molecules and polymers, govern essential aspects of the electronic, optical, and mechanical characteristics of organic semiconductors. We begin by describing general aspects of materials design, including the wide variety of chemistries exploited to control the electronic and optical properties of these materials. We then discuss explicit examples of how the study of noncovalent interactions can provide deeper chemical insights that can improve the design of new generations of organic electronic materials.

  9. Analytical local electron-electron interaction model potentials for atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neugebauer, Johannes; Reiher, Markus; Hinze, Juergen

    2002-01-01

    Analytical local potentials for modeling the electron-electron interaction in an atom reduce significantly the computational effort in electronic structure calculations. The development of such potentials has a long history, but some promising ideas have not yet been taken into account for further improvements. We determine a local electron-electron interaction potential akin to those suggested by Green et al. [Phys. Rev. 184, 1 (1969)], which are widely used in atom-ion scattering calculations, electron-capture processes, and electronic structure calculations. Generalized Yukawa-type model potentials are introduced. This leads, however, to shell-dependent local potentials, because the origin behavior of such potentials is different for different shells as has been explicated analytically [J. Neugebauer, M. Reiher, and J. Hinze, Phys. Rev. A 65, 032518 (2002)]. It is found that the parameters that characterize these local potentials can be interpolated and extrapolated reliably for different nuclear charges and different numbers of electrons. The analytical behavior of the corresponding localized Hartree-Fock potentials at the origin and at long distances is utilized in order to reduce the number of fit parameters. It turns out that the shell-dependent form of Green's potential, which we also derive, yields results of comparable accuracy using only one shell-dependent parameter

  10. Above- and Belowground Trophic Interactions on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) in High- and Low-Diversity Plant Communities: Potential for Biotic Resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Graça, O.; Rousseau, P.; Van der Putten, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of local communities to control introduced plants is called biotic resistance. Biotic resistance has been almost exclusively tested for plant competition and aboveground herbivores and pathogens, while neglecting root herbivores and soil pathogens. Here, we present biotic resistance by

  11. Above- and Belowground Trophic Interactions on Creeping Thistle (Cirsium arvense) in High- and Low-Diversity Plant Communities: Potential for Biotic Resistance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer, T.M.; Graça, O.; Rousseau, P.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2004-01-01

    The capacity of local communities to control introduced plants is called biotic resistance. Biotic resistance has been almost exclusively tested for plant competition and above-ground herbivores and pathogens, while neglecting root herbivores and soil pathogens. Here, we present biotic resistance by

  12. Electron-electron interactions in bilayer graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarenia, M.; Partoens, B.; Chakraborty, T.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    A parabolic quantum dot (QD) as realized by biasing nanostructured gates on bilayer graphene is investigated in the presence of electron-electron interaction. The energy spectrum and the phase diagram reveal unexpected transitions as a function of a magnetic field. For example, in contrast to semiconductor QDs, we find a valley transition rather than only the usual singlet-triplet transition in the ground state of the interacting system. The origin of these features can be traced to the valley degree of freedom in bilayer graphene. These transitions have important consequences for cyclotron resonance experiments.

  13. Interactions of electrons with biologically important molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pisklova, K.; Papp, P.; Stano, M.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of interactions of low-energy electrons with the molecules in the gas phase, the authors used electron-molecule cross-beam apparatus. The experiment is carried out in high vacuum, where molecules of the tested compound are inducted through a capillary. For purposes of this experiment the sample was electrically heated to 180 Deg C., giving a bundle of GlyGly molecules into the gas phase. The resulting signals can be evaluated in two different modes: mass spectrum - at continuous electron energy (e.g. 100 eV) they obtained the signal of intensity of the ions according to their mass to charge ratio; ionization and resonance spectra - for selected ion mass when the authors received the signal of intensity of the ions, depending on the energy of interacting electron.

  14. Drought as a modifier of interaction between adult beech and spruce - impacts on tree water use, C budgets and biotic interactions above- and belowground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Understanding biotic interactions among tree species with their microbial associates under drought will be crucial for silviculture in meeting ecological challenges of the future. This contribution gives an overview on a project integrating a throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE) on adult trees with a natural precipitation gradient (PGR) in central European forests. Focus is on drought affecting species interaction above and belowground, including associated ectomycorrhizal (ECM) communities. Study objects are pure and mixed forests dominated by adult European beech and Norway spruce trees (c. 70-years old). At the throughfall-exclusion experiment (TEE), trees are readily accessible via scaffolding and canopy crane (Kranzberg Forest, southern Germany). Effects of experimentally induced, repeated summer drought are assessed with roughly 100 trees assigned to a total of 12 plots (Kranzberg forest ROOF experiment, kroof.wzw.tum.de). The summer drought treatment started in 2014 and was repeated in 2015 and 2106. The focus on species interaction is intensified by a parallel study along a natural precipitation gradient with plot triplets of monocultures and mixed cultures of European beech and Norway spruce at each of the five study sites. Complementary resource use, effects of competitive vs. facilitation and related changes in ECM communities are exemplified for the two tree species of contrasting foliage (i.e. deciduous vs. evergreen) and stomatal sensitivity to drought (i.e. an-isohydric vs. isohydric behavior). At the TEE site, precipitation throughfall was completely excluded from early spring to late fall (i.e. March to November), resulting in pre-dawn leaf water potentials of both beech and spruce as low as -2.5 MPa. Despite significant reductions in growth and rate of photosynthesis by up to 80% under drought, NSC budget of trees was hardly affected. Moreover, phloem functionality, tested as phloem transport velocity through 13C-labeling of recent

  15. Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2002-08-16

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions was held at Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, 8/11-16/02. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field.

  16. Magnetic impurity coupled to interacting conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schork, T.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a magnetic impurity which interacts by hybridization with a system of weakly correlated electrons and determine the energy of the ground state by means of a 1/N f expansion. The correlations among the conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard Hamiltonian and are treated to the lowest order in the interaction strength. We find that their effect on the Kondo temperature, T K , in the Kondo limit is twofold: first, the position of the impurity level is shifted due to the reduction of charge fluctuations, which reduces T K . Secondly, the bare Kondo exchange coupling is enhanced as spin fluctuations are enlarged. In total, T K increases. Both corrections require intermediate states beyond the standard Varma-Yafet ansatz. This shows that the Hubbard interaction does not just provide quasiparticles, which hybridize with the impurity, but also renormalizes the Kondo coupling. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  17. Below-ground abiotic and biotic heterogeneity shapes above-ground infection outcomes and spatial divergence in a host-parasite interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ayco J M; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Burdon, Jeremy J; Bissett, Andrew; Thrall, Peter H

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the impact of below-ground and above-ground environmental heterogeneity on the ecology and evolution of a natural plant-pathogen interaction. We combined field measurements and a reciprocal inoculation experiment to investigate the potential for natural variation in abiotic and biotic factors to mediate infection outcomes in the association between the fungal pathogen Melampsora lini and its wild flax host, Linum marginale, where pathogen strains and plant lines originated from two ecologically distinct habitat types that occur in close proximity ('bog' and 'hill'). The two habitat types differed strikingly in soil moisture and soil microbiota. Infection outcomes for different host-pathogen combinations were strongly affected by the habitat of origin of the plant lines and pathogen strains, the soil environment and their interactions. Our results suggested that tradeoffs play a key role in explaining the evolutionary divergence in interaction traits among the two habitat types. Overall, we demonstrate that soil heterogeneity, by mediating infection outcomes and evolutionary divergence, can contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance and pathogenicity within a natural host-pathogen metapopulation. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Predicting species distribution and abundance responses to climate change: why it is essential to include biotic interactions across trophic levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Putten, W.H.; Macel, M.; Visser, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Current predictions on species responses to climate change strongly rely on projecting altered environmental conditions on species distributions. However, it is increasingly acknowledged that climate change also influences species interactions. We review and synthesize literature information on

  19. Interaction of rock, water, and plants in central Siberia (Russia) dominated by continuous permafrost: biotic versus abiotic fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J.; Pokrovsky, O. S.; Prokushkin, A. S.; Beaulieu, E.; Dupre, B.

    2009-12-01

    -ground biomass in this region. We analyzed large number of soils, larch needles, mosses, dwarf shrubs and waters (from soils and rivers) collected in the various local environments. Plant biomass was regularly collected from May to September 2007. Our efforts focus on weathering processes and elements transport mechanisms between the different chemical reservoirs (soil and litter, plants, atmosphere) using a multidisciplinary approach. The aim of the presentation is : i) to propose a conceptual model of the present-day “biogeochemical” functioning of basaltic watershed located in central Siberia, ii) to evaluate biotic and abiotic element fluxes from the watershed, and iii) to assess the effect of global warming through the local comparison of the north-facing and south-facing environments. The role of plants dominated by larches, dwarf shrubs and mosses will be particularly considered.

  20. Process-based species pools reveal the hidden signature of biotic interactions amid the influence of temperature filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Weinstein, Ben G.; Borregaard, Michael Krabbe

    2016-01-01

    A persistent challenge in ecology is to tease apart the in-fluence of multiple processes acting simultaneously and interacting in complex ways to shape the structure of species assemblages. We implement a heuristic approach that relies on explicitly defining spe-cies pools and permits assessment ...

  1. Three-way interaction between biological control insects, a congener and their shared parasitoid: Evidence of biotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invasive plants are one of the strongest drivers of species extinctions. Weed biological control offers a sustainable and safe means of long-term population reduction of their target. Herbivores introduced for the control of invasive plants interact with the native community in addition to the top-d...

  2. Runaway-electron-materials interaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolt, H.; Miyahara, A.

    1990-03-01

    During the operation of magnetic fusion devices it has been frequently observed that runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components. The energy of the runaway electrons could possibly reach several 100 MeV in a next generation device with an energy content in the plasma in the order of 100 MJ. In this study effects of high energy electron - materials interaction were determined by laboratory experiments using particle beam facilities, i.e. the Electron Linear Accelerator of the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research of Osaka University and the 10 MW Neutral Beam Injection Test Stand of the National Institute for Fusion Science. The experiments and further analyses lead to a first assessment of the damage thresholds of plasma facing materials and components under runaway electron impact. It was found that metals (stainless steel, molybdenum, tungsten) showed grain growth, crack formation and/or melting already below the threshold for crack initiation on graphite (14-33 MJ/m 2 ). Strong erosion of carbon materials would occur above 100 MJ/m 2 . Damage to metal coolant channels can occur already below an energy deposition of 100 MJ/m 2 . The energy deposited in the metal coolant channels depends on the thickness of the plasma facing carbon material D, with the shielding efficiency S of carbon approximately as S∼D 1.15 . (author) 304 refs. 12 tabs. 59 figs

  3. Gas–Electron Interaction in the ETEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Beleggia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Imaging in a differential pumped environmental TEM (ETEM) results in general in a degradation of the image quality. Scattering of electrons by gas molecules in the pressurized volume between the pole pieces blurs the image and decreases the signal-to-noise ratio of the acquired images. The somewhat...... simple picture of a plane wave interacting with the sample of interest is no longer valid. Furthermore, the exit wave from the sample is altered by scattering events taking place after the sample in the direction of propagation. In this chapter, the effect of the increased gas pressure between the pole...... pieces in an aberration-corrected highresolution transmission electron microscope is discussed in order to shine some light on the additional phenomena occurring in ETEM compared to conventional HRTEM. Both direct effects on the image quality and more indirect effects rising from gas ionization...

  4. Interaction of electron neutrino with LSD detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazhskaya, O. G.; Semenov, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of electron neutrino flux, originating in the rotational collapse mechanism on the first stage of Supernova burst, with the LSD detector components, such as 56Fe (a large amount of this metal is included in as shielding material) and liquid scintillator barNnH2n+2, is being investigated. Both charged and neutral channels of neutrino reaction with 12barN and 56Fe are considered. Experimental data, giving the possibility to extract information for nuclear matrix elements calculation are used. The number of signals, produced in LSD by the neutrino pulse of Supernova 1987A is determined. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  5. Interacting Flatland Electrons Never Stop Surprising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayegan, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    I will present the highlights of several new magneto-transport experiments that probe the physics of interacting two-dimensional (2D) electrons (or holes) at high magnetic fields and low temperatures. These include: (1) observation of rare fractional quantum Hall states at even-denominator (1/2) filling factor in 2D hole systems at an unusual crossing of the two lowest Landau levels; (2) tuning and measuring the shape and anisotropy of the composite fermion (CF) Fermi contours, and (3) data suggesting that CFs themselves can be interacting and form their own fractional quantum Hall and Wigner solid states. I will also discuss a bilayer experiment where the CFs in one layer are used to probe an electron Wigner solid in the other layer. (Work done in collaboration with Yang Liu, D. Kamburov, M.A. Mueed, S. Hasdemir, I. Jo, H. Deng, L.N. Pfeiffer, K.W. West, and K.W. Baldwin. Supported by the NSF, DOE, Keck, and Moore Foundations.)

  6. NV-NV electron-electron spin and NV-N S electron - electron and electron-nuclear spin interaction in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Seiji; Rogers, Lachlan J.; McMurtrie, Roger L.; Manson, Neil B.

    2010-02-01

    Features associated with the cross relaxation between spin of the ground electric state of the nitrogen vacancy centre (NV) and other impurity spins, mainly substitutional nitrogen, NS, are observed as changes of the emission intensity as a function of external magnetic field. The features are attributed to NV-NV electron-electron spin interaction, NV- NS electron-nuclear spin interaction and NV electron spin interaction with simultaneous change of an NS electron and nuclear spin change.

  7. Study of electron-positron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-09-15

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model.

  8. Study of electron-positron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Philonen, L.

    1990-01-01

    For the past seven years, this group has been interested in the study of tests of the Standard Model of Electroweak interactions. The program has centered about the AMY experiment which examines the nature of the final state products in electron-positron collisions in the center of mass energy range near 60 GeV. Results of these measurements have shown a remarkable consistency with the predictions of the minimal model of 3 quark and lepton generations and single charged and neutral intermediate bosons. No new particles or excited states have been observed nor has any evidence for departures in cross sections or angular asymmetries from expectations been observed. These conclusions have been even more firmly established by the higher energy results from the LEP and SLC colliders at center of mass energies of about 90 GeV. Our focus is shifting to the neutrino as a probe to electroweak interactions. The relative merit of attempting to observe neutrinos from point sources versus observing neutrinos generally is not easy to predict. The improved ability to interpret is offset by the probably episodic nature of the emission and irreproducibility of the results. In this phase of development, it is best to be sensitive to both sources of neutrinos. As a second phase of our program at Virginia Tech, we are studying the feasibility of detecting cosmic ray neutrinos in a proposed experiment which we have called NOVA. the results of the test setup will be instrumental in developing an optimum design. A third program we are involved in is the MEGA experiment at Los Alamos, an experiment to place a limit on the rate of muon decay to electron plus photon which is forbidden by the Standard Model

  9. Interaction effects in liquids with low electron densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, W.W. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The author discusses two complementary classes of systems in which strong electron-electron or electron-ion interactions appear at low electron densities. The first are the expanded liquid alkali metals (cesium) in which electron correlation effects have a profound effect on the magnetic properties on the metallic side of the metal-nonmetal transition. The second group are molten alkali halides containing low densities of localized electrons introduced, say, by dissolution of small amounts of excess metal. (Auth.)

  10. Limits to Electron Beam Emittance from Stochastic Coulomb Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Wan, Weishi

    2008-08-22

    Dense electron beams can now be generated on an ultrafast timescale using laser driven photo-cathodes and these are used for a range of applications from ultrafast electron defraction to free electron lasers. Here we determine a lower bound to the emittance of an electron beam limited by fundamental stochastic Coulomb interactions.

  11. Study of electron and neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers-in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  12. Electron-electron interactions in graphene field-induced quantum dots in a high magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlof, A.; Shylau, Artsem; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of electron-electron interaction in graphene quantum dots defined by an external electrostatic potential and a high magnetic field. To account for the electron-electron interaction, we use the Thomas-Fermi approximation and find that electron screening causes the formation...... of compressible strips in the potential profile and the electron density. We numerically solve the Dirac equations describing the electron dynamics in quantum dots, and we demonstrate that compressible strips lead to the appearance of plateaus in the electron energies as a function of the magnetic field. Finally...

  13. Electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Havener, C.C.; Hughes, I.G.; Overbury, S.H.; Robinson, M.T.; Zehner, D.M.; Meyer, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    The electron emission during multicharged ion-metal surface interactions will be discussed. The interactions lead to the emission of a significant number of electrons. Most of these electrons have energies below 30 eV. For incident ions with innershell vacancies the emission of Auger electrons that fill these vacancies has been found to occur mainly below the surface. We will present recently measured electron energy distributions which will be used to discuss the mechanisms that lead to the emission of Auger and of low-energy electrons

  14. Theoretical study of the interplay of electron-electron interaction and disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezini, A.; Behilil, S.

    1988-10-01

    A disordered Hubbard model with diagonal disorder is used to investigate the electron localization effects associated with both disorder and electron-electron interaction. Extensive results are reported on the ground state properties and compared to other theories. Two regimes have been found: when the electron-electron interaction u is greater than the disorder parameter w and when u < w. (author). 18 refs, 4 figs

  15. Effects of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foley, Simon Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the role of electron-electron interactions on electronic transport in disordered systems. We first consider a novel non-linear sigma model in order to microscopically treat the effects of disorder and electronic interaction. We successfully reproduce the perturbative results for the zero-bias anomaly and the interaction correction to the conductivity in a weakly disordered system, and discuss possible directions for future work. Secondly we consider the fluctuations of the dephasing rate for a closed diffusive and quantum dot system. Using the Keldysh technique we derive an expression for the inelastic scattering rate with which we self-consistently obtain the fluctuations in the dephasing rate. For the diffusive regime we find the relative fluctuations is given by F ∼ (L φ /L) 2 /g 2 , where g is the dimensionless conductance, L φ is the dephasing length and L is the sample size. For the quantum dot regime we find a perturbative divergence due to the presence of the zero mode. By mapping divergent diagrams to those for the two-level correlation function, we conjecture the existence of an exact relation between the two. Finally we discuss the consequences of this relation. (author)

  16. Electron interactions with nuclei. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    Research includes work at SLAC, Bates, and Saclay research facilities. The high energy program at SLAC concerns inclusive electron scattering from nuclei, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, and the design of an electron detection system for the SLAC 1.6 GeV/c magnetic spectrometer. The high energy program at Bates includes quasielastic electron scattering from 1 H, 2 H, 3 He, and 4 He, and electron scattering from 3 H and 3 He. Nuclear structure studies are based on high resolution inelastic electron scattering and include electron scattering from 208 Pb and mercury isotopes, charge densities from low lying states in 86 Sr, and magnetization densities of 205 Tl and 207 Pb. (DWL) 72 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab

  17. Spectroscopic Studies of the Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The electron donor-acceptor interaction between drugs which act as electron donors and some electron-deficient compounds (π acceptors) has severally been utilized as an analytical tool for the quantitation and qualitative assessment of such drugs. The objective of this study, therefore, was to develop an assay ...

  18. Interactions of Microwaves and Electron Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    The modification of microwave signals passing through an electron cloud can be used as a diagnostic tool for detecting its presence and as a measure for its effective density. This observation method was demonstrated in pioneering measurements at the CERN SPS in 2003 with protons and at PEP-II in 2006 with positron beams in the particle accelerator field. Results and applications of this technique are discussed as well as limitations and possible difficulties. A strong enhancement of the electron related signals due to cyclotron resonance is theoretically predicted and has been observed in different machines. The application of this method can also be extended for space applications and plasma physics where microwave diagnostics is known and used since many years. The question whether suitably chosen microwaves might also be employed for electron-cloud suppression will be addressed. An electron cloud may also emit microwaves itself and the intensity of this emission depends on external parameters such as the ...

  19. Muon: electron final states in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, eight candidates for the reaction ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything were observed with a total background of 1.5 +- 0.6 events. The detector consisted of twenty-eight optical spark chambers interspersed with liquid and plastic scintillation counters. Events classified as muon--electron final states are required to have a long noninteracting straight track in conjunction with an electromagnetic shower characteristic of that produced by an electron. Background processes are discussed and the total muon--electron background calculated. The ratio of the number of muon--electron candidates to all charged current events, corrected for the percentage of the neutrino beam above threshold is R' = [sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything)]/[sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + anything)] greater than or approximately 10 -2 . 47 references

  20. Interactivity in an Electronically Delivered Marketing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    In a marketing course delivered using Lotus Notes, 32 students were randomly assigned to large or small groups with heavy or light coaching. No differences in interactivity appeared related to group size or gender. More coaching increased the quantity, not quality, of interactivity. Quality seemed to decrease as quantity increased. (Contains 35…

  1. Interaction Between Electrons, Magnons and Phonons in Nickel. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frikkee, E.

    1971-02-01

    By means of inelastic neutron scattering, a localized electron excitation was observed in Ni and (4% Fe). The excitation interacts with magnons and phonons, and is assumed to correspond with transitions between the nearly-degenerate electronstates Δ 6 ↑ and Δ 7 ↑ near X, which are situated just below the Fermi level.Selection rules for electron-phonon and electronmagnon scattering are determined by means of group theory. It is found that in particular the transverse (Δ 5 ) phonons in the [100] direction are perturbed. The observed neutron-electron scattering turns out to be an indirect process, which is only possible due to the interaction between the (Δ 6 , Δ 7 ) electrons and the lattice. The basic mechanism for the observed effects is the electron spin-orbit coupling, which establishes the interaction between the electron spin system and the lattice. (author)

  2. Writing an Electronic Astronomy Book with Interactive Curricular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kristen L.; Belloni, Mario; Christian, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    With the rise of tablets, the past few years have seen an increase in the demand for quality electronic textbooks. Unfortunately, most of the current offerings do not exploit the accessibility and interactivity that electronic books can deliver. In this poster, we discuss how we are merging our curriculum development projects (Physlets, Easy Java/JavaScript Simulations, and Open Source Physics) with the EPUB electronic book format to develop an interactive textbook for use in a one-semester introductory astronomy course. The book, Astronomy: An Interactive Introduction, combines the narrative, equations, and images of a traditional astronomy text with new JavaScript simulations.

  3. RKKY interaction for the spin-polarized electron gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Mohammad M.; Satpathy, Sashi

    2015-11-01

    We extend the original work of Ruderman, Kittel, Kasuya and Yosida (RKKY) on the interaction between two magnetic moments embedded in an electron gas to the case where the electron gas is spin-polarized. The broken symmetry of a host material introduces the Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya (DM) vector and tensor interaction terms, in addition to the standard RKKY term, so that the net interaction energy has the form ℋ = JS1 ṡS2 + D ṡS1 ×S2 + S1 ṡΓ ↔ṡS2. We find that for the spin-polarized electron gas, a nonzero tensor interaction Γ ↔ is present in addition to the scalar RKKY interaction J, while D is zero due to the presence of inversion symmetry. Explicit expressions for these are derived for the electron gas both in 2D and 3D and we show that the net magnetic interaction can be expressed as a sum of Heisenberg and Ising like terms. The RKKY interaction exhibits a beating pattern, caused by the presence of the two Fermi momenta kF↑ and kF↓, while the R-3 distance dependence of the original RKKY result for the 3D electron gas is retained. This model serves as a simple example of the magnetic interaction in systems with broken symmetry, which goes beyond the RKKY interaction.

  4. Electron interactions with nuclei: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, J.S.

    1987-08-01

    High energy is being conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This includes inclusive electron scattering, electroexcitation of the delta in nuclei, longitudinal and transverse response in the quasi-elastic region, the q 2 dependence of 4 He(e,e'p), deep inelastic scattering from nuclei, transverse and longitudinal response in the resonance region, nuclear physics at PEP and 1.6 GeV spectrometer properties. Additional high energy research on electron scattering on 3 H and 3 He and the nuclear structure of 205 Tl and 206 Pb are being conducted at MIT-Bates. Other activities are being carried out at Saclay and research and development for Monte Carlo studies of Hall A spectrometers for CEBAF is being conducted

  5. The Electron-Phonon Interaction as Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    With recent advances in energy and angle resolution, the effects of electron-phonon interactions are manifest in many valence-band photoelectron spectra (PES) for states near the Fermi level in metals

  6. Effects of electronic and nuclear interactions in SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audren, A. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons Atomes et Molecules (SPAM), Laboratoire Francis Perrin, Bat. 522, P. 212B, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Monnet, I. [Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux, les Ions et la Photonique (CIMAP), CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, BP 5133, Bd Henri Becquerel, F-14070 Caen cedex 5 (France); Gosset, D. [CEA, DEN, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, 91191 Gif/Yvette cedex (France); Leconte, Y. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons Atomes et Molecules (SPAM), Laboratoire Francis Perrin, Bat. 522, P. 212B, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)], E-mail: Yann.leconte@cea.fr; Portier, X. [Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux, les Ions et la Photonique (CIMAP), CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, BP 5133, Bd Henri Becquerel, F-14070 Caen cedex 5 (France); Thome, L.; Garrido, F. [Centre de Spectroscopie Nucleaire et de Spectroscopie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Universite-Paris-Sud, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Benyagoub, A.; Levalois, M. [Centre de Recherche sur les Materiaux, les Ions et la Photonique (CIMAP), CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN, BP 5133, Bd Henri Becquerel, F-14070 Caen cedex 5 (France); Herlin-Boime, N.; Reynaud, C. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons Atomes et Molecules (SPAM), Laboratoire Francis Perrin, Bat. 522, P. 212B, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2009-03-15

    In this study, we performed irradiation experiments on nanostructured 3C-SiC samples, with 95 MeV Xe ions at room temperature. This energy permits the observation of the combined electronic and nuclear interactions with matter. The grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results do not reveal a complete amorphization, despite value of displacement per atom overcoming the total amorphization threshold. This may be attributed to competing effects between nuclear and electronic energy loss in this material since a total amorphization induced by nuclear interactions was found after low energy ion irradiation (4 MeV Au). Moreover, electronic interactions created by high energy ion irradiations induce no disorder in single crystalline 6H-SiC. But in samples previously disordered by low energy ion implantation (700 keV I), the electronic interactions generate a strong defects recovery.

  7. Electron-electron interactions in the chemical bond:``1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The prominent ``1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of twodimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron-electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effect ...

  8. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electron–electron interactions in lithium metal have been examined keeping in view the recent developments. The contribution of the electron–electron Umklapp scattering processes in the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures has been evaluated using a simplified spherical Fermi surface model with ...

  9. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electron–electron interactions in lithium metal have been examined keeping in view the recent developments. The contribution of the electron–electron Umklapp scattering processes in the electrical resistivity of lithium at low temperatures has been evaluated using a simplified spherical Fermi surface model with ...

  10. Interacting electrons theory and computational approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Richard M; Ceperley, David M

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and computation of electronic structure is bringing an unprecedented level of capability for research. Many-body methods are becoming essential tools vital for quantitative calculations and understanding materials phenomena in physics, chemistry, materials science and other fields. This book provides a unified exposition of the most-used tools: many-body perturbation theory, dynamical mean field theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Each topic is introduced with a less technical overview for a broad readership, followed by in-depth descriptions and mathematical formulation. Practical guidelines, illustrations and exercises are chosen to enable readers to appreciate the complementary approaches, their relationships, and the advantages and disadvantages of each method. This book is designed for graduate students and researchers who want to use and understand these advanced computational tools, get a broad overview, and acquire a basis for participating in new developments.

  11. The Electron-Phonon Interaction in Strongly Correlated Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.; Grilli, M.

    1995-01-01

    We analyze the effect of strong electron-electron repulsion on the electron-phonon interaction from a Fermi-liquid point of view and show that the electron-electron interaction is responsible for vertex corrections, which generically lead to a strong suppression of the electron-phonon coupling in the v F q/ω >>1 region, while such effect is not present when v F q/ω F is the Fermi velocity and q and ω are the transferred momentum and frequency respectively. In particular the e-ph scattering is suppressed in transport properties which are dominated by low-energy-high-momentum processes. On the other hand, analyzing the stability criterion for the compressibility, which involves the effective interactions in the dynamical limit, we show that a sizable electron-phonon interaction can push the system towards a phase-separation instability. Finally a detailed analysis of these ideas is carried out using a slave-boson approach for the infinite-U three-band Hubbard model in the presence of a coupling between the local hole density and a dispersionless optical phonon. (author)

  12. Microwave interaction with hot electron plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.; Fujiwara, M.; Ikegami, H.

    1980-01-01

    A numerical calculation is presented of ray trajectories and cyclotron damping for toroidal plasmas using geometrical optics. In the absorption region, group velocity does not always coincide with the velocity of energy flow, therefore it should be careful to apply the geometrical optics to finite temperature plasmas. In these calculations, attention is paid mainly to the finite temperature effect on ray tracing. Some numerical results for ordinary waves are presented. Second, new cutoff and resonance appear in the plasmas with anisotropic electron temperature. This resonance frequency is shifted from the usual cyclotron resonance by an amount proportional to T 11 /mc 2 , so that one can determine T 11 when this resonance frequency is measured. A simple discussion is given. The results are presented of recent density measurement on Nagoya Bumpy Torus obtained by interferometer system with different frequencies, 35 GHz and 55 GHz. The results are different than each other in T-mode. The possible reasons for these differences are enumerated in this section

  13. Designing Interactive Electronic Module in Chemistry Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwansyah, F. S.; Lubab, I.; Farida, I.; Ramdhani, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to design electronic module (e-module) oriented to the development of students’ chemical literacy on the solution colligative properties material. This research undergoes some stages including concept analysis, discourse analysis, storyboard design, design development, product packaging, validation, and feasibility test. Overall, this research undertakes three main stages, namely, Define (in the form of preliminary studies); Design (designing e-module); Develop (including validation and model trial). The concept presentation and visualization used in this e-module is oriented to chemical literacy skills. The presentation order carries aspects of scientific context, process, content, and attitude. Chemists and multi media experts have done the validation to test the initial quality of the products and give a feedback for the product improvement. The feasibility test results stated that the content presentation and display are valid and feasible to be used with the value of 85.77% and 87.94%. These values indicate that this e-module oriented to students’ chemical literacy skills for the solution colligative properties material is feasible to be used.

  14. Impact of electron-electron Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetissian, H. K.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2018-03-01

    Generation of high harmonics in a monolayer graphene initiated by a strong coherent radiation field, taking into account electron-electron Coulomb interaction, is investigated. A microscopic theory describing the nonlinear optical response of graphene is developed. The Coulomb interaction of electrons is treated in the scope of dynamic Hartree-Fock approximation. The closed set of integrodifferential equations for the single-particle density matrix of a graphene quantum structure is solved numerically. The obtained solutions show the significance of many-body Coulomb interaction on the high harmonic generation process in graphene.

  15. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Effects of electrostatic interactions on electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    The fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulse radiolysis. This technique allows the creation in about 10 -8 second radicals and radical ions with high redox potentials. For solvated electrons electrostatic interaction on the kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is described by Debye's equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from theory can occur in ion pairs formation. This is evidenced experimentally for anions by cation complexation with a cryptate. Relatively slow reactions are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than limited by diffusion. If ion pairs are not formed kinetics constant depends on dielectric constant of solvent and reaction radius. Experimentally is studied the effect of electrostatic interaction on the rate constants of solvated electrons with anions and cations in water-ethanol mixtures where the dielectric constant change from 80 to 25 at room temperature. 17 refs

  17. Probing Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Interaction with Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Jakob

    This thesis is concerned with fundamental research into electronic and magnetic interaction on the nanoscale. From small metallic and magnetic islands and layers to single atoms. The research revolves around magnetic interaction probed through the spectroscopic capabilities of the scanning....... This is related to research in correlated electron materials such as studies of phase transitions in heavy fermion compounds and magnetic interaction in spintronic research. The capping of cobalt islands on Cu(111) with silver is investigated with STM and photoemission spectroscopy. It is shown that at low...... coverage the silver preferably nucleates on top of the bilayer high cobalt islands compared to directly on the Cu(111) substrate. Furthermore, the silver forms a combination of a reconstruction and a Moire pattern which is investigated with low-energy electron diraction and spectroscopic STM mapping at 6...

  18. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy on electron-boson interactions in superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Schackert, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the experimental study of electron-boson interactions in superconductors by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy performed with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) at temperatures below 1 K. This new approach allows the direct measurement of the Eliashberg function of conventional superconductors as demonstrated on lead (Pb) and niobium (Nb). Preparative experiments on unconventional iron-pnictides are presented in the end.

  19. Magnetic impurity in a system of interacting electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huynh Thanh Duc; Nguyen Toan Thang

    1999-04-01

    The Kondo effect of the Anderson impurity in a correlated conduction electron system is studied within the slave boson mean-field theory. The interacting conduction electrons are described by a Hubbard model with an interaction of strength U. It is shown that the Kondo temperature T K decreases with an increase of U. In the intermediate regime at half-filling the exponential scale of the Kondo temperature T K is lost already at the saddle-point level of slave boson formulation. (author)

  20. Regulation of abiotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas Georg

    2016-01-01

    Plant hormones (phytohormones) are signal molecules produced within the plant, and occur in very low concentrations. In the present chapter, the current knowledge on the regulation of biotic and biotic stress responses by plant hormones is summarized with special focus on the novel insights...... into the complex hormonal crosstalk of classical growth stimulating plant hormones within the naturally occurring biotic and abiotic multistress environment of higher plants. The MAPK- and phytohormone-cascades which comprise a multitude of single molecules on different signalling levels, as well as interactions...

  1. Electronic interaction between nitrogen-doped graphene and porphyrin molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Van Dong; Lagoute, Jérôme; Mouhoub, Ouafi; Joucken, Frédéric; Repain, Vincent; Chacon, Cyril; Bellec, Amandine; Girard, Yann; Rousset, Sylvie

    2014-09-23

    The chemical doping of graphene is a promising route to improve the performances of graphene-based devices through enhanced chemical reactivity, catalytic activity, or transport characteristics. Understanding the interaction of molecules with doped graphene at the atomic scale is therefore a leading challenge to be overcome for the development of graphene-based electronics and sensors. Here, we use scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to study the electronic interaction of pristine and nitrogen-doped graphene with self-assembled tetraphenylporphyrin molecules. We provide an extensive measurement of the electronic structure of single porphyrins on Au(111), thus revealing an electronic decoupling effect of the porphyrins adsorbed on graphene. A tip-induced switching of the inner hydrogen atoms of porphyrins, first identified on Au(111), is observed on graphene, allowing the identification of the molecular conformation of porphyrins in the self-assembled molecular layer. On nitrogen-doped graphene, a local modification of the charge transfer around the nitrogen sites is evidenced via a downshift of the energies of the molecular elecronic states. These data show how the presence of nitrogen atoms in the graphene network modifies the electronic interaction of organic molecules with graphene. These results provide a basic understanding for the exploitation of doped graphene in molecular sensors or nanoelectronics.

  2. Interactions between electrons in the field of a positive ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heideman, A.G.M.; Eck, J. van.

    1976-01-01

    Recent studies on the (auto)ionization of atoms by means of electron-atom collisions reveal the existence of phenomena probably brought about by post-collision interactions in the vicinity of a positive ion. In this article, a review of the subject is given in relation to the research program of the Utrecht atomic physics group

  3. Electron-dislocation interaction at low temperatures. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of mobile dislocations with electrons in copper and copper alloys has shown that dislocation motion in copper, at low temperature, can be treated as an analog of an underdamped oscillator. We have also shown that the viscous drag on mobile dislocations in type II superconductors can be treated as an acoustic attenuation of an elastic wave

  4. Interactivity Between Proteges and Scientists in an Electronic Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved in an electronic mentoring program. This report analyzes the…

  5. How to integrate geology, biology, and modern wireless technologies to assess biotic-abiotic interactions on coastal dune systems: a new multidisciplinary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Giovanni; Bertoni, Duccio; Bini, Monica; Ciccarelli, Daniela; Ribolini, Adriano; Ruocco, Matteo; Pozzebon, Alessandro; Alquini, Fernanda; Giaccari, Riccardo; Tordella, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Coastal dune systems are arguably one of the most dynamic environments because their evolution is controlled by many factors, both natural and human-related. Hence, they are often exposed to processes leading to erosion, which in turn determine serious naturalistic and economic losses. Most recent studies carried out on different dune fields worldwide emphasized the notion that a better definition of this environment needs an approach that systematically involves several disciplines, striving to merge every data collected from any individual analyses. Therefore, a new multidisciplinary method to study coastal dune systems has been conceived in order to integrate geology, biology, and modern wireless technologies. The aim of the work is threefold: i) to check the reliability of this new approach; ii) to provide a dataset as complete as ever about the factors affecting the evolution of coastal dunes; and iii) to evaluate the influence of any biotic and abiotic factors on plant communities. The experimentation site is located along the Pisa coast within the Migliarino - S. Rossore - Massaciuccoli Regional Park, a protected area where human influence is low (Tuscany, Italy). A rectangle of 100 x 200 m containing 50 grids of 20 x 20 m was established along the coastal dune systems from the coastline to the pinewood at the landward end of the backdune area. Sampling from each grid determined grain-size analysis carried out on surface sediment samples such as geologic aspects; topographic surveys performed by means of DGPS-RTK instruments; geophysical surveys conducted with a GPR equipment, which will be matched with core drilling activities; digital image analysis of high definition pictures taken by means of a remote controlled aircraft drone flying over the study area; biological data obtained by percent cover of each vascular plant species recorded in the sampling unit. Along with geologic and biologic methodologies, this research implemented the use of informatics

  6. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  7. Revealing Electron-Electron Interactions within Lewis Pairs in Chemical Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proud, Adam Jonathan; Sheppard, Brendan James Henry; Pearson, Jason Kenneth

    2018-01-10

    The so-called "Lewis pair" is a ubiquitous phenomenon in chemistry and is often used as an intuitive construct to predict and rationalize chemical structure and behavior. Concepts from the very general Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) model to the most esoteric reaction mechanism routinely rely on the notion that electrons tend to exist in pairs and that these pairs can be thought of as being localized to a particular region of space. It is precisely this localization that allows one to intuit how these pairs might behave, generally speaking, so that reasonable predictions may be made regarding molecular structure, intermolecular interactions, property trends, and reaction mechanisms, etc. Of course, it is rather unfortunate that the Lewis model is entirely qualitative and yields no information regarding how any specific electron pair is distributed. Here we demonstrate a novel electronic structure analysis technique that predicts and analyzes precise quantitative details about the relative and absolute distribution of individual electron pairs. This Single Electron Pair Distribution Analysis (SEPDA) reveals quantitative details about the distribution of the well-known Lewis pairs, such as how they are distributed in space and how their relative velocities change in various chemical contexts. We show that these distributions allow one to image the explicitly pairwise electronic behavior of bonds and lone pairs. We further demonstrate how this electronic behavior changes with several conditions to explore the nature of the covalent chemical bond, non-covalent interactions, bond formation, and exotic 3-center-2-electron species. It is shown that indications of the strength of bonded and non-bonded interactions may also be gleaned from such distributions and SEPDA can be used as a tool to differentiate between interaction types. We anticipate that SEPDA will be of broad utility in a wide variety of chemical contexts because it affords a very detailed

  8. Biotic and abiotic factors investigated in two Drosophila species – evidence of both negative and positive effects of interactions on performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    Multiple environmental factors acting in concert can interact and strongly influence population fitness and ecosystem composition. Studies investigating interactions usually involve only two environmental factors; most frequently a chemical and another abiotic factor such as a stressful temperature....... Here we investigate the effects of three environmental factors: temperature, an insecticide (dimethoate) and interspecific co-occurrence. We expose two naturally co-occurring species of Drosophila (D. hydei and D. melanogaster) to the different environments during development and examine...... the consequences on several performance measures. Results are highly species and trait specific with evidence of two- and three-way interactions in approximately 30% of all cases, suggesting that additive effects of combined environmental factors are most common, and that interactions are not universal. To provide...

  9. INTERACTION OF SEARCH CAPABILITIES OF ELECTRONIC AND TRADITIONAL (CARD CATALOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л. В. Головко

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Interaction of search capabilities of electronic and traditional (card catalogs. Subject: search capabilities of electronic and traditional (card catalogs and their interaction. Goal: Creating efficient search system for library information services, updating and improving the information retrieval system. To reach this goal, following tasks are set: – to determine the possibility of parallel functioning of electronic and traditional card catalogs, and to reveal the interaction of their search capabilities by conducting a survey via questionnaire titled «Interaction of search capabilities of electronic and traditional (card catalogs»; – to find out which search systems are preferred by users; – to estimate the actual condition of search capabilities of electronic and traditional (card catalogs in the library. Methodology. On various stages of the survey the following methods were used: analysis and synthesis, comparison, generalization, primary sources search; sociological method (survey. These methods allowed determining, processing and ana lyzing the whole complex of available sources, which became an important factor of research objectivity. Finding. Survey results allowed us to analyze the dynamics of changes, new needs of the readers, and to make a decision regarding the quality improvement of information search services. Practical value. Creating a theoretical foundation for implementation of set tasks is the practical value of the acquired findings. Conclusions and results of the research can be used in university students’, postgraduates’ and professors’ information search activities. Certain results of the research are used and implemented in practice of the library of Kryvyi Rih State Pedagogical University, namely at workshops on the basics of information culture (using bibliographic reference unit, information search by key words, authors and titles via electronic catalogue. Guides for users were created. Duty

  10. VLF two-wave-electron interactions in the magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serra, F.M. (Instituto Superior Technico, Lisbon (Portugal). Centro de Electrodinamica)

    1984-08-01

    The mutual influence between two whistler mode waves, through cyclotron resonant interaction of each wave with the same set of energetic electrons, is analysed both theoretically and by computer simulations; this two-wave interaction mechanism seems to be an important process in understanding recently observed phenomena in Siple Station VLF multi-wave injection experiments. A criterion is established to estimate the threshold for the critical frequency spacing (for given wave amplitudes) for a significant mutual interaction between two monochromatic waves to occur. This criterion is based on the overlap of coherence bandwidths associated with the trapping domains of each wave and it takes into account the geomagnetospheric medium inhomogeneity. The effects of a perturbing second wave on electrons trapped by a first wave is discussed, considering the general situation of varying-frequency waves, and a simulation model is used to track the motion of test-electrons in the two-waves field. Conditions leading to detrapping and subsequent trapping by the second wave of previously first-wave trapped electrons are analysed and suggest the possiblity of this phenomenon to play an important role in frequency entrainment and energy exchange between two waves.

  11. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-01

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  12. Controlling electron quantum dot qubits by spin-orbit interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stano, P.

    2007-01-15

    Single electron confined in a quantum dot is studied. A special emphasis is laid on the spin properties and the influence of spin-orbit interactions on the system. The study is motivated by a perspective exploitation of the spin of the confined electron as a qubit, a basic building block of in a foreseen quantum computer. The electron is described using the single band effective mass approximation, with parameters typical for a lateral electrostatically defined quantum dot in a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. The stemming data for the analysis are obtained by numerical methods of exact diagonalization, however, all important conclusions are explained analytically. The work focuses on three main areas -- electron spectrum, phonon induced relaxation and electrically and magnetically induced Rabi oscillations. It is shown, how spin-orbit interactions influence the energy spectrum, cause finite spin relaxation and allow for all-electrical manipulation of the spin qubit. Among the main results is the discovery of easy passages, where the spin relaxation is unusually slow and the qubit is protected against parasitic electrical fields connected with manipulation by resonant electromagnetic fields. The results provide direct guide for manufacturing quantum dots with much improved properties, suitable for realizing single electron spin qubits. (orig.)

