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Sample records for biotech uni-gold recombigen

  1. Voices of biotech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amit, Ido; Baker, David; Barker, Roger; Berger, Bonnie; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Biffi, Alessandra; Demichelis, Francesca; Doudna, Jennifer; Dowdy, Steven F.; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander; Zhang, Tian

    2016-01-01

    What will be the most important areas of research in biotech over the coming years? Which technologies will be most important to advance knowledge and applications in these areas? Nature Biotechnology reached out to a set of investigators working in research areas representative of the journal's ...

  2. Quo vadis, biotech? (Part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, J

    2001-01-01

    Those following the financial markets and the valuation of biotechnology companies recently might find themselves perplexed. Towards the end of 1999, during which the availability of capital for biotech initial public offerings and for private investment rounds seemingly withered, the markets suddenly turned around and gave the biotechnology industry its biggest bonanza ever. PMID:11165169

  3. NMSBA: Sandia Biotech 2016 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this project is to modify the FluorAbody plasmid previously developed by Sandia Biotech to include a binding site for biotin by introducing the biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP)and a gold binding protein (GBP) into a loop of the red fluorescent protein (mRFP).

  4. Buying big into biotech: scale, financing, and the industrial dynamics of UK biotech, 1980–2009

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, M.M.; Crane, P.A.; Nightingale, P.; Baden-Fuller, C.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how the UK's biotech firms have evolved in response to their financial environment. As investors' expectations about the potential of biotech have changed, funding options have opened up and closed down, leading firms to develop new business models and routes of technology development. After a favorable period, new constraints on stock market funding have forced UK biotech firms to compress their life cycles, constraining their ability to generate the late-stage drug can...

  5. Structure, Employment and Performance in Biotech Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn; Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    biotech firms in a relevant context we compare a Danish segment of biotech firms with a matching Swedish segment.From an overall assessment modern biotechnology, despite the three decades elapsed since the first genetic manipulation, is still in a stage of experimentation, learning how to turn its new...... segment of Drug Discovery Firms (DDFs), which almost exclusively are based on capabilities in biotech research. This delimitation gives the advantage of studying a homogenous segment of firms. At the same time, this segment of biotech research firms is an informative indicator of the ability of the Danish...... economy to perform in the transition towards knowledge and sciencebased competitiveness. That is so because DDFs to an unusual extent depend on the ability of their framework to perform as an innovation system, by which we refer to advantages growing out of interactions and complementarities between e...

  6. Business Ethics 101 for the biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Biotechnology companies face ethical challenges of two distinct types: bioethical challenges faced on account of the nature of work in the life sciences, and corporate ethical challenges on account of their nature as commercial entities. The latter set of challenges has received almost no attention at all in the academic literature or media. This paper begins to remedy that lacuna, examining ethical issues that arise specifically on account of the status of biotech companies as commercial entities. The focus here is on three representative issues: product safety, corporate social responsibility, and corporate governance. It is argued that each of these issues poses particular ethical challenges for companies in the biotech sector. In the area of product safety, it is noted that biotech companies face particular challenges in determining what counts as a "safe" product, given the contentious nature of what might count as a "harm" in the biotech field. In the area of corporate social responsibility, the adoption of a "stakeholder approach" and an attempt to manage the social consequences of products pose special challenges for biotech companies. This is due to the enormous range of groups and individuals claiming to have a stake in the doings of such companies, and the trenchant controversies over just what the social consequences of various biotechnologies might be. In the area of corporate governance, biotech companies need to seek out and follow best practices regarding the ways in which information, authority, and influence flow between a company's shareholders, managers, and Board of Directors, if they are to avoid duplicating the ethical and financial scandal that brought down ImClone. An important meta-issue, here--one that renders each of these corporate ethical challenges more vexing--is the difficulty of finding the appropriate benchmarks for ethical corporate behavior in a field as controversial, and as rapidly evolving, as biotechnology. Three

  7. Financial Risk of the Biotech Industry versus the Pharmaceutical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Golec

    2009-01-01

    The biotech industry now accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total R&D spending on new medicines. However, compared with the pharmaceutical industry, the biotech industry is financially fragile. This article illustrates the financial fragility of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in the US and the implications of this fragility for the effects that government regulation could have on biotech firms. Graphical analysis and statistical tests were used to show how the bio...

  8. Neuro-oncology biotech industry progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shamik; Bodhinayake, Imithri; Chiluwal, Amrit; Langer, David J; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Symons, Marc; Boockvar, John A

    2016-05-01

    The Brain Tumor Biotech Center at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, in collaboration with Voices Against Brain Cancer hosted The Brain Tumor Biotech Summit at in New York City in June 2015. The focus was once again on fostering collaboration between neuro-oncologist, neurosurgeons, scientists, leaders from biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, and members of the financial community. The summit highlighted the recent advances in the treatment of brain tumor, and specifically focused on targeting of stem cells and EGFR, use of prophage and immunostimulatory vaccines, retroviral vectors for drug delivery, biologic prodrug, Cesium brachytherapy, and use of electric field to disrupt tumor cell proliferation. This article summarizes the current progress in brain tumor research as presented at 2015 The Brain Tumor Biotech Summit. PMID:26897014

  9. Partnership between small biotech and big pharma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederrecht, Gregory J; Hill, Raymond G; Beer, Margaret S

    2006-08-01

    The process involved in the identification and development of novel breakthrough medicines at big pharma has recently undergone significant changes, in part because of the extraordinary complexity that is associated with tackling diseases of high unmet need, and also because of the increasingly demanding requirements that have been placed on the pharmaceutical industry by investors and regulatory authorities. In addition, big pharma no longer have a monopoly on the tools and enabling technologies that are required to identify and discover new drugs, as many biotech companies now also have these capabilities. As a result, researchers at biotech companies are able to identify credible drug leads, as well as compounds that have the potential to become marketed medicinal products. This diversification of companies that are involved in drug discovery and development has in turn led to increased partnering interactions between the biotech sector and big pharma. This article examines how Merck and Co Inc, which has historically relied on a combination of internal scientific research and licensed products, has poised itself to become further engaged in partnering with biotech companies, as well as academic institutions, to increase the probability of success associated with identifying novel medicines to treat unmet medical needs--particularly in areas such as central nervous system disorders, obesity/metabolic diseases, atheroma and cancer, and also to cultivate its cardiovascular, respiratory, arthritis, bone, ophthalmology and infectious disease franchises. PMID:16871465

  10. Communicating financials in the biotech industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    In Denmark, biotechnology and its physical product, the genetically modified organism, continues to be controversial, leading to widespread public scepticism. This paper explores the effect of such scepticism on part of the financial communication of one of Denmark's largest biotech companies......, Novozymes. Research indicates that besides accommodating a legal demand for the disclosure of company financial details, the annual report, in particular the letter to the shareholders or the CEO's letter, serves the purpose of marketing the company to its constituents (Bowman 1984; Bülow-Møller 2003......; Hyland 1998). This point is arguably of more importance to a biotech company which in its communication to the public may have to consider promoting an overly favourable and trustworthy image not only of its financial results, but also of the industry in which it is engaged, to ensure continuous...

  11. 77 FR 35353 - Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission to Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... International Trade Administration Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission to Australia AGENCY: International Trade... Biotech Life Sciences trade mission to Australia, October 29-November 2, 2012. The mission to Australia is... of the trade mission to Australia are to (1) increase U.S. exports to Australia, (2) introduce...

  12. 76 FR 17621 - Biotech Life Science Trade Mission to China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... International Trade Administration Biotech Life Science Trade Mission to China AGENCY: International Trade.... biotechnology and life science firms and trade organizations. The mission will introduce mission participants to.... Commercial Setting U.S. biotech and life science firms often consider China the most important future...

  13. Financial risk of the biotech industry versus the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golec, Joseph; Vernon, John A

    2009-01-01

    The biotech industry now accounts for a substantial and growing proportion of total R&D spending on new medicines. However, compared with the pharmaceutical industry, the biotech industry is financially fragile. This article illustrates the financial fragility of the biotech and pharmaceutical industries in the US and the implications of this fragility for the effects that government regulation could have on biotech firms. Graphical analysis and statistical tests were used to show how the biotech industry differs from the pharmaceutical industry. The two industries' characteristics were measured and compared, along with various measures of firms' financial risk and sensitivity to government regulation. Data from firms' financial statements provided accounting-based measures and firms' stock returns applied to a multifactor asset pricing model provided financial market measures. The biotech industry was by far the most research-intensive industry in the US, averaging 38% R&D intensity (ratio of R&D spending to total firm assets) over the past 25 years, compared with an average of 25% for the pharmaceutical industry and 3% for all other industries. Biotech firms exhibited lower and more volatile profits and higher market-related and size-related risk, and they suffered more negative stock returns in response to threatened government price regulation. Biotech firms' financial risks increase their costs of capital and make them more sensitive to government regulations that affect their financial prospects. As biotech products grow to represent a larger share of new medicines, general stock market conditions and government regulations could have a greater impact on the level of innovation of new medicines. PMID:19799470

  14. Health care biotech industry (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Padmanaban

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern biotechnology became possible because of the ability to clone genes and produce gene products barriers of species and sex. Potential entrepreneurs are getting interested in venturing into health care biotech industry, stimulated by the success story in information technology. Products of protein therapeutics, such as insulin, growth hormones, interferons, blood proteins, streptokinase and vaccines have received special attention. Pharmaceutical companies got into the field of diagnostics, a major thrust area being products of antigen/antibody and nucleic acid-based diagnostic kits. The ability to clone and sequence genes from a variety of organisms has culminated in the subject of genomics. High throughput screening of thousands of organic molecules against a battery of drug targets using robotic machinery is the current approach to come up with lead molecules. New drug delivery systems for slow, sustained and direct delivery to target tissues are under way. There is hope that hereditary and metabolic disorders may have a cure through replacements of defective genes by normal cloned genes and by blocking the expression of unwanted genes, respectively. This mega approach would call for the availability of DNA chips, a product of collaboration between molecular biologists and electronic engineers. The tendency now-a-days is for a marriage between biotech and pharmaceutical industries. Animal cloning, spearheaded by the birth of Dolly, has revolutionised cell biology and is of promise to generate animal bio-vectors to produce desired protein pharmaceuticals in milk. Stem cell research has assumed a lot of importance. In our country, reasonable competence has been built-up in the field of biotechnology. Around two dozen institutes carry out front-line research in medical biotechnology. Successful commercialisation of a few diagnostic kits and recombinant vaccines has provided an impetus and enthusiasm to exploit biotechnology in a big way

  15. Scientific knowledge dynamics and relatedness in biotech cities

    OpenAIRE

    Boschma, Ron; Heimeriks, Gaston; Balland, Pierre-Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of scientific relatedness on knowledge dynamics in biotech at the city level during the period 1989-2008. We assess the extent to which the emergence of new research topics and the disappearance of existing topics in cities are dependent on their degree of scientific relatedness with existing topics in those cities. We make use of the rise and fall of title words in scientific publications in biotech to identify major cognitive developments within the field....

  16. Scientific Knowledge Dynamics and Relatedness in Bio-Tech Cities

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Boschma; Gaston Heimeriks; Pierre-Alexandre Balland

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of scientific relatedness on knowledge dynamics in biotech at the city level during the period 1989-2008. We assess the extent to which the emergence of new research topics and the disappearance of existing topics in cities are dependent on their degree of scientific relatedness with existing topics in those cities. We make use of the rise and fall of title words in scientific publications in biotech to identify major cognitive developments within the field....

  17. [Mexico recovers leadership on regulation of biosimilar biotech drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Silva, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Amid the epidemiological transition that Mexico is currently experiencing, an adequate access to biotech medicines is becoming very important. However, these medicines also involve new challenges for the sanitary authorities, given their higher complexity in structure and function than conventional chemical drugs. Consequently, it has been necessary to update the Mexican legal framework, which has placed Mexico at the forefront in this sector. This article describes briefly what biotech drugs are, why it has been necessary to regulate them differently, the evolution of the regulatory framework in Mexico, and the general features of the new system. PMID:22367313

  18. China's Biotech Policies and Their Impacts on U.S. Agricultural Exports to China

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Baohui; Marchant, Mary A.

    2006-01-01

    China is a key player in global agricultural markets, and the number one importer of U.S. soybeans and cotton, whereby soybeans and cotton are two of the main biotech commodities commercialized in the United States. As of 2005, 87% of soybeans and 79% of cotton planted in the U.S. were biotech. Thus, changes in China's biotech policies may have a significant impact on U.S. biotech commodity exports to China. An understanding of the evolution of China's biotech regulations and factors that may...

  19. Combining Instructionist and Constructionist Learning in a Virtual Biotech Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawabi, Peter; Wessner, Martin

    The background of this paper is an internal research project at the German National Research Center for Information Technology, Integrated Publication and Information Systems Institute, (GMD-IPSI) dealing with software engineering, computer-supported cooperative learning (CSCL) and practical biotech knowledge. The project goal is to develop a…

  20. MARKETING OF BIOTECH FUNCTIONAL FOODS IN THE US

    OpenAIRE

    Chema, Kambua; Marks, Leonie A.; Parcell, Joseph L.; Bredahl, Maury E.

    2004-01-01

    To date, most research in Europe and the United States has focused on eliciting consumer WTP for biotech foods without directly addressing strategies for marketing them. We use means-end theory to link consumers' knowledge about functional attributes, to their knowledge about consequences and core values, in order to gain insights into valued attributes for developing potential marketing strategies.

  1. Development of polymeric drug delivery systems for biotech products

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualin, Matteo

    2013-01-01

    Since the early 80’s the forward steps in genetics and proteomics, have led a particular interest to biotech products, such as DNA and proteins. Although difficult, their large-scale production enabled the therapeutic use of this compounds. Proteins and DNA sequences can be very interesting therapeutic molecules owing to their high selectivity/affinity for the receptor or the specific site of action. Unfortunately, some issues still limit their pharmaceutical use, such as the susceptibilit...

  2. The path- and place-dependent nature of scientific knowledge production in biotech 1986-2008

    OpenAIRE

    Gaston Heimeriks; Ron Boschma

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the worldwide spatial evolution of scientific knowledge production in biotechnology in the period 1986-2008. We employ new methodology that identifies new key topics in biotech on the basis of frequent use of title worlds in major biotech journals as an indication of new cognitive developments within this scientific field. Our analyses show that biotech is subject to a path- and place-dependent process of knowledge production. We observed a high degree of re-occurrences of...

  3. Social Network Analysis of the Irish Biotech Industry: Implications for Digital Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Egeraat, Chris; Curran, Declan

    This paper presents an analysis of the socio-spatial structures of innovation, collaboration and knowledge flow among SMEs in the Irish biotech sector. The study applies social network analysis to determine the structure of networks of company directors and inventors in the biotech sector. In addition, the article discusses the implications of the findings for the role and contours of a biotech digital ecosystem. To distil these lessons, the research team organised a seminar which was attended by representatives of biotech actors and experts.

  4. Deutsche Biotech-Unternehmen und ihre Innovationsfähigkeit im internationalen Vergleich : eine institutionentheoretische Analyse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, K.S.G.

    2006-01-01

    German Biotech-Companies and their Innovativeness in International Comparison – an Institutionalist Analysis 1 Introduction In the mid-1990s, legal changes and policy initiatives in Germany led to the rapid emergence of a biotechnology industry. Initially, German biotech companies focused on the mar

  5. Can science be a business? Lessons from biotech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisano, Gary P

    2006-10-01

    In 1976, Genentech, the first biotechnology company, was founded by a young venture capitalist and a university professor to exploit recombinant DNA technology. Thirty years and more than 300 billion dollars in investments later, only a handful of biotech firms have matched Genentech's success or even shown a profit. No avalanche of new drugs has hit the market, and the long-awaited breakthrough in R&D productivity has yet to materialize. This disappointing performance raises a question: Can organizations motivated by the need to make profits and please shareholders successfully conduct basic scientific research as a core activity? The question has largely been ignored, despite intense debate over whether business's invasion of basic science-long the domain of universities and nonprofit research institutions- is limiting access to discoveries, thereby slowing advances in science. Biotech has not lived up to its promise, says the author, because its anatomy, which has worked well in other high-tech sectors, can't handle the fundamental challenges facing drug R&D: profound, persistent uncertainty and high risks rooted in the limited knowledge of human biology; the need for the diverse disciplines involved in drug discovery to work together in an integrated fashion; and barriers to learning, including tacit knowledge and murky intellectual property rights, which can slow the pace of scientific advance. A more suitable anatomy would include increased vertical integration; a smaller number of closer, longer collaborations; an emphasis by universities on sharing rather than patenting scientific discoveries; more cross-disciplinary academic research; and more federal and private funding for translational research, which bridges basic and applied science. With such modifications, science can be a business. PMID:17040044

  6. 77 FR 10598 - BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION BIOTECH Holdings Ltd., California Oil & Gas Corp., Central Minera Corp., Chemokine Therapeutics... current and accurate information concerning the securities of California Oil & Gas Corp. because it...

  7. Deutsche Biotech-Unternehmen und ihre Innovationsfähigkeit im internationalen Vergleich: eine institutionentheoretische Analyse

    OpenAIRE

    Lange, K.S.G.

    2006-01-01

    German Biotech-Companies and their Innovativeness in International Comparison – an Institutionalist Analysis 1 Introduction In the mid-1990s, legal changes and policy initiatives in Germany led to the rapid emergence of a biotechnology industry. Initially, German biotech companies focused on the market segment of platform technologies, characterized by incremental innovations. In recent years however, many companies have shifted their strategic focus on the market segment of therapeutics, cha...

  8. Exploiting the business opportunities in biotech connections : The power of social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi-Sangari, Esmail

    2007-01-01

    Networks have a well-established importance in business. Here network analysis, grounded in socialnetwork theory, is used to analyse two international biotech business-to-business environments. Ofadditional value, the methodology employed is described for the benefi t of academics and practitionersalike. Swedish and Australian biotech fi rms are analysed through the examination of internet networks.Once gathered and analysed following the described methodology, several features of the networks ...

  9. Social Network Analysis of the Irish Biotech Industry: Implications for Digital Ecosystems (NIRSA) Working Paper Series No. 55.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Egeraat, Chris; Curran, Declan

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the socio-spatial structures of innovation, collaboration and knowledge flow among SMEs in the Irish biotech sector. The study applies social network analysis to determine the structure of networks of company directors and inventors in the biotech sector. In addition, the article discusses the implications of the findings for the role and contours of a biotech digital ecosystem. To distil these lessons, the research team organised a seminar which was attende...

  10. The Swiss biotech referendum: A case study of science communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 7 , 1998, the Swiss citizens voted on a constitutional amendment, which could have jeopardised the future of biotechnological research in Switzerland. Scientists and opinion leaders around the world expected the referendum with great anxiety. 'Nature', in an editorial, had firmly stated that the Swiss way showed 'how not to run a country', the 'Economist', a week prior to the referendum, had written that the Swiss might be the only people in the world who decided on their own to forego a world class position in scientific research. In fact, the Swiss did none of that. They rejected the constitutional amendment with an overwhelming majority of 67 per cent of the votes, and what started out as a dramatic threat to scientific research in Switzerland became a platform in favour of modern biotechnology. The presentation addresses some of the key features of the Swiss biotech campaign, analyses the success factors of the campaign, provides an insight in the most in-depth collection of data on public perception of biotechnology in the world, and draws conclusions as to what extent the Swiss experience can be of use in the way to communicate on modem science. The result of the Swiss referendum has convincingly shown that successful communication of modem science is possible if - scientists, authorities, and the industry accept the challenge to cope with the demands of communicating with the public at large, - there is a clear understanding that the public's needs may often be based on psychological rather than on logic scientific reasons, - all participants in the dialogue are willing to forego scientific jargon for clear understandable language, i.e. understand that it is hardly the public's fault if messages do not get across, - everybody accepts that dialogue, information, and education on modem science is a long-haul task. The Swiss biotech referendum was seen as a major threat to Switzerland as a leading country of scientific research. However, something which

  11. 3D-BioPrinting: The future of Red Biotech

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every day Science moves little steps forward, contributing to the progress of our society. Sometimes, however, a single invention revolutionizes the world. Indeed, the invention of woodblock printing and development of industrial-scale printing-press in the 15. century have changed our society. 3D-printing is now boosting another revolution. The production of custom-made objects from a virtual model will trigger a rapid development of a more versatile, less expensive manufacturing sector for the on-demand market. The real revolution, however, is represented by 3D-printing in biomedicine. 3D-bioprinting represents the future of the Red-Biotech. This technology, indeed, will be able to build ex-novo organs using biocompatible materials and human cells; replace the allograft transplants, eliminating waiting lists that often make the difference between life and death; and provide more predictive, less expensive experimental models, replacing animal tests. The high innovation content of this technology, can make the difference between being obsolete and new

  12. Trends in global approvals of biotech crops (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldemita, Rhodora R; Reaño, Ian Mari E; Solis, Renando O; Hautea, Randy A

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing number of genetically modified (GM) events, traits, and crops that are developed to benefit the global population, approval of these technologies for food, feed, cultivation and import in each country may vary depending on needs, demand and trade interest. ISAAA established a GMO Approval Database to document global approvals of biotech crops. GM event name, crops, traits, developer, year of approval for cultivation, food/feed, import, and relevant dossiers were sourced from credible government regulatory websites and biosafety clearinghouses. This paper investigates the trends in GM approvals for food, feed and cultivation based on the number of approving countries, GM crops, events, and traits in the last 23 y (1992-2014), rationale for approval, factors influencing approvals, and their implications in GM crop adoption. Results show that in 2014, there was an accumulative increase in the number of countries granting approvals at 29 (79% developing countries) for commercial cultivation and 31 (70% developing countries) for food and 19 (80% developing developing) for feed; 2012 had the highest number of approving countries and cultivation approvals; 2011 had the highest number of country approvals for feed, and 2014 for food approvals. Herbicide tolerance trait had the highest events approved, followed by insect tolerance traits. Approvals for food product quality increased in the second decade. Maize had the highest number of events approved (single and stacked traits), and stacked traits product gradually increased which is already 30% of the total trait approvals. These results may indicate understanding and acceptance of countries to enhance regulatory capability to be able to benefit from GM crop commercialization. Hence, the paper provided information on the trends on the growth of the GM crop industry in the last 23 y which may be vital in predicting future GM crops and traits. PMID:26039675

  13. Where is the biotech industry in China headed to?%中国生物技术产生的发展方向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏慰国

    2009-01-01

    @@ 2008 was a year marked with changes and turns for biotech industry in China. 2008 began with tremendous promises riding on the waves of a history-making, exceptionally strong year in 2007. However, the biotech industry in China was not immune to the macroeconomic changes during 2008. This report will attempt to examine changes and new trends in biotech industry in China.

  14. Detection methods for biotech cotton MON 15985 and MON 88913 by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hun; Kim, Jin-Kug; Yi, Bu-Young

    2007-05-01

    Plants derived through agricultural biotechnology, or genetically modified organisms (GMOs), may affect human health and ecological environment. A living GMO is also called a living modified organism (LMO). Biotech cotton is a GMO in food or feed and also an LMO in the environment. Recently, two varieties of biotech cotton, MON 15985 and MON 88913, were developed by Monsanto Co. The detection method is an essential element for the GMO labeling system or LMO management of biotech plants. In this paper, two primer pairs and probes were designed for specific amplification of 116 and 120 bp PCR products from MON 15985 and MON 88913, respectively, with no amplification from any other biotech cotton. Limits of detection of the qualitative method were all 0.05% for MON 15985 and MON 88913. The quantitative method was developed using a TaqMan real-time PCR. A synthetic plasmid, as a reference molecule, was constructed from a taxon-specific DNA sequence of cotton and two construct-specific DNA sequences of MON 15985 and MON 88913. The quantitative method was validated using six samples that contained levels of biotech cotton mixed with conventional cotton ranging from 0.1 to 10.0%. As a result, the biases from the true value and the relative deviations were all within the range of +/-20%. Limits of quantitation of the quantitative method were all 0.1%. Consequently, it is reported that the proposed detection methods were applicable for qualitative and quantitative analyses for biotech cotton MON 15985 and MON 88913. PMID:17402745

  15. Parameters of Regional Cooperative Behavior in the German Biotech Industry – A Quantitative Social Network Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo; Strotebeck, Falk

    We analyse the determinants of network formation in Germany’s biotechnology industry using social network analysis combined with a regression approach for count data. Outcome variable of interest is the degree centrality of German regions, which is specified as a function of the region’s innovative...... and economic performance as well as biotech-related policy variables. The inclusion of the latter allows us to shed new light on the question to what extent R&D-based cluster policies are able to impact on the formation of the German biotech network. Our results show that policy indicators such as the...... the German biotechnology network....

  16. How Is Corporate Social Responsibility Addressed by Biotech Firms? a Case Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Bustamante, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the biotech high-tech sector as a way to achieve competitive advantages. After presenting the importance of science for high-tech firms, the paper focuses on the social and economic role of CSR. Next, the primary reasons for firms' engagement in CSR activities are presented,…

  17. The industrial application requirement for biotech inventions in light of recent EPO & UK case law:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    at the date of filing to demonstrate a credible – or to use the terminology of the EPO – a plausible industrial application. In the final section of the article we shall also discuss various policy considerations relevant for the biotech industry and briefly refer to corresponding developments in the US...

  18. Biotech/GM crops in horticulture: plum cv. HoneySweet resistant to plum pox virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercialization of Biotech crops started in 1995. By 2011, genetically modified (GM) crops were grown world-wide on 160 million ha. Only 114.507 ha of GM crops were grown in Europe, of that, 114.490 ha were Bt maize and 17 ha were potato for industrial starch production. Currently, developing c...

  19. 77 FR 14852 - Advanced Growing Systems, Inc., Advantage Capital Development Corp., Amazon Biotech, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Advanced Growing Systems, Inc., Advantage Capital Development Corp., Amazon Biotech, Inc., Andover... securities of Advantage Capital Development Corp. because it has not filed any periodic reports since...

  20. 76 FR 42682 - China Biotech Life Sciences Trade Mission-Clarification and Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... publishing this supplement to the Notice of the Biotech Life Science Trade Mission to China, 76 FR 17,621... and life science firms and trade organizations. In response to various inquiries, CS is clarifying...), interested U.S. biotechnology and life science firms and trade organizations which have not already...

  1. Knowledge management in the QbD paradigm: manufacturing of biotech therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Christoph; Garcia-Aponte, Oscar F; Golabgir, Aydin; Rathore, Anurag S

    2015-07-01

    In the quality by design (QbD) paradigm, global regulatory agencies have introduced the concepts of quality risk management and knowledge management (KM) as enablers for an enhanced pharmaceutical quality system. Although the concept of quality risk management has been well elucidated in the literature, the topic of KM has received relatively scant attention. In this paper we present an opinion on KM in the QbD paradigm as it relates to the manufacturing of biotech therapeutic products. Both academic and industrial viewpoints have been considered and key gaps have been elucidated. The authors conclude that there is an urgent need for the biotech industry to create efficient KM approaches if they wish to be successful in QbD implementation. PMID:25980924

  2. The written description rejection as a barrier to biotech patent prosecution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2011-05-01

    Biotech firms always pursue broad claims to secure new discoveries, new technologies and even as yet undiscovered results of future research. However, expansive claims without sufficient description violate the principal of granting the patentee the right to exclude others from using the technical development for a certain amount of time in return for disclosing the innovation. Based on this investigation, a written description can be a barrier to biotech patents with broad claims. To avoid a written description rejection during patent prosecution or invalidation in litigation, the patent applicant or assignee should demonstrate possession of the claimed invention by describing the claimed invention with all of its limitations using descriptive means such as words, structures, figures, diagrams, and formulas that fully set forth the claimed invention. Although the court cases analyzed in this study were not directly related to vaccines, the guideline indeed is applicable to patents of vaccine. Furthermore, a vaccine patent application is also demonstrated. PMID:21552000

  3. The Effects of Information on Consumer Demand for Biotech Foods: Evidence from Experimental Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Tegene, Abebayehu; Huffman, Wallace E; Rousu, Matthew C.; Shogren, Jason F.

    2003-01-01

    Consumers' willingness to pay for food products decreases when the food label indicates that a food product is produced with the aid of modern biotechnology. This bulletin presents empirical evidence on consumers' willingness to pay for biotech foods based on the presence or absence of labels advising that the food was prepared with the aid of biotechnology. The authors designed and conducted an experimental auction to elicit consumers' willingness to pay for "genetically modified" (GM)-label...

  4. The Strategic Importance of M&A in the Biotech and Pharmaceutical Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Savri

    2011-01-01

    Background: The companies involved for the purpose of improving their respective market standings and income executes mergers. It is interesting how this merger & acquisition phenomena continue to attract many organizations across different sectors of the business world. The mergers & acquisition culture around the globe provides an ideal scenario to investigate into the healthcare industry which comprises of pharmaceutical and biotech companies and the impact of the mergers on the firms inv...

  5. Which Model of Technology Transfer for Nanotechnology? A Comparison with Biotech and Microelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Genet, Corine; Errabi, Khalid; Gauthier, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    International audience Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations, where technology transfer and knowledge-bridging will play a pivotal role in the industrial dynamics. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing it with the models of two recently emerged technologies: biotech and microelectronics. Our results show that the nanotechnology transfer model is very different from that involved in biotechnology e...

  6. Simplex and duplex event-specific analytical methods for functional biotech maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Hun; Kim, Su-Jeong; Yi, Bu-Young

    2009-08-26

    Analytical methods are very important in the control of genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling systems or living modified organism (LMO) management for biotech crops. Event-specific primers and probes were developed for qualitative and quantitative analysis for biotech maize event 3272 and LY 038 on the basis of the 3' flanking regions, respectively. The qualitative primers confirmed the specificity by a single PCR product and sensitivity to 0.05% as a limit of detection (LOD). Simplex and duplex quantitative methods were also developed using TaqMan real-time PCR. One synthetic plasmid was constructed from two taxon-specific DNA sequences of maize and two event-specific 3' flanking DNA sequences of event 3272 and LY 038 as reference molecules. In-house validation of the quantitative methods was performed using six levels of mixing samples, from 0.1 to 10.0%. As a result, the biases from the true value and the relative deviations were all within the range of +/-30%. Limits of quantitation (LOQs) of the quantitative methods were all 0.1% for simplex real-time PCRs of event 3272 and LY 038 and 0.5% for duplex real-time PCR of LY 038. This study reports that event-specific analytical methods were applicable for qualitative and quantitative analysis for biotech maize event 3272 and LY 038. PMID:19650633

  7. Does Cluster Policy Trigger R&D Activity? – Evidence from German Biotech Contests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engel, Dirk; Mitze, Timo; Patuelli, Roberto; Reinkowski, Janina

    in research clusters. We apply a Difference-in-Differences estimation technique in a generalized linear model framework, which allows us to control for different initial regional conditions in R&D activity of the biotech sector. Our econometric findings support the view that winners generally...... outperform non-winning participants during the treatment period, thus indicating that exclusive funding as well as the stimulating effect of being a “winner” have positive effects on R&D activity in the short-term. Apart from this direct winner effect, for the non-winning participants no beneficial indirect...

  8. Job Opportunities in Pharma and Biotech: What Makes a Future Employee Stand Out?

    OpenAIRE

    Mische, Sheenah

    2012-01-01

    These are turbulent times. For Pharma and Biotech there is the potential of new inventions and discovery tempered by the fact that it now takes an average of 12 to 15 years and up to $1.7 billion for a drug to go from discovery to market. Despite all the time and money invested, only a handful of drugs are approved by the FDA each year. The arduous drug approval process reveals a central fact about the pharmaceutical industry: it's one of the most intensely regulated industries in the world. ...

  9. Solid lipid nanoparticles for hydrophilic biotech drugs: optimization and cell viability studies (Caco-2 & HEPG-2 cell lines)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Severino, P.; Andreani, T.; Jäger, Alessandro; Chaud, M. V.; Santana, M. H. A.; Silva, A. M.; Souto, E. B.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 81, 23 June (2014), s. 28-34. ISSN 0223-5234 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1600 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : lipid nanoparticles * double emulsion * hydrophilic biotech drugs Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.447, year: 2014

  10. Science communication in policy making:A qualitative research about the motivation of academic biotech scientists to participate in policy making in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Coumou, Hilde; van der Werf Kulichova, Z.; Wehrmann, C.; Osseweijer, P.

    2014-01-01

    Policy making regarding application of agricultural biotechnology has been controversial. This study investigates what determines the motivation of European biotech scientists to actively participate in policy making. To do this, a conceptual framework was developed based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. The framework was operationalized in semi-structured interviews with 17 European biotech scientists to collect data about their motivation to involve in GMO policy making. The results of th...

  11. Trait stacking for biotech crops: an essential consideration for agbiotech development projects for building trust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of agricultural biotechnology humanitarian projects for food security in the last five years has been rapid in developing countries and is expected to rise sharply over the coming years. An extremely critical issue in these projects involves building trust with the community and farmers they aim to serve. For the first time, our social audit engagement with one of these initiatives, the Water Efficient Maize for Africa project, has revealed that a critical but unrecognized component of building trust with farmers involves publicly addressing the concerns surrounding stacked trait crops. As a result, we argue in this article that it is critical to actively anticipate the concerns that could be raised over trait stacking by incorporating them into global access plans of such initiatives early in order to facilitate adoption, provide the best value to the small-scale farmer and gain trust with the community whom these projects aim to serve. This perspective, based on an actual international social audit, should be of value to scientists, funders and partners involved in biotech development initiatives for food security.

  12. Biotech outsourcing strategies cmc--biologics stream. June 17, 2010, Copenhagen, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Now in its third year, the Biotech Outsourcing Strategies (BOS) meeting organized by Bio2Business took place at the Søhuset Conference Centre in Hørsholm, Copenhagen. The focus of this year's event was the demanding and challenging area of chemistry, manufacturing and controls (CMC), and the meeting provided ample opportunity for lively discussion of the key issues surrounding this area. New for the 2010 conference, a biologics-focused lecture stream ran in parallel to the established small molecule stream. Both streams boasted a distinguished panel of keynote speakers who discussed all aspects of CMC from early stage scale-up through late stage clinical development. In addition to the keynote speakers, selected contract research organizations (CROs) gave short presentations on the solutions that they could provide to some of the challenges facing CMC. The meeting attracted more than 150 delegates from leading drug development companies and CRO service providers, and greatly facilitated the forging of new working relationships through pre-arranged one-to-one meetings. Moreover, exhibitions from event sponsors and considerable scheduled networking time over lunch and evening reception further enhanced the highly productive and interactive nature of the meeting. PMID:20716956

  13. Next biotech plants: new traits, crops, developers and technologies for addressing global challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricroch, Agnès E; Hénard-Damave, Marie-Cécile

    2016-08-01

    Most of the genetically modified (GM) plants currently commercialized encompass a handful of crop species (soybean, corn, cotton and canola) with agronomic characters (traits) directed against some biotic stresses (pest resistance, herbicide tolerance or both) and created by multinational companies. The same crops with agronomic traits already on the market today will continue to be commercialized, but there will be also a wider range of species with combined traits. The timeframe anticipated for market release of the next biotech plants will not only depend on science progress in research and development (R&D) in laboratories and fields, but also primarily on how demanding regulatory requirements are in countries where marketing approvals are pending. Regulatory constraints, including environmental and health impact assessments, have increased significantly in the past decades, delaying approvals and increasing their costs. This has sometimes discouraged public research entities and small and medium size plant breeding companies from using biotechnology and given preference to other technologies, not as stringently regulated. Nevertheless, R&D programs are flourishing in developing countries, boosted by the necessity to meet the global challenges that are food security of a booming world population while mitigating climate change impacts. Biotechnology is an instrument at the service of these imperatives and a wide variety of plants are currently tested for their high yield despite biotic and abiotic stresses. Many plants with higher water or nitrogen use efficiency, tolerant to cold, salinity or water submergence are being developed. Food security is not only a question of quantity but also of quality of agricultural and food products, to be available and accessible for the ones who need it the most. Many biotech plants (especially staple food) are therefore being developed with nutritional traits, such as biofortification in vitamins and metals. The main

  14. 7 Leadership Blind Spots: Adult Development, Emotional Intelligence, and Leadership Effectiveness Among Biotech R&D Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Shiner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this multiple-case study of 6 mid-level leaders working in biotech R&D--an archetype of a complex, uncertain, turbulent, and, multidisciplinary 21st-Century workplace--I explore the importance and interaction of mental complexity (MC), an aspect of adult development, and emotional intelligence (EI) for leadership effectiveness (LE). MC concerns the sophistication of the mindsets we use to construct stories for ourselves about the meaning of things. EI refers to one’s ability to manage one’...

  15. Explaining ICT Infrastructure and E-Commerce Uses and Benefits in Industrial Clusters-Evidence from a Biotech Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Steinfield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    in an industrial cluster might utilize and derive benefit from a public, broadband ICT infrastructure, particularly in support of e-commerce applications. A case study of a successful biotech cluster in Denamrk and Sweden-The Medicon Valley-provides a preliminary test of these expectations. Distinctions in uses...... and benefits based upon firm size are considered. A key finding is that small firms that would not otherwise be expected to gain from global e-commerce can rely on the cluster "brand" to enable trade with unknown and distant partners....

  16. Explaining ICT Infrastructure and E-Commerce Uses and Benefits in Industrial Clusters-Evidence from a Biotech Cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Steinfield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    industrial cluster might utilize and derive benefit from a public, broadband ICT infrastructure, particularly in support of e-commerce applications. A case study of a successful biotech cluster in Denamrk and Sweden-The Medicon Valley-provides a preliminary test of these expectations. Distinctions in uses...... and benefits based upon firm size are considered. A key finding is that small firms that would not otherwise be expected to gain from global e-commerce can rely on the cluster "brand" to enable trade with unknown and distant partners....

  17. Quality Control and Performance of HIV Rapid Tests in a Microbicide Clinical Trial in Rural KwaZulu-Natal

    OpenAIRE

    Nina von Knorring; Mitzy Gafos; Motsei Ramokonupi; Ute Jentsch

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality control (QC) and evaluation of HIV rapid test procedures are an important aspect of HIV prevention trials. We describe QC and performance of two rapid tests, Determine™ and Uni-Gold™ used in a microbicide clinical trial in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods/Results Internal QC of both HIV rapid tests was conducted at the trial site using a Uni-Gold control kit (Uni-Gold™Recombigen® HIV). Both assays produced the expected results for a total of 4637 QC tes...

  18. Quality control and performance of HIV rapid tests in a microbicide clinical trial in rural KwaZulu-Natal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina von Knorring

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Quality control (QC and evaluation of HIV rapid test procedures are an important aspect of HIV prevention trials. We describe QC and performance of two rapid tests, Determine™ and Uni-Gold™ used in a microbicide clinical trial in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. METHODS/RESULTS: Internal QC of both HIV rapid tests was conducted at the trial site using a Uni-Gold control kit (Uni-Gold™Recombigen® HIV. Both assays produced the expected results for a total of 4637 QC tests. Study participants were tested for HIV at screening and, if enrolled, at regular time points throughout the study. Positive or discordant results were confirmed by a double HIV immunoassay testing strategy at a local laboratory. Overall, 15292 HIV rapid test were performed. Sensitivity and specificity of Determine was 98.95% (95% CI: 97.72-99.61 and 99.83% (95% CI: 99.70-99.91 respectively [positive predictive value (PPV 97.91% (95% CI: 96.38-98.92], for Uni-Gold it was 99.30% (95% CI: 98.21-99.81 and 99.96% (95% CI: 99.88-99.99 respectively [PPV 99.47% (95% CI: 98.46-99.89]. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that a Uni-Gold control kit can be used for internal QC of both Uni-Gold and the HIV-1 component of the Determine rapid tests. Both rapid tests performed proficiently in the trial population.

  19. The present status of commercialized and developed biotech (GM) crops, results of evaluation of plum 'HoneySweet" for resistance to plum pox virus in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commercialization of biotech (GM) crops started in 1996. A significant increase of 9 million hectars was realized in 1996-2009. In the years 2010-2011, it was already 12 million hectars (8 percent of total crop area). 16.7 million farmers in 29 countries planted 160 million hectars of GM crops in...

  20. Accumulation and Circulation of the Knowledge Needed for Biotech Business Promotion by Engineers of R&D Section in an IT Enterprise: The Case of Hitachi Software Engineering Co., Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Ota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Much research has been carried out on the accumulation and effective use of knowledge as a company-specific form of intellectual property. However, insufficient attention has been given to research focusing on the effects of micro-level knowledge absorption and its effective use. In this paper, we try to demonstrate what should be done in order to promote new biotech business from the perspective of each engineer’s knowledge, through a micro-level investigation focusing on the life science business section of one IT enterprise. Based on the results of a questionnaire survey of engineers, interviews of several engineers, and patent data analysis, we discuss the progress of the biotech business in an IT enterprise from the aspect of accumulation and circulation of knowledge in a core technology field, the IT business, and a technology field of new entry, the biotech business. This paper reports that the positive growth cycle of biotech business promotion in an IT enterprise, using Hitachi Software Engineering Co., Ltd. as a case, attained by incorporating the latest biotech knowledge from junior engineers and utilizing IT knowledge from middle engineers leads to the recruiting of qualified students.Keywords: accumulation and circulation of the knowledge, biotech business, open innovation, patent data analysis, questionnaire survey

  1. Evolution de l’industrie biotech et medtech suisse et influence de l’industrie pharmaceutique sur le système d’innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Klöpper, Christof; Haisch, Tina

    2010-01-01

    Cet article traite de l’influence d’un secteur ou d’une industrie dans l’économie nationale et de la manière dont il/elle peut influencer des secteurs et des technologies connexes. L’exemple choisi est constitué par l’industrie pharmaceutique suisse. L’article suggère que cette industrie a façonné le développement et la distribution spatiale des secteurs qui lui étaient liés, tels que les biotechnologies (biotech) et les technologies médicales (medtech). Il est supposé que cette influence dif...

  2. What affects the innovation performance of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the biotechnology industry? An empirical study on Korean biotech SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Nam; Lee, Yoon-Sik

    2008-10-01

    Research-intensive small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) play a crucial role in the advancement of the biotechnology industry. This paper explored the impacts of internal and contextual variables on innovative activity in Korea and compared the results of this analysis with previous studies of other countries. Our analysis of 149 Korean biotech SMEs showed that the ratio of R&D expenditure to sales, the ratio of R&D employees to total employees, CEO characteristics, governmental support and international networking are positively correlated with a firm's innovation performance. The results may help decision makers to better foster SMEs in the Korean biotechnology industry. PMID:18506395

  3. Public administration and R&D localisation by pharmaceutical and biotech companies: a theoretical framework and the Italian case-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jommi, Claudio; Paruzzolo, Silvia

    2007-04-01

    This article has two objectives. It firstly provides a general framework for variables that influence R&D (Research and Development) localisation by pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The analysis of R&D localization includes both in-house R&D and contracted R&D. Following a systematic literature search, these variables were classified into four distinct categories: regulatory environment, institutional framework, national systems of innovation and local development and specialisation. The authors highlight that some of these factors directly depend on the action of public administrations (e.g., patent protection, price regulation, public investments in research, and incentives to private companies); others are indirectly influenced by public policies (e.g., GDP growth rate, infrastructures). This theoretical framework was used to analyse the Italian case-study. Pros and cons of the Italian context were investigated from the point of view of multinational pharmaceutical companies and the Italian Association of Biotech Companies. Interviews were chosen as the most appropriate data gathering technique given the exploratory nature of the study of the Italian context. The paper is divided into five parts. A brief introduction provides figures showing that Europe has been loosing positions compared with other Continents and the same has occurred in Italy compared with other EU countries. The second one illustrates the methodology. The third one is focused on variables affecting R&D localisation. In the fourth section the Italian case-study is discussed. Theoretical and empirical findings are summarised and discussed in the conclusions. PMID:16824641

  4. The present state of research and exploitation of biotech (GM) crops in horticulture: results of research on plum cv. 'HoneySweet' resistant to plum pox virus (Sharka) and the deregulation of this cultivar in the CR & Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentically modified (GM) crops were grown world-wide on 160 million ha in 2011. Only 114.57 ha of GM crops were grown in Europe, of that, 114.90 ha were Bt maize and 17 ha were potato for industrial starch production. Commercialization of Biotech crops started in 1995. Currently, developing count...

  5. Biotech as 'Biothreat'?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    groups. In this, the paper tries to make up for the limited focus upon the role played by metaphor and discourse in shaping public attitudes of biotechnology. The paper has two parts; a theoretical part discussing the combination of conceptual metaphor studies and critical discourse analysis to provide a...... highly influenced by attitudes expressed by societal groups, based on the notions of risk, fear and danger....

  6. Judicial activism, the Biotech Directive and its institutional implications – Is the Court acting as a legislator or a court when defining the ‘human embryo’?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faeh, Andrea Beata

    2015-01-01

    The Court of Justice of the European Union (Court) delivered a preliminary ruling in 2011 in the case of Oliver Brüstle v Greenpeace on the interpretation of Article 6(2) of the Biotech Directive and thereby established an autonomous concept of the term ‘human embryo’. The Brüstle decision raises a...... autonomous interpretation of ‘human embryo’ and the flexibility allowed to the national courts needed further clarification. This clarification was recently given by the Court’s Grand Chamber in International Stem Cell Corporation v Comptroller General Patents where the Court concluded that a non......-fertilised human ovum, not capable of developing into a human being, is not a ‘human embryo’. Hence, ‘where a non-fertilised human ovum does not fulfil that condition [inherent capacity of developing into a human being], the mere fact that that organism commences a process of development is not sufficient for it...

  7. 近年来我国生物技术药物研究进展和趋势%The Research Progress and Trend of Biotech Drugs in Recent Years in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王友同; 吴文俊; 李谦; 高美风

    2013-01-01

    Biological technology is the topic height at the development of economy and technology in the 21st century all over the world . The authors based on the world biotech- drugs total development trend, summarized the biotech drugs research achievements in recent five years in China. The content includes: cytokine, protein and peptide drugs, fusion protein, cell-penetrating peptides, enzymes,gene therapy,stem cells,monoclonal antibodies,therapeutic vaccine,polysaccharide drugs,etc. It is found in the survey that the development of biotech drugs has a bright future in treating complicated diseases, protecting the human health, improving the life quality, and developing the biotech drugs industry, thank to the emerging of many creative biotech drug researches within our country. This paper provides the reference for establishing the relevant research plan, deciding the research project, setting development goals for enterprise research,and choosing professional development direction,and to biological pharmaceutical researchers.%生物技术是21世纪世界各国竞相发展的经济、技术的制高点,作者站在世界生物技术药物发展总趋势的高度上,具体而微地调查和总结了我国近5年来生物技术药物研究所取得的成果,内容包括:细胞因子、其它蛋白质和多肽药物、融合蛋白、穿膜肽、酶、基因治疗、干细胞、单克隆抗体、治疗性疫苗及多糖药物等.调查发现,在攻克人类顽疾、保障人民身体健康、提高生活质量和发展我国生物技术药物产业方面,由于国内成批有创见的研究成果持续涌现,发展前景一片光明.该文可为有关部门科研规划、确定研究项目、企业锁定发展目标及生物制药人员选择专业发展方向提供参考.

  8. Identification of the factors that result in obviousness rulings for biotech patents: an updated analysis of the US Federal Circuit decisions after KSR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fangyu; Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2013-11-01

    To demonstrate the influence of the US Supreme Court's KSR case, our analysis has shown that the ratio of obvious ruling increased from 0.42 to 0.62 after this case, whereas the ratio of non-obvious ruling decreased from 0.47 to 0.28. Therefore, without the rigid application of a "teaching, suggestion or motivation" test, the trends of obvious and non-obvious CAFC rulings significantly increased and decreased, respectively.   Based on this analysis, biotech inventors should contemplate the factors that have resulted in ruling of obviousness, which include claims that are too broad, the lack of secondary considerations, the reasonable expectation of success, and the reason or motivation to create a structure based on structural similarity. The presence of these factors most likely would result in the rejection of the claim during patent prosecution or the invalidation of the claim in patent litigation. Two immunotherapy and vaccine cases have applied these factors to overcome the obvious rejections. PMID:23899509

  9. Scientific Basis for Biotech Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to change the genetic makeup of plants have been ongoing since the beginning of agriculture, thousands of years ago. Early plant improvements relied on simply cross-breeding cultivars with desired traits. Advancements in mutation breeding through chemicals and radiation ...

  10. Space Biotech: Hindsight, Insight, Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Over the past forty years, microgravity has inspired and enabled applications in a wide range of sectors including medicine, materials, computers, communications, and national defense. Trends show that demand for high-tech solutions is increasing in these sectors, solutions that require higher resolution, greater precision, novel materials, innovative processes, and more sophisticated tools. These are areas where microgravity can offer unique capabilities for innovation. The Emerging Space Office (ESO) has engaged in multiple studies over the past year that have found that microgravity RD is one of the most promising technology areas for contributing to economic growth and to NASAs mission. The focus of these studies was on terrestrial markets rather than NASA applications, applied research rather than basic research, and commercial rather than academic investigators. There have been more success stories than are generally appreciated and there are significant areas of promising future potential. Many of the problems that have limited commercial microgravity development in the past are being solved. Microgravity research and development (RD) requires iteration and learning, as rapidly as possible. New technologies enable high throughput and rapid data collection in increasingly small payloads. The International Space Station is in orbit and provides a laboratory that is available 247 at least until 2024. Frequent flights by commercial space providers to and from the ISS now enable the fast learning cycles needed by high-tech industries. Launch costs are decreasing and the ability to return payloads to Earth is increasing. New commercial space laboratories, such as those being developed by SpaceX and Bigelow Aerospace, are in the final stages of development and testing. This ecosystem for microgravity RD has never been available before. These are game-changer conditions for attracting high-tech industries to space for terrestrial, as well as NASA, applications. However, few know that these capabilities are available or how to use them. In aggregate, the potential value for new applications from microgravity RD over the next ten years could add billions of dollars per year in terrestrial applications to the future economy, create new jobs, and generate a wide range of public benefits in medical advances, while broadening the customer base for the emerging space industry.

  11. La intervención del derecho penal en materia de bioseguridad: la criminalización de la actividad empresarial biotecnológica de liberación intencional en el ambiente con fines comerciales y de comercialización de productos biotech

    OpenAIRE

    Tanus Job e Meira, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    [ES] El objetivo general del presente trabajo reside en analizar el sistema de control del riesgo biotecnológico relativo a las principales actividades por las cuales se utilizan las empresas biotech en el ámbito agroalimentario, es decir, las conductas de liberación en el ambiente con fines comerciales, así como la comercialización de “organismos modificados genéticamente” (OMGs) y sus derivados. Tales actividades son consideradas como las más importantes en el ámbito mercantil y, efectivame...