  13. Simultaneous effects of electron-electron interactions, Rashba spin-orbit interaction and magnetic field on susceptibility of quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khordad, R.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we have theoretically studied susceptibility of an InAs quantum dot in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI), electron-electron (e--e-) interaction, and magnetic field. We have used two potential models, shifted parabolic and inverse lateral shifted parabolic potentials. We have first solved the Schrodinger equation to obtain energy levels and then obtain the susceptibility using canonical ensemble. It is found that the susceptibility at low magnetic field is negative and then it becomes positive with increasing the magnetic field. This transition occurs at a particular magnetic field. The transition diamagnetism to paramagnetism occurs at lower magnetic field when the temperature increases. The susceptibility reduces with increasing temperature without considering the Rashba SOI. With considering e--e- interaction, the peak position of susceptibility shifts toward lower magnetic fields. Also, the temperature has an effect on width and height of susceptibility.

  14. Secondary electron interactions in materials with environmental and radiological interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.; Blanco, F.; Pablos, J.L. de; Perez, J.M.; Williart, A.

    2003-01-01

    Important environmental and radiological applications require energy deposition models including the interactions between secondary electrons and the atoms or molecules of the medium. In this work we propose a method to obtain reliable cross-section data to be used in these models by combining total and ionization cross-section measurements with simple calculations of the differential and integral elastic cross-sections. The energy loss spectra obtained in this experiment have been also used to drive stopping power of the considered materials for electrons. Some examples of results for atomic (Xe) and molecular (CF 4 ) targets are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  15. Electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khosroabadi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   We explore the important role of the strong electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductivity through the study of the results of some important experiments, such as inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and isotope effects. We also present our computational results of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Ag Raman modes, and the ionic displacement dependence of the electronic band structure by density functional theory. It is clearly evident that the role of phonons in the mechanism behind the high-temperature superconducting state should be seriously considered.

  16. Electron-electron interaction effects on the optical excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumdar, Sumit

    2005-03-01

    We report correlated-electron calculations of optically excited states in ten semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a wide range of diameters.ootnotetextHongbo Zhao and Sumit Mazumdar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 157402 (2004) First, we show that optical excitation in SWCNTs occurs to excitons whose binding energies decrease with the increasing nanotube diameter, and are smaller than the binding energy of an isolated strand of poly-(paraphenylenevinylene), (PPV). Second, electron-electron interactions split the degeneracies characteristic of cylindrical geometries, and in all cases there occur forbidden excitons below the optical exciton. We ascribe the experimentally observed low quantum efficiency of the photoluminescence of SWCNTs to the presence of these forbidden states. Third, while within one-electron theory the transverse photo-excitations occur exactly halfway between the two lowest longitudinally polarized absorptions, they are shifted to considerably above the central region for nonzero electron-electron interactions. Finally, the ratio of the threshold energy of the second longitudinally polarized optical absorption to that of the lowest such transition in the widest SWCNTs is less than 2 within correlated-electron theory, in agreement with experiments.

  17. Nuclear-electronic orbital nonorthogonal configuration interaction approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skone, Jonathan H; Pak, Michael V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2005-10-01

    The nuclear-electronic orbital nonorthogonal configuration interaction (NEO-NOCI) approach is presented. In this framework, the hydrogen nuclei are treated quantum mechanically on the same level as the electrons, and a mixed nuclear-electronic time-independent Schrodinger equation is solved with molecular orbital techniques. For hydrogen transfer systems, the transferring hydrogen is represented by two basis function centers to allow delocalization of the nuclear wave function. In the two-state NEO-NOCI approach, the ground and excited state delocalized nuclear-electronic wave functions are expressed as linear combinations of two nonorthogonal localized nuclear-electronic wave functions obtained at the NEO-Hartree-Fock level. The advantages of the NEO-NOCI approach are the removal of the adiabatic separation between the electrons and the quantum nuclei, the computational efficiency, the potential for systematic improvement by enhancing the basis sets and number of configurations, and the applicability to a broad range of chemical systems. The tunneling splitting is determined by the energy difference between the two delocalized vibronic states. The hydrogen tunneling splittings calculated with the NEO-NOCI approach for the [He-H-He]+ model system with a range of fixed He-He distances are in excellent agreement with NEO-full CI and Fourier grid calculations. These benchmarking calculations indicate that NEO-NOCI is a promising approach for the calculation of delocalized, bilobal hydrogen wave functions and the corresponding hydrogen tunneling splittings.

  18. The electron-atom interaction in partially ionized dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omarbakiyeva, Yu A; Ramazanov, T S; Roepke, G [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole Bi 96a, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: yultuz@physics.kz

    2009-05-29

    The electron-atom interaction is considered in dense partially ionized plasmas. The separable potential is constructed from scattering data using effective radius theory. Parameters of the interaction potential were obtained from phase shifts, scattering length and effective radius. The binding energy of the electron in the H{sup -} ion is determined for the singlet channel on the basis of the reconstructed separable potential. In dense plasmas, the influence of the Pauli exclusion principle on the phase shifts and the binding energy is considered. Due to the Pauli blocking, the binding energy vanishes at the Mott density. At that density the behavior of the phase shifts is drastically changed. This leads to modifications of macroscopic properties such as composition and transport coefficients.

  19. Effect of electrostatic interactions on electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickel, B.

    1987-01-01

    Fast reactions of electron transfer are studied by pulsed radiolysis. By this technique radicals and ionic radicals with high redox potentials are created homogeneously in the solution in about 10 -8 second. For solvated electron effect of electrostatic interaction on kinetics of reactions limited by diffusion is obtained with a good approximation by the Debye equation when ion mobility is known. Deviation from the theory occurs in ion pair formation, which is evidenced experimentally in reactions between anions when cations are complexed by a cryptate. Slow reactions k 8 M -1 s -1 are more sensitive to electrostatic interactions than reactions limited by diffusion. When there is no ion pair formation the velocity constant depends upon dielectric constant of the solvent and reaction distance. 17 refs

  20. Electron-lattice Interaction and Nonlinear Excitations in Cuprate Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulsen, J.; Eschrig, H.; Drechsler, S.L.; Malek, J.

    1995-01-01

    A low temperature lattice modulation of the chains of the YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 is considered by deriving a Hamiltonian of electron-lattice interaction from density-functional calculations for deformed lattice and solving it for the groundstate. Hubbard-type Coulomb interaction is included. The obtained groundstate is a charge-density-wave state with a pereodicity of four lattice constants and a gap for one-electron excitations of about 1eV, sensitively depending on parameters of the Hamiltonian. There are lots of polaronic and solitonic excitations with formation energies deep in the gap, which can pin the Fermi level and thus produce again metallicity of the chain. They might also contribute to pairing of holes in adjacent CuO 2 -planes. (author)

  1. Physics of high-power electron beam-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koidan, V. S.

    1996-03-01

    Results related to physics of collective interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam with a magnetized plasma are presented. The main regularities of this process are given. The observed peculiarities of hot plasma producing by E-beam heating on the GOL-3 device are discussed. Some results on study of strong Langmuir turbulence by laser scattering method on GOL-M device are presented.

  2. Physics of high-power electron beam-plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koidan, V.S.

    1996-01-01

    Results related to physics of collective interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam with a magnetized plasma are presented. The main regularities of this process are given. The observed peculiarities of hot plasma producing by E-beam heating on the GOL-3 device are discussed. Some results on study of strong Langmuir turbulence by laser scattering method on GOL-M device are presented. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  3. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ 2 , where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  4. Relativistic electron mirrors from high intensity laser nanofoil interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiefer, Daniel

    2012-12-21

    The reflection of a laser pulse from a mirror moving close to the speed of light could in principle create an X-ray pulse with unprecedented high brightness owing to the increase in photon energy and accompanying temporal compression by a factor of 4γ{sup 2}, where γ is the Lorentz factor of the mirror. While this scheme is theoretically intriguingly simple and was first discussed by A. Einstein more than a century ago, the generation of a relativistic structure which acts as a mirror is demanding in many different aspects. Recently, the interaction of a high intensity laser pulse with a nanometer thin foil has raised great interest as it promises the creation of a dense, attosecond short, relativistic electron bunch capable of forming a mirror structure that scatters counter-propagating light coherently and shifts its frequency to higher photon energies. However, so far, this novel concept has been discussed only in theoretical studies using highly idealized interaction parameters. This thesis investigates the generation of a relativistic electron mirror from a nanometer foil with current state-of-the-art high intensity laser pulses and demonstrates for the first time the reflection from those structures in an experiment. To achieve this result, the electron acceleration from high intensity laser nanometer foil interactions was studied in a series of experiments using three inherently different high power laser systems and free-standing foils as thin as 3nm. A drastic increase in the electron energies was observed when reducing the target thickness from the micrometer to the nanometer scale. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams were measured for the first time from ultrathin (≤5nm) foils, reaching energies up to ∝35MeV. The acceleration process was studied in simulations well-adapted to the experiments, indicating the transition from plasma to free electron dynamics as the target thickness is reduced to the few nanometer range. The experience gained from those

  5. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  6. Direct and indirect climatic drivers of biotic interactions: ice-cover and carbon runoff shaping Arctic char Salvelinus alpinus and brown trout Salmo trutta competitive asymmetries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvan, Eva M; Finstad, Anders G; Ugedal, Ola; Berg, Ole Kristian

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in ecological climate change impact science is to untangle the climatic effects on biological interactions and indirect cascading effects through different ecosystems. Here, we test for direct and indirect climatic drivers on competitive impact of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus L.) on brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) along a climate gradient in central Scandinavia, spanning from coastal to high-alpine environments. As a measure of competitive impact, trout food consumption was measured using (137)Cs tracer methodology both during the ice-covered and ice-free periods, and contrasted between lakes with or without char coexistence along the climate gradient. Variation in food consumption between lakes was best described by a linear mixed effect model including a three-way interaction between the presence/absence of Arctic char, season and Secchi depth. The latter is proxy for terrestrial dissolved organic carbon run-off, strongly governed by climatic properties of the catchment. The presence of Arctic char had a negative impact on trout food consumption. However, this effect was stronger during ice-cover and in lakes receiving high carbon load from the catchment, whereas no effect of water temperature was evident. In conclusion, the length of the ice-covered period and the export of allochthonous material from the catchment are likely major, but contrasting, climatic drivers of the competitive interaction between two freshwater lake top predators. While future climatic scenarios predict shorter ice-cover duration, they also predict increased carbon run-off. The present study therefore emphasizes the complexity of cascading ecosystem effects in future effects of climate change on freshwater ecosystems.

  7. D-state Rydberg electrons interacting with ultracold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupp, Alexander Thorsten

    2014-10-02

    This thesis was established in the field of ultracold atoms where the interaction of highly excited D-state electrons with rubidium atoms was examined. This work is divided into two main parts: In the first part we study D-state Rydberg molecules resulting from the binding of a D-state Rydberg electron to a ground state rubidium atom. We show that we can address specific rovibrational molecular states by changing our laser detuning and thus create perfectly aligned axial or antialigned toroidal molecules, in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. Furthermore the influence of the electric field on the Rydberg molecules was investigated, creating novel states which show a different angular dependence and alignment. In the second part of this thesis we excite single D-state Rydberg electrons in a Bose-Einstein condensate. We study the lifetime of these Rydberg electrons, the change of the shape of our condensate and the atom losses in the condensate due to this process. Moreover, we observe quadrupolar shape oscillations of the whole condensate created by the consecutive excitation of Rydberg atoms and compare all results to previous S-state measurements. In the outlook we propose a wide range of further experiments including the proposal of imaging a single electron wavefunction by the imprint of its orbit into the Bose-Einstein condensate.

  8. Electron microscopy study of antioxidant interaction with bacterial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Oleg P.; Novikova, Olga V.; Konnov, Nikolai P.; Korsukov, Vladimir N.; Gunkin, Ivan F.; Volkov, Uryi P.

    2000-10-01

    To maintain native microorganisms genotype and phenotype features a lyophylization technique is widely used. However in this case cells are affected by influences of vacuum and low temperature that cause a part of the cells population to be destruction. Another factor reduced microorganisms vitality is formation of reactive oxygen forms that damage certain biological targets (such as DNA, membranes etc.) Recently to raise microorganism's resistance against adverse condition natural and synthetic antioxidants are used. Antioxidant- are antagonists of free radicals. Introduction of antioxidants in protective medium for lyophylization increase bacteria storage life about 2,0-4,8 fold in comparison with reference samples. In the article the main results of our investigation of antioxidants interaction with microorganism cells is described. As bacteria cells we use vaccine strain yersinia pestis EV, that were grown for 48 h at 28 degree(s)C on the Hottinger agar (pH 7,2). Antioxidants are inserted on the agar surface in specimen under test. To investigate a localization of antioxidants for electron microscopy investigation, thallium organic antioxidants were used. The thallium organic compounds have an antioxidant features if thallium is in low concentration (about 1(mu) g/ml). The localization of the thallium organic antioxidants on bacteria Y. pestis EV is visible in electron microscopy images, thallium being heavy metal with high electron density. The negatively stained bacteria and bacteria thin sections with thallium organic compounds were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. The localization of the thallium organic compounds is clearly visible in electron micrographs as small dark spots with size about 10-80nm. Probably mechanisms of interaction of antioxidants with bacteria cells are discussed.

  9. Topological confinement effects of electron-electron interactions in biased zigzag-edge bilayer graphene nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2018-03-01

    We have investigated topological confinement effects of electron-electron interactions on gapless edge states in zigzag-edge bilayer graphene nanoribbons under a voltage bias between the layers by using a tight-binding model with on-site Coulomb interactions. Spin-dependent potentials at the four edge sites resulting from the electron-electron interactions not only determine the spin configurations but also can result in topological confinement effects. In the magnetic phases with interlayer antiferromagnetic spin configurations, the edge potentials do not produce gapless edge states, and only gapless edge states can exist due to the edge shape. In the magnetic phases with interlayer ferromagnetic spin configurations, various gapless edge states due to the edge potential and edge shape are produced. Gapless edge states corresponding to the quantum spin-valley Hall phase and the layered antiferromagnetic phase can be described by topological confinement effects alone. The half-metallic quantum valley Hall phase can be described by topological confinement effects at inequivalent edge sites.

  10. Environmental extremes and biotic interactions facilitate depredation of endangered California Ridgway’s rail in a San Francisco Bay tidal marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Cory T.; Bobzien, Steven; Grefsrud, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    On 23 December 2015 while performing a high tide population survey for endangered Ridgway’s rails (Rallus obsoletus obsoletus; formerly known as the California clapper rail) and other rail species at Arrowhead Marsh, Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline, Oakland, California, the authors observed a series of species interactions resulting in the predation of a Ridgway’s rail by an adult female peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus). High tide surveys are performed during the highest tides of the year when tidal marsh vegetation at Arrowhead Marsh becomes inundated, concentrating the tidal marsh obligate species into the limited area of emergent vegetation remaining as refuge cover. Annual mean tide level (elevation referenced relative to mean lower low water) at Arrowhead Marsh is 1.10 m, mean higher high water is 2.04 m (NOAA National Ocean Service 2014) and the average elevation of the marsh surface is 1.60 m (Overton et al. 2014). Tidal conditions on the day of the survey were predicted to be 2.42 m. Observed tides at the nearby Alameda Island tide gauge were 8 cm higher than predicted due to a regional low-pressure system and warmer than average sea surface temperatures (NOAA National Ocean Service 2014). The approximately 80 cm deep inundation of the marsh plain was sufficient to completely submerge tidal marsh vegetation and effectively remove 90% of refugia habitats.

  11. Relativistic collision rate calculations for electron-air interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, G. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roussel-Dupre, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The most recent data available on differential cross sections for electron-air interactions are used to calculate the avalanche, momentum transfer, and energy loss rates that enter into the fluid equations. Data for the important elastic, inelastic, and ionizing processes are generally available out to electron energies of 1--10 keV. Prescriptions for extending these cross sections to the relativistic regime are presented. The angular dependence of the cross sections is included where data are available as is the doubly differential cross section for ionizing collisions. The collision rates are computed by taking moments of the Boltzmann collision integrals with the assumption that the electron momentum distribution function is given by the Juettner distribution function which satisfies the relativistic H- theorem and which reduces to the familiar Maxwellian velocity distribution in the nonrelativistic regime. The distribution function is parameterized in terms of the electron density, mean momentum, and thermal energy and the rates are therefore computed on a two dimensional grid as a function of mean kinetic energy and thermal energy.

  12. Signature of electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Ashokan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of thermal conductivity of high temperature superconductors (HTS based on electron and phonon line width (life times formulation is developed with Quantum dynamical approach of Green's function. The frequency line width is observed as an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of HTS as a collection of large number of scattering processes. The role of resonance scattering and electron-phonon interaction processes is found to be most prominent near critical temperature. The theory successfully explains the spectacular behaviour of high Tc superconductors in the vicinity of transition temperature. A successful agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained by analyzing the thermal conductivity data for the sample La1.8Sr0.2CuO4 in the temperature range 0 − 200K. The theory is equally and successfully applicable to all other high Tc superconductors.

  13. Hot electron target interaction experiments at the GOL-3 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astrelin, V.T.; Burdakov, A.V.; Chebotaev, P.Z.

    1997-01-01

    At the GOL-3 facility, experiments on the interaction of powerful hot electron streams with various materials have been performed. For energy densities of the hot electron stream above 10 MJ/m 2 an explosive-like erosion was observed, which at energy densities of 30 MJ/m 2 reaches 500 μm for fine grain graphite and 200 μm for tungsten. Under these conditions, the corona of the carbon vapour cloud has temperatures below 1.2eV and densities up to 10 17 cm -3 . It propagates along the magnetic field lines with maximum velocities of 2.7 x 10 6 cm/s. The longitudinal and transverse (along and across magnetic field lines) vapour velocities of the colder bulk plasma are about 10 6 cm/s. A model for explosive-like erosion was developed and tested against the GOL-3 results. For graphite the destruction threshold is 10 kJ/g. This value is considerably lower than the vaporization enthalpy of 20.5 kJ/g for three atomic vaporization. The validated model was applied to a numerical analysis of the occurrence of explosive-like erosion for ITER disruptions and runaway electrons. If the energy density of the runaways remains below 30 MJ/m 2 , explosive-like erosion of graphite occurs for electron energies below 20 MeV. For the energetic tail of Maxwellian plasma electrons with temperatures up to 20 keV and power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 without any angular spread, explosive-like erosion becomes comparable to erosion by vaporization. (author)

  14. Hot electron target interaction experiments at the GOL-3 facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Burdakov, A. V.; Chebotaev, P. Z.; Filippov, V. V.; Koidan, V. S.; Mekler, K. I.; Melnikov, P. I.; Postupaev, V. V.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Schcheglov, M. A.; Wurz, H.

    1997-11-01

    At the GOL-3 facility, experiments on the interaction of powerful hot electron streams with various materials have been performed. For energy densities of the hot electron stream above 10 MJ/m2 an explosive-like erosion was observed, which at energy densities of 30 MJ/m2 reaches 500 mu m for fine grain graphite and 200 mu m for tungsten. Under these conditions, the corona of the carbon vapour cloud has temperatures below 1.2 eV and densities up to 1017 cm-3. It propagates along the magnetic field lines with maximum velocities of 2.1*106 cm/s. The longitudinal and transverse (along and across magnetic field lines) vapour velocities of the colder bulk plasma are about 106 cm/s. A model for explosive-like erosion was developed and tested against the GOL-3 results. For graphite the destruction threshold is 10 kJ/g. This value is considerably lower than the vaporization enthalpy of 20.5 kJ/g for three atomic vaporization. The validated model was applied to a numerical analysis of the occurrence of explosive-like erosion for ITER disruptions and runaway electrons. If the energy density of the runaways remains below 30 MJ/m2, explosive-like erosion of graphite occurs for electron energies below 20 MeV. For the energetic tail of Maxwellian plasma electrons with temperatures up to 20 keV and power densities of 10 MW/cm2 without any angular spread, explosive-like erasion becomes comparable to erosion by vaporization

  15. Electron-electron interaction, weak localization and spin valve effect in vertical-transport graphene devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Mingsheng; Gong, Youpin; Wei, Xiangfei; Zhu, Chao; Xu, Jianbao; Liu, Ping; Guo, Yufen; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Liwei, E-mail: lwliu2007@sinano.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications-CAS and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Guangtong [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-04-14

    We fabricated a vertical structure device, in which graphene is sandwiched between two asymmetric ferromagnetic electrodes. The measurements of electron and spin transport were performed across the combined channels containing the vertical and horizontal components. The presence of electron-electron interaction (EEI) was found not only at low temperatures but also at moderate temperatures up to ∼120 K, and EEI dominates over weak localization (WL) with and without applying magnetic fields perpendicular to the sample plane. Moreover, spin valve effect was observed when magnetic filed is swept at the direction parallel to the sample surface. We attribute the EEI and WL surviving at a relatively high temperature to the effective suppress of phonon scattering in the vertical device structure. The findings open a way for studying quantum correlation at relatively high temperature.

  16. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron-electron interactions, application to graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowik, Piotr; Thobel, Jean-Luc; Adamowicz, Leszek

    2017-07-01

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron-electron (e-e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e-e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e-e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  17. 2012 Gordon Research Conference, Electron donor-acceptor interactions, August 5-10 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCusker, James [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  18. Simulation of electron-matter interaction during wet-STEM electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Septiyanto, Rahmat Firman, E-mail: karine.masenelli-varlot@insa-lyon.fr [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621, France and Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Masenelli-Varlot, Karine [MATEIS, INSA-Lyon, CNRS UMR5510, F-69621 (France); Iskandar, Ferry [Physics of Electronic Material, Departement of Physics, Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Sciences, ITB Jalan Ganesha No. 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Tomography is an efficient tool to probe the 3 dimensional (3D) structure of materials. In the laboratory, a device has been developed to perform electron tomography in an environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). The configuration of Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) provides a novel approach for the characterization of the 3D structure of materials and optimizes a compromise between the resolution level of a few nm and the large tomogram due to the high thickness of transparency. Moreover, STEM allows the observation in 2D of wet samples in an ESEM by finely controlling the sample temperature and the water pressure of the sample environment. It has been recently demonstrated that it was possible to acquire image series of hydrated objects and thus to attain 3D characterization of wet samples. In order to get reliable and quantitative data, the present study deals with the simulation of electron-matter interactions. From such simulation on the MCM-41 material, we determine the minimum quantity of water layer which can be detected on wet materials.

  19. Photon-Electron Interactions in Dirac Quantum Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Material Science and Engineering

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this proposal was to explore the fundamental light-matter interactions in a new class of Dirac quantum materials, atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Monolayer TMDs are newly discovered two-dimensional semiconductors with direct bandgap. Due to their hexagonal lattice structure, the band edge localizes at corner of Brillouin zone, i.e. “Dirac valleys”. This gives the corresponding electron states a “valley index” (or pseudospin) in addition to the real spin. Remarkably, the valley pseudospins have circularly polarized optical selection rules, providing the first solid state system for dynamic control of the valley degree of freedom. During this award, we have developed a suite of advanced nano-optical spectroscopy tools in the investigation and manipulation of charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom in monolayer semiconductors. Emerging physical phenomena, such as quantum coherence between valley pseudospins, have been demonstrated for the first time in solids. In addition to monolayers, we have developed a framework in engineering, formulating, and understanding valley pseudospin physics in 2D heterostructures formed by different monolayer semiconductors. We demonstrated long-lived valley-polarized interlayer excitons with valley-dependent many-body interaction effects. These works push the research frontier in understanding the light-matter interactions in atomically-thin quantum materials for protentional transformative energy technologies.

  20. Biotic Habitat Complexity Controls Species Diversity and Nutrient Effects on Net Biomass Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Rubach, Anja; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2006-01-01

    Canopy-forming plants and algae commonly contribute to spatial variation in habitat complexity for associated organisms and thereby create a biotic patchiness of communities. In this study, we tested for interaction effects between biotic habitat complexity and resource availability on net biomass

  1. Electron-positron interaction in light elements represented by atoms embedded in an electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronski, E. [W. Trzebiatowski Institute for Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 WrocIaw 2 (Poland)]. E-mail: boronski@int.pan.wroc.pl; Stachowiak, H. [W. Trzebiatowski Institute for Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1410, 50-950 WrocIaw 2 (Poland)

    2005-09-01

    Mijnarends et al. (J. Phys. Condens. Matter 10 (1998) 10383) contested the best existing calculations of positron annihilation rates in jellium and crystal lattices, pointing in this way at deficiencies of existing theories of electron-positron interaction in these materials. In the present work, the local enhancement factors due to e{sup +}-e{sup -} interaction in Li, Be, B, C, N and O are computed in a consequent many-body approach for core and as concerns lithium also for conduction electrons and compared to the results of existing approximations to this problem which avoid direct many-body calculations in metals, i.e., the local density, generalized gradient and weighted density approximations, as well as to experimental data. Conclusions about positron lifetime and e{sup +}-e{sup -} correlation energy are also presented. They support the results of Mijnarends et al. concerning applicability of the LDA approximation to e{sup +}-e{sup -} interaction and validity of the Boronski-Nieminen formula for the correlation function.

  2. Steric and electronic interactions between cofacial metallocene rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, R.; Foxman, B.M.; Rosenblum, M.; Euler, W.B.

    1988-06-01

    As part of a study of interactions between metallocenes, held so that two cyclopentadienyl rings are constrained to be proximate and facing one another, 1,8-diruthenocenylnaphthalene has been prepared and its crystal structure has been determined. This structure is shown to be close to that of 1,8-diferrocenylnaphthalene reported earlier, especially in respect to the dihedral angle between the substituted cyclopentadienyl and naphthalene ring planes and the splay angle between the two substituted cyclopentadienyl rings. Both of these distortions are significantly diminished in the monocation derived from 1a, suggesting that there is a significant decrease in electron density on the cyclopentadienyl rings on oxidation of ferrocene to a ferricenium cation, consistent with theoretical analyses.

  3. Nonlinear resonant interaction between acoustic impulse and electrons in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratus, E.N.; Shumeiko, V.S.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of inelastic electron interaction in a perfectly pure superconductor with a longitudinal sound impulse is considered. It is shown that the problem reduces to the equivalent one of elastic scattering by the static potential, and the sound absorption is expressed in terms of the reflection coefficient of this scattering. The classical and quantum properties of the scattering are studied and the phase region in which new excitations are created is indicated. A formula is derived that expresses the density matrix of the excitations created in terms of the exact scattering matrix of an impulse. The quasiclassical creation of excitations by a smooth-shaped impulse is investigated with regard to both overbarrier and underbarrier processes

  4. Local electron-electron interaction strength in ferromagnetic nickel determined by spin-polarized positron annihilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Josef Andreas; Weber, Josef Andreass; Böni, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Benea, Diana; Chioncel, Liviu; Ebert, Hubert; Minár, Jan; Vollhardt, Dieter; Hugenschmidt, Christoph

    2016-02-16

    We employ a positron annihilation technique, the spin-polarized two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR), to measure the spin-difference spectra of ferromagnetic nickel. The experimental data are compared with the theoretical results obtained within a combination of the local spin density approximation (LSDA) and the many-body dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We find that the self-energy defining the electronic correlations in Ni leads to anisotropic contributions to the momentum distribution. By direct comparison of the theoretical and experimental results we determine the strength of the local electronic interaction U in ferromagnetic Ni as 2.0 ± 0.1 eV.

  5. Electron scattering wings on lines in interacting supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chenliang; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the effect of electron scattering on lines emitted as a result of supernova interaction with a circumstellar medium, assuming that the scattering occurs in ionized gas in the pre-shock circumstellar medium. The single scattering case gives the broad component in the limit of low optical depth, showing a velocity full width half-maximum that is close to the thermal velocities of electrons. The line shape is approximately exponential at low velocities and steepens at higher velocities. At higher optical depths, the line profile remains exponential at low velocities, but wings strengthen with increasing optical depth. In addition to the line width, the ratio of narrow to broad (scattered) line strength is a possible diagnostic of the gas. The results depend on the density profile of the circumstellar gas, especially if the scattering and photon creation occur in different regions. We apply the scattering model to a number of supernovae, including Type IIn and Type Ia-circumstellar medium (CSM) events. The asymmetry to the red found in some cases can be explained by scattering in a fast wind region that is indicated by observations.

  6. Electron density interferometry measurement in laser-matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popovics-Chenais, C.

    1981-05-01

    This work is concerned with the laser-interferometry measurement of the electronic density in the corona and the conduction zone external part. Particularly, it is aimed at showing up density gradients and at their space-time localization. The first chapter recalls the density profile influence on the absorption principal mechanisms and the laser energy transport. In chapter two, the numerical and analytical hydrodynamic models describing the density profile are analysed. The influence on the density profile of the ponderomotive force associated to high oscillating electric fields is studied, together with the limited thermal conduction and suprathermal electron population. The mechanism action, in our measurement conditions, is numerically simulated. Calculations are made with experimental parameters. The measurement interaction conditions, together with the diagnostic method by high resolution laser interferometry are detailed. The results are analysed with the help of numerical simulation which is the experiment modeling. An overview of the mechanisms shown up by interferometric measurements and their correlation with other diagnostics is the conclusion of this work [fr

  7. Post-collision interaction in Auger-electron emission of rare-gas atoms following electron-impact ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H.; Iketaki, Y.; Watabe, T.; Takayanagi, T.; Wakiya, K.; Suzuki, H.; Koike, F.

    1991-01-01

    A study of post-collision interaction has been carried out experimentally for Auger-electron emission of rare-gas atoms following electron-impact ionization. Spectra of the Xe N5O23O23 (1S0), Kr M5N1N23 (1P1), and Ar L3M23M23 (1S0) Auger electrons have been measured changing the electron-impact energy from slightly above the threshold of the ionization to a few kilo-electron-volts. The Auger line shape has been analyzed using a profile formula that includes the finiteness of the velocities of all the cooperating electrons. Moreover, the analysis has partly considered the possible energy distribution of the scattered primary electron and the ejected secondary electron, due to the sharing of excess energy between them. The post-collision interaction effect is found to be absent at high excess energies.

  8. Anisotropic Electron-Photon and Electron-Phonon Interactions in Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xi; Huang, Shengxi; Hasdeo, Eddwi H; Liang, Liangbo; Parkin, William M; Tatsumi, Yuki; Nugraha, Ahmad R T; Puretzky, Alexander A; Das, Paul Masih; Sumpter, Bobby G; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Saito, Riichiro; Drndic, Marija; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-04-13

    Orthorhombic black phosphorus (BP) and other layered materials, such as gallium telluride (GaTe) and tin selenide (SnSe), stand out among two-dimensional (2D) materials owing to their anisotropic in-plane structure. This anisotropy adds a new dimension to the properties of 2D materials and stimulates the development of angle-resolved photonics and electronics. However, understanding the effect of anisotropy has remained unsatisfactory to date, as shown by a number of inconsistencies in the recent literature. We use angle-resolved absorption and Raman spectroscopies to investigate the role of anisotropy on the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions in BP. We highlight, both experimentally and theoretically, a nontrivial dependence between anisotropy and flake thickness and photon and phonon energies. We show that once understood, the anisotropic optical absorption appears to be a reliable and simple way to identify the crystalline orientation of BP, which cannot be determined from Raman spectroscopy without the explicit consideration of excitation wavelength and flake thickness, as commonly used previously.

  9. Coulomb drag: a probe of electron interactions in coupled quantum wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1996-01-01

    As semiconductor devices shrink in size and in dimensionality, interactions between charge carriers become more and more important. There is a simple physical reason behind this behavior: fewer carriers lead to less effective screening, and hence stronger effective interactions. A point in case...... are one-dimensional systems (quantum wires): there electron-electron interactions may lead to a behavior, which is qualitatively different from the standard Fermi liquid picture (Luttinger liquids). Electron-electron interactions also play a central role in the fractional quantum Hall effect, which...... be the study of quantum wires: there the interactions may lead to even more dramatic effects...

  10. A study of effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some vitamins for electron, H, He and C ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükyıldız, M.

    2017-09-01

    The radiological properties of some vitamins such as Retinol, Beta-carotene, Riboflavin, Niacin, Niacinamide, Pantothenic acid, Pyridoxine, Pyridoxamine, Pyridoxal, Biotin, Folic acid, Ascorbic acid, Cholecalciferol, Alpha-tocopherol, Gamma-tocopherol, Phylloquinone have been investigated with respect to total electron interaction and some heavy charged particle interaction as means of effective atomic numbers (Z_{eff}) and electron densities (N_{eff}) for the first time. Calculations were performed for total electron interaction and heavy ions such as H, He and C ion interactions in the energy region 10keV-10MeV by using a logarithmic interpolation method. Variations in Z_{eff}'s and N_{eff}'s of given vitamins have been studied according to the energy of electron or heavy charged particles, and significant variations have been observed for all types of interaction in the given energy region. The maximum values of Z_{eff} have been found in the different energy regions for different interactions remarkably and variations in N_{eff} seem approximately to be the same with variation in Z_{eff} for the given vitamins as expected. Z_{eff} values of some vitamins were plotted together and compared with each other for electron, H, He and C interactions and the ratios of Z_{eff}/ have been changed in the range of 0.25-0.36, 0.20-0.36, 0.22-0.35 and 0.20-0.35 for electron, H, He and C interactions, respectively.

  11. Strong biotic influences on regional patterns of climate regulation services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Chavez, H. M.; Swenson, N. G.; Weiser, M. D.; van Loon, E. E.; Bouten, W.; Davidson, M. D.; van Bodegom, P. M.

    2017-05-01

    Climate regulation services from forests are an important leverage in global-change mitigation treaties. Like most ecosystem services, climate regulation is the product of various ecological phenomena with unique spatial features. Elucidating which abiotic and biotic factors relate to spatial patterns of climate regulation services advances our understanding of what underlies climate-mitigation potential and its variation within and across ecosystems. Here we quantify and contrast the statistical relations between climate regulation services (albedo and evapotranspiration, primary productivity, and soil carbon) and abiotic and biotic factors. We focus on 16,955 forest plots in a regional extent across the eastern United States. We find the statistical effects of forest litter and understory carbon on climate regulation services to be as strong as those of temperature-precipitation interactions. These biotic factors likely influence climate regulation through changes in vegetation and canopy density, radiance scattering, and decomposition rates. We also find a moderate relation between leaf nitrogen traits and primary productivity at this regional scale. The statistical relation between climate regulation and temperature-precipitation ranges, seasonality, and climatic thresholds highlights a strong feedback with global climate change. Our assessment suggests the expression of strong biotic influences on climate regulation services at a regional, temperate extent. Biotic homogenization and management practices manipulating forest structure and succession will likely strongly impact climate-mitigation potential. The identity, strength, and direction of primary influences differed for each process involved in climate regulation. Hence, different abiotic and biotic factors are needed to monitor and quantify the full climate-mitigation potential of temperate forest ecosystems.

  12. Study of electron and neutrino interactions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abashian, A.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report for the DOE-sponsored experimental particle physics program at Virginia Tech to study the properties of the Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions. This contract (DE-AS05-80ER10713) covers the period from August 1, 1980 to January 31, 1993. Task B of this contract, headed by Professor Alexander Abashian, is described in this final report. This program has been pursued on many fronts by the researchers in a search for axions at SLAC, in electron-positron collisions in the AMY experiment at the TRISTAN collider in Japan, in measurements of muon decay properties in the MEGA and RHO experiments at the LAMPF accelerator, in a detailed analysis of scattering effects in the purported observation of a 17 keV neutrino at Oxford, in a search for a disoriented chiral condensate with the MiniMax experiment at Fermilab, and in an R ampersand D program on resistive plate counters that could find use in low-cost high-quality charged particle detection at low rates

  13. Electron and VLF travel time differences for wave-particle interactions at L=4: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rash, J.P.S.; Scourfield, M.W.J.; Dougherty, M.K.

    1984-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance or gyroresonance interaction has been widely invoked as a generation mechanism for discrete VLF emissions and plasmaspheric hiss. This interaction involves electrons and VLF waves travelling in opposite directions along a geomagnetic field line. We examine, for an interaction region in the equatorial plane at L=4, the energy of the resonant electrons as a function of VLF wave frequency and ambient equatorial electron density. Then for two different spatial configurations of the interaction and two standard plasma distribution models we examine the difference in travel times to a ground-based observer in the Southern hemisphere for the electrons and waves taking part in the interaction. This difference in travel times is shown as a function of VLF wave frequency and equatorial electron density. The results, and their significance for observations of auroral electrons and VLF at Sanae, Antarctica, are discussed and compared with similar results for the Cerenkov interaction discussed in an earlier paper

  14. A Web-Based Architecture for Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jorgensen, Eric L; Fuller, Joseph J

    2006-01-01

    ...) Interactive Electronic Technical Manuals (IETMs) so that an end user can view any DoD IETM, no matter what the source, using only one electronic display device and common set of browser software...

  15. TISSUE INTERACTIONS WITH DERMAL SHEEP COLLAGEN IMPLANTS - A TRANSMISSION ELECTRON-MICROSCOPIC EVALUATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANWACHEM, PB; VANLUYN, MJA; DAMINK, LO; FEIJEN, J; NIEUWENHUIS, P

    1991-01-01

    Tissue interactions with discs of dermal sheep collagen (DSC), subcutaneously implanted in rats, were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. DSC cross-linked with hexamethylenediisocyanate (HDSC) had already been tested previously. In the present study, we compared tissue interactions of

  16. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  17. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehart, R.C.; Ziock, K.O.H.

    1992-08-01

    The analysis of the deuterium content in the CD target used in an experiment to study the π + d → 2p reaction at incident pion energies from 4 to 20 MeV was completed. The final paper describing this experiment will be submitted for publication this summer. Analysis of LAMPF Exp. on pion absorption in 4 He is continuing. In 1991, we collaborated with D. Pocanic from the Univ. of Virginia on a measurement at LAMPF of the π 0 production in π + p interactions. This run proved the validity of the method and additional data were obtained in a second run during the summer of 1992, using a new target. Current collaborations at LAMPF include the search for the decay μ + → e + + γ(MEGA) and a measurement of the Michel ρ parameter in the decay μ → e + v + v. A U.Va.--PSI collaboration is measuring pion beta decay to an accuracy of less than 1%, using a large acceptance CsI detector to measure the π 0 following decay of stopped π + mesons. Most of the U.Va. effort is devoted to the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) program to the construction of the CLAS forward calorimeter. An apparatus to measure the properties of the scintillators with light from a N 2 laser was built in the spring of 1992. The electronic circuitry for the energy signal from the EGN detector and the circuitry needed to route the signals from the all the photomultipliers to the TDC and ADC circuits are being developed. Experimental proposals for the study of electroproduction of nucleon resonances at CEBAF, including measurements with polarized beam and targets, are being developed

  18. The Importance of Biotic vs. Abiotic Drivers of Local Plant Community Composition Along Regional Bioclimatic Gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Klanderud

    Full Text Available We assessed if the relative importance of biotic and abiotic factors for plant community composition differs along environmental gradients and between functional groups, and asked which implications this may have in a warmer and wetter future. The study location is a unique grid of sites spanning regional-scale temperature and precipitation gradients in boreal and alpine grasslands in southern Norway. Within each site we sampled vegetation and associated biotic and abiotic factors, and combined broad- and fine-scale ordination analyses to assess the relative explanatory power of these factors for species composition. Although the community responses to biotic and abiotic factors did not consistently change as predicted along the bioclimatic gradients, abiotic variables tended to explain a larger proportion of the variation in species composition towards colder sites, whereas biotic variables explained more towards warmer sites, supporting the stress gradient hypothesis. Significant interactions with precipitation suggest that biotic variables explained more towards wetter climates in the sub alpine and boreal sites, but more towards drier climates in the colder alpine. Thus, we predict that biotic interactions may become more important in alpine and boreal grasslands in a warmer future, although more winter precipitation may counteract this trend in oceanic alpine climates. Our results show that both local and regional scales analyses are needed to disentangle the local vegetation-environment relationships and their regional-scale drivers, and biotic interactions and precipitation must be included when predicting future species assemblages.

  19. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium induced by the electron-electron neutral weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteve, J.G.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Nuez-Lagos, R.; Pacheco, A.F.

    1984-04-01

    The parity-violating E1 transitions between the n = 2 levels of atomic helium, induced by the electron-electron neutral weak interaction have been computed by using Coulomb-type wave functions and (up to 84 parameter) Hylleraas wave functions. The parity-violating matrix elements turn out to be of the same order of magnitude as those due to the electron-nucleus weak interaction, thus allowing one to conclude that the relative importance of both effects is to be traced to their corresponding effective coupling constants.

  20. Biotic elements of NPP techno-ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protasov, A.A.; Silaeva, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Specific features of biotic elements in the NPP techno-ecosystems were considered and compared with natural ecosystems. Relationships between biotic communities and environmental factors that are specific to the techno-ecosystems were discussed, and the problems of limitation of biological hindrances in operation of equipment, principles of hydrobiological and environmental monitoring were considered.

  1. Effect of Electron-Electron Interaction on Transport in Dye-Sensitized Nanocrystalline TiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van de Lagemaat, J.; Kopidakis, N.; Neale, N. R.; Frank, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental measurements and continuous-time random walk simulations on sensitized electrolyte-infused porous nanocrystalline TiO2 films show that the actual electronic charge in the films is significantly larger than that estimated from small-perturbation methods by a constant, light-intensity-independent factor. This observation can be explained by small-perturbation techniques measuring the chemical diffusion coefficient of electrons instead of the normally assumed tracer diffusion coefficient of electrons. The difference between the two diffusion coefficients is attributed to the presence of an exponential density of states through which electrons interact. At high light intensities, an additional extra component owing to Coulomb interactions between the electrons is expected to arise.

  2. Simulating the Agostic Interaction in Electron-deficient (16-e) Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A large number of theoretical studies have focused on understanding the molecular features of the agostic interaction in various kinds of molecular environments. However, there is a lack of electronic structure information about the agostic interaction in electron-deficient group (VI)ML6 organometallic complexes. In this ...

  3. Spin effects in strong-field laser-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrens, S; Bauke, H; Müller, T-O; Villalba-Chávez, S; Müller, C

    2013-01-01

    The electron spin degree of freedom can play a significant role in relativistic scattering processes involving intense laser fields. In this contribution we discuss the influence of the electron spin on (i) Kapitza-Dirac scattering in an x-ray laser field of high intensity, (ii) photo-induced electron-positron pair production in a strong laser wave and (iii) multiphoton electron-positron pair production on an atomic nucleus. We show that in all cases under consideration the electron spin can have a characteristic impact on the process properties and their total probabilities. To this end, spin-resolved calculations based on the Dirac equation in the presence of an intense laser field are performed. The predictions from Dirac theory are also compared with the corresponding results from the Klein-Gordon equation.