  12. Matching biotech needs and yeast physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Passolunghi,

    2009-01-01

    The research in the field of industrial biotechnology, especially regards bioproducts and bioprocesses, are aimed at developing innovative technologies that lead to obtaining compounds with the use of microorganisms, or seeking to enhance existing processes to increase yield, production and productivity, trying to ensure a higher degree of sustainability and reducing environmental impact. To pursue these goals is possible to intervene by adopting a “technologic” approach that includes the...

  13. PROTECTING BIOTECH INVENTIONS: ARE WE READY?

    OpenAIRE

    Namrata Solanki

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology has been used in agriculture, food production and medicine since the dawn of our civilization. Biotechnology is a popular term for the generic technology of the 21st century. With the advancement in science and research, modern biotechnological inventions have brought a revolution in our lives. These inventions are protected under the Patent Law. The World Trade Organization’s TRIPS agreement sets down the minimum standards for intellectual property regulation for its member cou...

  14. Have Biotech Seeds Increased Maize Yields?

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zheng; David A. Hennessy; Moschini, GianCarlo

    2010-01-01

    Corn yield is determined by soils, weather, seed used and other technology choices. Global population and per capita income growth trends as well as demand from the energy sector have placed great stress on cropland use. Global cropland acres and/or yield per acre will need to increase. Whether new seed technologies have enhanced corn yield is a controversial issue. We study U.S. county corn yields 1964-2008, controlling for location effects, fertilization technologies and weather. We find ev...

  15. Genetic resources, biotech patents and gene ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchi, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Human genetic resources are increasingly considered as ordinary commercial goods, but their value and utility go beyond the simple and immediate private profit. In contrast to other biological resources, commercial use does not focus upon the material itself but rather upon the genetic information it contains. Information goods are then usually subject to intellectual property rights, but in the biological and life science domains, property rights can have a negative influence upon the proper allocation of several goods, including genetic material or goods that are related to it. This scenario reflects the facts of recent litigations in the United States and Europe. In particular, these lawsuits have revived the debate over private ownership and control over genes. Within this context, the objective of the paper is to discuss how to recast the traditional right to access to and use of biochemical and human genetic material currently considered as part of the market framework. Looking beyond the protection of traditional public goods, the paper emphasizes the debate around the progressive commodification of human genetic resources facilitated by an improper use of intellectual property rights. Different scenarios are analyzed to evaluate alternative instruments and new regulatory approaches to avoid the private appropriation of human genetic resources and other natural assets. PMID:25845208

  16. How to start a biotech company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajonar, Adriana

    2014-11-01

    The spirit of life science entrepreneurship is alive and well, with outstanding innovation hubs arising throughout the country and the world. Of note, many of these hubs flourish in close proximity to research universities. If universities are the engine for discovery, then startups are the vehicle for innovation. The creativity and drive of young researchers has the potential to explore novel or underserved applications and revolutionize industries. PMID:25360051

  17. Initial Accuracy of HIV Rapid Test Kits Stored in Suboptimal Conditions and Validity of Delayed Reading of Oral Fluid Tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine T Choko

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of storing commonly used rapid diagnostic tests above manufacturer-recommended temperature (at 37°C, and the accuracy of delayed reading of oral fluid kits with relevance to HIV self-testing programmes.A quality assurance study of OraQuick (OraSure, Determine HIV 1/2™ (Alere and Uni-Gold™ (Recombigen®.Consecutive adults (≥18y attending Ndirande Health Centre in urban Blantyre, Malawi in January to April 2012 underwent HIV testing with two of each of the three rapid diagnostic test kits stored for 28 days at either 18°C (optimally-stored or at 37°C (pre-incubated. Used OraQuick test kits were stored in a laboratory for delayed day 1 and subsequent monthly re-reading was undertaken for one year.Of 378 individuals who underwent parallel testing, 5 (1.3% were dropped from the final analysis due to discordant or missing reference standard results (optimally-stored Determine and Uni-Gold. Compared to the diagnostic reference standard, OraQuick had a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% CI: 93.6-99.6. There were 7 false negative results among all test kits stored at 37°C and three false negatives among optimally stored kits. Excellent agreement between pre-incubated tests and optimally-stored tests with Kappa values of 1.00 for Determine and Uni-Gold; and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95; 1.00 for OraQuick were observed. There was high visual stability on re-reading of OraQuick, with only 1/375 pre-incubated and 1/371 optimally-stored OraQuick kits changing from the initial result over 12 months.Erroneous results observed during HIV testing in low income settings are likely to be due to factors other than suboptimal storage conditions. Re-reading returned OraQuick kits may offer a convenient and accurate quality assurance approach, including in HIV self-testing programmes.

  18. Initial Accuracy of HIV Rapid Test Kits Stored in Suboptimal Conditions and Validity of Delayed Reading of Oral Fluid Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choko, Augustine T.; Taegtmeyer, Miriam; MacPherson, Peter; Cocker, Derek; Khundi, McEwen; Thindwa, Deus; Sambakunsi, Rodrick S.; Kumwenda, Moses K.; Chiumya, Kondwani; Malema, Owen; Makombe, Simon D.; Webb, Emily L.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of storing commonly used rapid diagnostic tests above manufacturer-recommended temperature (at 37°C), and the accuracy of delayed reading of oral fluid kits with relevance to HIV self-testing programmes. Design A quality assurance study of OraQuick (OraSure), Determine HIV 1/2™ (Alere) and Uni-Gold™ (Recombigen®). Methods Consecutive adults (≥18y) attending Ndirande Health Centre in urban Blantyre, Malawi in January to April 2012 underwent HIV testing with two of each of the three rapid diagnostic test kits stored for 28 days at either 18°C (optimally-stored) or at 37°C (pre-incubated). Used OraQuick test kits were stored in a laboratory for delayed day 1 and subsequent monthly re-reading was undertaken for one year. Results Of 378 individuals who underwent parallel testing, 5 (1.3%) were dropped from the final analysis due to discordant or missing reference standard results (optimally-stored Determine and Uni-Gold). Compared to the diagnostic reference standard, OraQuick had a sensitivity of 97.2% (95% CI: 93.6–99.6). There were 7 false negative results among all test kits stored at 37°C and three false negatives among optimally stored kits. Excellent agreement between pre-incubated tests and optimally-stored tests with Kappa values of 1.00 for Determine and Uni-Gold; and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95; 1.00) for OraQuick were observed. There was high visual stability on re-reading of OraQuick, with only 1/375 pre-incubated and 1/371 optimally-stored OraQuick kits changing from the initial result over 12 months. Conclusion Erroneous results observed during HIV testing in low income settings are likely to be due to factors other than suboptimal storage conditions. Re-reading returned OraQuick kits may offer a convenient and accurate quality assurance approach, including in HIV self-testing programmes. PMID:27336161

  19. The Industrial Application Requirement for Biotech Inventions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2016-01-01

    New Research CollectionEuropean Intellectual Property Law. Edited by Jan Rosén, Stockholm University and former ATRIP President. This one volume collection thoroughly covers and systematically displays the three main areas of Intellectual Property (IP) Law - Patents, Trademarks and Copyright - wi...

  20. Exploring Business Models for SMEs in the Biotech Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Holm-Bergqvist, Linus; Ödmark, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The interest in business models has lately increased, which could be traced back to the dot-com burst during the 2000s. There exists no general definition of business models. Howev-er, researchers all agree that business models are used to illustrate the design and architec-ture of the value creation process of companies. Today’s research of business models has mainly been focused on e-commerce. This thesis contributes to the research of business models by extending the research to focus on S...

  1. RNA triplexes: from structural principles to biological and biotech applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Gitali; Zhou, Yuan; Zhong, Zhensheng; Toh, Desiree-Faye Kaixin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The diverse biological functions of RNA are determined by the complex structures of RNA stabilized by both secondary and tertiary interactions. An RNA triplex is an important tertiary structure motif that is found in many pseudoknots and other structured RNAs. A triplex structure usually forms through tertiary interactions in the major or minor groove of a Watson-Crick base-paired stem. A major-groove RNA triplex structure is stable in isolation by forming consecutive major-groove base triples such as U·A-U and C(+) ·G-C. Minor-groove RNA triplexes, e.g., A-minor motif triplexes, are found in almost all large structured RNAs. As double-stranded RNA stem regions are often involved in biologically important tertiary triplex structure formation and protein binding, the ability to sequence specifically target any desired RNA duplexes by triplex formation would have great potential for biomedical applications. Programmable chemically modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been developed to form TFO·RNA2 and PNA·RNA2 triplexes, respectively, with enhanced binding affinity and sequence specificity at physiological conditions. Here, we (1) provide an overview of naturally occurring RNA triplexes, (2) summarize the experimental methods for studying triplexes, and (3) review the development of TFOs and triplex-forming PNAs for targeting an HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift-inducing RNA, a bacterial ribosomal A-site RNA, and a human microRNA hairpin precursor, and for inhibiting the RNA-protein interactions involving human RNA-dependent protein kinase and HIV-1 viral protein Rev. PMID:25146348

  2. North Carolina's Approach: Developing a Bio-Tech Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Norman

    2004-01-01

    States across the country are all chasing what are becoming known as "new-age" technologies. These are technologies such as biotechnology, nanotechnology, bio-informatics and others. These technologies offer the potential for long-term economic growth and well-paid jobs to employees working in these sectors. As these technologies mature,…

  3. Hunger Fighters See Biotech Hope for Poor Nations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julie; Ingwersen; 钱民徵

    2002-01-01

    基因,转基因,基因工程……与“基因”有关的这几个词,几乎成了上世纪末以来的热门词语。这似乎印证了“21世纪属于生物学世纪”这一著名预言。“genetically modified(GM)crops”也成了一个英语热门词汇。本文详细介绍了上世纪六、七十年代所谓绿色革命之父,诺贝尔奖获得者Norman Borlaug对(GM)crops这场新革命的观点。他的观点有两点值得我们关注: 1/为什么当今世界有人反对这场崭新意义的绿色革命?Borlaug的观点非常犀利: If we sit in Europe or North America and decide that because we don’t need that scientific approach for our food supply, therefore they can’t have it either, that is grossly (非常) unethical (不道德的). 2/凡是革命。那就必然会有风险:no agricultural advance is risk-free. Borlaug称,当年的绿色革命也同样遭受了人们的反对:Critics(批评家们)in the past accused the Green Revolution of popularizing (普及) chemical fertilizers, pesticides and irrigation that jeopardized (危害) the environment in developing countries.】

  4. Biotechnology regulation: limiting or contributing to biotech development?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne Grethe

    2001-01-01

    Modern biotechnology has been characterized by being surrounded by scientific and public debate and by interest conflicts. An early Danish debate and regulation has been criticized for inhibiting or retarding development and thus growth. Though much regulation and debate have been transferred to...

  5. Licensing biotech intellectual property in university-industry partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdoff, Vladimir; Fairbairn, Daryl

    2015-03-01

    Appropriate negotiation and drafting of license agreements are critical to successfully establishing and managing the expansive and complex relationships that are becoming more common between industry and universities. More often than not, the resulting licensing agreements become quite lengthy and complex, and the key principles become difficult to discern among all the details. This summary provides a short, nonexhaustive introduction to some of the essential components of these licenses with the intent of providing the non-licensing professional a better appreciation of some of the key commercial and legal terms from both an academic and company perspective, keeping in mind some of the considerations that particularly apply to biotechnology deals. PMID:25605752

  6. Evaluation and Audience Acceptance in Biotech News Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte; Vestergaard, Torben

    2009-01-01

    features by analysing the coverage of the biotechnology debate in one of the largest Danish newspapers, Politiken, during the first 9 months of 2004. The aim of this analysis is to uncover how seemingly objective and ‘neutral' accounts of events and state of affairs can be used by journalists to...... significantly influence the attitudes of the readership. In the analysis, it is shown that the feature Judgement (of people) is virtually absent, whereas Appreciation (of things) is quite frequent, reflecting the fact that the perceived risk factor associated with biotechnology was paramount in the said period...

  7. The Evolution of the French Public Policy to Promote Biotech Innovation : The Case of Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Branciard, Anne; Mangematin, Vincent

    2001-01-01

    Working Paper European Biotechnology companies and public policy-makers face to a number of crucial problems related to the development of Biotechnology in Europe : European industrial competitiveness, the relative under-exploitation of the European science base in Biotechnology, poor technology transfer mechanisms and difficulties in starting 'spin-off' firms. The aim of this paper on innovation in genomics and biomedical related biotechnologies is to study the relative impact of the diff...

  8. Blueprints for green biotech: development and application of standards for plant synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patron, Nicola J

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology aims to apply engineering principles to the design and modification of biological systems and to the construction of biological parts and devices. The ability to programme cells by providing new instructions written in DNA is a foundational technology of the field. Large-scale de novo DNA synthesis has accelerated synthetic biology by offering custom-made molecules at ever decreasing costs. However, for large fragments and for experiments in which libraries of DNA sequences are assembled in different combinations, assembly in the laboratory is still desirable. Biological assembly standards allow DNA parts, even those from multiple laboratories and experiments, to be assembled together using the same reagents and protocols. The adoption of such standards for plant synthetic biology has been cohesive for the plant science community, facilitating the application of genome editing technologies to plant systems and streamlining progress in large-scale, multi-laboratory bioengineering projects. PMID:27284031

  9. Who benefits from gm crops? Feeding the biotech giants, not the world's poor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Villar, J.; Freese, B.; Holder, H.; Chandrasekaran, K.; Rodriguez, L.

    2009-02-15

    The biotechnology industry has aggressively touted GM as a solution to hunger and the global food crisis. Their arguments have been accepted by many politicians. This Friends of the Earth International (FoEI) report looks behind the spin and exposes the reasons why GM crops cannot, and are unlikely to ever, contribute to poverty reduction, global food security or sustainable farming (authors' abstract)

  10. Research in Undergraduate Instruction: A Biotech Lab Project for Recombinant DNA Protein Expression in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockman, Mark; Ordman, Alfred B.; Campbell, A. Malcolm

    1996-06-01

    In the sophomore-level Molecular Biology and Biotechnology course at Beloit College, students learn basic methods in molecular biology in the context of pursuing a semester-long original research project. We are exploring how DNA sequence affects expression levels of proteins. A DNA fragment encoding all or part of the guanylate monokinase (gmk) sequence is cloned into pSP73 and expressed in E. coli. A monoclonal antibody is made to gmk. The expression level of gmk is determined by SDS gel elctrophoresis, a Western blot, and an ELISA assay. Over four years, an increase in enrollment in the course from 9 to 34 students, the 85% of majors pursuing advanced degrees, and course evaluations all support the conclusion that involving students in research during undergraduate courses encourages them to pursue careers in science.

  11. Vers une écologie « biotech » ?

    OpenAIRE

    Delord, Julien

    2010-01-01

    Si ces dernières années, l’idée de recréer des espèces disparues à partir de leur ADN fossile a enthousiasmé les amateurs de science-fiction, la réalisation de projets de cette nature est aujourd’hui considérée avec le plus grand sérieux par certains écologistes. Ainsi, pendant que l’on séquence de l’ADN de mammouth au Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle à Paris (Debruyne et al. 2003) ou de l’ADN d’ours des cavernes à Lyon (Orlando 2005), une équipe australienne lève plusieurs millions de do...

  12. Biotech cementitious materials : some aspects of an innovative approach for concrete with enhanced durability

    OpenAIRE

    Torgal, Fernando Pacheco; Labrincha, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    The deterioration of reinforced concrete structures is a very common problem due to the fact that this material has a high permeability which allows water and other aggressive media to enter, thus leading to corrosion problems. The use of sealers is a common way of contributing to concrete durability. However, the most common ones are based on organic polymers which have some degree of toxicity. The Regulation (EU) 305/2011 related to the Construction Products Regulation emphasize...

  13. 2012 in review - part II: overcoming the obstacles in the pharma/biotech industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasseda, X; Dulsat, C; Navarro, D; Cruces, E; Graul, A I; Jago, C; Tracy, M

    2013-02-01

    As highlighted in the first part of this review published last month, the year 2012 saw the approval of a remarkable number of new drugs, and among the new drugs reaching the market, a significant proportion were orphan drugs developed for treating less prevalent diseases. These drugs are certainly not expected to become blockbusters, but are of high interest because of their efficacy in a narrow spectrum of patients. This trend aligns with the general tendency of staying away from fit-for-all blockbusters into personalized medicine as one of the strategies for overcoming the patent cliff that resulted in a long list of drugs going off patent and being approved as generics also during last year. The emerging scenario resulting from new developments in the form of new drugs and biosimilars and newly available generic medications paralleled by strategic movements within the pharmaceutical industry to reinforce their position in the market, as reflected by merger and acquisition deals accompanied by significant efforts into prioritization resulting in spin-off and split transactions, is reviewed in this second part. This paper includes a significant amount of data in tables for quick review and to profile the new strategic movements in drug pipelines. Further information, including details on mechanisms of action, current status, itemized pharmacology, pharmacokinetic and clinical trial research findings and updated information can be found in the proprietary databases Thomson Reuters Integrity(SM) and Thomson Reuters Cortellis™. PMID:23462626

  14. Validation of cross-contamination control in biological safety cabinet for biotech/pharmaceutical manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shih-Cheng; Shiue, Angus; Tu, Jin-Xin; Liu, Han-Yang; Chiu, Rong-Ben

    2015-12-01

    For class II, type A2 biological safety cabinets (BSC), NSF/ANSI Standard 49 should be conformed in cabinet airflow velocity derivation, particle contamination, and aerodynamic flow properties. However, there exists a potential problem. It has been built that the cabinet air flow stabilize is influenced by the quantity of downflow of air and the height above the cabinet exhaust opening. Three air downflow quantities were compared as an operating apparatus was placed from 20 to 40 cm above the bench of the cabinet. The results show that the BSC air downflow velocity is a function of increased sampling height, displaying that containment is improvingly permitted over product protection as the sampling height decreases. This study investigated the concentration gradient of particles at various heights and downflow air quantity from the bench of the BSC. Experiment results indicate that performance near the bench was better than in the rest of the BSC. In terms of height, the best cleanliness was measured at a height of 10 cm over the bench; it reduced actually with add in height. The empirical curves accommodate, founded on the concentration gradient of particle created was elaborated for evaluating the particle concentration at different heights and downflow air quantity from the source of the bench of the BSC. The particle image velocimetry system applied for BSC airflow research to fix amount of airflow patterns and air distribution measurement and results of measurements show how obstructions can greatly influence the airflow and contaminant transportation in a BSC. PMID:26257118

  15. How to produce male-only progeny in pest insects for SIT: a biotech approach.

    OpenAIRE

    Petrella, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Insects represent the most abundant group of animals on earth, comprising about 800,000 described species, and approximately 10,000 of these species can be actually destructive for human activities. Pest control interventions, alternative to pesticides, are increasingly being implemented within the concept of Integrated Pest Management, involving the biological control to eradicate a pest from the area of interest. This concept has been recently extended also to those hemathoph...

  16. Who benefits from gm crops? Feeding the biotech giants, not the world's poor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biotechnology industry has aggressively touted GM as a solution to hunger and the global food crisis. Their arguments have been accepted by many politicians. This Friends of the Earth International (FoEI) report looks behind the spin and exposes the reasons why GM crops cannot, and are unlikely to ever, contribute to poverty reduction, global food security or sustainable farming (authors' abstract)

  17. Coaching' small biotech companies into success: the value-adding function of VC

    OpenAIRE

    Luukkonen, Terttu; Maunula, Mari

    2006-01-01

    The paper reports an empirical study on the non-financial value-added provided by Venture Capital investors to their investee firms. This study will use a four-class grouping of the various non-financial value-adding capabilities provided by VC firms, namely, scouting, monitoring, signalling and value-adding services. The study examines biotechnology industry in Finland. Finland has a dual system with independent (partially ever-green) VC companies and public or semi-public VC organisations. ...

  18. Scientific Advances with Aspergillus Species that Are Used for Food and Biotech Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesebeke, Rob Te; Record, Erik

    2008-01-01

    Yeast and filamentous fungi have been used for centuries in diverse biotechnological processes. Fungal fermentation technology is traditionally used in relation to food production, such as for bread, beer, cheese, sake and soy sauce. Last century, the industrial application of yeast and filamentous fungi expanded rapidly, with excellent examples such as purified enzymes and secondary metabolites (e.g. antibiotics), which are used in a wide range of food as well as non-food industries. Research on protein and/or metabolite secretion by fungal species has focused on identifying bottlenecks in (post-) transcriptional regulation of protein production, metabolic rerouting, morphology and the transit of proteins through the secretion pathway. In past years, genome sequencing of some fungi (e.g. Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus niger) has been completed. The available genome sequences have enabled identification of genes and functionally important regions of the genome. This has directed research to focus on a post-genomics era in which transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics methodologies will help to explore the scientific relevance and industrial application of fungal genome sequences. PMID:21558706

  19. Market entry and exit by biotech and device companies funded by venture capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton R; Housman, Michael G; Robinson, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Start-up companies in the biotechnology and medical device sectors are important sources of health care innovation. This paper describes the role of venture capital in supporting these companies and charts the growth in venture capital financial support. The paper then uses longitudinal data to describe market entry and exit by these companies. Similar factors are associated with entry and exit in the two sectors. Entries and exits in one sector also appear to influence entry in the other. These findings have important implications for developing innovative technologies and ensuring competitive markets in the life sciences. PMID:19049998

  20. Biotech Approaches to Overcome the Limitations of Using Transgenic Plants in Organic Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Lombardo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming prohibits the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs inasmuch as their genetic material has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally. In actual fact, there is a conventional identity between GMOs and transgenic organisms, so that genetic modification methods such as somatic hybridization and mutagenesis are equalized to conventional breeding. A loophole in this system is represented by more or less innovative genetic engineering approaches under regulatory discussion, such as cisgenesis, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, and antisense technologies, that are redefining the concept of GMOs and might circumvent the requirements of the GMO legislation and, indirectly, of organic farming.

  1. Auswirkungen von Medikamentengenehmigungen auf die Bewertung von Biotech- und Pharmaunternehmen: Eine Ereignisstudie. Eine empirische Untersuchung

    OpenAIRE

    Sturm, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Die Arbeit untersucht den Einfluss der Genehmigung von Medikamenten durch die amerikanische Zulassungsbehörde FDA (Food and Drug Administration) auf den Aktienkurs der Antrag stellenden Aktiengesellschaft. Dabei werden Genehmigungen von wichtigen pharmazeutischen und biopharmazeutischen Medikamenten aus den Jahren 1985-2004 herangezogen. Als Ergebnis kann festgehalten werden, dass die Aktienmärkte die neue Information in einer effizienten Art und Weise einarbeiten. Die Existenz eines Marktes ...

  2. Biotech Approaches to Overcome the Limitations of Using Transgenic Plants in Organic Farming

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Lombardo; Samanta Zelasco

    2016-01-01

    Organic farming prohibits the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) inasmuch as their genetic material has been altered in a way that does not occur naturally. In actual fact, there is a conventional identity between GMOs and transgenic organisms, so that genetic modification methods such as somatic hybridization and mutagenesis are equalized to conventional breeding. A loophole in this system is represented by more or less innovative genetic engineering approaches under regulatory dis...

  3. Biotech--Who Wins? Economic Benefits and Costs of Biotechnology Innovations in Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Moschini, GianCarlo

    2001-01-01

    The conceptual model necessary for an assessment of biotechnology's economic benefits and costs is outlined, emphasizing the need to account for the proprietary nature of biotechnology innovations. The model is illustrated with an application to Roundup Ready soybeans. The estimated value of this innovation is sizeable, with consumers and innovators claiming the largest shares of net benefits. Also, disparities in intellectual property rights protection across countries affect the distributio...

  4. R&D and knowledge dynamics in university-industry relationships in biotech and pharmaceuticals: An agent-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Triulzi, Giorgio; Scholz, Ramon; Pyka, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades, University-Industry Relationships have played an outstanding role in shaping innovation activities in Biotechnology and Pharmaceuticals. Despite the growing importance and the considerable scope of these relationships, there still is an intensive and open debate on their short and long term effects on the research system in life sciences. So far, the extensive literature on this topic has not been able to provide a widely accepted answer. This work introduces a new wa...

  5. Electrochemical sensor for multiplex screening of genetically modified DNA: identification of biotech crops by logic-based biomolecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ching; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2013-12-15

    Genetically modified (GM) technique, one of the modern biomolecular engineering technologies, has been deemed as profitable strategy to fight against global starvation. Yet rapid and reliable analytical method is deficient to evaluate the quality and potential risk of such resulting GM products. We herein present a biomolecular analytical system constructed with distinct biochemical activities to expedite the computational detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The computational mechanism provides an alternative to the complex procedures commonly involved in the screening of GMOs. Given that the bioanalytical system is capable of processing promoter, coding and species genes, affirmative interpretations succeed to identify specified GM event in terms of both electrochemical and optical fashions. The biomolecular computational assay exhibits detection capability of genetically modified DNA below sub-nanomolar level and is found interference-free by abundant coexistence of non-GM DNA. This bioanalytical system, furthermore, sophisticates in array fashion operating multiplex screening against variable GM events. Such a biomolecular computational assay and biosensor holds great promise for rapid, cost-effective, and high-fidelity screening of GMO. PMID:23893064

  6. Analytical criteria for performance characteristics of IgE binding methods for evaluating safety of biotech food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauser, Thomas; Ree, Ronald van; Poulsen, Lars K; Bannon, Gary A

    2008-10-01

    There is detailed guidance on how to perform bioinformatic analyses and enzymatic degradation studies for genetically modified crops under consideration for approval by regulatory agencies; however, there is no consensus in the scientific community on the details of how to perform IgE serum studies. IgE serum studies are an important safety component to acceptance of genetically modified crops when the introduced protein is novel, the introduced protein is similar to known allergens, or the crop is allergenic. In this manuscript, we describe the characteristics of the reagents, validation of assay performance, and data analysis necessary to optimize the information obtained from serum testing of novel proteins and genetically modified (GM) crops and to make results more accurate and comparable between different investigations. PMID:18727951

  7. The value of trust in biotech crop development: a case study of Bt cotton in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agricultural biotechnology public-private partnerships (PPPs have been recognized as having great potential in improving agricultural productivity and increasing food production in sub-Saharan Africa. However, there is much public skepticism about the use of GM (genetically modified crops and suspicion about private sector involvement in agbiotech projects. This case study sought to understand the role of trust in the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt cotton in Burkina Faso project by exploring practices and challenges associated with trust-building, and determining what makes these practices effective from the perspective of multiple stakeholders. Methods We conducted semi-structured, face-to-face interviews to obtain stakeholders’ understanding of trust in general as well as in the context of agbiotech PPPs. Relevant documents and articles were analyzed to generate descriptions of how trust was operationalized in this evolving agbiotech PPP. Data was analyzed based on emergent themes to create a comprehensive narrative on how trust is understood and built among the partners and with the community. Results We derived four key lessons from our findings. First, strong collaboration between research, industry and farmers greatly contributes to both the success of, and fostering of trust in, the partnership. Second, this case study also revealed the important, though often unrecognized, role of researchers as players in the communication strategy of the project. Third, effective and comprehensive communication takes into account issues such as illiteracy and diversity. Fourth, follow-up at the field level and the need for a multifaceted communications strategy is important for helping push the project forward. Conclusions Burkina Faso’s well-established and effective cotton selling system laid the foundation for the implementation of the Bt cotton project – particularly, the strong dialogue and the receptivity to collaboration. Interviewees reported that establishing and maintaining trust among partners, researchers and the community in Burkina Faso greatly contributed to the success of the PPP. By addressing challenges to building trust and engaging in trust-building practices early on, improvements in the effectiveness of agbiotech PPPs are likely.

  8. Competiveness and Innovation in High-tech Companies: an Application to the Italian Biotech and Aerospace Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Armando Calabrese; Domenico Campisi; Guendalina Capece; Roberta Costa; Francesca Di Pillo

    2013-01-01

    Innovation activities are a critical factor in national and regional development. The innovative behaviour of companies is one of the main sources of competitiveness, business survival, economic growth and employment in a territory. It is therefore important to identify and understand the factors that determine innovation behaviour among enterprises. In line with this, the aim of this study is to analyse the relations between innovation‐related variables and the impact that they have on compa...

  9. Teaching and implementing autonomous robotic lab walkthroughs in a biotech laboratory through model-based visual tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczyk, Martin; Panin, Giorgio; Röder, Thorsten; Lenz, Claus; Nair, Suraj; Heidemann, Rüdiger; Goudar, Chetan; Knoll, Alois

    2010-01-01

    After utilizing robots for more than 30 years for classic industrial automation applications, service robots form a constantly increasing market, although the big breakthrough is still awaited. Our approach to service robots was driven by the idea of supporting lab personnel in a biotechnology laboratory. After initial development in Germany, a mobile robot platform extended with an industrial manipulator and the necessary sensors for indoor localization and object manipulation, has been shipped to Bayer HealthCare in Berkeley, CA, USA, a global player in the sector of biopharmaceutical products, located in the San Francisco bay area. The determined goal of the mobile manipulator is to support the off-shift staff to carry out completely autonomous or guided, remote controlled lab walkthroughs, which we implement utilizing a recent development of our computer vision group: OpenTL - an integrated framework for model-based visual tracking.

  10. Build your own lab: Do-it-yourself biology and the rise of citizen biotech-economies

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Morgan

    2012-01-01

    Most articles on garage biology and do-it-yourself (DIY) biology highlight its somewhat immaterial cultures or ideologies. The issues usually raised include: the ways in which do-it-yourself biology potentially democratizes science and fosters a citizen science, that its practitioners are a "creative proof of the hacker principle", that the field is an illustration of the open source movement, that concerns about control, security and safety need to be addressed. However, rather than focusing...

  11. Collaborative pre-competitive preclinical drug discovery with academics and pharma/biotech partners at Sanford|Burnham: infrastructure, capabilities & operational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Thomas D Y

    2014-03-01

    There has been increased concern that the current "blockbuster" model of drug discovery and development practiced by "Big Pharma" are unsustainable in terms of cost (> $1 billion/approved drug) and time to market (10 - 15 years). The recent mergers and acquisitions (M&A), shuttering of internal research programs, closure of "redundant" sites of operations, senior management turnover and continued workforce reductions among the top 10 major pharmaceutical companies reflect draconian responses to reduce costs. However, the resultant exodus of intellectual capital, loss in motivation and momentum, and exit from early stage discovery programs by pharmaceutical companies has contributed to an "innovation deficit". Disease advocacy groups, investment communities and the government are calling for new innovative business models to address this deficit. In particular they are looking towards academia and clinical trials centers to catalyze new innovations in translational research. Indeed over the last decade many academic institutions have launched drug discovery centers largely comprising high-throughput screening (HTS) to accelerate "translational" research. A major impetus for this "open innovation" effort has been the National Institutes of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" and Molecular Libraries Initiative/Program (MLI/MLP), which is in its last year, and will be transitioned into the National Center for the Advancement of Translational Sciences (NCATS). With the end of Roadmap funding, general reduction in Federal government funding and its recent sequestration, academic drug discovery centers are being challenged to become selfsustaining, adding financial value, while remaining aligned with the missions of their respective academic non-profit institutions. We describe herein, a brief history of our bi-coastal Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics (Prebys Center) at the Sanford|Burnham Medical Research Institute (SBMRI), the key components of its infrastructure, core competencies of its fully integrated drug discovery expertise, best practices adopted in our day-to-day operations, and finally some of our current funding and collaboration and/or strategic alliance models for pre-competitive drug discovery with other academic/clinical partners, other governmental agencies, and with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. PMID:24409951

  12. Current barriers, challenges and opportunities for the development of effective STI vaccines: point of view of vaccine producers, biotech companies and funding agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodet, Betty

    2014-03-20

    Several barriers limit the development of vaccines against sexually transmitted diseases (STIs). Critical scientific information is missing that makes the feasibility and the likelihood of success of vaccines against genital herpes, chlamydia, gonorrhea and trichomonas uncertain: the immunity induced by natural infection is absent or imperfect which seriously limits the capacity to define the types of immune responses that an effective vaccine must induce. Reliable animal models are lacking and a number of crucial clinical questions are still unanswered about the goal of these vaccines and definition of endpoints for clinical trials. In the absence of a clear recognition of the need for vaccines against these diseases, there is no motivation for public or private research and industry to invest in the development of vaccines against STIs. The STI burden should be evaluated not only in terms of mortality and morbidity, but also in terms of economic and psycho-social impact. A global public-private consortium could mobilize the joint efforts of all stakeholders involved in the research, development and implementation of STI vaccines of the public and private sectors; ensure that sufficient resources are applied to R&D of vaccines against these STIs; and provide the pull-push forces that are necessary to overcome the barriers to develop safe and effective vaccines against these diseases. PMID:23994377

  13. Vývoj a optimalizace metodiky pro detekci GMO brambor

    OpenAIRE

    ČERMÁKOVÁ, Jitka

    2008-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) or transgenic crops, now more often called "Biotech crops" they are commercially cultivated since 1996. And also since 1996, the first year of commercialization of biotech crops, GM potatoes were cultivated in USA, Mexico, Canada and later in South Africa, China and India. The global area of approved biotech crops in 2006 was 102 million hectares and 22 countries grew biotech crops, 11 developing countries and 11 industrial countries. The Czech Republic is on of the ...

  14. Potential for false positive HIV test results with the serial rapid HIV testing algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baveewo Steven

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid HIV tests provide same-day results and are widely used in HIV testing programs in areas with limited personnel and laboratory infrastructure. The Uganda Ministry of Health currently recommends the serial rapid testing algorithm with Determine, STAT-PAK, and Uni-Gold for diagnosis of HIV infection. Using this algorithm, individuals who test positive on Determine, negative to STAT-PAK and positive to Uni-Gold are reported as HIV positive. We conducted further testing on this subgroup of samples using qualitative DNA PCR to assess the potential for false positive tests in this situation. Results Of the 3388 individuals who were tested, 984 were HIV positive on two consecutive tests, and 29 were considered positive by a tiebreaker (positive on Determine, negative on STAT-PAK, and positive on Uni-Gold. However, when the 29 samples were further tested using qualitative DNA PCR, 14 (48.2% were HIV negative. Conclusion Although this study was not primarily designed to assess the validity of rapid HIV tests and thus only a subset of the samples were retested, the findings show a potential for false positive HIV results in the subset of individuals who test positive when a tiebreaker test is used in serial testing. These findings highlight a need for confirmatory testing for this category of individuals.

  15. GMO Biosafety Management, Suggestions and Biotech Public Acceptance in China%我国转基因作物安全管理体系介绍、发展建议及生物技术舆论导向

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康乐; 陈明

    2013-01-01

    17年间,转基因作物在全球的种植面积逐渐扩大了100倍,截止2012年已经达到1.7亿公顷,产生了巨大的经济效益、社会效益和生态效益.我国转基因作物发展迅速,目前已有7种转基因植物获得生产应用安全证书,转基因棉花占全国棉花种植面积的80%.为保障转基因生物安全,我国已建立了完整的转基因生物安全管理体系,包括安全管理机构、政策、法规,转基因生物及其产品如环境安全评价、食品安全性评价及成份测定的技术标准.另一方面,我国转基因作物安全管理及安全评价体系仍然需要完善,本文针对现阶段存在的问题提出了改进及完善的建议.同时,本文分析了我国转基因作物舆情,列举了近来国内外所谓的转基因作物安全事件并揭示了事件的真实情况,提倡理性看待转基因作物的发展,为我国转基因研发与产业化营造积极的舆论氛围.%GM crops have been commercialized for 17 years all over the world,and brought great economic,social and ecological benefits to growers and the world.China has approved 7 GM crops for planting,among which Bt cotton accounts for 80% of cotton planting area.In this article,we reviewed development and application of GM crop internationally and domestically.The policy on GM crops in China including regulations,guidelines,food and environmental safety assessment are also briefly introduced.Some existing problems and suggestions on China's biosafety management and regulator process are also described in this review.Finally,the authors advocate rational understanding of GM crops to create a positive atmosphere for public acceptance,which will benefit research,development and commercialization of GM crops in China.

  16. (Asian) Life (in Asia) - Book reviews of Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner (Ed.): Frameworks of Choice, Amsterdam, Amsterdam Press 2010 and Aihwa Ong & Nancy Chen: Asian Biotech, Durham & London, Duke University Press 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo

    2011-01-01

    This article is concerned with the idea of societal 'spaciousness' and its relationship to individual and collective autonomy. These issues are analyzed in the context of the eviction of a self-managed social center of left-radical activists in Copenhagen and the protests and public debate that f...

  17. Create a translational medicine knowledge repository - Research downsizing, mergers and increased outsourcing have reduced the depth of in-house translational medicine expertise and institutional memory at many pharmaceutical and biotech companies: how will they avoid relearning old lessons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pharmaceutical industry consolidation and overall research downsizing threatens the ability of companies to benefit from their previous investments in translational research as key leaders with the most knowledge of the successful use of biomarkers and translational pharmacology models are laid off or accept their severance packages. Two recently published books may help to preserve this type of knowledge but much of this type of information is not in the public domain. Here we propose the creation of a translational medicine knowledge repository where companies can submit their translational research data and access similar data from other companies in a precompetitive environment. This searchable repository would become an invaluable resource for translational scientists and drug developers that could speed and reduce the cost of new drug development.

  18. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge(®))-Autopsy of an Innovative Paradigm Change in Cancer Treatment: Why a Single-Product Biotech Company Failed to Capitalize on its Breakthrough Invention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosławski, Szymon; Toumi, Mondher

    2015-10-01

    Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2010, sipuleucel-T (Provenge(®)) was the first 'personalized' cancer vaccine for the treatment of prostate cancer in a metastatic, non-symptomatic population of 30,000 men in the USA. Sipuleucel-T is prepared individually for each patient and infused in three sessions over a period of 1 month. However, in 2015, Dendreon, the owner of sipuleucel-T, filed for bankruptcy. This opinion paper reviews the probable reasons this innovative product failed to achieve commercial success. PubMed and internet searches were performed focused on pricing, reimbursement, and market access. We found that sipuleucel-T's FDA approval was delayed by 3 years, reportedly because of the vaccine's new mechanism of action. Sipuleucel-T was cleared by the European Medicines Agency 2 years later, but other national agencies were not approached. It was priced at $US93,000 for a course of treatment, and this high price combined with the company's late securement of reimbursement for the vaccine by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) resulted in another year's delay in accessing the market. Despite a positive recommendation by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, sipuleucel-T's complex administration, high price, and uncertainty about the reimbursement status deterred doctors from prescribing the product. Furthermore, the vaccine's supply was limited during the first year of launch due to limited manufacturing capacity. In addition, two oral metastatic prostate cancer drugs with similar survival benefits reached the US market 1 and 2 years after sipuleucel-T. Also, even though Dendreon's market capitalization topped $US7.5 billion following the FDA's approval of sipuleucel-T, this value degraded gradually until the firm's bankruptcy 5 years later. We conclude that the bankruptcy of Dendreon was largely due to the delay in securing FDA approval and CMS coverage, as well as the high cost that had to be incurred by providers up-front. Licensing sipuleucel-T to a pharmaceutical company more experienced in the market access pathway may have saved the company and the product. PMID:26403092

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF RICE BIOTECHNOLOGY ON OPTIMAL RICE CROP ROTATION IN THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER DELTA REGION

    OpenAIRE

    Annou, Mamane Malam; Thomsen, Michael R.; Hansen, James M.; Wailes, Eric J.; Cramer, Gail L.

    2001-01-01

    Availability of new herbicide-resistant biotech rice varieties may affect traditional rice rotation practices to control red rice and enhance yields. This research evaluates the adoption of biotech rice and its effects on the current practice of crop rotation in the Mississippi River Delta region. The optimal utilization of biotech rice rotation is analyzed using a nonlinear mathematical programming model with mixed integers. Optimal rotation was found to be sensitive to the technology fee, r...

  20. Learning Outcomes Associated with Classroom Implementation of a Biotechnology-Themed Video Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barko, Tim; Sadler, Troy D.

    2013-01-01

    The educational video game Mission Biotech provides a virtual experience for students in learning biotechnology materials and tools. This study explores the use of Mission Biotech and the associated curriculum by three high school teachers and their students. All three classes demonstrated gains on a curriculum-aligned test of science content.…

  1. The Role of Transgenic Crops in the Future of Global Food and Feed

    OpenAIRE

    O. Škubna; H. Řezbová

    2012-01-01

    The paper is aimed on the problematic of biotech crops planting (GM, transgenic crops). The main aim of this paper is to analyze the trends in the main biotech crops planting groups in the sense of their use for food and feed in the future. The selected groups of biotech crops analyzed in this article are soybeans, maize (corn), cotton and rapeseed (canola). The used methods are chain and basic indexes and regression analysis of times series/ trend data - for predicting on next four years (20...

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol as a feed additive for pigs, piglets, bovines, ovines, calves, equines, chickens for fattening, turkeys, other poultry, fish and other animal species or categories, based on a dossier submitted by Fermenta Biotech Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The principal physiological role of vitamin D in all vertebrates is in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. The classic clinical deficiency syndrome is rickets. The FEEDAP Panel notes that for turkeys for fattening, equines, bovines, ovines and pigs the maximum content for vitamin D3 in feed does not provide any margin of safety, and that, except for pigs, the maximum content is above the upper safe level, according to National Research Council data when animals were fed a supplemented diet for more than 60 days. No safety concern was identified for the use of vitamin D3 in chickens for fattening and fish. The FEEDAP Panel is not in a position to draw final conclusions on the safety of vitamin D for target animals but considers the current maximum contents temporarily acceptable pending a review of the recent scientific literature. Current nutritional surveys in 14 European countries showed that vitamin D intake is sufficiently below the upper safe limit. The FEEDAP Panel assumes that foodstuffs of animal origin were produced following current production practices, including vitamin D3 supplementation of feed and concludes that the use of vitamin D in animal nutrition at the currently authorised maximum dietary content has not and will not cause the tolerable upper intake level to be exceeded. Vitamin D3 should be considered as irritant to skin and eyes, and as a skin sensitiser. Inhaled vitamin D3 is highly toxic; exposure to dust is harmful. No risk to the environment resulting from the use of vitamin D3 in animal nutrition is expected. The vitamin D3 under application is regarded as an effective dietary source of the vitamin in animal nutrition.

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) as a feed additive for pigs, piglets, bovines, ovines, calves, equines, chickens for fattening, turkeys, other poultry, fish and other animal species or categories, based on a dossier submitted by Fermenta Biotech Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    The principal physiological role of vitamin D in all vertebrates is in calcium and phosphorus homeostasis. The classic clinical deficiency syndrome is rickets. The FEEDAP Panel notes that for turkeys for fattening, equines, bovines, ovines and pigs the maximum content for vitamin D3 in feed does not provide any margin of safety, and that, except for pigs, the maximum content is above the upper safe level, according to National Research Council data when animals were fed a supplemented diet fo...

  4. Increased chromosomal breakage in Tourette syndrome predicts the possibility of variable multiple gene involvement in spectrum phenotypes: Preliminary findings and hypothesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gericke, G.S.; Simonic, I.; Cloete, E.; Buckle, C. [Univ. of Pretoria (South Africa)] [and others

    1995-10-09

    Increased chromosomal breakage was found in 12 patients with DSM-IV Tourette syndrome (TS) as compared with 10 non-TS control individuals with respect to untreated, modified RPM1-, and BrdU treated lymphocyte cultures (P < 0.001 in each category). A hypothesis is proposed that a major TS gene is probably connected to genetic instability, and associated chromosomal marker sites may be indicative of the localization of secondary genes whose altered expression could be responsible for associated comorbid conditions. This concept implies that genes influencing higher brain functions may be situated at or near highly recombigenic areas allowing enhanced amplification, duplication and recombination following chromosomal strand breakage. Further studies on a larger sample size are required to confirm the findings relating to chromosomal breakage and to analyze the possible implications for a paradigmatic shift in linkage strategy for complex disorders by focusing on areas at or near unstable chromosomal marker sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  5. 生物产业与生物经济

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏广

    2004-01-01

    At the turn of 21 th century, breakthroughs have been made continuously in the biology technology. That gives a great help to the quick emergence of biotech industry. Some tendencies can be seen in the industry: 1) Biotech has become the research focus in many countries. 2)Biotech industry has been the emphasis of international high-tech and economic competition.3) Biology economy is becoming a new economic growth point after Internet.4)Biology security has become the key of the state security. The emergence of biotech industry will accelerate the formation of the 4th economy upsurge and will have great effect on the world economy and the development of human society.

  6. Estonian science breeds world-class researches / ToivoTänavsuu, Hille Tänavsuu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tänavsuu, Toivo

    2010-01-01

    Eesti teadusfirmadest: biotehnoloogia ettevõtted Celecure AS, Protobios OÜ, Icosagen AS, Asper Biotech AS ja Solis BioDyne OÜ, geenitehnoloogia firma Genorama OÜ, keemiatehnoloogia ettevõte AS Cambrex Tallinn

  7. Eesti teadlaste HIV-vaktsiini süstitakse katseks aafriklastele / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2006-01-01

    Vt. ka Postimees : na russkom jazõke 5. apr., lk. 2. Tartu teadlaste leiutatud ning Soome biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech arendatavat vaktsiini katsetatakse Lõuna-Aafrika Vabariigis 60 surmaviirusega nakatunud inimese peal. Lisa: Eestlaste HIV-vaktsiini senine lugu

  8. A GOLDEN HANDSHAKE FOR CH NA'S B OFUEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Friendly policies for overseas investors to invest in China's biofuel sector have influenced partnerships between domestic and foreign companies to develop the alternative to fossil fuel. For example, Green Biologics (GBL), a British biotech company, has

  9. Experiment list: SRX029315 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available | cell type=CD34+CD133+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) || antibody=anti-GABP-alpha || antibody manufacturer=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/e

  10. Small company mergers--good for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybeck, Vanessa; Bains, William

    2006-11-01

    An analysis of 105 mergers among small UK biotech companies over a 10-year period shows that the improvement of shareholder positions, rather than product pipelines or business opportunities, is the main motivation for such transactions. PMID:17093475

  11. Keeping enzymes kosher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Biotech companies increasingly seek certification for compliance with religious and dietary requirements in order to address new consumer markets. Technology plays a crucial role in such inspections alongside centuries old traditions and practices...

  12. Life Science Forum showcases regional research, new companies

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Annual Southwest Virginia Life Science Forum on Monday, Oct. 4, will showcase New River Valley biotech companies' research and job opportunities, and be a resource for the ACC Interdisciplinary Forum for Discovery in Life Sciences.

  13. Development of carotenoid-enriched vegetables with increased nutritional quality and visual appearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoids are a class of red, orange and yellow pigments widely distributed in nature. Biotech approach has been proved to be effective in successfully engineering of carotenoid content in food crops with better health and visual appearance....

  14. Eestis levinud HIVi erilisus jätab nakatunud vaktsiinilootuseta / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Soome biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech on loobumas kavast katsetada Eesti teadlaste leiutatud vaktsiini ka siinsete HIV-positiivsete katserühmal, sest Eestis on levinud maailmas üliharuldane HI-viiruse G-alatüüp

  15. Beyond The Needle: Biotech’s Delivery Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    FELCONE, LINDA HULL

    2004-01-01

    Some biotech companies are devoting sizeable resources to finding more mainstream forms of drug delivery, including oral, transdermal, inhaled, and ocular administration. P&T committees, watch closely: Easier dosing could bring broader acceptance.

  16. New challenges and opportunities for industrial biotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Guo-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Industrial biotechnology has not developed as fast as expected due to some challenges including the emergences of alternative energy sources, especially shale gas, natural gas hydrate (or gas hydrate) and sand oil et al. The weaknesses of microbial or enzymatic processes compared with the chemical processing also make industrial biotech products less competitive with the chemical ones. However, many opportunities are still there if industrial biotech processes can be as similar as th...

  17. Norway – a global maritime knowledge hub

    OpenAIRE

    Reve, Torger

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge based industrial development takes place in Global Knowledge Hubs or superclusters characterized by a high concentration of innovative industrial actors interacting closely with advanced research institutions, venture capital and competent ownership. The extreme example of a global knowledge hub is the biotech and life science industry in Boston. The greater Boston area has a higher concentration of advanced universities, research labs and specialized biotech firms, than anywhere el...

  18. Channeling, Identity Preservation and the Value Chain: Lessons from the Recent Problems with Starlink Corn

    OpenAIRE

    Ginder, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Biotech grains hold great promise for both producers and consumers but a thorough understanding of the value chain will be vitally important in realizing that potential. Biotech grains with input traits not approved for all uses can pose a serious problem for the grain handling and processing industry as they move through the value chain. This problem occurs because there is no premium to cover added costs of segregation and handling input trait grains after harvest. In the case of Starlink t...

  19. Tissue Microarray A New Tool for Cancer Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Shanghai Outdo Biotech Co.Ltd. (Outdo Biotech) is a leading company in human/animal Tissue Microarrays (TMA) and "Clinical-Type" Gene Chip (CTGC) in China. Our shareholders are Shanghai Biochip Co., Ltd. & National Engineering Center for Biochip at Shanghai, Shanghai Cancer institute and Eastern Liver and Bladder Hospital of Second Military Medical University. TMA is a mean of combining tens to hundreds of specimens of tissue, paraffin embedded or frozen, onto a single slide for analysis at once. Our constr...

  20. The Role of Transgenic Crops in the Future of Global Food and Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Škubna

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed on the problematic of biotech crops planting (GM, transgenic crops. The main aim of this paper is to analyze the trends in the main biotech crops planting groups in the sense of their use for food and feed in the future. The selected groups of biotech crops analyzed in this article are soybeans, maize (corn, cotton and rapeseed (canola. The used methods are chain and basic indexes and regression analysis of times series/ trend data - for predicting on next four years (2012-2015. The trends are able to determine the necessity of implementation the biotech crops planting into the agricultural systems everywhere (also in EU and it is without the questions if the impact are mainly positive or negative. The dependence of world agricultural commodity market on the biotech crops is undeniable and the prediction acknowledges that the importance is increasing. Pieces of knowledge introduced in this paper resulted from solution of an institutional research intention MSM 6046070906 „Economics of resources of Czech agriculture and their efficient use in frame of multifunctional agri-food systems“.

  1. Patent holdings of US biotherapeutic companies in major markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Teena E; Yerram, Chandra Bindu; Saberwal, Gayatri

    2009-05-01

    In previous studies we examined the (United States, US) patent holdings of 109 largely North American biotech companies developing therapeutics that, in particular, have an interest in discovery stage science. There appears little correlation between the number of patents and the number of products of individual companies. Here we quantified and compared the 103 US-headquartered companies' patent holdings in Australia, Canada, Europe, Japan and the US. The companies demonstrate variable and surprising patterns of patent holdings across these countries or regions. For most companies, patent holdings are not in proportion to the importance of the country as a biotech or pharma market. These results have implications for the patenting strategies of small biotech companies involved in drug discovery. PMID:19429502

  2. Research Strategies in Science-based Start-ups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Finn; Dahlgren, Johan Henrich; Lund Jensen, Rasmus

    Although biotech start-ups fail or succeed based on their research few attempts have been made to examine if and how they strategize in this core of their activity. Popular views on Dedicated Biotech Firms (DBFs) see the inherent uncertainty of research as defying notions of strategizing, directing...... instead the attention to the quality of their science, or the roles of boards, management, and collaborative networks etc. Using a unique comprehensive dataset on Danish and Swedish biotech start-ups in drug discovery this paper analyzes their research strategies. Adopting a Simonean point of departure we...... Shonhoovens classical argument that "strategy matters" is valid not only for the larger high-tech firms covered by her study, but also for small research-based start-ups operating at the very well springs of knowledge where science directly interacts with technologies. Even though a lot more research is...

  3. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are symbionts. In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place as...... the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of circumventing the science-industry food chain and sequestering biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time...

  4. Beyond the Boundary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorm Hansen, Birgitte

    2011-01-01

    . Drawing on interviews with the head of a research center in plant biology, this article argues that biology and biotech are "symbionts". In order to be viable and productive, symbiosis needs to be carefully managed and given room for divergence within mutual dependence. This process does not take place as...... the negotiation of a preexisting science-industry boundary. Rather, viability is obtained through a strategy of "circumventing" the science-industry food chain and "sequestering" biotech components within the research center. Symbiosis allows academic scientists to do biology while at the same time...

  5. Bioprocessing of wheat straw into nutritionally rich and digested cattle feed

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kalra, Anup; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-01-01

    Wheat straw was fermented by Crinipellis sp. RCK-1, a lignin degrading fungus, under solid state fermentation conditions. The fungus degraded 18.38% lignin at the expense of 10.37% cellulose within 9 days. However, when wheat straw fermented for different duration was evaluated in vitro, the 5 day fungal fermented wheat straw called here “Biotech Feed” was found to possess 36.74% organic matter digestibility (OMD) and 5.38 (MJ/Kg Dry matter) metabolizable energy (ME). The Biotech Feed was als...

  6. Science communication in policy making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coumou, Hilde; van der Werf Kulichova, Z.; Wehrmann, C.;

    2014-01-01

    Policy making regarding application of agricultural biotechnology has been controversial. This study investigates what determines the motivation of European biotech scientists to actively participate in policy making. To do this, a conceptual framework was developed based on the Theory of Planned...... Behavior. The framework was operationalized in semi-structured interviews with 17 European biotech scientists to collect data about their motivation to involve in GMO policy making. The results of this qualitative study suggest that the attitude of the scientists towards active participation in policy...

  7. The Controversies over Bioenergy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard; Andersen, Bente Hessellund

    2012-01-01

    convert coal fired power plants to biomass in order to sustain the role of these power plants. Their increasing use of imported wood pellets is criticized for increasing greenhouse gas emissions because of fast logging of years of forest growth. A Danish biotech company is developing enzymes for...

  8. DTREEv2, a computer-based support system for the risk assessment of genetically modified plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertry, I.; Nothegger, C.; Sweet, J.; Kuiper, H.A.; Davies, H.; Iserentant, D.; Hull, R.; Mezzetti, B.; Messens, K.; Loose, De M.; Oliveira, de D.; Burssens, S.; Gheysen, G.; Tzotzos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) remains a contentious area and a major factor influencing the adoption of agricultural biotech. Methodologically, in many countries, risk assessment is conducted by expert committees with little or no recourse to databases and expert systems t

  9. The Provincial Capital's Future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING WENLEI

    2010-01-01

    @@ A new city is in the making on the eastern outskirts of Guangzhou.In lieu of the average citizen,the city will be home to thousands of biotech engineers or new energy researchers.It will be a green city.It will be a hi-tech city.It will be a city of the future.

  10. Experiment list: SRX142525 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Cruz Biotech || antibody vendorid=sc-197 || control=Control_50bp || control description=This data represents a control being compare...on=Immortal cells || control=Control_50bp || control description=This data represents a control being compare

  11. Biotechnology Education in India: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kirti; Mehra, Kavita; Govil, Suman; Singh, Nitu

    2013-01-01

    Among the developing countries, India is one of those that recognises the importance of biotechnology. The trajectory of different policies being formulated over time is proof that the government is progressing towards achieving self-sufficiency. However, to cater to the ever-growing biotech industry, skilled manpower is required. This article…

  12. Networked Success and Failure at Hybritech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mark Peter

    2011-01-01

    The author presents an historical account of scientific work conducted at a commercial biotech firm in San Diego called Hybritech. It tells of disruptions in research programs following the acquisition of the company by the pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly in 1986. The story centers on responses to an organizational challenge that research managers…

  13. Global scenario on crop biotechnology: Communication setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various indications that research and development efforts are escalating in developing countries indicate the slight shift of such countries from just being end markets to being developers. The aggregate adoption of biotech crops in developing countries is clearly approaching that in developed count...

  14. Ryntäys Viroon jatkuu / Eeva-Riitta Seies

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Seies, Eeva-Riitta

    2002-01-01

    Soome kontsern Vapo ostis ASi Tootsi Turvas enamusaktsiad. Soome ettevõte Fit Biotech ostis Tartu biotehnoloogiaettevõtte Quattromed ja Soome toiduainetetööstuse ettevõte Saarioinen Oy Eesti tütarfirma omandas üle 66-protsendilise osaluse valmistoidufirmas Meleco AS

  15. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Lassen, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate animal cloning as a single issue.

  16. Innnovation and new business models for the regional development: travel and transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Tafur Segura, José Javier

    2011-01-01

    Regional development could present different strategies: •Relocation of industry clusters •Foreign Direct Investment attraction •Innovation based on new business models The Regional Government of Madrid (3rd largest GDP in the EU) selected strategic industries to compete & innovate: •Travel & Transportation •Aerospace •Nanotech. & •Biotech. •ICTs. •Energy

  17. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate...... animal cloning as a single issue....

  18. Experiment list: SRX821798 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available riment type=PPARG ChIP-seq || strain=N/A || tissue=NA || chip antibody=anti-PPAR? antibody || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech...nologies http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/

  19. New insights on the relationships between geographic and institutional distance in research collaborations: a long period analysis

    OpenAIRE

    D'Amore, Rosamaria; Iorio, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between institutional and geographic distance in scientific collaborations, evaluating the possible changes when a long period (sixteen years) is taken into consideration and discussing the use of some alternative measures of institutional distance. The main result, obtained by analysing the publications of the Italian biotech firms, is that international publications present an higher institutional distance than national papers, particularl...

  20. The integrated web service and genome database for agricultural plants with biotechnology information

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, ChangKug; Park, DongSuk; Seol, YoungJoo; Hahn, JangHo

    2011-01-01

    The National Agricultural Biotechnology Information Center (NABIC) constructed an agricultural biology-based infrastructure and developed a Web based relational database for agricultural plants with biotechnology information. The NABIC has concentrated on functional genomics of major agricultural plants, building an integrated biotechnology database for agro-biotech information that focuses on genomics of major agricultural resources. This genome database provides annotated genome information...

  1. Reporter-based screening and selection of enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, van T.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    The biotech industry is continuously seeking for new or improved biocatalysts. The success of these efforts is often hampered by the lack of an efficient screening assay. Thus, to be able to extend the number of enzymes available for industrial applications, high-throughput screening and selection m

  2. Molecular characteristics and efficacy of 16D10 siRNAs in inhibiting root-knot nematode infection in transgenic grape hairy roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) infect many annual and perennial crops and are the most devastating soil-born pests in vineyards. To develop a biotech-based solution for controlling RKNs in grapes, we evaluated the efficacy of plant-derived RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of a conserved RKN effector ge...

  3. The waves of Biotechnological Innovation in Medicine: Interfirm Cooperation Effects and a Venture Capital Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Fernald, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Improving medicine and health is the ultimate purpose of biotechnological innovation, where basic science is used to develop new innovative diagnostics and therapeutics to significantly improve the lives of patients worldwide. Concurrently, for three stakeholder groups, the primary goal is to generate profitable business from biotechnological innovation. These stakeholders are ‘entrepreneurial’ biotech companies, venture capitalists and established pharmaceutical firm...

  4. Social Capital, ICT Use and Company Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scupola, Ada; Steinfield, Charles; Lopez-Nicolas, Carolina

    2010-01-01

    This study explores how some uses of ICTs, as well as having social capital and other means of access to knowledge resources, are related to company performance in a knowledge-intensive business cluster. Data were collected through a survey of companies in the Medicon Valley biotech region locate...

  5. Bioprocessing of wheat straw into nutritionally rich and digested cattle feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Kavish Kumar; Kalra, Anup; Kuhad, Ramesh Chander

    2014-01-01

    Wheat straw was fermented by Crinipellis sp. RCK-1, a lignin degrading fungus, under solid state fermentation conditions. The fungus degraded 18.38% lignin at the expense of 10.37% cellulose within 9 days. However, when wheat straw fermented for different duration was evaluated in vitro, the 5 day fungal fermented wheat straw called here "Biotech Feed" was found to possess 36.74% organic matter digestibility (OMD) and 5.38 (MJ/Kg Dry matter) metabolizable energy (ME). The Biotech Feed was also observed to be significantly enriched with essential amino acids and fungal protein by fungal fermentation, eventually increasing its nutritional value. The Biotech Feed upon in vitro analysis showed potential to replace 50% grain from concentrate mixture. Further, the calves fed on Biotech Feed based diets exhibited significantly higher (p<0.05) dry matter intake (DMI: 3.74 Kg/d), dry matter digestibility (DMD: 57.82%), total digestible nutrients (TDN: 54.76%) and comparatively gained 50 g more daily body weight. PMID:25269679

  6. Kernel compositions of glyphosate-tolerant and corn rootworm-protected MON 88017 sweet corn and insect-protected MON 89034 sweet corn are equivalent to that of conventional sweet corn (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Kassie L; Festa, Adam R; Goddard, Scott D; Harrigan, George G; Taylor, Mary L

    2015-03-25

    Monsanto Co. has developed two sweet corn hybrids, MON 88017 and MON 89034, that contain biotechnology-derived (biotech) traits designed to enhance sustainability and improve agronomic practices. MON 88017 confers benefits of glyphosate tolerance and protection against corn rootworm. MON 89034 provides protection against European corn borer and other lepidopteran insect pests. The purpose of this assessment was to compare the kernel compositions of MON 88017 and MON 89034 sweet corn with that of a conventional control that has a genetic background similar to the biotech sweet corn but does not express the biotechnology-derived traits. The sweet corn samples were grown at five replicated sites in the United States during the 2010 growing season and the conventional hybrid and 17 reference hybrids were grown concurrently to provide an estimate of natural variability for all assessed components. The compositional analysis included proximates, fibers, amino acids, sugars, vitamins, minerals, and selected metabolites. Results highlighted that MON 88017 and MON 89034 sweet corns were compositionally equivalent to the conventional control and that levels of the components essential to the desired properties of sweet corn, such as sugars and vitamins, were more affected by growing environment than the biotech traits. In summary, the benefits of biotech traits can be incorporated into sweet corn with no adverse effects on nutritional quality. PMID:25764285

  7. CCACB - Culture Collection of Actinomycetes of the Institute of Soil Biology České Budějovice, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krištůfek, Václav; Chroňáková, Alica; Petrásek, Jiří; Chrudimský, Tomáš; Elhottová, Dana

    Praha: Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 2014. s. 157-158. ISBN 978-80-7080-887-0. [BioTech 2014 & 6 th Czech-Swiss Symposium with Exhibition. 11.06.2014-14.06.2014, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : CCACB * soil actinomycetes * depository Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  8. TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    This edition of "TECHcitement" contains the following articles: (1) ATE Program Leads to Student Success; (2) Doing Whatever It Takes for Aquaculture; (3) The Bridge to Biotech; (4) Girls See What They Can Do With Technology at Camp; (5) Students Advancing Solutions to Business Problems; (6) CREATE Recreates Technical Education in California; (7)…

  9. Genome sequence and annotation of Streptomyces sp. W6 - putative natural producer of annimycin antibiotic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrudimský, Tomáš; Chroňáková, Alica; Petříčková, Kateřina; Petříček, Miroslav; Krištůfek, Václav

    Praha : Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 2014. s. 102-103. ISBN 978-80-7080-887-0. [BioTech 2014 & 6 th Czech-Swiss Symposium with Exhibition. 11.06.2014-14.06.2014, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : genome sequence * annotation * Streptomyces sp. W6 * annimycin antibiotic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  10. 75 FR 71078 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Partial Rescission of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-22

    ... Request Administrative Review, 75 FR 23236-37 (May 3, 2010). On June 1, 2010, in accordance with 19 CFR... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews and Requests for Revocation in Part, 75 FR 37759 (June 30, 2010). On... Group Co., Ltd. Shanghai Henglijie Bio-Tech Co., Ltd. Shanghai Fenhe Biochemical Co., Ltd. Shanxi...

  11. Akadeemikust ettevõtja võitleb viirustega / Kaire Talviste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Talviste, Kaire, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Molekulaarbioloog Mart Ustavi tööst bioloogiliste ravimite väljatöötamisel. HIV1/AIDS vaktsiini väljatöötamisest FIT Biotech Oy Eesti filiaalis a-tel 2000-2011. M. Ustavi biotehnoloogia firma Icosagen Grupp tehnoloogilistest arendustest

  12. Eesti HIVi alatüüp jõuab registrisse / Villu Päärt

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Päärt, Villu, 1972-

    2005-01-01

    Ülemaailmses HIV- andmebaasis on registreerimisel HI-viiruse alatüüp, mida on seni avastatud ainult Eestis. Mosaiik-HIV on segu peamiselt Aafrikas esinevast viiruse vormist ning Ukrainas levinud tüübist, selgub biotehnoloogiafirma FIT Biotech uuringust. Kommenteerib Tartu Ülikooli tehnoloogiainstituudi direktor Mart Ustav

  13. Making the Case to Managed Care: The Science of Marketing Biologics

    OpenAIRE

    APPLEBY, CHUCK

    2004-01-01

    Making a case when biotechs market their products to their most cost-conscious customers — managed care organizations — is far different than what a traditional pharmaceutical company might do with HMO partners. It’s all about the science. Not the cost.

  14. Preliminary format design guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; Calaon, Matteo; Nørregaard, J.;

    2013-01-01

    The strategic research centre PolyNano aims at becoming the Danish competence centre for production-ready fabrication of polymer, nano-scale lab-on-a-chip (LoC) devices. In order to provide a competitive edge for Danish biotech companies launching LoC products by removal of the technology barrier...

  15. Experiment list: SRX262791 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/ea...IH3T3_MRTFB_LAT || cell line=NIH3T3 fibroblasts || genotype=normal || chip antibody=MRTF-B || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech

  16. The Rhetorical Helix of the Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Industries: Strategies of Transformation through Definition, Description and Ingratiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretton, Linda Burak

    2009-01-01

    The current pharmaceutical industry, whose origins date from the early 20th century, and the biotechnology industry, which emerged in the 1980s both have foundations built on the modern scientific method and share a mission to develop new drugs for humans and animals. At the same time, they are also made distinct by size (small biotechs versus…

  17. Experiment list: SRX262787 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available IH3T3_MRTFA_LAT || cell line=NIH3T3 fibroblasts || genotype=normal || chip antibody=MRTF-A || chip antibody vendor=Santa Cruz Biotech...nology http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/ea

  18. Pharmaceutical Economics

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Pharmaceutical Economics begins with an investigation of the structure of the industry and its three main components: the research firms which produce innovative products; the generic drug industry and its expanding role; and the biotech industry, which is regarded as the future for pharmaceuticals. Further sections discuss topics including demand and incentives, pricing and regulation.

  19. Informational Environments: Organizational Contexts of Online Information Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Roberta; King, John Leslie; Kling, Rob

    2003-01-01

    Examines sustained use and non-use of online services within organizations using an open-systems view that overcomes limitations of traditional approaches that led to over-estimates of use. Focuses on the informational environments of firms in three industries: law, real estate, and biotech/pharmaceuticals; and discusses insights from an intranets…

  20. Do-it-yourself biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golinelli, Stefano; Ruivenkamp, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Do-it-yourself biology, or garage biology, is a set of practices through which lay people can practice biotechnology and thus also challenge the exclusive control exercised on biotech R&D by Big Bio. This article describes how garage biologists aim to radically transform biotechnological soci

  1. Eesti firma hakkab koostöös soomlastega välja töötama Ebola viiruse ravimit / Joosep Värk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Värk, Joosep

    2014-01-01

    Eesti biotehnoloogiafirma Icosagen hakkab koos Soome ettevõtte FIT Biotech Oy'ga välja töötama Ebola viiruse vastast vaktsiini, arendustöös osaleb professor Andres Meritsa juhtimisel ka Tartu Ülikooli Tehnoloogiainstituudi rakendusviroloogia labor. Vestlusest Tartu Ülikooli biomeditsiinitehnoloogia professori Mart Ustaviga

  2. Tartu teadlased aitavad välja mõelda Ebola-vastast vaktsiini / Aime Jõgi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Jõgi, Aime, 1958-

    2014-01-01

    Eesti biotehnoloogiafirma Icosagen hakkab koos Soome ettevõtte FIT Biotech Oy'ga välja töötama Ebola viiruse vastast vaktsiini, arendustöös osaleb ka Tartu Ülikooli Tehnoloogiainstituudi rakendusviroloogia labor

  3. Technology and international strategies in born global firms: evidence from The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kundu, Sumit; Roelfsema, Hein; Delft, Anne van

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the internationalization strategies of biotech firms in the Netherlands. We find that many of these firms are born internationals in the sense that from their inception they are actively engaged in international cooperation. However, we find that the nature of potential intellect

  4. How to get exogenous DNA to cross the cell membrane of plants. Comment on “Physical methods for genetic transformation in plants” by Rivera et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Hernández, Andrés; Campos Guillén, Juan

    2012-09-01

    Physical methods for genetic transformation in plants. The most commonly applied methods in plant transformation include Agrobacterium infection and protoplast or microprojectile bombardment. A plant transformation system is a prerequisite for the development of a plant improvement program. The global area utilized for biotech crops increases every year.

  5. Uninformed and disinformed society and the GMO market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twardowski, Tomasz; Małyska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    The EU has a complicated regulatory framework, and this is slowing down the approval process of new genetically modified (GM) crops. Currently, labeling of GM organisms (GMOs) is mandatory in all Member States. However, the USA, in which GMO labeling is not mandatory, continues to lead the production of biotech crops, biopharmaceuticals, biomaterials, and bioenergy. PMID:25528967

  6. Identification and characterisation of probiotic lactic acid bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Španová, A.; Rittich, B.; Horák, Daniel; Dráb, V.; Drbohlav, J.

    Hydebarad : Osmania University, 2008. s. 17. [International Congress on Bioprocesses in Food Industries /3./ & Convention of the Biotech Research Society India /5./. 06.11.2008-08.11.2008, Hyderabad] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : probiotic lactic acid bacteria Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  7. Final Report: Northern Virginia Community College Training for Biotechnology Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Johanna V

    2010-05-31

    The intent of this project was to expand Northern Virginia Community College's capability to offer training to support the Biotechnology Industry in the northern Virginia region. The general goal of this project was to create a College Biotechnology Program; specific goals of the project were to a) design curricula/courses to prepare students to become entry-level lab technicians, b) redesign and equip lab space to better suit the needs of the program, c) develop partnerships with the local industry through outreach and the formation on an advisory board, d) recruit students into the program, and e) provide instructional support for local high school teachers. At the end of the grant period, NOVA has successfully created two new curricula in biotechnology: an Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Biotechnology (initiated in Fall 2008) and a Career Studies Certificate for Biotechnology Lab Technicians (to be initiated in Fall 2010). These curricula were designed with advice from an external advisory committee which is comprised of representatives from industry, transfer institutions and high school administrators. To date, almost all courses have been designed and piloted; the equipment needed for the courses and the initial supplies were paid for by the grant as was the re-modeling of some lab space to be used for the biotech courses. In order to market the program, the NOVA Biotech Program has also established relationships with the local high schools. Presentations were given at several local high schools and on-site workshops were held for high school students and teachers. As a result, close to 1000 students have attended program open houses, presentations within the high schools, or workshops held in the summer. Over 100 teachers have received information and/or training in biotechnology. These outreach efforts as well as high quality curricula have started to attract a number of students to the program – for example, there are currently 70 students

  8. Satraplatin: BMS 182751, BMY 45594, JM 216.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Satraplatin [BMS 182751, BMY 45594, JM 216] belongs to a series of orally-active platinum compounds with anticancer activity. It was jointly originated by Bristol-Myers Squibb, Johnson Matthey and the Institute of Cancer Research in the UK; however, Johnson Matthey has since ceased involvement with drug development. Subsequently, the agent has been licensed to and is under development with GPC Biotech, Pharmion and Spectrum Pharmaceuticals. Clinical trials are underway to evaluate satraplatin among patients with different tumour types, including prostate, breast, cervical and lung cancers. The compound is under regulatory review with the US FDA for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer. NeoTherapeutics (now Spectrum Pharmaceuticals) granted GPC Biotech an exclusive worldwide licence to develop and market satraplatin in October 2002. Under the terms of the agreement, GPC Biotech is fully funding development costs and commercialisation requirements for the drug. The deal also involves GPC Biotech paying a signing fee, milestone and royalty payments. Spectrum is a member of a joint development committee headed by GPC Biotech to govern development of satraplatin. Previously in October 2001, NeoOncoRx (Spectrum Pharmaceuticals) gained the rights to develop and market the compound worldwide. In December 2005, GPC Biotech and Pharmion Corporation entered into a co-development and license agreement for satraplatin. Under the agreement terms, Pharmion has exclusive commercialisation rights for Europe, Turkey, the Middle East, Australia and New Zealand, while GPC Biotech retains rights to North America and all other territories. Pharmion made an upfront payment of $US37.1 million to GPC Biotech, which included reimbursement for past clinical development costs plus funding for ongoing and certain clinical development activities to be jointly conducted by the companies. In addition, both parties will pursue a joint development plan for satraplatin in a variety of

  9. Algorithms for detecting antibodies to HIV-1: results from a rural Ugandan cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, A J; Biryahwaho, B; Downing, R G; van der Groen, G; Ojwiya, A; Mulder, D W

    1993-08-01

    Although the Western blot test is widely used to confirm HIV-1 serostatus, concerns over its additional cost have prompted review of the need for supplementary testing and the evaluation of alternative test algorithms. Serostatus tends to be confirmed with this additional test especially when tested individuals will be informed of their serostatus or when results will be used for research purposes. The confirmation procedure has been adopted as a means of securing suitably high levels of specificity and sensitivity. With the goal of exploring potential alternatives to Western blot confirmation, the authors describe the use of parallel testing with a competitive and an indirect enzyme immunoassay with and without supplementary Western blots. Sera were obtained from 7895 people in the rural population survey and tested with an algorithm based on the Recombigen HIV-1 EIA and Wellcozyme HIV-1 Recombinant; alternative algorithms were assessed on negative or confirmed positive sera. None of the 227 sera classified as negative by the 2 assays were positive by Western blot. Of the 192 identified ass positive by both assays, 4 were found to be seronegative with Western blot. The possibility of technical error does, however, exist for 3 of these latter cases. One of the alternative algorithms assessed classified all borderline or discordant assay results as negative with 100% specificity and 98.4% sensitivity. This particular algorithm costs only one-third the price of the conventional algorithm. These results therefore suggest that high specificity and sensitivity may be obtained without using Western blot and at a considerable reduction in cost. PMID:8397940

  10. New challenges and opportunities for industrial biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Guo-Qiang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Industrial biotechnology has not developed as fast as expected due to some challenges including the emergences of alternative energy sources, especially shale gas, natural gas hydrate (or gas hydrate and sand oil et al. The weaknesses of microbial or enzymatic processes compared with the chemical processing also make industrial biotech products less competitive with the chemical ones. However, many opportunities are still there if industrial biotech processes can be as similar as the chemical ones. Taking advantages of the molecular biology and synthetic biology methods as well as changing process patterns, we can develop bioprocesses as competitive as chemical ones, these including the minimized cells, open and continuous fermentation processes et al.

  11. Media Release for Immediate Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ling Ling

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New regional BioPharma Services hub offers larger operational space and advanced equipment to meet increasing clinical supply needs for Pharma and biotech customers. SINGAPORE, 18 November 2015 –To address the growing global demand for clinical services, Thermo Fisher Scientific, the world leader in serving science, today announced the official opening of its new state-of-the-art GMP1 facility. Having established its first clinical services facility in Singapore in 2001, the move to this newly built facility will meet the growing demand for clinical supply services in the region. The new site will provide both regional and global pharmaceutical and biotech companies with a one-stop service for clinical supplies − from GMP storage, local labeling, secondary packaging, comparator sourcing, handling and distribution of ambient and cold chain supplies to returns management.

  12. The gap between science and perception: the case of plant biotechnology in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsele, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Although the global area of biotech crops continues to climb for the tenth consecutive year at a sustainable double-digit growth rate, the acceptance of biotech products from agriculture in Europe is still low. There is a gap between science and perception. It is a strong belief that the public turning against science and against GM food has been encouraged by the negative activities of NGO groups. Scientists have to overcome the purely risk-based discussion, and the benefits of plant biotechnology have to be made literally visible. GM food should be available, the benefits should be tangible and the consumer should have fun with such novel food. The gap could be reduced if genetically modified plants and the products thereof were regulated in the same way as classical products. PMID:17522817

  13. Intellectual Property Rights and Agro-Biotechnology: Limitations and Alternatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Luz Yaya-Lancheros

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual property rights have led to stimulating innovation in different fields such as biotechnology. Patents, plant variety protection, industrial secrets and material transfer agreements are legal terms individually and/or collectively protecting materials or processes deemed necessary for agricultural-biotech product development. Such terms may often accumulate to such an extent that this hinders a product’s development and commercial release. Some current initiatives are aimed at facilitating access to basic technology for agricultural-biotech product development, including public organisation cooperation networks, requests for special licences for humanitarian programmes and open access projects. These may be good short-and medium-term alternatives for carrying out biotechnological research in countries like Colombia.

  14. 生物农药产业及市场分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    萧文湧

    2004-01-01

    From the point of macroscopical ecosystem,matching with the application of biotech the biology agrochemicals-especially focusing on the biology antisetics.pesticides and microorganism fertilizers which are used in farm crops and their seeding are developed.At the same time.combining with the construction of the large scale seeding cultivating center and the planning of the ecosystem farm,a natural organic pest-free agricultural environment is constructed.From the aspects of technology ,fund,knowledge and management,the competition capability of agriculture products is developed to the best.Besides the visible products such as biology agrochemicals ,microorganism fertilizers,seeding,farm corps,etc.,the "microorganism organism agriculture method" is configured to provide peasants with the usage system of biotech products,the blue print of "green agriculture"is gradually constructed ,the competiton capability is enhanced and finally,high rewards are out.

  15. Considerations on patent valuation based on patent classification and citation in biotechnological field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihara, Kenji

    Regarding innovation measurement utilizing patent information, a number of researchers are making great efforts to measure a "patent value (patent quality)." For patent valuation, patent classification and citation are often utilized as patent information. Also, biotechnological field is attracting attention from the viewpoint of application to environmental or medical study, and considerable researches on patent valuation are ongoing in this technical field. However, it is not enough recognized that researchers cannot be too careful when they deal with classification information in the biotech field because patent classification structure in this field is not well-established. And also, it is not known enough that citation patterns of both academic papers and patent documents are so complicated that the patterns cannot be easily generalized. In this article, the issues above were verified from a position based on working experiences of biotech patent examiner at Japan Patent Office, and considerations and implications were given on what patent valuation should be.

  16. Strategic alliances and market risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havenaar, Matthias; Hiscocks, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Strategic alliances in product development and marketing are crucial to the biotechnology industry. Many alliances, however, are terminated before the drug reaches the market. In this article we make the case that strategic alliances can fail because of how they are negotiated. Alliance contracts are often inflexible and do not allow for changes in market conditions. We propose a model for contract valuation that can assist biotech and/or pharma deal makers in negotiating alliances that have a higher chance of survival in uncertain market conditions. The model makes use of variable royalties and milestone payments. Because licensing is key to the biotech and/or pharma business model this article will be of interest not only to professionals in licensing, but to all professionals active in the industry. PMID:22484547

  17. Structural change in agriculture induced by innovative biobased technologies, an agent-based approach

    OpenAIRE

    Maes, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Industry and policy makers pursue the development of a biobased economy. The biobased economy emerged first as a promising segment of new biotech applications. But during the last years, the term evolved to cover a much larger concept. It currently has grown to a vision for a new industrial structure where all products, from energy carriers, plastics and food to high value additives and pharmaceuticals, are entirely based on organic matter, thereby annihilating any need for fossil fuels. ...

  18. Evaluation of a Real-Time PCR Assay Using the LightCycler System for Detection of Parvovirus B19 DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Buller, Richard S.; Storch, Gregory

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the artus RealArt Parvovirus B19 LC PCR reagent (artus biotech USA, San Francisco, Calif.) for real-time PCR detection of parvovirus B19 DNA by retesting 71 specimens previously submitted to our laboratory. The artus assay, which produces a quantitative result and provides an internal PCR control, appeared to be slightly more sensitive than our conventional qualitative PCR assay.

  19. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ladics, Gregory S.; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Bregitzer, Phil; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Gray, Alan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Jordan, Mark; Keese, Paul; Kok, Esther; Macdonald, Phil; Parrott, Wayne; Privalle, Laura; Raybould, Alan; Rhee, Seung Yon; Rice, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled “Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants” was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 scientists from academia, government, and the agro-biotech industry. The objectives of the meeting were to explore current knowledge and identify areas requiring further study on unintended effects ...

  20. Effects and Value of Verifiable Information in a Controversial Market: Evidence from Lab Auctions of Genetically Modified Food

    OpenAIRE

    Rousu, Matthew; Huffman, Wallace; Shogren, Jason F.; Tegene, Abebayehu

    2007-01-01

    Food products containing genetically modified (GM) ingredients have entered the market over the past decade. The biotech industry and environmental groups have disseminating conflicting private information about GM foods. This paper develops a unique methodology for valuing independent third-party information in such a setting and applies this method to consumersï¾’ willingness to pay for food products that might be GM. Data are collected from real consumers in an auction market setting with ...

  1. Interactions between trade policies and GM food regulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kym Anderson

    2005-01-01

    Agricultural biotechnologies, and especially transgenic crops, have the potential to offer higher incomes to biotech firms and farmers, and lower-priced and better quality food for consumers. However, the welfare effects of adoption of genetically modified (GM) food and feed crop varieties are being affected not only by some countriesÂ’ strict regulations governing GM food production and consumption, but also by their choice of food trade policy instruments. Specifically, notwithstanding the ...

  2. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt;

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and......-layed effect of DC vaccination after completion of the treatment. A prospective randomized phase-IIb or -III is needed to further evaluate the use of MelCancerVac® vaccine treatment in patients with progressive NSCLC....

  3. Young people's perspectives on genetics, identity and society using film and discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Padraig

    2005-01-01

    Since Darwin, knowledge about biology has, for many, had a diminishing effect on ideas of identity and humanity's place in the world. In recent years biotechnology has raised further public concerns about 'playing God' and 'interfering with life.' School biology curricula however rarely open up the socio-scientific debate to allow students to explore such philosophical issues. This study aimed to identify connections biology students make between current accepted genetic knowledge, biotech...

  4. Wheat straw lignin degradation induction to aromatics by por Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium chrysogenum

    OpenAIRE

    Baltierra-Trejo Eduardo; Silva-Espino Eliseo; Márquez-Benavides Liliana; Sánchez-Yáñez Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Wheat straw is a recalcitrant agricultural waste; incineration of this material represents an important environmental impact. Different reports have been made regarding the use of the structural components of wheat straw, i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; however, lignin has been less exploited because it is largely considered the recalcitrant part. Residual wheat straw lignin (REWSLI) has a potential biotech-nological value if depolymerization is attained to produce aromatics. Lignin...

  5. CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS: ROLE OF PRODUCT BENEFITS AND PERCEIVED RISKS

    OpenAIRE

    Onyango, Benjamin M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines consumer willingness to consume genetically modified food products with clearly stated benefits and risks. Results suggest that male; white, Southerners, and those with some college education are more likely to consume genetically modified fruits and vegetables. Trust in government, biotech industry, and medical professional on matters relating GM foods also have a positive impact on the willingness to consume GM foods; such trust allays fears associated with risks posed b...

  6. The new role of radio and its public in the age of social network sites

    OpenAIRE

    Bonini, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    A culture of co–creation is emerging in art, design, architecture (Armstrong and Stojmirovic, 2011), music, video, literature and other productive fields like manufacturing, urban agriculture and biotech. Many of the tools of production and distribution used by professionals are available to the broader public. Publics are becoming more and more productive (Jenkins, 1992; Arvidsson, 2011). The rise of these phenomena suggests that a new modality of value creation is affirming itself in the in...

  7. Consumer Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods: Traits, Labels and Diverse Information

    OpenAIRE

    Huffman, Wallace E

    2010-01-01

    New experimental economic methods are described and used to assess consumers' willingness to pay for food products that might be made from new transgenic and intragenic genetically modified (GM) traits. Participants in auctions are randomly chosen adult consumers in major US metropolitan areas and not college students. Food labels are kept simple and focus on key attributes of experimental goods. Diverse private information from the agricultural biotech industry (largely Monsanto and Syngenta...

  8. How to Deal with the Upcoming Challenges in GMO Detection in Food and Feed

    OpenAIRE

    Sylvia R. M. Broeders; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C.J.; Nancy H C Roosens

    2012-01-01

    Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator) into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new ty...

  9. Concise Review: Guidance in Developing Commercializable Autologous/Patient-Specific Cell Therapy Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Eaker, Shannon; Armant, Myriam; Brandwein, Harvey; Burger, Scott; Campbell, Andrew; Carpenito, Carmine; Clarke, Dominic; Fong, Timothy; Karnieli, Ohad; Niss, Knut; van"t Hof, Wouter; Wagey, Ravenska

    2013-01-01

    In this technical review, members of the International Society for Cell Therapy (ISCT) provide guidance in developing commercializable autologous and patient-specific manufacturing strategies from the perspective of process development. Guidance is provided to help small academic or biotech researchers determine what questions can be addressed at the bench level in order to make their cell therapy products more feasible for commercial-scale production.

  10. Frame dynamics and stakeholders in risk governance

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    The EU governance of food safety and GM food and feed has gone through significant changes since the BSE crisis and food scares during the 1990s. This work focuses on one particular new feature; the role of stakeholders representing the food chain: biotech associations, farmer organizations, food and feed processors, consumer organizations and environmental NGOs. These stakeholders are not merely lobbyists exerting influence on EU institutions; they are knowledge producers with a certain expe...

  11. A systematic review of the use of genetically modified food in China

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Rong; 高溶

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Genetically Modified (GM) food, which is one of the fruit of the modern biotechnology, is closely related to people's lives. GM food, specifically, GM crops, also known as biotech food, are produced from genetically modified organisms (GMO), which use genetic engineering techniques to introduce, recombine and modify DNA. The safety of GM food still do not have final conclusion at present. Although GM food has been introduced into China for over 15 years, many of the surveys ...

  12. Intellectual Property Rights and Agro-Biotechnology: Limitations and Alternatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Luz Yaya-Lancheros; Alejandro Chaparro-Giraldo

    2008-01-01

    Intellectual property rights have led to stimulating innovation in different fields such as biotechnology. Patents, plant variety protection, industrial secrets and material transfer agreements are legal terms individually and/or collectively protecting materials or processes deemed necessary for agricultural-biotech product development. Such terms may often accumulate to such an extent that this hinders a product’s development and commercial release. Some current initiatives are aimed ...

  13. Golden Rice and the Looming GMO Trade Debate: Implications for the Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Kym; Pohl Nielsen, Chantal

    2004-01-01

    The first generation of genetically modified crop varieties, currently most widespread in the maize and soybean sectors, sought to increase farmer profitability by improving agronomic traits. The next generation of biotech research is focusing also on breeding for attributes desired by consumers. Although not yet commercially available, a new variety of rice, known as ‘Golden Rice’, has been genetically engineered to contain a higher level of vitamin A. Thus in contrast with the current comme...

  14. Golden Rice and the Looming GMO Trade Debate: Implication for the Poor

    OpenAIRE

    Chantal Pohl Nielsen; Kym Anderson

    2003-01-01

    The first generation of genetically modified crop varieties, currently most widespread in the maize and soybean sectors, sought to increase farmer profitability by improving agronomic traits. The next generation of biotech research is focusing also on breeding for attributes desired by consumers. Although not yet commercially available, a new variety of rice, known as ‘Golden Rice’, has been genetically engineered to contain a higher level of vitamin A. Thus in contrast with the current com...

  15. CONSUMER BIOTECHNOLOGY FOOD AND NUTRITION INFORMATION SOURCES: THE TRUST FACTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Ekanem, Enefiok P.; Muhammad, Safdar; Tegegne, Fisseha; Singh, Surendra P.

    2004-01-01

    Although much has been written on consumer attitudes toward genetically modified foods, not much is known about how or where consumers get the information for the decisions they make about genetically modified foods. This paper reports on the media used by consumers in acquiring information about biotech food and nutrition issues, and examines how much trust consumers put in selected information sources. The paper also discusses how socio-economic variables affect level of trust in selected s...

  16. Relevance of Crop Biology for Environmental Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Crops in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Akinbo, Olalekan; Hancock, James F.; Makinde, Diran

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge about the crop biology of economic crops in Africa is needed for regulators to accurately review dossiers and conduct comprehensive environmental risk assessments (ERAs). This information allows regulators to decide whether biotech crops present a risk to biodiversity, since crossing between domesticated crops and their wild relatives could affect the adaptations of the wild species. The criteria that should be used in the evaluation of African crops for ERA include growth habit, ce...

  17. A capital market's view on Industrial Biotechnology:proper valuation is the key for picking the right investment opportunities in stormy times

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, B.W. (Bernd)

    2009-01-01

    Industrial biotechnology, also known as white biotechnology, is considered to be a revolutionary biotechnology field beside red and green biotechnology. After red (medicine) and green (agriculture), white biotechnology is now gaining momentum. With numerous applications e.g. in biocatalysis and fermentation technology, white biotech companies are able to produce – often from biomass out of agricultural products - biobased chemicals (like vitamins, amino acids or enzymes for textile finishing ...

  18. INDUSTRIAL AGRO-BIOTECHNOLOGY: KNOWLEDGE UPGRADING AS A PREREQUISITE FOR HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Hadi FARID

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnology development relates to the quality and skills of human resources. During the Ninth Malaysian Plan 2006-2010, higher education institutions have produced more than 4000 graduates and in service training programs for human resource development and are providing more scholarships to serving officers to pursue post graduate degree in biotechnology. However, gaps still continue to exist between demand for and supply of biotechnology skills and there is an alarming shortage of biotech...

  19. REQUIREMENTS FOR STORAGE AND TRANSPORT OF BIOTECHNOLOGICAL MEDICAL PRODUCTS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK OF MINISTRY OF PUBLIC HEALTH OF UKRAINE AND DETECTION OF VIOLATIONS IN THE MEDICAL AND PHARMACEUTICAL INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Shukaeva O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The rapid development of the pharmaceutical industry and the expansion of the range of biotech drugs require special conditions to ensure the quality, storage and transport through out the entire chain: manufacturer - distributor - pharmacy - hospital - the patient.We analyzed the current legislative frame work of Ministry of Public Health of Ukraine and conducted a study to identify and analyze of typical violations in the medical and pharmaceutical inst...

  20. The biotechnology innovation system of Brazil (part II)

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria Judice; Connie Vedovello

    2007-01-01

    Scientific and technological infrastructure in the field of biotechnology covers many universities, research centers, interrogators, technological institutes, research funds, which carry out research and training. To assess the scope of their activities in Brazil authors used a database prepared by the research group of the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq). With its help the most important biotech sectors at both the national and international lev...

  1. Utah Science Vol. 53 No. 4, Winter 1992

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The Center for Meat Processing Technologies: 106 Trimming the Meeknees from Red Meat Marketing The Center for Value Added Seed Technology: 113 Taming Apomixis to Create New Wheat Hybrids 119 Research in Brief 124 Better Resistance Against Dwarf Smut 125 Taming Range Grasses to Create Better Turf Grass 126 Removing a Biotech Bottleneck The Center for Dairy Foods Technology: 128 Helping the Dairy Industry Gear Up for the next Century 1992 Index 133 New Publicati...

  2. Monitoring results of CO2 avoidance with an 8.5 kWh solar electric generator integrated in a high rise commercial building in UK

    OpenAIRE

    Chukwuemeka Uchenna Ikedi; Michael I. Okoroh

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable energy technologies have become very attractive and effective at the moment for use in the UK and other parts of the world as techniques for reducing carbon footprints in the building sectors. These include micro-wind turbines, photovoltaics, small hydro power generators and bio-tech systems. Besides building integrated solar electric generators otherwise referred to as building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), which is aesthetically appealing and forms part of the applied buildin...

  3. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Mogens H. Claesson; Ayako W. Pedersen; Pia Kvistborg; Mai-Britt Zocca; Lotte Engell-Noerregaard; Anders Mellemgaard

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac&174, Dandrit Biotech,Copenhagen,Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and celecoxib were used as adjuvants to the vaccines. The objective of the study was to evaluate specific T cell response in vitro by IFNg EliSpot. Secondary objectives were overall survival, response and qua...

  4. NEW INSIGHTS ON THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN GEOGRAPHIC AND INSTITUTIONAL DISTANCE IN RESEARCH COLLABORATIONS:A LONG PERIOD ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Rosamaria D’Amore; Roberto Iorio

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the relationship between institutional and geographic distance in scientific collaborations, evaluating the possible changes when a long period (sixteen years) is taken into consideration and discussing the use of some alternative measures of institutional distance. The main result, obtained by analysing the publications of the Italian biotech firms, is that international publications present an higher institutional distance than national papers, particularly in the early ...

  5. Traditional knowledge and patent protection: Conflicting views on international patent standards

    OpenAIRE

    A Andrzejewski

    2010-01-01

    As diseases continue to spread around the globe, pharmaceutical and biotech companies continue to search for new and better drugs to treat them. Most of these companies have realised that useful compounds for these purposes may be found in the natural resources that indigenous and local communities use. And yet, even though the importance of these biological resources to global health and economic livelihood is well recognised, the legal ownership and control of this traditional knowledge is ...

  6. Development of food crops by modern biotechnology techniques in Central America Desarrollo de cultivos y alimentos por técnicas de biotecnología moderna en Centroamérica

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Garro Monge

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, the adoption of Genetically Modified Crops (GMC) has increased in stages worldwide. The worldwide total area planted with biotech crops reached 148 million hectares by 2010, also increasing the number of farmers around the world who decided to produce crops with this technology. At the regional level there are different responses of government agencies by generating rules and regu- lations according to the reality of these countries. In Central America, countries with grea...

  7. GMOs: Prospects for Productivity Increases in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Evenson Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    There are two mechanisms by which modern genetically modified organism (GMO) products can affect productivity in developing countries. The first is the Genes for Rent mechanism where a recipient country agrees with a GMO company to incorporate a GMO product (e.g., a Bt gene in cotton varieties) and pay a technology fee. The second is the Transgenic Breeding mechanism in which National Agricultural Research System (NARS) breeders use modern biotech methods marker-aided breeding, genetic maps, ...

  8. Low-cost Negative-pressure Wound Therapy Using Wall Vacuum: A 15 Dollars by Day Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Chaput, Benoit; Garrido, Ignacio; Eburdery, Harold; Grolleau, Jean Louis; Chavoin, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been marketed for about 20 years and remains popular. The only real obstacle to NPWT is the cost; therefore, we designed an inexpensive NPWT connected to a wall vacuum. Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France). Methods: As a first step, the constraints imposed on the manufacturer were equipment quality similar to that of commercial NPWT systems, with an average ...

  9. Comparison of four enzyme immunoassays for detection of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 2 antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, D; Yeh, E T; Moore, E S; Hanson, C V

    1996-01-01

    Four licensed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kits for the measurement of antibody to human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV) type 1, one from Organon Teknika Corp. (OTC), one from Cambridge Biotech Corp. (CBC), and two from Abbott Laboratories (the 1993 modification [Abb 93] and the 2.0 version licensed in 1995 [Abb 95]), were evaluated for sensitivity and specificity in the detection of HTLV type 2 antibody, and the results were compared with those previously obtained with earlier kit versions. The...

  10. Validation, Performance under Field Conditions, and Cost-Effectiveness of Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2 and Determine HIV-1/2 Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Assays Using Sequential and Parallel Testing Algorithms in Tanzania▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mayhood, Meghan K.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Odhiambo, Christopher O.; Ndanu, Epimack; Thielman, Nathan M.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Shao, John F; Wells Pence, Brian; Crump, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody tests support the effort to expand access to HIV testing and counseling services in remote, rural, and poor parts of the world. We validated the Capillus HIV-1/HIV-2 (Trinity Biotech PLC, Bray, County Wicklow, Ireland) and Determine HIV-1/2 (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL) rapid tests in a reference laboratory using patient samples from Tanzania and evaluated the performance of the tests under field conditions in northern Tanzania. We us...

  11. NANOTECHNOLOGY: A PROMISING CARRIER FOR INTRACELLULAR DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Malakar Jadupati; Ghosh Amitava; Basu Aalok; Nayak Amit Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is on its way to make a big impact in Biotech, Pharmaceutical and Medical diagnostics sciences. Nanotechnology holds a tremendous potential when it applied in the fields of drug delivery. In this review it has been discussed how nanotechnology can implemented to design formulations which can effectively carry drug molecule to the targeted cell organelles. Introduction of certain functional groups or addition of surface active agents may alter the characteristics of the carrier ...

  12. Development and tuning of an original search engine for patent libraries in medicinal chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Kreim, Olivier; Oezdemir-Zaech, Fatma; Vachon, Therese; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The large increase in the size of patent collections has led to the need of efficient search strategies. But the development of advanced text-mining applications dedicated to patents of the biomedical field remains rare, in particular to address the needs of the pharmaceutical & biotech industry, which intensively uses patent libraries for competitive intelligence and drug development. METHODS: We describe here the development of an advanced retrieval engine to search information ...

  13. Patenting activity in biotechnology and pharmaceuticals: a comparative analysis of the Nordic Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Enrico Sorisio

    2009-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study innovative activity, as measured by patent indicators, in pharmaceutical and biotechnological sectors in the Nordic Countries. The biotech sector in general and pharmaceutical in particular is one of the areas selected for strategic investments in every Nordic country. In terms of patents granted by country of inventors Denmark plays a leading role followed by Sweden, while patenting activity in Finland and Norway is lower. A concentration of patents tow...

  14. Applications of recombinant Pichia pastoris in the healthcare industry

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Weinacker; Claudia Rabert; Zepeda, Andrea B.; Figueroa, Carolina A.; Adalberto Pessoa; Farías, Jorge G.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the establishment and development of the biotech industry has improved exponentially, allowing the commercial production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Nowadays, new recombinant protein production is considered a multibillion-dollar market, in which about 25% of commercial pharmaceuticals are biopharmaceuticals. But to achieve a competitive production process is not an easy task. Any production process has to be highly productive, efficient and economic. Despite that the perf...

  15. ANALYSING CONSUMERS’ BEHAVIOUR TOWARDS GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD BY A VARIANCE-BASED STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODELLING METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar-Ordonez, Melania; Rodriguez-Entrena, Macario

    2012-01-01

    Applying gene technology in agricultural production, which results on the so-called genetically modified (GM) foods, is one of the most controversial scientific, political and social debates. In the EU, the underdevelopment of biotech crops is attributed to the social distrust in transgenic food. The potential consumers’ reactions towards Genetically Modified (GM) food influence the commercial feasibility and determine the economic agent decisions. This paper studies the underlying factors in...

  16. Technological Diversity and Future Product Diversity in the Drug Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Cantner, Uwe; Plotnikova, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the topic of related R&D and innovation strategies of large firms. We ask what determines the diversity of a firm's product portfolio. More specifically, we try to explain large firms' expansion into new product markets driven by the characteristics of their technological knowledge. Empirically, we study firms in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries, using relevant data on product development and technological knowledge. We find a positive relationship between the d...

  17. Despite benefits, commercialization of transgenic horticultural crops lags

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, David; Klee, Harry; Dandekar, Abhaya

    2004-01-01

    The acreage of agronomic crops (soybean, cotton, corn and canola) developed using recombinant DNA technology has expanded dramatically since their introduction in 1996, while the commercialization of biotech horticultural crops (vegetables, fruits, nuts and ornamentals) has languished. This is not due to a lack of both current and potential traits that could be utilized in horticultural crops, as ongoing research is identifying a diverse array of applications. However, commercialization is st...

  18. THE EVOLUTION OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ON CONVENTIONAL VARIETIES IN BRAZIL 2003-2009 CULTIVARS INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK AND AGROBIODIVERSITY MENACES IN BRAZIL

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha Dos Santos, Roseli; Lucht, Evelin

    2010-01-01

    N° ISBN - 978-2-7380-1284-5 International audience The aim of this paper is to discuss the role of cultivar protection regulations in the availability of conventional seeds in Brazilian agriculture. The expansion of intellectual property rights has stimulated innovative research on breeding in Brazil, mainly on the biotech applications, but this may constitute a challenge to the adoption of policies aiming to preserve agrobiodiversity. The institutional apparatus tends to reward standar...

  19. Do venture capitalists really invest in good industries? Risk-return perceptions and path dependence in the emerging European energy VC market

    OpenAIRE

    Wüstenhagen, Rolf; Teppo, Tarja

    2006-01-01

    Venture Capital (VC) plays an important role in the commercialisation of innovation. Sectors like information and communication technologies and biotech account for two-thirds of all VC investments. Little attention has been paid to understanding how the venture capital market extends to new industries. Based on a survey of European energy technology VCs, we discuss the factors determining the emergence of a new market sector for VC investments. While there are sizeable investment poportun...