  4. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  5. Biotic and abiotic oxidation and reduction of iron at circumneutral pH are inseparable processes under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ionescu, Danny; Heim, Christine; Polerecky, L.; Thiel, Volker; de Beer, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation and reduction of iron can occur through abiotic (chemical) and biotic (microbial) processes. Abiotic iron oxidation is a function of pH and O2 concentration. Biotic iron oxidation is carried out by a diverse group of bacteria, using O2 or NO3 as terminal electron acceptors. At

  6. Features of electron-phonon interactions in nanotubes with chiral symmetry in magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Kibis, O V

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of the electrons with acoustic phonons in the nanotube with chiral symmetry by availability of the magnetic field, parallel to the nanotube axis, is considered. It is shown that the electron energy spectrum is asymmetric relative to the electron wave vector inversion and for that reason the electron-phonon interaction appears to be different for similar phonons with mutually contrary directions of the wave vector. This phenomenon leads to origination of the electromotive force by the spatially uniform electron gas heating and to appearance of the quadrupole component in the nanotube volt-ampere characteristics

  7. Biotic Proxies For Ocean Acidification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E.

    2013-12-01

    Present and future high atmospheric pCO2 levels have caused acidification of the oceans, which has led to studies of past ocean acidification and its biotic response in the geological record (1). Therefore we need proxies for past acidification. Geochemical proxies for ocean pH are being developed (e.g., boron based), and various trace element and stable isotope proxies in part reflect carbonate saturation levels. In addition to geochemical proxies, the relative abundances of some benthic foraminiferal species might serve as proxies for the saturation state of bottom or pore waters. In general, pore waters are less carbonate-saturated than bottom waters, and infaunal benthic foraminifera calcify in such less saturated waters. The relative abundance of infaunal species of benthic foraminifera has commonly been used as a proxy for a high food supply (and/or oxygen depleted bottom or pore waters). This proxy (infaunal %), however, can be used to indicate high food/low oxygen ONLY in the absence of evidence for carbonate dissolution, and is a qualitative proxy for carbonate undersaturation of bottom and pore waters in the presence of such evidence (2). The living species Nuttallides umbonifer can calcify in carbonate-corrosive waters (i.e., below the lysocline), and its extinct Paleogene ancestor N. truempyi may have had a similar tolerance, in view of the fact that it is a deep-water species and commonly abundant in samples which otherwise contain agglutinant taxa only. The pattern of deep-sea benthic foraminiferal abundances across the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum at South Atlantic Site 1263 (Walvis Ridge) can then be interpreted as a time sequence indicative of full dissolution (no calcareous benthics) at the start of the event, followed by strong dissolution (mainly infaunal taxa with relatively high % of N. truempyi), moderate dissolution (high % of N. truempyi), and return to background conditions. On the opposite extreme, extinction of pelagic calcifiers at

  8. Calculating the radiation characteristics of accelerated electrons in laser-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X. F.; Yu, Q.; Qu, J. F.; Kong, Q.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kawata, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the characteristics of radiation emitted by electrons accelerated in a laser–plasma interaction by using the Lienard–Wiechert field. In the interaction of a laser pulse with a underdense plasma, electrons are accelerated by two mechanisms: direct laser acceleration (DLA) and laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). At the beginning of the process, the DLA electrons emit most of the radiation, and the DLA electrons emit a much higher peak photon energy than the LWFA electrons. As the laser–plasma interaction progresses, the LWFA electrons become the major radiation emitter; however, even at this stage, the contribution from DLA electrons is significant, especially to the peak photon energy.

  9. Muon-electron final states in neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1977-01-01

    In an experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, eight candidates for the reaction ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything were observed with a total background of 1.5 +- 0.6 events. The detector consisted of twenty-eight optical spark chambers interspersed with liquid and plastic scintillation counters. Events classified as muon - electron final states are required to have a long noninteracting straight track in conjunction with an electromagnetic shower characteristic of that produced by an electron. Background processes are discussed and the total muon - electron background calculated. The ratio of the number of muon - electron candidates to all charged current events, corrected for the percentage of the neutrino beam above threshold, is R' = sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + e + anything)/sigma(ν/sub μ/ + N → μ + anything) approx. > 10 -2

  10. Interaction of measles virus vectors with Auger electron emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingli, David; Peng, K.-W.; Harvey, Mary E.; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Bergert, Elizabeth R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Cattaneo, Roberto; Morris, John C.; Russell, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    A recombinant measles virus (MV) expressing the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is being considered for therapy of advanced multiple myeloma. Auger electrons selectively damage cells in which the isotope decays. We hypothesized that the Auger electron emitting isotope 125 I can be used to control viral proliferation. MV was engineered to express both carcinoembryonic antigen and NIS (MV-NICE). Cells were infected with MV-NICE and exposed to 125 I with appropriate controls. MV-NICE replication in vitro is inhibited by the selective uptake of 125 I by cells expressing NIS. Auger electron damage is partly mediated by free radicals and abrogated by glutathione. In myeloma xenografts, control of MV-NICE with 125 I was not possible under the conditions of the experiment. MV-NICE does not replicate faster in the presence of radiation. Auger electron emitting isotopes effectively stop propagation of MV vectors expressing NIS in vitro. Additional work is necessary to translate these observations in vivo

  11. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  12. Electron-electron attractive interaction in Maxwell-Chern-Simons QED3 at zero temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belich, H.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.; Helayel-Neto, J.A.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.

    2001-04-01

    One discusses the issue of low-energy electron-electron bound states in the Maxwell-Chern-Simons model coupled to QED 3 with spontaneous breaking of a local U(1)-symmetry. The scattering potential, in the non-relativistic limit, steaming from the electron-electron Moeller scattering, mediated by the Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Proca gauge field and the Higgs scalar, might be attractive by fine-tuning properly the physical parameters of the model. (author)

  13. Biotic games and cloud experimentation as novel media for biophysics education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar; Blikstein, Paulo

    2014-03-01

    First-hand, open-ended experimentation is key for effective formal and informal biophysics education. We developed, tested and assessed multiple new platforms that enable students and children to directly interact with and learn about microscopic biophysical processes: (1) Biotic games that enable local and online play using galvano- and photo-tactic stimulation of micro-swimmers, illustrating concepts such as biased random walks, Low Reynolds number hydrodynamics, and Brownian motion; (2) an undergraduate course where students learn optics, electronics, micro-fluidics, real time image analysis, and instrument control by building biotic games; and (3) a graduate class on the biophysics of multi-cellular systems that contains a cloud experimentation lab enabling students to execute open-ended chemotaxis experiments on slimemolds online, analyze their data, and build biophysical models. Our work aims to generate the equivalent excitement and educational impact for biophysics as robotics and video games have had for mechatronics and computer science, respectively. We also discuss how scaled-up cloud experimentation systems can support MOOCs with true lab components and life-science research in general.

  14. Quantum theory of incoherent THz emission of an interacting electron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M.; Schaarschmidt, M.; Knorr, A.; Hoyer, W.; Moloney, J. V.; Wright, E. M.; Kira, M.; Koch, S. W.

    2005-05-01

    The THz spectrum of the spontaneous emission of an interacting electron-ion gas, recently observed in laser pulse ionized air, is theoretically analyzed. Using the correlation expansion of the involved many particle system, the contribution of electron-molecule and electron-ion collisions to the transitions in the free electron continuum are treated. Depending on the particle density and the ion distribution, electromagnetic emission is found from the terahertz range up to optical frequencies.

  15. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Sitek, Anna [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Abdullah, Nzar Rauf [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Science Education, School of Science, University of Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region (Iraq); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, Miaoli (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University (Iceland)

    2016-05-15

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Low-energy elastic electron interactions with pyrimidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palihawadana, Prasanga; Sullivan, James; Buckman, Stephen; Brunger, Michael; Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent; Garcia, Gustavo; Blanco, F.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of measurements and calculations of elastic electron scattering from pyrimidine in the energy range 3-50 eV. Absolute differential and integral elastic cross sections have been measured using a crossed electron-molecule beam spectrometer and the relative flow technique. The measured cross sections are compared with results of calculations using the well-known Schwinger variational technique and an independent-atom model. Agreement between the measured differential cross sections and the results of the Schwinger calculations is good at lower energies but less satisfactory at higher energies where inelastic channels that should be open are kept closed in the calculations.

  17. Molecular Understanding of Fullerene - Electron Donor Interactions in Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ryno, Sean

    2016-09-13

    Organic solar cells hold promise of providing low-cost, renewable power generation, with current devices providing up to 13% power conversion efficiency. The rational design of more performant systems requires an in-depth understanding of the interactions between the electron donating and electron accepting materials within the active layers of these devices. Here, we explore works that give insight into the intermolecular interactions between electron donors and electron acceptors, and the impact of molecular orientations and environment on these interactions. We highlight, from a theoretical standpoint, the effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of charge carriers at the donor/acceptor interface and in the bulk and how these interactions influence the nature of the charge transfer states as wells as the charge separation and charge transport processes. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The interaction of electrons with polar-optical phonons in two- and three-dimensional electron systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassnig, R.

    1983-11-01

    The influence of the polar-optical interaction on the electronic energy levels at high magnetic fields has been investigated for two- and three-dimensional electron systems in weakly polar semiconductors. The interaction leads to a resonant splitting of the energy levels. For a three-dimensional syste m the well-known perturbation theoretical approaches have been compared with variational calculations. An improved Wigner-Brillouin-like perturbation theory has been developed which describes the polaron effects far away as well as in the resonance with high accuracy. For the two-dimensional electron systems a variational non-parabolicity model has been developed to describe the band structure. The influence of the electric and the magnetic potential on the energy levels is described analytically. The broadening of the Landau levels by ionizing impurity scattering and the cyuclotron resonance linewidth has been calculatd. The experimentally observed oscillation of the linweidth with the filling factor of the Landau levels can be well attributed to the variation of the screening strength. The influence of the distribution of the scattering centers with respect to the inversion layer has been calculated, which allows the determination of the material quality. The polaron interaction in two-dimensional electron systems has been first calculated in single-particle interaction for the zeroth and the first electric subband. The influence of the dynamic screening on the interaction strength has been investigated and a dependence on the filling factor as well as on the levelwidth was found. (Author)

  19. The interaction of swift electrons with surface excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1992-01-01

    For many decades swift electrons have comprised a powerful tool for the study of the dynamical properties of condensed matter. The development of this technique has involved much important physics. Here we sketch the historical background of the field and some important developments in theory and experiment. Possible directions for future research are indicated

  20. Interactive electronic storybooks for kindergartners to promote vocabulary growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, Daisy J. H.; Bus, Adriana G

    2012-01-01

    The goals of this study were to examine (a) whether extratextual vocabulary instructions embedded in electronic storybooks facilitated word learning over reading alone and (b) whether instructional formats that required children to invest more effort were more effective than formats that required

  1. Electron–electron interactions and the electrical resistivity of lithium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fermi velocity (= hkF/m∗), E∗. F is the Fermi energy, kF is the Fermi wave vector and kB is the Boltzmann constant. Further, * (asterisk) on the symbols denotes that the value is evaluated with the effective mass of the electron in lithium. In deriving the electrical resistivity ρee(T) from eq. (10), certain assumptions were made.

  2. Mechanisms of Interactions of Energetic Electrons with Epoxy Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Coulter, D. R.; Tsay, F. D.; Moacanin, J.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of deactivation of energy of excitation in a resin system was investigated on optical excitation as well as excitation by high energy electrons. This mechanism involves formation of excited state complexes, known as exciplexes which have a considerable charge transfer character. This mechanism will be used to develop a degradation model for epoxy matrix materials deployed in a space environment.

  3. Nonlinear optical response in intersubband transitions of a symmetric quantum well: Role of electron-electron interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Ibrahim

    2017-11-01

    We investigate theoretically the saturation problem of the nonlinear intersubband response in a symmetric quantum well. We first obtain the analytical expressions for the absorption/dispersion spectra from the steady-state solutions of the nonlinear density matrix equations. This expressions include the depolarization effect that results from the electron-electron interactions and also depends on the population difference between the first two subbands. We calculate the line shape of the dispersion spectrum and show that the dispersion spectrum becomes non-antisymetric as the intensity of the radiation increases. For larger values of the electron sheet density, this distortion becomes more apparent. We also find that the optical bistability can be obtained for appropriate values of the electron sheet density and the intensity of the optical radiation. Our results also show that the electron redistribution among the subbands by additional external factor has a dramatic effect on the nonlinear intersubband response.

  4. Confinement of acoustical modes due to the electron-phonon interaction within 2D-electron gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochelap, V.A.; Gulseren, O.

    1992-09-01

    We study the confinement of acoustical modes within 2DEG due only to the electron-phonon interaction. The confined modes split out from the bulk phonons even at uniform lattice parameters, when the 2DEG is created by means of modulation doping. The effect is more pronounced when the wave vector q of the modes increases and is maximum at q = 2 k F (k F is the Fermi wave vector). In the case of several electron sheets the additional features of the confinement effect appear. In the limit of the strong electron-phonon coupling and high surface concentration of the electrons the considered system can suffer Peierls-type phase transition. In this case periodical deformation of the lattice and charge density wave are confined within the electron sheet. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs

  5. Interaction Region Design for the Electron-Ion Collider eRHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Montag, Christoph; Tepikian, Steven; Wang, Dong

    2005-01-01

    To facilitate the study of collisions between 10 GeV polarized electrons and 100 GeV/u heavy ions or 250 GeV polarized protons at high luminosities, adding a 10 GeV electron storage ring to the existing RHIC complex has been proposed. The interaction region of this electron-ion collider eRHIC has to provide the required low-beta focusing, while simultaneously accomodating the synchrotron radiation fan generated by beam separation close to the interaction point, which is particularly challenging. The latest design status of the eRHIC interaction region is presented.

  6. Local biotic adaptation of trees and shrubs to plant neighbors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Kevin C.; Wood, Troy E.; Kolb, Thomas E.; Hersch-Green, Erika; Shuster, Stephen M.; Gehring, Catherine A.; Hart, Stephen C.; Allan, Gerard J.; Whitham, Thomas G.

    2017-01-01

    Natural selection as a result of plant–plant interactions can lead to local biotic adaptation. This may occur where species frequently interact and compete intensely for resources limiting growth, survival, and reproduction. Selection is demonstrated by comparing a genotype interacting with con- or hetero-specific sympatric neighbor genotypes with a shared site-level history (derived from the same source location), to the same genotype interacting with foreign neighbor genotypes (from different sources). Better genotype performance in sympatric than allopatric neighborhoods provides evidence of local biotic adaptation. This pattern might be explained by selection to avoid competition by shifting resource niches (differentiation) or by interactions benefitting one or more members (facilitation). We tested for local biotic adaptation among two riparian trees, Populus fremontii and Salix gooddingii, and the shrub Salix exigua by transplanting replicated genotypes from multiple source locations to a 17 000 tree common garden with sympatric and allopatric treatments along the Colorado River in California. Three major patterns were observed: 1) across species, 62 of 88 genotypes grew faster with sympatric neighbors than allopatric neighbors; 2) these growth rates, on an individual tree basis, were 44, 15 and 33% higher in sympatric than allopatric treatments for P. fremontii, S. exigua and S. gooddingii, respectively, and; 3) survivorship was higher in sympatric treatments for P. fremontiiand S. exigua. These results support the view that fitness of foundation species supporting diverse communities and dominating ecosystem processes is determined by adaptive interactions among multiple plant species with the outcome that performance depends on the genetic identity of plant neighbors. The occurrence of evolution in a plant-community context for trees and shrubs builds on ecological evolutionary research that has demonstrated co-evolution among herbaceous taxa, and

  7. Interaction of relativistic electrons with plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, H.W.

    1992-07-01

    Runaway electrons can cause severe damage to plasma facing components of large tokamaks. The designs proposed for the first wall and divertor of the next large fusion experiment, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), are investigated. Energies of up to 300 MeV per electron and surface energy depositions of 30 MJ/m 2 are assumed. The GEANT code originating from high energy physics was used to model the energy deposition [J/cm 3 ] quantitatively as a function of the penetration depth and material. A two dimensional representation of the geometry was chosen. For the third coordinate the assumption of symmetric conditions is very close to reality. The magnetic field was included in the analysis. It causes bending back of reflected charged particles and reduced penetration depth of the electrons due to the gyration of the electrons around the magnetic field lines. The energy deposition in the bulk material for a given surface energy load is roughly independent of the incident angle and energy (above 100 MeV) since the main physical process of the energy loss is the formation of an electromagnetic shower, i.e. rapid dissipation of the initial energy into many electrons, positrons and photons. Typical divertor designs protect the cooling tubes with a 1 cm thick graphite layer. Melting of such molybdenum (copper) cooling tubes occurs at a heat load of 50 (25) MJ/m 2 . Every additional cm of graphite roughly doubles the runaway protection. Since it is proposed to operate ITER with low cooling water temperatures (T H2O 2 . (orig.)

  8. Intense Microsecond Electron Beam Interactions with Low-Pressure Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-28

    1986) investigated collisional ex- citation of neutral argon due to relativistic electrons. In this paper, the methods of Peter - son and Allen (1971...0.0626 38. 3d’ /21] - 4P ( 2 P3 1 2 1 0.4305 0.032739. 3d’( 2D3/1 - 4p ( 2 Pt/ 3.007 0.0447 S rUdikive 40. 3df[ %aj4) - 4p[ /21 0.4122 0.0266S

  9. Electronic Field Trip: Journalism's New Frontier Involves Live, Interactive Broadcast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMar, Jason

    1998-01-01

    Describes the "Newseum," a recently opened museum in Arlington, Virginia, dedicated to journalism and freedom of speech. Lists its highlights: free admission, an interactive newsroom, a 126-foot video wall, a news history gallery, a domed theater with a 20-by-40-foot high-definition video screen, and "The Freedom Wall." (PA)

  10. Computerized creation of interactive electronic technical manuals (IETM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galin, I.Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The author informs that the automated system of developing and maintaining the operational documentation (OD) (Technical Guide Builder) has been first developed and experimentally tested. The obtained result raises the competitiveness of Russian aircraft in international markets. The author offers methods and technology of OD formation, allowing to produce interactive OD for domestic aircraft industry, issued according to international standards in several languages [ru

  11. Orthogonal interactions between nitryl derivatives and electron donors: pnictogen bonds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sanchez-Sanz, Goar; Trujillo, Cristina; Solimannejad, M.; Alkorta, I.; Elguero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 34 (2013), s. 14310-14318 ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : center-dot-N * perturbation-theory approach * pnicogen bonds * noncovalent interactions * hydrogen-bonds Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.198, year: 2013

  12. Experimental evidence for interactions between anions and electron-deficient aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Orion B; Johnson, Darren W

    2009-06-14

    This feature article summarizes our research aimed at using electron-deficient aromatic rings to bind anions in the context of complementary research in this active field. Particular attention is paid to the different types of interactions exhibited between anions and electron-deficient arenes in solution. The 120+ references cited in this article underscore the flurry of recent activity by numerous researchers in this field, which was relatively nascent when our efforts began in 2005. While the interaction of anions with electron-deficient aromatic rings has recently garnered much attention by supramolecular chemists, the observation of these interactions is not a recent discovery. Therefore, we begin with a historical perspective on early examples of anions interacting with electron-deficient arenes. An introduction to recent (and not so recent) computational investigations concerning anions and electron-deficient aromatic rings as well as a brief structural survey of crystalline examples of this interaction are provided. Finally, the limited solution-based observations of anions interacting with electron-deficient aromatic rings are summarized to introduce our current investigations in this area. We highlight three different systems from our lab where anion-arene interactions have been investigated. First, we show that tandem hydrogen bonds and anion-arene interactions augment halide binding in solution. Second, a crystallographic and computational study highlights the multiple types of interactions possible between anions and electron-deficient arenes. Third, we summarize the first example of a class of designed receptors that emphasize the different types of anion-arene interactions possible in solution.

  13. Direct observation of children's preferences and activity levels during interactive and online electronic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cindy H P; Lam, Jessica W K; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2010-07-01

    Interactive electronic games have recently been popularized and are believed to help promote children's physical activity (PA). The purpose of the study was to examine preferences and PA levels during interactive and online electronic games among overweight and nonoverweight boys and girls. Using a modification of the SOFIT, we systematically observed 70 Hong Kong Chinese children (35 boys, 35 girls; 50 nonoverweight, 20 overweight), age 9 to 12 years, during 2 60-minute recreation sessions and recorded their game mode choices and PA levels. During Session One children could play either an interactive or an online electronic bowling game and during Session Two they could play an interactive or an online electronic running game. Children chose to play the games during 94% of session time and split this time between interactive (52%) and online (48%) versions. They engaged in significantly more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during interactive games than their online electronic versions (70% vs. 2% of game time). Boys and nonoverweight children expended relatively more energy during the interactive games than girls and overweight children, respectively. New-generation interactive games can facilitate physical activity in children, and given the opportunity children may select them over sedentary versions.

  14. Modified Monte Carlo method for study of electron transport in degenerate electron gas in the presence of electron–electron interactions, application to graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Piotr, E-mail: pborow@poczta.onet.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Thobel, Jean-Luc, E-mail: jean-luc.thobel@iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologies, UMR CNRS 8520, Université Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cédex (France); Adamowicz, Leszek, E-mail: adamo@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland)

    2017-07-15

    Standard computational methods used to take account of the Pauli Exclusion Principle into Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of electron transport in semiconductors may give unphysical results in low field regime, where obtained electron distribution function takes values exceeding unity. Modified algorithms were already proposed and allow to correctly account for electron scattering on phonons or impurities. Present paper extends this approach and proposes improved simulation scheme allowing including Pauli exclusion principle for electron–electron (e–e) scattering into MC simulations. Simulations with significantly reduced computational cost recreate correct values of the electron distribution function. Proposed algorithm is applied to study transport properties of degenerate electrons in graphene with e–e interactions. This required adapting the treatment of e–e scattering in the case of linear band dispersion relation. Hence, this part of the simulation algorithm is described in details.

  15. The Natural Biotic Environment of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulenburg, Hinrich; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Organisms evolve in response to their natural environment. Consideration of natural ecological parameters are thus of key importance for our understanding of an organism’s biology. Curiously, the natural ecology of the model species Caenorhabditis elegans has long been neglected, even though this nematode has become one of the most intensively studied models in biological research. This lack of interest changed ∼10 yr ago. Since then, an increasing number of studies have focused on the nematode’s natural ecology. Yet many unknowns still remain. Here, we provide an overview of the currently available information on the natural environment of C. elegans. We focus on the biotic environment, which is usually less predictable and thus can create high selective constraints that are likely to have had a strong impact on C. elegans evolution. This nematode is particularly abundant in microbe-rich environments, especially rotting plant matter such as decomposing fruits and stems. In this environment, it is part of a complex interaction network, which is particularly shaped by a species-rich microbial community. These microbes can be food, part of a beneficial gut microbiome, parasites and pathogens, and possibly competitors. C. elegans is additionally confronted with predators; it interacts with vector organisms that facilitate dispersal to new habitats, and also with competitors for similar food environments, including competitors from congeneric and also the same species. Full appreciation of this nematode’s biology warrants further exploration of its natural environment and subsequent integration of this information into the well-established laboratory-based research approaches. PMID:28476862

  16. On the gyro resonance electron-whistler interaction in transition layers of near-earth plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erokhin, N.S.; Zol'nikova, N.N.; Mikhajlovskaya, L.A.

    1996-01-01

    Gyro resonance interaction of electrons with low amplitude triggered whistler in the transition layers of the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasma that correspond to the blurred jumps of the magnetic field and plasma concentration was studied

  17. EXPERIMENTS ON WAVE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN PLASMA AND AN ELECTRON STREAM IN A MAGNETIC FIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    a collimating magnetic field of 200 oersted intensity. The theory and measurements show the instability to be due to the interaction of the electron cyclotron wave in the plasma with the ’plasma wave’ in the beam.

  18. Influence of the Electron-Electron Interaction in the Surface Valence Band on Low Energy Ion Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Vladimir M.; Devreese, Jozef T.

    1996-03-01

    The influence of the electron-electron interaction in the surface valence band on the low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) is investigated in the framework of the modified Muda---Newns approach. With this aim the Anderson-type electron-electron interaction term is taken into account in the Hamiltonian of the system and a resulting nonlinear set of equations of motion for the occupation number matrix is solved for various values of the effective electron-electron coupling constant U. It is demonstrated that for increasing U the steady-state value of the atomic level occupation number after the scattering increases. As a result, the ion survival probability is found, e. g., for the scattering of ^4He^+ ions from Cu to be a decreasing function of U. These results allow a consistent interpretation of the recent experimental data on low-energy He^+ ion scattering from metals. The work is supported by the C.E.C. Human Capital and Mobility Project "Quantification of Surface Analysis by Low Energy Ion Scattering". Also at the Technical University of Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

  19. Electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ding; Xie, Bai-Song; Ali Bake, Muhammad; Sang, Hai-Bo; Zhao, Xue-Yan; Wu, Hai-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Some typical electrons trajectories around a bubble regime in intense laser plasma interaction are investigated theoretically. By considering a modification of the fields and ellipsoid bubble shape due to the presence of residual electrons in the bubble regime, we study in detail the electrons nonlinear dynamics with or without laser pulse. To examine the electron dynamical behaviors, a set of typical electrons, which locate initially at the front of the bubble, on the transverse edge and at the bottom of the bubble respectively, are chosen for study. It is found that the range of trapped electrons in the case with laser pulse is a little narrower than that without laser pulse. The partial phase portraits for electrons around the bubble are presented numerically and their characteristic behaviors are discussed theoretically. Implication of our results on the high quality electron beam generation is also discussed briefly

  20. Characterization of Laser-Electron Interaction at the BESSY Femtoslicing Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Kachel, Torsten; Mitzner, Rolf; Quast, Torsten; Senf, Friedmar

    2004-01-01

    A "femtoslicing" facility to generate ultrashort x-ray pulses by laser-electron interaction [1] is being commissioned at the BESSY II storage ring. The energy modulation of electrons by femtosecond laser pulses of several mJ in an undulator is a good test case for FEL seeding schemes. The dependence of the interaction efficiency on various parameters is measured and compared to simulations and analytical results.

  1. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  2. Many-body theory of electron-positron interaction in metallic lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, H. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    1997-10-01

    Development of hypernetted-chain approach to the electronic structure of simple metals offers the possibility to perform many-body calculations of the electron-positron interaction in these materials. A theory of this interaction is proposed and applied to lithium. It leads to nonlinear three-dimensions integro-differential equation for the enhancement amplitude. This equation is solved for two cases in which it reduces to one dimension. (author). 4 refs, 3 figs.

  3. Wave-Particle Interactions on Relativistic Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-16

    block nuebstj C-, S_ i l iN .... . .6l I~A.S i~In V )d... D D 1473 EDO ,o,, OF 1 NOv i IS 02SOLTE . S/NC 007-014-CL601 , -T ASIeStC4-UIrYl CLAS’.IFICA...differential equation and per- nits the electron orbits to turn in the wave frame, corresponding as one advances along the beam in the direction of...state helical orbits are included. If perturbed, these orbits oscillate about equilibrium, so that substantial gain enhancement can occur if the

  4. Unraveling the acoustic electron-phonon interaction in graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Thygesen, Kristian S.; Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2012-01-01

    Using a first-principles approach we calculate the electron-phonon couplings in graphene for the transverse and longitudinal acoustic phonons. Analytic forms of the coupling matrix elements valid in the long-wavelength limit are found to give an almost quantitative description of the first...... that the intrinsic effective acoustic deformation potential of graphene is Ξeff=6.8 eV and that the temperature dependence of the mobility μ~T-α in the Bloch-Gru¨neisen regime increases beyond an α=4 dependence even in the absence of screening when the true coupling matrix elements are considered. The α>4...

  5. Interactive electronic storybooks for kindergartners to promote vocabulary growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Daisy J H; Bus, Adriana G

    2012-05-01

    The goals of this study were to examine (a) whether extratextual vocabulary instructions embedded in electronic storybooks facilitated word learning over reading alone and (b) whether instructional formats that required children to invest more effort were more effective than formats that required less effort. A computer-based "assistant" was added to electronic storybooks. The assistant posed extratextual vocabulary questions. Questions were presented in a multiple-choice format so that children could respond by clicking on the picture that best represented the target word. In Experiment 1 (N=20), children read stories with and without questions. Children learned more words when reading with questions than without. Expressive vocabulary was particularly affected by question insertion. In Experiment 2 (N=27), we used two methods for teaching words: one requiring more effort on the part of children (questions) and one requiring less effort ("hotspots" that provide definitions). Results revealed that questions were more beneficial than just providing a definition or synonym of the target word. Implications for designing new e-book apps are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Quasi-emf under contact interaction of bodies during cutting as electron potential energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, S.V.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that cutting quasi-emf measured under the contact interaction of a number of pure metals (molybdenum, titanium, niobium, iron, copper, beryllium, lead, nickel and cobalt), graphite and silicon correlates closely with Fermi levels calculated for them, i.e. it reflects the potential electron energy. Correlation is observed at different cutting rate (temperature) and consequently at different electron kinetic energy

  7. Restrictions on the Quasi-Linear Description of Electron-Chorus Interaction in the Earth's Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.; Sibeck, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of electrons with coherent chorus waves in the random phase approximation can be described as quasi-linear diffusion for waves with amplitudes below some limit. The limit is calculated for relativistic and non-relativistic electrons. For stronger waves, the friction force should be taken into account.

  8. Electron–electron interactions in the chemical bond: “1/3” Effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The prominent “1/3” effect observed in the Hall effect plateaus of two- dimensional electron gas (2DEG) systems has been postulated to indicating 1/3 fractional charge quasiparticle excitations arising from electron–electron interactions. Tunneling shot-noise experiments on 2DEF exhibiting fractional quantum Hall ...

  9. Biotic replacement and mass extinction of the Ediacara biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darroch, Simon A F; Sperling, Erik A; Boag, Thomas H; Racicot, Rachel A; Mason, Sara J; Morgan, Alex S; Tweedt, Sarah; Myrow, Paul; Johnston, David T; Erwin, Douglas H; Laflamme, Marc

    2015-09-07

    The latest Neoproterozoic extinction of the Ediacara biota has been variously attributed to catastrophic removal by perturbations to global geochemical cycles, 'biotic replacement' by Cambrian-type ecosystem engineers, and a taphonomic artefact. We perform the first critical test of the 'biotic replacement' hypothesis using combined palaeoecological and geochemical data collected from the youngest Ediacaran strata in southern Namibia. We find that, even after accounting for a variety of potential sampling and taphonomic biases, the Ediacaran assemblage preserved at Farm Swartpunt has significantly lower genus richness than older assemblages. Geochemical and sedimentological analyses confirm an oxygenated and non-restricted palaeoenvironment for fossil-bearing sediments, thus suggesting that oxygen stress and/or hypersalinity are unlikely to be responsible for the low diversity of communities preserved at Swartpunt. These combined analyses suggest depauperate communities characterized the latest Ediacaran and provide the first quantitative support for the biotic replacement model for the end of the Ediacara biota. Although more sites (especially those recording different palaeoenvironments) are undoubtedly needed, this study provides the first quantitative palaeoecological evidence to suggest that evolutionary innovation, ecosystem engineering and biological interactions may have ultimately caused the first mass extinction of complex life. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Electron - polar acoustical phonon interactions in nitride based diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well via hot electron magnetotransport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Ankur; Shinde, Satyam; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the hot electron transport properties like carrier energy and momentum scattering rates and electron energy loss rates are calculated via interactions of electrons with polar acoustical phonons for Mn doped BN quantum well in BN nanosheets via piezoelectric scattering and deformation potential mechanisms at low temperatures with high electric field. Electron energy loss rate increases with the electric field. It is observed that at low temperatures and for low electric field the phonon absorption is taking place whereas, for sufficient large electric field, phonon emission takes place. Under the piezoelectric (polar acoustical phonon) scattering mechanism, the carrier scattering rate decreases with the reduction of electric field at low temperatures wherein, the scattering rate variation with electric field is limited by a specific temperature beyond which there is no any impact of electric field on such scattering

  11. Final Report on Investigation of the Electron Interactions in Graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Philip [Columbia University

    2015-02-14

    In graphene, combined with the real spin degree of freedom, which exhibits SU(2) symmetry, the total internal degrees of freedom of graphene carriers is thus described by a larger SU(4) symmetry, which produces a richer space for potential phenomena of emergent correlated electron phenomena. The major part of this proposal is exploring this unique multicomponent correlated system in the quantum limit. In the current period of DOE BES support we have made several key advances that will serve as a foundation for the new studies in this proposal. Employing the high-mobility encapsulated graphene heterostructures developed during the current phase of research, we have investigated spin and valley quantum Hall ferromagnetism in graphene and discovered a spin phase transition leading to a quantum spin Hall analogue. We have also observed the fractal quantum Hall effect arising from the Hofstadter’s butterfly energy spectrum. In addition, we have discovered multiband transport phenomena in bilayer graphene at high carrier densities.

  12. Theoretical investigation of electron-positive ion/atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msezane, A.Z.

    1992-01-01

    Very brief summaries are given on three research topics. Electron impact elastic, excitation, and total cross sections for K were investigated by using elaborate Cl target wave functions in the close-coupling approximation. Photoionization cross sections from ground-state Na were calculated near the 2s 2 2p 5 3s and 2s2p 6 3s inner-shell thresholds; also, the photoionization cross sections of excited 3p 2 P o and 3d 2 D states were calculated with the R-matrix methodology near the 2s2p 6 3s thresholds. A numerical approach was developed to calculate the charge transfer matrix elements for ion-atom(ion) collisions; this was used for the proton-hydrogen collision problem as an illustration

  13. Measurement of the magnetic interaction between two bound electrons of two separate ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Akerman, Nitzan; Navon, Nir; Glickman, Yinnon; Ozeri, Roee

    2014-06-19

    Electrons have an intrinsic, indivisible, magnetic dipole aligned with their internal angular momentum (spin). The magnetic interaction between two electronic spins can therefore impose a change in their orientation. Similar dipolar magnetic interactions exist between other spin systems and have been studied experimentally. Examples include the interaction between an electron and its nucleus and the interaction between several multi-electron spin complexes. The challenge in observing such interactions for two electrons is twofold. First, at the atomic scale, where the coupling is relatively large, it is often dominated by the much larger Coulomb exchange counterpart. Second, on scales that are substantially larger than the atomic, the magnetic coupling is very weak and can be well below the ambient magnetic noise. Here we report the measurement of the magnetic interaction between the two ground-state spin-1/2 valence electrons of two (88)Sr(+) ions, co-trapped in an electric Paul trap. We varied the ion separation, d, between 2.18 and 2.76 micrometres and measured the electrons' weak, millihertz-scale, magnetic interaction as a function of distance, in the presence of magnetic noise that was six orders of magnitude larger than the magnetic fields the electrons apply on each other. The cooperative spin dynamics was kept coherent for 15 seconds, during which spin entanglement was generated, as verified by a negative measured value of -0.16 for the swap entanglement witness. The sensitivity necessary for this measurement was provided by restricting the spin evolution to a decoherence-free subspace that is immune to collective magnetic field noise. Our measurements show a d(-3.0(4)) distance dependence for the coupling, consistent with the inverse-cube law.

  14. Magnetization of a two-dimensional electron gas with a spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Naomichi; Shirasaki, Ryoen; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2006-04-01

    We argue that a two-dimensional electron gas with a spin-orbit interaction is magnetized when a voltage is applied with the Fermi level tuned to be in the energy gap. The magnetization is an indication of spin-carrying currents due to the spin-orbit interaction. (author)

  15. A Proposed Performance-Based System for Teacher Interactive Electronic Continuous Professional Development (TIE-CPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, Rafiza Abdul; Yusop, Farrah Dina; Idris, Aizal Yusrina; Al-Sinaiyah, Yanbu; Halili, Siti Hajar

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduces Teacher Interactive Electronic Continuous Professional Development (TIE-CPD), an online interactive training system. The framework and methodology of TIE-CPD are designed with functionalities comparable with existing e-training systems. The system design and development literature offers several methodology and framework…

  16. Electronic Interactions of n-Doped Perylene Diimide Groups Appended to Polynorbornene Chains: Implications for Electron Transport in Organic Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh T; Biberdorf, Joshua D; Holliday, Bradley J; Jones, Richard A

    2017-11-01

    A polymer consisting of a polynorbornene backbone with perylene diimide (PDI) pendant groups on each monomeric unit is synthesized via ring opening metathesis polymerization. The PDI pendant groups along the polymer backbone, studied by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence emission, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in addition to electrochemical methods, show evidence of molecular aggregation and corresponding electronic coupling with neighboring groups, which forms pathways for efficient electron transport from one group to another in a specific reduced form. When n-doped, the title polymer shows redox conductivity of 5.4 × 10 -3 S cm -1 , comparable with crystalline PDI materials, and is therefore a promising material for use in organic electronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Interaction of relativistic short proton bunches with space charge limited electron clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. B. Petrov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The electron cloud buildup and interaction with a train of relativistic, short proton bunches is studied using particle-in-cell codes. The simulation models describe the electron generation at the beam pipe wall as well as the wakefield behind the bunches. The study focuses on the space charge limited (saturated cloud profile between the bunches and on the incoherent tune spread caused by the interaction of the saturated cloud with individual bunches. Analytical expressions describing the pinch of a saturated electron cloud are derived and compared to simulation results.

  18. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Ikonnikov, A. V.; Orlita, M.; Sadofyev, Yu. G.; Goiran, M.; Teppe, F.; Knap, W.

    2015-01-01

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction

  19. Effect of electron-electron interaction on cyclotron resonance in high-mobility InAs/AlSb quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru; Gavrilenko, V. I. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University, 23 Prospekt Gagarina, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Ikonnikov, A. V. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures, Russian Academy of Sciences, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod, GSP-105 (Russian Federation); Orlita, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-G), CNRS, 25 rue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble (France); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991, GSP-1, 53 Leninskiy Prospect (Russian Federation); Goiran, M. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnétiques Intenses (LNCMI-T), CNRS, 143 Avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [Laboratoire Charles Coulomb (L2C), UMR CNRS 5221, GIS-TERALAB, Universite Montpellier II, 34095 Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-21

    We report observation of electron-electron (e-e) interaction effect on cyclotron resonance (CR) in InAs/AlSb quantum well heterostructures. High mobility values allow us to observe strongly pronounced triple splitting of CR line at noninteger filling factors of Landau levels ν. At magnetic fields, corresponding to ν > 4, experimental values of CR energies are in good agreement with single-electron calculations on the basis of eight-band k ⋅ p Hamiltonian. In the range of filling factors 3 < ν < 4 pronounced, splitting of CR line, exceeding significantly the difference in single-electron CR energies, is discovered. The strength of the splitting increases when occupation of the partially filled Landau level tends to a half, being in qualitative agreement with previous prediction by MacDonald and Kallin [Phys. Rev. B 40, 5795 (1989)]. We demonstrate that such behaviour of CR modes can be quantitatively described if one takes into account both electron correlations and the mixing between conduction and valence bands in the calculations of matrix elements of e-e interaction.

  20. Coevolutionary aesthetics in human and biotic artworlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a coevolutionary theory of aesthetics that encompasses both biotic and human arts. Anthropocentric perspectives in aesthetics prevent the recognition of the ontological complexity of the aesthetics of nature, and the aesthetic agency of many non-human organisms. The process of evaluative coevolution is shared by all biotic advertisements. I propose that art consists of a form of communication that coevolves with its own evaluation. Art and art history are population phenomena. I expand Arthur Danto's Artworld concept to any aesthetic population of producers and evaluators. Current concepts of art cannot exclusively circumscribe the human arts from many forms of non-human biotic art. Without assuming an arbitrarily anthropocentric perspective, any concept of art will need to engage with biodiversity, and either recognize many instances of biotic advertisements as art, or exclude some instances of human art. Coevolutionary aesthetic theory provides a heuristic account of aesthetic change in both human and biotic artworlds, including the coevolutionary origin of aesthetic properties and aesthetic value within artworlds. Restructuring aesthetics, art criticism, and art history without human beings at the organizing centers of these disciplines stimulate new progress in our understanding of art, and the unique human contributions to aesthetics and aesthetic diversity.

  1. Attractive electron-electron interactions at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prawiroatmodjo, Guenevere E D K

    state is found, and transport characteristics are described to originate from attractive electron-electron interactions that result in a negative effective charging energy U. Further, the excitation spectrum is explored and compared to calculations based on a single-orbital Anderson model with negative...... U. We find that for strong tunnel coupling, the negative U gives rise to the charge Kondo effect, where an effective ’charge flip’ resonance at the pair tunneling resonance enhances conductivity at low temperature and magnetic field....

  2. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  3. Electron spin interactions in chemistry and biology fundamentals, methods, reactions mechanisms, magnetic phenomena, structure investigation

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the versatile and pivotal role of electron spin interactions in nature. It provides the background, methodologies and tools for basic areas related to spin interactions, such as spin chemistry and biology, electron transfer, light energy conversion, photochemistry, radical reactions, magneto-chemistry and magneto-biology. The book also includes an overview of designing advanced magnetic materials, optical and spintronic devices and photo catalysts. This monograph appeals to scientists and graduate students working in the areas related to spin interactions physics, biophysics, chemistry and chemical engineering.

  4. Theoretical study of ultrarelativistic laser-electron interaction with radiation reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seto K.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available When the laser intensity becomes higher than 1022  W/cm2, the motion of an electron becomes relativistic, and emits large amounts of radiation. This radiation energy loss transferred to the kinetic energy loss of the electron, is treated as an external force, the “radiation reaction force”. We show the new equation of motion including this radiation reaction and the simulation method, as well as results of single electron system or dual electrons system with Liénard-Wiechert field interaction.

  5. Interactive stereo electron microscopy enhanced with virtual reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E.Wes; Bastacky, S.Jacob; Schwartz, Kenneth S.

    2001-12-17

    An analytical system is presented that is used to take measurements of objects perceived in stereo image pairs obtained from a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Our system operates by presenting a single stereo view that contains stereo image data obtained from the SEM, along with geometric representations of two types of virtual measurement instruments, a ''protractor'' and a ''caliper''. The measurements obtained from this system are an integral part of a medical study evaluating surfactant, a liquid coating the inner surface of the lung which makes possible the process of breathing. Measurements of the curvature and contact angle of submicron diameter droplets of a fluorocarbon deposited on the surface of airways are performed in order to determine surface tension of the air/liquid interface. This approach has been extended to a microscopic level from the techniques of traditional surface science by measuring submicrometer rather than millimeter diameter droplets, as well as the lengths and curvature of cilia responsible for movement of the surfactant, the airway's protective liquid blanket. An earlier implementation of this approach for taking angle measurements from objects perceived in stereo image pairs using a virtual protractor is extended in this paper to include distance measurements and to use a unified view model. The system is built around a unified view model that is derived from microscope-specific parameters, such as focal length, visible area and magnification. The unified view model ensures that the underlying view models and resultant binocular parallax cues are consistent between synthetic and acquired imagery. When the view models are consistent, it is possible to take measurements of features that are not constrained to lie within the projection plane. The system is first calibrated using non-clinical data of known size and resolution. Using the SEM, stereo image pairs of grids and spheres of

  6. The influence of environmental, biotic and spatial factors on diatom metacommunity structure in Swedish headwater streams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Göthe

    Full Text Available Stream assemblages are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering and biotic interactions and regional factors (e.g., dispersal related processes. The relative importance of environmental and spatial (i.e., regional factors structuring stream assemblages has been frequently assessed in previous large-scale studies, but biotic predictors (potentially reflecting local biotic interactions have rarely been included. Diatoms may be useful for studying the effect of trophic interactions on community structure since: (1 a majority of experimental studies shows significant grazing effects on diatom species composition, and (2 assemblages can be divided into guilds that have different susceptibility to grazing. We used a dataset from boreal headwater streams in south-central Sweden (covering a spatial extent of ∼14000 km(2, which included information about diatom taxonomic composition, abundance of invertebrate grazers (biotic factor, environmental (physicochemical and spatial factors (obtained through spatial eigenfunction analyses. We assessed the relative importance of environmental, biotic, and spatial factors structuring diatom assemblages, and performed separate analyses on different diatom guilds. Our results showed that the diatom assemblages were mainly structured by environmental factors. However, unique spatial and biological gradients, specific to different guilds and unrelated to each other, were also evident. We conclude that biological predictors, in combination with environmental and spatial variables, can reveal a more complete picture of the local vs. regional control of species assemblages in lotic environments. Biotic factors should therefore not be overlooked in applied research since they can capture additional local control and therefore increase accuracy and performance of predictive models. The inclusion of biotic predictors did, however, not significantly influence the unique fraction explained by spatial

  7. The Influence of Environmental, Biotic and Spatial Factors on Diatom Metacommunity Structure in Swedish Headwater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göthe, Emma; Angeler, David G.; Gottschalk, Steffi; Löfgren, Stefan; Sandin, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Stream assemblages are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering and biotic interactions) and regional factors (e.g., dispersal related processes). The relative importance of environmental and spatial (i.e., regional) factors structuring stream assemblages has been frequently assessed in previous large-scale studies, but biotic predictors (potentially reflecting local biotic interactions) have rarely been included. Diatoms may be useful for studying the effect of trophic interactions on community structure since: (1) a majority of experimental studies shows significant grazing effects on diatom species composition, and (2) assemblages can be divided into guilds that have different susceptibility to grazing. We used a dataset from boreal headwater streams in south-central Sweden (covering a spatial extent of ∼14000 km2), which included information about diatom taxonomic composition, abundance of invertebrate grazers (biotic factor), environmental (physicochemical) and spatial factors (obtained through spatial eigenfunction analyses). We assessed the relative importance of environmental, biotic, and spatial factors structuring diatom assemblages, and performed separate analyses on different diatom guilds. Our results showed that the diatom assemblages were mainly structured by environmental factors. However, unique spatial and biological gradients, specific to different guilds and unrelated to each other, were also evident. We conclude that biological predictors, in combination with environmental and spatial variables, can reveal a more complete picture of the local vs. regional control of species assemblages in lotic environments. Biotic factors should therefore not be overlooked in applied research since they can capture additional local control and therefore increase accuracy and performance of predictive models. The inclusion of biotic predictors did, however, not significantly influence the unique fraction explained by spatial factors

  8. Analytical Determination of the Confinement Potential and Coupling Constant of Spin--Orbit Interactions of Electrons in Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Dineykhan, M; Zhaugasheva, S A; Al Farabi Kazakh State National University. Almaty

    2005-01-01

    Multilayer nanocrystalline structure is represented by the electrostatic field inducted by total image charge, and the confinement potential for electrons is determined. Assuming that at a given distance the confinement potential is equal to the Coulomb repulsion and an interaction between electrons becomes spin-orbit, the constant of the spin-orbit interaction of electrons in nanostructures is determined. The dependence of the constant of the spin-orbit interaction on environment parameters and the distance between electrons is studied.

  9. Strong quadrupole interaction in electron paramagnetic resonance. Study of the indium hexacyanide (III) in KCl irradiated with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vugman, N.V.

    1973-08-01

    The radiation effects in ]Ir III (CN) 6 ] 3- diamagnetic complexe inserted in the KCl lattice and irradiated with electrons of 2MeV by electron spin resonance (ESR) are analysed. Formulas for g and A tensors in the ligand field approximation, are derivated to calculate non coupling electron density in the metal. The X polarization field of inner shells is positive, indicating a 6s function mixture in the non coupling electron molecular orbital. The observed hyperfine structure is assigned to 4 equivalent nitrogen and one non equivalent nitrogen. This hypothesis is verified by experience of isotope substitution with 15 N. The s and p spin density in ligands are calculated and discussed in terms of molecular obitals. The effects of strong quadrupole interaction into the EPR spectra of ]Ir II (CN) 5 ] 3- complex are analysed by MAGNSPEC computer program to diagonalize the Spin Hamiltonian of the system. Empiric rules for EPR espectrum interpretation with strong quadrupole interaction. A review of EPR technique and a review of main concepts of crystal-field and ligand field theories, are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Quantitative Assessment of MeV Electron Acceleration in Non-Linear Interactions with VLF Chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.

    2016-12-01

    For occurrences of apparent rapid acceleration of radiation belt electrons to MeV energies at L 4, we examine the energy gained by seed electrons in non-linear (NL) interactions with VLF chorus rising tones. For the 17-18 March 2013 storm, observations of outer zone radiation belt electron populations were made with the magEIS and REPT instruments on Van Allen Probes A & B. These reveal that MeV electron fluxes at L=4.2 increased 10-fold in 30 min at the times of 30 - 100 keV electron injections during "substorm" dipolarizations. Simultaneous enhancements of VLF chorus were observed with the EMFISIS wave instruments. Three-axis burst mode observations of wave electric and magnetic fields have been used to investigate electron interactions with individual chorus rising tones on a sub millisecond time scale. Wave amplitudes at 2500 Hz were 1 nT (|B|) and 30 mV/m (|E|). Frequency - time characteristics of the observed chorus elements closely match those predicted by NL electron-chorus interaction modeling [Omura et al., 2015, J. Geophys. Res. Space Phys., 120, doi:10.1002/2015JA021563]. For seed electrons with initial energies 50 keV to 8 MeV, subpacket wave analysis was used to quantify resonant electron energy gain both by relativistic turning acceleration and by ultrarelativistic acceleration through nonlinear trapping by the chorus waves. Electrons with 1-2 MeV initial energy can experience a 300 keV total energy gain in NL interactions with a single 200 msec rising tone. Maximum energy gain from interaction with a single 10 msec subpacket was 100 keV for a 2 MeV seed electron. Examining a number of chorus elements at different locations during the rapid local acceleration of the radiation belt during this event, we conclude that seed electrons (100s keV - 5 MeV) can be accelerated by 50 keV - 500 keV in resonant NL interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 msec.

  11. Final state interactions in electron induced trinucleon breakup reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijgaard, E. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis presents an exact analysis of the electromagnetic breakup process of a trinucleon system. The one-photon exchange mechanism is reviewed. The relevant components of the nuclear current are discussed and the off-shell one-body current matrix elements are derived to accommodate the evaluation of the trinucleon nuclear structure functions. The Faddeev equations are introduced. To facilitate the numerical evaluations the unitary pole expansion (UPE) is employed to describe a local S-wave spin-dependent interaction in a series of separable potential terms. The UPE convergence properties for the trinucleon bound state as well as for the N-N and N-d scattering observables are investigated. In view of the electromagnetic two-body and three-body breakup analysis the half off-shell wave functions for 3N→Nd and 3N→3N scattering are calculated. The nuclear structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup structure functions of the electromagnetic two-body breakup processes are derived and exactly calculated. Results are presented and discussed for several kinetamic configurations. The nuclear response functions of the trinucleon breakup processes are calculated for a momentum transfer Q = 400 MeV/c. The results are compared with recent experimental data for the longitudinal and transverse response of both trinucleon systems. The three-body contributions to the response functions result from an essentially fourfold numerical integration of the invariant electromagnetic three-body breakup amplitude. A detailed derivation of this amplitude is presented and the treatment of the subsequent integration is discussed. An extension is formulated to include D-state components in the trinucleon bound state as well as in the disconnected final state components for the two-body breakup process. One kinematic situation is studied with the D-state extension. For the three-body breakup processes only the PWIA response is determined with the D-state component in the

  12. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  13. Enhancement of the Number of Fast Electrons Generated in a Laser Inverse Cone Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Ling, Ji; Gang, Jiang; Wei-Dong, Wu; Ji-Cheng, Zhang; Yong-Jian, Tang

    2010-01-01

    Enhancement of the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to target electrons is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a laser-inverse cone interaction. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminates the inverse cone target, the electrons at the cone end are accelerated by the ponderomotive force. Then these electrons are guided and confined to transport along the inverse cone walls by the induced electromagnetic fields. A device consisting of inverse hollow-cone and multihole array plasma is proposed in order to increase the energy-conversion efficiency from laser to electrons. Particle-in-cell simulations present that the multiholes transpiercing the cone end help to enhance the number of fast electrons and the maximum electron energy significantly. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  14. Weak localization and electron-electron interaction in modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taboryski, R.; Lindelof, P.E.

    1990-01-01

    The first heterostructure wafer only had one electronic subband at the GaAs/AlGaAs interface populated. Weak localization magnetoresistance was interpreted by a theory valid to relatively high magnetic fields and also valid for electrons with a long mean free path. The adjustable parameter in fitting the magnetoresistance was in each case the phasebreaking relaxation time, which could then subsequently be plotted as a function of temperature. The temperature dependence of the phasebreaking rate could be interpreted on the basic of existing theories, but the residual relaxation rate at the lowest temperature remains so far unexplained. Already at low magnetic fields the weak localization magnetoresistance saturates, indicating a complete quench of weak localization. We find that the value of saturation (i.e. the total weak localization at the appropriate temperature) was smaller than predicted by the existing theories. At magnetic fields of the order of the inverse electron mobility, a quadratic magnetoresistance show up in our experiments. This quadratic magnetoresistance corresponds to corrections to the conductivity of the order of e 2 /h. Whereas we find that the temperature dependence of this conductivity correction is well in agreement with predicted effects of electron-electron interaction, the dependence on mobility, which we can measure via our ion implantation, is larger than any existing theory predicts, yet still in the ballpark of the conductance quantum. (orig./BHO)

  15. Many-body theory of electron-positron interaction in metallic lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, H.; Boronski, E.; Banach, G. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    1997-12-31

    The development of the partial density amplitude approach to the electronic structure of simple metals offers the possibility to perform direct many-body calculations of the electron-positron interaction in these materials. A theory of this interaction based on the hypernetted-chain formalism is proposed and applied to lithium. It leads to a nonlinear three-dimensional integro-differential equation for the enhancement amplitude. This equation is solved for two cases in which it reduces to one dimension. The relation between the results obtained in this way for the annihilation rate and the predictions of the local density approximation and other approaches is studied. The role of core electrons in the interaction is explained. (orig.) 8 refs.

  16. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  17. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T; Inwood, David W; Leach, Andrew S; Whalley, Penny S; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-22

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  18. Design, engineering and utility of biotic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H; Chung, Alice M; Dura, Burak; Hamilton, Andrea L; Lee, Byung C

    2011-01-07

    Games are a significant and defining part of human culture, and their utility beyond pure entertainment has been demonstrated with so-called 'serious games'. Biotechnology--despite its recent advancements--has had no impact on gaming yet. Here we propose the concept of 'biotic games', i.e., games that operate on biological processes. Utilizing a variety of biological processes we designed and tested a collection of games: 'Enlightenment', 'Ciliaball', 'PAC-mecium', 'Microbash', 'Biotic Pinball', 'POND PONG', 'PolymerRace', and 'The Prisoner's Smellemma'. We found that biotic games exhibit unique features compared to existing game modalities, such as utilizing biological noise, providing a real-life experience rather than virtual reality, and integrating the chemical senses into play. Analogous to video games, biotic games could have significant conceptual and cost-reducing effects on biotechnology and eventually healthcare; enable volunteers to participate in crowd-sourcing to support medical research; and educate society at large to support personal medical decisions and the public discourse on bio-related issues.

  19. Polistes olivaceous decreases biotic surface colonization

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... Polistes olivaceous on oral biotic surface (biofilm) model by means of pH response, population of oral bacteria and enamel .... Another 50 subjects used oral rinses of 0.9% normal saline to serve as a negative control and ... Bacterial count of S. mutans, S. sanguis and S. salivarus in each flow. Bacteria.

  20. Manipulation of Nanoparticle Electron Transfer Dynamics by Engineering of Metal-Ligand Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Limei

    2017-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent a novel class of material consisting of hundreds to a few thousand atoms each, and their physical and chemical properties are significantly different than the bulk materials. The electronic structure, chemical and optical properties of nanoparticles can be tuned by the size, shape, surface modification and interaction with supporting materials, to fulfil the potential specific applications in catalysis, imaging and electronic devices. In the preparation of nanoparticle...

  1. Emission and electron transitions in an atom interacting with an ultrashort electromagnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Electron transitions and emission of an atom interacting with a spatially inhomogeneous ultrashort electromagnetic pulse are considered. The excitation and ionization probabilities are obtained as well as the spectra and cross sections of the reemission of such a pulse by atoms. By way of an example, one- and two-electron inelastic processes accompanying the interaction of ultrashort pulses with hydrogen- and helium-like atoms are considered. The developed technique makes it possible to take into account exactly the spatial nonuniformity of the ultrashort pulse field and photon momenta in the course of reemission

  2. Wave-Particle Interactions Involving Correlated Electron Bursts and Whistler Chorus in Earth's Radiation Belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterling, N.; Schriver, D.; Roeder, J. L.; Fennell, J. F.

    2017-12-01

    During the recovery phase of substorm plasma injections, the Van Allen Probes commonly observe events of quasi-periodic energetic electron bursts correlating with simultaneously detected upper-band, whistler-mode chorus emissions. These electron bursts exhibit narrow ranges of pitch angles (75-80° and 100-105°) and energies (20-40 keV). Electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions are also commonly detected, but typically do not display correlation with the electron bursts. To examine sources of free energy and the generation of these wave emissions, an observed electron velocity distribution on January 13, 2013 is used as the starting condition for a particle in cell (PIC) simulation. Effects of temperature anisotropy (perpendicular temperature greater than parallel temperature), the presence of a loss cone and a cold electron population on the generation of whistler and ECH waves are examined to understand wave generation and nonlinear interactions with the particle population. These nonlinear interactions produce energy diffusion along with strong pitch angle scattering into the loss cone on the order of milliseconds, which is faster than a typical bounce period of seconds. To examine the quasi-periodic nature of the electron bursts, a loss-cone recycling technique is implemented to model the effects of the periodic emptying of the loss cone and electron injection on the growth of whistler and ECH waves. The results of the simulations are compared to the Van Allen Probe observations to determine electron acceleration, heating and transport in Earth's radiation belts due to wave-particle interactions.

  3. Ultrafast Gap Dynamics and Electronic Interactions in a Photoexcited Cuprate Superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, S.; Li, H.; Nummy, T. J.; Waugh, J. A.; Zhou, X. Q.; Griffith, J.; Schneeloch, J.; Zhong, R. D.; Gu, G. D.; Dessau, D. S.

    2017-10-01

    We perform time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES) on optimally doped Bi2 Sr2 CaCu2 O8 +δ (BSCCO-2212) using sufficient energy resolution (9 meV) to resolve the k -dependent near-nodal gap structure on time scales where the concept of an electronic pseudotemperature is a useful quantity, i.e., after electronic thermalization has occurred. We study the ultrafast evolution of this gap structure, uncovering a very rich landscape of decay rates as a function of angle, temperature, and energy. We explicitly focus on the quasiparticle states at the gap edge as well as on the spectral weight inside the gap that "fills" the gap—understood as an interaction, or self-energy effect—and we also make high resolution measurements of the nodal states, enabling a direct and accurate measurement of the electronic temperature (or pseudotemperature) of the electrons in the system. Rather than the standard method of interpreting these results using individual quasiparticle scattering rates that vary significantly as a function of angle, temperature, and energy, we show that the entire landscape of relaxations can be understood by modeling the system as following a nonequilibrium, electronic pseudotemperature that controls all electrons in the zone. Furthermore, this model has zero free parameters, as we obtain the crucial information of the SC gap Δ and the gap-filling strength ΓTDoS by connecting to static ARPES measurements. The quantitative and qualitative agreement between data and model suggests that the critical parameters and interactions of the system, including the pairing interactions, follow parametrically from the electronic pseudotemperature. We expect that this concept will be relevant for understanding the ultrafast response of a great variety of electronic materials, even though the electronic pseudotemperature may not be directly measurable.

  4. Ultrafast Gap Dynamics and Electronic Interactions in a Photoexcited Cuprate Superconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Parham

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We perform time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (trARPES on optimally doped Bi_{2}Sr_{2}CaCu_{2}O_{8+δ} (BSCCO-2212 using sufficient energy resolution (9 meV to resolve the k-dependent near-nodal gap structure on time scales where the concept of an electronic pseudotemperature is a useful quantity, i.e., after electronic thermalization has occurred. We study the ultrafast evolution of this gap structure, uncovering a very rich landscape of decay rates as a function of angle, temperature, and energy. We explicitly focus on the quasiparticle states at the gap edge as well as on the spectral weight inside the gap that “fills” the gap—understood as an interaction, or self-energy effect—and we also make high resolution measurements of the nodal states, enabling a direct and accurate measurement of the electronic temperature (or pseudotemperature of the electrons in the system. Rather than the standard method of interpreting these results using individual quasiparticle scattering rates that vary significantly as a function of angle, temperature, and energy, we show that the entire landscape of relaxations can be understood by modeling the system as following a nonequilibrium, electronic pseudotemperature that controls all electrons in the zone. Furthermore, this model has zero free parameters, as we obtain the crucial information of the SC gap Δ and the gap-filling strength Γ_{TDoS} by connecting to static ARPES measurements. The quantitative and qualitative agreement between data and model suggests that the critical parameters and interactions of the system, including the pairing interactions, follow parametrically from the electronic pseudotemperature. We expect that this concept will be relevant for understanding the ultrafast response of a great variety of electronic materials, even though the electronic pseudotemperature may not be directly measurable.

  5. Electroweak interactions between intense neutrino beams and dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tsintsadze, N L; Stenflo, L

    2003-01-01

    The electroweak coupling between intense neutrino beams and strongly degenerate relativistic dense electron-positron magneto-plasmas is considered. The intense neutrino bursts interact with the plasma due to the weak Fermi interaction force, and their dynamics is governed by a kinetic equation. Our objective here is to develop a kinetic equation for a degenerate neutrino gas and to use that equation to derive relativistic magnetohydrodynamic equations. The latter are useful for studying numerous collective processes when intense neutrino beams nonlinearly interact with degenerate, relativistic, dense electron-positron plasmas in strong magnetic fields. If the number densities of the plasma particles are of the order of 10 sup 3 sup 3 cm sup - sup 3 , the pair plasma becomes ultra-relativistic, which strongly affects the potential energy of the weak Fermi interaction. The new system of equations allows several neutrino-driven streaming instabilities involving new types of relativistic Alfven-like waves, The re...

  6. Interactivity between protégés and scientists in an electronic mentoring program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    were examined to provide context: 542 messages were posted among the 20 mentors and 20 protégés. These messages were formed into 5-10 threads per pair, with 3-4 messages per thread, indicating a high level of interactivity (there were more responses posted than independent messages). Mentor......Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved...... in an electronic mentoring program. This report analyzes the interactivity between pairs of corporate research scientists (mentors) and university biology students (protégés) during two consecutive implementations of an electronic mentoring program. The frequency and structure of the interactions within each pair...

  7. Quantum coherence effects in electromagnetic radiation in the case of interaction with electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazazian, A. D.; Sherman, B. G.

    1989-07-01

    A study is made of electron dynamics in a monochromatic quantum field whose state is represented in different forms. Wave functions of the system are obtained, and it is shown that electron motion in a linearly polarized coherent quantum field leads to the formation of the compressed photon state. The coherent state is formed in the case of the circular polarization of the external field. The compressed photon state is also formed in the case of electron interaction with individual linearly polarized vacuum modes in a finite volume. Formulas are obtained for the classical field emission and Compton effect.

  8. Modeling the process of interaction of 10 keV electrons with a plane dielectric surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vokhmyanina, Kristina; Sotnikova, Valentina; Sotnikov, Alexey; Kaplii, Anna; Nikulicheva, Tatyana; Kubankin, Alexandr; Kishin, Ivan

    2018-05-01

    The effect of guiding of charged particles by dielectric channels is of noticeable interest at the present time. The phenomenon is widely studied experimentally and theoretically but some points still need to be clarified. A previously developed model of interaction of fast electrons with dielectric surface at grazing incidence is used to study the independence of electron deflection on the value of electron beam current. The calculations were performed assuming a smooth dependence of the surface conductivity on the beam current in the 40-3000 nA range.

  9. Electromagnetic microwaves in metal films with electron-phonon interaction and a dc magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselberg, L.E.

    1976-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical treatment of electromagnetic microwaves is performed for a metal film. The directions of the exterior ac and dc fields are taken to be arbitrary and boundary conditions for the electrons are assumed to be specular. The relation between the current and the electromagnetic field...... in the transmission spectrum can perhaps be obtained by assuming a finite Debye temperature and specular reflections of the electrons at the boundary surfaces. A sharp peak entirely caused by the finite electron-phonon interaction is also discussed....

  10. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent ion-surface interaction at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new spectroscopy based on the resonant coherently induced electron loss to the continuum in ion-surface scattering under grazing incidence is proposed. A series of peaks, corresponding to the energy differences determined by the resonant interaction with the rows of atoms in the surface, is predicted to appear in the energy distribution of electrons emitted from electronic states bound to the probe. Calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with a glancing angle of 0--2 mrad show a total yield close to 1

  11. Hyperfine interactions of 57Fe implanted in solids studied by conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawicka, B.D.

    1978-01-01

    The hyperfine interactions of stable 57 Fe nuclei implanted in various matrices were studied using conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy. The results obtained for 57 Fe implanted in aluminium in d-metals in silicon and germanium are presented. The properties of the implantation produced materials and the lattice location of iron impurities are discussed. The information concerning the volume dependence of the hyperfine interactions and the origin of the electric field gradients in solids were obtained. (author)

  12. Electron-phonon interactions in manganites: efect on the electronic transport and magnetization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otero-Leal, M.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mixed-valent manganese oxides with perovskite structure offer a certain degree of chemical flexibility that allows making systematic studies of the relationship between the electric and magnetic properties with the crystalline structure. Here we present magnetic measurements in La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 that demonstrate that the adiabatic approximation breaks down at low x, due to the strong coupling of the electronic and the lattice degrees of freedom.

    Los óxidos de manganeso con valencia mixta y estructura de perovskita poseen un cierto grado de flexibilidad química que permite hacer estudios sistemáticos entre las propiedades eléctricas y magnéticas, con la estructura cristalina. En este trabajo presentamos medidas magnéticas en la serie La2/3(Ca1-xSrx1/3MnO3 donde se demuestra que la aproximación adiabática falla para pequeñas x, debido el fuerte acoplamiento de los grados de libertad electrónicos y de la red.

  13. Study of tokamak plasma electron cyclotron emission during electron-wave interaction near the lower hybrid frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girard, A.

    1986-11-01

    The quasilinear theory of wave-particle interaction is presented. Diagnostic possibilities of electron cyclotron emission. To study the cyclotron radiation (whose wavelength is millimeter order), a Michelson type interferometer is used, which allows to select willingly the useful spectral field. The cyclotron radiation allows characterization of a pumping wave: in studying the spectrum part where plasma is optically thin the studied cyclotron emissivity is directly proportional to absorbed power by plasma. Saturation of power absorption by plasma has been observed and studied [fr

  14. Electron emission induced by resonant coherent interaction in ion-surface scattering at grazing incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.; Ponce, V.H.; Echenique, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    The resonant coherent interaction of an ion with an oriented crystal surface, under grazing-incidence conditions with respect to a special direction of the crystal, gives rise to electron loss to the continuum from electronic bound states of the ion. The calculations presented below predict large probabilities for electron emission due to this mechanism. The electrons are emitted with well defined energies, expressed in terms of the condition of resonance. Furthermore, the emission takes place around certain preferential directions, which are determined by both the latter condition and the symmetry of the surface lattice. Our calculations for MeV He + ions scattered at a W(001) surface along the left-angle 100 right-angle direction with glancing angle of 0--2 mrad indicate a yield of emission close to 1. Using heavier projectiles, one obtains smaller yields, but still large enough to be measurable in some cases (e.g., ∼0.9 for 53 MeV B 4+ and an angle of incidence of 1 mrad). Besides, the initial bound state is energy shifted due to the interaction with both the crystal potential and the velocity-dependent image potential. This results in a slight shift of the peaks of emission, which suggests a possible spectroscopy for analyzing the dynamical interaction of electronic bound states with solid surfaces

  15. Atom Core Interactive Electronic Book to Develop Self Efficacy and Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradina, Luthfia Puspa; Suyatna, Agus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop interactive atomic electronic school book (IESB) to cultivate critical thinking skills and confidence of students grade 12. The method used in this research was the ADDIE (Analyze Design Development Implementation Evaluation) development procedure which is limited to the test phase of product design…

  16. Density functional theory for strongly-interacting electrons: Perspectives for Physics and Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gori Giorgi, P.; Seidl, M.

    2010-01-01

    Improving the accuracy and thus broadening the applicability of electronic density functional theory (DFT) is crucial to many research areas, from material science, to theoretical chemistry, biophysics and biochemistry. In the last three years, the mathematical structure of the strong-interaction

  17. Three-wave interaction during electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Hansen, Søren Kjer

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear wave-wave interactions in fusion plasmas, such as the parametric decay instability (PDI) of gyrotron radiation, can potentially hamper the use of microwave diagnostics. Here we report on anomalous scattering in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak during electron cyclotron resonance heating exper...

  18. Characteristics of muon-electron events produced in high energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mapp, J.; Camerini, U.; Cline, D.; Fry, W.; Krogh, J. von; Loveless, R.J.; March, R.; Reeder, D.D.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Bosetti, P.; Lynch, G.; Marriner, J.; Solmitz, F.; Stevenson, M.K.; Cence, R.; Harris, F.; Parker, S.I.; Peters, M.; Peterson, V.; Stenger, V.

    The observation of neutrino interactions producing a muon, and an electron among the final state particles implies production of at least one new particle with a new quantum number. Evidence is presented for such events produced using the Fermilab 15' hydrogen-neon bubble chamber and the external muon identifier

  19. Concepts relating magnetic interactions, intertwined electronic orders, and strongly correlated superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. C. Séamus; Lee, Dung-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Unconventional superconductivity (SC) is said to occur when Cooper pair formation is dominated by repulsive electron–electron interactions, so that the symmetry of the pair wave function is other than an isotropic s-wave. The strong, on-site, repulsive electron–electron interactions that are the proximate cause of such SC are more typically drivers of commensurate magnetism. Indeed, it is the suppression of commensurate antiferromagnetism (AF) that usually allows this type of unconventional superconductivity to emerge. Importantly, however, intervening between these AF and SC phases, intertwined electronic ordered phases (IP) of an unexpected nature are frequently discovered. For this reason, it has been extremely difficult to distinguish the microscopic essence of the correlated superconductivity from the often spectacular phenomenology of the IPs. Here we introduce a model conceptual framework within which to understand the relationship between AF electron–electron interactions, IPs, and correlated SC. We demonstrate its effectiveness in simultaneously explaining the consequences of AF interactions for the copper-based, iron-based, and heavy-fermion superconductors, as well as for their quite distinct IPs. PMID:24114268

  20. A new neutron interferometry approach in the determination of the neutron-electron interaction amplitude

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ioffe, A.; Vrána, Miroslav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 1 (2002), s. S314-316 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK1010104 Keywords : neutron-electron interaction * neutron interferometer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.231, year: 2002

  1. Dependence of Xmax and multiplicity of electron and muon on different high energy interaction models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rastegarzadeh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Different high energy interaction models are the applied in CORSIKA code to simulate Extensive Air Showers (EAS generated by Cosmic Rays (CR. In this work the effects of QGSJET01, QGSJETII, DPMJET, SIBYLL models on Xmax and multiplicity of secondary electrons and muons at observation level are studied.

  2. QCD corrections to single top quark production in electron-photon interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kühn, J H; Uwer, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Single top quark production in electron-photon interactions provides a clean environment for the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V sub t sub b. Aiming at an experimental precision at the percent level the knowledge of radiative corrections is important. In this paper we present results for the radiative corrections in quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  3. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-21

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant ("skin-like") electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  4. Model and simulation of wide-band interaction in free-electron lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Pinhasi, Y; Yahalom, A

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional, space-frequency model for simulation of interaction in free-electron lasers (FELs) is presented. The model utilizes an expansion of the total electromagnetic field (radiation and space-charge waves) in terms of transverse eigenmodes of the waveguide, in which the field is excited and propagates. The mutual interaction between the electron beam and the electromagnetic field is fully described by coupled equations, expressing the evolution of mode amplitudes and electron beam dynamics. Based on the three-dimensional model, a numerical particle simulation code was developed. A set of coupled-mode excitation equations, expressed in the frequency domain, are solved self-consistently with the equations of particles motion. Variational numerical methods were used to simulate excitation of backward modes. At present, the code can simulate FELs operation in various modes: spontaneous (shot-noise) and self-amplified spontaneous emission, super-radiance and stimulated emission, all in the non-linear...

  5. Relativistic phase effect in modeling interactions between ultraintense laser beams and electrons plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Alexandru; Stancalie, Viorica

    2017-06-01

    In a series of previous papers we proved an accurate connection between quantum and classical equations in the case of electrodynamic systems. We have used this connection to elaborate simplified models for systems composed of very intense laser beams and electrons or atoms. These models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data from literature. In this paper we develop the above approach for the new field of interactions between ultraintense laser beams, having intensities in the range 1018 - 1022 W/cm2, and electron plasmas. We show that in this case new effects take place, such as the fact that the variation of the phase of the field at the point where the electron is situated, decreases when the intensity of the field increases, due to a strong relativistic behavior. This effect leads to an aperiodic behavior of the radiations generated by above interactions, and to a possible new method for solitary waves generation.

  6. Kinetics of two-dimensional electron plasma, interacting with fluctuating potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiko, I.I.; Sirenko, Y.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, from the first principles, after the fashion of Klimontovich, the authors derive quantum kinetic equation for electron gas, inhomogeneous in z-direction and homogeneous in XY-plane. Special attention is given to the systems with quasi-two-dimensional electron gas (2 DEG), which are widely explored now. Both interaction between the particles of 2 DEG (in general, of several sorts), and interaction with an external system (phonons, impurities, after change carries etc.) are considered. General theory is used to obtain energy and momentum balance equations and relaxation frequencies for 2 DEG in the basis of plane waves. The case of crossed electric and magnetic fields is also treated. As an illustration the problems of 2 DEG scattering on semibounded three-dimensional electron gas and on two-dimensional hole gas are considered; transverse conductivity of nondegenerate 2 DEG, scattered by impurities in ultraquantum magnetic field, is calculated

  7. Soft Electronics Enabled Ergonomic Human-Computer Interaction for Swallowing Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongkuk; Nicholls, Benjamin; Sup Lee, Dong; Chen, Yanfei; Chun, Youngjae; Siang Ang, Chee; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2017-04-01

    We introduce a skin-friendly electronic system that enables human-computer interaction (HCI) for swallowing training in dysphagia rehabilitation. For an ergonomic HCI, we utilize a soft, highly compliant (“skin-like”) electrode, which addresses critical issues of an existing rigid and planar electrode combined with a problematic conductive electrolyte and adhesive pad. The skin-like electrode offers a highly conformal, user-comfortable interaction with the skin for long-term wearable, high-fidelity recording of swallowing electromyograms on the chin. Mechanics modeling and experimental quantification captures the ultra-elastic mechanical characteristics of an open mesh microstructured sensor, conjugated with an elastomeric membrane. Systematic in vivo studies investigate the functionality of the soft electronics for HCI-enabled swallowing training, which includes the application of a biofeedback system to detect swallowing behavior. The collection of results demonstrates clinical feasibility of the ergonomic electronics in HCI-driven rehabilitation for patients with swallowing disorders.

  8. Exact and variational calculations of eigenmodes for three-dimensional free electron laser interaction with a warm electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    I present an exact calculation of free-electron-laser (FEL) eigenmodes (fundamental as well as higher order modes) in the exponential-gain regime. These eigenmodes specify transverse profiles and exponential growth rates of the laser field, and they are self-consistent solutions of the coupled Maxwell-Vlasov equations describing the FEL interaction taking into account the effects due to energy spread, emittance and betatron oscillations of the electron beam, and diffraction and guiding of the laser field. The unperturbed electron distribution is assumed to be of Gaussian shape in four dimensional transverse phase space and in the energy variable, but uniform in longitudinal coordinate. The focusing of the electron beam is assumed to be matched to the natural wiggler focusing in both transverse planes. With these assumptions the eigenvalue problem can be reduced to a numerically manageable integral equation and solved exactly with a kernel iteration method. An approximate, but more efficient solution of the integral equation is also obtained for the fundamental mode by a variational technique, which is shown to agree well with the exact results. Furthermore, I present a handy formula, obtained from interpolating the numerical results, for a quick calculation of FEL exponential growth rate. Comparisons with simulation code TDA will also be presented. Application of these solutions to the design and multi-dimensional parameter space optimization for an X-ray free electron laser driven by SLAC linac will be demonstrated. In addition, a rigorous analysis of transverse mode degeneracy and hence the transverse coherence of the X-ray FEL will be presented based on the exact solutions of the higher order guided modes.

  9. The Effect of Background Pressure on Electron Acceleration from Ultra-Intense Laser-Matter Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Manh; Ngirmang, Gregory; Orban, Chris; Morrison, John; Chowdhury, Enam; Roquemore, William

    2017-10-01

    We present two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations that investigate the role of background pressure on the acceleration of electrons from ultra intense laser interaction at normal incidence with liquid density ethylene glycol targets. The interaction was simulated at ten different pressures varying from 7.8 mTorr to 26 Torr. We calculated conversion efficiencies from the simulation results and plotted the efficiencies with respect to the background pressure. The results revealed that the laser to > 100 keV electron conversion efficiency remained flat around 0.35% from 7.8 mTorr to 1.2 Torr and increased exponentially from 1.2 Torr onward to about 1.47% at 26 Torr. Increasing the background pressure clearly has a dramatic effect on the acceleration of electrons from the target. We explain how electrostatic effects, in particular the neutralization of the target by the background plasma, allows electrons to escape more easily and that this effect is strengthened with higher densities. This work could facilitate the design of future experiments in increasing laser to electron conversion efficiency and generating substantial bursts of electrons with relativistic energies. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under LRIR Project 17RQCOR504 under the management of Dr. Riq Parra and Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier. Support was also provided by the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  10. Measuring exchange interactions between atomic spins using electron spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian; Choi, Taeyoung; Heinrich, Andreas; Lutz, Christopher

    Exchange interactions between neighboring atoms give rise to magnetic order in magnetic materials. As the size of the electronic device is miniaturized toward the limit of single atoms, magnetic nanostructures such as coupled atomic dimers and clusters are explored more as prototypes for possible data storage, spintronics as well as quantum computing applications. Characterizing inter-atom exchange interactions calls for increasing spatial resolution and higher energy sensitivity to better understand this fundamental interaction. Here, using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we studied a magnetically coupled atomic dimer consisting of two 3d transition metal atoms, with one adsorbed on an insulating layer (MgO) and the other attached to the STM tip. We demonstrate the ability to measure the short-range exchange interaction between the two atomic spins with orders-of-magnitude variation ranging from milli-eV all the way to micro-eV. This is realized by the successful combination of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques in STM implemented at different energy scales. We unambiguously confirm the exponential decay behavior of the direct exchange interaction.

  11. Electronic structure theory based study of proline interacting with gold nano clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Sandhya; Singh, Harjinder

    2013-10-01

    Interaction between metal nanoparticles and biomolecules is important from the view point of developing and designing biosensors. Studies on proline tagged with gold nanoclusters are reported here using density functional theory (DFT) calculations for its structural, electronic and bonding properties. Geometries of the complexes are optimized using the PBE1PBE functional and mixed basis set, i. e., 6-311++G for the amino acid and SDD for the gold clusters. Equilibrium configurations are analyzed in terms of interaction energies, molecular orbitals and charge density. The complexes associated with cluster composed of an odd number of Au atoms show higher stability. Marked decrease in the HOMO-LUMO gaps is observed on complexation. Major components of interaction between the two moieties are: the anchoring N-Au and O-Au bond; and the non covalent interactions between Au and N-H or O-H bonds. The electron affinities and vertical ionization potentials for all complexes are calculated. They show an increased value of electron affinity and ionization potential on complexation. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis reveals a charge transfer between the donor (proline) and acceptor (gold cluster). The results indicate that the nature of interaction between the two moieties is partially covalent. Our results will be useful for further experimental studies and may be important for future applications.

  12. Column study of enhanced Cr(VI) removal and longevity by coupled abiotic and biotic processes using Fe0 and mixed anaerobic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jiawei; Yin, Weizhao; Li, Yongtao; Li, Ping; Wu, Jinhua; Jiang, Gangbiao; Gu, Jingjing; Liang, Hao

    2017-10-01

    In this study, Fe 0 and mixed anaerobic culture were integrated in one column to investigate the coupled abiotic and biotic effects on hexa-valent chromium (Cr(VI)) removal and column longevity with an abiotic Fe 0 column in the control experiments. According to the breakthrough study, a slower Cr(VI) breakthrough rate of 0.19 cm/PV was observed in the biotic Fe 0 column whereas the value in the abiotic Fe 0 column was 0.30 cm/PV, resulting in 64% longer life-span and 62% higher Cr(VI) removal capacity in the biotic Fe 0 column than the abiotic one. The solid phase characterization by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed that this enhancement was attributed to the higher consumption of iron and greater production of diverse reactive minerals (e.g., green rust, magnetite and lepidocrocite) induced by the synergistic interaction of Fe 0 and anaerobic culture, providing more reactive sites for Cr(VI) adsorption, reduction and co-precipitation. Furthermore, the decreasing breakthrough rates and growing iron corrosion along the biotic Fe 0 column demonstrated an inhomogeneous distribution of reactive zones in the column and its latter 3/5 section was considered to be the most reactive area for Cr(VI) removal. These results indicate that the inoculation of microorganisms in Fe 0 -based permeable reactive barriers will enable this technology a higher removal capacity and longer life-span for the remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Declining of forests - biotic and abiotic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Zlatan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last several years, a significant decline of different forests in Serbia was recorded. The decline is more widespread in conifer stands, but occurence of decline was recorded in broadleaved forest stands as well. These declines are the result of abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors. According to the studies performed so far in Serbia, the predisposing factor were droughts during the 2012 and 2013 vegetation periods that caused physiological weakness of the trees. Among the biotic factors, the most important are fungi (mainly root rot, but rot fungi, and needle diseases and insects (bark beetles in conifer species and defoliators in broadleaved species. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 37008 i br. TR 31070

  14. Electrostatics of electron-hole interactions in van der Waals heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante, L. S. R.; Chaves, A.; Van Duppen, B.; Peeters, F. M.; Reichman, D. R.

    2018-03-01

    The role of dielectric screening of electron-hole interaction in van der Waals heterostructures is theoretically investigated. A comparison between models available in the literature for describing these interactions is made and the limitations of these approaches are discussed. A simple numerical solution of Poisson's equation for a stack of dielectric slabs based on a transfer matrix method is developed, enabling the calculation of the electron-hole interaction potential at very low computational cost and with reasonable accuracy. Using different potential models, direct and indirect exciton binding energies in these systems are calculated within Wannier-Mott theory, and a comparison of theoretical results with recent experiments on excitons in two-dimensional materials is discussed.

  15. UROX 2.0: an interactive tool for fitting atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siebert, Xavier; Navaza, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    UROX is software designed for the interactive fitting of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. The main features of the software are presented, along with a few examples. Electron microscopy of a macromolecular structure can lead to three-dimensional reconstructions with resolutions that are typically in the 30–10 Å range and sometimes even beyond 10 Å. Fitting atomic models of the individual components of the macromolecular structure (e.g. those obtained by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance) into an electron-microscopy map allows the interpretation of the latter at near-atomic resolution, providing insight into the interactions between the components. Graphical software is presented that was designed for the interactive fitting and refinement of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. Several characteristics enable it to be applied over a wide range of cases and resolutions. Firstly, calculations are performed in reciprocal space, which results in fast algorithms. This allows the entire reconstruction (or at least a sizeable portion of it) to be used by taking into account the symmetry of the reconstruction both in the calculations and in the graphical display. Secondly, atomic models can be placed graphically in the map while the correlation between the model-based electron density and the electron-microscopy reconstruction is computed and displayed in real time. The positions and orientations of the models are refined by a least-squares minimization. Thirdly, normal-mode calculations can be used to simulate conformational changes between the atomic model of an individual component and its corresponding density within a macromolecular complex determined by electron microscopy. These features are illustrated using three practical cases with different symmetries and resolutions. The software, together with examples and user instructions, is available free of charge at http://mem.ibs.fr/UROX/

  16. Electron acceleration at Jupiter: input from cyclotron-resonant interaction with whistler-mode chorus waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jupiter has the most intense radiation belts of all the outer planets. It is not yet known how electrons can be accelerated to energies of 10 MeV or more. It has been suggested that cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions by chorus waves could accelerate electrons to a few MeV near the orbit of Io. Here we use the chorus wave intensities observed by the Galileo spacecraft to calculate the changes in electron flux as a result of pitch angle and energy diffusion. We show that, when the bandwidth of the waves and its variation with L are taken into account, pitch angle and energy diffusion due to chorus waves is a factor of 8 larger at L-shells greater than 10 than previously shown. We have used the latitudinal wave intensity profile from Galileo data to model the time evolution of the electron flux using the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt (BAS model. This profile confines intense chorus waves near the magnetic equator with a peak intensity at ∼5° latitude. Electron fluxes in the BAS model increase by an order of magnitude for energies around 3 MeV. Extending our results to L = 14 shows that cyclotron-resonant interactions with chorus waves are equally important for electron acceleration beyond L = 10. These results suggest that there is significant electron acceleration by cyclotron-resonant interactions at Jupiter contributing to the creation of Jupiter's radiation belts and also increasing the range of L-shells over which this mechanism should be considered.

  17. Pivoting from Arabidopsis to wheat to understand how agricultural plants integrate responses to biotic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we argue for a research initiative on gene-for-gene (g-f-g) interactions between wheat and its parasites. One aim is to begin a conversation between the disparate communities of plant pathology and entomology. Another is to understand how responses to biotic stress are integrated in an import...

  18. Rodent seed predation as a biotic filter influencing exotic plant abundance and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. E. Pearson; J. L. Hierro; M. Chiuffo; D. Villarreal

    2014-01-01

    Biotic resistance is commonly invoked to explain why many exotic plants fail to thrive in introduced ranges, but the role of seed predation as an invasion filter is understudied. Abiotic conditions may also influence plant populations and can interact with consumers to determine plant distributions, but how these factors jointly influence invasions is poorly understood...

  19. Biotic and abiotic variables show little redundancy in explaining tree species distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Elaine S.; Kienast, Felix; Pearman, Peter B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic factors such as climate and soil determine the species fundamental niche, which is further constrained by biotic interactions such as interspecific competition. To parameterize this realized niche, species distribution models (SDMs) most often relate species occurrence data to abiotic var...

  20. On resonance and nonresonance interaction of electrons with space-periodic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, A.V.; Gordeev, I.A.; Loseva, T.V.