  20. A venture capital view of challenges, opportunities, and innovation in biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, L T

    2011-02-01

    Small biotech companies have been an important source of innovation, pipelines, and new products for the pharmaceutical industry, and are primarily financed by venture capital (VC). The significant changes happening within the VC industry have broad implications for these small companies. This includes a shift to financing later-stage programs with increasing interest in orphan or specialty indications. Nontraditional sources of capital and innovative risk-sharing structures can enable early-stage companies. PMID:21252935

  1. Star Scientists, Institutions, and the Entry of Japanese Biotechnology Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Michael R. Darby; Lynne G. ZUCKER

    1996-01-01

    Advance of science and its commercial applications are in a close, symbiotic relationship in the U.S. biotechnology industry. Comparing Japan and the U.S., the structure of the science appears broadly similar, but the organization of the biotechnology industry is quite dissimilar. In the U.S., some 77 percent of new biotechnology enterprises (NBEs) were dedicated new biotechnology firms (NBFs) started for this purpose while 88 percent of Japanese biotech firms in our data base were subunits o...

  2. Which form of venture capital is most supportive of innovation?

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoni, Fabio; Tykvová, Tereza

    2012-01-01

    Although there seems to be consensus in the literature that venture capital investors increase the innovation output of their portfolio companies, there is little evidence about how investor type (governmental vs. private) and transaction structure (syndicated vs. non-syndicated) moderate this impact. Using a sample of 865 young biotech and pharmaceutical companies from seven European countries, we investigate which form of venture capital is most supportive of innovation. Our results suggest...

  3. Hydrolytic abilities of lipases from Geotrichum candidum 4013

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brabcová, Jana; Zarevúcka, Marie; Mackova, M.

    Praha : Institute of Chemical Technology, 2011 - (Spiwok, V.; Schreiberová, O.; Paulová, L.; Káš, J.). s. 70-70 ISBN 978-80-7080-782-8. [Biotech 2011 & Czech-Swiss Symposium with Exhibition /5./. 15.06.2011-17.06.2011, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : lipases * microorganisms * substrate Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  4. The potential for targeting extracellular LOX proteins in human malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mayorca-Guiliani A; Erler JT

    2013-01-01

    Alejandro Mayorca-Guiliani, Janine T Erler Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the physical scaffold where cells are organized into tissues and organs. The ECM may be modified during cancer to allow and promote proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. The family of lysyl oxidase (LOX) enzymes cross-links collagens and elastin and, therefore, is a central player in ECM deposition and maturation. Exten...

  5. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  6. Physicochemical and functional characterization of a biosimilar adalimumab ZRC-3197

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay S; Mahajan M; Mehta T; Singh AK; Parikh A; Gupta AK; Kalita P; Patel M; Mendiratta SK

    2014-01-01

    Sanjay Bandyopadhyay, Mukesh Mahajan, Tulsi Mehta, Arun K Singh, Aashini Parikh, Ajit K Gupta, Pankaj Kalita, Mihir Patel, Sanjeev Kumar Mendiratta Zydus Research Centre, Biotech Division, Cadila Healthcare Ltd, The Zydus Group, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Abstract: ZRC-3197 has been developed indigenously by Cadila Healthcare Ltd as a biosimilar adalimumab of originator HUMIRA®. Biosimilarity has been demonstrated with a comprehensive set of state-of-the-art analytical techniques to chara...

  7. Physicochemical and functional characterization of a biosimilar adalimumab ZRC-3197

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Sanjay Bandyopadhyay, Mukesh Mahajan, Tulsi Mehta, Arun K Singh, Aashini Parikh, Ajit K Gupta, Pankaj Kalita, Mihir Patel, Sanjeev Kumar Mendiratta Zydus Research Centre, Biotech Division, Cadila Healthcare Ltd, The Zydus Group, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Abstract: ZRC-3197 has been developed indigenously by Cadila Healthcare Ltd as a biosimilar adalimumab of originator HUMIRA®. Biosimilarity has been demonstrated with a comprehensive set of state-of-the-art analytical techniques to c...

  8. Estudio de la intención emprendedora en el ámbito científico público. El caso de las ciencias de la vida en España.

    OpenAIRE

    RODRÍGUEZ BATALLA, FIDEL

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Predicting entrepreneurial behaviour within the environment of public sector research is considered to be of great interest, because this is what will determine the creation of new technology-based start-ups - often known as spin-offs - in universities, hospitals and other public research bodies. In the framework of the knowledge economy, and specifically in the life sciences sector, or "bioeconomy" (European Commission, 2012), the creation and development of a biotech company is conside...

  9. Identifying Local Determinants Of Research Commercialization Strategies In Iranian Biotechnology Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Jahangir Yadollahi Fars; Zahra Kalatehaei

    2012-01-01

    Biotechnology industry has a special place among novel industries. The majority of biotech companies are start-ups or small companies that have been working for several years yet are not profitable. Evidences showed that firms and researchers have problems in turning academic findings to commercial revenue and there is problem in commercialization process and choosing method of the exploitation academic opportunities or choosing proper commercialization strategy in this industry. In this stud...

  10. LOGISTICAL COSTS AND RISKS OF MARKETING GENETICALLY MODIFIED WHEAT

    OpenAIRE

    Schlecht, Shannon M.; Wilson, William W.; Dahl, Bruce L.

    2004-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) grains have increased in importance. Moving biotech grains from producers to processors is a challenge for the grain handling system that could involve increased segregations. The objective of this research is to determine how testing strategies affect the logistical costs of a grain pipeline when GM wheat is present. A logistical model was developed and simulated to analyze impacts of uncertainty in demand, receipts, test accuracy, rail deliveries, and transit time....

  11. TECHNOLOGICAL FIELDS AND CONCENTRATION OF INNOVATION AMONG FOOD AND BEVERAGE MULTINATIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Alfranca, Oscar; Rama, Ruth; von Tunzelmann, Nicholas

    2003-01-01

    With a sample of nearly 18,611 utility patents, this paper studies the technology mix of 90 of the world's leading food and beverage multinationals (FBMs) over 1969-1994. It explores the statistical association between patenting in food technology and in non-food technological fields. Food patenting is always associated with patenting in Biotech, Chemistry, Machinery and Other patenting, whatever the home country of the company. The strength of the association, however, could vary. Herfindahl...

  12. Aproveitamento sustentável de biomassa e de recursos naturais na inovação química Sustainable use fo biomass and natural resources for chemical innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Galembeck; César Augusto Sales Barbosa; Rafael Arromba Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Increased production of biomass is currently the only immediately accessible alternative for large-scale carbon sequestration and it can produce large amounts of food, fuel and raw materials for the chemical industry that can in turn growingly replace oil as a source of organic building blocks and also of hydrogen and sulfur. Development of processes for biomass and abundant minerals transformation into chemical raw materials should now benefit from large inputs from nanotechnologies, biotech...

  13. Consumer knowledge and acceptance of agricultural biotechnology vary

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer S. James

    2004-01-01

    Results from consumer surveys reveal some basic conclusions about consumer attitudes toward agricultural biotechnology. First, consumers do not agree about whether biotech foods are good or bad. Second, a small group of people strongly opposes them. Third, the majority of consumers are uninformed about the technology and how food is produced. Relatively small but vocal anti-biotechnology activist groups are successful at influencing public opinion because of consumers’ lack of knowledge, crea...

  14. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR THE FOOD INDUSTRY: A CONCEPTUAL MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    Khramtsov, Andrey; Evdokimov, Ivan; Lodygin, Aleksey; Budkevich, Roman

    2014-01-01

    The information available on high technology in food industry is systematized. Different approaches to the development and integration of scientific knowledge are discussed. According to the European Institute for Food Processing (EU-IFP), there are three possible areas where a breakthrough in food science can occur: biotechnology (BIOTECH), nanotechnology (NANO), and information and communication technology (ICT). A transition is expected of high technology in food industry to convergent tec...

  15. Clinical experience with cytomegalovirus isolation using conventional cell cultures and early antigen detection in centrifugation-enhanced shell vial cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Leland, D S; Hansing, R L; French, M L

    1989-01-01

    A total of 1,915 clinical samples was inoculated by low-speed centrifugation into shell vials (Bartels Immunodiagnostics, Bellvue, Wash.) containing cover slip monolayers of MRC-5 fibroblasts. At 1 and 2 days postinoculation, one cover slip was stained by an indirect immunofluorescence technique using a monoclonal antibody (Biotech Research Laboratories for Dupont, Billerica, Mass.) to cytomegalovirus (CMV) early antigen (EA). Clinical samples were also inoculated into three MRC-5 or MRHF cel...

  16. Long-term Socioeconomic Challenges for Russia and Demand for New Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Apokin; Dmitry Belousov; Vladimir Salnikov(Laboratoire de Mathématiques Nicolas Oresme, Université de Caen Basse-Normandie, CS 14032, Bd. Maréchal Juin, BP 5186, 14032 Caen Cedex, France); Igor Frolov

    2015-01-01

    The primary long-term socio-economic challenges facing Russia – both global and country-specific in nature — drive demand for a range of technologies. We explore several groups of challenges, namely urbanization, demographic, socio-economic, the consequences of ageing, geopolitical, restricted access to key technological competences, climate change and its ecological consequences, as well as technological challenges largely associated with risks in ICT and biotech deve...

  17. State responses to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews biotechnology legislation in the 50 states for 11 policy areas spanning 1990-2010, an era of immense growth in biotechnology, genetic knowledge, and significant policy development. Policies regarding health insurance, life insurance, long-term care insurance, DNA data bank collection, biotech research protection, biotech promotion and support, employment discrimination, genetic counselor licensing, human cloning, and genetic privacy each represent major policy responses arising from biotechnology and coinciding with key areas of state regulation (insurance, criminal justice, economic development, labor law, health and safety, privacy, and property rights). This analysis seeks to answer three questions regarding biotechnology legislation at the state level: who is acting (policy adoption), when is policy adopted (policy timing), and what is policy doing (policy content). Theoretical concerns examine state ideology (conservative or liberal), policy type (economic or moral), and the role of external events (federal law, news events, etc.) on state policy adoption. Findings suggest ideological patterns in adoption, timing, and content of biotech policy. Findings also suggest economic policies tend to be more uniform in content than moral policies, and findings also document a clear link between federal policy development, external events, and state policy response. PMID:26399943

  18. Nutritional and safety assessments of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through biotechnology: lysine maize as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Kevin C

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the area of biotech crops modified for agronomic input traits (e.g., herbicide tolerance and insect protection) has increased to 90 million halyear, grown by over 8 million farmers in a total of 17 countries. As adoption of these improved agronomic trait biotech crops has grown, so has interest in biotech crops that have improved nutritional characteristics for use as feed and food. A previous publication by the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) reported on the principles and concepts proposed for the nutritional and safety assessments of foods and feeds nutritionally improved through biotechnology. In this paper, the guidelines and principles recommended in the earlier publication are discussed relative to a specific case study, Lysine maize. Lysine maize is a feed ingredient with enhanced nutritional characteristics for poultry and swine and provides an alternative to the need for addition of supplemental lysine to some diets for these animals. The 2004 Task Force of the ILSI has also applied the concepts from that report to 4 other case studies: sweet potato enriched in provitamin A (2 examples, one using biotechnology and one using conventional breeding); Golden Rice 2; double-embryo maize; and ASP-1 enhanced protein sweet potato. PMID:17955996

  19. Evaluation of nine HIV rapid test kits to develop a national HIV testing algorithm in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orji Bassey

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-cold chain-dependent HIV rapid testing has been adopted in many resource-constrained nations as a strategy for reaching out to populations. HIV rapid test kits (RTKs have the advantage of ease of use, low operational cost and short turnaround times. Before 2005, different RTKs had been used in Nigeria without formal evaluation. Between 2005 and 2007, a study was conducted to formally evaluate a number of RTKs and construct HIV testing algorithms. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to assess and select HIV RTKs and develop national testing algorithms. Method: Nine RTKs were evaluated using 528 well-characterised plasma samples. These comprised 198 HIV-positive specimens (37.5% and 330 HIV-negative specimens (62.5%, collected nationally. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated with 95% confidence intervals for all nine RTKs singly and for serial and parallel combinations of six RTKs; and relative costs were estimated. Results: Six of the nine RTKs met the selection criteria, including minimum sensitivity and specificity (both ≥ 99.0% requirements. There were no significant differences in sensitivities or specificities of RTKs in the serial and parallel algorithms, but the cost of RTKs in parallel algorithms was twice that in serial algorithms. Consequently, three serial algorithms, comprising four test kits (BundiTM, DetermineTM, Stat-Pak® and Uni-GoldTM with 100.0% sensitivity and 99.1% – 100.0% specificity, were recommended and adopted as national interim testing algorithms in 2007. Conclusion: This evaluation provides the first evidence for reliable combinations of RTKs for HIV testing in Nigeria. However, these RTKs need further evaluation in the field (Phase II to re-validate their performance.

  20. SUDBIOTECH: A Training Initiative in Plant Biotechnology Dedicated to Scientific Communities in Developing and Emerging Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain RIVAL

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The SudBiotech project is targeting PhD and Masters Programmes in Universities and Excellence Research Centres located in developing countries. It proposes an integrative and multidisciplinary approach under the form of a one-week discovery and training itinerary. SudBiotech is aimed at addressing various different fields of Plant Biotechnology, under the specific socioeconomic context of scientific communities from these countries. Our main goal is to train students, research staff, deciders, professionals and journalists to the basic knowledge underlying applications of plant biotechnologies, in order to both update the amount of knowledge which is requested at Master’s level and to acquire a solid body of information which is indispensable for any decision making, in a field of research which is often the target of political, social and media-related pressure. The team of Professors involved in the project shares a strong experience in teaching and training in overseas French Speaking Universities (AUPELF-UREF projects in Marocco, Tunisia, Togo, Côte d’Ivoire, TEMPUS Programme in Lebanon, AUF-Actions de Recherche en Réseau in Benin. The team is composed of senior scientists acting in various complementary fields, namely: Biochemistry/Physiology (A. Nato, Plant Breeding/Molecular Biology (Y. Henry, Tropical Agriculture/Epigenetics (A. Rival. Thanks to these complementarities, SudBiotech is able to propose a training itinerary which is diversified and integrated, covering areas from the plant cell and its original potentialities to the most recent industrial applications of plant biotechnologies (GMOs, their public acceptance in developing and emerging nations and their applicability to tropical plant commodities. The training offer is amplified and enriched through the active role of local research and training staff, who are encouraged to actively participate in the SudBiotech project under various forms including lectures, field visits

  1. The current status of immunotoxins: an overview of experimental and clinical studies as presented at the Third International Symposium on Immunotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uckun, F M; Frankel, A

    1993-02-01

    The Third International Symposium on Immunotoxins was held on June 19-21, 1992 in Orlando, Florida. This symposium was sponsored by NATO, NIH, Pierce Chemical Company, Walt Disney Cancer Institute at Florida Hospital, Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Xoma, Immunogen, Seragen, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Chiron, Ortho Biotech, Upjohn, Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Abbot Laboratories, Lilly Research Laboratories, and Evans & Sutherland. The Pierce Immunotoxin Award which recognizes outstanding contributions to immunotoxin research and development, was presented to Drs David FitzGerald, Fatih Uckun, David Eisenberg, and Ira Wool, for their contributions to the immunotoxin field. PMID:8093912

  2. Deproteination of shrimp shell wastes using immobilized marine associated pseudomonad Amet1776

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhagat, J.; Venkatramani, M.; Hussain, A. J.; Jayaprakashvel, M.

    ).Chitin and its product has a wide application in the field of waste water treatment (No &Hur, 1998; Lora & Brennan, 2009), cosmetics (Felse& Panda, 1999), 212 BHAGAT et al., Biosci., Biotech. Res. Asia, Vol. 11(Spl. Edn. 1), 211-220 (2014) health care...). We have obtained an appreciable amount (22.8 g) of chitin from 80 g of the shrimp shell powder with an efficiency of 28.5%. Similar trend was reported by Nair and Madhavan, 20.5% chitin in body shell of crab Scylla serrata. Thirunavukkarasu et al...

  3. Clinical application of a new antimyosin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mouse monoclonal antibody, 3-48 (Rougier Bio-Tech Ltd, Montreal) which recognizes the alpha and beta heavy chains of human atrial and ventricular myosin, and the beta heavy chain of human slow skeletal muscle, has recently been developed. In the rat isoproterenol-induced infarction model and the canine model of selective obstruction of a coronary artery, the antibody was shown to be specifically localized to the necrotic myocardium. A selected group of patients with known infarction was imaged with the 111indium labeled F(ab')2 protion of this antibody in a pre-clinical feasibility study, and the results therefrom are reported in this communication. (orig.)

  4. High-Pressure CO2 as a Green Solvent for Extraction, Reaction, Particle Formation and Others Processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sajfrtová, Marie; Sovová, Helena

    Praha: VENICE, 2011 - (Spiwok, V.; Schreiberová, O.; Paulová, L.; Káš, J.), s. 61-62 ISBN 978-80-7080-782-8. [Biotech 2011 and 5th Czech-Swiss Symposium with Exhibition. Prague (CZ), 15.06.2011-17.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06024; GA MŠk 2B06049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : organic solvents * supercritical fluids * extraction Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  5. Leadership decisions that shaped the destiny of Genzyme: Lessons from 30 years of entrepreneurial leadership: critical decisions for growth

    OpenAIRE

    Steen, van der, M.

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on an interview of Marianne van der Steen with Henri Termeer‐the long time CEO of Genzyme. Within Europe, Genzyme’s state-of-the-art cell culture production facility for therapeutic proteins is located in Geel, Belgium, and is among the largest bio‐manufacturing sites in Europe. This month, the company announced that it will build an additional manufacturing plant in Geel. The topic of the interview was growth decisions from biotech start-up to a fully integrated biophar...

  6. Commentary on patents: Don`t dismiss Rifkin`s damning of gene patents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoyle, R.

    1995-07-01

    Biotech may have less to fear from Rifkin than from its own inclination to dismiss the fact that the evolution of ethics and patent laws applying to patenting genes has been haphazard. Perhaps it is time for the biotechnology industry to get behind the establishment of an effective forum for opening much-needed dialogue. Perhaps a Senate proposal to establish a bioethics commission, which reportedly has bogged down in partisan politics, is just such a venue for the government and private sector to begin to hash out the ethical and legal dilemmas that are indisputably at the heart of the biotechnology industry, and its future success.

  7. Development and characterization of a cell culture manufacturing process using quality by design (QbD) principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Daniel M; Gao, Jinxin; Griffiths, Kristi; Froggatt, Christopher; Wang, Tongtong; Wei, Gan

    2014-01-01

    The principles of quality by design (QbD) have been applied in cell culture manufacturing process development and characterization in the biotech industry. Here we share our approach and practice in developing and characterizing a cell culture manufacturing process using QbD principles for establishing a process control strategy. Process development and characterization start with critical quality attribute identification, followed by process parameter and incoming raw material risk assessment, design of experiment, and process parameter classification, and conclude with a design space construction. Finally, a rational process control strategy is established and documented. PMID:23828505

  8. Life cycle inventory and risk assessment of genetic modified perennial ryegrass in a technology foresight perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, K.; Rasmussen, B.; Schleisner, L.

    2000-01-01

    , a methodological approach is suggested to analyse the uncertainties that the biotech industry and the authorities face when implementing genetically modified (GM) crops. These uncertainties embracescientific rationality regarding technological development and risk assessments, as well as ethic...... drivers as the most important and uncertain fac-tors for the future direction of GM crops: 1) publicparticipation in regulation, 2) utility value for the consumers, 3) being first to market GM-ryegrass, and 4) an efficient professional network. Based on the identified drivers several scenar-ios were...

  9. Biorefineries to integrate fuel, energy and chemical production processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrica Bargiacchi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The world of renewable energies is in fast evolution and arouses political and public interests, especially as an opportunity to boost environmental sustainability by mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions. This work aims at examining the possibilities related to the development of biorefineries, where biomass conversion processes to produce biofuels, electricity and biochemicals are integrated. Particular interest is given to the production processes of biodiesel, bioethanol and biogas, for which present world situation, problems, and perspectives are drawn. Potential areas for agronomic and biotech researches are also discussed. Producing biomass for biorefinery processing will eventually lead to maximize yields, in the non food agriculture.

  10. Bioceres: AG Biotechnology from Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Feeney

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this case we present a business decision-making situation in which the CEO of an Argentine Ag Biotech company, Bioceres, has to decide the best way to commercialize a new drought-tolerant transgenic technology. The company was founded by twenty three farmers, who shared a common dream that Argentina could become a benchmark in the development of Ag biotechnology. The case has strategic and financial implications, as well as decision-making situation involving a joint venture with an American biotechnology company. It also introduces to discussion the business models of Ag biotechnology companies in developing countries.

  11. Biopharma business models in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March-Chordà, I; Yagüe-Perales, R M

    2011-08-01

    This article provides new insights into the different strategy paths or business models currently being implemented by Canadian biopharma companies. Through a case-study methodology, seven biopharma companies pertaining to three business models were analyzed, leading to a broad set of results emerging from the following areas: activity, business model and strategy; management and human resources; and R&D, technology and innovation strategy. The three business models represented were: model 1 (conventional biotech oriented to new drug development, radical innovation and search for discoveries); model 2 (development of a technology platform, usually in proteomics and bioinformatics); and model 3 (incremental innovation, with shorter and less risky development timelines). PMID:21708279

  12. Biomedical engineering entrepreneurship

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jen-Shih

    2014-01-01

    This book is written for undergraduate and graduate students in biomedical engineering wanting to learn how to pursue a career in building up their entrepreneur ventures. Practicing engineers wanting to apply their innovations for healthcare will also find this book useful. The 21st century is the Biotech Century where many nations are investing heavily in biotechnology. As a result, tremendous business opportunities exist for biomedical engineering graduates who are interested in becoming successful entrepreneurs. However, many challenges await these entrepreneurs intending to invent safe and

  13. Le marché des variétés de coton-Bt : analyse de la situation en Chine dans une perspective internationale

    OpenAIRE

    Fok, Michel; Xu, Naiyin

    2010-01-01

    texte publié disponible à : http://www.john-libbey-eurotext.fr/fr/revues/agro_biotech/agr/e-docs/00/04/52/90/resume.phtml International audience About ten countries have adopted Bt-cotton since its commercial release in the USA in 1996. This release immediately has led to raise the concern of Monsanto's monopoly and loss of varietal diversity in adopting countries. There are very few studies addressing the actual state of the cotton variety markets in the adopting countries. This articl...

  14. Brachymetatarsia of the fourth metatarsal, lengthening scarf osteotomy with bone graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Desai

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 16-year-old girl presented with left fourth metatarsal shortening causing significant psychological distress. She underwent lengthening scarf osteotomy held with an Omnitech® screw (Biotech International, France with the addition of two 1 cm cancellous cubes (RTI Biologics, United States. A lengthening z-plasty of the extensor tendons and skin were also performed. At 6 weeks the patient was fully weight bearing and at one-year follow up, the patient was satisfied and discharged. A modified technique of lengthening scarf osteotomy is described for congenital brachymatatarsia. This technique allows one stage lengthening through a single incision with graft incorporation by 6 weeks.

  15. Review on Micro- and Nanolithography Techniques and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werayut Srituravanich

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews major micro- and nanolithography techniques and their applications from commercial micro devices to emerging applications in nanoscale science and engineering. Micro- and nanolithography has been the key technology in manufacturing of integrated circuits and microchips in the semiconductor industry. Such a technology is also sparking a magnificent transformation of nanotechnology. The lithography techniques including photolithography, electron beam lithography, focused ion beam lithography, soft lithography, nanoimprint lithography and scanning probe lithography are discussed. Furthermore, their applications are reviewed and summarized into four major areas: electronics and microsystems, medical and biotech, optics and photonics, and environment and energy harvesting.

  16. Blind Technology Transfer or Technological Knowledge Leakage: a Case Study from the South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Codner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Blurring boundaries between science and technology is a new phenomenon especially in fields such as biotechnology. The present work shows the fate of biotech research papers on foreign patents produced during the last decade in Quilmes National University. It aims at recognizing the flow of scientific knowledge developed at a public university towards foreign companies and organizations as well as reflecting on its technological value, the role of technology transfer management, the institutional significance of technology transfer processes and the need to develop innovative public policies for solving structural failures caused by industrial underdevelopment

  17. Platform for a Technological Leap in Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzelmann, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    NTN Swiss Biotech™ brings together the Swiss Biotech Association SBA, which is involved in regulatory, financial and legal issues, and biotechnet Switzerland, which is active in translational R&D, to provide a technology base for joint projects. Biotechnet aims to push promising domains by creating topic-oriented platforms that enable academia and industry to work together to produce R&D results of major importance to society and the economy. The first activity initiated by biotechnet is the Antibiotics Platform that has now been launched. PMID:26842338

  18. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.;

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing...... interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV...

  19. Fostering a new dialogue to improve access to finance for European biopharma SMEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelot, Emmanuel; Suojanen, Christian

    2010-12-31

    This article reviews the current economic crisis as it impacts upon European biopharma SMEs and their ability to secure investment and funding. In particular it presents an analysis of a broader, pre-crisis structural problem in Europe related to the lack of institutional investors for Europe's life sciences venture capital funds and the impact this has both on the funds available for investment by VCs into Europe's biotech companies, and the effect on the type and stage of biopharma companies able to raise money. This article also presents an overview of an on-going stakeholder dialogue to address these issues and the proposals raised so far for possible solutions. PMID:20678597

  20. GETTING TESTY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MATT; YOUNG

    2006-01-01

    Chinese labs begin R&D for Big Pharma and other biotech companies It came down to three countries for Bridge Pharmaceuticals' new animal testing lab: India, Singapore and China. In the process India fell out of the equation. "India doesn't have primates or dogs," said Glenn Rice, the Menlo Park, California-based company's president and CEO. India is a great place for small molecule manufacturing but not for toxicology testing on animals because the right breeders are not available there, Rice

  1. Microfluidic very large-scale integration for biochips: Technology, testing and fault-tolerant design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araci, Ismail Emre; Pop, Paul; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    paper is on continuous-flow biochips, where the basic building block is a microvalve. By combining these microvalves, more complex units such as mixers, switches, multiplexers can be built, hence the name of the technology, “microfluidic Very Large-Scale Integration” (mVLSI). A roadblock in the......Microfluidic biochips are replacing the conventional biochemical analyzers by integrating all the necessary functions for biochemical analysis using microfluidics. Biochips are used in many application areas, such as, in vitro diagnostics, drug discovery, biotech and ecology. The focus of this...

  2. Environmental Technologies Summary Book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book lists the companies and their technology, which have new excellent technology authentication and technology verification. They are as in the following : sewage advanced treatment technology using a three-stage Bio-Ceramic Filtration by Shinwoo engineering.co.kr, Twist Filter by Sungshin engineering.co.kr, Sewage advanced treatment technology using CIMEN-DOC by Taeyeong/CI biotech.co.kr, DeNipho using pump ejector and Bio Green Media by Green Technology.co.kr, Automatic integrated management system using Envi-SIS by Sallasanup.com Kozone.co.kr and Geoworks.co.kr.

  3. Identification and characterization of novel activities from plant stem cell extracts regulating epidermal cell proliferation and homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    di Martino, Orsola

    2015-01-01

    My PhD program included two phases, the first was carried out in the laboratory of Molecular Genetics, under the supervision of Professor Viola Calabrò, and the latter in the laboratory of Arterra Biosciene Srl. Arterra Bioscience is an Italian research-based biotech company with a strong know-how in biological science and an extensive experience in screening for the discovery of active molecules. The opportunity to join these two different scientific groups allows me to gain a more co...

  4. Clinical Comparison of the Treponema pallidum CAPTIA Syphilis-G Enzyme Immunoassay with the Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody Absorption Immunoglobulin G Assay for Syphilis Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Halling, V. W.; Jones, M. F.; Bestrom, J. E.; Wold, A D; Rosenblatt, J E; Smith, T. F.; Cockerill, F R

    1999-01-01

    Recently, a treponema-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme immunoassay (EIA), the CAPTIA Syphilis-G (Trinity Biotech, Jamestown, N.Y.), has become available as a diagnostic test for syphilis. A total of 89 stored sera previously tested by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA-ABS) IgG assay were evaluated by the CAPTIA EIA. The FTA-ABS IgG procedure was performed by technologists unblinded to results of rapid plasmid reagin (RPR) testing of the same specimens. Borderline CAPTI...

  5. IR light source based on LED for endoscopy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz López, Mabel

    2009-01-01

    Tesina final de master feta en col.laboració amb Transmural Biotech S.L A specific endoscopy technology uses an InfraRed (IR) light to achieve specific imaging of the vascular system. This IR light is obtained by an IR laser source. The aim of this study is to find a new IR illumination built with LEDs to substitute the existing IR source. LEDs may contribute in the endoscopy application with their advantage: LEDs cost is lower than lasers, LEDs have a longer lifetime, LEDs are...

  6. Deficiencia de glucosa 6 fosfato deshidrogenasa: análisis enzimático y molecular en una población de Bogotá

    OpenAIRE

    Magda Carolina Sánchez; Victoria Eugenia Villegas; Dora Fonseca

    2008-01-01

    bjetivo: Determinar qué tan frecuente es la deficiencia de glucosa 6 fosfato deshidrogenasa (G6PD) y realizar análisis molecular para identificar las variantes A+, A- y mediterránea en una población de residentes en Bogotá.Métodos: Se analizaron 348 personas que residen en Bogotá, pertenecientes a la Policía Nacional y a la Universidad del Rosario. La actividad enzimática se determinó en muestras de sangre mediante espectrofotometría con el kit Trinity Biotech (Cat 345-B). Los valores de hemo...

  7. Assessing the impacts of industrial water use in Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lévová, Tereza; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2011-01-01

    use also depends on the local sensitivity to freshwater extraction, and the change in the quality from water intake to discharge of the usedwater. A methodology is presented catering to these characteristics of the water use issue and demonstrated on an industrial case study from the biotech industry.......Use of freshwater gives rise to important environmental impacts to consider in the sustainability analysis of an industry or a product. Water use impacts are highly dependent on the local or regional conditions, and apart from the quantity that is extracted and used, the impact of the freshwater...

  8. WRIB Poster Award winners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The 10th Workshop on Recent Issues in Bioanalysis (WRIB) held in Orlando, USA, in April 2016. It drew close to 500 professionals representing large pharmas, biotechs, CROs and multiple regulatory agencies from around the world, working on both small- and large-molecule bioanalysis. This year, bioanalysis and bioanalysis zone were proud to support the WRIB Poster Awards and we feature profiles of the authors of the winning posters. Go to www.bioanalysis-zone.com to see the winning posters in full. Winning posters. PMID:27523325

  9. An Asian perspective on GMO and biotechnology issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Paul P S

    2008-01-01

    Of the 102 million hectares that made up the global area of biotech crops in 2006, less than 8% (7.6 million ha) were in Asia. Three biotech crops are currently planted in significant areas in four Asian countries with government regulatory approval; namely, cotton, corn (maize), and canola. However, the amount of GM crop material imported into the Asian region for processing into food and animal feed is very substantial, and almost every country imports GM food. The issues which concern Asian scientists, regulators, and the lay public resemble those of other regions - biosafety, food safety, ethics and social justice, competitiveness, and the "EU" trade question. Most Asian countries now have regulatory systems for approving the commercialization of GM crops, and for approving food safety of GM crops. In Asia, because of the varied cultures, issues concerning the use of genes derived from animals arouse much emotion for religious and diet choice reasons. Because many Asian producers and farmers are small-scale, there is also concern about technology dependency and to whom the benefits accrue. All consumers surveyed have expressed concern about potential allergenic and long-term toxic effects, neither of which is grounded on scientific facts. Because of Asia's growing demand for high volumes of quality food, it is likely that GM crops will become an increasing feature of our diet. PMID:18296345

  10. Variability in the results of inr (international normalized ratio: a comparison of six commercial thromboplastin brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Daniela Serralvo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The efficacy and safety in treatment with oral anticoagulants are dependent on the monitoring of the effect of anticoagulants by the prothrombin time (PT. The system INR (International Normalized Ratio was developed to minimize the variability in the PT, mainly because of the thromboplastin reagent used. Objective: Compare the results of INR employing six thromboplastins and plasmas of patients using oral anticoagulants. Materials and Methods: For this study, 96 patients using oral anticoagulants and that had TP collected for monitoring anticoagulants were selected randomly. INR values were determined using six commercially available thromboplastin brands. Results and Discussion: Of the 96 patients, 29 were with the INR between 2 and 3 when used reagents Dade-Behring®, Human do Brasil® and Diagnostica Stago®. Regardless of the range of INR, the results obtained with the reagent Labtest® were statistically different from the Dade-Behring®, from Diagnostica Stago®, Trinity Biotech and Bios Diagnostica®. With INR between 2 and 3 only differences were observed between the results of brands and Bios Diagnostica® Labtest®. With INR above 3, the results of Labtest® were different from the Dade-Behring®, from Diagnostica Stago®, Trinity Biotech® and Bios Diagnostica®. Conclusion: Despite the establishment of INR, there are still significant differences in INR results depending on the thromboplastin brand used, which can interfere with the therapeutic approach in relation to oral anticoagulants.

  11. Genetically modified crops: the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khush Gurdev S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The major scientific advances of the last century featured the identification of the structure of DNA, the development of molecular biology and the technology to exploit these advances. These breakthroughs gave us new tools for crop improvement, including molecular marker-aided selection (MAS and genetic modification (GM. MAS improves the efficiency of breeding programs, and GM allows us to accomplish breeding objectives not possible through conventional breeding approaches. MAS is not controversial and is now routinely used in crop improvement programs. However, the international debate about the application of genetic manipulation to crop improvement has slowed the adoption of GM crops in developing as well as in European countries. Since GM crops were first introduced to global agriculture in 1996, Clive James has published annual reports on the global status of commercialized GM crops as well as special reports on individual GM crops for The International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-biotech Applications (ISAAA. His 34th report, Global Status of Commercialized Biotech/ GM crops: 2011 [1] is essential reading for those who are concerned about world food security.

  12. Essential Drugs Production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoheir Ezziane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines.

  13. Energy from waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the fast growing population, the demand for energy and the discharge of waste are also increasing day by day. So, there is two method of waste treatment that practiced by our company, centralised and de centralised. For de centralised treatment, there are some advantages like no collection, no transportation, small investment and for disadvantages, more treatment plants are needed. Waste of food materials and other bio degradable wastes generated in Factory canteens, Convents, Hospitals, Hostels, Hotels and other industrial organizations can be treated in an eco-friendly way for the production of cooking gas in very large scale. BIOTECH has completed the installation of 52 Nos. power generation projects using market /slaughter house waste. The power generated from these projects is being utilized for energy requirements of the concerned markets and to meet the in-house requirements of the projects. In recognition of our selfless services to the society through our system of waste management and the generation of Energy from waste. BIOTECH was honored by conferring on it the prestigious International Ashden Award GREEN OSCAR 2007. (Author)

  14. Essential drugs production in Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS): opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to elucidate various essential drugs in the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) countries. It discusses the opportunities and challenges of the existing biotech infrastructure and the production of drugs and vaccines in member states of the BRICS. This research is based on a systematic literature review between the years 2000 and 2014 of documents retrieved from the databases Embase, PubMed/Medline, Global Health, and Google Scholar, and the websites of relevant international organizations, research institutions and philanthropic organizations. Findings vary from one member state to another. These include useful comparison between the BRICS countries in terms of pharmaceuticals expenditure versus total health expenditure, local manufacturing of drugs/vaccines using technology and know-how transferred from developed countries, and biotech entrepreneurial collaborations under the umbrella of the BRICS region. This study concludes by providing recommendations to support more of inter collaborations among the BRICS countries as well as between BRICS and many developing countries to shrink drug production costs. In addition, this collaboration would also culminate in reaching out to poor countries that are not able to provide their communities and patients with cost-effective essential medicines. PMID:25489593

  15. The Court of Justice of the European Union changes its case law on patentability of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadio, Enrico; Rovati, Angelo Maria

    2015-01-01

    On 18 December 2014, in International Stem Cell Corporation v. Comptroller General of Patents, Designs and Trade Marks (C-364/13), the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) delivered an important decision regarding the scope of the exclusion from patentability on morality-related grounds under Article 6(2) of the EU Biotech Directive. The Court made an important distinction between embryonic stem cell technologies based on fertilised human ovum and those based on unfertilised human ovum stimulated by parthenogenesis. The CJEU held, in particular, that a human ovum: (i) who is unfertilized and (ii) whose division and further development has been stimulated by parthenogenesis, is not a human embryo under Article 6(2)(c) of the Biotech Directive, if it in itself has not the inherent capacity of developing into a human being, this matter to be ascertained by the national court in the light of current scientific knowledge. By doing so, the Court clarified its previous ruling in Brüstle (October 2011). PMID:26665350

  16. The influence of human factor on financial sustainability of agricultural production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ivanovich Ogorodnikov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of functioning ofcomplex production systems in agroindustrial sphere — largecrop farms and livestock farms — shows that the basis for dynamic development of their productive activities is based on a reliable and stable operation of the complex biotech (human-machine systems. Urgent problems, whose solution promotes a dynamic and efficient operation of complex biotechnological systems, are to create mathematical models of the total biotech system, allowing sufficiently informatively guide the work of major agricultural organizations. This paper discusses an alternative methodological approach to assessing and forecasting financial sustainability of an enterprise. An important place among the factors that shape the financial stability of the economic entity, takes the human factor (decision maker. Financial sustainability of the enterprise is seen from the perspective of bio-approach that includes elements of the system MME (man, machine, and environment. This approach improves the results when evaluating the adequacy of the financial stability of companies in various states of the economy. Newly developed approaches and mathematical models to managesystems of biotechnology makeit possibleto significantly increase the productivity of animals, crop production and the level of socio-economic status of people in the country.

  17. Commercialisation of science in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major changes are occurring across the science and technology (S and T) landscape in this country. Messages from Federal and State Governments in recent times could not have been clearer - in return for 'taxpayer $ into ideas' (in other words, funding for front end basic research) there is an expectation that 'ideas will be translated into $' (in other words, commercialisation will be pursued aggressively). As we in Australian S and T are constantly reminded, with part justification only, Australian researchers (especially in the life sciences) are good at generating a wealth of ideas but not much wealth from ideas. It is claimed that despite scientific excellence, many in the sector are risk averse, immobile, prone to academic snobbery, better employees than employers, not entrepreneurial etc, etc. Regardless of the veracity of any of this, the 1990s has seen a change with many more scientists interested in pursuing the progression of ideas to research to invention to intellectual property to competitive advantage to commercialisation to wealth, jobs and social development to profits and tax dollars to increased support for innovation, R and D, basic research etc. In regard to biomedical research, it has been said that '... medical biotechnology was the first business with enough glamour to persuade eminent scientists that the entrepreneurial spirit and academic respectability are not mutually exclusive. Maybe it's OK to be a science-literate businessman and to make money from science. Successful biotech companies emerge when good science meets excellent management and that combination, in an enabling environment, attracts informed investors and partners. Biotech companies may focus on a single product, a portfolio, or a technology platform and the majority are destined not to become, and have no intention of becoming, an integrated biopharmaceutical or agrochemical company. Their capacity to raise funds is influenced by 'signals' that the technology, the people

  18. Biotechnology for Sustainable Crop Production and Protection: Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Manjunath

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, transgenic crops were grown on 134 million hectares in 25 countries, including India, in six continents by about 14million farmers, marking an 80-fold increase in the area since their first commercialization on 1.7 m ha in the USA and fiveother countries in 1996. The dominant transgenic traits were herbicide tolerance and insect resistance, deployed either alone orboth stacked in the same plant. A recent survey of the global impact of biotech crops estimated that in 2008 alone, the totalcrop production gain globally for the 4 principal biotech crops - maize, soybean, cotton and canola - was 29.6 million metrictons while the net economic benefit to the biotech farmers was US$ 9.2 billion. The cumulative benefits for the period 1996-2008 were yield gains of 167 million tons and economic returns of US$ 51.9 billion. In India, the area planted with Bt-cottonincreased significantly from year to year since its introduction in 2002 and reached 8.4 million hectares in 2009. The overallbenefits from Bt-cotton included an yield increase of up to 63% due to effective control of bollworms, pesticide reduction by50%, net profit to farmers up to Rs.10,000/hectare and turned India from an importer to a major exporter of cotton. Theseindicate that biotechnology has made significant contributions to higher productivity, lower costs of production and increasedeconomic benefits and that it has enormous potential for the future with new traits, events and crops. Over 60 countries,including India, are engaged in research on about 55 crop species to incorporate transgenes to bestow various traits such asresistance to pests, diseases or herbicides; tolerance to environmental stresses like drought, cold or salinity; enhanced cropyields, nutrition or shelf-life, etc. However, unreasonable opposition to biotechnology and undue delays in regulatoryapprovals are some of the major challenges that need to be addressed so as to make full use of this technology which

  19. Nucleopolyhedrovirus Introduction in Australia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrick Buerger; Caroline Hauxwell; David Murray

    2007-01-01

    Nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) has become an integral part of integrated pest management (IPM) in many Australian agricultural and horticultural crops. This is the culmination of years of work conducted by researchers at the Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (QDPI&F) and Ag Biotech Australia Pty Ltd. In the early 1970's researchers at QDPI&F identified and isolated a virus in Helicoverpa armigera populations in the field. This NPV was extensively studied and shown to be highly specific to Helicoverpa and Heliothis species. Further work showed that when used appropriately the virus could be used effectively to manage these insects in crops such as sorghum, cotton, chickpea and sweet corn. A similar virus was first commercially produced in the USA in the 1970's. This product, Elcar(R), was introduced into Australia in the late 1970's by Shell Chemicals with limited success. A major factor contributing to the poor adoption of Elcar was the concurrent enormous success of the synthetic pyrethroids. The importance of integrated pest management was probably also not widely accepted at that time. Gradual development of insect resistance to synthetic pyrethroids and other synthetic insecticides in Australia and the increased awareness of the importance of IPM meant that researchers once again turned their attentions to environmentally friendly pest management tools such NPV and beneficial insects. In the 1990's a company called Rhone-Poulenc registered an NPV for use in Australian sorghum, chickpea and cotton. This product, Gemstar(R), was imported from the USA. In 2000 Ag Biotech Australia established an in-vivo production facility in Australia to produce commercial volumes of a product similar to the imported product. This product was branded, ViVUS(R), and was first registered and sold commercially in Australia in 2003. The initial production of ViVUS used a virus identical to the American product but replicating it in an Australian Helicoverpa

  20. Applications of recombinant Pichia pastoris in the healthcare industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinacker, Daniel; Rabert, Claudia; Zepeda, Andrea B; Figueroa, Carolina A; Pessoa, Adalberto; Farías, Jorge G

    2013-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the establishment and development of the biotech industry has improved exponentially, allowing the commercial production of biopharmaceutical proteins. Nowadays, new recombinant protein production is considered a multibillion-dollar market, in which about 25% of commercial pharmaceuticals are biopharmaceuticals. But to achieve a competitive production process is not an easy task. Any production process has to be highly productive, efficient and economic. Despite that the perfect host is still not discovered, several research groups have chosen Pichia pastoris as expression system for the production of their protein because of its many features. The attempt of this review is to embrace several research lines that have adopted Pichia pastoris as their expression system to produce a protein on an industrial scale in the health care industry. PMID:24688491

  1. Valuable biomolecules from nine North Atlantic red macroalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Bruhn, Annette; Eybye, Karin Loft;

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, novel marine resources are scrutinized pursuing compounds of use in the medical, pharmaceutical, biotech, food or feed industry. Few of the numerous marine macroalgae are currently exploited. In this study, the contents of nutritional compounds from nine common North Atlantic red......, glutamic acid, and arginine, respectively. The amino acid score of the nine algae varied from 44% to 92%, the most commonly first limiting amino acid being histidine. Lutein, β-carotene, and zeaxanthin were the identified carotenoids. Contents of all macro and trace minerals, with the exception of...... phosphorus, were higher than those described for conventional food. Low sodium/potassium ratios (0.08 - 2.54) suggested a potential for using the ash fraction for sodium salt replacement. The algae constituted rich sources of carbohydrates (40% to 71% of DM) which show their potential for a broader...

  2. Structure-Based Virtual Screening of Commercially Available Compound Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Virtual screening (VS) is an efficient hit-finding tool. Its distinctive strength is that it allows one to screen compound libraries that are not available in the lab. Moreover, structure-based (SB) VS also enables an understanding of how the hit compounds bind the protein target, thus laying ground work for the rational hit-to-lead progression. SBVS requires a very limited experimental effort and is particularly well suited for academic labs and small biotech companies that, unlike pharmaceutical companies, do not have physical access to quality small-molecule libraries. Here, we describe SBVS of commercial compound libraries for Mer kinase inhibitors. The screening protocol relies on the docking algorithm Glide complemented by a post-docking filter based on structural protein-ligand interaction fingerprints (SPLIF). PMID:27316988

  3. Bridging regional innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2013-01-01

    The topics of regional innovation systems (RIS) and cross-border regions attract increasing attention, but few studies combine the themes. Further, the existing empirical studies of cross-border innovation and knowledge creation analyse one case at one point in time, thus, making it difficult to...... assess the progress of integration in the regions, as well as the effect of cross-border innovation policies. Consequently, important questions are left unanswered, including the central research question of this paper: does the sudden removal of significant physical barriers directly impacts...... collaboration activity in cross-border innovation systems? This paper examines regional integration in the Oresund Region over time. It deals with a specific part of the RIS, as it analyses research collaboration between actors from the Danish and Swedish sides, with a specific emphasis on the biotech industry...

  4. Managing Demands for Social Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Cecilie

    In recent years numerous calls have been made to enhance the social responsibility of biotechnology from both social scientists (e.g. Nowotny et. al. 2001) and political institutions (e.g. Royal Society 2004; U.S. Congress 2003; EEA 2002). The demands vary in form and content: From state incentives...... pressure on the biotech research organizations that find themselves in a jumble of demands to engage themselves with society. Mccarthy and Kelty, for instance, quote a nano-technologist for saying that he is afraid of “too much responsibility” (2010: 407). Based on a laboratory ethnography, this paper...... way society’s expectations are managed have severe implications on how research projects are organized and prioritized among the organizations’ employees....

  5. Towards ontology based search and knowledgesharing using domain ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zambach, Sine

    This paper reports on work in progress. We present work on domain specific verbs and their role as relations in domain ontologies. The domain ontology which is in focus for our research is modeled in cooperation with the Danish biotech company Novo Nordic. Two of the main purposes of domain...... ontologies for enterprises are as background for search and knowledge sharing used for e.g. multi lingual product development. Our aim is to use linguistic methods and logic to construct consistent ontologies that can be used in both a search perspective and as knowledge sharing.This focuses on identifying...... verbs for relations in the ontology modeling. For this work we use frequency lists from a biomedical text corpus of different genres as well as a study of the relations used in other biomedical text mining tools. In addition, we discuss how these relations can be used in broarder perspective....

  6. Exuberant innovation: The Human Genome Project

    CERN Document Server

    Gisler, Monika; Woodard, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    We present a detailed synthesis of the development of the Human Genome Project (HGP) from 1986 to 2003 in order to test the "social bubble" hypothesis that strong social interactions between enthusiastic supporters of the HGP weaved a network of reinforcing feedbacks that led to a widespread endorsement and extraordinary commitment by those involved in the project, beyond what would be rationalized by a standard cost-benefit analysis in the presence of extraordinary uncertainties and risks. The vigorous competition and race between the initially public project and several private initiatives is argued to support the social bubble hypothesis. We also present quantitative analyses of the concomitant financial bubble concentrated on the biotech sector. Confirmation of this hypothesis is offered by the present consensus that it will take decades to exploit the fruits of the HGP, via a slow and arduous process aiming at disentangling the extraordinary complexity of the human complex body. The HGP has ushered other...

  7. Perspectives of DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG XiaoKun; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are important tools for high-throughput genome research, in revealing both the structural and functional characteristics of genomes. In the past decade the DNA microarray technologies have been widely applied in the studies of functional genomics, systems biology and pharmacogenomics. The next-generation DNA sequenc-ing method was first introduced by the 454 Company in 2003, immediately followed by the establish-ment of the Solexa and Solid techniques by other biotech companies. Though it has not been long since the first emergence of this technology, with the fast and impressive improvement, the application of this technology has extended to almost all fields of genomics research, as a rival challenging the existing DNA microarray technology. This paper briefly reviews the working principles of these two technologies as well as their application and perspectives in genome research.

  8. What Finance Can Learn from Biopharma Industry: A Transfer of Innovation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco COREA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The financial sector is living a profound crisis in order to keep pace with the continuous technological breakthroughs that come out daily, while other sectors seem to be historically more growth-by-innovation-based (e.g., the pharma/biotech sector. This work focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to innovation, and on insights that the banking sector can draw from the pharmaceutical one. Hence, a unique dataset has been built, and it collects information on the most relevant players for both the fields. Different indicators have been created as well in order to empirically test whether the financial industry is actually less innovative with respect to the pharmaceutical one, and to understand the best growing strategy for the banking industry. The results confirm that there is an innovation gap between the two industries, as well as identify the corporate venture capital as the best mean to drive business growth through innovation.

  9. Managing Front-End Innovation through Idea Markets at Novozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauto, Giancarlo; Valentin, Finn; Hatzack, Frank;

    2013-01-01

    Online collaboration is a powerful tool for boosting idea generation in large corporations. However, management may experience an overload of proposals from employees. To improve front-end innovation, the Danish industrial biotech company Novozymes implemented an internal idea competition in which...... a relatively small number of highly motivated participants screened their colleagues' inventions through an "idea market." The idea competition fulfilled its goals of generating two ideas with high growth potential within a short time, uncovering and recombining old proposals that inventors had not...... previously been able to advance in the organization and focusing managerial attention on the selection process. The campaign is an effective tool to recombine existing knowledge that had not been utilized. The process demonstrated that asking participants to comment on proposals improves idea generation and...

  10. National differences in FEI support and innovation management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Front End Innovation (FEI) is supported among companies of different nationality within the context of Pharmaceutical R&D. The present study is carried out in order to contribute to the development of a clearer understanding of active facilitation of innovation management...... and front end innovation in theory and practice. I aim to show how different aspects of company size, type and nationality affect the way innovation management and FEI is supported within organizations. This is examined through an in-depth case study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A....../S, and a comparative study including seven European and American Biotech and Pharmaceutical companies. The findings from the study reveal a number of similarities and differences in innovation management and FEI support among the different companies and present propositions of important aspects to...