    2003-01-01

    Effect of resonance and non-resonance interaction of electrons with spatially periodic clusters are studied. It is shown, both analytically and using numerical calculations, that phase shift δ l of the wave function, occurring during resonance scattering of electrons on the periodic structure, equals |δ l | = π/4. The value of the phase shift corresponds to the limiting case of great value of the Born parameter for the cluster. Effect of non-resonance scattering of electrons on the periodic potential, its spatial period incommensurable with the Brillouin wave length of scattered electron, was considered analytically. It is shown that non-resonance scattering is formally a higher order effect in terms of parameter ε 0 [ru

  1. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir; Anvari, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, E. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  2. Interaction of slow electrons with high-pressure gases ('Quasi-liquids'): synthesis of our knowledge on slow electron-molecule interactions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCorkle, D.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1985-01-01

    A crucial step in our efforts to develop not only a coherent picture of radiation interaction with matter, but also to understand radiation effects and mechanisms, as well as the effects of chemical pollutants and toxic compounds, is to relate the often abundant knowledge on isolated molecules (low pressure gases) to that on liquids or solids. To understand the roles of the physical and chemical properties of molecules in biological reactions, we must know how these isolated-molecule properties change as molecules are embedded in gradually thicker and thicker (denser and denser) gaseous and, finally, liquid environments. The work initiated by us both at the Physics Department of The University of Tennessee and at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory addresses itself to this question. At both places, high pressure (40 to approx.8000 kPa) electron swarm experiments are currently in operation yielding information as to the effects of the density and nature of the environment on fundamental electron-molecule interaction processes at densities intermediate to those corresponding to low pressure gases and liquids, and the gradual transition from isolated molecule to condensed phase behavior

  3. Generation of femtosecond soft x-ray pulse by interaction between laser and electron beam in an electron storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, T; Amano, S; Mochizuki, T; Yatsuzaka, M

    2002-01-01

    A femtosecond synchrotron radiation pulse train can be extracted from an electron storage ring by interaction between an ultrashort laser pulse and an electron beam in an undulator. Generation system of a femtosecond soft x-ray pulse by the slicing technique was studied with numerical calculations for its performance, as applicable for the NewSUBARU synchrotron radiation facility at LASTI. The femtosecond electron pulse, that is energy-modulated with a Ti:sapphire laser at a pulse energy of 100 mu J, a pulse width of 150 fs, and repetition frequency of 20 kHz, can be sufficiently separated in a bending magnet. A femtosecond soft x-ray pulse (the critical photon energy of 0.69 keV and a pulse width of 250 fs) is obtained with a collimator (diameter of 800 mu m phi), and it has an average brightness 3 x 10 sup 6 photons/s/mm sup 2 /mrad sup 2 /0.1 %BW and an average photon flux 10 sup 5 photons/s/0.1 %BW. (author)

  4. Charge transfer dynamics from adsorbates to surfaces with single active electron and configuration interaction based approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan, E-mail: r.ramakrishnan@unibas.ch [Institute of Physical Chemistry, National Center for Computational Design and Discovery of Novel Materials (MARVEL), Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 80, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Nest, Mathias [Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universität München, Lichtenbergstr. 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2015-01-13

    Highlights: • We model electron dynamics across cyano alkanethiolates attached to gold cluster. • We present electron transfer time scales from TD-DFT and TD-CI based simulations. • Both DFT and CI methods qualitatively predict the trend in time scales. • TD-CI predicts the experimental relative time scale very accurately. - Abstract: We employ wavepacket simulations based on many-body time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI), and single active electron theories, to predict the ultrafast molecule/metal electron transfer time scales, in cyano alkanethiolates bonded to model gold clusters. The initial states represent two excited states where a valence electron is promoted to one of the two virtual π{sup ∗} molecular orbitals localized on the cyanide fragment. The ratio of the two time scales indicate the efficiency of one charge transfer channel over the other. In both our one-and many-electron simulations, this ratio agree qualitatively with each other as well as with the previously reported experimental time scales (Blobner et al., 2012), measured for a macroscopic metal surface. We study the effect of cluster size and the description of electron correlation on the charge transfer process.

  5. Latitudinal dependence of nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave and radiation belt relativistic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zheng, Huinan; Shen, Chao; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2013-06-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are long suggested to account for the rapid loss of radiation belt relativistic electrons. Here we perform both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation to comprehensively investigate the nonlinear interaction between EMIC wave and relativistic electrons. In particular, we emphasize the dependence of nonlinear processes on the electron initial latitude. The nonlinear phase trapping yields negative equatorial pitch angle transport, with efficiency varying over the electron initial latitude, implying that it can increase the loss rate predicted by quasilinear theory. The nonlinear channel effect phase bunching produces positive equatorial pitch angle transport, less dependent on the electron initial latitude, suggesting that it can decrease the loss rate predicted by quasilinear theory. The nonlinear cluster effect phase bunching alternately causes positive and negative equatorial pitch angle transport, quasi-periodically dependent on the electron initial latitude, suggesting that it can either decrease or increase the loss rate predicted by the quasilinear theory. Such latitudinal dependence of nonlinear processes should be taken into account in the evaluation of radiation belt electron loss rate driven by EMIC waves.

  6. Interaction between Solid Nitrogen and 1-3-keV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental studies were made of the interaction between solid nitrogen and beams of 1-2-keV electrons. The projected range for the electrons was measured by means of the mirror-substrate method (gold substrate), giving the result 9.02×1016 E1.75 molecules/cm2 with the energy given in ke......V. The escape depth for secondary electrons was studied by means of the equivalent-substrate method (carbon substrate). The results varied from 280 Å at 1 keV to 400 Å at 3 keV. Measurements were also made of the secondary-electron-emission coefficient, which varied from 2.3 el/el at 1 keV to 1.2 el/el at 3 ke......V. At 3 keV, the SEE coefficient is 12 times that for solid deuterium. This is attributed partly to the larger production rate for low-energy electrons in nitrogen and partly to the larger escape probability for these electrons. Moreover, measurements were made of the electron-reflection coefficient, both...

  7. A study of the interactions of high energy electron-neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwenhuis, C.H.M.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis describes an analysis of electron-neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions with nuclei. The data were collected with the calorimeter of the Amsterdam-CERN-Hamburg-Moscow-Rome (CHARM) group in a beam dump exposure to 400 GeV/c protons from the CERN SPS in 1982. The predictions of the Standard Model for the quantities measured in this experiment are given. The results of the analysis of events without a primary muon in the final state are given in the form of an experimental y-distribution. The measured quantities are compared with the predictions of the theory and the measurements of other experiments. Presented are the cross-section ratio of neutral current and charged current electron-neutrino induced events, the prompt CC ν(anti ν) e interaction rate, the prompt (ν e +anti ν e )/(ν μ +anti ν μ ) flux ratio, the energy dependence of the prompt electron-neutrino flux and a measurement of the DantiD cross-section times semileptonic branching ratio based on prompt electron-neutrino interactions. (Auth.)

  8. Electronic patient record use during ward rounds: a qualitative study of interaction between medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Cecily; Jones, Matthew; Blackwell, Alan; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Electronic patient records are becoming more common in critical care. As their design and implementation are optimized for single users rather than for groups, we aimed to understand the differences in interaction between members of a multidisciplinary team during ward rounds using an electronic, as opposed to paper, patient medical record. A qualitative study of morning ward rounds of an intensive care unit that triangulates data from video-based interaction analysis, observation, and interviews. Our analysis demonstrates several difficulties the ward round team faced when interacting with each other using the electronic record compared with the paper one. The physical setup of the technology may impede the consultant's ability to lead the ward round and may prevent other clinical staff from contributing to discussions. We discuss technical and social solutions for minimizing the impact of introducing an electronic patient record, emphasizing the need to balance both. We note that awareness of the effects of technology can enable ward-round teams to adapt their formations and information sources to facilitate multidisciplinary communication during the ward round.

  9. One-Dimensional Physics of Interacting Electrons and Phonons in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vikram Vijay

    The one-dimensional (1D) world is quite different from its higher dimensional counterparts. For example, the electronic ground state in 1D is not a Fermi liquid as in most solids, due to the role of electron-electron interactions. Most commonly, electrons in 1D are described as a Luttinger liquid , where the low-energy excitations are decoupled bosonic charge and spin waves. Carbon nanotubes are clean 1D systems which have been shown to behave like a Luttinger liquid at high electron density. However, at low electron density and in the absence of disorder, the ground state is predicted to be a 1D Wigner crystal---an electron solid dominated by long-range Coulomb interaction. Moreover, short-range interaction mediated by the atomic lattice (umklapp scattering) is predicted to transform a nominal 1D metal into a Mott insulator. In this thesis, we develop techniques to make extremely clean nanotube single-electron transistors. We study them in the few-electron/hole regime using Coulomb blockade spectroscopy in a magnetic field. In semiconducting nanotubes, we map out the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling as a function of carrier number and find excellent agreement to a Wigner crystal model. In nominally metallic nanotubes, we observe a universal energy gap in addition to the single-particle bandgap, implying that nanotubes are never metallic. The magnitude, radius dependence and low-energy neutral excitations of this additional gap indicate a Mott insulating origin. Further, we use simultaneous electrical and Raman spectroscopy measurements to study the phonons scattered by an electric current. At high bias, suspended nanotubes show striking negative differential conductance, attributed to non-equilibrium phonons. We directly observe such "hot" phonon populations in the Raman response and also report preferential electron coupling to one of two optical phonon modes. In addition, using spatially-resolved Raman spectroscopy, we obtain a wealth of local information

  10. Cascaded neural networks improving fish species prediction accuracy: the role of the biotic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschini, Simone; Gandola, Emanuele; Martinoli, Marco; Tancioni, Lorenzo; Scardi, Michele

    2018-03-15

    Species distribution is the result of complex interactions that involve environmental parameters as well as biotic factors. However, methodological approaches that consider the use of biotic variables during the prediction process are still largely lacking. Here, a cascaded Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) approach is proposed in order to increase the accuracy of fish species occurrence estimates and a case study for Leucos aula in NE Italy is presented as a demonstration case. Potentially useful biotic information (i.e. occurrence of other species) was selected by means of tetrachoric correlation analysis and on the basis of the improvements it allowed to obtain relative to models based on environmental variables only. The prediction accuracy of the L. aula model based on environmental variables only was improved by the addition of occurrence data for A. arborella and S. erythrophthalmus. While biotic information was needed to train the ANNs, the final cascaded ANN model was able to predict L. aula better than a conventional ANN using environmental variables only as inputs. Results highlighted that biotic information provided by occurrence estimates for non-target species whose distribution can be more easily and accurately modeled may play a very useful role, providing additional predictive variables to target species distribution models.

  11. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  12. Plant Immune System: Crosstalk Between Responses to Biotic and Abiotic Stresses the Missing Link in Understanding Plant Defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Mantri, Nitin

    2017-01-01

    Environmental pollution, global warming and climate change exacerbate the impact of biotic and abiotic stresses on plant growth and yield. Plants have evolved sophisticated defence network, also called innate immune system, in response to ever- changing environmental conditions. Significant progress has been made in identifying the key stress-inducible genes associated with defence response to single stressors. However, relatively little information is available on the signaling crosstalk in response to combined biotic/abiotic stresses. Recent evidence highlights the complex nature of interactions between biotic and abiotic stress responses, significant aberrant signaling crosstalk in response to combined stresses and a degree of overlap, but unique response to each environmental stimulus. Further, the results of simultaneous combined biotic and abiotic stress studies indicate that abiotic stresses particularly heat and drought enhance plant susceptibility to plant pathogens. It is noteworthy that global climate change is predicted to have a negative impact on biotic stress resistance in plants. Therefore, it is vital to conduct plant transcriptome analysis in response to combined stresses to identify general or multiple stress- and pathogen-specific genes that confer multiple stress tolerance in plants under climate change. Here, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of crosstalk in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Pinpointing both, common and specific components of the signaling crosstalk in plants, allows identification of new targets and development of novel methods to combat biotic and abiotic stresses under global climate change.

  13. Study of neutrino interactions with the electronic detectors of the OPERA experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Agafonova, N.; Altinok, O.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Autiero, D.; Badertscher, A.; Bagulya, A.; Bendhabi, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugiere, T.; Brugnera, R.; Brunet, F.; Brunetti, G.; Buontempo, S.; Cazes, A.; Chaussard, L.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chiarella, V.; Chukanov, A.; D'Ambrosio, N.; Dal Corso, F.; De Lellis, G.; del Amo Sanchez, P.; Declais, Y.; De Serio, M.; Di Capua, F.; Di Crescenzo, A.; Di Ferdinando, D.; Di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Egorov, O.; Enikeev, R.; Ereditato, A.; Esposito, L.S.; Favier, J.; Ferber, T.; Fini, R.A.; Frekers, D.; Fukuda, T.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Giorgini, M.; Gollnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Golubkov, D.; Goncharova, L.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Grianti, F.; Guler, A.M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hamada, K.; Hara, T.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Hoshino, K.; Ieva, M.; Ishida, H.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Juget, F.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Kazuyama, K.; Kim, S.H.; Kimura, M.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Knuesel, J.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Kubota, H.; Lazzaro, C.; Lenkeit, J.; Lippi, I.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Lutter, G.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Mannai, K.; Marteau, J.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meisel, F.; Meregaglia, A.; Migliozzi, P.; Mikado, S.; Miyamoto, S.; Monacelli, P.; Morishima, K.; Moser, U.; Muciaccia, M.T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nikitina, V.; Niwa, K.; Nonoyama, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olchevski, A.; Paniccia, M.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B.D.; Park, I.G.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Pretzl, K.; Pilipenko, V.; Pistillo, C.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Rescigno, R.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Romano, G.; Rosa, G.; Rostovtseva, I.; Rubbia, A.; Russo, A.; Ryasny, V.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Sato, Y.; Schembri, A.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Schroeder, H.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Song, J.S.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stipcevic, M.; Strauss, T.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tezuka, I.; Tioukov, V.; Tolun, P.; Trabelsi, A.; Tran, T.; Tufanli, S.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yakushev, V.; Yoon, C.S.; Yoshioka, T.; Yoshida, J.; Zaitsev, Y.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.; Zimmermann, R.

    2011-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is based on a hybrid technology combining electronic detectors and nuclear emulsions. OPERA collected muon-neutrino interactions during the 2008 and 2009 physics runs of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of $5.3 \\times 10^{19}$ protons on target equivalent luminosity has been analysed with the OPERA electronic detectors: scintillator strips target trackers and magnetic muon spectrometers equipped with resistive plate gas chambers and drift tubes, allowing a detailed reconstruction of muon-neutrino interactions. Charged Current (CC) and Neutral Current (NC) interactions are identified, using the measurements in the electronic detectors, and the NC/CC ratio is computed. The momentum distribution and the charge of the muon tracks produced in CC interactions are analysed. Calorimetric measurements of the visible energy are performed for both the CC and NC samples. For CC events the Bjorken-$y$ distribution and the hadronic shower profile ...

  14. Noncovalent interactions from electron density topology and solvent effects on spectral properties of Schiff bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhimathi, S.; Balakrishnan, C.; Theetharappan, M.; Neelakantan, M. A.; Venkataraman, R.

    2017-03-01

    Two Schiff bases were prepared by the condensation of o-allyl substituted 2,4-dihydroxy acetophenone with 1,2-diaminopropane (L1) and ethanediamine (L2) and characterized by elemental analysis, and ESI-MS, IR, UV-Vis, 1H and 13C NMR spectral techniques. The effect of solvents with respect to different polarities on UV-Vis and emission spectra of L1 and L2 was investigated at room temperature show that the compounds exist in keto and enol forms in solution and may be attributed to the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state. The solute-solvent interactions, change in dipole moment and solvatochromic properties of the compounds were studied based on the solvent polarity parameters. For L1 and L2, the ground and excited state electronic structure calculations were carried out by DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level, respectively. The IR, NMR and electronic absorption spectra computed were compared with the experimental observations. The intramolecular charge transfer within the molecule is evidenced from the HOMO and LUMO energy levels and surface analysis. The noncovalent interactions like hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions were identified from the molecular geometry and electron localization function. These interactions in molecules have been studied by using reduced density gradient and graphed by Multiwfn.

  15. Effects of donor-acceptor electronic interactions on the rates of gas-phase metallocene electron-exchange reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, D.K.; Gord, J.R.; Freiser, B.S.; Weaver, M.J. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States))

    1991-05-30

    Rate constants for electron self-exchange, k{sub ex}, of five cobaltocenium-cobaltocene and ferrocenium-ferrocene couples in the gas phase have been measured by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in order to explore the possible effects of donor-acceptor electronic coupling on gas-phase redox reactivity. The systems studied, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} (Cp = cyclopentadienyl), the decamethyl derivative Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, carboxymethyl(cobaltocenium-cobaltocene) (Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0}), and hydroxymethyl(ferrocenium-ferrocene) (HMFc{sup +/0}), were selected in view of the substantial variations in electronic coupling inferred on the basis of their solvent-dependent reactivities and theoretical grounds. The sequence of k{sub ex} values determined in the gas phase, Cp{sub 2}{sup e}Co{sup +/0} {approx} Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0} > Cp{prime}{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} > HMFc{sup +/0} > Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0}, is roughly similar to that observed in solution, although the magnitude (up to 5-fold) of the k{sub ex} variations is smaller in the former case. The likely origins of these differences in gas-phase reactivity are discussed in light of the known variations in the electronic coupling matrix element H{sub 12}, inner-shell reorganization energy {Delta}E*, and gas-phase ion-molecule interaction energy {Delta}E{sub w} extracted from solution-phase rates, structural data, and theoretical calculations. It is concluded that the observed variations in gas-phase k{sub ex} values, especially for Cp{sub 2}Fe{sup +/0} versus Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +/0}, arise predominantly from the presence of weaker donor-acceptor orbital overlap for the ferrocene couples, yielding inefficient electron tunneling for a substantial fraction of the gas-phase ion-molecule encounters. The anticipated differences as well as similarities of such nonadiabatic effects for gas-phase and solution electron-transfer processes are briefly outlined.

  16. Electron Bubbles in Superfluid (3) 3 He-A: Exploring the Quasiparticle-Ion Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, Oleksii; Sauls, J. A.

    2017-06-01

    When an electron is forced into liquid ^3He, it forms an "electron bubble", a heavy ion with radius, R˜eq 1.5 nm, and mass, M˜eq 100 m_3, where m_3 is the mass of a ^3He atom. These negative ions have proven to be powerful local probes of the physical properties of the host quantum fluid, especially the excitation spectra of the superfluid phases. We recently developed a theory for Bogoliubov quasiparticles scattering off electron bubbles embedded in a chiral superfluid that provides a detailed understanding of the spectrum of Weyl Fermions bound to the negative ion, as well as a theory for the forces on moving electron bubbles in superfluid ^3He-A (Shevtsov and Sauls in Phys Rev B 94:064511, 2016). This theory is shown to provide quantitative agreement with measurements reported by the RIKEN group (Ikegami et al. in Science 341(6141):59, 2013) for the drag force and anomalous Hall effect of moving electron bubbles in superfluid ^3He-A. In this report, we discuss the sensitivity of the forces on the moving ion to the effective interaction between normal-state quasiparticles and the ion. We consider models for the quasiparticle-ion (QP-ion) interaction, including the hard-sphere potential, constrained random-phase-shifts, and interactions with short-range repulsion and intermediate-range attraction. Our results show that the transverse force responsible for the anomalous Hall effect is particularly sensitive to the structure of the QP-ion potential and that strong short-range repulsion, captured by the hard-sphere potential, provides an accurate model for computing the forces acting on the moving electron bubble in superfluid 3He-A.

  17. Chirped Auger electron emission due to field-assisted post-collision interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonitz M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the Auger decay in the temporal domain by applying a terahertz streaking light field. Xenon and krypton atoms were studied by implementing the free-electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH as well as a source of high-order harmonic radiation combined with terahertz pulses from an optical rectification source. The observed linewidth asymmetries in the streaked spectra suggest a chirped Auger electron emission which is understood in terms of field-assisted post-collision interaction. The experimentally obtained results agree well with model calculations.

  18. Experimental evidence and theory for the interaction of superthermal electrons with the MHD modes during ECRH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazaros, Avrilios

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of ECRH with the m/n=2/1 tearing mode, which was observed in toroidal plasmas, is attributed to the superthermal electrons which are produced on the EC resonance by the ECRH. Superthermal electrons diffusing across the q=2 surface, exchange power with the m/n=2/1 MHD mode which is either suppressed or enhanced. When the EC resonance is outside the rational surface, the mode is always suppressed. When the EC resonance is inside the rational surface, modes with large amplitude are enhanced while modes with small amplitude are suppressed. (author)

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF SHORT UNDULATORS FOR ELECTRON-BEAM-RADIATION INTERACTION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piot, P. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andorf, M. B. [NICADD, DeKalb; Fagerberg, G. [Northern Illinois U.; Figora, M. [Northern Illinois U.; Sturtz, A. [Northern Illinois U.

    2016-10-19

    Interaction of an electron beam with external field or its own radiation has widespread applications ranging from coherent-radiation generation, phase space cooling or formation of temporally-structured beams. An efficient coupling mechanism between an electron beam and radiation field relies on the use of a magnetic undulator. In this contribution we detail our plans to build short (11-period) undulators with 7-cm period refurbishing parts of the aladdin U3 undulator [1]. Possible use of these undulators at available test facilities to support experiments relevant to cooling techniques and radiation sources are outlined.

  20. 2010 Electron Donor-Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference, August 8 - 13, 2010.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Meyer

    2010-08-18

    The Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions (GRC EDAI) presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer Processes and Energy Conversion. The fundamental concepts underpinning the field of electron transfer and charge transport phenomena are understood, but fascinating experimental discoveries and novel applications based on charge transfer processes are expanding the discipline. Simultaneously, global challenges for development of viable and economical alternative energy resources, on which many researchers in the field focus their efforts, are now the subject of daily news headlines. Enduring themes of this conference relate to photosynthesis, both natural and artificial, and solar energy conversion. More recent developments include molecular electronics, optical switches, and nanoscale charge transport structures of both natural (biological) and man-made origin. The GRC EDAI is one of the major international meetings advancing this field, and is one of the few scientific meetings where fundamental research in solar energy conversion has a leading voice. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices. In addition to disseminating the latest advances in the field of electron transfer processes, the conference is an excellent forum for scientists from different disciplines to meet and initiate new directions; for scientists from different countries to make contacts; for young scientists to network and establish personal contacts with other young scientists and with established scientists who, otherwise, might not have the time to meet young people. The EDAI GRC also features an interactive atmosphere with lively poster sessions, a few of which are selected for oral presentations.

  1. Interaction of electron beams with optical nanostructures and metamaterials: from coherent photon sources towards shaping the wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the interaction of electron beams with materials and light has been a field of research for more than a century. The field was advanced theoretically by the rise of quantum mechanics and technically by the introduction of electron microscopes and accelerators. It is possible nowadays to uncover a multitude of information from electron-induced excitations in matter by means of advanced techniques like holography, tomography, and, most recently, photon-induced near-field electron microscopy. The question is whether the interaction can be controlled in an even, more efficient way in order to unravel important questions like modal decomposition of the electron-induced polarization by performing experiments with better spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions. This review discusses recent advances in controlling electron and light interactions at the nanoscale. Theoretical and numerical aspects of the interaction of electrons with nanostructures and metamaterials will be discussed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of radiation in the interaction of electrons with even more sophisticated structures. Based on these mechanisms of radiation, state-of-the art and novel electron-driven few-photon sources will be discussed. Applications of such sources to gain an understanding of quantum optical effects and also to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes will be covered. In an inverse approach, as in the case of the inverse Smith-Purcell effect, laser-induced excitations of nanostructures can cause electron beams traveling in the near-field of such structures to accelerate, provided a synchronization criterion is satisfied. This effect is the basis for linear dielectric and metallic electron accelerators. Moreover, acceleration is accompanied by bunching of the electrons. When single electrons are considered, an efficient design of nanostructures can lead to the shaping of the electron wave function travelling adjacent to them, for

  2. Negligible Electronic Interaction between Photoexcited Electron-Hole Pairs and Free Electrons in Phosphorus-Boron Co-Doped Silicon Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limpens, Rens [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Neale, Nathan R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fujii, Minoru [Kobe University; Gregorkiewicz, Tom [University of Amsterdam

    2018-03-05

    Phosphorus (P) and boron (B) co-doped Si nanocrystals (NCs) have raised interest in the optoelectronic industry due to their electronic tunability, optimal carrier multiplication properties, and straightforward dispersibility in polar solvents. Yet a basic understanding of the interaction of photoexcited electron-hole (e-h) pairs with new physical features that are introduced by the co-doping process (free carriers, defect states, and surface chemistry) is missing. Here, we present the first study of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in SiO2-embedded P-B co-doped Si NC ensembles using induced absorption spectroscopy through a two-step approach. First, the induced absorption data show that the large fraction of the dopants residing on the NC surface slows down carrier relaxation dynamics within the first 20 ps relative to intrinsic (undoped) Si NCs, which we interpret as enhanced surface passivation. On longer time-scales (picosecond to nanosecond regime), we observe a speeding up of the carrier relaxation dynamics and ascribe it to doping-induced trap states. This argument is deduced from the second part of the study, where we investigate multiexciton interactions. From a stochastic modeling approach we show that localized carriers, which are introduced by the P or B dopants, have minor electronic interactions with the photoexcited e-h pairs. This is understood in light of the strong localization of the introduced carriers on their original P- or B-dopant atoms, due to the strong quantum confinement regime in these relatively small NCs (<6 nm).

  3. Electronic-property dependent interactions between tetracycline and graphene nanomaterials in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lin; Liu, Fei-Fei; Zhao, Mengyao; Qi, Zhen; Sun, Xuefei; Afzal, Muhammad Zaheer; Sun, Xiaomin; Li, Yanhui; Hao, Jingcheng; Wang, Shuguang

    2018-04-01

    Understanding the interactions between graphene nanomaterials (GNMs) and antibiotics in aqueous solution is critical to both the engineering applications of GNMs and the assessment of their potential impact on the fate and transport of antibiotics in the aquatic environment. In this study, adsorption of one common antibiotic, tetracycline, by graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was examined with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphite as comparison. The results showed that the tetracycline adsorption capacity by the four selected carbonaceous materials on the unit mass basis followed an order of GO>RGO>MWCNTs>graphite. Upon normalization by surface area, graphite, RGO and MWCNTs had almost the same high tetracycline adsorption affinity while GO exhibited the lowest. We proposed π-electron-property dependent interaction mechanisms to explain the observed different adsorption behaviors. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggested that the oxygen-containing functional groups on GO surface reduced its π-electron-donating ability, and thus decreased the π-based interactions between tetracycline and GO surface. Comparison of adsorption efficiency at different pH indicated that electrostatic interaction also played an important role in tetracycline-GO interactions. Site energy analysis confirmed a highly heterogeneous distribution of the binding sites and strong tetracycline binding affinity of GO surface. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Mobility and bulk electron-phonon interaction in two-dimensional materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads; Markussen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    -of-plane modes. However, we find that graphene only has a slightly higher mobility compared to silicene. For MoS2 we obtain several orders of magnitude lower mobilities and in agreement with other recent theoretical results. The simulations illustrate the predictive capabilities of the newly implemented......We present calculations of the phonon-limited mobility in intrinsic n-type monolayer graphene, silicene and MoS2. The material properties, including the electron-phonon interaction, are calculated from first principles. Unlike graphene, the carriers in silicene show strong interaction with the out...

  5. Studies of the relativistic electron source and related phenomena in Petawatt Laser matter interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Key, M.H.; Campbell, E.M.; Cowan, T.E.; Hatchett, S.P.; Henry, E.A.; Koch, J.A.; Landgon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Lee, R.W.; MacKinnon, A.; Offenberger, A.; Pennington, D.M.; Perry, M.D.; Sangster, T.C.; Yasuike, K.; Snavely, R.; Roth, M.; Phillips, T.W.; Stoyer, M.A.; Wilks, S.C.; Singh, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of laser radiation with solid targets at 1 petawatt power and intensity up to 3x10 20 Wcm -2 has been studied with emphasis on relativistic electrons and high energy ions. Secondary effects including Bremsstrahlung radiation, nuclear interactions and heating have been characterized. A collimated beam of protons with up to 55 MeV energy is emitted normal to the rear surface of thin targets and its characteristics and origin are discussed. The significance of the data for radiography, fast ignition and proton beam applications is summarized

  6. Prediction of hot electron production by ultraintense KrF laser-plasma interactions on solid-density targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Susumu; Takahashi, Eiichi; Miura, Eisuke; Owadano, Yoshiro; Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Kato, Tomokazu

    2002-01-01

    The scaling of hot electron temperature and the spectrum of electron energy by intense laser plasma interactions are reexamined from a viewpoint of the difference in laser wavelength. Laser plasma interaction such as parametric instabilities is usually determined by the Iλ2 scaling, where I and λ is the laser intensity and wavelength, respectively. However, the hot electron temperature is proportional to (ncr/ne0)1/2 [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] rather than [(1 + a 0 2 ) 1/2 - 1] at the interaction with overdense plasmas, where ne0 is a electron density of overdense plasmas and a0 is a normalized laser intensity

  7. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.

    Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  8. Interaction of suprathermal solar wind electron fluxes with sheared whistler waves: fan instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Krafft

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Several in situ measurements performed in the solar wind evidenced that solar type III radio bursts were some-times associated with locally excited Langmuir waves, high-energy electron fluxes and low-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic waves; moreover, in some cases, the simultaneous identification of energetic electron fluxes, Langmuir and whistler waves was performed. This paper shows how whistlers can be excited in the disturbed solar wind through the so-called "fan instability" by interacting with energetic electrons at the anomalous Doppler resonance. This instability process, which is driven by the anisotropy in the energetic electron velocity distribution along the ambient magnetic field, does not require any positive slope in the suprathermal electron tail and thus can account for physical situations where plateaued reduced electron velocity distributions were observed in solar wind plasmas in association with Langmuir and whistler waves. Owing to linear calculations of growth rates, we show that for disturbed solar wind conditions (that is, when suprathermal particle fluxes propagate along the ambient magnetic field, the fan instability can excite VLF waves (whistlers and lower hybrid waves with characteristics close to those observed in space experiments.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Radio Science (waves in plasma – Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (radio emissions

  9. The high luminosity interaction region for a ring-ring Large Hadron Electron Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, R. B.; Thompson, L.; Holzer, B.; Fitterer, M.; Bernard, N.; Kostka, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) project is a proposal for high luminosity TeV-scale electron-proton (ep) collisions at the LHC. The LHeC Conceptual Design Report presented an early overview of the machine, including an electron linac solution and a solution involving a 60 GeV electron storage ring. Here we present a new complete solution for the collision insertion of this electron ring, incorporating all constraints including those imposed by the LHC and, for the first time, proving the feasibility of ep collisions at a luminosity of ˜1033 cm-2s-1 in the LHC era. The solution presented offers high luminosity while maintaining the large detector coverage required by the particle physics programme. This negates the earlier need for two separate interaction region designs, one optimized for high luminosity at the cost of detector coverage, and the other for lower luminosity but higher coverage. Synchrotron radiation emission is also a major factor in electron accelerator design, and studies are presented showing the feasibility of the design in this regard. The design is found to be technically viable, solving the problem of TeV-scale, high luminosity and high coverage ep collisions at a ring-ring LHeC.

  10. Electronic and magnetic interactions in high temperature superconducting and high coercivity materials. Final performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    The issue addressed in the research was how to understand what controls the competition between two types of phase transition (ordering) which may be present in a hybridizing correlated-electron system containing two transition-shell atomic species; and how the variation of behavior observed can be used to understand the mechanisms giving the observed ordered state. This is significant for understanding mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity and other states of highly correlated electron systems. Thus the research pertains to magnetic effects as related to interactions giving high temperature superconductivity; where the working hypothesis is that the essential feature governing the magnetic and superconducting behavior of copper-oxide-type systems is a cooperative valence fluctuation mechanism involving the copper ions, as mediated through hybridization effects dominated by the oxygen p electrons. (Substitution of praseodymium at the rare earth sites in the 1·2·3 material provides an interesting illustration of this mechanism since experimentally such substitution strongly suppresses and destroys the superconductivity; and, at 100% Pr, gives Pr f-electron magnetic ordering at a temperature above 16K). The research was theoretical and computational and involved use of techniques aimed at correlated-electron systems that can be described within the confines of model hamiltonians such as the Anderson lattice hamiltonian. Specific techniques used included slave boson methodology used to treat modification of electronic structure and the Mori projection operator (memory function) method used to treat magnetic response (dynamic susceptibility)

  11. Giant amplification in degenerate band edge slow-wave structures interacting with an electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Veysi, Mehdi; Capolino, Filippo [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Figotin, Alexander [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We propose a new amplification regime based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate electromagnetic (EM) modes in a slow-wave structure and the electron beam, referred to as super synchronization. These four EM modes arise in a Fabry-Pérot cavity when degenerate band edge (DBE) condition is satisfied. The modes interact constructively with the electron beam resulting in superior amplification. In particular, much larger gains are achieved for smaller beam currents compared to conventional structures based on synchronization with only a single EM mode. We demonstrate giant gain scaling with respect to the length of the slow-wave structure compared to conventional Pierce type single mode traveling wave tube amplifiers. We construct a coupled transmission line model for a loaded waveguide slow-wave structure exhibiting a DBE, and investigate the phenomenon of giant gain via super synchronization using the Pierce model generalized to multimode interaction.

  12. Search for direct electron production in anti pp interactions at 70 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, J.J.; Lemonne, J.; van Homwegen, G.; Verbeure, F.; Wickens, J.H.; Hagman, V.M.; Karimaeki, V.; Tuominiemi, J.; Valtonen, K.; Estruch, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    A search for directly produced electrons in 70 GeV/c anti pp interactions has been performed using BEBC equipped with a hydrogen filled track sensitive target surrounded by a hydrogen/neon blanket. No candidates for single electron production with momentum p/sub e/ > 500 MeV/c were found in a sample of 66,000 primary interactions. This result places an upper limit of 2.5 ..mu..b on the cross section for single esup(+-) production at the 90% confidence level. The corresponding upper limit on the charmed particle production cross section is 14 ..mu..b. From the observation of 7 events producing an e/sup +/e/sup -/ pair with mass m/sub e//sub +//sub e//sub -/ > m/sub ..pi..//sub 0/ the esup(+-)/..pi..sup(+-) ratio from this source is estimated to be (0.7 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -4/.

  13. Strong electron-phonon interaction in the high-Tc superconductors: Evidence from the infrared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timusk, T.; Porter, C.D.; Tanner, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    We show that low-frequency structure in the infrared reflectance of the high-temperature superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 results from the electron-phonon interaction. Characteristic antiresonant line shapes are seen in the phonon region of the spectrum and the frequency-dependent scattering rate of the mid-infrared electronic continuum has peaks at 150 cm -1 (19 meV) and at 360 cm -1 (45 meV) in good agreement with phonon density-of-states peaks in neutron time-of-flight spectra that develop in superconducting samples. The interaction between the phonons and the charge carriers can be understood in terms of a charged-phonon model

  14. The weak π − π interaction originated resonant tunneling and fast switching in the carbon based electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun He

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the nonequilibrium Green's functions and the density functional theory, we have investigated the electronic transport properties of C60 based electronic device with different intermolecular interactions. It is found that the electronic transport properties vary with the types of the interaction between two C60 molecules. A fast electrical switching behavior based on negative differential resistance has been found when two molecules are coupled by the weak π − π interaction. Compared to the solid bonding, the weak interaction is found to induce resonant tunneling, which is responsible for the fast response to the applied electric field and hence the velocity of switching.

  15. Methods of Information Subjects and Objects Interaction Rules Formalization in the Electronic Trading Platform System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Emanuilova Yandybaeva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The methods of information subjects and objects interaction rules formalization in the electronic trading platform system has been developed. They are based on mathematical model of mandatory role-based access control. As a result of the work we have defined set of user roles and constructed roles hierarchy. For the roles hierarchy restrictions have been imposed to ensure the safety of the information system.

  16. Renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction in electron-positron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Y.H.

    1989-07-01

    This note is devoted to explaining the essence of the renormalization theory of beam-beam interaction for carrying out analytical calculations of equilibrium particle distributions in electron-positron colliding beam storage rings. Some new numerical examples are presented such as for betatron tune dependence of the rms beam size. The theory shows reasonably good agreements with the results of computer simulations. 5 refs., 6 figs

  17. Ion and electron beam interaction on surfaces - a detection mechanism for obtaining visual ion beam images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, J.; Gorden, R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional images have been obtained of ion beam impact cross sections on solid surfaces by the coincident interaction of a rastered electron beam. This detection method is effective in producing images in real time on various insulator surfaces. The size of these images correlates well with ion beam current density profile measurements (at full width) and, therefore, can be very useful for ion beam diagnostics and alignment. (Auth.)

  18. Controlling the Electronic Structure of Graphene Using Surface-Adsorbate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-21

    able to achieve relatively good control over the concentration of defects in graphene by introducing oxide impurities into the Ni(111) substrate and...1 Controlling the electronic structure of graphene using surface-adsorbate interactions Piotr Matyba, Adra V. Carr, Cong Chen, David L. Miller...atomic orbitals in graphene on Ni(111) opens a large energy gap of ≈2.8 eV between non-hybridized states at the K-point. Here we use alkali metal

  19. Neutrino interaction vertex location with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornushkin, Yu.A.; Dmitrievskij, S.G.; Chukanov, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of ν τ appearance from ν μ →ν τ oscillation in a ν μ beam. Description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by the electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  20. Longitudinal phase space manipulation of an ultrashort electron beam via THz IFEL interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J. T.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Scoby, C. M.; To, H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles California, 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A scheme where a laser locked THz source is used to manipulate the longitudinal phase space of an ultrashort electron beam using an IFEL interaction is investigated. The efficiency of THz source based on the pulse front tilt optical rectification scheme is increased by cryogenic cooling to achieve sufficient THz power for compression and synchronization. Start-to-end simulations describing the evolution of the beam from the cathode to the compression point after the undulator are presented.

  1. Interaction-induced huge magnetoresistance in a high mobility two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockhorn, L.; Haug, R. J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Gornyi, I. V. [Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut of Technology, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Schuh, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Wegscheider, W. [ETH Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-12-04

    A strong negative magnetoresistance is observed in a high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As quantum well. We discuss that the negative magnetoresistance consists of a small peak induced by a combination of two types of disorder and a huge magnetoresistance explained by the interaction correction to the conductivity for mixed disorder.

  2. Exact suppression of depolarisation by beam-beam interaction in an electron ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buon, J.

    1983-03-01

    It is shown that depolarisation due to beam-beam interaction can be exactly suppressed in an electron storage ring. The necessary ''spin matching'' conditions to be fulfilled are derived for a planar ring. They depend on the ring optics, assumed linear, but not on the features of the beam-beam force, like intensity and non-linearity. Extension to a ring equipped with 90 0 spin rotators is straightorward

  3. Towards hot electron mediated charge exchange in hyperthermal energy ion-surface interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ray, M. P.; Lake, R. E.; Thomsen, Lasse Bjørchmar

    2010-01-01

    electrons useful for driving chemical reactions at surfaces. Using the binary collision approximation and a nonadiabatic model that takes into account the time-varying nature of the ion–surface interaction, the energy loss of the ions is reproduced. The energy loss for Na + ions incident on the devices......We have made Na + and He + ions incident on the surface of solid state tunnel junctions and measured the energy loss due to atomic displacement and electronic excitations. Each tunnel junction consists of an ultrathin film metal–oxide–semiconductor device which can be biased to create a band of hot...... shows that the primary energy loss mechanism is the atomic displacement of Au atoms in the thin film of the metal–oxide–semiconductor device. We propose that neutral particle detection of the scattered flux from a biased device could be a route to hot electron mediated charge exchange....

  4. Towards understanding the influence of electron-gas interactions on imaging in an environmental TEM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Boothroyd, Chris; Beleggia, Marco

    2011-01-01

    improved the point resolution to the sub-Ångström level [1] and reduced image delocalization, allowing images of surface and interface structures to be interpreted more directly [2]. However, when gas is present in the microscope the path of electrons along the column is modified due to gas......-electron scattering [3]. In general there are two approaches for performing TEM experiments in the presence of gases. These approaches are based on a differential pumping scheme and the closed cell TEM holder approach and each has its advantages and disadvantages. In the closed cell approach, gas molecules...... are confined to a thin (typically 50-200 μm thick) slab around the sample, but the electrons interact with the window material (e.g. C, SiN) as well as with the gas and the sample. In addition, the field of view is typically smaller than in a conventional TEM and a limited range of sample geometries can...

  5. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation.

  6. Photon and electron interaction databases and their use in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullen, D.E.

    1994-05-01

    This paper discusses the All Particle-Method photon and electron interaction, and atomic relaxation data bases, that were initially developed for use in medical applications. Currently these data bases are being used in both medical and industrial applications. The All Particle Method data bases are designed to allow modelling of individual collisions in as much detail as possible. Elastic scattering can be modelled as single, as opposed to multiple, scattering events. Ionization can be modelled at the atomic subshell level, to define which subshell was ionized, spectrum of the initially emitted electron, as well as the spectra of electron and photons emitted as the atom relaxes back to neutrality. These data bases are currently being used in applications involving rather small spatial regions, where detailed calculations of individual events are required. While initially designed for use in medical applications, these data bases are now being used in a variety of industrial applications, e.g., transport in microelectronics

  7. HOT ELECTRON ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM ULTRA-INTENSE LASER SOLID INTERACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S C; Kruer, W; Patel, P; Shepherd, R

    2008-10-08

    Measurements of electron energy distributions from ultra-intense (>10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) laser-solid interactions using an electron spectrometer are presented. These measurements were performed on the Vulcan petawatt laser at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the Callisto laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The effective hot electron temperatures (T{sub hot}) have been measured for laser intensities (I{lambda}{sup 2}) from 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2} {micro}m{sup 2} for the first time, and T{sub hot} is found to increase as (I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 0.34} {+-} 0.4. This scaling agrees well with the empirical scaling published by Beg et al. (1997), and is explained by a simple physical model that gives good agreement with experimental results and particle-in-cell simulations.

  8. Microwave Detection of Electron-Phonon Interactions in a Cavity-Coupled Double Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, T. R.; Liu, Y.-Y.; Gullans, M. J.; Petta, J. R.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum confinement leads to the formation of discrete electronic states in quantum dots. Here we probe electron-phonon interactions in a suspended InAs nanowire double quantum dot (DQD) that is electric-dipole coupled to a microwave cavity. We apply a finite bias across the wire to drive a steady state population in the DQD excited state, enabling a direct measurement of the electron-phonon coupling strength at the DQD transition energy. The amplitude and phase response of the cavity field exhibit oscillations that are periodic in the DQD energy level detuning due to the phonon modes of the nanowire. The observed cavity phase shift is consistent with theory that predicts a renormalization of the cavity center frequency by coupling to phonons.