  11. How Patent Function Integration with R&D Influence the Value of Patents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beukel, Karin; Valentin, Finn

    Patent strategies are endogenous to firm appropriability. However, to what extent does firm’s R&D teams’ engagement with patent experts influence the value of patents? We estimate the relationship between firm’s R&D use of patent functions on patent value in Biotech firms. Controlling for...... characteristics of scientific team, firm effects, and other patent value indicators, we find that having a firm specific (in-house) internal patent function is a driver of patent value. In addition, we find that the way in which patent functions create patent value differs dependent on whether the firm has...... internal patent function or not. In-house patent functions create value through narrow patents, whereas, firms with no in-house patent function create valuable patents by the use of broader scoped patents. Our results point to a strong effect of firm specific patent functions, but also explain how firms...

  12. The Battle for Patent Rights in Plant Biotechnology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Cédric

    2011-01-01

    . Results indicate that the opposition rate is far greater in plant biotechnology than in other emerging industries. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the empirical findings suggest that opposed patents are disproportionately those that score high on features that proxy for their “value” or “quality......This paper describes and analyzes the occurrence and extent of oppositions initiated against plant biotechnology patents granted by the European Patent Office (EPO). The opposition mechanism is a legal procedure that allows any third party to challenge the validity of patents awarded by the EPO......”. In contrast to previous findings, however, the results show that large-volume applicants are more likely to be opposed. Because the boundaries of plant biotech patents are ill-defined, large patent portfolios do not promote cooperative behavior such as licensing or settlements. The analysis rejects...

  13. FACILITATING RADICAL FRONT-END INNOVATION THROUGH TARGETED HR PRACTICES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Annabeth

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how radical front end innovation can be actively facilitated through selected and targeted HR practices and bundles of HR practices. The empirical field is an explorative case study of front end innovation and HR practices in the pharmaceutical industry, with an in-depth case...... study of the Danish pharmaceutical company, H. Lundbeck A/S, and explorative studies of seven European and American pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The study aims to show how companies can apply HR practices in ways that actively supports the development of radical front end innovation. The value...... added and the contribution of this article to the existing FEI and HR literature therefore lies in the exploration and mapping of how radical front end innovation is and can be facilitated through targeted HR practices; and in identifying the unique opportunities and challenges of innovation...

  14. Perspectives of DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    DNA microarray and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are important tools for high-throughput genome research,in revealing both the structural and functional characteristics of genomes.In the past decade the DNA microarray technologies have been widely applied in the studies of functional genomics,systems biology and pharmacogenomics.The next-generation DNA sequencing method was first introduced by the 454 Company in 2003,immediately followed by the establishment of the Solexa and Solid techniques by other biotech companies.Though it has not been long since the first emergence of this technology,with the fast and impressive improvement,the application of this technology has extended to almost all fields of genomics research,as a rival challenging the existing DNA microarray technology.This paper briefly reviews the working principles of these two technologies as well as their application and perspectives in genome research.

  15. Biotechnology SMEs, start-ups, spin-offs or microenterprises are they molecules coming from the research results? If so, what place do they hold in the global industrial tissue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddoli, Roberto

    2007-02-01

    In recent years, the number of biotech enterprises in Europe has grown spectacularly, largely fueled by the increasing number of entrepreneurial initiatives from Europe's leading research institutes. The place held on the economic market by these enterprises, is a question that market analysts have been asking themselves since their rapid growth and, more particularly, their over valuation which, at times, has led to the crash of their shares on the stock markets. To be sure, this article does not claim to go into an in-depth financial analysis to explain the details of certain "shipwrecks". Rather, it just would like to provide some useful indications for all those having embarked, or desirous of doing so, in the creation of biomedical enterprises. PMID:16887388

  16. Uncertainty as Certaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzinger, Tom

    I am trying to make money in the biotech industry from complexity science. And I am doing it with inspiration that I picked up on the edge of Appalachia spending time with June Holley and ACEnet when I was a Wall Street Journal reporter. I took some of those ideas to Pittsburgh, in biotechnology, in a completely private setting with an economic development focus, but also with a mission t o return profit to private capital. And we are doing that. I submit as a hypothesis, something we are figuring out in the post- industrial era, that business evolves. It is not the definition of business, but business critically involves the design of systems in which uncertainty is treated as a certainty. That is what I have seen and what I have tried to put into practice.

  17. Measurement of organic/polymer material by phase modulation ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yong; Teboul, Eric; Kramer, Alan R.

    2004-06-01

    Due to they can be tailored to provide a wide range of physical properties and their easiness of processing and fabrication, polymeric materials have found widespread use in the manufacture of microwave, electronics, photonics and bio-tech systems. This paper presents the basic principle of phase modulation spectroscopic ellipsometer (PMSE) and its advantages over other ellipsometry in measuring polymer film. Used for thin film measurements ultra-thin dielectric, meal film and organic film, the PMSE technique is now used over a wide spectral range from the vacuum ultraviolet to the mid infrared. Film thickness ranging from Angstrom up to 50um can be measured by PMSE. Applications of PMSE on measurement and characterization of polymer/organic material are given in the paper.

  18. Offshoring of Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakonsson, Stine

    2013-01-01

    products developed in the home economy; secondly, they increasingly adjust their products to the new markets; and thirdly, some of the more high-tech companies have developed international techno-scientific networks. These companies explain the development as a strategy for ‘tapping into new knowledge’ by...... constructs. Furthermore, companies face many difficulties in organizing innovation internationally. These challenges are dealt with through either virtual or physical centres of excellence. Communication and communication tools provide a key for companies to manage these centres, and new forms of......This chapter is an investigation into the internationalization of innovation in the Danish food-related biotech industry. The process of the internationalization of innovation in food and ingredients into new markets has followed a similar path: first, the companies enter new markets with their...

  19. Production and estimation of alkaline protease by immobilized Bacillus licheniformis isolated from poultry farm soil of 24 Parganas and its reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamba Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial alkaline protease has become an important industrial and commercial biotech product in the recent years and exerts major applications in food, textile, detergent, and pharmaceutical industries. By immobilization of microbes in different entrapment matrices, the enzyme produced can be more stable, pure, continuous, and can be reused which in turn modulates the enzyme production in an economical manner. There have been reports in support of calcium alginate and corn cab as excellent matrices for immobilization of Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis, respectively. This study has been carried out using calcium alginate, κ-carrageenan, agar-agar, polyacrylamide gel, and gelatin which emphasizes not only on enzyme activity of immobilized whole cells by different entrapment matrices but also on their efficiency with respect to their reusability as first attempt. Gelatin was found to be the best matrix among all with highest enzyme activity (517 U/ml at 24 h incubation point and also showed efficiency when reused.

  20. What I've Learned and Unlearned as a Physical Scientist in the Life Science Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, David

    2008-04-01

    I joined Monsanto in 1996 with a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry and a background in photochemistry and supercritical fluids, just as the company was exiting the chemical business. Since then, I experienced a merger into a pharmaceutical company (Pharmacia) and a spinoff into a purely agricultural company, focused on Biotech and Crop Protection. Change of this kind is typical in industrial research. I have found it to be a continuing challenge to decide when to adapt and when to focus on marketing the expertise that I brought into the company. Viewed as a problem in career tactics in a constantly changing technical, business, and organizational landscape, it might seem overwhelmingly difficult. But, as I will discuss, life in industrial research is constantly offering opportunities to provide new answers to the question, ``what should I do with my life?'' Thus, particularly for those who believe that research should serve society, the satisfactions of an industrial research career are deep and varied.

  1. Social Capital, ICT Use and Company Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinfield, Charles; Scupola, Ada; López-Nicolás, Carolina

    2009-01-01

    This study explores how some kinds of ICT uses, as well as social capital and other means of access to knowledge resources, are related to company performance in a knowledge-intensive business cluster. Data were collected through a survey of companies in the Medicon Valley biotech region located in...... Denmark and Southern Sweden. Responding companies included established producers of biotechnology-related products as well as small biotechnology start-up firms emphasizing research and development.  The results suggest that when ICT use was aimed at accessing and enhancing human and intellectual capital......, such as use of online databases for recruitment, intranets to enhance employee access to information and education, and collaborative tools to connect with off-premise researchers, companies reported better performance outcomes. Social capital in the form of connections to people who can provide access...

  2. Traditional Knowledge and Patent Protection: Conflicting Views On International Patent Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Andrzejewski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As diseases continue to spread around the globe, pharmaceutical and biotech companies continue to search for new and better drugs to treat them. Most of these companies have realised that useful compounds for these purposes may be found in the natural resources that indigenous and local communities use. And yet, even though the importance of these biological resources to global health and economic livelihood is well recognised, the legal ownership and control of this traditional knowledge is still very controversial. This article undertakes a comparative analysis of American and European, as well as international legal regulations on patent law and traditional knowledge. Key questions include: What is traditional knowledge? How have the national patent laws of these countries treated the protection of plant variety and plant genetic resources? What are the existing international standards for patents, and what implications do they have for protecting traditional knowledge? And finally, what protection systems are emerging for the future?

  3. Seafood Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    This presentation will fill the total picture of this conference between fisheries and aquaculture, blue biotech and bioconservation, by considering the optimal processing technology of marine resources from the raw material until the seafood reaches the plate of the consumer. The situation today...... must be performed such that total traceability and authenticity of the final products can be presented on demand. The most important aspects to be considered within seafood technology today are safety, healthy products and high eating quality. Safety can be divided into microbiological safety...... and not presenting any safety risk per se. Seafood is healthy due to the omega-3 fatty acids and the nutritional value of vitamins, peptides and proteins. The processing technology must however be performed such that these valuable features are not lost during production. The same applies to the eating quality. Any...

  4. CVD 908, CVD 908-htrA, and CVD 909 live oral typhoid vaccines: a logical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacket, Carol O; Levine, Myron M

    2007-07-15

    Typhoid fever remains an important public health problem in many parts of the world. Despite the availability of oral Ty21a (Vivotif; Berna Biotech) and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi; Aventis Pasteur), improved typhoid fever vaccines have been sought. These include a series of vaccine candidates developed at the Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland, based on attenuation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi by deletions in the aroC, aroD, and htrA genes. These vaccine candidates, designated "CVD 908," "CVD 908-htrA," and "CVD 909," have been developed and tested in volunteers with variable success. This review summarizes the clinical data that directed the logical progression of this vaccine development strategy. PMID:17582563

  5. Meeting report VLPNPV: Session 3: Immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Trudy G

    2014-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) and nano-particles (NP) are increasingly considered for both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for a wide variety of human and animal diseases. Indeed, 2 VLPs have already been licensed for use in humans, the human papilloma virus vaccine and the hepatitis B virus vaccine. (1) Reflecting this increased interest, a second international conference with a specific focus on VLPs and NP was held at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, in June 2014. Approximately 100 attendees, hailing from many nations, came from academic institutions, research institutes, and biotech companies. A wide variety of topics were discussed, ranging from development and characterization of specific VLP and NP vaccine candidates to methods of production of these particles. Session three was focused on the general question of immune responses to VLPs. PMID:25529229

  6. Basic concepts of cellulose polymers- A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Harika

    2012-01-01

    As pharmaceutically active ingredients continue to become more ′′potent′′ the effective controlled delivery of doses have become intriguing. As a result, polymers now often constitute the major portion of many pharmaceutical dosage forms and as such can have profound impact on the reproducibility of drug release and overall performance of the dosage forms.The technical complexities associated with drug development have increased in controlled delivery due to challenges such as complex drug actives, and in cases of biotech products, stabilization of the active ingredient. The multidisciplinary understanding of polymers is thus required including technical, safety, quality, and regulatory aspects, which, prior to this effort, has not been available in a single resource. It also proposes new and innovative ways for regulatory review of polymers, which, if adopted,

  7. Impact of T-shaped skill and top management support on innovation speed; the moderating role of technology uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Hamdi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the moderating role of technology uncertainty on the relationship between team contextual factors of top management support and T-shaped skills with innovation speed. For the purpose of this study, the data were collected from 227 new products from 147 biotechnology firms in Malaysia. The overall results confirmed the moderating effect of technology uncertainty on the relationship between T-shaped skills, as well as top management support with innovation speed. The results further confirmed that under the high technology uncertainty, this effect is higher in comparison to the low and medium uncertainty. This indicates that the effect of top management support and T-shaped skills on innovation speed improves when technology uncertainty increases. On the practical side, the report equips biotech firms with valuable insights to develop effective strategies.

  8. Patentability of Parthenogenic Stem Cells: International Stem Cell Corporation v. Comptroller General of Patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-06-01

    The European Court of Justice (ECJ) has recently issued a ruling in Case C-364/13 International Stem Cell Corporation v. Comptroller General of Patents Designs and Tademarks (Case) that aims at harmonising the patenting practices regarding interpretation of Article 6.2.c of Directive 98/44/EC (Biotech Patent Directive) in respect of patentability of human parthenogenic stem cells (hpSCs). The Case alters the patenting regime for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) applications, by stating that moral restrictions against hESC-patents are only applicable to such cells derived from embryos that had the potential to develop into a human being. Consequently, hpSC-based inventions may be patentable in Europe. This Case represents a leap forward to striking a balance between protecting human dignity and integrity whilst granting patent incentives for biomedical research. PMID:26399046

  9. Effects of research tool patents on biotechnology innovation in a developing country: A case study of South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Tae-Kyu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concerns have recently been raised about the negative effects of patents on innovation. In this study, the effects of patents on innovations in the Korean biotech SMEs (small and medium-sized entrepreneurs were examined using survey data and statistical analysis. Results The survey results of this study provided some evidence that restricted access problems have occurred even though their frequency was not high. Statistical analysis revealed that difficulties in accessing patented research tools were not negatively correlated with the level of innovation performance and attitudes toward the patent system. Conclusion On the basis of the results of this investigation in combination with those of previous studies, we concluded that although restricted access problems have occurred, this has not yet deterred innovation in Korea. However, potential problems do exist, and the effects of restricted access should be constantly scrutinized.

  10. Cell sheet approach for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Utoh, Rie; Nagase, Kenichi; Okano, Teruo

    2014-09-28

    After the biotech medicine era, regenerative medicine is expected to be an advanced medicine that is capable of curing patients with difficult-to-treat diseases and physically impaired function. Our original scaffold-free cell sheet-based tissue engineering technology enables transplanted cells to be engrafted for a long time, while fully maintaining their viability. This technology has already been applied to various diseases in the clinical setting, including the cornea, esophagus, heart, periodontal ligament, and cartilage using autologous cells. Transplanted cell sheets not only replace the injured tissue and compensate for impaired function, but also deliver growth factors and cytokines in a spatiotemporal manner over a prolonged period, which leads to promotion of tissue repair. Moreover, the integration of stem cell biology and cell sheet technology with sufficient vascularization opens possibilities for fabrication of human three-dimensional vascularized dense and intact tissue grafts for regenerative medicine to parenchymal organs. PMID:24858800

  11. Social Capital in the Internationalization of Knowledge-Intensive new Ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Neergaard, Helle

    2005-01-01

    international activities. Based on statistical analysis it elucidates the relationship among a number of factors related to social capital which may influence the internationalization process. These factors include the number and types of contacts as well as how these contacts are utilized. The results indicate......It has long been recognised that social capital in the shape of network relationships plays a significant role in the internationalisation process of a business. This research seeks to further the discussion of how social capital influences the early internationalization of new technology......-based ventures. It is based on survey data provided by 98 entrepreneurs and in-depth interviews with the founders of 24 ventures in the Danish IT/communication and biotech/medico industries. The paper focuses on contrasting new ventures already operating on the international scene with those that have no...

  12. Changing the way science is taught through gamified laboratories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Makransky, G.; Wandall, J.;

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of high school and college students indicate that they have little interest in science, and many graduate with marginal science competencies. However, laboratory exercises, usually the most engaging part of science courses, tend to be expensive, time consuming and occasionally...... constrained by safety concerns. Combining gamification elements with simulations may provide an opportunity for great gains in learning effectiveness and motivation of biotech students. An advanced laboratory simulation platform based on mathematical algorithms supporting open-ended investigations was...... developed and combined with gamification elements such as an immersive 3D universe, storytelling, conversations with fictional characters and a scoring system. Two gamified laboratory simulations were tested: a crime-scene lab and a genetic engineering lab (http://www.labster.com/biolabs/). A study testing...

  13. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Schwartz, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    biotech-claims directed to personalized medicine, biological correlations and compounds containing biological information. Part IV, which is to be published in issue 4, finally offers a broader discussion of the recent US patent-eligibility developments from an innovation policy perspective including......This is the fourth part of a four-partite article discussing the US Federal Circuit decision in AMP v. USPTO , also known as the ACLU /Myriad "gene patenting" case ("Myriad"). Part I commenced with a description of the legal framework and an explanation of how the decision relates to the recently...... invigorated U.S. debate on patent eligibility, referring inter alia to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos and the pending certiorari in Prometheus v. Mayo (1). Before this background, Part I recited the complex procedural history of AMP v. USPTO (2) and summarized the underpinnings of...

  14. Patent Assessment Quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Paul F.; Reitzig, Markus

    2006-01-01

    The increasing number of patent applications worldwide and the extension of patenting to the areas of software and business methods have triggered a debate on "patent quality". While patent quality may have various dimensions, this paper argues that consistency in the decision making on the side of...... the patent office is one important dimension, particularly in new patenting areas (emerging technologies). In order to understand whether patent offices appear capable of providing consistent assessments of a patent's technological quality in such novel industries from the beginning, we study the...... concordance of the European Patent Office's (EPO's) granting and opoposition decisions for individual patents. We use the historical example of biotech patens filed between 1978 until 1986, the early stage of the industry. Our results indicate that the EPO shows systematically different assessments of...

  15. Managing Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Heidi; Vintergaard, Christian

    Logically it seems that companies pursuing different business strategies wouldalso manage their relationships with other firms accordingly. Nevertheless, due tothe lack of research in the field of network strategies, this link still remainsinadequately examined. Based on the well-known framework...... of organisationalbehaviour developed by Miles and Snow (1978), this paper argues that thepatterns of network behaviour practiced by firms greatly depend on the businesstypology of the company. That is, a company's business typology will to a certaindegree dictate the network identity of the company. In this paper evidence...... isprovided, that the relation between a company's strategy, structure and processesin fact have a considerable influence on its pattern of network behaviour. Threecase studies from the Danish biotech industry exemplify and illustrate how acompany's strategy is directly correlated with how it manages its...

  16. The Impact of Obfuscation on Strategic Alliance Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Blettner, Daniela;

    Strategic alliances have become a major instrument for companies to create competitive advantage. Hence, the choice of alliance partners becomes an important but little studied part of firm strategy. In this paper we highlight the role of obfuscation, i.e., the degree to which firms conceal...... alliances. Based on a sample of pharmaceutical and biotech firms, we create a dyad-level panel-dataset of all potential and realized linkages to study firm?s partner choices. We find that, on average, obfuscation decreases alliance formation probability for those firms that lack previous alliance experience...... as a primary signal. This effect is dyadic in nature, i.e., particularly pronounced when experienced firms evaluate un-experienced partners. Our findings have important implications for impression management and perception engineering of firms which are new to industries or markets....

  17. Pharmaceutical and biomedical applications of lipid-based nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Claudia; Leonardi, Antonio; Cupri, Sarha; Puglisi, Giovanni; Pignatello, Rosario

    2014-03-01

    Increasing attention is being given to lipid nanocarriers (LNs) as drug delivery systems, due to the advantages offered of a higher biocompatibility and lower toxicity compared with polymeric nanoparticles. Many administration routes are being investigated for LNs, including topical, oral and parenteral ones. LNs are also proposed for specific applications such as cancer treatment, gene therapy, diagnosis and medical devices production. However, the high number of published research articles does not match an equal amount of patents. A recent Review of ours, published in Pharmaceutical Patent Analyst, reported the patents proposing novel methods for the production of LNs. This review work discusses recent patents, filed in 2007-2013 and dealing with the industrial applications of lipid-based nanocarriers for the vectorization of therapeutically relevant molecules, as well as biotech products such as proteins, gene material and vaccines, in the pharmaceutical, diagnostic and biomedical areas. PMID:24588596

  18. The "real world" barriers and solutions to Candida vaccine patent prosecutions: an analysis of U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions on related applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shyh-Jen

    2012-10-01

    The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) adopts recent patent courts' opinions (such as KSR In re Fisher and Ariad v. Lilly) in patent examinations, which would certainly create barriers to biotech patent prosecution. To identify the barriers to Candida vaccine patent prosecution, we analyzed 99 US-granted patents from January 2001 to May 2012 related to Candida vaccines. The rejections were based on factors that included obviousness, novelty, indefiniteness, double patenting, enablement, written description and utility. Based on this investigation, we find that some of these rejections were actually avoidable, and then further provide workable solutions to avoid some of the barriers, especially those related to patentability. These principles recited in this study should also be applicable to other fields of vaccines and immunotherapeutics. PMID:22894949

  19. DTREEv2, a computer-based support system for the risk assessment of genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertry, Ine; Nothegger, Clemens; Sweet, Jeremy; Kuiper, Harry; Davies, Howard; Iserentant, Dirk; Hull, Roger; Mezzetti, Bruno; Messens, Kathy; De Loose, Marc; de Oliveira, Dulce; Burssens, Sylvia; Gheysen, Godelieve; Tzotzos, George

    2014-03-25

    Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) remains a contentious area and a major factor influencing the adoption of agricultural biotech. Methodologically, in many countries, risk assessment is conducted by expert committees with little or no recourse to databases and expert systems that can facilitate the risk assessment process. In this paper we describe DTREEv2, a computer-based decision support system for the identification of hazards related to the introduction of GM-crops into the environment. DTREEv2 structures hazard identification and evaluation by means of an Event-Tree type of analysis. The system produces an output flagging identified hazards and potential risks. It is intended to be used for the preparation and evaluation of biosafety dossiers and, as such, its usefulness extends to researchers, risk assessors and regulators in government and industry. PMID:24308933

  20. Diagnostic reliability of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy during continuous treatment with different somatostatin analogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the diagnostic reliability of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) in patients treated with somatostatin analogs, ten patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors were investigated before and during continuous treatment. Different somatostatin analogs were used for therapy: five patients received octreotide (Sandostatin, Sandoz, Switzerland) and five were treated with BIM 23014 (Lanreotide, Ipsen Biotech, France) within the scope of a clinical phase II study. The SRS findings were analyzed in terms of biodistribution of the labeled somatostatin analogy and tumor visualization comparing the two studies in each patient. Whereas liver, spleen, and kidney uptake were decreased during octreotide treatment and increased on lanreotide therapy, tumor accumulation was intensified in all but one patient. Our results suggest that the diagnostic value of SRS is not necessarily restricted during treatment with somatostatin analogs. Indeed, tumor visualization may even be enhanced in this therapeutic setting. (orig.)

  1. Real intention of the enterprise who looks for such a newcomer; Konna shinjin motomu, kigyo no honne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The age when the change which to become rapidly global entails is drastic is reached, and that way of having it is renewed, and the Japanese chemical business world is being asked to it. Questionnaire was done to take the reference of the enterprise person of not only the students thinking about employment to the enterprise by making the talented people figure which is necessary in such an age rise from the opinion in the front of the enterprise but also the present post and the persons concerned in education. 1. Asahi Chemical Industry Co., Ltd. 2. Asahi Glass Co., Ltd. 3. Asahi Chiba 4. Ube Industries, Ltd. 5. SDS Biotech6. Kao Corp. 7. Kyowa Hakko Kogyo Co., Ltd. 8. Konica Corp. 9. Sharp and 10. Showa polymer. (NEDO)

  2. [Conflicts of interest: should we lower our guard?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luca

    2015-07-01

    Conflicts of interest affect the scientific communication and information: their effects on the physician's prescribing behavior have been frequently studied and clearly documented. Recently, the New England Journal of Medicine published a series of papers questioning the radical positions on this topic, asking to reconsider the most intransigent approach, so that it may be possible a productive collaboration between academic medicine and pharmaceutical industry, in the interest of the patient. The papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine confirm the difficulties experienced by the biomedical journals: the support of the industry is essential and most of the authors and referees has ties with pharmaceutical or biotech companies. The debate among the various stakeholders is vital but should be open and transparent, with the aim to restore credibility to all the parties concerned: academic medicine, pharmaceutical industry and scientific publishers. PMID:26228720

  3. Modeling of Filtration Processes—Microfiltration and Depth Filtration for Harvest of a Therapeutic Protein Expressed in Pichia pastoris at Constant Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthukumar Sampath

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Filtration steps are ubiquitous in biotech processes due to the simplicity of operation, ease of scalability and the myriad of operations that they can be used for. Microfiltration, depth filtration, ultrafiltration and diafiltration are some of the most commonly used biotech unit operations. For clean feed streams, when fouling is minimal, scaling of these unit operations is performed linearly based on the filter area per unit volume of feed stream. However, for cases when considerable fouling occurs, such as the case of harvesting a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris, linear scaling may not be possible and current industrial practices involve use of 20–30% excess filter area over and above the calculated filter area to account for the uncertainty in scaling. In view of the fact that filters used for harvest are likely to have a very limited lifetime, this oversizing of the filters can add considerable cost of goods for the manufacturer. Modeling offers a way out of this conundrum. In this paper, we examine feasibility of using the various proposed models for filtration of a therapeutic product expressed in Pichia pastoris at constant pressure. It is observed that none of the individual models yield a satisfactory fit of the data, thus indicating that more than one fouling mechanism is at work. Filters with smaller pores were found to undergo fouling via complete pore blocking followed by cake filtration. On the other hand, filters with larger pores were found to undergo fouling via intermediate pore blocking followed by cake filtration. The proposed approach can be used for more accurate sizing of microfilters and depth filters.

  4. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm. PMID:23408723

  5. The effect of problem-based learning on high school students enrolled in biology for the technologies as measured by concept of self and attitude toward science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carll-Williamson, Martha Perrow

    This study examined the effects of a Problem-Based Learning unit of instruction on high school students enrolled in Biology for the Technologies by measuring the effect of a Problem-Based Learning unit on student concept of self and attitude toward science. Bracken's (1992) commercially available Multidimensional Self Concept Scale (MSCS) with six subscales was used to measure the difference in the concept of self of two groups of high school Bio-Tech students, one group that participated in a Problem-Based Learning unit of study for four to six weeks and another group that did not do so. A second measure, Science as You See It (SAYSI), with five subscales was designed by the investigator to evaluate the effect of the same Problem-Based Learning unit of instruction on the attitude toward science of the same two groups of high school Bio-Tech students. This study also explored the relationship between the dependent variables and considered the effect of gender on performance over time as measured by the MSCS and the SAYSI. According to the multivariate tests of significance, the intervention, a Problem-Based Learning unit of instruction, appeared to have no statistically significant effect on the total score or subscores of the concept of self of high school students enrolled in Biology for the Technologies, nor did it seem to have any statistically significant effect on the attitude toward science of these same students. No statistically significant correlation was evident between the two measures or their subscales, and no relationship appeared to exist between pre- and post scores according to gender by treatment. Gender, alone, was statistically significant for attitude toward science.

  6. Comparison of Three Screening Test Kits for G6PD Enzyme Deficiency: Implications for Its Use in the Radical Cure of Vivax Malaria in Remote and Resource-Poor Areas in the Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino, Fe Esperanza; Sornillo, Johanna Beulah; Tan, Alvin; von Seidlein, Lorenz

    2016-01-01

    Objective We evaluated a battery of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase diagnostic point-of-care tests (PoC) to assess the most suitable product in terms of performance and operational characteristics for remote areas. Methods Samples were collected in Puerto Princesa City, Palawan, Philippines and tested for G6PD deficiency with a fluorescent spot test (FST; Procedure 203, Trinity Biotech, Ireland), the semiquantitative WST8/1-methoxy PMS (WST; Dojindo, Japan) and the Carestart G6PD Rapid Diagnostic Test (CSG; AccessBio, USA). Results were compared to spectrophotometry (Procedure 345, Trinity Biotech, Ireland). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each test with cut-off activities of 10%, 20%, 30% and 60% of the adjusted male median. Results The adjusted male median was 270.5 IU/1012 RBC. FST and WST were tested on 621 capillary blood samples, the CSG was tested on venous and capillary blood on 302 samples. At 30% G6PD activity, sensitivity for the FST was between 87.7% (95%CI: 76.8% to 93.9%) and 96.5% (95%CI: 87.9% to 99.5%) depending on definition of intermediate results; the WST was 84.2% (95%CI: 72.1% to 92.5%); and the CSG was between 68.8% (95%CI: 41.3% to 89.0%) and 93.8% (95%CI: 69.8% to 99.8%) when the test was performed on capillary or venous blood respectively. Sensitivity of FST and CSG (tested with venous blood) were comparable (p>0.05). The analysis of venous blood samples by the CSG yielded significantly higher results than FST and CSG performed on capillary blood (p<0.05). Sensitivity of the CSG varied depending on source of blood used (p<0.05). Conclusion The operational characteristics of the CSG were superior to all other test formats. Performance and operational characteristics of the CSG performed on venous blood suggest the test to be a good alternative to the FST. PMID:26849445

  7. Concordance of four commercial enzyme immunoassay and three immunoblot formats for the detection of Lyme borreliosis antibodies in human serum: the two-tier approach remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickeson, David J; Chen, Sharon C-A; Sintchenko, Vitali G

    2016-04-01

    Serological tests show considerable variation in their ability to correctly diagnose Lyme borreliosis (LB). This study compared four commercially available screening enzyme immunoassays (EIA) for the detection of LB IgG using either whole cell lysate (WCL) antigens, purified proteins or recombinant antigens with the second-tier whole cell sonicate (WCS) western immunoblots or recombinant antigen line blots. A consensus between three EIA results from 222 patient sera was designated as a point of comparison for each method which gave 66 positive and 156 negative results. The positive predictive values (PPV) of WCL EIA were 40% for the MarDx Diagnostics Borrelia burgdorferi EIA 'combined' IgG and IgM (Trinity Biotech) and 55% for the EUROIMMUN plus VlsE IgG. These were significantly lower PPVs than that produced by the recombinant antigen-based EIA NovaLisa Borrelia burgdorferi IgG-ELISA (NovaTec Immunodiagnostica) and the EUROIMMUN Anti-Borrelia Select ELISA IgG (90% and 100%, respectively; p = 0.02). The WCS western immunoblot using B. burgdorferi and B. afzelii separately showed a high PPV of 91% but its positive agreement with consensus EIA result was only 65%. Another WCL western immunoblot with purified extracts of Osp C and VlsE, the Trinity Biotech EU Lyme + VlsE IgG Western Blot had a PPV of 92% while the recombinant line blot from EUROIMMUN, the Anti-Borrelia (IgG) EUROLINE-RN-AT, demonstrated a significantly reduced PPV of 70% with some non-specific reactions in sera containing antibodies to Leptospira species, Helicobacter pylori and Treponema pallidum. The use of recombinant antigens in EIA for LB IgG screening significantly improves the predictive values of serological results above those of WCL antigen EIA. Second tier WCS western immunoblots offer high PPVs, especially with added specific purified proteins, more so than in one recombinant line blot. PMID:27020501

  8. Monitoring the agricultural landscape for insect resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Joseph; Glaser, J. A.; Copenhaver, Ken

    Farmers in 25 countries on six continents are using plant biotechnology to solve difficult crop production challenges and conserve the environment. In fact, 13.3 million farmers, which include 90 percent of the farming in developing countries, choose to plant biotech crops. Over the past decade, farmers increased area planted in genetically modified (GM) crops by more than 10 percent each year, thus increasing their farm income by more than 44 billion US dollars (1996-2007), and achieved economic, environmental and social benefits in crops such as soybeans, canola, corn and cotton. To date, total acres of biotech crops harvested exceed more than 2 billion with a proven 13-year history of safe use. Over the next decade, expanded adoption combined with current research on 57 crops in 63 countries will broaden the advantages of genetically modified foods for growers, consumers and the environment. Genetically modified (GM) crops with the ability to produce toxins lethal to specific insect pests are covering a larger percentage of the agricultural landscape every year. The United States department of Agriculture (USDA) estimated that 63 percent of corn and 65 percent of cotton contained these specific genetic traits in 2009. The toxins could protect billions of dollars of loss from insect damage for crops valued at greater than 165 billion US dollars in 2008. The stable and efficient production of these crops has taken on even more importance in recent years with their use, not only as a food source, but now also a source of fuel. It is in the best interest of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to ensure the continued efficacy of toxin producing GM crops as their use reduces pesticides harmful to humans and animals. However, population genetics models have indicated the risk of insect pests developing resistance to these toxins if a high percentage of acreage is grown in these crops. The USEPA is developing methods to monitor the agricultural

  9. Who owns what? Private ownership and the public interest in recombinant DNA technology in the 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Doogab

    2011-09-01

    This essay analyzes how academic institutions, government agencies, and the nascent biotech industry contested the legal ownership of recombinant DNA technology in the name of the public interest. It reconstructs the way a small but influential group of government officials and university research administrators introduced a new framework for the commercialization of academic research in the context of a national debate over scientific research's contributions to American economic prosperity and public health. They claimed that private ownership of inventions arising from public support would provide a powerful means to liberate biomedical discoveries for public benefit. This articulation of the causal link between private ownership and the public interest, it is argued, justified a new set of expectations about the use of research results arising from government or public support, in which commercialization became a new public obligation for academic researchers. By highlighting the broader economic and legal shifts that prompted the reconfiguration of the ownership of public knowledge in late twentieth-century American capitalism, the essay examines the threads of policy-informed legal ideas that came together to affirm private ownership of biomedical knowledge as germane to the public interest in the coming of age of biotechnology and genetic medicine. PMID:22073770

  10. Frequency of glucose-6-ph-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency in asymptomatic Pakistani population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the frequency of G6PD deficiency in asymptomatic Pakistan population. Healthy young males and females between the ages of 13 to 28 years were tested for G6PD deficiency. None of the individuals had the findings of chronic hemolytic anemia. Their test was carried out on Trinity Biotech visual, qualitative, colorimetric procedure for determining G6PD deficiency using dichlorophenol indophenols as an indicator. During the study period 888 individuals, 804 males and 84 females were tested for G6PD deficiency. Forty (4.5%) individual had G6PD deficiency. All were otherwise healthy with normal general physical examination, complete blood count, blood glucose level, liver function tests, renal function tests, lipid profile, urine analysis, electrocardiogram and X- Ray chest. Out of 804 males 40 (5.0%) had G6PD deficiency. None of the 84 females had the enzyme deficiency. G6PD deficiency is observed to be 4.5%.Our findings are in conformity with W.H.O data for geographic distribution of G6PD deficiency in Pakistan. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemolytic anemia, especially following drug administration. (author)

  11. Challenges in the clinical development requirements for the marketing authorization of new medicines in southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2009-03-01

    A rapid growth of investment into clinical research and new drug development has manifested itself by an exponential increase of new products coming onto the worldwide market. The emerging pharmaceutical and biotech markets in Southeast Asia are believed to be extremely promising from a commercial point of view in the next decade. The unique position of the Asian market and the diversity in clinical research initiatives are linked with diverse regulatory requirements for clinical development and registration of new medicines. Some of these differences have an impact on timelines for marketing authorizations in South Korea, China, Thailand, Japan, Singapore, and other countries. One of the approaches to streamlining regulatory strategy in different countries is the initiation of multicountry international clinical trials trying to address requirements and allowing registration in several regional countries simultaneously. Increasing cooperation between South Asian countries in relation to regulatory requirements and clinical development will facilitate the registration of innovative medicines in this rapidly developing region of the world and enable improved cohesiveness between countries in a drug safety framework. PMID:19168433

  12. High-pressure applications in medicine and pharmacology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Jerson L; Foguel, Debora; Suarez, Marisa; Gomes, Andre M O; Oliveira, Andrea C [Centro Nacional de Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear, Departamento de Bioquimica Medica, Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-590 (Brazil)

    2004-04-14

    High pressure has emerged as an important tool to tackle several problems in medicine and biotechnology. Misfolded proteins, aggregates and amyloids have been studied, which point toward the understanding of the protein misfolding diseases. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has also been used to dissociate non-amyloid aggregates and inclusion bodies. The diverse range of diseases that result from protein misfolding has made this theme an important research focus for pharmaceutical and biotech companies. The use of high pressure promises to contribute to identifying the mechanisms behind these defects and creating therapies against these diseases. High pressure has also been used to study viruses and other infectious agents for the purpose of sterilization and in the development of vaccines. Using pressure, we have detected the presence of a ribonucleoprotein intermediate, where the coat protein is partially unfolded but bound to RNA. These intermediates are potential targets for antiviral compounds. The ability of pressure to inactivate viruses, prions and bacteria has been evaluated with a view toward the applications of vaccine development and virus sterilization. Recent studies demonstrate that pressure causes virus inactivation while preserving the immunogenic properties. There is increasing evidence that a high-pressure cycle traps a virus in the 'fusion intermediate state', not infectious but highly immunogenic.

  13. Cooperación y estrategia de apropiación en alta tecnología: el caso de una empresa biofarmacéutica argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiro Verre

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta el estudio de caso de Delta Biotech S.A., una pyme argentina perteneciente a un sector de alta tecnología como lo es el biofarmacéutico. El análisis apunta a evidenciar cómo la estrategia de apropiación de los resultados de las innovaciones tecnológicas de la firma se basa en la articulación de distintos mecanismos y, al ser la actividad de innovación realizada con el aporte de fuentes externas y públicas de conocimiento, dicha estrategia debe tener en cuenta los riesgos que derivan de este rasgo constitutivo de la innovación. La cooperación público-privada para la innovación genera efectos variados sobre cada uno de los mecanismos de apropiación y, por tanto, las características específicas que asume la misma son relevantes para evaluar cuáles son sus efectos sobre la estrategia de apropiación de la empresa.

  14. Development and application of modern agricultural biotechnology in Botswana: the potentials, opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlang, Utlwang; Tsurupe, Gorata; Segwagwe, Amogelang; Obopile, Motshwari

    2014-07-01

    In Botswana, approximately 40% of the population live in rural areas and derive most of their livelihood from agriculture by keeping livestock and practising arable farming. Due to the nature of their farming practises livestock and crops are exposed to diseases and environmental stresses. These challenges offer opportunities for application of biotechnology to develop adaptable materials to the country's environment. On the other hand, the perceived risk of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has dimmed the promise of the technology for its application in agriculture. This calls for a holistic approach to the application of biotechnology to address issues of biosafety of GMOs. We have therefore assessed the potentials, challenges and opportunities to apply biotechnology with specific emphasis on agriculture, taking cognisance of requirement for its research, development and application in research and teaching institutions. In order to achieve this, resource availability, infrastructure, human and laboratory requirements were analyzed. The analysis revealed that the country has the capacity to carry out research in biotechnology in the development and production of genetically modified crops for food and fodder crops. These will include gene discovery, genetic transformation and development of systems to comply with the world regulatory framework on biosafety. In view of the challenges facing the country in agriculture, first generation biotech crops could be released for production. Novel GM products for development may include disease diagnosis kits, animal disease vaccines, and nutrient use efficiency, drought, and pest and disease resistant food and fodder crops. PMID:25437237

  15. Science at the supermarket: multiplication, personalization and consumption of science in everyday life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Luca

    2014-06-01

    Which is the kind science's psychological guidance upon everyday life? I will try to discuss some issues about the role that techno-scientific knowledge plays in sense-making and decision making about practical questions of life. This relation of both love and hate, antagonism and connivance is inscribable in a wider debate between a trend of science to intervene in fields that are traditionally prerogative of political, religious or ethical choices, and, on the other side, the position of those who aim at stemming "technocracy" and governing these processes. I argue that multiplication, personalization and consumption are the characteristics of the relationship between science, technology and society in the age of "multiculturalism" and "multi-scientism". This makes more difficult but intriguing the study and understanding of the processes through which scientific knowledge is socialized. Science topics, like biotech, climate change, etc. are today an unavoidable reference frame. It is not possible to not know them and to attach them to the most disparate questions. Like in the case of Moscovici's "Freud for all seasons", the fact itself that the members of a group or a society believe in science as a reference point for others, roots its social representation and the belief that it can solve everyday life problems. PMID:24578069

  16. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part I. DNA technology and recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical biotechnology has a long tradition and is rooted in the last century, first exemplified by penicillin and streptomycin as low molecular weight biosynthetic compounds. Today, pharmaceutical biotechnology still has its fundamentals in fermentation and bioprocessing, but the paradigmatic change affected by biotechnology and pharmaceutical sciences has led to an updated definition. The biotechnology revolution redrew the research, development, production and even marketing processes of drugs. Powerful new instruments and biotechnology related scientific disciplines (genomics, proteomics) make it possible to examine and exploit the behavior of proteins and molecules. Recombinant DNA (rDNA) technologies (genetic, protein, and metabolic engineering) allow the production of a wide range of peptides, proteins, and biochemicals from naturally nonproducing cells. This technology, now approximately 25 years old, is becoming one of the most important technologies developed in the 20(th) century. Pharmaceutical products and industrial enzymes were the first biotech products on the world market made by means of rDNA. Despite important advances regarding rDNA applications in mammalian cells, yeasts still represent attractive hosts for the production of heterologous proteins. In this review we describe these processes. PMID:24399704

  17. Regenerative medicine in Europe: global competition and innovation governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogarth, Stuart; Salter, Brian

    2010-11-01

    Leading European nations with strong biotech sectors, such as the UK and Germany, are investing heavily in regenerative medicine, seeking competitive advantage in this emerging sector. However, in the broader biopharmaceutical sector, the EU is outperformed by the USA on all metrics, reflecting longstanding problems: limited venture capital finance, a fragmented patent system, and relatively weak relations between academia and industry. The current global downturn has exacerbated these difficulties. The crisis comes at a time when the EU is reframing its approach to the governance of innovation and renewing its commitment to the goal of making Europe the leading player in the global knowledge economy. If the EU is to gain a competitive advantage in the regenerative medicine sector then it must coordinate a complex multilevel governance framework that encompasses the EU, member states and regional authorities. This article takes stock of Europe's current competitive position within the global bioeconomy, drawing on a variety of metrics in the three intersecting spheres of innovation governance: science, market and society. These data then provide a platform for reviewing the problems of innovation governance faced by the EU and the strategic choices that have to be confronted in the regenerative medicine sector. PMID:21082895

  18. How to Deal with the Upcoming Challenges in GMO Detection in Food and Feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia R. M. Broeders

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new types of genetic elements will be used to construct new GMO and new crops will be transformed. Additionally, the presence of unauthorised GMO in food and feed samples might increase in the near future. To enable enforcement laboratories to continue detecting all GM events and to obtain an idea of the possible presence of unauthorised GMO in a food and feed sample, an intensive screening will become necessary. A pragmatic, cost-effective, and time-saving approach is presented here together with an overview of the evolution of the GMO and the upcoming needs.

  19. OPTIMIZED DESIGN OF BIO-SENSOR USING CONDUCTING POLYMERS AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha.A,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This Research work is focused on the design, development and technological evolution of emerging fields of Nanotechnology and Conducting Polymer Electronics, Bio-Tech based Embedded Sensors and Smart Systems employing System-0n- Chip (SOC Core, as applied to Health Monitoring of Human and Complex Systems in Engineering and Medicine. With the Invention of Thin-Film Technology, it is now possible to fabricate Novel Conducting-Polymer based sensors and devices with built-in-flexible electronics resulting in high throughput devices and systems that are flexible, lighter, bio-compatible and economical also. The flexible and EmbeddedElectronics is a key enabler for a number of platform methodologies such as Designed Thin-Films, Smart Electronics and Sensor Devices. The integration of the Bio-Sensor with embedded electronics data conditioning and processing SOC and Wireless –Communication System may provide vast opportunities for Biological – Sensor Applications, especially for physiological monitoring of Leukocyte-Counts in blood sample or analyte for Leukemia Patients in the Society.

  20. Marine biotechnologies and synthetic biology, new issues for a fair and equitable profit-sharing commercial use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Jean-François; Tardieu-Guigues, Elisabeth

    2014-10-01

    The sea will be a source of economic development in the next years. Today the research works in marine biotechnologies supply new products and processes. The introduction in the laboratories of a new technology, synthesis biology, is going to increase the possibilities of creation of new products. Exploitation of product stemming from marine biodiversity has to be made with regard to various rights among which industrial property law, maritime law and the Convention on BioDiversity. All participants involved in the promotion of research in marine biotechnology must address the fair and equitable sharing of any commercial exploitation. Carrying out work involving synthetic biology has increased the number of unanswered questions about how operators should manage in order to avoid any threat of being sued for infringements of IP rights or for alleged bio-piracy. This paper, by no means exhaustive in the field, analyzes some of the issues raised on the modification to the landscape in marine biotechnology by the advent of synthetic biology. Such issues indicate how important the collaboration between researchers, industrialists, lawyers is for allowing proper use of marine biotech. PMID:25116370

  1. Genetic basis and detection of unintended effects in genetically modified crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladics, Gregory S; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Bregitzer, Phil; Doerrer, Nancy G; Gray, Alan; Holzhauser, Thomas; Jordan, Mark; Keese, Paul; Kok, Esther; Macdonald, Phil; Parrott, Wayne; Privalle, Laura; Raybould, Alan; Rhee, Seung Yon; Rice, Elena; Romeis, Jörg; Vaughn, Justin; Wal, Jean-Michel; Glenn, Kevin

    2015-08-01

    In January 2014, an international meeting sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute/Health and Environmental Sciences Institute and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency titled "Genetic Basis of Unintended Effects in Modified Plants" was held in Ottawa, Canada, bringing together over 75 scientists from academia, government, and the agro-biotech industry. The objectives of the meeting were to explore current knowledge and identify areas requiring further study on unintended effects in plants and to discuss how this information can inform and improve genetically modified (GM) crop risk assessments. The meeting featured presentations on the molecular basis of plant genome variability in general, unintended changes at the molecular and phenotypic levels, and the development and use of hypothesis-driven evaluations of unintended effects in assessing conventional and GM crops. The development and role of emerging "omics" technologies in the assessment of unintended effects was also discussed. Several themes recurred in a number of talks; for example, a common observation was that no system for genetic modification, including conventional methods of plant breeding, is without unintended effects. Another common observation was that "unintended" does not necessarily mean "harmful". This paper summarizes key points from the information presented at the meeting to provide readers with current viewpoints on these topics. PMID:25716164

  2. Towards personalized agriculture: What chemical genomics can bring to plant biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Stokes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the dominant drug paradigm in which compounds were developed to fit all, new models focused around personalized medicine are appearing where treatments are customized for individual patients. The agricultural biotechnology industry should also think about these new personalized models. For example, most common herbicides are generic in action, which led to the development of genetically modified crops to add specificity. The ease and accessibility of modern genomic analysis should facilitate the discovery of chemicals that are more selective in their utility. Is it possible to develop species-selective herbicides and growth regulators? More generally put, is plant research at a stage where chemicals can be developed that streamline plant development and growth to various environments? We believe the advent of chemical genomics now opens up these and other opportunities to personalize agriculture. Furthermore, chemical genomics does not necessarily require genetically tractable plant models, which in principle should allow quick translation to practical applications. For this to happen, however, will require collaboration between the Ag-biotech industry and academic labs for early-stage research and development.

  3. Zapatista corn: a case study in biocultural innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Marisa

    2014-12-01

    In November 2001, Nature published a letter in which University of California Berkeley's biologists claimed to have found evidence of genetically modified (GM) DNA in regional varieties of maize in Oaxaca, even though the Mexican government had banned transgenic corn agriculture in 1998. While urban protesters marched against the genetic 'contamination' of Mexican corn by US-based agricultural biotech firms, rural indigenous communities needed a framework for understanding concepts such as GM before they could take action. This article analyzes how the indigenous organization, the Zapatistas, mobilized a program to address this novel entity. Their anti-GM project entailed educating local farmers about genetics, importing genetic testing kits, seed-banking landrace corn and sending seeds to 'solidarity growers' around the world. This article explores material-semiotic translations to explain one of the central aspects of this project, the definition and circulation of Zapatista corn--an entity defined not only through cultural geography, but also technological means. Through its circulation, Zapatista corn serves to perform a biocultural engagement with Zapatista's political project of resistance to neoliberalism. While much has been written about both regulatory policy and consumer activism against GM in the Global North, Zapatista corn also provides a case study in indigenous, anti-GM activism founded on biocultural innovation and the creation of alternative networks for circulating corn. PMID:25608442

  4. Evolution of the Novalux extended cavity surface-emitting semiconductor laser (NECSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, John G.

    2016-03-01

    Novalux Inc was an enterprise founded by Aram Mooradian in 1998 to commercialise a novel electrically pumped vertical extended cavity semiconductor laser platform, initially aiming to produce pump lasers for optical fiber telecommunication networks. Following successful major investment in 2000, the company developed a range of single- and multi-mode 980 nm pump lasers emitting from 100-500 mW with excellent beam quality and efficiency. This rapid development required solution of several significant problems in chip and external cavity design, substrate and DBR mirror optimization, thermal engineering and mode selection. Output coupling to single mode fiber was exceptional. Following the collapse of the long haul telecom market in late 2001, a major reorientation of effort was undertaken, initially to develop compact 60-100 mW hybrid monolithically integrated pumplets for metro/local amplified networks, then to frequency-doubled blue light emitters for biotech, reprographics and general scientific applications. During 2001-3 I worked at Novalux on a career break from University College Cork, first as R&D Director managing a small group tasked with producing new capabilities and product options based on the NECSEL platform, including high power, pulsed and frequency doubled versions, then in 2002 as Director of New Product Realization managing the full engineering team, leading the transition to frequency doubled products.

  5. How to Deal with the Upcoming Challenges in GMO Detection in Food and Feed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Sylvia R. M.; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C. J.; Roosens, Nancy H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator) into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new types of genetic elements will be used to construct new GMO and new crops will be transformed. Additionally, the presence of unauthorised GMO in food and feed samples might increase in the near future. To enable enforcement laboratories to continue detecting all GM events and to obtain an idea of the possible presence of unauthorised GMO in a food and feed sample, an intensive screening will become necessary. A pragmatic, cost-effective, and time-saving approach is presented here together with an overview of the evolution of the GMO and the upcoming needs. PMID:23193359

  6. Process development in the QbD paradigm: Role of process integration in process optimization for production of biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Anurag S; Pathak, Mili; Godara, Avinash

    2016-03-01

    Biotherapeutics have become the focus of the pharmaceutical industry due to their proven effectiveness in managing complex diseases. Downstream processes of these molecules consist of several orthogonal, high resolution unit operations designed so as to be able to separate variants having very similar physicochemical properties. Typical process development involves optimization of the individual unit operations based on Quality by Design principles in order to define the design space within which the process can deliver product that meets the predefined specifications. However, limited efforts are dedicated to understanding the interactions between the unit operations. This paper aims to showcase the importance of understanding these interactions and thereby arrive at operating conditions that are optimal for the overall process. It is demonstrated that these are not necessarily same as those obtained from optimization of the individual unit operations. Purification of Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF), a biotherapeutic expressed in E. coli., has been used as a case study. It is evident that the suggested approach results in not only higher yield (91.5 vs. 86.4) but also improved product quality (% RP-HPLC purity of 98.3 vs. 97.5) and process robustness. We think that this paper is very relevant to the present times when the biotech industry is in the midst of implementing Quality by Design towards process development. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:355-362, 2016. PMID:26588604

  7. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Geoffrey; Cagan, Ross

    2015-10-01

    Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease. PMID:26438691

  8. Foundation-industry relationships--a new business model joint-venture philanthropy in therapy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartek, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The business model for medical therapy development has changed drastically. Large companies that once conducted their own Research and Development (R&D) and funded all the preclinical studies, all phases of clinical development and marketing of the products are increasingly turning to others for more and more of the earlier work in hopes of being able to in-license a de-risked program well downstream, take it through the final phases of clinical development and into the marketplace. This new paradigm has required patient-advocacy foundations, especially in the rare-disease space, to become far more effective in building relationships with all the players along the therapy-development pathway -- academic scientists, government agencies, other foundations with overlapping interests, biotechs, small biopharmaceutical entities and even the larger industry companies. From the perspective of the patient-advocacy community, these increasingly essential public-private partnerships have taken on the nature of what could be called joint-venture philanthropy and involve a broad spectrum of collaborations and financial relationships between foundations and industry partners that are not without concerns about potential conflicts of interest. PMID:24283968

  9. Nonprofit pharma: solutions to what ails the industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, W H; Kodukula, K

    2011-01-01

    Nonprofit organizations (NPOs) play an increasingly important role providing solutions to the significant challenges faced today by both large pharmaceutical and smaller biotechnology companies, not to mention academia. NPOs chartered for the public benefit are common in the USA and in selected other parts of the world. SRI International, originally founded as the Stanford Research Institute in 1946, is one of the largest and most successful independent NPOs. To provide a perspective on NPO business models, a number of SRI case studies spanning a broad range of technical and business initiatives will be summarized, including basic and contract research, discovery and development of new drugs and biologics, pharmaceutical and biotech research and development and contract services, technology pivots, company spin-ins and spin-outs, and the creation of new NPOs. How to bridge the National Institute of Health's "Valley of Death" and how to navigate the Food and Drug Administration's "Critical Path" will be discussed. We conclude with lessons learned about collaborations and routes to commercialization, along with food for thought for bioscience companies and outsourcing participants. Throughout, we attempt to explain why the role of NPOs is important to both the scientific and business communities and to patients and caregivers. PMID:21728955

  10. Business models and opportunities for cancer vaccine developers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrin, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Despite of growing oncology pipeline, cancer vaccines contribute only to a minor share of total oncology-attributed revenues. This is mainly because of a limited number of approved products and limited sales from products approved under compassionate or via early access entry in smaller and less developed markets. However revenue contribution from these products is extremely limited and it remains to be established whether developers are breaking even or achieving profitability with existing sales. Cancer vaccine field is well recognized for high development costs and risks, low historical rates of investment return and high probability of failures arising in ventures, partnerships and alliances. The cost of reimbursement for new oncology agents is not universally acceptable to payers limiting the potential for a global expansion, market access and reducing probability of commercial success. In addition, the innovation in cancer immunotherapy is currently focused in small and mid-size biotech companies and academic institutions struggling for investment. Existing R&D innovation models are deemed unsustainable in current "value-for-money" oriented healthcare environment. New business models should be much more open to collaborative, networked and federated styles, which could help to outreach global, markets and increase cost-efficiencies across an entire value chain. Lessons learned from some developing countries and especially from South Korea illustrate that further growth of cancer vaccine industry will depends not only on new business models but also will heavily rely on regional support and initiatives from different bodies, such as governments, payers and regulatory bodies. PMID:22894953

  11. Walking between academia and industry to find successful solutions to biomedical challenges: an interview with Geoffrey Smith

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Geoffrey W. Smith is currently the Managing Director of Mars Ventures. He actually started his studies with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a Doctorate in Law but then, in part by chance and in part by following in his family footsteps, he stepped into the healthcare and biotech field. Since then, he has successfully contributed to the birth of a number of healthcare companies and has also held academic positions at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and at The Rockefeller University in New York, teaching about the interface between science and business. During 2014 he served as Senior Editor on Disease Models & Mechanisms, bringing to the editorial team his valuable experience in drug development and discovery. In this interview, Geoff talks to Ross Cagan, Editor-in-Chief of Disease Models & Mechanisms, about how he developed his incredibly varied career, sharing his views about industry, academia and science publishing, and discussing how academia and industry can fruitfully meet to advance bioscience, train the scientists and stakeholders of the future, and drive the successful discovery of new therapeutics to treat human disease.

  12. Nonwovens for filtration media%非织造材料过滤介质

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.Ganesan; T.Karthik; 杜雪子; 李毓陵

    2011-01-01

    目前很多企业将非织造材料用于过滤,其中涉及食品、饮料、生物技术、药物、饮用水、液压用油、燃料、溶剂、酸碱等。不同用途所需去除的杂质也有所不同,非织造材料种类繁多,可满足这些不同应用的需求。非织造材料随着加工原料、加工方法和表面特征的不同而不同。根据成型方法可分成两大类。第一种方法是干法成网工艺,包括梳理、针刺、纺粘和熔喷。第二种方法是湿法成网工艺,一般是在造纸机上完成。两种工艺各具特色,在不同用途上可以发挥各自不同的优势。%There is a wide range of industries that use nonwovens media for filtration applications. They range from food and beverage, biotech, pharmaceutical potable water, hydraulic oils, fuels, solvents, acids and bases. Each application has a different contamin

  13. Breeding and biotechnology for improving berry nutritional quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, Jessica; Battino, Maurizio; Costantini, Elisa; Mezzetti, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    Breeding and biotechnological approaches are currently used to increase the content of specific bioactive components of plants, but the manipulation of plant metabolism is still not easy to address. There is an increasing awareness that multiple genetic and environmental factors affect production and accumulation of bioactive compounds, but these factors are rarely taken into account when fruit is marketed. Rigorous and unprejudiced evaluation of scientific evidence requires a defined set of criteria and methods of evaluation, particularly when breeding and biotech programs are aimed of producing new varieties with improved nutritional values combined with high plant production efficiency and fruit quality. In order to develop new genotypes and commercial cultivars the availability of new sources of Quality Attributes (QA) and Nutritional Attributes (NA) should be explored. In the strawberry, wild species such as F. virginiana glauca and F. vesca are good sources of bioactive compounds, but in raspberries the introduction of the wild germplasm (R. parvifolium) did not improve the nutritional quality of fruit. The methods available for detecting fruit TAC, combined with TPH and other quality parameters such as sugars, total acidity and fruit color, can be proposed as excellent tools for developing a fast and reliable program for screening large breeding populations for high nutritional quality genotypes. Furthermore, NA can represent a useful tool to facilitate analysis of "substantial equivalence" of transgenic and control derived fruit. PMID:16498208

  14. Inclusion of Moloney murine leukemia virus elements upstream of the transgene cassette in an E1-deleted adenovirus leads to an unusual genomic integration in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Classically, the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs) are considered necessary but not sufficient for retroviral integration. Recently, we reported that inclusion of these and additional elements from Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) facilitated transgene integration, without retroviral integrase, when placed in an adenoviral context (AdLTR-luc vector) (Nat. Biotech. 18 (2000), 176; Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 300 (2003), 115). To help understand this nonhomologous DNA recombination event, we constructed another vector, AdELP-luc, with 2.7 kb of MoMLV elements identically placed into an E1-deleted adenovirus type 5 backbone upstream of a luciferase cDNA reporter gene. Unlike AdLTR-luc, no MoMLV elements were placed downstream of the expression cassette. AdELP-luc readily infected epithelial cells in vitro. Southern hybridizations with DNA from cloned cells showed that disruption of the MoMLV sequences occurred. One cell clone, grown in vitro without any special selection medium for 9 months, exhibited stable vector integration and luciferase activity. Importantly, both Southern hybridization and FISH analyses showed that in addition to the MoMLV elements and expression cassette, substantial adenoviral sequence downstream of the luciferase cDNA was genomically integrated. These results suggest that the 2.7 kb of MoMLV sequence included in AdELP-luc have cis-acting functions and mediates an unusual integration event

  15. Scale-up protein separation on stainless steel wide bore toroidal columns in the type-J counter-current chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue Hugh; Hewitson, Peter; van den Heuvel, Remco N A M; Zhao, Yan; Siebers, Rick P G; Zhuang, Ying-Ping; Sutherland, Ian

    2015-12-11

    Manufacturing high-value added biotech biopharmaceutical products (e.g. therapeutic proteins) requires quick-to-develop, GMP-compliant, easy-to-scale and cost effective preparatory chromatography technologies. In this work, we describe the construction and testing of a set of 5-mm inner diameter stainless steel toroidal columns for use on commercially available preparatory scale synchronous J-type counter-current chromatography (CCC) machinery. We used a 20.2m long column with an aqueous two-phase system containing 14% (w/w) PEG1000 and 14% (w/w) potassium phosphate at pH 7, and tested a sample loading of 5% column volume and a mobile phase flow rate of 20ml/min. We then satisfactorily demonstrated the potential for a weekly protein separation and preparation throughput of ca. 11g based on a normal weekly routine for separating a pair of model proteins by making five stacked injections on a single portion of stationary phase with no stripping. Compared to our previous 1.6mm bore PTFE toroidal column, the present columns enlarged the nominal column processing throughput by nearly 10. For an ideal model protein injection modality, we observed a scaling up factor of at least 21. The 2 scales of protein separation and purification steps were realized on the same commercial CCC device. PMID:25818556

  16. Biotechnology's foreign policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbaum, Carl

    2002-01-01

    From its inception, biotechnology has been a uniquely international enterprise. An American and an Englishman working together elucidated the structure of DNA almost 50 years ago; more recently, the Human Genome Project linked researchers around the world, from the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston to the Beijing Human Genome Center. Today our industry's researchers hail from African villages and Manhattan high rises; from Munich and Melbourne; from London, Ontario, and London, England; from Scotland and Nova Scotia--New Scotland; from Calcutta and Calgary. But in the beginning, the infrastructure that supported these efforts--intellectual property, venture capital, streamlined technology transfer--was less widely dispersed and the world's brightest biotech researchers clustered in only half a dozen scientific Meccas. Previous technological revolutions have spread around the world. Following in their footsteps, biotechnology's global diaspora seems inevitable, especially since governments are promoting it. But as our science and business emigrate from early strongholds in the United States, Canada and Europe across oceans and borders and into new cultures, international tensions over biotechnology continue to grow. In just the last few years, controversies have rolled over R&D spending priorities, genetic patents, bioprospecting, transgenic agriculture and drug pricing. My premise today is that our industry needs to formulate its first foreign policy, one which is cognizant of the miserable judgments and mistakes of other industries--and avoids them. PMID:12402751

  17. Competitive intelligence information management and innovation in small technology-based companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    In this article we examine how (i) company type and (ii) the competitive intelligence information used by small technology-based companies affect their innovation performance. The focus is on the specific information types used and not on the information sources. Information topics are classified in four groups - customers (10), company (9), competitor (11) and industry (12). The sample consists of 45 small new technology-based companies, specialized suppliers, and service companies from a variety of sectors - software, photonics, telecommunications, biomedical engineering and biotech, traditional manufacturing etc. The results suggest that the total number of intelligence information topics companies use to make decisions about innovation is not associated with the number of their new products, processes, services and patents. Therefore the companies in our sample do not seem to have the resources, processes or value systems required to use different competitive intelligence information when making decisions on innovation or may rely more on their own internal logic than on external information. Companies are classified using a Pavitt-like taxonomy. Service companies are considered as a separate company type. This allows for explicitly studying both, the innovative role of new services in product driven companies, and the role of new product development in service companies.

  18. Hepatitis B virus surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus rapid tests underestimate hepatitis prevalence among HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hønge, Bo Langhoff; Jespersen, S; Medina, C;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the case of coinfection with HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatic disease progression is often accelerated, with higher rates of liver cirrhosis and liver-related mortality. We aimed to evaluate the performance of the rapid tests used routinely to...... detect HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-HCV among HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau. METHODS: Blood samples from HIV-infected patients in Guinea-Bissau were stored after testing for HBsAg and anti-HCV with rapid tests. Samples were subsequently re-tested for HBsAg and anti-HCV in Denmark....... RESULTS: Two rapid tests were used in Guinea-Bissau: HBsAg Strip Ref 2034 (VEDA.LAB, Alençon, France; sensitivity 62.3%; specificity 99.2%) and HEPA-SCAN (Bhat Bio-Tech, Bangalore, India; sensitivity 57.1%; specificity 99.7%). In the two tests the ability to obtain the correct outcome depended on the...

  19. WSTO9 (TOOKAD) mediated photodynamic therapy as an alternative modality in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Huang, Zheng; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2002-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizes optical energy to activate a pre-administered photosensitizer drug to achieve a localized tumor control. In the presented study, PDT mediated with a second-generation photosensitizer, WST09 (TOOKAD, Steba Biotech, The Netherlands), is investigated as an alternative therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. In vivo canine prostate is used as the animal model. PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates both superficially and interstitially with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the intra-operatively i.v. infused photosensitizer. During light irradiation, tissue optical properties, and temperature were monitored. During the one-week to 3-month period post PDT treatment, the dogs recovered well with little or no complications. The prostates were harvested and subjected to histopathological evaluations. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single treatment, suggesting the therapy is extremely effective in destroying prostatic tissue. Although we found there was loss of epithelial lining in prostatic urethra, there was no evidence it had caused urinary tract side effects as reported in those studies utilizing transurethral irradiation. In conclusion, we found second generation photosensitizer WST09 mediated PDT may provide an excellent alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  20. Valutazione del nuovo sistema automatizzato Triturus - Grifols nella diagnosi sierologica delle infezioni da complesso ToRCH e da virus di Epstein Barr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Sparacino

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The laboratory diagnosis of infections belonging to the ToRCH complex is mainly based of the determination of the immune status to each individual microrganism. In this report, the diagnostic performance of a new automated EIA plates processor system (SeraQuest - GRIFOLS, Pisa, Italy has been compared with other automaed methods: Enzygnost (Dade behring, Marburg, Germany, EIA Well (RADIM, Pomezia, Italy,VIDAS (bioMériuex, Marcy l’etoile, France. In addition, the diagnostic performance of SeraQuest has also been evaluated for the detection of specific immune response to Epstein Barr virus, in comparison with a conventional EIA test (Delta, Pomezia, Italy and with an immunoblotting method (Genelabs - AlfaBiotech, Milan, Italy.The overal evaluation of SeraQuest demonstrated that this test has sensitivity and specificity well comaparable with those of the other methods studied and that could be used as an alternative test in the serological diagnosis of ToRCH and EBV infections.

  1. Yield oil of Jatropha curcas seeds of trees irrigated and fertilized with OMM-Tech; Rendimento de oleo de sementes de pinhao manso submetido a irrigacao e adubacao com OMM-Tech

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelista, Adao W.P.; Alves Junior, Jose; Barbosa, Ricardo A.F.; Frazao, Joaquim J.; Araujo, Fausto J.M. [Universidade Federal de Goias (UFG), Goiania, GO (Brazil). Escola de Agronomia e Engenharia de Alimentos. Setor de Engenharia Rural], E-mail: awpego@bol.com.br

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of irrigation and application of Organo-Minerals-Marine + Biotech (OMM-Tech) in yield oil of Jatropha curcas seeds. The experiment was conducted in an experimental area located in Federal University of Lavras, Brazil. A randomized block experimental design with subdivided parcels and three replications was used. The parcels were submitted to different OMM-Tech fertilizer application methods: T1 = control (no OMM-Tech); T2 = soil application (120 kg ha{sup -1} of OMM-Tech in a powder form); T3 = leaf application (OMM-Tech in a liquid form with a 5% concentration); T4 = soil + leaf application (60 kg ha{sup -1} of OMM-Tech in powder form + OMM-Tech in liquid form with a 2.5% concentration). The sub-plots received two different water management treatments: irrigated and no irrigated. A drip irrigation system with drippers spaced by 0.50 m was used. We evaluated yield oil of seeds in first production year. Jatropha trees irrigated showed a higher seeds oil yield than no irrigated trees. However, fertilization with OMM-Tech no influenced seed oil yield. Seeds oil yield of Jatropha trees irrigated was 34%, and no irrigated 27%. (author)

  2. Noninferiority of Shanghai Cingular biotech’s bovine pericardial valve preclinical study in juvenile ovine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin-Miao; Ding, Yu; Lu, Shu-Yang; Pan, Sun; Abudupataer, Mieradilijiang

    2016-01-01

    Background This study introduces a newly Chinese domestic-designed/manufactured bovine pericardial valve, the SCBC valve (Shanghai Cingular Biotech Corporation, Shanghai, China), and evaluates its hemodynamic performance and calcification potential compared with the Carpentier-Edwards (CE) PerimountTM valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA, USA) in juvenile sheep for preclinical study. Methods Five SCBC valves in study group and three CE PerimountTM valves (6900P with TFX) in control group were implanted in the mitral position of juvenile sheep and followed up for five months. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) for hemodynamic measurement was performed ten days, three months and five months postoperatively. Valve calcification was assessed by X-ray after euthanasia. Other collected data included macroscopic examination, blood analysis, microorganism culture and histological assessment. Results All sheep in two groups lived to sacrifice without evidence of valvular dysfunction. The SCBC valve had similar hemodynamic performance and susceptibility of calcification compared with the CE PerimountTM valve in juvenile ovine model. In all other parameters, the SCBC valve also exhibited no significant difference compared with the CE PerimountTM valve. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that the SCBC valve can exhibit similar mid-term satisfactory safety and efficacy compared with the CE PerimountTM valve in the mitral position of juvenile sheep model. PMID:27293835

  3. Adalimumab: a review of the reference product and biosimilars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo VF

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Valderílio Feijó Azevedo,1,2 Ludmila Della Coletta Troiano,2 Natalia Bassalobre Galli,1 Alais Kleinfelder,1 Nathan M Catolino,1 Paulo Cesar Urbano Martins2 1Rheumatology Unit, Federal University of Paraná, 2Edumed Health Research and Biotech, Curitiba, Brazil Abstract: Adalimumab was the first fully humanized monoclonal antibody approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Launched in 2003, the clinical efficacy and safety of adalimumab were assessed in various trials in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn’s Disease, and ulcerative colitis, among others. At the global level, adalimumab is a major sales success among biologicals. It is still the greatest blockbuster among monoclonal antibodies. The date of its patent expiration paves the road for several potential biosimilars in various markets worldwide. This article discusses the current situation of molecules that are the main candidates to become adalimumab biosimilars. In addition, it also addresses the production processes, clinical studies, and relevant regulatory issues relative to the approval of those molecules, which must meet the challenge of demonstrating similar efficacy and safety to Humira®, but at a lower cost. Keywords: biosimilars, adalimumab, anti-TNF, biosimilarity

  4. Advancing Cancer Survivorship in a Country with 1.35 Billion People: The China Lymphoma Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven; Reno, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Rates of lymphoma are rising rapidly and lymphoma is now the ninth most common cancer among Chinese males. The China Lymphoma Project was founded to increase awareness of lymphoma in China, including the survivability of the disease and the availability of potentially life-saving treatments, and to provide social support for men, women, and children in China who are living with the disease. The project is working with China government officials, several of the top cancer hospitals in China and the U.S., internationally known oncologists and cancer researchers, pharmaceutical and biotech companies in China and the U.S., healthcare and environmental companies, the Confucius Institute at San Diego State University, and the Asian Heritage Society. Advances in e-Health are being utilized to provide patient education and social support. The project will provide free e-books that profile lymphoma survivors (e.g., Kai-Fu Lee, creator of Google China), new videos, websites, pamphlets, blogs, video logs (vlogs), peer-to-peer counseling and support, and information about the latest treatments and oncology clinical trials.

  5. Awakening interest in the natural sciences - BASF's Kids' Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Cinthia

    2012-01-01

    At BASF's Ludwigshafen headquarters, kids and young adults in grades 1-13 can learn about chemistry in the Kids' Labs. Different programs exist for different levels of knowledge. In the two 'Hands-on Lab H(2)O & Co.' Kids' Labs, students from grades 1-6 explore the secrets of chemistry. BASF Kids' Labs have now been set up in over 30 countries. In Switzerland alone, almost 2,000 students have taken part in the 'Water Loves Chemistry' Kids' Lab since it was started in 2011. In Alsace, 600 students have participated to date. In the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Middle School', middle school students explore five different programs with the themes 'substance labyrinth', 'nutrition', 'coffee, caffeine & co.', 'cosmetics' and 'energy'. Biotechnological methods are the focus of the Teens' Lab 'Xplore Biotech' for students taking basic and advanced biology courses. In the 'Xplore High School' Teens' Lab, chemistry teachers present their own experimental lab instruction for students in basic and advanced chemistry courses. The Virtual Lab has been expanding the offerings of the BASF Kids' Labs since 2011. The online lab was developed by the company for the International Year Of Chemistry and gives kids and young adults the opportunity to do interactive experiments outside of the lab. PMID:23394237

  6. Nanotechnology Based Treatments for Neurological Disorders from Genetics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Kurek

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechology involves the application, analysis and manipulation of nanomaterials. These materials have unique and medically useful properties due to their nanoscale parameters. Nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics might eventually bring great relief to people suffering from neurological disorders including autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disorders. A large variety of nonmaterials such as viruses, carbon nanotubes, gold and silica nanoparticles, nanoshells, quantum dots, genetic material and proteins as well as hordes of other forms of nanotechnology have been researched in order to determine their potential in enhancing disease treatments and diagnostics. Nanotechnology has shown countless applications and might eventually be used in every biotech/health industry. Nevertheless, many nanomaterials may pose some safety risks and whether their benefits overweigh the risk is still being debated. Once the proper ethical and safety protocols are established and enough research is completed, nanotechnology is expected to benefit the mankind enormously. In this article, we will discuss and analyze many ways in which, nanotechnology based treatments and diagnostics will be used to help people with neurological disorders through the methods that we currently have at our disposal. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 12-32

  7. A bright weekend: THE Port develops a better solution for the “Children of the Night”

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    THE Port Hackathon took place at CERN and Geneva’s Campus Biotech from 2 to 4 October. Among the various prototypes presented at the final event was a novel solution for the special mask that children suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum have to wear to reduce their risk of getting skin cancer. The whole initiative was triggered by an article published in one of the summer issues of the Bulletin.   Developing and testing the mask prototype at THE Port Hackathon, 2015. (Images: Andrey Loginov, Pierre Freyermuth, Antonio Bellotta/ THE Port)   “The improvements are really substantial and have made the president of the French Children of the Night Association really happy!” says Andy Butterworth from the team that worked on developing a prototype for a new mask during THE Port Hackathon. In his “normal” professional life, Andy is a radio-frequency expert working in the Beams department. During the hackathon, he worked with colleagues from CE...

  8. Low-cost Negative-pressure Wound Therapy Using Wall Vacuum: A 15 Dollars by Day Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Ignacio; Eburdery, Harold; Grolleau, Jean Louis; Chavoin, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been marketed for about 20 years and remains popular. The only real obstacle to NPWT is the cost; therefore, we designed an inexpensive NPWT connected to a wall vacuum. Here, we report the feasibility and safety of this product, which we call PROVACUUM (Z-Biotech, Saint-Avertin, France). Methods: As a first step, the constraints imposed on the manufacturer were equipment quality similar to that of commercial NPWT systems, with an average treatment cost of $15/d. Then, we conducted a prospective study of patients with indications for NPWT from September 2013 to January 2015. Data collected included ease of use, quality of materials, and occurrence of complications during treatment. Results: We enrolled 23 patients with a mean age of 50.8 years. The average duration of treatment was 8.5 days (range, 3–21 days). The dressings were changed every 3.3 days (range, 2–4 days). Two hematomas occurred that required surgical revision and the transfusion of 2 units after large debridement of pressure ulcer. No other adverse events or infections occurred. The surgeons found that our device was similar to commercial NPWT devices. Conclusions: We developed an inexpensive NPWT that costs an average of $15/d. Our process is not intended to replace portable or stand-alone devices with batteries, but rather offers a less expensive alternative for hospitalized patients and makes NPWT accessible to the most precarious countries and institutions. PMID:26180719

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroprevalence among Inmates of the Penitentiary Complex of the Region of Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neusa Maria Osti

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and ninety three male inmates from three penitentiaries, two (A and B maximum-security systems and one (C minimum-security facility, located in Campinas, State of São Paulo, Brazil were studied for the presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV antibodies, using a cross-sectional design. The search for anti-HIV antibodies in 693 samples of sera collected was carried out by two serological tests: (a the Microparticle enzyme immunoassay-HIV-1 and HIV-2 (MEIA (Abbott Laboratories and (b the Western Blot-HIV-1 (WB (Cambridge Biotech Corporation to confirm positive results with MEIA. Sera reactivity for HIV antibodies was 14.4%. The highest frequency of anti-HIV antibodies was found in the A and B maximum-security prisons: 17% and 21.5%, respectively. In prison C, the frequency of reagents was 10.9%. Seventy three inmates, initially negative in the MEIA test, were checked again five and seven months later. Three of them, all from the maximum-security facilities, became reactive in the MEIA test, with confirmation in the WB, suggesting that serological conversion had occurred after imprisonment.

  10. Identification of Resistance to Pythium ultimum in Sunflower Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad R. Asgharipour

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate Pythium-mediated damping-off a laboratory experiment was conducted at Biotech Research Center of the University of Zabol, in 2010. The experimental design was a completely randomized with seven genotypes, together with seven replicates. The seeds were inoculated in oospore suspension of fungi (105 mg/mL for 1 min. After 5 days, seedlings were evaluated with an aim to counting non-germinated seeds, abnormal seedlings and healthy seedlings. Then the healthy seedlings were planted in pots after infecting seedlings through a piece of paper towels contaminated with fungal suspension, and normal seedlings were counted after 12 days. The result showed that there were significant differences among the genotypes for all evaluated traits. The greatest non-germinated seeds were observed in Azargol with 38% and followed by Record and Allstar. Azargol also had the highest abnormal seedlings (86% and the minimum abnormal seedlings were observed in Xaria with 72%. Regarding normal seedlings at pot, Golshid and Hysun- 33 were superior with 60 and 49%, respectively. These findings suggest that all genotypes had a high susceptibility to P. ultimum. Also, results obtained from the paper towel experiment were different to the results of the soil.

  11. 纤维素酶催化与三液相萃取偶联制备盾叶薯蓣皂苷元%Preparation of diosgenin by integrated bioprocess of cellulase catalysis and extration in three-liquid-phase system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏夺; 董悦生; 韩松; 修志龙

    2012-01-01

    Using coupling biotech of cellulase-catalysis and extrusion in three-liquid-phase system that composed of n-hexane, 1,4-dioxane and ammonium sulfate to hydrolyze dioscin in Chinese yan and glucose connected to steroidal saponins, and extration separation to collect diosgenin. The distribution of several steroidal saponins, hydrolyzed glucose, enzyme and its activity in the three-phase system were studied, and catalytic conversion by cellulase-enzyme and formation of diosgenin in three-liquid, organic and aqueous phases were compared. The results showed that diosgenin yield in the three-liquid-phase system could compare with that in organic phase and aqueous phase. The three-liquid-phase system could be suitable for simultaneous enzymatic hydrolysis of steroidal saponins and extration of diosgenin and glucose. The substrate and enzyme were held in the middle phase of 1,4-dioxane, whiles the products, diosgenin and glucose, were partitioned into the top and bottom phase, respectively. The yields of diosgenin was 69. 4% at 96 h in the three-liquid-phase system, which was twice and 27. 6 folds obtained in organic phase and aqueous phase respectively.

  12. How to deal with the upcoming challenges in GMO detection in food and feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeders, Sylvia R M; De Keersmaecker, Sigrid C J; Roosens, Nancy H C

    2012-01-01

    Biotech crops are the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. The commercialisation of GMO is in many countries strictly regulated laying down the need for traceability and labelling. To comply with these legislations, detection methods are needed. To date, GM events have been developed by the introduction of a transgenic insert (i.e., promoter, coding sequence, terminator) into the plant genome and real-time PCR is the detection method of choice. However, new types of genetic elements will be used to construct new GMO and new crops will be transformed. Additionally, the presence of unauthorised GMO in food and feed samples might increase in the near future. To enable enforcement laboratories to continue detecting all GM events and to obtain an idea of the possible presence of unauthorised GMO in a food and feed sample, an intensive screening will become necessary. A pragmatic, cost-effective, and time-saving approach is presented here together with an overview of the evolution of the GMO and the upcoming needs. PMID:23193359

  13. Using DrugBank for In Silico Drug Exploration and Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishart, David S; Wu, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    DrugBank is a fully curated drug and drug target database that contains 8174 drug entries including 1944 FDA approved small-molecule drugs, 198 FDA-approved biotech (protein/peptide) drugs, 93 nutraceuticals, and over 6000 experimental drugs. Additionally, 4300 non-redundant protein (i.e., drug target/enzyme/transporter/carrier) sequences are linked to these drug entries. DrugBank is primarily focused on providing both the query/search tools and biophysical data needed to facilitate drug discovery and drug development. This unit provides readers with a detailed description of how to effectively use the DrugBank database and how to navigate through the DrugBank Web site. It also provides specific examples of how to find chemical homologs of potential drug leads and how to identify potential drug targets from newly sequenced tumor samples. The intent of this unit is to give readers an introduction to the field of Web-based drug discovery and to show how cheminformatics can be seamlessly integrated into the field of bioinformatics. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27322405

  14. Preeclampsia – will Orphan Drug Status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinuhe eHahn

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-relates disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered to the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder, exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia be accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture which relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13 or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia.

  15. Preeclampsia – Will Orphan Drug Status Facilitate Innovative Biological Therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  16. Preeclampsia - will orphan drug status facilitate innovative biological therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sinuhe

    2015-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the development of novel therapies to treat pregnancy-related disorders, such as preeclampsia, is hampered by the paucity of research funding. Hence, it is with great interest to become aware of at least three novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this disorder: exploiting either the anticoagulant activity of antithrombin, the free radical scavenging activity of alpha-1-microglobulin, or the regenerative capacity of placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells. As these projects are being carried out by small biotech enterprises, the question arises of how they are able to fund such undertakings. A novel strategy adopted by two of these companies is that they successfully petitioned US and EU agencies in order that preeclampsia is accepted in the register of rare or orphan diseases. This provides a number of benefits including market exclusivity, assistance with clinical trials, and dedicated funding schemes. Other strategies to supplement meager research funds, especially to test novel approaches, could be crowdfunding, a venture that relies on intimate interaction with advocacy groups. In other words, preeclampsia meets Facebook. Perhaps similar strategies can be adopted to examine novel therapies targeting either the imbalance in pro- or anti-angiogenic growth factors, complement activation, reduced levels of placenta protein 13, or excessive neutrophil activation evident in preeclampsia. PMID:25767802

  17. Detección de anticuerpos contra Borrelia burgdorferi e identificación de garrapatas ixodidas en Piura Y Amazonas, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Glenny A

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Detectar anticuerpos IgG/IgM contra Borrelia burgdorferi en población general, procedentes de los departamentos de Piura y Amazonas e identificar especies de garrapatas probablemente incriminadas en la transmisión de la enfermedad de Lyme. Material y Métodos: Entre agosto del año 2001 y junio de 2002, se colectaron muestras de sangre de 232 pobladores procedentes de ocho localidades del Departamento de Piura y 12 del Departamento de Amazonas, para evaluar mediante ELISA Captia™ Lyme IgG/IgM (Trinity biotech la presencia de anticuerpos contra Borrelia burgdorferi. Además, se colectaron garrapatas en animales domésticos por búsqueda directa. Resultados: Se detectó seropositividad en 9,9 % de los sueros evaluados. Asimismo, de 433 garrapatas colectadas se identificaron los géneros: Ixodes (5,5%, Amblyomma (18,0%, Rhipicephalus (23,5%, Anocentor (31,1% y Boophilus (21,7%. Conclusiones: Existen personas seropositivas por Borrelia en Piura y Amazonas, coincidiendo con los hallazgos realizados en Sapillica en el año 1992, además se detectó la presencia de garrapatas del género Ixodes en Piura.

  18. Entrepreneurism from the ground up: Entrepreneurism, innovation, and responsiveness in a start-up university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michael Paul Anthony

    Colleges and universities are under increased pressure from internal and external constituencies for increased innovation and responsiveness. Entrepreneurial private industry models such as start-up businesses, corporate ventures and spin-off organizations have been recognized for their ability to quickly adapt to changing business environments and rapidly innovate to take advantage of new opportunities. This case study investigates these claims with regard to a start-up university founded with the identity of an entrepreneurial, interdisciplinary institution that prepares graduate level students for leadership careers as entrepreneurs in the bio-tech industry. By interviewing twenty-four administrators, faculty, and members of the Board of Trustees, including all but one of the founding full-time faculty, I present an "insider's" depiction of the lived experience of those most closely associated with the founding and subsequent institution building of this unique higher education organization. Initial chapters present a theory of higher education organizations, derived from Birnbaum (1988) and Bolman and Deal (1991), as driven by two primary tasks: resolving identity and establishing power and resources in relation to that identity. I also present Russell and Russell's (1992) theory of "entrepreneurial posture" in relation to a higher education organization. Subsequent chapters analyze the start-up university's environment, strategy, culture, and structure within the framework of the two primary organizational tasks and Russell and Russell's (1992) definition of an entrepreneurial organization.

  19. Maternal immunization efforts of the National Institutes of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Fran A; Koso-Thomas, Marion; Isaacs, Maggie Brewinski; Piper, Jeanna; Read, Jennifer; Nesin, Mirjana

    2015-11-25

    Over the last 35 years, efforts at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to protect mothers and their infants against infectious diseases have involved a bench-to-bedside approach. Basic and translational research that provided a foundation for clinical trials of vaccines in pregnancy include natural history and vaccine antigen identification studies. Development of laboratory assays and reagents have been funded by NIAID; these are critical for the advancement of vaccine candidates through the preclinical and clinical steps along the maternal immunization research pathway to support vaccine efficacy. Animal models of maternal immunization have been developed to evaluate efficacy of vaccine candidates. Clinical studies required development of maternal immunization protocols to address specific pregnancy related issues, for enrollment and safety assessment of mothers and their infants. NIH has organized and participated in meetings, workshops and other collaborative efforts with partners have advanced maternal immunization efforts. Partners have included many institutes and offices at NIH as well as other Department of Health and Human Services agencies and offices (Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Vaccine Program Office), World Health Organization, academic investigators, Biotech and pharmaceutical companies, and nonprofit organizations such as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. These research and development partnership are essential for advancing maternal immunization. Continued efforts are needed to promote maternal immunization to protect pregnant women and their infants against vaccine-preventable infectious disease, especially in resource-limited settings where the burden of infections is high. PMID:26458798

  20. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  1. [Development of Human Health Discoveries. 10 years results of Young Innovative Company incubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsac, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Medicine is evolving every day in its operating procedures and the services offered to patients, emphasizing personalized medicine, safety and medical benefits. The individual patient is more than ever the hub of healthcare organization. Medical innovation is thus a public health priority. However it requires an accurate assessment of medical utility and risk-benefit ratios, and in-depth analysis of economic and organizational impacts. Ten years of experience in the Paris Biotech Santé company incubator has identified key actions for effective support of research projects and the success of innovative companies. Strong expertise is needed to prepare development plans, ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and obtain research funding. During its first decade, this incubator has created 87 innovative companies employing 1500 people, raised more than 90 million euros of funding, and reached a cumulative company value of 1200 million euros. Key factors of success have been identified, but an analysis of the causes of failure shows that operational adjustments are mandatory, particularly a strong commitment from medical experts, in order to promote access to new and useful products for patients while at the same time assessing their social impact. PMID:26753415

  2. Development of Plant Mutant Resources with an useful characters by Radiation Fusion Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomics researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasms, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomics and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits

  3. Recent Progress on Systems and Synthetic Biology Approaches to Engineer Fungi As Microbial Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores, Gerardo Ruiz; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Arruda, Letícia Magalhães; Silva-Rocha, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Filamentous fungi are remarkable organisms naturally specialized in deconstructing plant biomass and this feature has a tremendous potential for biofuel production from renewable sources. The past decades have been marked by a remarkable progress in the genetic engineering of fungi to generate industry-compatible strains needed for some biotech applications. In this sense, progress in this field has been marked by the utilization of high-throughput techniques to gain deep understanding of the molecular machinery controlling the physiology of these organisms, starting thus the Systems Biology era of fungi. Additionally, genetic engineering has been extensively applied to modify wellcharacterized promoters in order to construct new expression systems with enhanced performance under the conditions of interest. In this review, we discuss some aspects related to significant progress in the understating and engineering of fungi for biotechnological applications, with special focus on the construction of synthetic promoters and circuits in organisms relevant for industry. Different engineering approaches are shown, and their potential and limitations for the construction of complex synthetic circuits in these organisms are examined. Finally, we discuss the impact of engineered promoter architecture in the single-cell behavior of the system, an often-neglected relationship with a tremendous impact in the final performance of the process of interest. We expect to provide here some new directions to drive future research directed to the construction of high-performance, engineered fungal strains working as microbial cell factories. PMID:27226765

  4. 三种不同方法测定糖化血红蛋白的结果比对和偏移评估分析%Comparison and bias estimation of three methods in determination of glycated hemoglobin A1c

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林莉; 戴永辉; 刘冬冬; 黄景春; 石文; 尚陈宇; 潘婉仪; 邱峰; 徐建华

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the bias of three different methods in determination of glycated hemoglobin A1 c (HbA1 c).Methods According to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) EP9-A3 document,40 serum specimens among linear range were tested by immunoturbidimetry assay (Roche Tina-quant),capillary electrophoresis (Sebia Minicap FP),high performance liquid chromatography system (HPLC,Trinity Biotech Premier Hb 9210TM).Results were analyzed by pairwise comparision.The difference plots and scatter plots were analyzed.The results of outliers were examined by extreme studentized deviate (ESD) method.The best regression model was chosen to fit the regression equation and the biases were calculated at the level of medical decision and judged the comparability according to the half of TEa acceptance standard.Results Scatter plots and ESD results showed good correlation among test results of 40 samples,no abnormal values were found.Based on proportional difference deviation plots,proportional difference rank order deviation plots,numerical deviation plots and ranked order difference plots,weighted least squares (WLS) (Roche (X) vs sebia (Y1)),ordinary linear regression (OLR) (Roche(X)vs Trinity (Y2)) and Deming (Sebia(Y1)vs Trinity(Y2))were chosen to fit regression analysis model.The regression equations were Y1 =-0.420 3 + 1.052 7X,Y2 =-0.174 0 + 1.027 0X,Y2 =0.423 1 + 0.959 0Y1,respectively.Assuming the HbA1c medical decision points of 10%,16% to regression equation,the proportional biases were 1.06% and 2.61% at Roche (X)and sebia(Y1) system,0.96% and 1.60% at Roche(X) and Trinity (Y2) system,0.13% and-1.47% at Sebia (Y1)and Trinity (Y2)system respectively,which were all lower than the acceptable values.Conclusion The measurement values of HbA1c by capillary electrophoresis (Sebia Minieap FP),HPLC (Trinity Biotech Premier Hb 9210TM) and immunoturbidimetry assay (Roche Tina-quant),are comparable.%目的 对3种不同原理

  5. The effects of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of Apis mellifera ligustica (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Geng, Li-Li; Li, Yun-He; Wang, Qiang; Diao, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Ting; Dai, Ping-Li

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been regarded as a key species in the environmental risk assessment of biotech crops. Here, the potential adverse effects of Cry1Ie toxin on the midgut bacteria of the worker bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed with different concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin syrups (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL), pure sugar syrup, and 48 ppb of imidacloprid syrups, then sampled after 15 and 30 d. We characterized the dominant midgut bacteria and compared the composition and structure of the midgut bacterial community in all samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V3-V4 regions of 16S rDNA. No significant differences in the diversity of the midgut bacteria were observed between the five treatments. This work was the first to show the effects of Cry1Ie toxin on honey bees, and our study provided a theoretical basis for the biosafety assessment of transgenic Cry1Ie maize. PMID:27090812

  6. Out of Academics: Education, Entrepreneurship and Enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banes, Albert J

    2013-06-25

    The author started a niche biotech company in 1985 called Flexcell(®) to distribute an enabling technology, mechanobiology devices, to the field. He was the first University of North Carolina faculty member to start a company and stay with it as he pursued his career in academics. That was an unpopular route at that time, but a path he was driven to navigate. Those interests, merged with his training, led to the design and manufacture of mechanobiology devices such as the Flexercell(®) Strain Unit and the BioFlex(®) flexible bottom culture plates to study fundamental responses of cells to strain. Principles in these devices were also incorporated into bioreactors for tissue engineering, which are standard in the marketplace today. In this article, the major roadblocks will be chronicled that were overcome to help build the field of mechanobiology and create a small biotechnology company. Through example, the author's formula for achieving milestones will be discussed including, the DRIVE it takes to get there ["DRIVE": Determination (Confidence), Research and Development (R&D) and Risk-Taking, Innovation (Imagination) and Intellectual Property, achieving Victory, and Enterprise]. PMID:23797777

  7. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits.

  8. RSRE: RNA structural robustness evaluator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2007-07-01

    Biological robustness, defined as the ability to maintain stable functioning in the face of various perturbations, is an important and fundamental topic in current biology, and has become a focus of numerous studies in recent years. Although structural robustness has been explored in several types of RNA molecules, the origins of robustness are still controversial. Computational analysis results are needed to make up for the lack of evidence of robustness in natural biological systems. The RNA structural robustness evaluator (RSRE) web server presented here provides a freely available online tool to quantitatively evaluate the structural robustness of RNA based on the widely accepted definition of neutrality. Several classical structure comparison methods are employed; five randomization methods are implemented to generate control sequences; sub-optimal predicted structures can be optionally utilized to mitigate the uncertainty of secondary structure prediction. With a user-friendly interface, the web application is easy to use. Intuitive illustrations are provided along with the original computational results to facilitate analysis. The RSRE will be helpful in the wide exploration of RNA structural robustness and will catalyze our understanding of RNA evolution. The RSRE web server is freely available at http://biosrv1.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/ or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/. PMID:17567615

  9. Infrared Thermographic Assessment of Cooling Effectiveness in Selected Dental Implant Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstein, Karol; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Kosior, Piotr; Chrószcz, Aleksander; Dudek, Krzysztof; Fita, Katarzyna; Parulska, Olga; Rybak, Zbigniew; Skalec, Aleksandra; Szklarz, Magdalena; Janeczek, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    The excessive temperature fluctuations during dental implant site preparation may affect the process of bone-implant osseointegration. In the presented studies, we aimed to assess the quality of cooling during the use of 3 different dental implant systems (BEGO®, NEO BIOTECH®, and BIOMET 3i®). The swine rib was chosen as a study model. The preparation of dental implant site was performed with the use of 3 different speeds of rotation (800, 1,200, and 1,500 rpm) and three types of cooling: with saline solution at room temperature, with saline solution cooled down to 3°C, and without cooling. A statistically significant difference in temperature fluctuations was observed between BEGO and NEO BIOTECH dental systems when cooling with saline solution at 3°C was used (22.3°C versus 21.8°C). In case of all three evaluated dental implant systems, the highest temperature fluctuations occurred when pilot drills were used for implant site preparation. The critical temperature, defined in the available literature, was exceeded only in case of pilot drills (of all 3 systems) used at rotation speed of 1,500 rpm without cooling. PMID:27110558

  10. Regenerative medicine: then and now--an update of recent history into future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polykandriotis, E; Popescu, L M; Horch, R E

    2010-10-01

    The fields of tissue engineering (TE) and regenerative medicine (RegMed) are yet to bring about the anticipated therapeutic revolution. After two decades of extremely high expectations and often disappointing returns both in the medical as well as in the financial arena, this scientific field reflects the sense of a new era and suggests the feeling of making a fresh start although many scientists are probably seeking reorientation. Much of research was industry driven, so that especially in the aftermath of the recent financial meltdown in the last 2 years we have witnessed a biotech asset yard sale. Despite any monetary shortcomings, from a technological point of view there have been great leaps that are yet to find their way to the patient. RegMed is definitely bound to play a major role in our life because it embodies one of the primordial dreams of mankind, such as: everlasting youth, flying, remote communication and setting foot on the moon. The Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine has been at the frontier of these developments in TE and RegMed from its beginning and reflects recent scientific advances in both fields. Therefore this review tries to look at RegMed through the keyhole of history which might just be like looking 'back to the future'. PMID:20825521

  11. Generation and characterization of the first immortalized alpaca cell line suitable for diagnostic and immunization studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Franceschi

    Full Text Available Raising of alpacas as exotic livestock for wool and meat production and as companion animals is growing in importance in the United States, Europe and Australia. Furthermore the alpaca, as well as the rest of the camelids, possesses the peculiarity of producing single-chain antibodies from which nanobodies can be generated. Nanobodies, due to their structural simplicity and reduced size, are very versatile in terms of manipulation and bio-therapeutic exploitation. In fact the biotech companies involved in nanobody production and application continue to grow in number and size. Hence, the development of reagents and tools to assist in the further growth of this new scientific and entrepreneurial reality is becoming a necessity. These are needed mainly to address alpaca disease diagnosis and prophylaxis, and to develop alpaca immunization strategies for nanobody generation. For instance an immortalized alpaca cell line would be extremely valuable. In the present work the first stabilized alpaca cell line from alpaca skin stromal cells (ASSCs was generated and characterized. This cell line was shown to be suitable for replication of viruses bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus and caprine herpesvirus-1 and the endocellular parasite Neospora caninum. Moreover ASSCs were easy to transfect and transduce by several methods. These two latter characteristics are extremely useful when recombinant antigens need to be produced in a host homologous system. This work could be considered as a starting point for the expansion of the biotechnologies linked to alpaca farming and industry.

  12. Enhancements Needed in GE Crop and Food Regulation in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eBenbrook

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetically engineered (GE crops, multi-ingredient foods derived from one or more GE ingredients, and GE agricultural inputs are regulated in the United States under a Coordinated Framework that was literally cobbled together in the early 1990s. Via this Framework, responsibility is spread across three federal agencies for the assessment and management of potential risks arising from the planting of GE crops, the raising of GE animals, or uses of GE inputs.The Framework was incomplete and conceptually flawed from the beginning. Despite multiple, piecemeal efforts to update aspects of GE risk assessment and regulatory policy, the Coordinated Framework survives to this day largely unchanged. Its shortcomings are recognized in both the scientific and legal communities, but meaningful reforms thus far remain out of reach, blocked by the intense controversy now surrounding all things biotech.Five generic reforms and another five specific initiatives are described to create a more robust, science-driven GE regulatory infrastructure in the U.S.

  13. La estructura social de la industria biotecnológica en Francia: un estudio de las relaciones inter-organizacionales a nivel inter-individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piña-Stranger, Alvaro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Various authors have shown the importance of collaborative relationships for inter-organizational performance, the mode of governance or the trajectory of biotechnology companies. Most of these works analyze the exclusive contractual agreements between companies and their main relationships among individuals. We show that this purely economic approach presents a major limitation: the nature of contractual relationships does not explore in detail how players cooperate. We propose to extend the study of these inter-organizational social relations, seen through the resource exchange in inter-individual. An empirical study on the leaders of the biotechnology industry in the area of human health in France has allowed us to map their relationships and resources they exchange them. Our results confirm the existence of a system of exchange dense and multiple. It presents a hierarchical distribution of various types of resources, where the centre is different from the periphery relations denser, more numerous and more reciprocal. However, comparative analysis of different networks reveals that the relationships of the board are highly centralized, while those of friendship following a more even distribution. We suggest that this phenomenon is part of a compensation mechanism to less central actors to maintain inter-organizational relationships. Finally, two standards of the cooperation process, revealed by the relational behaviour of actors, have been discovered. We suggest that they reflect in part the difficult process of adjustment that must cross a science project out of the realm of academic research and develop in a private structure: the biotech company.

  14. Hepatitis C Virus infection in apparentenly healthy individuals with family history of diabetes in Vom, Plateau State Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duru Boniface N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is an important public health problem worldwide. Its association with, and predisposing nature for diabetes mellitus (DM has been long established. This research was carried out to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis C virus (HCV amongst people with possible genetic predisposition to diabetes mellitus living in and around Vom, Plateau State, Nigeria. 188 subjects were screened after they filled a structured questionnaire to determine some of their demographic data, social habits and possible risk factors. 5 ml of blood was collected from each subject and sera separated out. Biotech's third generation ELISA Kit for HCV antibodies was used for the screening. Liver enzyme analysis was carried out on positive samples to determine their disease status. A prevalence of 14.36% was recorded with the highest seropositive group being those in the age bracket of 18 – 37 years. 13(13.40% of males and 14(15.38% of females were sero-positive. Liver enzyme analysis of sero-positive subjects showed increased levels which may imply early onset of liver damage. These result showed that these individuals could later suffer diabetes which may be triggered by their HCV infection if not treated. This is not over-looking the economic significance of their ill health, assuming they progress to cirrhotic HCV or develop hepatocelluar carcinoma due to HCV chronicity.