  9. First-principles calculations of electron-positron interaction in light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, H.; Boronski, E.; Banach, G. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    2001-07-01

    The approach to e{sup +}-e{sup -} interaction in jellium proposed by Gondzik and Stachowiak proved to be simple numerically and leading to reasonable results. This is why it seemed to be particularly suited for generalizations to real solids, a problem which in spite of more than thirty years of research in this direction did not get yet a satisfactory solution. An obstacle up to now was the necessity to solve integro-differential equations in two dimensions. After overcoming this difficulty we were able to compute e{sup +}-e{sup -} enhancement for core and valence electrons in lithium and for core electrons in other two-electrons core elements. The results are compared to such simplifying guesses concerning this problem as the local density, the generalized gradient and the weighted density approximations. (orig.)

  10. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  11. Electron acceleration by femtosecond laser interaction with micro-structured plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goers, Andy James

    Laser-driven accelerators are a promising and compact alternative to RF accelerator technology for generating relativistic electron bunches for medical, scientific, and security applications. This dissertation presents three experiments using structured plasmas designed to advance the state of the art in laser-based electron accelerators, with the goal of reducing the energy of the drive laser pulse and enabling higher repetition rate operation with current laser technology. First, electron acceleration by intense femtosecond laser pulses in He-like nitrogen plasma waveguides is demonstrated. Second, significant progress toward a proof of concept realization of quasi-phasematched direct acceleration (QPM-DLA) is presented. Finally, a laser wakefield accelerator at very high plasma density is studied, enabling relativistic electron beam generation with ˜10 mJ pulse energies. Major results from these experiments include: • Acceleration of electrons up to 120 MeV from an ionization injected wakefield accelerator driven in a 1.5 mm long He-like nitrogen plasma waveguide • Guiding of an intense, quasi-radially polarized femtosecond laser pulse in a 1 cm plasma waveguide. This pulse provides a strong drive field for the QPM-DLA concept. • Wakefield acceleration of electrons up to ˜10 MeV with sub-terawatt, ˜10 mJ pulses interacting with a thin (˜200 mum), high density (>1020 cm-3) plasma. • Observation of an intense, coherent, broadband wave breaking radiation flash from a high plasma density laser wakefield accelerator. The flash radiates > 1% of the drive laser pulse energy in a bandwidth consistent with half-cycle (˜1 fs) emission from violent unidirectional acceleration of electron bunches from rest. These results open the way to high repetition rate (>˜kHz) laser-driven generation of relativistic electron beams with existing laser technology.

  12. UROX 2.0: an interactive tool for fitting atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Xavier; Navaza, Jorge

    2009-07-01

    Electron microscopy of a macromolecular structure can lead to three-dimensional reconstructions with resolutions that are typically in the 30-10 A range and sometimes even beyond 10 A. Fitting atomic models of the individual components of the macromolecular structure (e.g. those obtained by X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance) into an electron-microscopy map allows the interpretation of the latter at near-atomic resolution, providing insight into the interactions between the components. Graphical software is presented that was designed for the interactive fitting and refinement of atomic models into electron-microscopy reconstructions. Several characteristics enable it to be applied over a wide range of cases and resolutions. Firstly, calculations are performed in reciprocal space, which results in fast algorithms. This allows the entire reconstruction (or at least a sizeable portion of it) to be used by taking into account the symmetry of the reconstruction both in the calculations and in the graphical display. Secondly, atomic models can be placed graphically in the map while the correlation between the model-based electron density and the electron-microscopy reconstruction is computed and displayed in real time. The positions and orientations of the models are refined by a least-squares minimization. Thirdly, normal-mode calculations can be used to simulate conformational changes between the atomic model of an individual component and its corresponding density within a macromolecular complex determined by electron microscopy. These features are illustrated using three practical cases with different symmetries and resolutions. The software, together with examples and user instructions, is available free of charge at http://mem.ibs.fr/UROX/.

  13. Critical Behavior of a Strongly-Interacting 2D Electron System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarachik, Myriam P.

    2013-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) electron systems that obey Fermi liquid theory at high electron densities are expected to undergo one or more transitions to spatially and/or spin-ordered phases as the density is decreased, ultimately forming a Wigner crystal in the dilute, strongly-interacting limit. Interesting, unexpected behavior is observed with decreasing electron density as the electrons' interactions become increasingly important relative to their kinetic energy: the resistivity undergoes a transition from metallic to insulating temperature dependence; the resistance increases sharply and then saturates abruptly with increasing in-plane magnetic field; a number of experiments indicate that the electrons' effective mass exhibits a substantial increase approaching a finite ``critical'' density. There has been a great deal of debate concerning the underlying physics in these systems, and many have questioned whether the change of the resistivity from metallic to insulating signals a phase transition or a crossover. In this talk, I will report measurements that show that with decreasing density ns, the thermopower S of a low-disorder 2D electron system in silicon exhibits a sharp increase by more than an order of magnitude, tending to a divergence at a finite, disorder-independent density nt, consistent with the critical form (- T / S) ~(ns -nt) x with x = 1 . 0 +/- 0 . 1 (T is the temperature). Unlike the resistivity which may not clearly distinguish between a transition and crossover behavior, the thermopower provides clear evidence that a true phase transition occurs with decreasing density to a new low-density phase. Work supported by DOE Grant DE-FG02-84ER45153, BSF grant 2006375, RFBR, RAS, and the Russian Ministry of Science.

  14. Spin-orbit interaction in a two-dimensional electron gas in a InAs/AlSb quantum well with gate-controlled electron density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, J.P.; Wees, B.J. van; Kuipers, J.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; Borghs, G.

    1998-01-01

    We present experiments on the tuning of the spin-orbit interaction in a two-dimensional electron gas in an asymmetric InAs/AlSb quantum well using a gate. The observed dependence of the spin splitting energy on the electron density can be attributed solely to the change in the Fermi wave vector. The

  15. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction.

  16. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction

  17. Experimental and theoretical studies of picosecond laser interactions with electronic materials-laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Samuel S. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Lasers having picosecond and shorter pulse duration are receiving much attention due to their capabilities for direct-write micromachining on many materials with minimal substrate damage. Substantial progress has been made in the understanding of laser ablation processes, particularly the creation of plasmas that often shield the target and reduce the material processing efficiency at nanosecond time scales. However, a considerable challenge that still remains is the understanding of the underlying mechanisms during picosecond laser interactions with electronic solids. In this work we first study picosecond laser-induced electron emission from semiconductor surfaces. A theoretical model was set up based on carrier transport inside the semiconductor material during picosecond laser-semiconductor interactions. We demonstrate that nonequilibrium carrier dynamics plays a significant role for picosecond, as well as short nanosecond, laser induced electron emission from semiconductors. Photoelectric effect is found to be responsible for electron emission at low incident laser fluences, whereas thermionic emission is dominant at higher fluences. We have also performed experimental and theoretical studies on the formation and subsequent evolution of plasmas during laser-metal interactions at the picosecond time scale. Using picosecond time-resolved shadowgrams ahd interferograms, a novel type of plasma is observed, which has an electron density on the order of 1020cm-3.The origin of this picosecond plasma is attributed to gas breakdown, which is caused by laser-induced electron emission fi-om the target surface. After the laser pulse is completed, the longitudinal expansion of the plasma is suppressed. This suppression is found to result from an electric field above the target that prevents, after laser irradiation, fbrther movement of the electrons inside the plasma. Measurements of lateral plasma expansion indicate that the picosecond plasma may absorb

  18. Relativistic electron beam interaction and $K_{\\alpha}$-generation in solid targets

    CERN Document Server

    Fill, E; Eder, D; Eidmann, K; Saemann, A

    1999-01-01

    When fs laser pulses interact with solid surfaces at intensities I lambda /sup 2/ >10/sup 18/ W/cm/sup 2/ mu m/sup 2/, collimated relativistic electron beams are generated. These electrons can be used for producing intense X-radiation (bremsstrahlung or K/sub alpha /) for pumping an innershell X-ray laser. The basic concept of such a laser involves the propagation of the electron beam in a material which converts electron energy into appropriate pump photons. Using the ATLAS titanium-sapphire laser at Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, we investigate the generation of hot electrons and of characteristic radiation in copper. The laser (200 mJ/130 fs) is focused by means of an off-axis parabola to a diameter of about 10 mu m. By varying the position of the focus, we measure the copper K/sub alpha /-yield as a function of intensity in a range from 10/sup 15/ to 2 x 10/sup 18/ W/cm/sup 2/ while keeping the laser pulse energy constant. Surprisingly, the highest emission is obtained at an intensity of about 10/s...

  19. Interaction between Solid Nitrogen and 1-3-keV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental studies were made of the interaction between solid nitrogen and beams of 1-2-keV electrons. The projected range for the electrons was measured by means of the mirror-substrate method (gold substrate), giving the result 9.02×1016 E1.75 molecules/cm2 with the energy given in ke......V. At 3 keV, the SEE coefficient is 12 times that for solid deuterium. This is attributed partly to the larger production rate for low-energy electrons in nitrogen and partly to the larger escape probability for these electrons. Moreover, measurements were made of the electron-reflection coefficient, both...... for solid nitrogen and for the carbon substrate. For nitrogen, it varied from 0.17 el/el at 1 keV to 0.13 el/el at 3 keV, and for carbon it varied from 0.13 to 0.12. The observations are discussed and comparisons made with other theoretical and experimental results. The agreement ranges from good to fair...

  20. Neutrons production during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons with a thin tungsten target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto B, T. G.; Medina C, D.; Baltazar R, A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    When a linear accelerator for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages higher than 8 MV, neutrons are produced, as secondary radiation which deposits an undesirable and undesirable dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, the cancer treatment with a Linac is performed with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and (e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section for the neutrons production by reactions (γ, n) is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the effective section of the reactions (e, e n), studies on the effects of this secondary radiation have focused on photo neutrons. en a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam coming out of the magnetic deflector is impinged on the dispersion lamella in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and to expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; the objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of the photons and neutrons that occur when a mono-energetic electron beam of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm of thickness. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with code MCNP6 for electron beams of 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 4 point detectors placed at different equidistant points from the center of the lamella. (Author)

  1. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishtopenko, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system

  2. Effects of the electron-electron interaction in the spin resonance in 2D systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishtopenko, S. S., E-mail: sergey.krishtopenko@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    The effect of the electron-electron interaction on the spin-resonance frequency in two-dimensional electron systems with Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling is investigated. The oscillatory dependence of many-body corrections on the magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that the consideration of many-body interaction leads to a decrease or an increase in the spin-resonance frequency, depending on the sign of the g factor. It is found that the term cubic in quasimomentum in Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling partially decreases exchange corrections to the spin resonance energy in a two-dimensional system.

  3. Interaction of a relativistic electron beam with radiation in the THz frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Chieh

    The ability to generate a train of microbunches that are only typically tens of femtosecond wide and are separated by a picosecond is a topic of contemporary interest in the field of free electron lasers and plasma based accelerators. Moreover the usefulness of the high gradients present in plasma accelerators will depend on the ability to obtain mono-energetic relativistic electrons. This means that in addition to being prebunched on a scale shorter than the plasma wavelength the externally injected electron beam must be phase-locked to the accelerating plasma wave structure. In this thesis we investigate two techniques, Free Electron Laser interaction (FEL) and the Inverse Free Electron Laser interaction (IFEL), by which a medium energy electron beam can be prebunched into a series of microbunches with the same periodicity as a plasma wave and is phase locked to it. Using full-scale, 3-D simulations we show in this thesis that when a relativistic electron beam and an electromagnetic wave propagate collinearly through a magnetic undulator, FEL and IFEL interactions have the capability to form electron microbunches with periodicity 300-100 mum (1-3 THz range), which contain 50% of electrons within a small fraction of the ponderomotive buckets. Such a bunched beam is suitable for injection into plasma densities in the range 1016-1017 cm-3, respectively. Microbunching using the FEL mechanism requires a narrowband THz radiation source to act as a seed whereas the IFEL mechanism requires, in addition, such a source to be high power. In this thesis the generation of THz radiation in the Neptune Laboratory by mixing of two CO2 laser lines in a non-collinearly phase matched GaAs at room temperature is described A high-power THz pulse with up to 2 MW of peak power in a 250 ps pulse was generated using a TW class CO2 laser pulse. Such high power THz radiation is needed for the IFEL approach to microbunching. We also produced a high repetition rate THz source tunable in the

  4. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, E.; Sanche, L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N 2 , O 2 , H 2 O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N 2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O 2 and H 2 O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O 2 and H 2 O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitization of these agents in chemo-radiation cancer therapy. (authors)

  5. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  6. Interaction of non-equilibrium phonons with electron-hole plasmas in germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirch, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis presents results of experiments on the interaction of phonons and photo-excited electron-hole plasmas in Ge at low temperature. The first two studies involved the low-temperature fluid phase known as the electron-hole liquid (EHL). The third study involved a wider range of temperatures and includes the higher temperature electron-hole plasma (EHP). In the first experiment, superconducting tunnel junctions are used to produce quasi-monochromatic phonons, which propagate through the EHL. The magnitude of the absorption of these non-equilibrium phonons gives a direct measure of the coupling constant, the deformation potential. In the second experiment, the nonequilibrium phonons are generated by laser excitation of a metal film. An unusual sample geometry allows examination of the EHL-phonon interaction near the EHL excitation surface. This coupling is examined for both cw and pulsed EHL excitation. In the third experiment, the phonons are byproducts of the photo-excited carrier thermalization. The spatial, spectral and temporal dependence of the recombination luminescence is examined. A phonon wind force is observed to dominate the transport properties of the EHL and the EHP. These carriers are never observed to move faster than the phonon velocity even during the laser pulse

  7. Digital video analysis of health professionals' interactions with an electronic whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Kushniruk, Andre

    2013-01-01

    As hospital departments continue to introduce electronic whiteboards in real clinical settings a range of human factor issues have emerged and it has become clear that there is a need for improved methods for designing and testing these systems. In this study, we employed a longitudinal and natur......As hospital departments continue to introduce electronic whiteboards in real clinical settings a range of human factor issues have emerged and it has become clear that there is a need for improved methods for designing and testing these systems. In this study, we employed a longitudinal...... and naturalistic method in the usability evaluation of an electronic whiteboard system. The goal of the evaluation was to explore the extent to which usability issues experienced by users change as they gain more experience with the system. In addition, the paper explores the use of a new approach to collection...... and analysis of continuous digital video recordings of naturalistic "live" user interactions. The method developed and employed in the study included recording the users' interactions with system during actual use using screen-capturing software and analyzing these recordings for usability issues...

  8. The importance of the on-site electron-electron interaction for the magnetic coupling in the zigzag spin-chain compound In2VO5

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2010-09-27

    We present first-principles electronic structure calculations for the zigzag spin-chain compound In2VO5 using the generalized gradient approximation both with and without inclusion of an on-site Coulomb interaction. It has been proposed that In2VO5 is characterized by itinerant V 3d electrons at high temperature and localized electrons at low temperature. Consequently, it is to be expected that electronic correlations play an important role for the magnetic transition from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic exchange around 120 K. In this context, we study the electronic and magnetic properties of a set of possible spin configurations. Our calculations show that inclusion of an on-site Coulomb interaction in fact changes the ground state from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. Study on mutual interactions and electronic structures of hyaluronan with Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid and Arginine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chytil, Martin; Trojan, Martin; Kovalenko, Alexander

    2016-05-20

    Interactions between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants have been in a great interest for several decades, yet the conventional surfactants may cause a problem in medical applications. Interactivity between polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) and amino acids Lysine, 6-Aminocaproic acid (6-AcA), and Arginine as an alternative system is reported. The interactions were investigated by means of rheology and electric conductance and the electronic structures were explored by the density functional theory (DFT). Lysine exhibits the strongest interaction of all, which was manifested, e.g. by nearly 6-time drop of the initial viscosity comparing with only 1.3-time lower value in the case of 6-AcA. Arginine interaction with HA was surprisingly weaker in terms of viscosity than that of Lysine due to a lower and delocalized charge density on its guanidine group. According to the DFT calculations, the binding of Lysine to HA was found to be more flexible, while Arginine creates more rigid structure with HA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Dispersion, mode-mixing and the electron-phonon interaction in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, A.; Ridley, B. K.

    2018-03-01

    The electron-phonon interaction with polar optical modes in nanostructures is re-examined in the light of phonon dispersion relations and the role of the Fuchs-Kliewer (FK) mode. At an interface between adjacent polar materials the frequencies of the FK mode are drawn from the dielectric constants of the adjacent materials and are significantly smaller than the corresponding frequencies of the longitudinal optic (LO) modes at the zone centre. The requirement that all polar modes satisfy mechanical and electrical boundary conditions forces the modes to become hybrids. For a hybrid to have both FK and LO components the LO mode must have the FK frequency, which can only come about through the reduction associated with phonon dispersion relations. We illustrate the effect of phonon dispersion relations on the Fröhlich interaction by considering a simple linear-chain model of the zincblende lattice. Optical and acoustic modes become mixed towards short wavelengths in both optical and acoustic branches. A study of GaAs, InP and cubic GaN and AlN shows that the polarity of the optical branch and the acousticity of the acoustic branch are reduced by dispersion in equal measures, but the effect is relatively weak. Coupling coefficients quantifying the strengths of the interaction with electrons for optical and acoustic components of mixed modes in the optical branch show that, in most cases, the polar interaction dominates the acoustic interaction, and it is reduced from the long-wavelength result towards the zone boundary by only a few percent. The effect on the lower-frequency FK mode can be large.

  11. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  12. Simulation of the interaction of positively charged beams and electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markovik, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    The incoherent (head-tail) effect on the bunch due to the interaction with electron clouds (e-clouds) leads to a blow up of the transverse beam size in storage rings operating with positively charged beams. Even more the e-cloud effects are considered to be the main limiting factor for high current, high-brightness or high-luminosity operation of future machines. Therefore the simulation of e-cloud phenomena is a highly active field of research. The main focus in this work was set to a development of a tool for simulation of the interaction of relativistic bunches with non-relativistic parasitic charged particles. The result is the Particle-In-Cell Program MOEVE PIC Tracking which can track a 3D bunch under the influence of its own and external electromagnetic fields but first and foremost it simulates the interaction of relativistic positively charged bunches and initially static electrons. In MOEVE PIC Tracking the conducting beam pipe can be modeled with an arbitrary elliptical cross-section to achieve more accurate space charge field computations for both the bunch and the e-cloud. The simulation of the interaction between positron bunches and electron clouds in this work gave a detailed insight of the behavior of both particle species during and after the interaction. Further and ultimate goal of this work was a fast estimation of the beam stability under the influence of e-clouds in the storage ring. The standard approach to simulate the stability of a single bunch is to track the bunch particles through the linear optics of the machine by multiplying the 6D vector of each particle with the transformation matrices describing the lattice. Thereby the action of the e-cloud on the bunch is approximated by a pre-computed wake kick which is applied on one or more points in the lattice. Following the idea of K.Ohmi the wake kick was pre-computed as a two variable function of the bunch part exiting the e-cloud and the subsequent parts of a bunch which receive a

  13. Local Electron Interaction with Point Defects in Sphalerite Zinc Selenide: Calculation from First Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyk, O. P.; Syrotyuk, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The present article deals with the description of electron scattering on the different types of point defects in zinc blende ZnSe on the basis of short-range principles. The electron interaction with polar and nonpolar optical phonons, piezoelectric and acoustic phonons, neutral and ionized impurities and static strain centers is considered. The electron transition probabilities and, respectively, the kinetic coefficients in zinc selenide, were calculated using the numerical eigenfunction and self-consistent potential obtained within the ab initio density functional theory. The latter were evaluated using the projector augmented waves formalism as implemented in the ABINIT software suite. We investigated ZnSe samples with defect concentration 4.7 × 1015-1.08 × 1017 cm-3 , then calculated temperature dependencies of electron mobility and Hall factors in the range of 20-400 K. It is shown that the theoretical curves obtained in the framework of short-range scattering models much better coincide with experimental data than the curves calculated on the basis of long-range scattering models.

  14. Modeling of the interaction of a volumetric metallic metamaterial structure with a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Lu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the design of a volumetric metamaterial (MTM structure and its interaction with a relativistic electron beam. This novel structure has promising applications in particle beam diagnostics, acceleration, and microwave generation. The volumetric MTM has a cubic unit cell allowing structures of arbitrary size to be configured as an array of identical cells. This structure allows the exploration of the properties of a metamaterial structure without having to consider substrates or other supporting elements. The dispersion characteristics of the unit cell are obtained using eigenmode simulations in the hfss code and also using an effective medium theory with spatial dispersion. Good agreement is obtained between these two approaches. The lowest-order mode of the MTM structure is found to have a negative group velocity in all directions of propagation. The frequency spectrum of the radiation from a relativistic electron beam passing through the MTM structure is calculated analytically and also calculated with the cst code, with very good agreement. The radiation pattern from the relativistic electron beam is found to be backward Cherenkov radiation, which is a promising tool for particle diagnostics. Calculations are also presented for the application of a MTM-based wakefield accelerator as a possible all-metal replacement for the conventional dielectric wakefield structure. The proposed structure may also be useful for MTM-based vacuum electron devices for microwave generation and amplification.

  15. Efficient harmonic microbunching in a 7th-order inverse-free-electron laser interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ya. Tochitsky

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that a seventh-order inverse-free-electron laser (IFEL interaction, where the radiation frequency is the seventh harmonic of the fundamental resonant frequency, can microbunch a beam of relativistic electrons inside an undulator. Using coherent transition radiation (CTR emitted by the bunched 12.3 MeV beam as a diagnostic, strong microbunching of the beam is inferred from the observation of CTR at the first, second, and third harmonics of the seed 10  μm radiation. Three-dimensional IFEL simulations show that the observed harmonic ratios can be explained only if transverse spatial distribution of the steepened bunched beam is taken into account.

  16. FEATURES OF TECHNOLOGIES CREATE INTERACTIVE ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT FOR SUPPORT OF LABORATORY PRACTICAL PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola A. Meleshko

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the content of the «flash-book» construct, defining its properties and possible components. There are presented some examples of components programming steps of “authoring flash – book”, considered the possibility of using such an electronic document to optimize the learning process at the Technical University in the performance of laboratory training on general physics. The technique of its using to provide individualized approach to learning and the use of various experimental base from classical to digital equipment laboratories is proposed. It was carried out the analysis of ways to improve such interactive electronic document for the development of information technology competence of engineering students.

  17. The abiotic and biotic factors limiting establishment of predatory fishes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alofs, Karen M; Jackson, Donald A

    2015-06-01

    There is a poor understanding of the importance of biotic interactions in determining species distributions with climate change. Theory from invasion biology suggests that the success of species introductions outside of their historical ranges may be either positively (biotic acceptance) or negatively (biotic resistance) related to native biodiversity. Using data on fish community composition from two survey periods separated by approximately 28 years during which climate was warming, we examined the factors influencing the establishment of three predatory centrarchids: Smallmouth Bass (Micropterus dolomieu), Largemouth Bass (M. salmoides), and Rock Bass (Ambloplites rupestris) in lakes at their expanding northern range boundaries in Ontario. Variance partitioning demonstrated that, at a regional scale, abiotic factors play a stronger role in determining the establishment of these species than biotic factors. Pairing lakes within watersheds where each species had established with lakes sharing similar abiotic conditions where the species had not established revealed both positive and negative relationships between the establishment of centrarchids and the historical presence of other predatory species. The establishment of these species near their northern range boundaries is primarily determined by abiotic factors at a regional scale; however, biotic factors become important at the lake-to-lake scale. Studies of exotic species invasions have previously highlighted how spatial scale mediates the importance of abiotic vs. biotic factors on species establishment. Our study demonstrates how concepts from invasion biology can inform our understanding of the factors controlling species distributions with changing climate. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Variational Calculations for a Two-Electron Quantum Dot Interacting with a Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nader, D. J.; Alvarez-Jiménez, J.; Mejía-Díaz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The behavior of the two-electron quantum dot interacting with a uniform magnetic field is not fully understood yet. This lack of clarity arises from the fact that the mixed, spherical and cylindrical, coordinates do not allow the system to be separable. In this paper, we applied an standard variational method, with a physical recipe for choosing compact trial functions. In order to solve the six dimensional integrals necessary to compute the expectation value of the Hamiltonian, we used a Monte Carlo routine. The energy values obtained are in agreement with the ones presented in previous literature. (author)

  19. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinitsky, S. L.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  20. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinitsky, S. L.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  1. Studies of high-current relativistic electron beam interaction with gas and plasma in Novosibirsk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinitsky, S. L., E-mail: s.l.sinitsky@inp.nsk.su; Arzhannikov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova St., Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Acad. Lavrentyev Ave, Novosibirsk, 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Prospekt K. Marksa, Novosibirsk, 630073 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-25

    This paper presents an overview of the studies on the interaction of a high-power relativistic electron beam (REB) with dense plasma confined in a long open magnetic trap. The main goal of this research is to achieve plasma parameters close to those required for thermonuclear fusion burning. The experimental studies were carried over the course of four decades on various devices: INAR, GOL, INAR-2, GOL-M, and GOL-3 (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics) for a wide range of beam and plasma parameters.

  2. Optical transitions and electronic interactions in self-assembled cobalt-fullerene mixture films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Chvostová, Dagmar; Lavrentieva, Inna; Vacík, Jiří; Daskal, Y.; Barchuk, M.; Rafaja, D.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 48 (2017), č. článku 485305. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : fullerene * cobalt * electronic interaction * optical absorption * mixture film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BO - Biophysics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Biophysics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  3. EFFECTS OF NEUTRINO ELECTROMAGNETIC FORM FACTORS ON NEUTRINO INTERACTION WITH FINITE TEMPERATURE ELECTRON MATTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anto Sulaksono

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The differential cross-section of neutrino interaction with dense and warm electron gasses has been calculated by takinginto account the neutrino electromagnetic form factors. The significant effect of electromagnetic properties of neutrinocan be found if the neutrino dipole moment, μ ν , is ≥ 5.10-9 μB and neutrino charge radius, Rv, is ≥ 5.10-6 MeV-1. Theimportance of the retarded correction, detailed balance and Pauli blocking factors is shown and analyzed. Many-bodyeffects on the target matter which are included via random phase approximation (RPA correlation as well as photoneffective mass are also investigated.

  4. Misunderstandings connected with the problem of electron-positron interaction in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachowiak, H.; Boronski, E. [Polska Akademia Nauk, Wroclaw (Poland). Inst. Niskich Temperatur i Badan Strukturalnych

    1997-10-01

    It is pointed out that some misunderstandings concerning the theory of electron-positron interaction are an obstacle in a reliable experimental determination of the annihilation characteristics in simple metals. A two step program of reaching progress in this direction is proposed. First a definitive conclusion concerning the applicability of the consequently many-body approach of Arponen and Pajanne in describing positron annihilation in metals. Then a precise determination of the momentum dependence of enhancement, since the approximate biquadratic formula of Kahana, generally and uncritically used by experimentalists, differs in an essential way from the exact solution of the Kahana equation. (author). 17 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Quantum corrected Langevin dynamics for adsorbates on metal surfaces interacting with hot electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the importance of including quantized initial conditions in Langevin dynamics for adsorbates interacting with a thermal reservoir of electrons. For quadratic potentials the time evolution is exactly described by a classical Langevin equation and it is shown how to rigorously obtain...... mechanical master equation approach. With CO on Cu(100) as an example, we demonstrate the effect for a system with ab initio frictional tensor and potential energy surfaces and show that quantizing the initial conditions can have a large impact on both the desorption probability and the distribution...

  6. Molecular modeling of interactions in electronic nose sensors for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevade, A. V.; Ryan, M. A.; Homer, M. L.; Manfreda, A. M.; Yen, S. -P. S.; Zhou, H.; Manatt, K.

    2002-01-01

    We report a study aimed at understanding analyte interactions with sensors made from polymer-carbon black composite films. The sensors are used in an Electronic Nose (ENose) which is used for monitoring the breathing air quality in human habitats. The model mimics the experimental conditions of the composite film deposition and formation and was developed using molecular modeling and simulation tools. The Dreiding 2.21 Force Field was used for the polymer and analyte molecules while graphite parameters were assigned to the carbon black atoms. The polymer considered for this work is methyl vinyl ether / maleic acid copolymer. The target analytes include both inorganic (NH3) and organic (methanol) types of compound. Results indicate different composite-analyte interaction behavior.

  7. Powerful effective one-electron Hamiltonian for describing many-atom interacting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo, J.O.; Vergara, L.I.; Bolcatto, P.G.; Goldberg, E.C.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we present an alternative way to build the effective one-electron picture of a many-atom interacting system. By simplifying the many-body general problem we present two different options for the bond-pair model Hamiltonian. We have found that the successive approximations in order to achieve the effective description have a dramatic influence on the result. Thus, only the model that introduces the correct renormalization in the diagonal term due to the overlap is able to reproduce, even in a quantitative fashion, the main properties of simple homonuclear diatomic molecules. The success of the model resides in the accurate definitions (free of parametrization) of the Hamiltonian terms, which, therefore, could be used to describe more complex interacting systems such as polyatomic molecules, adsorbed species, or atoms scattered by a surface

  8. submitter ELECTRON CLOUD AND COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN THE INTERACTION REGION OF FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, E; Rumolo, G

    2016-01-01

    The FCC-ee is an e⁺e⁻ circular collider designed to accommodate four different experiments in a beam energy range from 91 to 350 GeV and is a part of the Future Circular Collider (FCC) project at CERN. One of the most critical aspects of this new very challenging machine regards the collective effects which can produce instabilities, thus limiting the accelerator operation and reducing its performance. The following studies are focused on the Interaction Region of the machine. This talk will present preliminary simulation results of the power loss due to the wake fields generated by the electromagnetic interaction of the beam with the vacuum chamber. A preliminary estimation of the electron cloud build-up is also reported, whose effects have been recognized as one of the main limitations for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

  9. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2013-12-10

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements.

  10. Theory of substrate, Zeeman, and electron-phonon interaction effects on the quantum capacitance in graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.; Sabeeh, K.; Shaukat, A.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of graphene, a lot of interest has been attracted by the zeroth Landau level, which has no analog in the conventional two dimensional electron gas. Recently, lifting of the spin and valley degeneracies has been confirmed experimentally by capacitance measurements, while in transport experiments, this is difficult due to the scattering in the device. In this context, we model interaction effects on the quantum capacitance of graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field, finding good agreement with experiments. We demonstrate that the valley degeneracy is lifted by the substrate and by Kekule distortion, whereas the spin degeneracy is lifted by Zeeman interaction. The two cases can be distinguished by capacitance measurements

  11. Transmission electron microscopy study of stacking faults and their interaction with pyramidal dislocations in deformed Mg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, B.; Yan, P.F.; Sui, M.L.; Ma, E.

    2010-01-01

    We present transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of stacking faults (SFs) and their interactions with pyramidal dislocations, in plastically deformed polycrystalline pure magnesium. We have observed well-defined fringes as well as streaking in diffraction patterns, typical of SFs. The basal SFs are decorated by a large number of dark speckles, which are created by the interaction with pyramidal dislocations that have both and components as revealed by our contrast analysis. The SFs do not appear to result from the splitting of unit dislocations, as the SFs are relatively wide and no dislocation nodes were observed. By tilting the specimen systematically inside TEM, the SFs and the associated dislocations in Mg are found to exhibit a rich variety of features in terms of their morphology and diffraction contrast.

  12. Magnetism of singlet - singlet ions interacting with an electron gas: application to PrAl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palermo, L.

    1986-01-01

    Various magnetic quantities are investigated for a system consisting of singlet-singlet ions interacting with an electron gas. In obtaining the magnetic state equations, the molecular field approximation is used. At T=0, an onset magnetic order condition in function of crystal field and exchange parameters and eletronic density of states at Fermi level is derived. A parametric study of the model is performed numerically. Main results are shown on diagrams. From the experimental data existent in the literature for magnetisation, susceptibility and magnetic specific heat of the PrAl 2 , a fitting with the model predictions is obtained using the following parameters: exchange interaction: 611meV; crystal field parameters: 2,5 meV; band with: 10 eV (of a rectangular density of states with 0,8 el/atom). (author) [pt

  13. Transmission electron microscopy and time resolved optical spectroscopy study of the electronic and structural interactions of ZnO nanorods with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaumünzer, M; Weichsel, U; Mačković, M; Spiecker, E; Peukert, W; Kryschi, C

    2013-08-22

    The adsorption behavior and electronic interactions of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with ZnO nanorod surfaces were investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as stationary and time-resolved optical spectroscopy techniques. Transmission electron microscopy shows that ZnO nanorod surfaces are surrounded by a homogeneous amorphous BSA film with thicknesses between ~2.5 and 5.0 nm. The electronic structure and adsorption geometry of BSA were examined using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The adsorption process was observed to result into an unfolded conformation of BSA becoming predominantly bound in the side-on orientation at the ZnO surface. This adsorption mode of the BSA molecules allows for a strong interaction with surface states of the ZnO nanorods. This is obvious from its efficient quenching of the defect-center photoluminescence of ZnO. Complementary information of electronic interactions across the ZnO nanorod interface was obtained from femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy experiments. The rise dynamics of the measured transients revealed altered hole trapping dynamics and, thus, indicated to heterogeneous charge transfer as emerging from adsorbed BSA molecules to defect centers of the ZnO interface.

  14. Interactions between low energy electrons and DNA: a perspective from first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; McAllister, Maeve; Tribello, Gareth A.; Gu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by irradiation has been studied for many decades. Such studies allow us to better assess the dangers posed by radiation, and to increase the efficiency of the radiotherapies that are used to combat cancer. A full description of the irradiation process involves multiple size and time scales. It starts with the interaction of radiation—either photons or swift ions—and the biological medium, which causes electronic excitation and ionisation. The two main products of ionising radiation are thus electrons and radicals. Both of these species can cause damage to biological molecules, in particular DNA. In the long run, this molecular level damage can prevent cells from replicating and can hence lead to cell death. For a long time it was assumed that the main actors in the damage process were the radicals. However, experiments in a seminal paper by the group of Leon Sanche in 2000 showed that low-energy electrons (LEE), such as those generated when ionising biological targets, can also cause bond breaks in biomolecules, and strand breaks in plasmid DNA in particular (Boudaiffa et al 2000 Science 287 1658-60). These results prompted a significant amount of experimental and theoretical work aimed at elucidating the role played by LEE in DNA damage. In this Topical Review we provide a general overview of the problem. We discuss experimental findings and theoretical results hand in hand with the aim of describing the physics and chemistry that occurs during the process of radiation damage, from the initial stages of electronic excitation, through the inelastic propagation of electrons in the medium, the interaction of electrons with DNA, and the chemical end-point effects on DNA. A very important aspect of this discussion is the consideration of a realistic, physiological environment. The role played by the aqueous solution and the amino acids from the histones in chromatin must be considered. Moreover, thermal fluctuations must be incorporated when

  15. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millaku, Agron, E-mail: agron.mi@hotmail.com [Limnos-Company for Applied Ecology Ltd, Podlimbarskega 31, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Advanced Materials and Technologies for the Future (CO NAMASTE), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Centre of Excellence, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (Nanocentre), Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Torkar, Matjaz [Institute of Metals and Technology IMT, Lepi pot 11, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Novak, Sara [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Remškar, Maja [Jožef Stefan Institute, Condensed Matter Physics Department, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Pipan-Tkalec, Živa [University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Biology, Večna pot 111, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2013-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells.

  16. Use of scanning electron microscopy to monitor nanofibre/cell interaction in digestive epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millaku, Agron; Drobne, Damjana; Torkar, Matjaz; Novak, Sara; Remškar, Maja; Pipan-Tkalec, Živa

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Scanning electron microscopy is particularly well suited to the observation of nanofibre/cell interaction in the endothelial cells lining the hepatopancreas. (a) Tungsten oxide nanofibres, (b) test organism Porcellio scaber and schematic appearance of digestive tubes, (c) digestive tube (hepatopancreas) prepared for SEM investigation, (d) digestive gland cells (C) with nanofibres (NF) embedded in the cell membrane and (e) nanofibres inserted deeply in the cells and damaged nanofibres due to peristalsis. -- Highlights: • Tungsten oxide nanofibres react physically with digestive gland epithelial cells in Porcellio scaber. • Physical peristaltic forces of lead to insertion of nanofibres into the cells. • No toxic responses as measured by conventional toxicity biomarkers were detected. • Physical interactions were observed in a majority of the investigated animals. -- Abstract: We provide data obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) on the interaction of ingested tungsten nanofibers with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes of a test organism Porcellio scaber. Conventional toxicity endpoints including feeding behaviour, weight loss and mortality were also measured in each investigated animal. No toxicity was detected in any of exposed animals after 14 days of feeding on tungsten nanofiber dosed food, but when nanofibers enter the digestive system they can react with epithelial cells of the digestive tubes, becoming physically inserted into the cells. In this way, nanofibers can injure the epithelial cells of digestive gland tubes when they are ingested with food. Our SEM data suggest that peristaltic forces may have an important role, not predicted by in vitro experiments, in the interactions of nanomaterials with digestive intestinal cells

  17. Electron-electron attractive interaction in Maxwell-Chern-Simons QED{sub 3} at zero temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belich, H.; Ferreira Junior, M.M.; Helayel-Neto, J.A. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: belich@cbpf.br; manojr@cbpf.br; helayel@gft.ucp.br; Ferreira Junior, M.M. [Universidade Catolica de Petropolis, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Fisica Teorica. E-mail: delcima@gft.ucp.br

    2001-04-01

    One discusses the issue of low-energy electron-electron bound states in the Maxwell-Chern-Simons model coupled to QED{sub 3} with spontaneous breaking of a local U(1)-symmetry. The scattering potential, in the non-relativistic limit, steaming from the electron-electron Moeller scattering, mediated by the Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Proca gauge field and the Higgs scalar, might be attractive by fine-tuning properly the physical parameters of the model. (author)

  18. The lattice dynamical studies of rare earth compounds: electron-phonon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Singh, R.K.

    2002-01-01

    During the last two decades chalcogenides and pnictides of rare earth (RE) atoms have drawn considerable attention of the solid state physicists because of their peculiar electronic, magnetic, optical and phonon properties. Some of these compounds e.g. sulphides and selenides of cerium (Ce), samarium (Sm), yttrium (Y), ytterbium (Yb), europium (Eu) and thulium (Tm) and their alloys show nonintegral valence (between 2 and 3), arising due to f-d electron hybridization at ambient temperature and pressure. The rare earth mixed valence compounds (MVC) reviewed in this article crystallize in simple cubic structure. Most of these compounds show the existence of strong electron-phonon coupling at half way to the zone boundary. This fact manifests itself through softening of the longitudinal acoustic mode, negative value of elastic constant C 12 etc. The purpose of this contribution is to review some of the recent activities in the fields of lattice dynamics and allied properties of rare earth compounds. The present article is primarily devoted to review the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the dynamical properties of rare earth compounds by using the lattice dynamical model theories based on charged density deformations and long-range many body forces. While the long range charge transfer effect arises due to f-d hybridization of nearly degenerate 4f-5d bands of rare earth ions, the density deformation comes into the picture of breathing motion of electron shells. These effects of charge transfer and charge density deformation when considered in the lattice dynamical models namely the three body force rigid ion model (TRM) and breathing shell model (BSM) are quite successful in explaining the phonon anomalies in these compounds and undoubtedly unraveled many important physical process governing the phonon anomalies in rare earth compounds

  19. Methyl salicylate production in tomato affects biotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, K.; Krasikov, V.; Allmann, S.; Rep, M.; Takken, F.L.W.; Schuurink, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    The role of methyl salicylate (MeSA) production was studied in indirect and direct defence responses of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to the spider mite Tetranychus urticae and the root-invading fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, respectively. To this end, we silenced the tomato gene

  20. ABC transporters from Botrytis cinerea in biotic and abiotic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoonbeek, H.

    2004-01-01

    Botrytis cinereais the causal agent of grey mould disease on a wide variety of crop plants. It is relatively insensitive to natural and synthetic fungitoxic compounds. This thesis describes how ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporters contribute to protection by actively

  1. Methods for evaluating stream, riparian, and biotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    William S. Platts; Walter F. Megahan; G. Wayne Minshall

    1983-01-01

    This report develops a standard way of measuring stream, riparian, and biotic conditions and evaluates the validity of the measurements recommended. Accuracy and precision of most measurements are defined. This report will be of value to those persons documenting, monitoring, or predicting stream conditions and their biotic resources, especially those related to...

  2. Physico-chemical and biotic factors influencing microalgal seed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The growth of Chlorella vulgaris in open pond aquatic conditions poses serious challenges due to the interplay of both physico-chemical and biotic factors. We report here the monitoring of physico-chemical and biotic parameters affecting the propagation of C. vulgaris seed culture for inoculation of a large scale raceway ...

  3. Molstack-Interactive visualization tool for presentation, interpretation, and validation of macromolecules and electron density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porebski, Przemyslaw J; Sroka, Piotr; Zheng, Heping; Cooper, David R; Minor, Wladek

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the world of biomolecular structures is based upon the interpretation of macromolecular models, of which ∼90% are an interpretation of electron density maps. This structural information guides scientific progress and exploration in many biomedical disciplines. The Protein Data Bank's web portals have made these structures available for mass scientific consumption and greatly broaden the scope of information presented in scientific publications. The portals provide numerous quality metrics; however, the portion of the structure that is most vital for interpretation of the function may have the most difficult to interpret electron density and this ambiguity is not reflected by any single metric. The possible consequences of basing research on suboptimal models make it imperative to inspect the agreement of a model with its experimental evidence. Molstack, a web-based interactive publishing platform for structural data, allows users to present density maps and structural models by displaying a collection of maps and models, including different interpretation of one's own data, re-refinements, and corrections of existing structures. Molstack organizes the sharing and dissemination of these structural models along with their experimental evidence as an interactive session. Molstack was designed with three groups of users in mind; researchers can present the evidence of their interpretation, reviewers and readers can independently judge the experimental evidence of the authors' conclusions, and other researchers can present or even publish their new hypotheses in the context of prior results. The server is available at http://molstack.bioreproducibility.org. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Modulating the electronic structure of amino acids: interaction of model lewis acids with anthranilic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tareq Irshaidat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of theoretical B3LYP calculations, Yáñez and co-workers (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2012, 8, 2293 illustrated that beryllium ions are capable of significantly modulating (changing the electronic structures of imidazole. In this computational organic chemistry study, the interaction of this β-amino acid and five model Lewis acids (BeF1+, Be2+, AlF2(1+, AlF2+, and Al3+ were investigated. Several aspects were addressed: natural bond orbitals, including second order perturbation analysis of intra-molecular charge delocalization and the natural population analysis atomic charges; molecular geometries; selected infrared stretching frequencies (C-N, C-O, and N-H, and selected ¹H-NMR chemical shifts. The data illustrate that this interaction can weaken the H-O bond and goes beyond strengthening the intra-molecular hydrogen bond (N...H-O to cause a spontaneous transfer of the proton to the nitrogen atom in five cases generating zwitterion structures. Many new features are observed. Most importantly, the zwitterion structures include a stabilizing hydrogen bond (N-H...O that varies in relative strength according to the Lewis acid. These findings explain the experimental observations of α-amino acids (for example: J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001, 123, 3577 and are the first reported fundamental electronic structure characterization of β-amino acids in zwitterion form.

  5. Determination of Odour Interactions in Gaseous Mixtures Using Electronic Nose Methods with Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczyński, Bartosz; Gębicki, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents application of an electronic nose prototype comprised of eight sensors, five TGS-type sensors, two electrochemical sensors and one PID-type sensor, to identify odour interaction phenomenon in two-, three-, four- and five-component odorous mixtures. Typical chemical compounds, such as toluene, acetone, triethylamine, α-pinene and n-butanol, present near municipal landfills and sewage treatment plants were subjected to investigation. Evaluation of predicted odour intensity and hedonic tone was performed with selected artificial neural network structures with the activation functions tanh and Leaky rectified linear units (Leaky ReLUs) with the parameter a=0.03. Correctness of identification of odour interactions in the odorous mixtures was determined based on the results obtained with the electronic nose instrument and non-linear data analysis. This value (average) was at the level of 88% in the case of odour intensity, whereas the average was at the level of 74% in the case of hedonic tone. In both cases, correctness of identification depended on the number of components present in the odorous mixture. PMID:29419798

  6. 3-D Parallel Simulation Model of Continuous Beam-Electron Cloud Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalam, Ali F; Decyk, Viktor K; Huang Cheng Kun; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Mori, Warren; Rumolo, Giovanni; Zimmermann, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A 3D Particle-In-Cell model for continuous modeling of beam and electron cloud interaction in a circular accelerator is presented. A simple model for lattice structure, mainly the Quadruple and dipole magnets and chromaticity have been added to a plasma PIC code, QuickPIC, used extensively to model plasma wakefield acceleration concept. The code utilizes parallel processing techniques with domain decomposition in both longitudinal and transverse domains to overcome the massive computational costs of continuously modeling the beam-cloud interaction. Through parallel modeling, we have been able to simulate long-term beam propagation in the presence of electron cloud in many existing and future circular machines around the world. The exact dipole lattice structure has been added to the code and the simulation results for CERN-SPS and LHC with the new lattice structure have been studied. Also the simulation results are compared to the results from the two macro-particle modeling for strong head-tail instability. ...

  7. Transverse Dynamics and Energy Tuning of Fast Electrons Generated in Sub-Relativistic Intensity Laser Pulse Interaction with Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, M.; Kando, M.; Daito, I.; Kotaki, H.; Hayashi, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Ogura, K.; Sagisaka, A.; Koga, J.; Nakajima, K.; Daido, H.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kimura, T.

    2006-01-01

    The regimes of quasi-mono-energetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  8. Transverse dynamics and energy tuning of fast electrons generated in sub-relativistic intensity laser pulse interaction with plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)]. E-mail: mori.michiaki@jaea.go.jp; Kando, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daito, I. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kotaki, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hayashi, Y. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Yamazaki, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Ogura, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sagisaka, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Koga, J. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Nakajima, K. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Daido, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Bulanov, S.V.; Kimura, T. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umemidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2006-07-31

    The regimes of quasi-monoenergetic electron beam generation were experimentally studied in the sub-relativistic intensity laser plasma interaction. The observed electron acceleration regime is unfolded with two-dimensional-particle-in-cell simulations of laser-wakefield generation in the self-modulation regime.

  9. Non-linear and stimulated effects in laser-free electrons interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupersztych, Joseph.

    1977-11-01

    A new method of calculating interaction processes between free particles and the strong field of an arbitrary plane electromagnetic wave is presented. To construct the method, the electron behavior is examined by investigating the most general space-time symmetry properties of the field. The classical evolution operator is shown to describe both the evolution of the electron and the evolution of its spin in the external field. The quantum evolution operator allows one to define a representation well adapted to the calculation of scattering processes that occur in a laser beam. The nonrelativistic and ultra-relativistic limits of that representation are obtained by means of two unitary transformations which enable the Volkov states to be put exactly in two-component forms. The physical meaning of those transformations is shown to be connected to the motion of the electron spin (rigorously described by the Bargmann-Michel-Telegdi equation) and to the motion of its helicity in the wave. The method is used to calculate completely the relativistic cross-sections of the stimulated Bremsstrahlung and multiphoton inverse Bremsstrahlung processes. This last process is also investigated numerically and a saturation effect at high flux is exhibited [fr

  10. IMPORTANCE OF FULL COULOMB INTERACTIONS FOR UNDERSTANDING THE ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF DELTA-Pu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, E; Kolorenc, J; Wehling, T; Hafermann, H; Lichtenstein, A I; Shick, A B; Rubtsov, A N; Katsnelson, M I; Landa, A; McMahan, A K

    2010-04-01

    The solid-state properties of most elements are now well understood on the basis of quantum physics - with few exceptions, notably the element number 94, plutonium. Plutonium has six crystalline phases at ambient pressure, some of which are separated by unusual phase transitions with large discontinuities in volume, exhibit negative thermal expansion coefficients, or form exotic low-symmetry structures. The main challenge to explain these anomalous properties is that the characteristic ingredient of actinides, the 5f electronic states, are in the cross-over regime between the localized and delocalized (itinerant) behaviour in Pu. The early part of the actinide series with the 5f states being itinerant, i.e. part of the metallic bond, culminates with Pu; starting with Am (Z = 95), the 5f states are localized, nonbonding, and resemble the 4f states in lanthanides. Both itinerant and localized regimes are well covered by existing theories, but they cannot be simply interpolated due to the importance of dynamical electron-electron correlations. Here we present accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations achieving previously inaccessible resolution. Obtained results demonstrate that interplay of the full Coulomb interaction vertex with spin-orbital coupling is crucial for understanding the experimentally observed spectral properties of plutonium near the Fermi level.

  11. High frequency electric field spikes formed by electron beam-plasma interaction in plasma density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunell, H.; Loefgren, T.

    1997-02-01

    In the electron beam-plasma interaction at an electric double layer the beam density is much higher than in the classical beam-plasma experiments. The wave propagation takes place along the density gradient, that is present at the high potential side of the double layer. Such a case is studied experimentally by injecting the electron beam from a plane cathode, without any grids suppressing the gradient, and by particle simulations. The high frequency field concentrates in a sharp 'spike' with a half width of the order of one wavelength. The spike is found to be a standing wave surrounded by regions dominated by propagating waves. It forms at a position where its frequency is close to the local plasma frequency. The spike forms also when the electric field is well below the threshold for modulational instability, and long before a density cavity is formed in the simulations. Particle simulations reveal that, at the spike, there is a backward travelling wave that, when it is strongly damped, accelerates electrons back towards the cathode. In a simulation of a homogeneous plasma without the density gradient no spike is seen, and the wave is purely travelling instead of standing. 9 refs

  12. Electric field spikes formed by electron beam endash plasma interaction in plasma density gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunell, H.; Loefgren, T.

    1997-01-01

    In the electron beam endash plasma interaction at an electric double layer the beam density is much higher than in the classical beam endash plasma experiments. The wave propagation takes place along the density gradient that is present at the high potential side of the double layer. Such a case is studied experimentally by injecting the electron beam from a plane cathode, without any grids suppressing the gradient, and by particle simulations. The high frequency field concentrates in a sharp open-quotes spikeclose quotes with a half width of the order of one wavelength. The spike is found to be a standing wave surrounded by regions dominated by propagating waves. It forms at a position where its frequency is close to the local plasma frequency. The spike forms also when the electric field is well below the threshold for modulational instability, and long before a density cavity is formed in the simulations. Particle simulations reveal that, at the spike, there is a backward traveling wave that, when it is strongly damped, accelerates electrons back towards the cathode. In a simulation of a homogeneous plasma without the density gradient no spike is seen, and the wave is purely travelling instead of standing. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  13. Simulation of the development and interaction of instabilities in a relativistic electron beam under variation of the beam wall thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badarin, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation); Koronovskii, A. A. [Yuri Gagarin State Technical University (Russian Federation); Rak, A. O. [Belorussian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Hramov, A. E., E-mail: hramovae@gmail.com [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    The development and interaction of Bursian and diocotron instabilities in an annular relativistic electron beam propagating in a cylindrical drift chamber are investigated analytically and numerically as functions of the beam wall thickness and the magnitude of the external uniform magnetic field. It is found that the interaction of instabilities results in the formation of a virtual cathode with a complicated rotating helical structure and several reflection regions (electron bunches) in the azimuthal direction. It is shown that the number of electron bunches in the azimuthal direction increases with decreasing beam wall thickness and depends in a complicated manner on the magnitude of the external magnetic field.

  14. Final Report - Composite Fermion Approach to Strongly Interacting Quasi Two Dimensional Electron Gas Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, John

    2009-11-30

    Work related to this project introduced the idea of an effective monopole strength Q* that acted as the effective angular momentum of the lowest shell of composite Fermions (CF). This allowed us to predict the angular momentum of the lowest band of energy states for any value of the applied magnetic field simply by determining N{sub QP} the number of quasielectrons (QE) or quasiholes (QH) in a partially filled CF shell and adding angular momenta of the N{sub QP} Fermions excitations. The approach reported treated the filled CF level as a vacuum state which could support QE and QH excitations. Numerical diagonalization of small systems allowed us to determine the angular momenta, the energy, and the pair interaction energies of these elementary excitations. The spectra of low energy states could then be evaluated in a Fermi liquid-like picture, treating the much smaller number of quasiparticles and their interactions instead of the larger system of N electrons with Coulomb interactions.

  15. End-Triassic nonmarine biotic events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer G. Lucas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Late Triassic was a prolonged interval of elevated extinction rates and low origination rates that manifested themselves in a series of extinctions during Carnian, Norian and Rhaetian time. Most of these extinctions took place in the marine realm, particularly affecting radiolarians, conodonts, bivalves, ammonoids and reef-building organisms. On land, the case for a Late Triassic mass extinction is much more tenuous and has largely focused on tetrapod vertebrates (amphibians and reptiles, though some workers advocate a sudden end-Triassic (TJB extinction of land plants. Nevertheless, an extensive literature does not identify a major extinction of land plants at the TJB, and a comprehensive review of palynological records concluded that TJB vegetation changes were non-uniform (different changes in different places, not synchronous and not indicative of a mass extinction of land plants. Claims of a substantial perturbation of plant ecology and diversity at the TJB in East Greenland are indicative of a local change in the paleoflora largely driven by lithofacies changes resulting in changing taphonomic filters. Plant extinctions at the TJB were palaeogeographically localized events, not global in extent. With new and more detailed stratigraphic data, the perceived TJB tetrapod extinction is mostly an artifact of coarse temporal resolution, the compiled correlation effect. The amphibian, archosaur and synapsid extinctions of the Late Triassic are not concentrated at the TJB, but instead occur stepwise, beginning in the Norian and extending into the Hettangian. There was a disruption of the terrestrial ecosystem across the TJB, but it was more modest than generally claimed. The ecological severity of the end-Triassic nonmarine biotic events are relatively low on the global scale. Biotic turnover at the end of the Triassic was likely driven by the CAMP (Central Atlantic Magmatic Province eruptions, which caused significant environmental

  16. Many-body Green’s function theory for electron-phonon interactions: Ground state properties of the Holstein dimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Säkkinen, Niko; Leeuwen, Robert van; Peng, Yang; Appel, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We study ground-state properties of a two-site, two-electron Holstein model describing two molecules coupled indirectly via electron-phonon interaction by using both exact diagonalization and self-consistent diagrammatic many-body perturbation theory. The Hartree and self-consistent Born approximations used in the present work are studied at different levels of self-consistency. The governing equations are shown to exhibit multiple solutions when the electron-phonon interaction is sufficiently strong, whereas at smaller interactions, only a single solution is found. The additional solutions at larger electron-phonon couplings correspond to symmetry-broken states with inhomogeneous electron densities. A comparison to exact results indicates that this symmetry breaking is strongly correlated with the formation of a bipolaron state in which the two electrons prefer to reside on the same molecule. The results further show that the Hartree and partially self-consistent Born solutions obtained by enforcing symmetry do not compare well with exact energetics, while the fully self-consistent Born approximation improves the qualitative and quantitative agreement with exact results in the same symmetric case. This together with a presented natural occupation number analysis supports the conclusion that the fully self-consistent approximation describes partially the bipolaron crossover. These results contribute to better understanding how these approximations cope with the strong localizing effect of the electron-phonon interaction

  17. Comparative study of the corrosion product films formed in biotic and abiotic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Videla, H.A.; Mele, M.F.L. de [Univ. of La Plata (Argentina). Dept. of Chemistry; Swords, C. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). School of Materials; Edyvean, R.G.J. [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical and Processing Engineering; Beech, I.B. [Univ. of Portsmouth (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-11-01

    The growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) affects several important parameters at the metal/solution interface of carbon steel in liquid media such as pH and redox potential values, as well as modifications of the composition and structure of corrosion product layers. Electrochemical techniques for corrosion assessment and surface analyses by energy dispersion X-ray analysis (EDAX), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), X-ray distraction (XRD) and electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) complemented with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (MM) observations, were used to study the structure and composition of protective films on carbon steel in abiotic and biotic media containing different sulfur anions. The results revealed that in biotic and abiotic sulfide films the outer layers were formed by both FeS and FeS{sub 2}, although the relative content of these compounds varied in each case. Usually, the corrosion product films biotically formed were more adherent to the metal surface than those developed abiotically. The latter were flaky and loosely adherent, thus differing in their function during the corrosion process.

  18. Exchange electron-hole interaction of two-dimensional magnetoexcitons under the influence of the Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskalenko, S.A.; Podlesny, I.V.; Lelyakov, I.A.; Novikov, B.V.; Kiselyova, E.S.; Gherciu, L.

    2011-01-01

    The Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) in the case of two-dimensional (2D) electrons and holes in a strong perpendicular magnetic field was studied. The spinor-type wave functions are characterized by different numbers of Landau levels in different spin projections. For electrons they differ by 1 as was established earlier by Rashba, whereas for holes they differ by 3. Two lowest electron states and four lowest hole states of Landau quantization give rise to eight 2D magnetoexciton states. The exchange electron-hole interaction in the frame of these states is investigated.

  19. eRDF Analyser: An interactive GUI for electron reduced density function analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaki Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available eRDF Analyser is an interactive MATLAB GUI for reduced density function (RDF or pair distribution function (PDF analysis of amorphous and polycrystalline materials to study their local structure. It is developed as an integrated tool with an easy-to-use interface that offers a streamlined approach to extract RDF from electron diffraction data without the need for external routines. The software incorporates recent developments in scattering factor parameterisation and an automated fitting routine for the atomic scattering curve. It also features an automated optimisation routine for determination of the position of the centre of diffraction patterns recorded using both central and off-centre locations of the incident beam. It is available in both open source code (MATLAB m-file and executable form.

  20. eRDF Analyser: An interactive GUI for electron reduced density function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Janaki; Borisenko, Konstantin B.; Chou, Yu-Jen; Kirkland, Angus I.

    eRDF Analyser is an interactive MATLAB GUI for reduced density function (RDF) or pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of amorphous and polycrystalline materials to study their local structure. It is developed as an integrated tool with an easy-to-use interface that offers a streamlined approach to extract RDF from electron diffraction data without the need for external routines. The software incorporates recent developments in scattering factor parameterisation and an automated fitting routine for the atomic scattering curve. It also features an automated optimisation routine for determination of the position of the centre of diffraction patterns recorded using both central and off-centre locations of the incident beam. It is available in both open source code (MATLAB m-file) and executable form.

  1. PIC-simulation of the electron beam interaction with modulated density plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.; Efimova, A. A.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the processes of electromagnetic radiation generation as a result of the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with hydrogen and argon plasma are studied on the basis of numerical modeling by the particle-in-cells method (PIC). Series of numerical experiments for different background plasma parameters, beam and magnetic field have been performed using modern computer systems with massively parallel architecture. Estimates of the radiation efficiency for both the initially homogeneous plasma and for longitudinal density modulation are obtained. It is shown that the change in the plasma density due to the development of the modulation instability makes it possible to increase substantially the power of the generated sub-THz radiation. The parameters used in numerical experiments correspond to the conditions of laboratory experiments on GOL-3 facility (BINP SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia).

  2. Database and interactive monitoring system for the electronics of RPC muon trigger in CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wiacek, D; Kudla, I; Pozniak, Krzysztof T; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2005-01-01

    The main task of the RPC (resistive plate chamber) muon trigger monitoring system design for the CMS (compact muon solenoid) experiment (at LHC in CERN Geneva) is the visualization of data that includes the structure of electronic trigger system (e.g. geometry and imagery), the way of its processes and to generate automatically files with VHDL source code used for programming of the FPGA matrix. In the near future, the system enables the analysis of condition, operation and efficiency of individual muon trigger elements, registration of information about some muon trigger devices and present previously obtained results in interactive presentation layer. A broad variety of different database and programming concepts for design of muon trigger monitoring system was presented in this article.

  3. Ultra-High Density Electron Beams for Beam Radiation and Beam Plasma Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Scott; Frigola, Pedro; Gibson, David J; Hartemann, Fred V; Jacob, Jeremy S; Lim, Jae; Musumeci, Pietro; Rosenzweig, James E; Travish, Gil; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    Current and future applications of high brightness electron beams, which include advanced accelerators such as the plasma wake-field accelerator (PWFA) and beam-radiation interactions such as inverse-Compton scattering (ICS), require both transverse and longitudinal beam sizes on the order of tens of microns. Ultra-high density beams may be produced at moderate energy (50 MeV) by compression and subsequent strong focusing of low emittance, photoinjector sources. We describe the implementation of this method used at LLNL's PLEIADES ICS x-ray source in which the photoinjector-generated beam has been compressed to 300 fsec duration using the velocity bunching technique and focused to 20 μm rms size using an extremely high gradient, permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) focusing system.

  4. Geometrical contributions to the exchange constants: Free electrons with spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2017-05-01

    Using thermal quantum field theory, we derive an expression for the exchange constant that resembles Fukuyama's formula for orbital magnetic susceptibility (OMS). Guided by this formal analogy between the exchange constant and OMS, we identify a contribution to the exchange constant that arises from the geometrical properties of the band structure in mixed phase space. We compute the exchange constants for free electrons and show that the geometrical contribution is generally important. Our formalism allows us to study the exchange constants in the presence of spin-orbit interaction. Thereby, we find sizable differences between the exchange constants of helical and cycloidal spin spirals. Furthermore, we discuss how to calculate the exchange constants based on a gauge-field approach in the case of the Rashba model with an additional exchange splitting, and we show that the exchange constants obtained from this gauge-field approach are in perfect agreement with those obtained from the quantum field theoretical method.

  5. Modeling the interaction of high power ion or electron beams with solid target materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    Intense energy deposition on first wall materials and other components as a result of plasma disruptions in magnetic fusion devices are expected to cause melting and vaporization of these materials. The exact amount of vaporization losses and melt layer thickness are very important to fusion reactor design and lifetime. Experiments using ion or electron beams to simulate the disruption effects have different environments than the actual disruption conditions in fusion reactors. A model has been developed to accurately simulate the beam-target interactions so that the results from such experiments can be meaningful and useful to reactor design. This model includes a two dimensional solution of the heat conduction equation with moving boundaries. It is found that the vaporization and melting of the sample strongly depends on the characteristics of the beam spatial distribution, beam diameter, and on the power-time variation of the beam

  6. Using an electronic platform interactively to improve treatment outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Krogh, Niels Steen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Electronic platforms have been developed to help the clinician monitor disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to support at treat-to-target strategy. We present an initiative to interactively improve disease control in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. METHODS: In patients who...... presented with one or more swollen joints AND moderate/high disease activity (i.e. either CDAI≥10.1 and/or DAS-28CRP>3.2, which is automatically calculated in the DANBIO registry), a red alert was shown, which activated a pop-up: "This patient has at least one swollen joint AND either CDAI≥ 10.1 or DAS28CRP......>3.2. Which action do you as a physician take today: □ Intensify treatment, □ Treatment intensification is not possible currently/awaiting results of additional investigations, □ No further treatment intensification is possible, □ The patient does not want to intensify treatment, □ Other decisions...

  7. Using an electronic platform interactively to improve treatment outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetland, Merete Lund; Krogh, Niels Steen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Electronic platforms have been developed to help the clinician monitor disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to support at treat-to-target strategy. We present an initiative to interactively improve disease control in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods. In patients who...... presented with one or more swollen joints AND moderate/high disease activity (i.e. either CDAI≥10.1 and/or DAS- 28CRP > 3.2, which is automatically calculated in the DANBIO registry), a red alert was shown, which activated a pop-up: "This patient has at least one swollen joint AND either CDAI≥ 10.1 or DAS28......CRP > 3.2. Which action do you as a physician take today: □ Intensify treatment, □Treatment intensification is not possible currently/awaiting results of additional investigations, □ No further treatment intensification is possible, □ The patient does not want to intensify treatment, □ Other decisions...

  8. Inclusive electron scattering on 3H and 3He with full inclusion of final state interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golak, J.; Wital, H.; Kamada, H.; Hueber, D.; Ishikawa, S.; Gloeckle, W.

    1995-01-01

    Inclusive electron scattering data on 3 He and 3 H are analyzed under full treatment of the final state interactions (FSI) using realistic nucleon-nucleon forces. The data are well described. We use two different methods, one where we calculate the pd and ppn breakup contributions separately and another one which is related to the optical theorem for Compton scattering. Both rely on precise solutions of Faddeev-like equations and agree perfectly. The importance of FSI and the inclusion of total isospin T=3/2 for the full breakup of 3 He is demonstrated. We also comment on the Coulomb sum rule and the extraction of the proton-proton correlation function

  9. Unbiased reduced density matrices and electronic properties from full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overy, Catherine; Blunt, N. S.; Shepherd, James J.; Booth, George H.; Cleland, Deidre; Alavi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Properties that are necessarily formulated within pure (symmetric) expectation values are difficult to calculate for projector quantum Monte Carlo approaches, but are critical in order to compute many of the important observable properties of electronic systems. Here, we investigate an approach for the sampling of unbiased reduced density matrices within the full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo dynamic, which requires only small computational overheads. This is achieved via an independent replica population of walkers in the dynamic, sampled alongside the original population. The resulting reduced density matrices are free from systematic error (beyond those present via constraints on the dynamic itself) and can be used to compute a variety of expectation values and properties, with rapid convergence to an exact limit. A quasi-variational energy estimate derived from these density matrices is proposed as an accurate alternative to the projected estimator for multiconfigurational wavefunctions, while its variational property could potentially lend itself to accurate extrapolation approaches in larger systems

  10. Electronic Transport as a Driver for Self-Interaction-Corrected Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Pertsova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. While spintronics often investigates striking collective spin effects in large systems, a very important research direction deals with spin-dependent phenomena in nanostructures, reaching the extreme of a single spin confined in a quantum dot, in a molecule, or localized on an impurity or dopant. The issue considered in this chapter involves taking this extreme to the nanoscale and the quest to use first-principles methods to predict and control the behavior of a few "spins" (down to 1 spin) when they are placed in an interesting environment. Particular interest is on environments for which addressing these systems with external fields and/or electric or spin currents is possible. The realization of such systems, including those that consist of a core of a few transition-metal (TM) atoms carrying a spin, connected and exchanged-coupled through bridging oxo-ligands has been due to work by many experimental researchers at the interface of atomic, molecular and condensed matter physics. This chapter addresses computational problems associated with understanding the behaviors of nano- and molecular-scale spin systems and reports on how the computational complexity increases when such systems are used for elements of electron transport devices. Especially for cases where these elements are attached to substrates with electronegativities that are very different than the molecule, or for coulomb blockade systems, or for cases where the spin-ordering within the molecules is weakly antiferromagnetic, the delocalization error in DFT is particularly problematic and one which requires solutions, such as self-interaction corrections, to move forward. We highlight the intersecting fields of spin-ordered nanoscale molecular magnets, electron transport, and coulomb blockade and highlight cases where self-interaction corrected methodologies can improve our predictive power in this emerging field.

  11. A study of fast electron energy transport in relativistically intense laser-plasma interactions with large density scalelengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R. H. H.; Norreys, P. A. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Perez, F.; Baton, S. D. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR 7605, CNRS/CEA/UPMC, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Santos, J. J.; Nicolai, Ph.; Hulin, S. [Univ. Bordeaux/CNRS/CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, 33405 Talence (France); Ridgers, C. P. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Davies, J. R. [GoLP, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear - Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Lancaster, K. L.; Trines, R. M. G. M. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, A. R.; Tzoufras, M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxford OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Rose, S. J. [Department of Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    A systematic experimental and computational investigation of the effects of three well characterized density scalelengths on fast electron energy transport in ultra-intense laser-solid interactions has been performed. Experimental evidence is presented which shows that, when the density scalelength is sufficiently large, the fast electron beam entering the solid-density plasma is best described by two distinct populations: those accelerated within the coronal plasma (the fast electron pre-beam) and those accelerated near or at the critical density surface (the fast electron main-beam). The former has considerably lower divergence and higher temperature than that of the main-beam with a half-angle of {approx}20 Degree-Sign . It contains up to 30% of the total fast electron energy absorbed into the target. The number, kinetic energy, and total energy of the fast electrons in the pre-beam are increased by an increase in density scalelength. With larger density scalelengths, the fast electrons heat a smaller cross sectional area of the target, causing the thinnest targets to reach significantly higher rear surface temperatures. Modelling indicates that the enhanced fast electron pre-beam associated with the large density scalelength interaction generates a magnetic field within the target of sufficient magnitude to partially collimate the subsequent, more divergent, fast electron main-beam.

  12. Topologically distinct Feynman diagrams for mass operator in electron-phonon interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C. Tovstyuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The new method for designing topologically distinct Feynman diagrams for electron's mass operator in electron-phonon interaction is developed using the permutation group theory. The carried out classification of DPs allows to choose the classes, corresponding to disconnected diagrams, to singly connected diagrams, direct ("tadpole" diagrams, to diagrams corresponding to phonon Green functions. After this classification the set of considered double permutations is reduced to one class since only these are relevant to mass operator. We derive analytical expressions which allow to identify the DP, and to choose the phonon components, which are not accepted in every type. To avoid repetition of asymmetric diagrams, which correspond to the same analytical expression, we introduce the procedure of inversion in phonon component, and identify symmetric as well as a pair of asymmetric phonon components. For every type of DP (denoted by its digital encoding, taking into account its symmetry, we perform a set of transformations on this DP, list all DPs of the type and all the corresponding Feynman diagrams of mass operator automatically. It is clear that no more expressions (diagrams for the relevant order of perturbation theory for mass operator can be designed.

  13. Effective atomic numbers and electron densities of bioactive glasses for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    This work was carried out to study the nature of mass attenuation coefficient of bioactive glasses for gamma rays. Bioactive glasses are a group of synthetic silica-based bioactive materials with unique bone bonding properties. In the present study, we have calculated the effective atomic number, electron density for photon interaction of some selected bioactive glasses viz., SiO2-Na2O, SiO2-Na2O-CaO and SiO2-Na2O-P2O5 in the energy range 1 keV to 100 MeV. We have also computed the single valued effective atomic number by using XMuDat program. It is observed that variation in effective atomic number (ZPI, eff) depends also upon the weight fractions of selected bioactive glasses and range of atomic numbers of the elements. The results shown here on effective atomic number, electron density will be more useful in the medical dosimetry for the calculation of absorbed dose and dose rate.

  14. Search for New Physics in Electron-Positron Interactions with Photons in the Final State

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschmeier, D

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of single and multi-photon events with missing energy in electron-positron interactions. The results have been used to measure the neutrino pair-production cross section and to determine the number of light neutrino species. A search for various kinds of new physics processes involving photons and missing energy in the final state like the production of supersymmetric particles, a fermiophobic Higgs boson and massive gravitons has been carried out. The analysis has been performed using data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 130 GeV and 190 GeV corresponding to a total luminosity of 265 1/pb. The cross section of the process electron positron to neutrino anti-neutrino photon (photon) for a photon energy larger than 5 GeV and a photon scattering angle with respect to the beam axis larger than 14 degrees at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV has been measured to be (5.25 +- 0.22 +- 0.07) pb and has been extrapolated to a total cross secti...

  15. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  16. Exciton-dopant and exciton-charge interactions in electronically doped OLEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Christopher; Lee, Sergey; Ferraris, John; Zakhidov, A. Anvar

    2004-01-01

    The electronic dopants, like tetrafluorocyanoquinodimethane (F 4 -TCNQ) molecules, used for p-doping of hole transport layers in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are found to quench the electroluminescence (EL) if they diffuse into the emissive layer. We observed EL quenching in OLED with F 4 -TCNQ doped N,N'-diphenyl-N'N'-bis(1-naphthyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine hole transport layer at large dopant concentrations, >5%. To separate the effects of exciton-dopant quenching, from exciton-polaron quenching we have intentionally doped the emissive layer of (8-tris-hydroxyquinoline) with three acceptors (A) of different electron affinities: F 4 -TCNQ, TCNQ, and C 60 , and found that C 60 is the strongest EL-quencher, while F 4 -TCNQ is the weakest, contrary to intuitive expectations. The new effects of charge transfer and usually considered energy transfer from exciton to neutral (A) and charged acceptors (A - ) are compared as channels for non-radiative Ex-A decay. At high current loads the EL quenching is observed, which is due to decay of Ex on free charge carriers, hole polarons P + . We consider contributions to Ex-P + interaction by short-range charge transfer and describe the structure of microscopic charge transfer (CT)-processes responsible for it. The formation of metastable states of 'charged excitons' (predicted and studied by Agranovich et al. Chem. Phys. 272 (2001) 159) by electron transfer from a P to an Ex is pointed out, and ways to suppress non-radiative Ex-P decay are suggested

  17. Invasion by nonnative brook trout in Panther Creek, Idaho: Roles of habitat quality, connectivity, and biotic resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph R. Benjamin

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest the invasion of nonnative freshwater species is facilitated through the interaction of three factors: biotic resistance, habitat quality, and connectivity. We measured variables that represented each component to determine which were associated with small (150 mm) brook trout occurrence in Panther Creek, a tributary...

  18. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Gargi, E-mail: gargi.tiwari@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Dipendra, E-mail: d-11sharma@rediffmail.com; Dwivedi, K. K., E-mail: dwivedikarunesh4@gmail.com [Department of Physics, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Dwivedi, M. K., E-mail: dwivedi-ji@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2016-05-06

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  19. Transcriptomic responses to biotic stresses in Malus x domestica: a meta-analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Bipin; Marra, Francesco Paolo; Caruso, Tiziano; Martinelli, Federico

    2018-01-31

    RNA-Seq analysis is a strong tool to gain insight into the molecular responses to biotic stresses in plants. The objective of this work is to identify specific and common molecular responses between different transcriptomic data related to fungi, virus and bacteria attacks in Malus x domestica. We analyzed seven transcriptomic datasets in Malus x domestica divided in responses to fungal pathogens, virus (Apple Stem Grooving Virus) and bacteria (Erwinia amylovora). Data were dissected using an integrated approach of pathway- and gene- set enrichment analysis, Mapman visualization tool, gene ontology analysis and inferred protein-protein interaction network. Our meta-analysis revealed that the bacterial infection enhanced specifically genes involved in sugar alcohol metabolism. Brassinosteroids were upregulated by fungal pathogens while ethylene was highly affected by Erwinia amylovora. Gibberellins and jasmonates were strongly repressed by fungal and viral infections. The protein-protein interaction network highlighted the role of WRKYs in responses to the studied pathogens. In summary, our meta-analysis provides a better understanding of the Malus X domestica transcriptome responses to different biotic stress conditions; we anticipate that these insights will assist in the development of genetic resistance and acute therapeutic strategies. This work would be an example for next meta-analysis works aiming at identifying specific common molecular features linked with biotic stress responses in other specialty crops.

  20. Effects of Heme Electronic Structure and Distal Polar Interaction on Functional and Vibrational Properties of Myoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yuki; Nishimura, Ryu; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Shibata, Tomokazu; Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Ogura, Takashi; Matsuo, Takashi; Hirota, Shun; Neya, Saburo; Suzuki, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko

    2016-02-15

    We analyzed the oxygen (O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) binding properties, autoxidation reaction rate, and FeO2 and FeCO vibrational frequencies of the H64Q mutant of sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) reconstituted with chemically modified heme cofactors possessing a variety of heme Fe electron densities (ρ(Fe)), and the results were compared with those for the previously studied native [Shibata, T. et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2010, 132, 6091-6098], and H64L [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 1091-1099], and L29F [Nishimura, R. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2014, 53, 9156-9165] mutants in order to elucidate the effect of changes in the heme electronic structure and distal polar interaction contributing to stabilization of the Fe-bound ligand on the functional and vibrational properties of the protein. The study revealed that, as in the cases of the previously studied native protein [Shibata, T. et al. Inorg. Chem. 2012, 51, 11955-11960], the O2 affinity and autoxidation reaction rate of the H64Q mutant decreased with a decrease in ρ(Fe), as expected from the effect of a change in ρ(Fe) on the resonance between the Fe(2+)-O2 bond and Fe(3+)-O2(-)-like species in the O2 form, while the CO affinity of the protein is independent of a change in ρ(Fe). We also found that the well-known inverse correlation between the frequencies of Fe-bound CO (ν(CO)) and Fe-C (ν(FeC)) stretching [Li, X.-Y.; Spiro, T. G. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1988, 110, 6024-6033] is affected differently by changes in ρ(Fe) and the distal polar interaction, indicating that the effects of the two electronic perturbations due to the chemical modification of a heme cofactor and the replacement of nearby amino acid residues on the resonance between the two alternative canonical forms of the FeCO fragment in the protein are slightly different from each other. These findings provide a new insight for deeper understanding of the functional regulation of the protein.

  1. Resonance modulation of intersubband electron-electron interaction in AlSb(δ-Te)/InAs(δ-Te) quantum well by quantizing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadushkin, V.I.; Sadof'ev, Yu.G.; Bird, J.P.; Johnson, S.R.; Zhang

    2007-01-01

    The amplitude-frequency modulation of oscillations of the magnetoresistance of 2D electrons in an AlSb(δ - Te)/InAs/AsSb(δ - Te) quantum well is studied. In the dependence of the oscillation amplitude δ(1/B) at T=const, regions of negative Dingle temperature are observed. The anomalies in the δ(1/B) dependence at T=const are attributed to the fact that the quantizing magnetic field resonantly induces intersubband electron-electron interaction between the 2D electrons of the ground size-quantization subband and excited sub- band. The resonance fields B and the times corresponding to the collision-related broadening of the Landau levels are estimated. The concentration threshold of filling of the excited size-quantization subband is established at the level of n s ∼ 8 x 10 11 cm -2 [ru

  2. Spin-Orbit Interaction and Related Transport Phenomena in 2d Electron and Hole Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaetskii, A.

    Spin-orbit interaction is responsible for many physical phenomena which are under intensive study currently. Here we discuss several of them. The first phenomenon is the edge spin accumulation, which appears due to spin-orbit interaction in 2D mesoscopic structures in the presence of a charge current. We consider the case of a strong spin-orbit-related splitting of the electron spectrum, i.e. a spin precession length is small compared to the mean free path l. The structure can be either in a ballistic regime (when the mean free path is the largest scale in the problem) or quasi-ballistic regime (when l is much smaller than the sample size). We show how physics of edge spin accumulation in different situations should be understood from the point of view of unitarity of boundary scattering. Using transparent method of scattering states, we are able to explain some previous puzzling theoretical results. We clarify the important role of the form of the spin-orbit Hamiltonian, the role of the boundary conditions, etc., and reveal the wrong results obtained in the field by other researchers. The relation between the edge spin density and the bulk spin current in different regimes is discussed. The detailed comparison with the existing theoretical works is presented. Besides, we consider several new transport phenomena which appear in the presence of spin-orbit interaction, for example, magnetotransport phenomena in an external classical magnetic field. In particular, new mechanism of negative magneto-resistance appears which is due to destruction of spin fluxes by the magnetic field, and which can be really pronounced in 2D systems with strong scatterers.

  3. Interaction of high-current relativistic electron beams with plasma. Physical nature of the phenomenon and its application in microwave electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rukhadze, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    Pulsed high-current electron beams with characteristic parameters: electron energy 10 5 -10 7 eV, electron current 10 3 -10 6 A, pulse duration 10 -8 -10 -6 s, beam energy 10 2 -10 6 J and power 10 8 -10 13 W, are widely used in different branches of science and technology such as controlled thermonuclear fusion, relativistic microwave electronics, powerful semiconductors, chemical and gaseous lasers, new principles of heavy-ion acceleration, and long-distance energy transmission. The paper discusses a new branch of science - pulsed high-current electronics, which has its own experimental technique and methods of theoretical analysis. Parts I and II determine what is meant by ''high current'' in an electron beam and calculate the maximum obtainable current values; these calculations are made for the simplest geometrical configurations realizable in practice. Current methods for theoretical analysis of high-current electron beam physics are described, together with classification of current experimental devices for generating such beams according to high-current parameters. The stability of electron beams is discussed and the concept of critical currents is introduced. Part III gives a detailed account of plasma-beam instability which occurs on the interaction of a high-current electron beam with high-density space-limited plasma. The linear and non-linear stages of beam instability are considered. The given theory is used for calculations for amplifiers and microwave generators of electromagnetic radiation. Finally, the experimental achievements in high-current relativistic microwave electronics are reviewed. (author)

  4. Biotic Invasions: Causes, Epidemiology, Global Consequences and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The module provides a link to an article in a series of articles in Issues in Ecology. This article presents information on biotic invaders, their destruction, controlling their detriment and the effects aquaculture is having on world fish supplies.

  5. Effect of biotic and abiotic factors on composition and foraging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    scale are well known: climate, soil type, land use management practices and landscape structure are among the most influential factors (Dauber et al., 2003, 2005). At smaller scales, however, there is less agreement about the biotic and abiotic ...

  6. Modeling of the interaction of an x-ray free-electron laser with large finite samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrusse, O.; André, J.-M.; Jonnard, P.; Gaudin, J.

    2017-10-01

    We describe a model for the study of the interaction of short x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses with large finite samples. Hydrodynamics is solved in one-dimensional planar geometry with consideration of the electron-ion energy exchange and of the possible elastoplastic behavior. From a time-dependent calculation of the complex refractive index and of the underlying atomic physics, XFEL energy deposition is modeled through a calculation of the radiation field in the material. In the case of hard x-ray irradiation, energetic electrons induced by the XFEL absorption can propagate and deposit their energy outside the interaction region. Simulations of the interaction of hard x-ray ultrashort pulses with solid materials Ru and Si at different grazing incidence angles are presented and discussed. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of this approach to predict damage dynamics for materials of interest for x-ray optics.

  7. The Role of Silicon under Biotic and Abiotic Stress Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    YAVAŞ, İlkay; ÜNAY, Aydın

    2017-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stress factors can adversely affect the agricultural productivity leading to physiological and biochemical damage to crops. Therefore, the most effective way is to increase the resistance to stresses. Silicon plays a role in reducing the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses (drought, salt stress, disease and insect stress etc.) on plants. Silicon is accumulated in the cell walls and intercellular spaces and thus it has beneficial effects on disease infestations in especia...

  8. Critical evaluation of dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions I. Electron displacement within and between molecules, liquids and semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenholm, Jarl B

    2017-09-01

    Specific dipolar, acid-base and charge interactions involve electron displacements. For atoms, single bonds and molecules electron displacement is characterized by electronic potential, absolute hardness, electronegativity and electron gap. In addition, dissociation, bonding, atomization, formation, ionization, affinity and lattice enthalpies are required to quantify the electron displacement in solids. Semiconductors are characterized by valence and conduction band energies, electron gaps and average Fermi energies which in turn determine Galvani potentials of the bulk, space charge layer and surface states. Electron displacement due to interaction between (probe) molecules, liquids and solids are characterized by parameters such as Hamaker constant, solubility parameter, exchange energy density, surface tension, work of adhesion and immersion. They are determined from permittivity, refractive index, enthalpy of vaporization, molar volume, surface pressure and contact angle. Moreover, acidic and basic probes may form adducts which are adsorbed on target substrates in order to establish an indirect measure of polarity, acidity, basicity or hydrogen bonding. Acidic acceptor numbers (AN), basic donor numbers (DN), acidic and basic "electrostatic" (E) and "covalent" (C) parameters determined by enthalpy of adduct formation are considered as general acid-base scales. However, the formal grounds for assignments as dispersive, Lifshitz-van der Waals, polar, acid, base and hydrogen bond interactions are inconsistent. Although correlations are found no of the parameters are mutually fully compatible and moreover the enthalpies of acid-base interaction do not correspond to free energies. In this review the foundations of different acid-base parameters relating to electron displacement within and between (probe) molecules, liquids and (semiconducting) solids are thoroughly investigated and their mutual relationships are evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  9. Linear electron accelerator based pulse radiolysis facility probing radiation - matter interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Sisir K.

    2011-01-01

    Since the first report of the chemical effects of radiation by Pierre and Marie Curie, researchers have needed tools to deliver ionizing radiation for their scientific studies in increasingly precise ways. In the mid-20th century, particle (primarily electrons) accelerators took over as the primary tools of radiation chemists. However, the development of pulse radiolysis techniques in the 1960s vastly increased the ability of radiation chemists. We at Radiation and Photochemistry Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre engaged in investigations of different thrust areas of radiation-matter interaction. However, the past twenty five years has seen an explosion of interest because of their pivotal role in physics, chemistry and biology. In the present talk, I would like to share some of the excitements from the first pulse radiolysis facility in the country based on 7 MeV electron LINAC which is the work-horse for Radiation Chemistry Research. After going through the essential hardware and software, we will have glimpses of our R and D programmes which have evolved around this facility. Future plans to make it more versatile facility will also be discussed. In the new frontier, we are in advanced stage of developing a picosecond pulse radiolysis facility employing photocathode RF gun. This will be used apart from radiation chemistry research for radiation damage studies of structural materials; polymers; biological material; charge-carrier dynamics of semiconductors and quantum dots. Further I will touch upon the new ultrafast sources with femtosecond resolution currently being developed internationally which will widen the canvas of radiation chemical research. (author)

  10. Biotic and Biogeochemical Feedbacks to Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, M. S.; Harte, J.

    2002-12-01

    Feedbacks to paleoclimate change are evident in ice core records showing correlations of temperature with carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. Such feedbacks may be explained by plant and microbial responses to climate change, and are likely to occur under impending climate warming, as evidenced by results of ecosystem climate manipulation experiments and biometeorological observations along ecological and climate gradients. Ecosystems exert considerable influence on climate, by controlling the energy and water balance of the land surface as well as being sinks and sources of greenhouse gases. This presentation will focus on biotic and biogeochemical climate feedbacks on decadal to century time scales, emphasizing carbon storage and energy exchange. In addition to the direct effects of climate on decomposition rates and of climate and CO2 on plant productivity, climate change can alter species composition; because plant species differ in their surface properties, productivity, phenology, and chemistry, climate-induced changes in plant species composition can exert a large influence on the magnitude and sign of climate feedbacks. We discuss the effects of plant species on ecosystem carbon storage that result from characteristic differences in plant biomass and lifetime, allocation to roots vs. leaves, litter quality, microclimate for decomposition and the ultimate stabilization of soil organic matter. We compare the effect of species transitions on transpiration, albedo, and other surface properties, with the effect of elevated CO2 and warming on single species' surface exchange. Global change models and experiments that investigate the effect of climate only on existing vegetation may miss the biggest impacts of climate change on biogeochemical cycling and feedbacks. Quantification of feedbacks will require understanding how species composition and long-term soil processes will change under global warming. Although no single approach, be it experimental

  11. study of neutrino interactions using the electronic detectors and emulsion-lead targets of the OPERA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolin, Alessandro; Kose, Umut

    2011-01-01

    OPERA collected muon-neutrino interaction during the 2008, 2009 and 2010 physics run of the CNGS neutrino beam, produced at CERN with an energy range of about 5-35 GeV. A total of 5.3 x 10 19 protons on target equivalent luminosity from the 2008-2009 sample has been analysed using the measurements in the electronic detectors. We report on the OPERA electronic detectors performances and comparison of momentum measurements of soft muon tracks performed by the electronic detectors to the measurement performed in the OPERA neutrino target brick.