  15. Genotyping, serotyping and determination of mating-type of Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates from São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Marcelo Teruyuki; Fusco-Almeida, Ana Marisa; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Melhem, Márcia de Souza Carvalho; Medes-Giannini, Maria José Soares

    2007-01-01

    The basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is an important fungal pathogen mainly in immunocompromised patients. In this study, 47 clinical isolates of C. neoformans from regions of São Paulo State were studied serologically by using the Crypto Check Iatron RM 304-K kit, their genetic diversity was estimated by PCR-fingerprinting with a microsatellite-specific sequence (GACA)(4), RAPD with primer 6 (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the phospholipase B gene (PLB1) digested with AvaI and mating type analysis by PCR. All 47 strains isolated from HIV positive patients included in this study were serotype A and MATalpha. The majority of the isolates (45/47) were VNI and only two were VNII by PCR-fingerprinting and PCR-RFLP analysis. High degree of homogeneity was observed when (GACA)(4) was used, being highly correlated (> 0.9). In contrast, the RAPD analysis was more heterogeneous with higher number of molecular profiles. By PCR-RFLP, no new molecular type was found, enhancing the suggestion that the differences based on conserved gene as PLB1, can be resultant of ongoing divergent evolution within the C. neoformans complex, into the current eight subtypes. Our results furnish new information on the molecular epidemiology of C. neoformans in the southeast region of Brazil. PMID:17384819

  16. 韩国农业生物技术年报(2011年)%Seung-Ah Chung,Michael G. Francom,Kathryn Ting* Korea Agricultural Biotechnology Annual

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung-Ah Chung; Michael G. Francom; Kathryn Ting

    2013-01-01

    Korea is in the process of revising its laws and regulations to reflect the current language in the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety as well as other international practices. These revisions will make the approval of new biotech events and the trade in these products more predictable and transparent. Consumer attitudes toward the use of biotechnology in food are starting to soften, but negative perceptions still persist. Generating local farmers' support to adopt and actively use this technology in locally grown crops is seen as the key to increasing consumer confidence.%  韩国正在修改其法律和法规,以体现《卡塔赫纳生物安全议定书》中的最新要求以及其他国际惯例。这些修订将让新转基因成分和转基因产品贸易的审批更加可以预测和透明。消费者对转基因食品的态度开始缓和,但是负面观点仍然存在。发动本地农民支持采用和积极推广这种技术在本地种植的作物中的采用被认为是增强消费者信心的关键。

  17. The year's new drugs & biologics 2014 - Part II: trends & challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graul, A I; Serebrov, M; Cruces, E; Tracy, M; Dulsat, C

    2015-02-01

    2014 was a year of continued high activity in the pharma and biotech industry, as evidenced in part I of this annual two-part review article published last month in this journal (1). As of December 23, 2014, a total of 55 new chemical and biological entities had reached their first markets worldwide, together with another 29 important new line extensions. Another 19 products were approved for the first time during the year but not yet launched by December 23. Furthermore, during the now-traditional year-end sprint, several regulatory agencies issued last-minute approvals for other compounds that missed the deadline for inclusion in that article, bringing the total of new approvals for the year to a somewhat higher number. In addition to the successful development, registration and launch of new drugs and biologics, there are various other trends and tendencies that serve as indicators of the overall health and status of the industry. These include the pursuit of novel programs designed by regulators to stimulate the development of drugs for diseases that are currently under-treated; the regular and pragmatic culling by companies of their R&D pipelines; and the decision to unify pipelines, portfolios and sales forces through mergers and acquisitions. PMID:25756068

  18. Self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stent for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Oong; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Han, Byung Hoon; Shin, Dong Hoon [Gospel Hospital, College of Medicine, Kosin University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Ji Ho [Masan Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    We wanted to determine the technical and clinical efficacy of placing a self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent for the management of inoperable malignant biliary obstruction. Thirty six patients with inoperable malignant biliary obstructions were treated by placement of self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stents (S and G Biotech Corporation, Seongnam, Korea). Clinical evaluation was done with assessment of the serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels, which were measured before and after stent placement within 1 week, at 1 month and at 3 months. The patient survival rate and stent patency rate were calculated with performing Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Successful stent placement was achieved in all the patients without procedure-related complication. Pancreatitis as an early complication occurred in two cases. The serum bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly decreased after the procedure. During the follow-up, recurrent obstructive jaundice occurred in six cases; stent migration occurred in four cases and tumor overgrowth occurred in two cases. The survival rates were 97%, 80%, 67% and 59% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. The stent patency rates were 96%, 92%, 86% and 86% at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, respectively. Self-expandable PTFE-covered nitinol stent placement seems to be technically feasible and effective for the palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction.

  19. Design, production and optimization of solid lipid microparticles (SLM) by a coaxial microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capretto, Lorenzo; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2012-06-28

    This paper describes a method for the production of lipid microparticles (SLM) based on microfluidics using a newly designed modular device constituted of three main parts: a temperature control, a co-flow dripping element and a congealing element. The presented data demonstrated that the microfluidic approach resulted in the production of SLM with narrow size distribution and optimal morphological characteristics in term of sphericity, surface smoothness and absence of defects (i.e. partial coalescence or irregular shape). The optimization of SLM production was performed by screening the effect of different experimental parameters and device configurations by a classical intuitive approach COST (Changing One Separate factor a Time). This process allowed selecting the proper value for a number of parameters including, (i) the congealing element geometry, (ii) the presence and concentration of a stabilizer, (iii) the temperature of water and oil phases and (iv) the water and oil flow rates. In addition, the interplay between oil phase and water phase flow rates, in controlling the size and morphology of SLM, was investigated by a statistical "Design of the Experiments" approach (DoE). The combined use of COST and DoE studies allowed the production of optimized SLM for the encapsulation of dye/drugs. The obtained results demonstrated that the guest molecules did not affect the general characteristics of SLM, confirming the robustness of the microfluidic procedure in view of the production of SLM for biopharmaceutical and biotech protocols. PMID:22542700

  20. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits

  1. A Wide-Field Fluorescence Microscope Extension for Ultrafast Screening of One-Bead One-Compound Libraries Using a Spectral Image Subtraction Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusermann, Wolf; Ludin, Beat; Pham, Nhan T; Auer, Manfred; Weidemann, Thomas; Hintersteiner, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The increasing involvement of academic institutions and biotech companies in drug discovery calls for cost-effective methods to identify new bioactive molecules. Affinity-based on-bead screening of combinatorial one-bead one-compound libraries combines a split-mix synthesis design with a simple protein binding assay operating directly at the bead matrix. However, one bottleneck for academic scale on-bead screening is the unavailability of a cheap, automated, and robust screening platform that still provides a quantitative signal related to the amount of target protein binding to individual beads for hit bead ranking. Wide-field fluorescence microscopy has long been considered unsuitable due to significant broad spectrum autofluorescence of the library beads in conjunction with low detection sensitivity. Herein, we demonstrate how such a standard microscope equipped with LED-based excitation and a modern CMOS camera can be successfully used for selecting hit beads. We show that the autofluorescence issue can be overcome by an optical image subtraction approach that yields excellent signal-to-noise ratios for the detection of bead-associated target proteins. A polymer capillary attached to a semiautomated bead-picking device allows the operator to efficiently isolate individual hit beads in less than 20 s. The system can be used for ultrafast screening of >200,000 bead-bound compounds in 1.5 h, thereby making high-throughput screening accessible to a wider group within the scientific community. PMID:27057765

  2. The entrepreneurial state debunking public vs. private sector myths

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucato, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    This new bestseller from leading economist Mariana Mazzucato – named by the ‘New Republic’ as one of the ‘most important innovation thinkers’ today – is stirring up much-needed debates worldwide about the role of the State in innovation. Debunking the myth of a laggard State at odds with a dynamic private sector, Mazzucato reveals in case study after case study that in fact the opposite situation is true, with the private sector only finding the courage to invest after the entrepreneurial State has made the high-risk investments. Case studies include examples of the State’s role in the ‘green revolution’, in biotech and pharmaceuticals, as well as several detailed examples from Silicon Valley. In an intensely researched chapter, she reveals that every technology that makes the iPhone so ‘smart’ was government funded: the Internet, GPS, its touch-screen display and the voice-activated Siri. Mazzucato also controversially argues that in the history of modern capitalism the State has not on...

  3. Non-invasive biomarkers in pancreatic cancer diagnosis: what we need versus what we have.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreros-Villanueva, Marta; Bujanda, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is probably the most lethal tumor being forecast as the second most fatal cancer by 2020 in developed countries. Only the earliest forms of the disease are a curable disease but it has to be diagnosed before symptoms starts. Detection at curable phase demands screening intervention for early detection and differential diagnosis. Unfortunately, no successful strategy or image technique has been concluded as effective approach and currently non-invasive biomarkers are the hope. Multiple translational research studies have explored minimally or non-invasive biomarkers in biofluids-blood, urine, stool, saliva or pancreatic juice, but diagnostic performance has not been validated yet. Nowadays no biomarker, alone or in combination, has been superior to carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in sensitivity and specificity. Although the number of novel biomarkers for early diagnosis of PC has been increasing during the last couple of years, no molecular signature is ready to be implemented in clinical routine. Under the uncertain future, miRNAs profiling and methylation status seem to be the most promising biomarkers. However, good results in larger validations are urgently needed before application. Industry efforts through biotech and pharmaceutical companies are urgently required to demonstrate accuracy and validate promising results from basic and translational results. PMID:27162784

  4. Development of agribiotechnology and biosafety regulations used to assess safety of genetically modified crops in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiruddin, Khondoker M; Nasim, Anwar

    2007-01-01

    Bangladesh is on the verge of adopting genetically modified (GM) crops for commercial cultivation and consumption as feed and food. Most of the laboratories are engaged in tissue culture and molecular characterization on plants, whereas some have started living modified organism research with shortages of trained manpower, infrastructure, and funding. Nutritionally improved Golden Rice, biotech brinjal, and late blight-resistant potato are in contained trials in a greenhouse, and potato ring spot virus-resistant papaya is in the process of approval for a field trial. The government has taken some initiative in support of GM organism research, which include the formation of a Biotechnology Department in all institutes and the formation of the apex body, the National Task Force Committee on Biotechnology of Bangladesh under the chairpersonship of the Prime Minister. Biosafety policy guidelines and related aspects of biotechnology issues have been approved, and the laws are in the process of being promulgated. Being a party to the Cartagena Protocol, proper biosafety measures are regulated by the appropriate authority as stated. Although there are no laws made yet directly for biosafety of GM crops/foods, the relevant laws on agriculture, medicine, food, import, trade, environment, etc. may suffice and explain the situation. PMID:17956000

  5. The national synchrotron ray of hope or ring of fire?

    CERN Document Server

    Hollis, T

    2002-01-01

    While most agree the synchrotron will be a boost for Australian science, the author reports on concerns about the cost of building and operating the project Biotech industry representatives want to know how that $100 million will be used and want to see the government's justification for pouring more than a third of its total technology budget for 2001/2 into the synchrotron. They, and the opposition, also want to know where the private money will come from to make up the balance or whether the state will ultimately have to pitch in the rest itself. Indeed, an Auditor-General's report released last week warned of the need for comprehensive financial risk management of the facility. The National Synchrotron, to be built at Monash University, will be a hollow ring of about 60 metres diameter and initially housing nine beamlines, each capable of performing independent experiments simultaneously. According to Dr Richard Garrett, director of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (http://www.ansto.gov.au/natf...

  6. Positioning for Success in University-Industry Drug-Discovery Collaborations: Initiatives towards Effective Trans-Constituency Team Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Janero

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite entrenched differences between academia and the industrial sector, business models partnering universities and commercial entities to conduct preclinical drug-discovery team science are increasingly prevalent as attempts to boost and de-risk therapeutics invention. This dichotomy invites consideration of three high-level contextual elements that can help such trans-constituency alliances actualize their potential: an enabling operational profile as strategic roadmap; milestones supporting project progress and inviting improvement; and a critical mass of capable, engaged academic and industrial co-participants working across institutional boundaries and sharing risks and rewards. These elements bring many (intangible and often underappreciated benefits to a research-driven public-private discovery collaboration, e.g., underscoring its translational nature; acknowledging the important roles of vigilant self-evaluation and change; setting trust and quality expectations; establishing lines of communication and accountability; inviting knowledge cross-pollination; and avoiding project compromise by cross- purpose activities and personal/institutional self-interests. Although the inherently unpredictable nature of scientific progress and the heterogeneity of university-industry discovery collaborations preclude a universal success formula, pragmatic enablers discussed can help such alliances between academia and pharma/biotech traverse the rugged terrain at the science-business interface.

  7. Detecting authorized and unauthorized genetically modified organisms containing vip3A by real-time PCR and next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chanjuan; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Scholtens, Ingrid M J; Staats, Martijn; Prins, Theo W; Voorhuijzen, Marleen M; da Silva, Andrea M; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave; den Dunnen, Johan T; Kok, Esther J

    2014-04-01

    The growing number of biotech crops with novel genetic elements increasingly complicates the detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed samples using conventional screening methods. Unauthorized GMOs (UGMOs) in food and feed are currently identified through combining GMO element screening with sequencing the DNA flanking these elements. In this study, a specific and sensitive qPCR assay was developed for vip3A element detection based on the vip3Aa20 coding sequences of the recently marketed MIR162 maize and COT102 cotton. Furthermore, SiteFinding-PCR in combination with Sanger, Illumina or Pacific BioSciences (PacBio) sequencing was performed targeting the flanking DNA of the vip3Aa20 element in MIR162. De novo assembly and Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches were used to mimic UGMO identification. PacBio data resulted in relatively long contigs in the upstream (1,326 nucleotides (nt); 95 % identity) and downstream (1,135 nt; 92 % identity) regions, whereas Illumina data resulted in two smaller contigs of 858 and 1,038 nt with higher sequence identity (>99 % identity). Both approaches outperformed Sanger sequencing, underlining the potential for next-generation sequencing in UGMO identification. PMID:24553665

  8. Instrumentação interespinhosa na doença degenerativa da coluna lombar: medição da altura do disco no segmento instrumentado Instrumentación interespinosa en la enfermedad degenerativa de la columna lumbar: medición de la altura del disco en el segmento instrumentado Interspinous instrumentation in patients with degenerative lumbar spine disease: disc height measurement on instrumented segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto de Castro Guimarães Consciência

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: na última década, a instrumentação interespinhosa vem sendo mais frequentemente utilizada. Apesar dos inúmeros artigos publicados em revistas internacionais de reconhecido mérito científico, são escassas as referências à modificação da altura do disco no segmento tratado, secundária àquela instrumentação. OBJECTIVO: quantificar uma eventual modificação da altura discal decorrente da aplicação de instrumentação interespinhosa (DIAM - Cousin-Biotech - Medtronic Sofamor Danek Inc©. MÉTODOS: o autor avalia um grupo de 20 pacientes com patologia degenerativa da coluna lombar e os seguintes critérios de inclusão: idade >40 e 6; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI >30; Zung Depression Rating Scale INTRODUCCIÓN: la instrumentación interespinosa tiene sido empleada con creciente frecuencia en la última década. Pero, apesar de las numerosas publicaciones científicas hechas en jornales científicos de reconocido mérito internacional, se han producido muy escasas referencias a una hipotética modificación de la altura discal dependiente de la técnica. OBJETIVO: cuantificar una eventual modificación de la altura discal inherente a la aplicación de instrumentación interespinosa. MÉTODOS: el autor hace una evaluación de un grupo de 20 pacientes con patología degenerativa de la columna lumbar, y diversos criterios de inclusión, a saber: edad >40 y 6; Oswestry Disability Index >30; Zung Depression Rating Scale INTRODUCTION: the use of interspinous instrumentation has been increasing in the last decade. However, in spite of the numerous papers seen in relevant scientific publications, there are very few references to an eventual disc height variation in the instrumented segment. OBJECTIVE: to certify eventual changes in disk height after interspinous instrumentation (DIAM - Cousin-Biotech - Medtronic Sofamor Danek Inc©. METHODS: the author evaluated 20 patients with degenerative lumbar disease and the following

  9. Biocompatibility and Mechanical Properties of Support Sling for Female Urinary Stress Incontinence%一体化妇科吊带的力学性能及生物相容性评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄建艳; 谢佩仪; 赵能育; 徐斌; 徐国风

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨应用新的组织处理技术研制的一体化妇科吊带的力学性能及生物相容性.方法:以动物的膜材料及肌腱为原料,经脱细胞、环氧固定及表面修饰技术处理,制备成一体化妇科吊带,进行拉伸试验及植入试验评价其力学性能及生物相容性.结果:各种型号的一体化妇科吊带均有良好的力学性能,最大拉力及抗拉强度随悬吊带的宽度和长度而异,其中抗拉强度为11.47~28.82 MPa;植入实验表明一体化妇科吊带稳定性高,生物相容性好,未引起宿主免疫排异反应,植入后只是在周围组织中引起轻度的异物反应,很快与宿主组织长合为一体,促进纤维组织长人.结论:应用新的组织处理技术研制的一体化妇科吊带,有效地去除了动物异种蛋白的免疫原性,具有良好的力学性能,在宿主体内组织相容性好,加上外形的特别设计使其使用简便,有望成为压力性尿失禁患者盆底重建的理想替代材料.%To investigate the biocompatibility and mechanical properties of support sling for female urinary stress incontinence prepared by novel biotech, support sling was prepared by fresh porcine membrane and tendons with acellular process, epoxy cross-linking fixation and surface activating process. Then the biocompatibility and mechanical properties were evaluated by tensile test and animal test. The tensile test showed that the mechanical properties were feasible for support female urinary stress, which maximum tension and tension-resistant strength were different according to the length and width of the sling. And tensionresistant strength was between 11.47-28.82 MPa. The sling showed good biocompatibility and high stability without immunologic rejection after implanting in the goats’ muscle of abdominal wall except for slight foreign body reaction, and new tissues were grown into the core of the mesh. Prepared by the new biotech, support sling for female urinary stress

  10. Genotyping, serotyping and determination of mating-type of Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates from São Paulo State, Brazil Genotipagem, sorotipagem e determinação de mating-type de isolados clínicos de Cryptococcus neoformans do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Teruyuki Matsumoto

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans is an important fungal pathogen mainly in immunocompromised patients. In this study, 47 clinical isolates of C. neoformans from regions of São Paulo State were studied serologically by using the Crypto Check Iatron RM 304-K kit, their genetic diversity was estimated by PCR-fingerprinting with a microsatellite-specific sequence (GACA4, RAPD with primer 6 (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of the phospholipase B gene (PLB1 digested with AvaI and mating type analysis by PCR. All 47 strains isolated from HIV positive patients included in this study were serotype A and MATalpha. The majority of the isolates (45/47 were VNI and only two were VNII by PCR-fingerprinting and PCR-RFLP analysis. High degree of homogeneity was observed when (GACA4 was used, being highly correlated (> 0.9. In contrast, the RAPD analysis was more heterogeneous with higher number of molecular profiles. By PCR-RFLP, no new molecular type was found, enhancing the suggestion that the differences based on conserved gene as PLB1, can be resultant of ongoing divergent evolution within the C. neoformans complex, into the current eight subtypes. Our results furnish new information on the molecular epidemiology of C. neoformans in the southeast region of Brazil.Cryptococcus neoformans, pertencente à classe dos basidiomicetos, é um importante patógeno, principalmente em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Neste estudo, 47 isolados clínicos de C. neoformans de várias regiões do Estado de São Paulo foram avaliados quanto aos sorotipos e ao mating-type por PCR. A diversidade genética foi analisada por PCR-fingerprinting com a seqüência iniciadora específica para regiões microssatélite (GACA4, RAPD com o iniciador 6 (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech e por RFLP do gene PLB1 digerido com AvaI. Todos os isolados foram obtidos de pacientes HIV positivos e identificados como sorotipo A e

  11. Fraunhofer Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME). Annual report 2014/2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual report 2014/2015 of the Fraunhofer Institute for molecular biology and applied ecology includes the following contributions: (A) Molecular Biology: TheraSECOURE - Novel immunotherapeutics for targeted cancer therapy; ''MultiNaBel ''- Automated diagnosis of leukemia; Breeding potato for optimized specialty starches; NGS-based zygosity detection in transgenic maize; High-throughput screen ing system for cellulases based on microfluidic devices; Filter aids reduce production costs for plant-derived biopharmaceuticals; Transient expression of recombinant proteins in packed plant cells; ERA-NET Biodiversa EXOTIC project on the invasive harlequin ladybird; AIM-Biotech supported by the Fraunhofer-Max Planck Cooperation program; Metabolic control analysis of the MEP pathway; Metabolic engineering of Clostridium spp. by genomic integration; The Fraunhofer Future Foundation malaria project; Autoantibodies to type 11 collagen as biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis; Development of a new drug for the treatment of sepsis; Databionic drug research; Structure-based drug design; Neu2: competence consortium for multiple sclerosis drug development; Natural compounds from marine fungi for the treatment of cancer; FCR Center for Systems Biotechnology (CSB): Two selected projects; Development and implementation of a plant-derived vaccine against yellow fever. (B) Applied Ecology: Comparison and improvement of laboratory water/sediment test systems; Inter-laboratory comparison of Hyalella Azteca exposure tests lasting 10-42 days; Substance- and matrix-related environmental monitoring of biocides; GERDA-geobased runoff, erosion and drainage risk assessment; The minimum detectable difference and reliability of mesocosm studies; Mechanistic effect models for the ecological risk assessment of pesticides; Molecular biology test for the online analysis of spontaneously-fermented wines; Coupling two test systems to determine the effect of wastewater

  12. High Level Secretion of Laccase (LccH) from a Newly Isolated White-Rot Basidiomycete, Hexagonia hirta MSF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Muniraj, Iniya K.; Purushothaman, Namitha; Sekar, Ashika; Sharmila, D. J. S.; Kumarasamy, Ramasamy; Uthandi, Sivakumar

    2016-01-01

    Newer and novel laccases attract considerable attention due to its promising and valuable multiple applications in biotech industry. This present investigation documents, for the first time, on high level extracellular secretion of laccase (LccH) in newly isolated wood-degrading basidiomycete Hexagonia hirta MSF2. LccH was optimally active at 40°C in citrate phosphate buffer with a pH of 3.4. Optimized Cu2+ in glucose yeast extract (GY) medium enhanced the LccH production by H. hirta to 1944.44 U.ml-1. A further increment in LccH activity of 5671.30 U.ml-1 was achieved by the addition of a phenolic inducer, 2,5 Xylidine. Zymogram and sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE) analysis of LccH revealed that LccH is a monomer with a molecular mass of 66 kDa. MALDI-TOF-MS based peptide mass fingerprinting and comparative modeling of the amino acid sequence of LccH showed that it was closer to Trametes sp. AH28-2 (PDB: 3KW7) with 48% identity, 95% coverage, 0.011 alignment score and RMSD of 0.497Å. Crude LccH delignified lignocellulosic biomass such as wood and corncob, to a level of 28.6 and 16.5%, respectively. Such high level secretion, thermal and solvent stability of LccH make H. hirta a potential candidate not only for LccH production and biodelignification but also generation of lignin derived aromatic feed stock chemicals for industrial and environmental applications. PMID:27242729

  13. Safety, immunogenicity and cross-reactivity of a Northern hemisphere 2013-2014 seasonal trivalent inactivated split influenza virus vaccine, Anflu®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yonggang; Hu, Yuansheng; Meng, Fanya; Du, Wenjun; Li, Wei; Song, Yufei; Ji, Xiaoci; Huo, Liqun; Fu, Zhenping; Yin, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Anflu® is a seasonal trivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine manufactured by Sinovac Biotech Co., Ltd. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety of Anflu® (2013-14 formulation: H1N1, H3N2 and BYAM) in infants and adults and its immunogenicity and cross-reactivity against mismatched influenza B lineage and avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses (hereafter BVIC and H7N9, respectively) in adults. In this phase IV open label trial, infants 6-35 months old (n=61) each received two injections with 28 days apart; adults 18-60 yrs old (n=60) and elderly >60 yrs old (n=61) each received one injection. Information of adverse events was collected through safety observation and follow-up visits. Pre- and post-immune blood samples (day 0 and 21) were collected from subjects ≥18 yrs old to detect hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers and calculate seroprotection rates (SPRs) and seroconversion rates (SCRs). The overall adverse reaction incidence was 1.6% (3/182), and no serious adverse event was reported during the study period. For subjects ≥18 yrs old, the SCRs, SPRs, and the geometric mean titers (GMTs) met the European criteria for all three strains. In addition, the point estimations of SCR, SPR and GMT for BVIC also met the European criteria. Six subjects were seroconverted against H7N9; however the serological results did not meet the European criteria. In conclusion, the results showed a satisfactory safety and immunogenicity profile of Anflu® and cross-reactivity against BVIC, but did not demonstrate cross-reactivity against H7N9 (Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02269852). PMID:26934750

  14. 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis protein profiles of the scorpion venom from Brotheas amazonicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, A.M.; Noronha, M.D.N. [Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Rede Proteomica do Amazonas (Proteam). Lab. de Genomica e Proteomica; Rocha-Oliveira, F.; Lopez-Lozano, J.L.L. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Biotecnologia

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Scorpions venoms show specific neurotoxins to insect or mammals. These toxins are very important molecular tools to development of news drugs or bioinsecticides. Brotheas amazonicus scorpion is an endemic specie in Amazonian Rain Forest, but your venom do not show toxicity in humans. Information about biological specific activity on insect of this venom is not known yet. Objectives: Molecular protein toxins profiles of the venom from Brotheas amazonicus scorpion by 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis methods to detected toxins with potential biotech applications. Results: Several spots 'families' with {approx} 60, 70 and 80 kDa were detected in gel acidic region with pI {approx} 4,5 - 6 range, in the same region 1-D zimography showed proteolytic activity on gelatin and fibrinogen and proteolytic activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting scorpion serine proteinases. 50 kDa proteins were detected with pI {approx} 6,5 - 7 range. In 23 - 50 kDa gel acid region were observed some proteins. In 23 - 14 kDa gel acidic region were detected proteins with pI 4 - 7 range. 1-D Tris-tricine gel showed proteins with {approx} 7 kDa, suggesting scorpion neurotoxins. In gel basic region only 14 kDa proteins were observed with pI {approx} 9 - 10 range. Conclusion: Molecular profile of the scorpion venom from B. amazonicus showed proteins with high and low molecular masses, mainly with acidic pI. Proteolytic activity suggest serine proteinases with high molecular masses and 7 kDa proteins in B. amazonicus venom suggest scorpion neurotoxins. Purification and molecular characterization of these toxins are in course.

  15. H pylori seroprevalence in patients with lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katayoon Najafizadeh; Sayeed Falah Tafti; Masoud Shiehmorteza; Masoud Saloor; Masoud Jamali

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess H pylori seroprevalence in lung cancer and determine whether there is a potential association between lung cancer and H pylori infection.METHODS: The study was conducted on forty consecutive patients with lung cancer, confirmed by pathology (32 men, 8 women; mean age 55.50 ± 11.91 years,range 16-77 years).Forty healthy subjects (25 men,15 women;mean age 43.08 ± 12.60 years,range 20-79 years) from the patients' family members were matched to each case Subject on the basis of age and socioeconomic status.H pylori infection was detected with a commercially available immunoglobulin G (IgG) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Trinity kit,Biotech co.,USA),previously validated in adults (86% sensitivity,96% specificity) against a gold standard of culture and histology.RESULTS: H pylori seropositivity was present in 52.5% of patients with lung cancer in comparison to 45.0% of healthy control subjects. Although H pylori seropositivity was more frequent in lung cancer patients than in controls, the difference did not reach statistical significance (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.56-3.25; P = 0.65). In addition, there was no significant difference between cases and controls in terms of gastrointestinal symptoms.CONCLUSION: The earlier described association between H pylori infection and lung cancer was not supported in this study. Further studies with larger sample sizes should be undertaken to assess the frequency of H pylori infection in patients with lung cancer and their potential association.

  16. Burden of rotavirus in India - Is rotavirus vaccine an answer to it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davendra K Taneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is currently by far the most common cause of severe diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide and of diarrheal deaths in developing countries. Worldwide Rotavirus is responsible for 611,000 childhood deaths out of which more than 80% occur in low-income countries. The resistance of rotavirus to commonly used disinfectants and ineffectiveness of oral rehydration therapy due to severe vomiting indicates that if an effective vaccine is the preferred option. WHO has recommended inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the National Schedules where under 5 mortality due to diarrheal diseases is ≥ 10%. Currently two vaccines are available against rotavirus. Rotarix (GlaxoSmithKline is a monovalent vaccine recommended to be orally administered in two doses at 6-12 weeks. Rota Teq (Merck is a pentavalent vaccine recommended to be orally administered in three doses starting at 6-12 weeks of age. Serodiversity of rotavirus in India and its regional variation favor either a monovalent vaccine that can induce heterotypic immunity or a polyvalent vaccine incorporating majority of serotypes prevalent in the country. However, the efficacy of available rotavirus vaccines is less in low-income countries. Both the candidate vaccines when coadministered with OPV, immune response to first dose of these vaccines is reduced. However, immune responses to subsequent rotavirus vaccine doses are not affected. In view of this, WHO recommends three doses of either vaccine to be given to children in developing countries to produce the optimum response. Indigenous vaccine, 116E (Bharat Biotech based on human rotavirus of serotype G9P [11] is still under Phase 2 trials. Another multivalent vaccine is being developed by Shantha Biotechnics in India. The cost effectiveness of the three dose schedule of the available and the rsults of the field trials of the indigenous vaccines should be assessed before inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the National Immunization

  17. Impedance microflow cytometry for viability studies of microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Berardino, Marco; Hebeisen, Monika; Hessler, Thomas; Ziswiler, Adrian; Largiadèr, Stephanie; Schade, Grit

    2011-02-01

    Impedance-based Coulter counters and its derivatives are widely used cell analysis tools in many laboratories and use normally DC or low frequency AC to perform these electrical analyses. The emergence of micro-fabrication technologies in the last decade, however, provides a new means of measuring electrical properties of cells. Microfluidic approaches combined with impedance spectroscopy measurements in the radio frequency (RF) range increase sensitivity and information content and thus push single cell analyses beyond simple cell counting and sizing applications towards multiparametric cell characterization. Promising results have been shown already in the fields of cell differentiation and blood analysis. Here we emphasize the potential of this technology by presenting new data obtained from viability studies on microorganisms. Impedance measurements of several yeast and bacteria strains performed at frequencies around 10 MHz enable an easy discrimination between dead and viable cells. Moreover, cytotoxic effects of antibiotics and other reagents, as well as cell starvation can also be monitored easily. Control analyses performed with conventional flow cytometers using various fluorescent dyes (propidium iodide, oxonol) indicate a good correlation and further highlight the capability of this device. The label-free approach makes on the one hand the use of usually expensive fluorochromes obsolete, on the other hand practically eliminates laborious sample preparation procedures. Until now, online cell monitoring was limited to the determination of viable biomass, which provides rather poor information of a cell culture. Impedance microflow cytometry, besides other aspects, proposes a simple solution to these limitations and might become an important tool for bioprocess monitoring applications in the biotech industry.

  18. Development of Manufacturing Method of Highly Functional Material Gallic acid-CLA Ester Using Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing interest and current trends for natural materials with various health beneficial functions by radiation (RT)-biotechnology (BT) fusion by developed countries. However, the information and development of new functional materials using the RT-BT fusion technology is still limited. The target material developed and manufactured by RT-BT fusion technology may have a multi-functional effect on human health and it can be applied for pharmaceutical materials as well as functional food ingredient. The market of functional new materials has been grown dramatically and a multi-functional material manufactured by RT-BT fusion technology may have a great economic impact for both the domestic and overseas market. Development of GA-CLA ester by chemical synthetic method. Transformation of linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acid by irradiation. Identification and confirmation of the biological functions including antioxidative, cancer cell proliferation inhibition, anti-microbial, enhancement of immune response and lipid metabolism of GA-CLA ester. Increase industrial applicability of the new materials. Development of GA-CLA ester by chemical synthetic method(2 patents submitted). Development of the optimum methodology of GA-CLA and its derivative, octadeca-9,12-dienyl-3,4,5-trihydroxy benzoate). Identification and confirmation of biological activities of GA-CLA. Extramural funding from the Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy subjected by gallic acid-fatty acid derivatives (205,000,000 Won). Provides the basic data for successful project 'Development of cosmeceutical and cosmetics using gallic acid fatty acid derivatives' funded by Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy and collaboration with the Technology-invested venture company, SunBiotech, Co. and problem-solving for industrial application. Complete the patent procedure and publish the results to international or domestic peer-reviewed journals

  19. Environmental safety of genetically modified insect resistant maize and future perspectives for implementation in China%转基因抗虫玉米环境安全性及我国应用前景

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 何康来; 崔蕾; 王振营

    2011-01-01

    转基因抗虫玉米在生产上应用对于促进玉米增产、保障国家粮食安全具有巨大潜力.种植转基因玉米的环境安全性是公众对于应用这一生物技术产品最为关心的问题.本文从基因漂移、对玉米田节肢动物多样性的影响、靶标害虫的抗性及其治理策略和转基因抗虫玉米研发应用现状及其经济效益等方面对转基因抗虫玉米的生态影响研究进行了回顾,分析了种植转基因抗虫玉米的潜在生态风险,展望了我国转基因抗虫玉米的应用前景.%The potential of genetically modified insect resistant maize in increasing grain production and making great contributions to national food security and agricultural sustainability is indisputable. The potential ecological impact is the major concern for using the biotech products in the production practice. To better understand the environmental safety for using genetically modified insect resistant maize, we summarize information about the environmental risk assessments in view of gene flow, impact on the biodiversity of arthropods, evolution of resistance in targets, and benefits. The practical demand for their future deployment and utilization in China was discussed.

  20. Building a wave energy policy focusing on innovation, manufacturing and deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Irish Government has set a goal to make Ireland a world leader for research, development and deployment of ocean energy technologies. Ireland has a wave energy resource of 21 TWh and an ambition is to achieve at least 500 MW installed generating capacity from ocean energy by 2020. This paper investigates what is required to move from ambition to delivery. A successful wave energy strategy will require focused policies that will stimulate innovation to develop the technologies, manufacturing to produce the devices and deployment to build the required wave power plants. The paper draws on the successful policies in Ireland that have stimulated each of these dimensions, albeit for different sectors. From 2004 to 2008, successful policies in (ICT and biotech) innovation led to an increase in Ireland's Innovation Index score from 0.48 to 0.53. The policy focus on (food and pharmaceuticals) manufacturing in Ireland resulted in high levels of economic growth over the period 1998-2002, reaching >10% GDP growth levels per annum, and full employment. Successful wind energy policies deployment has accelerated rapidly since 2003 and reached 1.2 GW installed capacity in 2009 representing 15% of Ireland's total installed capacity. The paper draws on appropriate elements of these policies to build a successful wave energy policy for Ireland. It also draws on the successful policies adopted in Denmark for innovation, manufacturing and deployment of wind energy. The Danish wind turbine manufacturers hold a world market share of approximately 40%. The paper proposes establishing a wave energy strategy group to develop an action plan to deliver the 500 MW. It also proposes a novel extension of corporate tax specifically for wave energy companies, an initial 30% capital grant scheme for wave energy developers, a grid code for wave energy devices and fast tracking of planning decisions through an amended approach to strategic infrastructure. (author)

  1. A Chemiluminescent Protein Microarray Method for Determining the Seroglycoid Fucosylation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aiying; Skog, Sven; Wang, Shengqi; Ke, Yang; Zhang, Yonghong; Li, Kang; He, Ellen; Li, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3) is widely used to screen for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Japan and China. We developed a chemiluminescent protein microarray for determining the AFP-L3/AFP index (the ratio of AFP-L3 to total AFP, AFP-L3%) by fixing AFP-specific antibodies and Lens culinaris lectin on aldehyde-coated glass slides. Serum samples were tested for AFP using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to validate the microarray. AFP-L3 was detected using Hotgen Biotech glycosyl capture spin column pretreatment technology and ELISA. When the AFP cut-off value was set to 20 ng/ml, the protein microarray displayed 89.74% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 87.17% sensitivity and 100% specificity. When the AFP-L3% cut-off value was set to 0.1, the protein microarray displayed 56.41% sensitivity and 100% specificity for HCC diagnosis, and the ELISA displayed 53.84% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The ROC curve for the HCC diagnosis showed that the AFP area under the ROC curve (AUC = 0.996; 95% CI: 0.986-1.005) was much higher than that of AFP-L3 (AUC = 0.857; 95% CI: 0.769-0.94) and AFP-L3% (AUC = 0.827; CI: 0.730-0.924). The microarray assay used in this study is a highly sensitive, accurate, and efficient assay for the determination of the AFP-L3%. PMID:27528397

  2. Storytelling that moves people. A conversation with screenwriting coach Robert McKee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Robert

    2003-06-01

    When executives need to persuade an audience, most try to build a case with facts, statistics, and some quotes from authorities. In other words, they resort to "companyspeak," the tools of rhetoric they have been trained to use. In this conversation with HBR, Robert McKee, the world's best-known screenwriting lecturer, argues that executives can engage people in a much deeper--and ultimately more convincing--way if they toss out their Power-Point slides and memos and learn to tell good stories. As human beings, we make sense of our experiences through stories. But becoming a good storyteller is hard. It requires imagination and an understanding of what makes a story worth telling. All great stories deal with the conflict between subjective expectations and an uncooperative objective reality. They show a protagonist wrestling with antagonizing forces, not a rosy picture of results meeting expectations--which no one ends up believing. Consider the CEO of a biotech start-up that has discovered a chemical compound to prevent heart attacks. He could make a pitch to investors by offering up market projections, the business plan, and upbeat, hypothetical scenarios. Or he could captivate them by telling the story of his father, who died of a heart attack, and of the CEO's subsequent struggle against various antagonists--nature, the FDA, potential rivals--to bring to market the effective, low-cost test that might have prevented his father's death. Good storytellers are not necessarily good leaders, but they do share certain traits. Both are self-aware, and both are skeptics who realize that all people--and institutions--wear masks. Compelling stories can be found behind those masks. PMID:12800716

  3. Study on Low Carbon Economy of Chinese Liquor-making Industry%中国白酒产业低碳发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永

    2012-01-01

    通过对当前世界能源形势的分析,指出低碳经济是社会的必然选择,而中国白酒产业是国民经济低碳发展的重要部分。对中国白酒产业低碳发展已初步具备的外部环境、法律保障、技术支撑及人才储备作简要介绍;指出中国白酒产业要通过提高认识确立低碳发展的目标,加强科技创新推行清洁生产,并购重组实现规模经济,利用生物技术完善产业链融合来实现低碳发展。%Low carbon economy is the inevitable choice for society.Liquor-making industry is an important part of low carbon economic development in China.In this paper,the external environment to practice low carbon development for liquor-making industry such as legal safeguard,technical support,and talents reserve were introduced.Liquor-making industry should improve its low carbon knowledge to achieve its low carbon development goals by strengthening technical innovation,implementing clean production,quickening enterprise merger to achieve scale economy,and using biotech to perfect industrial chain to further realize low carbon development.

  4. Innovative farmers and regulatory gatekeepers: Genetically modified crops regulation and adoption in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinebo, Woldeyesus; Maredia, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The regulation of genetically modified (GM) crops is a topical issue in agriculture and environment over the past 2 decades. The objective of this paper is to recount regulatory and adoption practices in some developing countries that have successfully adopted GM crops so that aspiring countries may draw useful lessons and best practices for their biosafatey regulatory regimes. The first 11 mega-GM crops growing countries each with an area of more than one million hectares in 2014 were examined. Only five out of the 11 countries had smooth and orderly adoption of these crops as per the regulatory requirement of each country. In the remaining 6 countries (all developing countries), GM crops were either introduced across borders without official authorization, released prior to regulatory approval or unapproved seeds were sold along with the approved ones in violation to the existing regulations. Rapid expansion of transgenic crops over the past 2 decades in the developing world was a result of an intense desire by farmers to adopt these crops irrespective of regulatory roadblocks. Lack of workable biosafety regulatory system and political will to support GM crops encouraged unauthorized access to GM crop varieties. In certain cases, unregulated access in turn appeared to result in the adoption of substandard or spurious technology which undermined performance and productivity. An optimal interaction among the national agricultural innovation systems, biosafety regulatory bodies, biotech companies and high level policy makers is vital in making a workable regulated progress in the adoption of GM crops. Factoring forgone opportunities to farmers to benefit from GM crops arising from overregulation into biosafety risk analysis and decision making is suggested. Building functional biosafety regulatory systems that balances the needs of farmers to access and utilize the GM technology with the regulatory imperatives to ensure adequate safety to the environment and human

  5. Governing GMOs: The (Counter Movement for Mandatory and Voluntary Non-GMO Labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Bain

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2012 the anti-GMO (genetically modified organism movement has gained significant grassroots momentum in its efforts to require mandatory GMO food labels through state-level ballot and legislative efforts. Major food and agriculture corporations are opposed to mandatory GMO labels and have successfully defeated most of these initiatives. Nevertheless, these battles have garnered significant media attention and re-energized the debate over GMO crops and foods. In this paper, we argue that one of the most significant outcomes of this fight is efforts by food retailers and value-based food companies to implement voluntary non-GMO labels and brands. We draw on the governance and political consumerism literature to explore (counter movement efforts for mandatory labels and how these efforts are being institutionalized through private voluntary governance institutions. Our assessment is based on in-depth, semi-structured interviews with key informants from consumer and environmental organizations, agriculture and biotech companies, and government regulatory agencies, as well as a content analysis of food industry websites. A growing number of food retailers recognize the reputational and economic value that new niche markets for non-GMO foods can offer, while the anti-GMO movement views these efforts as a step in the direction of mandatory GMO labels. We conclude that voluntary labels may act to settle the labeling debate by mollifying agri-food industry concerns about mandatory labeling and meeting the desire of political consumers for greater choice and transparency but without addressing the broader social and environmental sustainability concerns that drives the anti-GMO movement in the first place.

  6. Interdisciplinary Practice Approach to Proteins Study and Analysis in Undergraduate Program in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Xavier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate program in Biotechnology at Federal University of Pará has been consolidated as excellence course in Pará, however there are still difficulties in some practice classes. In this way, the aim of this research was to develop low cost and easy implementation methodologies of teaching and learning that help the students to understand the integration of contents, and promote interdisciplinary and greater integration among professors. The main theme of the study was “Proteins: obtaining to analysis”. Professors charged of subjects in Biochemistry, Protein Biochemistry, Protein Engineering, Microbiology and Separation Methods of Biotech Products, has developed this work, which has been promoted by the program PROINT of UFPA. The main purpose of PROINT has been the consolidation of undergraduate teaching projects. Thirty students enrolled in the third semester were involved in this study. To perform the practice classes: a were made models with alternative materials (Styrofoam, cardboard; b were used the tutorials and exercises online as a complement to the teaching and learning process and; c were analyzed chromatograms, simulation purification steps, assembled and interpreted tables purification (falcon tubes, colored beads. Were used also conventional materials and reagents purchased in practices related to microbiology with the support of PROINT. Until now had been a greater interest and participation of students in the implementation of practices and a greater understanding of the theoretical content covered.

  7. CLINICAL EXPERIENCE OF CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY INTEGRATED WITH OLEIC ACID COMPLEXED WITH DE-GLYCOSYLATED VITAMIN D BINDING PROTEIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Ward

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins highly represented in milk such as α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin bind Oleic Acid (OA to form complexes with selective anti-tumor activity. A protein present in milk, colostrum and blood, vitamin D binding protein is the precursor of a potent Macrophage Activating Factor (GcMAF and in analogy with other OA-protein complexes, we proposed that OA-GcMAF could demonstrate a greater immunotherapeutic activity than that of GcMAF alone. We describe a preliminary experience treating patients with advanced cancers, often labelled as “incurable” with an integrative immunotherapy centred on OA-GcMAF. Patients with advanced cancer were treated at the Immuno Biotech Treatment Centre with OA-GcMAF-based integrative immunotherapy in combination with a very low carbohydrate, high protein diet, fermented milk products containing naturally produced GcMAF, vitamin D3 and low-dose acetylsalicylic acid. When the primary tumor or a metastasis could be measured by ultrasonographic techniques, we observed, on average, a decrease of tumor volume of approximately 25% in a week. We also observed a consistent increase in splenic blood flow that was interpreted in the context of generalised immune system activation and allowed to assess the degree of responsiveness of the individual patient. The results reported here are consistent with the results previously described in the experimental animal harbouring a human hepatocellular carcinoma as well as with the results reported for neoadjuvant chemotherapy. OA-protein complexes are bound to play a leading role in cancer therapy thanks to selectivity of antitumoral effects, absence of any side effects, safety and oral availability. We hypothesise that OA-GcMAF, combines the known anticancer effects OA-protein complexes with the well established immune stimulating effects of GcMAF.

  8. A time for growth: an interview with Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer. Interview by Paul Hemp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharer, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    Fast growth is a nice problem to have--but a hard one to manage well. In this interview, Kevin Sharer, the CEO of biotech giant Amgen, talks about the special challenges leaders face when their companies are on a roll. Sharer, who was also head of marketing at pre-WorldCom MCI and a division head and a staff assistant to Jack Welch at GE, offers insights drawn from his own experience--and from his own self-proclaimed blunders: "I learned the hard way that you need to become credible and enlist support inside the company before you start trying to be a change agent. If you think you're going to make change happen simply by force of personality or position or intellect, you'd better think again." And change there was: Under Sharer's leadership, Amgen overhauled its management team, altered its culture, and launched a couple of blockbuster products. How do chief executives survive in that kind of dizzying environment? "A CEO must always be switching between different altitudes--tasks of different levels of abstraction and specificity," Sharer says. "You might need to spend time working on a redesign of your organizational structure and then quickly switch to drafting a memo to all employees aimed at reinforcing one of the company's values." Having a supportive and capable top team is also key: "A top management team is the most revealing window into a CEO's style, values, and aspirations.... If you don't have the right top team, you won't have the right tiers below them. [The] A players won't work for B players. Maybe with a company like GE, the reputation of the company is so strong that it can attract top people to work for weaker managers. In a new company like Amgen, that won't happen." PMID:15241953

  9. [Italy of miracles. Does the renaissaince of Italian science pass by the Vatican?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    In a commentary published in The Lancet on January 2016, Giuseppe Remuzzi and Richard Horton, analyse the origin of the decline of the Italian primacy in biomedical science. Among the others, the existence of Italian political groups «which oppose science simply to please the Church and to achieve political gain» was considered as detrimental for advancing research in such areas as assisted reproduction or embryonic stem cell research. Some hope for a change is raised, in the opinion of Remuzzi and Horton, by the more open attitude toward science of pope Francis. Hence, the two authors conclude that the time has come to promote a dialogue between Italian scientists and the Vatican and, by that, to see «if conditions are ripe to create a renaissance in Italian intellectual life». I humbly challange the analyses and conclusions of Remuzzi and Horton on the Italian scientific decline and the possible way forward. The rooth of the Italian decline in science are deep-seated into the chronic lack of resources, into the under-development of academic institutions, and into the lack of motivations for young researchers. As for bioethical paradigms, they are the end result of a co-production between social norms and scientific development, and their definition would ideally involve the participation of large sectors of the society. One example of such a process is offered by the "Les Etats généraux de la bioéthique" in France in 2009. The ethical discussion concerning biotech innovations is not limited to theological issues, but involves social aspects such as public health priorities, equity, and information strategies to avoid creating unrealistic expectations. PMID:27030219

  10. Intellectual property: A strong determinant of economic growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Rai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The returns from almost all human endeavors can ultimately be translated into monetary gains. The past few years have seen increased attention paid to the strengthening of intellectual property rights due to globalization. The development of Intellectual property rights (IPR over the years has invariably brought an upsurge in the outlook of nations toward the aspect of societal and cultural growth, this being said with the preliminary assumption that economic growth has been the most affected realm and that it requires a separate spectrum of analysis. The artifacts between the IP regime and the national economy can be easily interpreted by the fact that India′s independence had itself brought an era where the enactment of the national IP laws were considered to stand on the touchstone of the market economy. The aim of the present article is to investigate the impact of a strong IP regime on the economic development of a nation and also a light is raised into Indian economy, and the creation of an efficient innovative system is discussed. A strong relation of the IPR with the pharma and biotech sectors has been discussed. Undoubtedly, the Intellectual property (IP systems must be developed so as to bring in socioeconomic well-being. The fact that a strong IPR actually provokes IPR infringements in many developing nations also seems to be an issue that needs to be analyzed while understanding the need of the former. The trade-off between unfair competition laws and IP also assumes importance of high magnitude and hence needs to be particularly emphasized. With the growing recognition of IPR, the importance of worldwide forums on IPR has been realized. Companies, universities, and industries want to protect their IPR internationally. In order to reach this goal, countries have signed numerous agreements and treaties.

  11. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-15

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine. PMID:26862199

  12. Gene and protein targeting technologies create novel opportunities in plant biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important platform technology that is missing in the field of plant science is gene targeting through homologous recombination. Moreover, for many economically important plant varieties, robust and efficient protocols for vegetative propagation and genetic modification are still lacking. The availability of such technologies is essential for the further development of plant biotechnology. Add2X Biosciences BV is a young biotech spin-off from Leiden University that aims to create novel opportunities in plant biotechnology, by developing innovative platform technologies and products for the directed and efficient delivery of DNA and proteins into plant cells. The Add2X portfolio includes: 1. Efficient gene targeting in plants through suppression of the non-homologous recombination pathway. Proof of concept has been obtained in different yeasts and filamentous fungi. Currently, research is in progress to confirm the applicability of this technology in plant species. 2. Agrobacterium-mediated protein translocation to produce and transiently 'inject' proteins of interest into plant cells in order to exert their function without permanently altering the host cells. 3. Induction of somatic embryogenesis in hitherto recalcitrant crop species. A protein family was identified that, when over-expressed, stimulates the spontaneous formation of somatic embryos from vegetative plant cells. The Add2X technologies stand well on their own, but clearly have the potential to be combined into integrated technologies or products. The technologies are developed in close collaboration with Leiden University. In addition, Add2X has established strategic alliances with other academic and industrial partners to explore novel opportunities and to achieve rapid implementation of the technologies in the biotechnology sector. (author)

  13. La escasa relevancia de la información contable sobre los activos intangibles en la valoración de las empresas innovadoras españolas: el caso de los sectores farmacéutico y biotecnológico || The Low Impact of Accounting Information about Intangible Assets in the Valuation of Innovative Spanish Companies: The Case of Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio Martín, Gracia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo analiza en qué medida la norma contable recoge adecuadamente el valor de los activos intangibles, así como su utilidad para los agentes financieros en los procesos de compra-venta de empresas. A partir de una muestra, que recoge los precios pagados en transacciones privadas y en los mercados cotizados de los sectores farmacéutico y biotecnológico españoles durante el periodo 2005-2011, se ha analizado, en primer lugar, el comportamiento de la ratio precio-valor en libros. En segundo lugar, a través de un modelo de regresión, se ha evaluado la relevancia de las diferentes partidas contables en el proceso de generación de precios, así como qué parte del valor intangible de la empresa no aparece recogido en los estados contables. Los autores concluyen sobre la necesidad de acompañar la información económico-financiera tradicional con un informe de capital intelectual. || This article analyzes the extent to which accounting standards adequately reflects the value of intangible assets as well as its usefulness for financial agents in the process of buying and selling companies. Based on a sample that includes price of private transactions and listed companies from the pharmaceutical and biotech Spanish sector in the period 2005-2011, we have analyzed: i The performance of price-to-book ratio; and ii Based on a regression model, the relevance of different accounting items in the price generation process, as well as what part of the intangible value of the company is not reflected in the financial statements. The authors conclude that traditional financial information must be complemented with an intellectual capital report.