  12. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hongtao

    2012-01-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients from resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in planetary magnetospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Tripathi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Pitch-angle diffusion coefficients have been calculated for resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH waves in the magnetospheres of Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Calculations have been performed at two radial distances of each planet. It is found that observed wave electric field amplitudes in the magnetospheres of Earth and Jupiter are sufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion in the energy range of less than 100 eV. However, for Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the observed ECH wave amplitude are insufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion at any radial distance.

  14. Three-dimensional statistical reduction of the N -body Schrödinger equation for electrons with pairwise Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreshkov, Boyan D.

    2008-09-01

    Based on a second-quantized representation of the nonrelativistic Hamiltonian of a system of N electrons with pairwise Coulomb interactions, we demonstrate the exact statistical reduction of the N -body problem to a three-dimensional Schrödinger equation for the motion of a single active electron with all other N-1 electrons acting as spectators. As a by-product, three-dimensional Schrödinger equations for the ground and excited states of two-electron atoms and ions are derived and the dynamical role of Pauli’s exclusion principle is established. The classical limit ℏ→0 of the quantal all-electron equations is examined, and the Thomas-Fermi equation including the Amaldi correction is obtained.

  15. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth DeVore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems. We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their

  16. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their own pace. We

  17. Free electrons and ionic liquids: study of excited states by means of electron-energy loss spectroscopy and the density functional theory multireference configuration interaction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Bannwarth, Christoph; Grimme, Stefan; Allan, Michael

    2015-06-28

    The technique of low energy (0-30 eV) electron impact spectroscopy, originally developed for gas phase molecules, is applied to room temperature ionic liquids (IL). Electron energy loss (EEL) spectra recorded near threshold, by collecting 0-2 eV electrons, are largely continuous, assigned to excitation of a quasi-continuum of high overtones and combination vibrations of low-frequency modes. EEL spectra recorded by collecting 10 eV electrons show predominantly discrete vibrational and electronic bands. The vibrational energy-loss spectra correspond well to IR spectra except for a broadening (∼0.04 eV) caused by the liquid surroundings, and enhanced overtone activity indicating a contribution from resonant excitation mechanism. The spectra of four representative ILs were recorded in the energy range of electronic excitations and compared to density functional theory multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations, with good agreement. The spectra up to about 8 eV are dominated by π-π* transitions of the aromatic cations. The lowest bands were identified as triplet states. The spectral region 2-8 eV was empty in the case of a cation without π orbitals. The EEL spectrum of a saturated solution of methylene green in an IL band showed the methylene green EEL band at 2 eV, indicating that ILs may be used as a host to study nonvolatile compounds by this technique in the future.

  18. Observations of electron vortex magnetic holes and related wave-particle interactions in the turbulent magnetosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Sahraoui, F.; Yuan, Z.; He, J.; Zhao, J.; Du, J.; Le Contel, O.; Wang, X.; Deng, X.; Fu, H.; Zhou, M.; Shi, Q.; Breuillard, H.; Pang, Y.; Yu, X.; Wang, D.

    2017-12-01

    Magnetic hole is characterized by a magnetic depression, a density peak, a total electron temperature increase (with a parallel temperature decrease but a perpendicular temperature increase), and strong currents carried by the electrons. The current has a dip in the core region of the magnetic hole and a peak in the outer region of the magnetic hole. There is an enhancement in the perpendicular electron fluxes at 90° pitch angles inside the magnetic hole, implying that the electrons are trapped within it. The variations of the electron velocity components Vem and Ven suggest that an electron vortex is formed by trapping electrons inside the magnetic hole in the circular cross-section. These observations demonstrate the existence of a new type of coherent structures behaving as an electron vortex magnetic hole in turbulent space plasmas as predicted by recent kinetic simulations. We perform a statistically study using high time solution data from the MMS mission. The magnetic holes with short duration (i.e., < 0.5 s) have their cross section smaller than the ion gyro-radius. Superposed epoch analysis of all events reveals that an increase in the electron density and total temperature, significantly increase (resp. decrease) the electron perpendicular (resp. parallel) temperature, and an electron vortex inside the holes. Electron fluxes at 90° pitch angles with selective energies increase in the KSMHs, are trapped inside KSMHs and form the electron vortex due to their collective motion. All these features are consistent with the electron vortex magnetic holes obtained in 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations, indicating that the observed the magnetic holes seem to be best explained as electron vortex magnetic holes. It is furthermore shown that the magnetic holes are likely to heat and accelerate the electrons. We also investigate the coupling between whistler waves and electron vortex magnetic holes. These whistler waves can be locally generated inside electron

  19. Generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of high intensity laser with matter; Generation et transport des electrons rapides dans l'interaction laser-matiere a haut flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, H

    2005-10-15

    The general context of this study is the Inertial Confinement for thermonuclear controlled fusion and, more precisely, the Fast Igniter (FI). In this context the knowledge of the generation and transport of fast electrons is crucial. This thesis is an experimental study of the generation and transport of fast electrons in the interaction of a high intensity laser ({>=} 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}) with a solid target. The main diagnostic used here is the transition radiation. This radiation depends on the electrons which produce it and thus it gives important information on the electrons: energy, temperature, propagation geometry, etc. The spectral, temporal and spatial analysis permitted to put in evidence the acceleration of periodic electron bunches which, in this case, emit a Coherent Transition Radiation (CTR). During this thesis we have developed some theoretical models in order to explain the experimental results. We find this way two kinds of electron bunches, emitted either at the laser frequency ({omega}{sub 0}), either at the double of this frequency (2{omega}{sub 0}), involving several acceleration mechanisms: vacuum heating / resonance absorption and Lorentz force, respectively. These bunches are also observed in the PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The electron temperature is of about 2 MeV in our experimental conditions. The electrons are emitted starting from a point source (which is the laser focal spot) and then propagate in a ballistic way through the target. In some cases they can be re-injected in the target by the electrostatic field from the target edges. This diagnostic is only sensitive to the coherent relativistic electrons, which explains the weak total energy that they contain (about a few mJ). The CTR signal emitted by those fast electrons is largely dominating the signal emitted by the less energetic electrons, even if they contain the major part of the energy (about 1 J). (author)

  20. Electron-phonon interaction and nonlinear transport phenomena in solid Hg point-contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khotkevych, V V [Department of Physics, University of Bath, Claverton Down, BA2 7AY Bath (United Kingdom); Khotkevych, N V [Department of Physics, Karazin National University, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Morlok, S V [National Technical University, 61002, Kharkiv (Ukraine); Konopatskyi, B L; Khotkevych, A V [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering, 61103 Kharkiv (Ukraine)], E-mail: V.Khotkevych@bath.ac.uk

    2009-02-01

    At cryogenic temperatures the conductivity of Hg point-contacts was studied in both the superconducting and normal state. An original method of fabricating the Hg-based point-contacts directly in liquid {sup 4}He was proposed, which guaranteed creation of small-size high-purity ballistic contacts. The resistance of the contacts as well as the current-voltage characteristics along with the voltage dependence of their first and second derivatives were experimentally investigated at 1.5 K. We analyze such characteristics of the contacts as Josephson critical current, excess current, energy gap and the nonlinear part of conductivity caused by electron-phonon interaction (EPI). The point-contact EPI function g{sub pc}({omega}) for Hg was reconstructed and integral parameters of EPI were calculated. The g{sub pc}({omega}) was then used as an approximation to the phonon density of states for estimations of the thermodynamic characteristics in Hg. Finally we discuss the results of our calculations of non-linear conductivity caused by manifestation of the frequency dependence of the energy gap function in the elastic current component through the contact.

  1. Introduction to Topological Phases and Electronic Interactions in (2+1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Leandro O.

    2017-04-01

    A brief introduction to topological phases is provided, considering several two-band Hamiltonians in one and two dimensions. Relevant concepts of the topological insulator theory, such as: Berry phase, Chern number, and the quantum adiabatic theorem, are reviewed in a basic framework, which is meant to be accessible to non-specialists. We discuss the Kitaev chain, SSH, and BHZ models. The role of the electromagnetic interaction in the topological insulator theory is addressed in the light of the pseudo-quantum electrodynamics (PQED). The well-known parity anomaly for massless Dirac particle is reviewed in terms of the Chern number. Within the continuum limit, a half-quantized Hall conductivity is obtained. Thereafter, by considering the lattice regularization of the Dirac theory, we show how one may obtain the well-known quantum Hall conductivity for a single Dirac cone. The renormalization of the electron energy spectrum, for both small and large coupling regime, is derived. In particular, it is shown that massless Dirac particles may, only in the strong correlated limit, break either chiral or parity symmetries. For graphene, this implies the generation of Landau-like energy levels and the quantum valley Hall effect.

  2. Diagnosis of abiotic and biotic stress factors using the visible symptoms in foliage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vollenweider, P.; Guenthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S.

    2005-01-01

    Visible symptoms in the foliage of trees are recorded to monitor the effects of abiotic and biotic stress. Difficulties are reported in diagnosing the origin of stress. The present paper discusses several diagnostic criteria which are usable in different species for a better determination of the stress factor type. A new diagnosis scheme to differentiate between classes of abiotic and biotic stress factors is supplied. Abiotic stress generates gradients of symptoms. The symptom specificity is determined by the degree of interaction between the stress factor and plant defense system. Symptoms caused by abiotic stress and natural autumnal senescence can be morphologically different or undistinguishable according to the stress and plant species. With biotic stress, the class of parasitic is generally recognizable on the basis of the visible symptoms. Structurally and physiologically based explanations of the symptom morphology are still missing for many stress factors. - The morphology and distribution of visible stress symptoms in tree foliage provides diagnostic tools to identify plant defense responses and differentiate stress from natural senescence symptoms

  3. Induced Systemic Tolerance to Multiple Stresses Including Biotic and Abiotic Factors by Rhizobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Je Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, global warming and drastic climate change are the greatest threat to the world. The climate change can affect plant productivity by reducing plant adaptation to diverse environments including frequent high temperature; worsen drought condition and increased pathogen transmission and infection. Plants have to survive in this condition with a variety of biotic (pathogen/pest attack and abiotic stress (salt, high/low temperature, drought. Plants can interact with beneficial microbes including plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, which help plant mitigate biotic and abiotic stress. This overview presents that rhizobacteria plays an important role in induced systemic resistance (ISR to biotic stress or induced systemic tolerance (IST to abiotic stress condition; bacterial determinants related to ISR and/or IST. In addition, we describe effects of rhizobacteria on defense/tolerance related signal pathway in plants. We also review recent information including plant resistance or tolerance against multiple stresses (bioticabiotic. We desire that this review contribute to expand understanding and knowledge on the microbial application in a constantly varying agroecosystem, and suggest beneficial microbes as one of alternative environment-friendly application to alleviate multiple stresses.

  4. A novel technique for determining luminosity in electron-scattering/positron-scattering experiments from multi-interaction events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; O'Connor, C.; Bernauer, J. C.; Milner, R.

    2018-01-01

    The OLYMPUS experiment measured the cross-section ratio of positron-proton elastic scattering relative to electron-proton elastic scattering to look for evidence of hard two-photon exchange. To make this measurement, the experiment alternated between electron beam and positron beam running modes, with the relative integrated luminosities of the two running modes providing the crucial normalization. For this reason, OLYMPUS had several redundant luminosity monitoring systems, including a pair of electromagnetic calorimeters positioned downstream from the target to detect symmetric Møller and Bhabha scattering from atomic electrons in the hydrogen gas target. Though this system was designed to monitor the rate of events with single Møller/Bhabha interactions, we found that a more accurate determination of relative luminosity could be made by additionally considering the rate of events with both a Møller/Bhabha interaction and a concurrent elastic ep interaction. This method was improved by small corrections for the variance of the current within bunches in the storage ring and for the probability of three interactions occurring within a bunch. After accounting for systematic effects, we estimate that the method is accurate in determining the relative luminosity to within 0.36%. This precise technique can be employed in future electron-proton and positron-proton scattering experiments to monitor relative luminosity between different running modes.

  5. Influence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions on the electron states in circular quantum rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudryashov, V.V.; Baran, A.V.

    2015-01-01

    Within the framework of perturbation theory the energy levels and wave functions are found for an electron in two-dimensional semiconductor circular quantum rings in the presence of the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions with a realistic axially symmetric confining square well potential of finite depth. (authors)

  6. PROJECTILE IMAGE ACCELERATION, NEUTRALIZATION AND ELECTRON-EMISSION DURING GRAZING INTERACTIONS OF MULTICHARGED IONS WITH AU(110)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MEYER, FW; FOLKERTS, HO

    Recent Oak Ridge work is summarized on projectile energy gain by image charge acceleration, scattered ion charge distributions, and K-Auger electron emission during low energy grazing interactions of highly charged Pb, I, O and Ar ions with a Au(110) surface.

  7. Critical metal-insulator transition and divergence in a two-particle irreducible vertex in disordered and interacting electron systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 4 (2014), "045143-1"-"045143-11" ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : metal-insulator transition * disordered and interacting electron systems * dynamical mean-field theory * critical behavior Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.736, year: 2014

  8. Elementary electron-molecule interactions and negative ion resonances at subexcitation energies and their significance in gaseous dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.

    1977-01-01

    Recent knowledge on low-energy (mostly approximately less than 10 eV) electron-molecule interaction processes in dilute and in dense gases is synthesized, discussed, and related to the breakdown strength of gaseous dielectrics. Optimal design of multicomponent gaseous insulators can be made on the basis of such knowledge

  9. Particle-in-cell simulation study of the interaction between a relativistically moving leptonic micro-cloud and ambient electrons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieckmann, M.E.; Sarri, G.; Markoff, S.; Borghesi, M.; Zepf, M.

    2015-01-01

    Context. The jets of compact accreting objects are composed of electrons and a mixture of positrons and ions. These outflows impinge on the interstellar or intergalactic medium and both plasmas interact via collisionless processes. Filamentation (beam-Weibel) instabilities give rise to the growth of

  10. Banded structures in electron pitch angle diffusion coefficients from resonant wave-particle interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathi, A. K., E-mail: aktrip2001@yahoo.co.in; Singhal, R. P., E-mail: rpsiitbhu@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh (India); Khazanov, G. V., E-mail: George.V.Khazanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Avanov, L. A., E-mail: levon.a.avanov@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Electron pitch angle (D{sub αα}) and momentum (D{sub pp}) diffusion coefficients have been calculated due to resonant interactions with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode chorus waves. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L = 4.6 and 6.8 for electron energies ≤10 keV. Landau (n = 0) resonance and cyclotron harmonic resonances n = ±1, ±2, … ±5 have been included in the calculations. It is found that diffusion coefficient versus pitch angle (α) profiles show large dips and oscillations or banded structures. The structures are more pronounced for ECH and lower band chorus (LBC) and particularly at location 4.6. Calculations of diffusion coefficients have also been performed for individual resonances. It is noticed that the main contribution of ECH waves in pitch angle diffusion coefficient is due to resonances n = +1 and n = +2. A major contribution to momentum diffusion coefficients appears from n = +2. However, the banded structures in D{sub αα} and D{sub pp} coefficients appear only in the profile of diffusion coefficients for n = +2. The contribution of other resonances to diffusion coefficients is found to be, in general, quite small or even negligible. For LBC and upper band chorus waves, the banded structures appear only in Landau resonance. The D{sub pp} diffusion coefficient for ECH waves is one to two orders smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients. For chorus waves, D{sub pp} coefficients are about an order of magnitude smaller than D{sub αα} coefficients for the case n ≠ 0. In case of Landau resonance, the values of D{sub pp} coefficient are generally larger than the values of D{sub αα} coefficients particularly at lower energies. As an aid to the interpretation of results, we have also determined the resonant frequencies. For ECH waves, resonant frequencies have been estimated for wave normal angle 89° and harmonic resonances n = +1, +2, and +3

  11. An open-source framework for analyzing N-electron dynamics. II. Hybrid density functional theory/configuration interaction methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Gunter; Pohl, Vincent; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2017-10-30

    In this contribution, we extend our framework for analyzing and visualizing correlated many-electron dynamics to non-variational, highly scalable electronic structure method. Specifically, an explicitly time-dependent electronic wave packet is written as a linear combination of N-electron wave functions at the configuration interaction singles (CIS) level, which are obtained from a reference time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation. The procedure is implemented in the open-source Python program detCI@ORBKIT, which extends the capabilities of our recently published post-processing toolbox (Hermann et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2016, 37, 1511). From the output of standard quantum chemistry packages using atom-centered Gaussian-type basis functions, the framework exploits the multideterminental structure of the hybrid TDDFT/CIS wave packet to compute fundamental one-electron quantities such as difference electronic densities, transient electronic flux densities, and transition dipole moments. The hybrid scheme is benchmarked against wave function data for the laser-driven state selective excitation in LiH. It is shown that all features of the electron dynamics are in good quantitative agreement with the higher-level method provided a judicious choice of functional is made. Broadband excitation of a medium-sized organic chromophore further demonstrates the scalability of the method. In addition, the time-dependent flux densities unravel the mechanistic details of the simulated charge migration process at a glance. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Experiments on the collective interaction of a microsecond relativistic electron beam with a plasma in the GOL-3 facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, A.V.; Voropaev, S.G.; Koidan, V.S.; Lebedev, S.V.; Mekler, K.I.; Nikiforov, A.A.; Postupaev, V.V.; Shcheglov, M.A.; Piffl, V.

    1996-01-01

    A considerable collisionless slowing of a beam in a plasma (a decrease in the mean electron energy by ∼25%) and transfer of a significant portion of the beam energy to the plasma are achieved as a result of the collective interaction of a microsecond relativistic electron beam with a plasma in the GOL-3 facility. A beam with a duration up to 5 μs and an energy up to 100 kJ is injected into a hydrogen plasma with a density ∼1015 cm-3 found in a 7-m solenoid with a field equal to 5.5 T. The specific energy content of the plasma remains longitudinally inhomogeneous during the heating period with a maximum near the point where the beam is injected. The parameters of the superthermal electrons born during the collective interaction are also determined. The features of the heating process and heat transfer in the plasma are discussed

  13. High performance compact magnetic spectrometers for energetic ion and electron measurement in ultra intense short pulse laser solid interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Link, A; van Maren, R; Patel, P; Shepherd, R; Wilks, S C; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-05-08

    Ultra intense short pulse lasers incident on solid targets can generate relativistic electrons that then accelerate energetic protons and ions. These fast electrons and ions can effectively heat the solid target, beyond the region of direct laser interaction, and are vital to realizing the fast ignition concept. To study these energetic ions and electrons produced from the laser-target interactions, we have developed a range of spectrometers that can cover a large energy range (from less than 0.1 MeV to above 100 MeV). They are physically compact and feature high performance and low cost. We will present the basic design of these spectrometers and their test results from recent laser experiments.

  14. 2008 Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions Gordon Research Conference-August 3-8, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbes, Malcolm [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Gray, Nancy Ryan [Gordon Research Conferences, West Kingston, RI (United States)

    2009-09-19

    The conference presents and advances the current frontiers in experimental and theoretical studies of Electron Transfer and Transport in Molecular and Nano-scale Systems. The program includes sessions on coupled electron transfers, molecular solar energy conversion, biological and biomimetic systems, spin effects, ultrafast reactions and technical frontiers as well as electron transport in single molecules and devices.

  15. Electronic Interactions: How Students and Teachers Organize Schooling over the Wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Shelley V.; Newman, Denis

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of electronic mail discourse among sixth-grade students and their teachers. Highlights include structures of the sixth-grade classrooms; common characteristics of and differences between electronic and face-to-face communication; metacommunication; consistency with print genres; hierarchy; and the potential of electronic mail in…

  16. Neutrons production during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons with a thin tungsten target; Produccion de neutrones durante la interaccion de electrones monoenergeticos con un blanco delgado de tungsteno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Medina C, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Basicas, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Baltazar R, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Programa de Doctorado en Ingenieria y Tecnologia Aplicada, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    When a linear accelerator for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages higher than 8 MV, neutrons are produced, as secondary radiation which deposits an undesirable and undesirable dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, the cancer treatment with a Linac is performed with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and (e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section for the neutrons production by reactions (γ, n) is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the effective section of the reactions (e, e n), studies on the effects of this secondary radiation have focused on photo neutrons. en a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam coming out of the magnetic deflector is impinged on the dispersion lamella in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and to expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; the objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of the photons and neutrons that occur when a mono-energetic electron beam of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm of thickness. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with code MCNP6 for electron beams of 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 4 point detectors placed at different equidistant points from the center of the lamella. (Author)

  17. Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions effects on electronic features of a two dimensional elliptic quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, P.; Rezaei, G.; Zamani, A.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, electronic structure of a two dimensional elliptic quantum dot under the influence of external electric and magnetic fields are studied in the presence of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. This investigation is done computationally and to do this, at first, the effective Hamiltonian of the system by considering the spin-orbit coupling is demonstrated in the presence of applied electric and magnetic fields and afterwards the Schrödinger equation is solved using the finite difference approach. Utilizing finite element method, eigenvalues and eigenstates of the system are calculated and the effect of the external fields, the size of the dot as well as the strength of Rashba spin-orbit interaction are studied. Our results indicate that, Spin-orbit interactions, external fields and the dot size have a great influence on the electronic structure of the system.

  18. Electronic interaction in the teaching of Portuguese as an additional foreign language: the optimization of beginners’ learning experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Rottava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses language learners’ interaction in a virtual learning environment, contemplating two interconnected aspects: the possibilities of interaction through the use of electronic resources and the configuration of teaching and learning of Portuguese as an additional language (AL. The objective is to analyse learners of Portuguese-AL’s oral and written production. The data analysed was produced in a virtual environment. The results suggest some aspects that electronic resources optimise: genuine interaction; situations in which learners risk more whist producing written and speaking work in the FL, connecting to what happens in everyday life; learning develops beyond the context of the classroom, since learners receive feedback from the tutor about language forms and uses beyond the syllabus of the course; and the granting of autonomy to learners as they can systematise their learning process.

  19. Terahertz instability of surface optical-phonon polaritons that interact with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydoruk, O.; Solymar, L.; Shamonina, E.; Kalinin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave interaction between optical phonons and electrons drifting in diatomic semiconductors has potential for amplification and generation of terahertz radiation. Existing models of this interaction were developed for infinite materials. As a more practically relevant configuration, we studied theoretically a finite semiconductor slab surrounded by a dielectric. This paper analyzes the optical-phonon instability in the slab including the Lorentz force and compares it to the instability in an infinite material. As the analysis shows, the slab instability occurs because of the interaction of surface optical-phonon polaritons with surface plasmon polaritons in the presence of electron drift. The properties of the instability depend on the slab thickness when the thickness is comparable to the wavelength. For large slab thicknesses, however, the dispersion relation of the slab is similar to that of an infinite material, although the coupling is weaker. The results could be used for the design of practical terahertz traveling-wave oscillators and amplifiers.

  20. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; Khedr, D. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); El-Shamy, E. F. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science, King Khalid University, P.O. 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Sabry, R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Damietta University, Damietta El-Gedida 34517 (Egypt); Department of Physics, College of Science and Humanitarian Studies, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  1. The interaction of two nonplanar solitary waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas: An application in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Labany, S. K.; EL-Shamy, E. F.; Sabry, R.; Khedr, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    In the present research paper, the effect of bounded nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) geometry on the interaction between two nonplanar electrostatic solitary waves (NESWs) in electron-positron-ion plasmas has been studied. The extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo method is used to obtain nonplanar phase shifts after the interaction of the two NESWs. This study is a first attempt to investigate nonplanar phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs in a two-fluid plasma (a pair-plasma) consisting of electrons and positrons, as well as immobile background positive ions in nonplanar geometry. The change of phase shifts and trajectories for NESWs due to the effect of cylindrical geometry, spherical geometry, the physical processes (either isothermal or adiabatic), and the positions of two NESWs are discussed. The present investigation may be beneficial to understand the interaction between two NESWs that may occur in active galactic nuclei.

  2. Electron Lifetimes from Narrowband Wave-Particle Interactions within the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll, J. F.; Albert, J.; Cunningham, G.

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to the systematic study of electron lifetimes from narrowband wave-particle interactions in the plasmasphere. It relies on a new formulation of the bounce-averaged quasi-linear pitch angle diffusion coefficients parameterized by a single frequency, w, and wave-normal angle, theta [Albert, 2012]. We first show that the diffusion coefficients scale with w/Wce, where Wce is the equatorial electron gyrofrequency, and that maximal pitch angle diffusion occurs along the line alpha0=pi/2-theta, where alpha0 is the equatorial pitch angle. Lifetimes are computed for L-shell values in the range [1.5, 3.5] and energies, E, in the range [0.1, 6] MeV as a function of frequency and wave-normal angle. The lifetimes are relatively independent of frequency and wave-normal angle after taking into consideration the scaling law, with a weak dependence on wave-normal angle up to 60-70°, increasing to infinity as the wave-normal angle approaches the resonance cone. We identify regions in the (L, E) plane in which a single wave type (hiss, VLF transmitters, or lightning-generated waves) is dominant relative to the others. We find that VLF waves dominate the lifetime for 0.2-0.4 MeV at L~2 and for 0.5-0.8 MeV at L~1.5, while hiss dominates the lifetime for 2-3 MeV at L=3-3.5. The influence of lightning-generated waves is always mixed with the other two and cannot be easily differentiated. Limitations of the method for addressing effects due to restricted latitude or pitch angle domains are also discussed. Finally, for each (L, E) we search for the minimum lifetime and find that the "optimal" frequency that produces this lifetime increases as L diminishes. Restricting the search to very oblique waves, which could be emitted during the DSX satellite mission, we find that the optimal frequency is always close to 0.16Wce.

  3. Environmental scanning electron microscopy study of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Pia

    The behavior of fluids at the nanoscale is currently of interest, as nanotechnology promises tools for the precise delivery and analysis of minute volumes of liquids. Because of their reported properties, ease of manipulation and hollow cavity, carbon nanotubes have attracted attention for fluidic delivery. Thus far, experimental studies on wetting of carbon nanotubes have been limited, and other work revolves around theoretical modeling. Consequently, there is a considerable lack of experimental data on the subject. In this work, environmental scanning electron microscopy was employed for visualization of the interaction of carbon nanotubes with fluids such as water, liquid crystals, and biological solutions. Carbon nanotubes of diverse surface structure and chemistry were evaluated, and hydrophobic and hydrophilic behavior was observed. Nanotubes made by catalytic chemical vapor deposition showed highly hydrophobic behavior by the formation of spherical water droplets on nanotube agglomerates. This behavior was caused by roughness of the agglomerates as well as pinning of the droplets on defects and functional groups along the walls of the nanotubes. On highly graphitic carbon nanotube agglomerates, no droplet formation was observed due to the lack of defects and terminations on the surface. Formation of "barrel" and "clam-shell" shaped droplets on individual nanotubes was also observed. Capillary condensation inside carbon nanotubes made by non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition was also observed in the environmental scanning electron microscope. Condensation was marked by the formation of a thin film of water on the inner walls of the nanotubes, followed by growth of a meniscus of low contact angle, indicating the hydrophilic nature of the nanotubes. Spontaneous elastic deformation of the nanotubes was observed upon the formation of the film due to surface tension effects. By annealing, the carbon nanotubes were graphitized, and highly hydrophobic behavior was

  4. On the interaction between radon progeny and particles generated by electronic and traditional cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas Trassierra, C.; Cardellini, F.; Buonanno, G.; De Felice, P.

    2015-04-01

    During their entire lives, people are exposed to the pollutants present in indoor air. Recently, Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems, mainly known as electronic cigarettes, have been widely commercialized: they deliver particles into the lungs of the users but a "second-hand smoke" has yet to be associated to this indoor source. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring radioactive gas, i.e. radon, represents a significant risk for lung cancer, and the cumulative action of these two agents could be worse than the agents separately would. In order to deepen the interaction between radon progeny and second-hand aerosol from different types of cigarettes, a designed experimental study was carried out by generating aerosol from e-cigarette vaping as well as from second-hand traditional smoke inside a walk-in radon chamber at the National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (INMRI) of Italy. In this chamber, the radon present in air comes naturally from the floor and ambient conditions are controlled. To characterize the sidestream smoke emitted by cigarettes, condensation particle counters and scanning mobility particle sizer were used. Radon concentration in the air was measured through an Alphaguard ionization chamber, whereas the measurement of radon decay product in the air was performed with the Tracelab BWLM Plus-2S Radon daughter Monitor. It was found an increase of the Potential Alpha-Energy Concentration (PAEC) due to the radon decay products attached to aerosol for higher particle number concentrations. This varied from 7.47 ± 0.34 MeV L-1 to 12.6 ± 0.26 MeV L-1 (69%) for the e-cigarette. In the case of traditional cigarette and at the same radon concentration, the increase was from 14.1 ± 0.43 MeV L-1 to 18.6 ± 0.19 MeV L-1 (31%). The equilibrium factor increases, varying from 23.4% ± 1.11% to 29.5% ± 0.26% and from 30.9% ± 1.0% to 38.1 ± 0.88 for the e-cigarette and traditional cigarette, respectively. These growths still continue for long

  5. Target surface area effects on hot electron dynamics from high intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulick, C.; Raymond, A.; McKelvey, A.; Chvykov, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Willingale, L.; Yanovsky, V.; Krushelnick, K.

    2016-06-01

    Reduced surface area targets were studied using an ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser in order to determine the effect of electron sheath field confinement on electron dynamics. X-ray emission due to energetic electrons was imaged using a {K}α imaging crystal. Electrons were observed to travel along the surface of wire targets, and were slowed mainly by the induced fields. Targets with reduced surface areas were correlated with increased hot electron densities and proton energies. Hybrid Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations demonstrated increased electric sheath field strength in reduced surface area targets.

  6. Dynamics and post-collision interaction effects in two electron decay from the Xenon 4d hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lablanquie, P; Sheinerman, S; Penent, F; Hall, R I; Ahmad, M; Hikosaka, Y; Ito, K

    2001-07-30

    Two Auger electrons, one very slow, one fast, have been detected in coincidence following near threshold 4d photoionization of the Xe atom. The distribution in the energy the two electrons share has been measured for the first time revealing the presence of post-collision interaction effects that provide unique information on the decay dynamics of the 4d hole. Analysis of the distorted line shapes indicates that the dominant process is decay of Xe+(4d(-1)) to Xe3+ through cascade emission of a zero kinetic energy Auger electron followed by a fast Auger electron. The widths of the intermediate Xe2+* states are estimated to be about 60 meV.

  7. Terahertz electromagnetic radiation based on the interaction between a self-modulated electron beam and plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shengpeng; Zhou, Qing; Tang, Changjian; Chen, Shaoyong

    2017-12-01

    This particle-in-cell simulation study finds that the system of a long relativistic electron beam passing through an overdense plasma can produce high harmonic terahertz electromagnetic radiation. In this process, the electron beam is self-modulated to create a periodic electromagnetic structure which will resonate with the plasma wakefield and excite the electromagnetic instability in the nonlinear stage of the self-modulation. The study also finds that when the radiation is achieved, the self-modulated electron beam will be destroyed due to the self-consistent interaction among the radiation, the electron beam, and the plasma. Meanwhile, the radiation will gradually attenuate, which also coincides with the physical explanation of the radiation.

  8. Study of decoherence in a system of superconducting flux-qubits interacting with an ensemble of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboiro, M., E-mail: reboiro@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Civitarese, O., E-mail: osvaldo.civitarese@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata (Argentina); Ramírez, R. [IFLP, CONICET-Department of Mathematics, University of La Plata (Argentina)

    2017-03-15

    The degree of coherence in a hybrid system composed of superconducting flux-qubits and an electron ensemble is analysed. Both, the interactions among the electrons and among the superconducting flux-qubits are taken into account. The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly, and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. It is seen that the inclusion of a line width, for the electrons and for the superconducting flux-qubits, influences the pattern of spin-squeezing and the coherence of the superconducting flux qubits. - Highlights: • The degree of coherence in a hybrid system, composed of superconducting flux qubits and an electron ensemble, is analysed. • The time evolution of the hybrid system is solved exactly and discussed in terms of the reduced density matrix of each subsystem. • It is shown that the initial state of the system evolves to a stationary squeezed state.

  9. Influence of the electron density on the characteristics of terahertz waves generated under laser–cluster interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, A. A., E-mail: frolov@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    A theory of generation of terahertz radiation under laser–cluster interaction, developed earlier for an overdense cluster plasma [A. A. Frolov, Plasma Phys. Rep. 42. 637 (2016)], is generalized for the case of arbitrary electron density. The spectral composition of radiation is shown to substantially depend on the density of free electrons in the cluster. For an underdense cluster plasma, there is a sharp peak in the terahertz spectrum at the frequency of the quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere. As the electron density increases to supercritical values, this spectral line vanishes and a broad maximum at the frequency comparable with the reciprocal of the laser pulse duration appears in the spectrum. The dependence of the total energy of terahertz radiation on the density of free electrons is analyzed. The radiation yield is shown to increase significantly under resonance conditions, when the laser frequency is close to the eigenfrequency of the dipole or quadrupole mode of a plasma sphere.

  10. Size-scaling behaviour of the electronic polarizability of one-dimensional interacting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappe, G.; Louis, E.; Vergés, J. A.

    2018-05-01

    Electronic polarizability of finite chains is accurately calculated from the total energy variation of the system produced by small but finite static electric fields applied along the chain direction. Normalized polarizability, that is, polarizability divided by chain length, diverges as the second power of length for metallic systems but approaches a constant value for insulating systems. This behaviour provides a very convenient way to characterize the wave-function malleability of finite systems as it avoids the need of attaching infinite contacts to the chain ends. Hubbard model calculations at half filling show that the method works for a small U  =  1 interaction value that corresponds to a really small spectral gap of 0.005 (hopping t  =  ‑1 is assumed). Once successfully checked, the method has been applied to the long-range hopping model of Gebhard and Ruckenstein showing 1/r hopping decay (Gebhard and Ruckenstein 1992 Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 244; Gebhard et al 1994 Phys. Rev. B 49 10926). Metallicity for U values below the reported metal-insulator transition is obtained but the surprise comes for U values larger than the critical one (when a gap appears in the spectral density of states) because a steady increase of the normalized polarizability with size is obtained. This critical size-scaling behaviour can be understood as corresponding to a molecule which polarizability is unbounded. We have checked that a real transfer of charge from one chain end to the opposite occurs as a response to very small electric fields in spite of the existence of a large gap of the order of U for one-particle excitations. Finally, ab initio quantum chemistry calculations of realistic poly-acetylene chains prove that the occurrence of such critical behaviour in real systems is unlikely.

  11. Protein folding, misfolding and aggregation: The importance of two-electron stabilizing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Andrzej Stanisław

    2017-01-01

    Proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases are highly pleiomorphic and may adopt an all-α-helical fold in one environment, assemble into all-β-sheet or collapse into a coil in another, and rapidly polymerize in yet another one via divergent aggregation pathways that yield broad diversity of aggregates' morphology. A thorough understanding of this behaviour may be necessary to develop a treatment for Alzheimer's and related disorders. Unfortunately, our present comprehension of folding and misfolding is limited for want of a physicochemical theory of protein secondary and tertiary structure. Here we demonstrate that electronic configuration and hyperconjugation of the peptide amide bonds ought to be taken into account to advance such a theory. To capture the effect of polarization of peptide linkages on conformational and H-bonding propensity of the polypeptide backbone, we introduce a function of shielding tensors of the Cα atoms. Carrying no information about side chain-side chain interactions, this function nonetheless identifies basic features of the secondary and tertiary structure, establishes sequence correlates of the metamorphic and pH-driven equilibria, relates binding affinities and folding rate constants to secondary structure preferences, and manifests common patterns of backbone density distribution in amyloidogenic regions of Alzheimer's amyloid β and tau, Parkinson's α-synuclein and prions. Based on those findings, a split-intein like mechanism of molecular recognition is proposed to underlie dimerization of Aβ, tau, αS and PrPC, and divergent pathways for subsequent association of dimers are outlined; a related mechanism is proposed to underlie formation of PrPSc fibrils. The model does account for: (i) structural features of paranuclei, off-pathway oligomers, non-fibrillar aggregates and fibrils; (ii) effects of incubation conditions, point mutations, isoform lengths, small-molecule assembly modulators and chirality of solid

  12. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  13. Investigation on some biotic factors in carp fish ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Terziyski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Three years studies (2004 – 2006 on the main biotic parameters (chlorophyll-a, phytoplankton biomass, zooplankton biomass and bacterioplankton biomass in carp fish ponds were carried out. The aim of the study was to investigate the biotic factors and the effect of manuring on the fish ponds. The relative -1 changes in these factors in case of fertilization with manure 3000 kg.ha or without fertilization were determined. The impact of fertilization as bottom-up melioration on some biotic factors was proven by means of paired non-parametric Wilcoxon test with following significant differences: higher levels of chlorophyll-a and higher phytoplankton biomass in fertilized ponds. Zooplankton biomass was higher in fertilized ponds, but the differences were statistically insignificant. Bacterioplankton biomass was higher in the fertilized ponds, which is an indication that the applied melioration does not lead to overload of organic matter in the ponds.

  14. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  15. Effect of the van der Waals interaction on the electron energy-loss near edge structure theoretical calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsukura, Hirotaka; Miyata, Tomohiro; Tomita, Kota; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2017-07-01

    The effect of the van der Waals (vdW) interaction on the simulation of the electron energy-loss near edge structure (ELNES) by a first-principles band-structure calculation is reported. The effect of the vdW interaction is considered by the Tkatchenko-Scheffler scheme, and the change of the spectrum profile and the energy shift are discussed. We perform calculations on systems in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. The transition energy shifts to lower energy by approximately 0.1eV in the condensed (solid and liquid) systems by introducing the vdW effect into the calculation, whereas the energy shift in the gaseous models is negligible owing to the long intermolecular distance. We reveal that the vdW interaction exhibits a larger effect on the excited state than the ground state owing to the presence of an excited electron in the unoccupied band. Moreover, the vdW effect is found to depend on the local electron density and the molecular coordination. In addition, this study suggests that the detection of the vdW interactions exhibited within materials is possible by a very stable and high resolution observation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Rapid plasma heating by collective interactions, using strong turbulence and relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    A multi-kilovolt, moderate density plasma was generated in a magnetic mirror confinement system by two methods: turbulent heating and relativistic electron beam. Extensive diagnostic development permitted the measurement of important plasma characteristics, leading to interesting and novel conclusions regarding heating and loss mechanisms. Electron and ion heating mechanisms were categorized, and parameter studies made to establish ranges of importance. Nonthermal ion and electron energy distributions were measured. Beam propagation and energy deposition studies yielded the spatial dependence of plasma heating

  17. Detailed spectra of high power broadband microwave radiation from interactions of relativistic electron beams with weakly magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, K.G.; Benford, G.; Tzach, D.

    1983-01-01

    Prodigious quantities of microwave energy are observed uniformly across a wide frequency band when a relativistic electron beam (REB) penetrates a plasma. Measurement calculations are illustrated. A model of Compton-like boosting of ambient plasma waves by beam electrons, with collateral emission of high frequency photons, qualitatively explain the spectra. A transition in spectral behavior is observed from the weak to strong turbulence theories advocated for Type III solar burst radiation, and further into the regime the authors characterize as super-strong REB-plasma interactions

  18. Experiments on collective interaction of a microsecond relativistic electron beam with plasma at the GOL-3 device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burdakov, A.V.; Voropaev, S.G.; Kojdan, V.S.; Lebedev, S.V.; Meksler, K.I.; Nikiforov, A.A.; Postupaev, V.V.; Shcheglov, M.A.; Piffl, V.

    1996-01-01

    Significant non-collision beam brake action in plasma (decrease in electron average energy by approximately 25%) was obtained as a result of collective interaction of microsecond relativistic electron beam with plasma on the GOL-3 device. The beam of about 5 μs length and with energy up to 100 kJ was injected in plasma with density of approximately 10 15 cm -3 , located in the seven-meter solenoid with the field of 5 x 5 Tl. The plasma specific energy content remains heterogeneous by length during heating time with the maximum close to the beam injection point. 21 refs., 11 figs

  19. Graphic Mining of High-Order Drug Interactions and Their Directional Effects on Myopathy Using Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, L; Chakraborty, A; Chiang, C-W; Cheng, L; Quinney, S K; Wu, H; Zhang, P; Li, L; Shen, L

    2015-08-01

    We propose to study a novel pharmacovigilance problem for mining directional effects of high-order drug interactions on an adverse drug event (ADE). Our goal is to estimate each individual risk of adding a new drug to an existing drug combination. In this proof-of-concept study, we analyzed a large electronic medical records database and extracted myopathy-relevant case control drug co-occurrence data. We applied frequent itemset mining to discover frequent drug combinations within the extracted data, evaluated directional drug interactions related to these combinations, and identified directional drug interactions with large effect sizes. Furthermore, we developed a novel visualization method to organize multiple directional drug interaction effects depicted as a tree, to generate an intuitive graphical and visual representation of our data-mining results. This translational bioinformatics approach yields promising results, adds valuable and complementary information to the existing pharmacovigilance literature, and has the potential to impact clinical practice.

  20. Studying the molecular mechanisms of radiation damage : low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules and medically relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzer, K.

    2015-01-01

    Since it was discovered in the year 2000 that secondary electrons with energies below 20 eV, which are the most abundant secondary species produced upon the interaction of ionizing radiation with biological tissue, can induce severe damages in the DNA such as single and double strand breaks, the interest for the study of the interaction of electrons with essential molecules of the human body has grown immensely. Double strand breaks can lead to cancer and are therefore a substantial threat to human health, however, the radiation research community is not sure how these strand breaks are formed upon interaction with ionizing radiation. The fact that even electrons with energies well below the ionization threshold can induce great damage in biological molecules via a resonant process called dissociative electron attachment (DEA), has even furthered the interest in these electron interactions, as it was shown to be a very efficient decomposition mechanism. A variety of studies, such as DEA studies to components of the DNA, for example, have been undertaken so far to shed more light on the role electrons play in the radiation damage of biomolecules. In this thesis two nucleobases, adenine and hypoxanthine, have been studied by observing their response towards low-energy electrons. It has been found that these nucleobases behave in a similar manner upon low-energy electron interaction, as do other nucleobases, that have been studied previously. The loss of hydrogen is suspected to act as a precursor for the decomposition of the DNA and the nucleobases can also undergo ring cleavage, which will induce substantial damage in the DNA. Furthermore, the search for improved and more efficient methods for the treatment of cancer is as important as ever, considering the ever-rising number of cancer deaths. Radiotherapy has proven to be one of the best treatments for tumors, but was found to be ineffective in hypoxic - oxygen deprived - tumors. Compounds called radiosensitizers