  14. The UBCTM test may be useful for diagnosis of recurred urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously we reported the usefulness of UBCTM test compared to urinary cytology for diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder in patients with hematuria. Now we evaluated the usefulness of the UBCTM test for diagnosis of recurred urinary bladder cancer. 146 patients with hematuria were included in our study. UNCTM test (IDL Biotech, Sweden) were assayed in mid-stream urine according to the ordinary assay protocol. 33 patients were confirmed as TCC by cystoscopic examination and underwent transurethral resection (Group A). Other patients had various benign urinary tract conditions (Group B). Samples were considered positive as the UBC concentration was greater than 12 μ g/L. We compared UBCTM level with previous value 6 months later in patients whom diagnosed with TCC. UBC levels were significantly different between group A (95.9±166.4 μ g/L) and group B (19.2±85.6 μ g/L) (pTM test and 100% (97/97) in cytology. UBCTM test was significantly more sensitive in stage Ta. T1 tumors (80 vs 20 %, pTM test showed tendency to be more sensitive as the stage and grade was higher (80% in Ta, 83.3% in T1 and 100% in T2, 80% in Grade I, 85.7% in Grade II and 100% in Grade III). We follow-up UBCTM test in 5 patients after 6 months. UBCTM levels and recurrence were correlated in 4 patient (80%). Follow-up levels of UBCTM were increased in two recurred patients and normalized in non-recurred patients. One patient showed increased level of UBCTM test but clinically no evidence of recurrence. Although Also our patients were small, UBCTM test may be useful method for detecting the recurrence of TCC and further follow-up is necessary

  15. 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis protein profiles of the scorpion venom from Brotheas amazonicus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Scorpions venoms show specific neurotoxins to insect or mammals. These toxins are very important molecular tools to development of news drugs or bioinsecticides. Brotheas amazonicus scorpion is an endemic specie in Amazonian Rain Forest, but your venom do not show toxicity in humans. Information about biological specific activity on insect of this venom is not known yet. Objectives: Molecular protein toxins profiles of the venom from Brotheas amazonicus scorpion by 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis methods to detected toxins with potential biotech applications. Results: Several spots 'families' with ∼ 60, 70 and 80 kDa were detected in gel acidic region with pI ∼ 4,5 - 6 range, in the same region 1-D zimography showed proteolytic activity on gelatin and fibrinogen and proteolytic activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting scorpion serine proteinases. 50 kDa proteins were detected with pI ∼ 6,5 - 7 range. In 23 - 50 kDa gel acid region were observed some proteins. In 23 - 14 kDa gel acidic region were detected proteins with pI 4 - 7 range. 1-D Tris-tricine gel showed proteins with ∼ 7 kDa, suggesting scorpion neurotoxins. In gel basic region only 14 kDa proteins were observed with pI ∼ 9 - 10 range. Conclusion: Molecular profile of the scorpion venom from B. amazonicus showed proteins with high and low molecular masses, mainly with acidic pI. Proteolytic activity suggest serine proteinases with high molecular masses and 7 kDa proteins in B. amazonicus venom suggest scorpion neurotoxins. Purification and molecular characterization of these toxins are in course

  16. Equipment characterization to mitigate risks during transfers of cell culture manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieblist, Christian; Jenzsch, Marco; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies by mammalian cell culture in bioreactors up to 25,000 L is state of the art technology in the biotech industry. During the lifecycle of a product, several scale up activities and technology transfers are typically executed to enable the supply chain strategy of a global pharmaceutical company. Given the sensitivity of mammalian cells to physicochemical culture conditions, process and equipment knowledge are critical to avoid impacts on timelines, product quantity and quality. Especially, the fluid dynamics of large scale bioreactors versus small scale models need to be described, and similarity demonstrated, in light of the Quality by Design approach promoted by the FDA. This approach comprises an associated design space which is established during process characterization and validation in bench scale bioreactors. Therefore the establishment of predictive models and simulation tools for major operating conditions of stirred vessels (mixing, mass transfer, and shear force.), based on fundamental engineering principles, have experienced a renaissance in the recent years. This work illustrates the systematic characterization of a large variety of bioreactor designs deployed in a global manufacturing network ranging from small bench scale equipment to large scale production equipment (25,000 L). Several traditional methods to determine power input, mixing, mass transfer and shear force have been used to create a data base and identify differences for various impeller types and configurations in operating ranges typically applied in cell culture processes at manufacturing scale. In addition, extrapolation of different empirical models, e.g. Cooke et al. (Paper presented at the proceedings of the 2nd international conference of bioreactor fluid dynamics, Cranfield, UK, 1988), have been assessed for their validity in these operational ranges. Results for selected designs are shown and serve as examples of structured

  17. Overcoming barriers to trust in agricultural biotechnology projects: a case study of Bt cowpea in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nigeria, Africa’s most populous country, has been the world’s largest cowpea importer since 2004. The country is currently in the early phases of confined field trials for two genetically modified crops: Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt cowpea and nutritionally enhanced cassava (“BioCassava Plus”. Using the bio-safety guidelines process as a backdrop, we evaluate the role of trust in the operation of the Cowpea Productivity Improvement Project, which is an international agricultural biotechnology public-private partnership (PPP aimed at providing pest-resistant cowpea varieties to Nigerian farmers. Methods We reviewed the published literature and collected data through direct observations and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Data were analyzed based on emergent themes to create a comprehensive narrative on how trust is understood and built among the partners and with the community. Results Our findings highlight the importance of respecting mandates and eliminating conflicts of interest; holding community engagement initiatives early on; having on-going internal discussion and planning; and serving a locally-defined need. These four lessons could prove helpful to other agricultural biotechnology initiatives in which partners may face similar trust-related challenges. Conclusions Overcoming challenges to building trust requires concerted effort throughout all stages of project implementation. Currently, plans are being made to backcross the cowpea strain into a local variety in Nigeria. The development and adoption of the Bt cowpea seed hinges on the adoption of a National Biosafety Law in Nigeria. For countries that have decided to adopt biotech crops, the Nigerian cowpea experiment can be used as a model for other West African nations, and is actually applied as such in Ghana and Burkina Faso, interested in developing a Bt cowpea.

  18. Synthetic biology for pharmaceutical drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trosset JY

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Jean-Yves Trosset,1 Pablo Carbonell2,3 1Bioinformation Research Laboratory, Sup’Biotech, Villejuif, France; 2Faculty of Life Sciences, SYNBIOCHEM Centre, Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK; 3Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS, Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB, Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute (IMIM, Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Synthetic biology (SB is an emerging discipline, which is slowly reorienting the field of drug discovery. For thousands of years, living organisms such as plants were the major source of human medicines. The difficulty in resynthesizing natural products, however, often turned pharmaceutical industries away from this rich source for human medicine. More recently, progress on transformation through genetic manipulation of biosynthetic units in microorganisms has opened the possibility of in-depth exploration of the large chemical space of natural products derivatives. Success of SB in drug synthesis culminated with the bioproduction of artemisinin by microorganisms, a tour de force in protein and metabolic engineering. Today, synthetic cells are not only used as biofactories but also used as cell-based screening platforms for both target-based and phenotypic-based approaches. Engineered genetic circuits in synthetic cells are also used to decipher disease mechanisms or drug mechanism of actions and to study cell–cell communication within bacteria consortia. This review presents latest developments of SB in the field of drug discovery, including some challenging issues such as drug resistance and drug toxicity. Keywords: metabolic engineering, plant synthetic biology, natural products, synthetic quorum sensing, drug resistance

  19. When doctors go to business school: career shoices of physician-MBAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljuboja, Damir; Powers, Brian W; Robbins, Benjamin; Huckman, Robert; Yeshwant, Krishnan; Jain, Sachin H

    2016-01-01

    There has been substantial growth in the number of physicians pursing Master of Business Administration (MBA) degrees over the past decade, but there is continuing debate over the utility of these programs and the career outcomes of their graduates. The authors analyzed the clinical and professional activities of a large cohort of physician-MBAs by gathering information on 206 physician graduates from the Harvard Business School MBA program who obtained their degrees between 1941 and 2014. Key outcome measures that were examined include medical specialty, current professional activity, and clinical practice. Chi square tests were used to assess the correlations in the data. Among the careers that were tracked (n = 195), there was significant heterogeneity in current primary employment. The most common sectors were clinical (27.7%), investment banking/finance (27.0%), hospital/provider administration (11.7%), biotech/device/pharmaceutical (10.9%), and entrepreneurship (9.5%). Overall, 84% of physician-MBAs entered residency; approximately half (49.3%) remained clinically active in some capacity and only one-fourth (27.7%) reported clinical medicine as their primary professional role. Among those who pursued residency training, the most common specialties were internal medicine (39.3%), emergency medicine (10.4%), orthopedic surgery (9.2%), and general surgery (8.6%). Physician-MBAs trained in internal medicine were significantly more likely to remain clinically active (63.8% vs 42.4%; P = .01). Clinical activity and primary employment in a clinical role decreased after degree conferment. After completing their education, a majority of physician-MBAs divert their primary professional focus away from clinical activity. These findings reveal new insights into the career outcomes of physician-MBAs. PMID:27355906

  20. Computational RNomics of Drosophilids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hertel Jana

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent experimental and computational studies have provided overwhelming evidence for a plethora of diverse transcripts that are unrelated to protein-coding genes. One subclass consists of those RNAs that require distinctive secondary structure motifs to exert their biological function and hence exhibit distinctive patterns of sequence conservation characteristic for positive selection on RNA secondary structure. The deep-sequencing of 12 drosophilid species coordinated by the NHGRI provides an ideal data set of comparative computational approaches to determine those genomic loci that code for evolutionarily conserved RNA motifs. This class of loci includes the majority of the known small ncRNAs as well as structured RNA motifs in mRNAs. We report here on a genome-wide survey using RNAz. Results We obtain 16 000 high quality predictions among which we recover the majority of the known ncRNAs. Taking a pessimistically estimated false discovery rate of 40% into account, this implies that at least some ten thousand loci in the Drosophila genome show the hallmarks of stabilizing selection action of RNA structure, and hence are most likely functional at the RNA level. A subset of RNAz predictions overlapping with TRF1 and BRF binding sites [Isogai et al., EMBO J. 26: 79–89 (2007], which are plausible candidates of Pol III transcripts, have been studied in more detail. Among these sequences we identify several "clusters" of ncRNA candidates with striking structural similarities. Conclusion The statistical evaluation of the RNAz predictions in comparison with a similar analysis of vertebrate genomes [Washietl et al., Nat. Biotech. 23: 1383–1390 (2005] shows that qualitatively similar fractions of structured RNAs are found in introns, UTRs, and intergenic regions. The intergenic RNA structures, however, are concentrated much more closely around known protein-coding loci, suggesting that flies have significantly smaller complement

  1. The pathway to earthquake early warning in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, R. M.; Given, D. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Vidale, J. E.; West Coast Earthquake Early Warning Development Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of earthquake early warning capabilities in the United States is now accelerating and expanding as the technical capability to provide warning is demonstrated and additional funding resources are making it possible to expand the current testing region to the entire west coast (California, Oregon and Washington). Over the course of the next two years we plan to build a prototype system that will provide a blueprint for a full public system in the US. California currently has a demonstrations warning system, ShakeAlert, that provides alerts to a group of test users from the public and private sector. These include biotech companies, technology companies, the entertainment industry, the transportation sector, and the emergency planning and response community. Most groups are currently in an evaluation mode, receiving the alerts and developing protocols for future response. The Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system is the one group who has now implemented an automated response to the warning system. BART now stops trains when an earthquake of sufficient size is detected. Research and development also continues to develop improved early warning algorithms to better predict the distribution of shaking in large earthquakes when the finiteness of the source becomes important. The algorithms under development include the use of both seismic and GPS instrumentation and integration with existing point source algorithms. At the same time, initial testing and development of algorithms in and for the Pacific Northwest is underway. In this presentation we will review the current status of the systems, highlight the new research developments, and lay out a pathway to a full public system for the US west coast. The research and development described is ongoing at Caltech, UC Berkeley, University of Washington, ETH Zurich, Southern California Earthquake Center, and the US Geological Survey, and is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the US Geological

  2. High level secretion of laccase (LccH from a newly isolated white rot basidiomycete, Hexagonia hirta MSF2

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    Sujatha eKandhasamy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Newer and novel laccases attract considerable attention due to its promising and valuable multiple applications in biotech industry. This present investigation documents, for the first time, on high level extracellular secretion of laccase (LccH in newly isolated wood-degrading basidiomycete Hexagonia hirta MSF2. LccH was optimally active at 40°C in citrate phosphate buffer with a pH of 3.4. Optimized Cu2+ in glucose yeast extract (GY medium enhanced the LccH production by H. hirta to 1944.44 U.ml-1. A further increment in LccH activity of 5671.30 U.ml-1 was achieved by the addition of a phenolic inducer, 2,5 Xylidine. Zymogram and sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE analysis of LccH revealed that LccH is a monomer with a molecular mass of 66 kDa. MALDI-TOF-MS based peptide mass fingerprinting and comparative modelling of the amino acid sequence of LccH showed that it was closer to Trametes sp. AH28-2 (PDB: 3KW7 with 48% identity, 95% coverage, 0.011 alignment score and RMSD of 0.497Å. Crude LccH delignified lignocellulosic biomass such as wood and corncob, to a level of 28.6 and 16.5 % respectively. Such high level secretion, thermal and solvent stability of LccH make H.hirta a potential candidate not only for LccH production and biodelignification but also generation of lignin derived aromatic feed stock chemicals for industrial and environmental applications.

  3. Research perspectives for pre-screening alternatives to animal experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MEIC study revealed a high predictivity of in vitro cytotoxicity data for human acute systemic toxicity. The idea, put forward by several authors, that compounds that show high cytotoxicity should not need further testing for confirmation but could be assumed toxic also in vivo provides a convenient concept for the selection of the most relevant compounds for further studies in large sets of chemicals, as in the REACH program. The automated techniques applied in high throughput screening (HTS) by the pharmaceutical and biotech industries to select hits in extensive compound collections represent an opportunity to significantly increase the capacity of cytotoxicity testing. Furthermore, it has been suggested that a combination of cytotoxicity data and some basic biokinetic information would greatly improve the accuracy in the extrapolation from in vitro to in vivo and thus make it possible to identify additional toxic compounds that might have escaped in the initial screen. Such information, which can be obtained in a medium throughput screening mode (MTS), includes biotransformation, absorption and some aspects of distribution. The measurement of the net flux of a compound over a cellular barrier, as the one formed in culture by human Caco-2 cells, gives useful, but limited, information on both gut absorption and blood-brain barrier penetration. The test procedures discussed here, as well as other supplementary in vitro tests, cannot always easily be described in terms of animal-based test replacements. In those instances, the necessary test validation cannot be carried out using animal reference data, and prediction models may have to be adapted to new ideas. Consequently, concepts of prospective validation to supplement the now well-established retrospective validation have to be developed

  4. Development of Manufacturing Method of Highly Functional Material Gallic acid-CLA Ester Using Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, C. H.; Byun, M. W.; Jeong, I. Y.; Kim, D. H

    2006-01-15

    Increasing interest and current trends for natural materials with various health beneficial functions by radiation (RT)-biotechnology (BT) fusion by developed countries. However, the information and development of new functional materials using the RT-BT fusion technology is still limited. The target material developed and manufactured by RT-BT fusion technology may have a multi-functional effect on human health and it can be applied for pharmaceutical materials as well as functional food ingredient. The market of functional new materials has been grown dramatically and a multi-functional material manufactured by RT-BT fusion technology may have a great economic impact for both the domestic and overseas market. Development of GA-CLA ester by chemical synthetic method. Transformation of linoleic acid to conjugated linoleic acid by irradiation. Identification and confirmation of the biological functions including antioxidative, cancer cell proliferation inhibition, anti-microbial, enhancement of immune response and lipid metabolism of GA-CLA ester. Increase industrial applicability of the new materials. Development of GA-CLA ester by chemical synthetic method(2 patents submitted). Development of the optimum methodology of GA-CLA and its derivative, octadeca-9,12-dienyl-3,4,5-trihydroxy benzoate). Identification and confirmation of biological activities of GA-CLA. Extramural funding from the Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy subjected by gallic acid-fatty acid derivatives (205,000,000 Won). Provides the basic data for successful project 'Development of cosmeceutical and cosmetics using gallic acid fatty acid derivatives' funded by Ministry of Commerce, Industry, and Energy and collaboration with the Technology-invested venture company, SunBiotech, Co. and problem-solving for industrial application. Complete the patent procedure and publish the results to international or domestic peer-reviewed journals.

  5. High throughput screening of particle conditioning operations: I. System design and method development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Aaron; Huffman, Ben; Godavarti, Ranga; Titchener-Hooker, Nigel; Coffman, Jonathan; Sunasara, Khurram; Mukhopadhyay, Tarit

    2015-08-01

    The biotech industry is under increasing pressure to decrease both time to market and development costs. Simultaneously, regulators are expecting increased process understanding. High throughput process development (HTPD) employs small volumes, parallel processing, and high throughput analytics to reduce development costs and speed the development of novel therapeutics. As such, HTPD is increasingly viewed as integral to improving developmental productivity and deepening process understanding. Particle conditioning steps such as precipitation and flocculation may be used to aid the recovery and purification of biological products. In this first part of two articles, we describe an ultra scale-down system (USD) for high throughput particle conditioning (HTPC) composed of off-the-shelf components. The apparatus is comprised of a temperature-controlled microplate with magnetically driven stirrers and integrated with a Tecan liquid handling robot. With this system, 96 individual reaction conditions can be evaluated in parallel, including downstream centrifugal clarification. A comprehensive suite of high throughput analytics enables measurement of product titer, product quality, impurity clearance, clarification efficiency, and particle characterization. HTPC at the 1 mL scale was evaluated with fermentation broth containing a vaccine polysaccharide. The response profile was compared with the Pilot-scale performance of a non-geometrically similar, 3 L reactor. An engineering characterization of the reactors and scale-up context examines theoretical considerations for comparing this USD system with larger scale stirred reactors. In the second paper, we will explore application of this system to industrially relevant vaccines and test different scale-up heuristics. PMID:25728932

  6. The bioscience revolution & the biological weapons threat: levers & interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Greg

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In December 2008, the US Commission on the Prevention of Weapons of Mass Destruction Proliferation and Terrorism, released a report, World At Risk. The Report points to the fact that, not only is the use of a weapon of mass destruction in a terrorist attack before the end of 2013, more likely than not, but also to the fact that terrorists are more likely to be able to obtain and use biological weapons than nuclear. This paper examines the recommendations of the report in the context of the historic and geopolitical changes, in particular globalization. The authors highlight the "dual-use" dilemma, as described in the report, as the paradoxical use of technology developed for the benefit of mankind being used for sinister purposes. The mitigation of such a threat lies in broad stakeholder involvement and cooperation, including non-state actors, governments and the bio-tech industry itself. The importance of vigilance measures within the life science community is emphasized and, the authors propose, could include a web-based didactic course in bioterrorism and weapons of mass destruction identification. The site could outline safety protocols, have detailed disaster management tutorials, and could be specifically tailored for different subsets of industry and health professionals. The paper concludes with an endorsement of a multi-pronged approach including strong international guidelines and intelligence cooperation and preparatory measures such as the wide-spread use of detection systems as well as diagnostic decision support systems for bioterrorism detection at the local level.

  7. Wheat straw lignin degradation induction to aromatics by por Aspergillus spp. and Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltierra-Trejo Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Wheat straw is a recalcitrant agricultural waste; incineration of this material represents an important environmental impact. Different reports have been made regarding the use of the structural components of wheat straw, i.e. cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin; however, lignin has been less exploited because it is largely considered the recalcitrant part. Residual wheat straw lignin (REWSLI has a potential biotech-nological value if depolymerization is attained to produce aromatics. Ligninolytic mitosporic fungus represent an alternative where very little research has been done, even though they are capable of depol-ymerize REWSLI in simple nutritional conditions in relatively short periods, when compared to basidio-mycetes. The aim of this research was to study the depolymerization activity of Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp on semipurified REWSLI as the sole carbon source to produce aromatics. The depoly-merization capacity was determined by the activity of the laccase, lignin peroxidase and manganese peroxidase enzymes. The generated aromatics derived from the REWSLI depolymerization were identi-fied by gas chromatography. Obtained results revealed that Penicillium chrysogenum depolymerized the lignin material by 34.8% during the 28-day experimentation period. Laccase activity showed the largest activity with 111 U L-1 in a seven-day period, this enzyme induction was detected in a smaller period than that required by basidiomycetes to induce it. Moreover, the enzymatic activity was produced with-out the addition of an extra carbon source as metabolic inductor. Aspergillus spp and Penicillium spp generated guaiacol, vanillin, and hydroxybenzoic, vanillinic, syringic and ferulic acid with a maximum weekly production of 3.5, 3.3, 3.2, 3.3, 10.1 and 21.9 mg mL-1, respectively.

  8. Improvement of endophytic Azospirillum colonization by co-inoculation with Cellulomonas Uda ATCC 491

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Mehdipour Moghaddam

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most of the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR such as Azopirillum if accompanied with strong cellulase producing bacteria such as Cellulomonas, their colonization may be increased and their host plants growth improved. Materials and methods: Six endophytic Azospirilla which isolated from three rice and three wheat cultivars and also one strain from commercial biofertilizer (Green Biotech Co., identified by biochemical tests and 16S rDNA analysis and were studied on the basis of cellulase, pectinase and auxin production and also their chemotaxis toward rice and wheat cultivars exudates was investigated. Two cellulase positive (A5 and A6 and two negative (A2 and A3 strains were selected and their interaction with C. uda ATCC 491 on auxin production and colonization on roots were compared. Results: This study showed that none of the strains had pectinase activity, but the strain isolated from rice had more Carboxy methyl cellulase (CMCase activity. Selected isolates and C. uda ATCC 491 showed chemotaxis toward roots exudates. In most of the isolates, rate of auxin production increased by coculture with C. uda ATCC 491. Also, it was determined that C. uda ATCC 491 promoted the colonization of Azospirillum without or with cellulase activity on rice and wheat roots, respectively. Discussion and conclusion: Co-inoculation Azospirillum with C. uda ATCC 491 improves plant root system due to stimulation or additive effect of auxin production and cellulase activity, followed by more uptakes of water and minerals by roots. Also, it raises the number of colonization niches for useful bacteria such as Azospirillum and finally quantitative and qualitative plant parameters.

  9. Hepatology in the 21st century. Gene transfer, hepatocyte transplantation, DNA chips, cyberspace and ... a friendly hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, P L

    1999-12-01

    What to expect for hepatology in the 21st century? If science is allowed to proceed at its current rate, expectations can hardly be underestimated. Bound by the present day's limitations we are only able to see a glimpse of what could be available 100 years from now. For the next few decades, the global eradication of viral hepatitis will be on the agenda. For the treatment of inherited and acquired metabolic, toxic and immune liver disease, targeted drugs, genes and antisense oligonucleotides will be added to our therapeutic repertoire. The completion of the human genome project in 2003 will have far-reaching consequences: the widespread use of prenatal diagnosis, using DNA chip technology, may be expected to cause a dramatic decrease in the incidence of inherited diseases. Liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and inborn errors of metabolism may be treated by gene transfer or gene repair therapy. Although eventually these developments may decrease the need for organ transplantation, this by no means is the case yet and no solution is available for an increased demand and a decreased supply of organs. In the long run, diseases caused by multi-drug-resistant infectious agents and diseases associated with the abuse of alcohol and drugs are expected to become major problems. The future of university-based research is uncertain. The staggering costs of research and limited career possibilities may force universities to the limited task of higher education, with as a result biotech companies, shareholders and corporate finance ruling the scientific waves in the next century. The 21st century patient will know the way in cyberspace and will go shopping for the best doctor, for the best treatment and for the best, or friendliest, hospital. PMID:10628176

  10. Composites containing albumin protein or cyanoacrylate adhesives and biodegradable scaffolds: I. Acute wound closure study in a rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Grant T.; Soller, Eric C.; Heintzelman, Douglas L.; Duffy, Mark T.; Bloom, Jeffrey N.; Gilmour, Travis M.; Gonnerman, Krista N.; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M.

    2004-07-01

    Composite adhesives composed of biodegradable scaffolds impregnated with a biological or synthetic adhesive were investigated for use in wound closure as an alternative to using either one of the adhesives alone. Two different scaffold materials were investigated: (i) a synthetic biodegradable material fabricated from poly(L-lactic-co-glycolic acid); and (ii) a biological material, small intestinal sub mucosa, manufactured by Cook BioTech. The biological adhesive was composed of 50%(w/v) bovine serum albumin solder and 0.5mg/ml indocyanine green dye mixed in deionized water, and activated with an 808-nm diode laser. The synthetic adhesive was Ethicon's Dermabond, a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate. The tensile strength of skin incisions repaired ex vivo in a rat model, by adhesive alone or in combination with a scaffold, as well as the time-to-failure, were measured and compared. The tensile strength of repairs formed using the scaffold-enhanced biological adhesives were on average, 80% stronger than their non-enhanced counterparts, with an accompanying increase in the time-to-failure of the repairs. These results support the theory that a scaffold material with an irregular surface that bridges the wound provides a stronger, more durable and consistent adhesion, due to the distribution of the tensile stress forces over the many micro-adhesions provided by the irregular surface, rather than the one large continuous adhesive contact. This theory is also supported by several previous ex vivo experiments demonstrating enhanced tensile strength of irregular versus smooth scaffold surfaces in identical tissue repairs performed on bovine thoracic aorta, liver, spleen, small intestine and lung tissue.

  11. External Quality Assessment of MERS-CoV Molecular Diagnostics During the 2015 Korean Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Moon-Woo; Lee, Seung Jun; Cho, Sung Im; Ko, Kyungphil; Kim, Mi-Na; Sung, Heungsub; Kim, Jae-Seok; Ahn, Ji Soo; Yu, Byung Su; Kim, Taek Soo; Kim, Eui Chong

    2016-01-01

    Background The largest outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection outside Middle East Asia in 2015 has necessitated the rapid expansion of laboratories that conduct MERS-CoV molecular testing in Korea, together with external quality assessment (EQA) to evaluate the assays used. Methods The EQA program consisted of two phases; self-validation and blind assessment. For the first EQA phase, in vitro transcribed upstream region of the envelope gene (upE) and the open reading frame (ORF)1a RNAs were used at a concentration of 1,000 copies/µL. The test panel for the second EQA phase consisted of RNA extracts from three samples, which were obtained from two MERS-CoV positive patients and one MERS-CoV negative patient. Results The first EQA phase results for 46 participants showed a linear relationship between the threshold cycle (CT) values of RNA materials and the logarithmic concentrations for both upE and ORF1a gene targets (R2=0.73 and 0.75, respectively). The mean CT value for each concentration was different depending on which commercial kit was used for the assay. Among the three commonly used kits, PowerChek MERS Real-Time PCR kit (KogeneBiotech, Korea) showed the lowest CT values at all concentrations of upE and most concentrations of ORF1a. The second EQA phase results for 47 participants were 100% correct for all tested samples. Conclusions This EQA survey demonstrates that the MERS-CoV molecular testing performed in Korea during the 2015 outbreak is of robust capability. However, careful establishment and validation of a cut-off value are recommended to ensure good analytical sensitivity. PMID:26915611

  12. Automated Electrophysiology Makes the Pace for Cardiac Ion Channel Safety Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eMoeller

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The field of automated patch-clamp electrophysiology has emerged from the tension between the pharmaceutical industry’s need for high-throughput compound screening versus its need to be conservative due to regulatory requirements. On the one hand, hERG channel screening was increasingly requested for new chemical entities, as the correlation between blockade of the ion channel coded by hERG and Torsades de Pointes cardiac arrhythmia gained increasing attention. On the other hand, manual patch-clamping, typically quoted as the gold-standard for understanding ion channel function and modulation, was far too slow (and, consequently, too expensive for keeping pace with the numbers of compounds submitted for hERG channel investigations from pharmaceutical R&D departments. In consequence it became more common for some pharmaceutical companies to outsource safety pharmacological investigations, with a focus on hERG channel interactions. This outsourcing has allowed those pharmaceutical companies to build up operational flexibility and greater independence from internal resources, and allowed them to obtain access to the latest technological developments that emerged in automated patch-clamp electrophysiology – much of which arose in specialized biotech companies. Assays for nearly all major cardiac ion channels are now available by automated patch-clamping using heterologous expression systems, and recently, automated action potential recordings from stem-cell derived cardiomyocytes have been demonstrated. Today, most of the large pharmaceutical companies have acquired automated electrophysiology robots and have established various automated cardiac ion channel safety screening assays on these, in addition to outsourcing parts of their needs for safety screening.

  13. Usefulness of the UBCTM (urinary bladder cancer) test compared to urinary cytology for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder in patients with hematuria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urinary cytology and cystoscopic exam are effective methods for diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). But the former shows drawbacks such as the need for a well-trained examiner, and wide imprecision related to the variability of microscopic exam; the latter is a invasive method. UBCTM test detects the epitope on specific cytokeratin fragments released from epithelium of bladder cancer by immunoradiometric assay. We compared UBCTM test with urinary cytology for diagnosis of TCC to evaluate the utility of UBCTM test. Eighty-four patients with hematuria were included in our study, UBCTM tests (IDL Biotech, Sweden) were assayed in mid-stream urine according to the ordinary assay protocol. Nineteen patients were confirmed as TCC by cystoscopic examination and underwent transurethral resection (Group A). Other patients had various benign urinary tract conditions (Group B). Samples were considered positive as the UBCTM concentration was greater than 12 μg/L. UBCTM levels were significantly different between group A (95.9 ±166.4 μg/L) and group B (19.2 ± 85.6 μg/L)(pTM test and 100% (65/65) in cytology. UBCTM test was significantly more sensitive in stage Ta, T1 tumors (84.6 vs 38.5%, pTM test showed a tendency to be more sensitive as the grade was higher (83.3% in Grade 1, 90% in Grade II and 100% in Grade III). UBCTM test could be a useful method in distinguishing TCC from other benign genitourinary diseases. Moreover, UBCTM test could be an especially valuable marker for diagnosis of TCC in patients with early TCC of low grade TCC compared to urinary cytology. Therefore, mbined use of UBCTM test in association with cytology is helpful to overcome the limited sensitivity of cytology

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of miRNA targets in Brachypodium and Biomass Energy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Pamela J. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)

    2015-08-11

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) contribute to the control of numerous biological processes through the regulation of specific target mRNAs. Although the identities of these targets are essential to elucidate miRNA function, the targets are much more difficult to identify than the small RNAs themselves. Before this work, we pioneered the genome-wide identification of the targets of Arabidopsis miRNAs using an approach called PARE (German et al., Nature Biotech. 2008; Nature Protocols, 2009). Under this project, we applied PARE to Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), a model plant in the Poaceae family, which includes the major food grain and bioenergy crops. Through in-depth global analysis and examination of specific examples, this research greatly expanded our knowledge of miRNAs and target RNAs of Brachypodium. New regulation in response to environmental stress or tissue type was found, and many new miRNAs were discovered. More than 260 targets of new and known miRNAs with PARE sequences at the precise sites of miRNA-guided cleavage were identified and characterized. Combining PARE data with the small RNA data also identified the miRNAs responsible for initiating approximately 500 phased loci, including one of the novel miRNAs. PARE analysis also revealed that differentially expressed miRNAs in the same family guide specific target RNA cleavage in a correspondingly tissue-preferential manner. The project included generation of small RNA and PARE resources for bioenergy crops, to facilitate ongoing discovery of conserved miRNA-target RNA regulation. By associating specific miRNA-target RNA pairs with known physiological functions, the research provides insights about gene regulation in different tissues and in response to environmental stress. This, and release of new PARE and small RNA data sets should contribute basic knowledge to enhance breeding and may suggest new strategies for improvement of biomass energy crops.

  15. Incentives for Starting Small Companies Focused on Rare and Neglected Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Wood, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Starting biotech or pharmaceutical companies is traditionally thought to be based around a scientist, their technology platform or a clinical candidate spun out from another company. Between us we have taken a different approach and formed two small early stage companies after initially leveraging the perspective of a parent with a child with a life-threatening rare disease. Phoenix Nest ( http://www.phoenixnestbiotech.com/ ) was co-founded to work on treatments for Sanfilippo syndrome a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. In the space of just over 3 years we have built up collaborations with leading scientists in academia and industry and been awarded multiple NIH small business grants. The second company, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals Inc. ( http://www.collaborationspharma.com/ ) was founded to address some of the other 7000 or so rare diseases as well as neglected infectious diseases. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher is likely the most important incentive for companies working on rare diseases with very small populations. This may also be partially responsible for the recent acquisitions of rare disease companies with late stage candidates. Lessons learned in the process of starting our companies are that rare disease parents or patients can readily partner with a scientist and fund research through NIH grants rather than venture capital or angel investors initially. This process may be slow so patience and perseverance is key. We would encourage other pharmaceutical scientists to meet rare disease parents, patients or advocates and work with them to further the science on their diseases and create a source of future drugs. PMID:26666772

  16. Healing wounds - radiation processing technology for hydrogel dressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uses of hydrogels are known and have several applications in medical field. Drug delivery devices, contact lenses, wound dressing, artificial cartilage's or membranes, vascular prosthesis, gel coated catheters etc., are some of the examples. Due to direct relevance to human health, scientists have been continuously exploring these systems. Generally, hydro (water) gels contain 30-90% of water entrapped in a three dimensional network structure of a hydrophilic polymer. The large water content makes them highly bio-compatible and therefore preferred for use as biomaterials. Some of the hydrophilic polymers used in these applications include poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), poly (ethylene oxide), poly (vinyl alcohol) and poly (acrylic acid ). Depending upon the nature of application, the size of these hydrogel can vary from nanometers (nanogels, injectable hydrogels) to centimeters to meters (wound dressing, fire blankets, drug delivery devices and implants). BARC hydrogel dressings have been so far used for treating burns, leprosy ulcers, animal bites, diabetic foot ulcers, herpes, fresh scars, bullet injuries, boils, pimples, sun burns, abrasion, surgical wounds of breast cancer, as bolus for radiation therapy in cancer etc. The use of gels have shown excellent result in diabetic ulcers which definitely provides an alternate to expensive biotech products and relief to expanding population of diabetics in India. Its application and some of the examples are shown in the paper. Other hydrogel based products which are under development in the authors laboratory are radiation processed silver nano-particle hydrogels to treat infected wounds and fire blankets for whole body coverage for protection from fire for defense personnel and fire service people

  17. Glycoprotein IIIa Preparation for T-cell Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Anani Sarab

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiplatelet autoantibodis. The major target of the anti platelet antibodies is platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. In order to characterize the immunodominant epitopes in the structure of GPIIIa, the extracellular portions of GPIIIa will be expressed and purified. These antigens will be tested for antigenicity in further investigation. The first segment of GPIIIa which was considered for expression as a recombinant glutathion S-transferase (GST fusion proteins included IIIa22-262 which encompass amino acid residue 22-262 of the 762 amino acids of GPIIIa. A segment of GPIIIa complementary DNA (cDNA was subcloned into the 39 end of the Schistosoma japonicum GST gene in the bacterial expression plasmid vector, pGEX 6P-1 (Amersham Pharmacia Biotech. In summary, the expression plasmid vector, pGEX 6P-1 containing segment IIIa22-262 was introduced to E.coli. Saturated overnight culture was used and the bacterial cells were grown to log-phase. IPTG was added to the culture to induce overexpression of fusion protein and the cells were grown for an additional 1-3 hours. Bacterial lysate containing recombinant protein was prepared by sonication. The fusion protein was purified from total cell extract using glutathione-agarose beads. Specificity of the GST-fusion proteins was confirmed on Immunoblot probed with rabbit anti-GST polyclonal antibodies. PreScission Protease was used to remove the GST tag. Protein extract and purified products were analyzed by SDS gel electrophoresis. The recombinant GST-fusion protein IIIa22-262 was successfully expressed and purified in large quantities but the yield of the IIIa22-262 peptide after enzyme treatment was low. When a good yield is fully obtained, the purified protein segment will be used for T-cell stimulation in culture.

  18. Medicamentos Biotecnológicos: Requisitos Exigidos para el Desarrollo y Aprobación de Biosimilares Biological Medicinal Products: Requirements for the Development and Approval of Biosimilars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Calvo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En este artículo se revisan las directrices europeas de comparabilidad que establecen la metodología para la determinación de biosimilitud entre los medicamentos biosimilares (follow-on biologics en USA y el medicamento biológico de referencia. Los biosimilares son medicamentos biológicos parecidos pero no idénticos al medicamento original y pueden ser fabricados por cualquier fabricante al finalizar el periodo de patente de los medicamentos biotecnológicos. En el articulo se detallan las directrices de la Agencia Europea del Medicamento (EMA y de la Conferencia Internacional de Armonización (ICH a tener en cuenta en el desarrollo y aprobación de estos medicamentos. Se demuestra que los medicamentos biosimilares no pueden considerarse medicamentos genéricos, siendo necesario realizar una serie de ensayos adicionales previos a la obtención de la autorización de comercialización.This article reviews the European guidelines on drugs comparability that establish the methodology for verifying biosimilarity between the so-called biosimilar drugs and the reference biological medicinal product. Biosimilars are biological medicines similar but not identical to the original drugs and can be manufactured by any laboratory after the expiration of biotech drugs patent. The guidelines of the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH that must be considered in the development and approval of these drugs also are reviewed. It is shown that biosimilars cannot be considered as generic drugs, being necessary to conduct additional assays prior to obtain marketing authorization.

  19. Fraunhofer Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME). Annual report 2014/2015; Fraunhofer Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Angewandte Oekologie (IME). Jahresbericht 2014/2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-07-01

    The Annual report 2014/2015 of the Fraunhofer Institute for molecular biology and applied ecology includes the following contributions: (A) Molecular Biology: TheraSECOURE - Novel immunotherapeutics for targeted cancer therapy; ''MultiNaBel ''- Automated diagnosis of leukemia; Breeding potato for optimized specialty starches; NGS-based zygosity detection in transgenic maize; High-throughput screen ing system for cellulases based on microfluidic devices; Filter aids reduce production costs for plant-derived biopharmaceuticals; Transient expression of recombinant proteins in packed plant cells; ERA-NET Biodiversa EXOTIC project on the invasive harlequin ladybird; AIM-Biotech supported by the Fraunhofer-Max Planck Cooperation program; Metabolic control analysis of the MEP pathway; Metabolic engineering of Clostridium spp. by genomic integration; The Fraunhofer Future Foundation malaria project; Autoantibodies to type 11 collagen as biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis; Development of a new drug for the treatment of sepsis; Databionic drug research; Structure-based drug design; Neu{sup 2}: competence consortium for multiple sclerosis drug development; Natural compounds from marine fungi for the treatment of cancer; FCR Center for Systems Biotechnology (CSB): Two selected projects; Development and implementation of a plant-derived vaccine against yellow fever. (B) Applied Ecology: Comparison and improvement of laboratory water/sediment test systems; Inter-laboratory comparison of Hyalella Azteca exposure tests lasting 10-42 days; Substance- and matrix-related environmental monitoring of biocides; GERDA-geobased runoff, erosion and drainage risk assessment; The minimum detectable difference and reliability of mesocosm studies; Mechanistic effect models for the ecological risk assessment of pesticides; Molecular biology test for the online analysis of spontaneously-fermented wines; Coupling two test systems to determine the effect of wastewater

  20. Servier's pipeline in oncology: moving from research to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therasse, Patrick; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    Patrick Therasse and Jean-Pierre Abastado speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Patrick Therasse is an MD, PhD who has focused his career on drug development in oncology. He is currently the Head of Oncology Development for Servier. Before working for Servier, he worked 8 years for GlaxoSmithKline Vaccines as Vice President, Head of Global Clinical Development for immunotherapeutics. He started his career at the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) as a research fellow and then served as Director of the EORTC Research Center for 11 years. He has worked in all fields of oncology with a long track record of publications mainly in the field of breast cancer and methodological research. He is most well known for developing new Response Criteria In Solid Tumours (RECIST), the reference for response assessment in cancer clinical trials since 2000. His areas of expertise encompass Phase I-III drug development with small molecules or active/passive immunotherapy and translational research. Jean-Pierre Abastado is an immuno-oncologist in charge of the R&D in Oncology at Servier, where he is Director of the Therapeutic Innovation Pole in Oncology. He conducted his professional career between various academic and industrial institutions. He was trained at Ecole Polytechnique (Paris), prepared his PhD on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) at the Pasteur Institute, and made a postdoctoral training at NIH (Bethesda, MD, USA). He studied T-cell activation in the Immunology department of the Pasteur Institute and at the CNRS. He was Vice President, Chief Scientific Officer of IDM-Pharma, a company specialized in cell therapy against cancer. Before joining Servier, he headed the Laboratory of Tumour Immunology within the Singapore Immunology Network (SIgN) where his team studied the tumor immune microenvironment. He has served on the Editorial board of several journals and in the Scientific Advisory Board of several biotech

  1. ЛАБОРАТОРНЫЕ ФЕРМЕНТЕРЫ ЕМКОСТНОГО ТИПА

    OpenAIRE

    Сидоров, Ю.

    2012-01-01

    Приведены сведения о современных компьютеризованных лабораторных ферментерах (биореакторах) емкостного типа с перемешивающими устройствами, предназначенные для культивирования прокариотов, растительных, животных клеток и клеток насекомых, которые предлагают фирмы: Sartorius BBI Systems, New Brunswick Scientific, В. Вraun Biotech, Bioengineering AG, Lambda Minifor, «Проинтех»: от самых простых с одной емкостью без автоматической регулировки подачи реагентов до многореакторных с автоматической ...

  2. Transgene Expression in Microalgae—From Tools to Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doron, Lior; Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide range of transformation

  3. Critical points of DNA quantification by real-time PCR – effects of DNA extraction method and sample matrix on quantification of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žel Jana

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time PCR is the technique of choice for nucleic acid quantification. In the field of detection of genetically modified organisms (GMOs quantification of biotech products may be required to fulfil legislative requirements. However, successful quantification depends crucially on the quality of the sample DNA analyzed. Methods for GMO detection are generally validated on certified reference materials that are in the form of powdered grain material, while detection in routine laboratories must be performed on a wide variety of sample matrixes. Due to food processing, the DNA in sample matrixes can be present in low amounts and also degraded. In addition, molecules of plant origin or from other sources that affect PCR amplification of samples will influence the reliability of the quantification. Further, the wide variety of sample matrixes presents a challenge for detection laboratories. The extraction method must ensure high yield and quality of the DNA obtained and must be carefully selected, since even components of DNA extraction solutions can influence PCR reactions. GMO quantification is based on a standard curve, therefore similarity of PCR efficiency for the sample and standard reference material is a prerequisite for exact quantification. Little information on the performance of real-time PCR on samples of different matrixes is available. Results Five commonly used DNA extraction techniques were compared and their suitability for quantitative analysis was assessed. The effect of sample matrix on nucleic acid quantification was assessed by comparing 4 maize and 4 soybean matrixes. In addition 205 maize and soybean samples from routine analysis were analyzed for PCR efficiency to assess variability of PCR performance within each sample matrix. Together with the amount of DNA needed for reliable quantification, PCR efficiency is the crucial parameter determining the reliability of quantitative results, therefore it was

  4. A randomized comparison of every-2-week darbepoetin alfa and weekly epoetin alfa for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia in patients with breast, lung, or gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzberg, Lee S; Yee, Lorrin K; Senecal, Frank M; Charu, Veena; Tomita, Dianne; Wallace, Joel; Rossi, Greg

    2004-01-01

    An important clinical question is the relative efficacy of the most common dosages of darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp; Amgen Inc.; Thousand Oaks, CA) 200 microg every 2 weeks (Q2W) and epoetin alfa (Procrit; Ortho Biotech Products, LP; Raritan, NJ) 40,000 U weekly (QW) for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia. We designed three concurrent randomized, open-label, multicenter, identical trials (with the exception of tumor type criteria of breast, gynecologic, or lung cancer) of darbepoetin alfa and epoetin alfa in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia to validate the Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire for Anemia (PSQ-An) treatment tool and to compare the efficacies and safety profiles of these two agents. In each trial, patients were randomized 1:1 to receive either darbepoetin alfa at a dose of 200 microg Q2W or epoetin alfa at a dose of 40,000 U QW for up to 16 weeks. The PSQ-An was assessed for validity, feasibility, and reliability. Secondary clinical endpoints were analyzed using the primary analysis set. Both individual trial analyses and a protocol-specified combined analysis of data from all three trials were conducted. Overall, 312 patients (157 darbepoetin alfa; 155 epoetin alfa) were randomized and received study drug. Baseline characteristics were similar in both treatment groups in each trial and overall. The PSQ-An was valid, feasible, and reliable. In general, no difference between treatment groups was observed for hemoglobin- and transfusion-based endpoints in each individual trial or in the combined analysis. From exploratory analyses, achievement and maintenance of a hemoglobin target range (11-13 g/dl) were similar in both groups. No differences in safety were observed. With the PSQ-An, formal comparisons of the impact of anemia therapies on patients and caregivers can be made in future prospective studies. Further, darbepoetin alfa (200 microg Q2W) and epoetin alfa (40,000 U QW) appear to achieve comparable clinical and hematologic outcomes

  5. Assessment of Site Specific Mutational Effect on Transcription Initiation at Escherichia coli Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: It is widely accepted thought that the weak promoters control the RNA synthesis and play regulatory role in complex genetic networks in bacterial system. An experiment had been designed to address whether mutations in the -16/-17 region affect the rate of transcription at an activator-independent promoter in E. coli or not? Approach: The aim of this study was to determine whether mutations in the -16/-17 region affect the rate of expression at an activator-dependent promoter in JM109 strain of E. coli. Primers were constructed to amplify the mutant promoter genes through PCR. The amplified PCR product was checked and then inserted into the MCS region of pAA128 plasmid. Further the plasmid vector was transformed into JM109 strain of E. coli and then cloned the selected transformats. Finally, the plasmid from each mutant colony was then sequenced using the protocol supplied with the Amersham Pharmacia Biotech T7 sequencing Kit. The JM109 cultures for which the sequences were determined, then assayed for ß-galactosidase activity to assess the rate of gene expression from the altered promoters. Results: The present investigation revealed that the extended-10 promoter region has a substantial effect on the rate of transcription at weak promoter sequence and also bearing little resemblance to the consensus sequence recognized by RNA. The expression of the genetically engineered plasmid proved that the 2 bps (-16 and -17 base pair found adjacently upstream of the extended-10 promoter have an effect on the level of transcription. This was achieved by site specific base substitutions into the weak promoter of a modified lac operon lacking any activator or repressor binding sites. The results from gene expression assays of several mutants showed a distinct preference for either GG or TT located adjacently upstream of the extended promoter element. Thus the present study emphasized that

  6. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010: November 29-December 1, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Alain; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC. As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration FDA. The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements of

  7. Targeting PD-1/PD-L1 in lung cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Cao M

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available María González-Cao,1 Niki Karachaliou,1 Santiago Viteri,1 Daniela Morales-Espinosa,1 Cristina Teixidó,2 Jesús Sánchez Ruiz,3 Miquel Ángel Molina-Vila,2 Mariacarmela Santarpia,4 Rafael Rosell1,2,5,61Translational Cancer Research Unit, Instituto Oncológico Dr Rosell, Quirón Dexeus University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain; 2Pangaea Biotech SL, Barcelona, Spain; 3Centro Nacional de Investigación Oncología (CNIO, Madrid, Spain; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Human Pathology Department, University of Messina, Messina, Italy; 5Cancer Biology and Precision Medicine Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Germans Trias i Pujol Health Sciences Institute and Hospital, Campus Can Ruti, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain; 6Fundación Molecular Oncology Research, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: Increased understanding of tumor immunology has led to the development of effective immunotherapy treatments. One of the most important advances in this field has been due to pharmacological design of antibodies against immune checkpoint inhibitors. Anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies are currently in advanced phases of clinical development for several tumors, including lung cancer. Results from Phase I–III trials with anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies in non-small-cell lung cancer have demonstrated response rates of around 20% (range, 16%–50%. More importantly, responses are long-lasting (median duration of response, 18 months and fast (50% of responses are detected at time of first tumor evaluation with very low grade 3–4 toxicity (less than 5%. Recently, the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA breakthrough therapy designation for treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer, supported by data from a Phase Ib trial. Another anti-PD-1 antibody, nivolumab, has also been approved for lung cancer based on survival advantage demonstrated in recently released data from a Phase III trial in squamous cell lung cancer.Keywords: immunotherapy, immunoncology

  8. Transgene expression in microalgae – from tools to applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lior eDoron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae comprise a biodiverse group of photosynthetic organisms that reside in water sources and sediments. The green microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was adopted as a useful model organism for studying various physiological systems. Its ability to grow under both photosynthetic and heterotrophic conditions allows efficient growth of non-photosynthetic mutants, making Chlamydomonas a useful genetic tool to study photosynthesis. In addition, this green alga can grow as haploid or diploid cells, similar to yeast, providing a powerful genetic system. As a result, easy and efficient transformation systems have been developed for Chlamydomonas, targeting both the chloroplast and nuclear genomes. Since microalgae comprise a rich repertoire of species that offer variable advantages for biotech and biomed industries, gene transfer technologies were further developed for many microalgae to allow for the expression of foreign proteins of interest. Expressing foreign genes in the chloroplast enables the targeting of foreign DNA to specific sites by homologous recombination. Chloroplast transformation also allows for the introduction of genes encoding several enzymes from a complex pathway, possibly as an operon. Expressing foreign proteins in the chloroplast can also be achieved by introducing the target gene into the nuclear genome, with the protein product bearing a targeting signal that directs import of the transgene-product into the chloroplast, like other endogenous chloroplast proteins. Integration of foreign genes into the nuclear genome is mostly random, resulting in large variability between different clones, such that extensive screening is required. The use of different selection modalities is also described, with special emphasis on the use of herbicides and metabolic markers which are considered to be friendly to the environment, as compared to drug-resistance genes that are commonly used. Finally, despite the development of a wide

  9. Preclinical animal study and human clinical trial data of co-electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone and fibrinogen mesh for anterior pelvic floor reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu XJ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Xujun Wu,1,2,* Yuru Wang,3,* Cancan Zhu,2 Xiaowen Tong,3 Ming Yang,2 Li Yang,2 Zhang Liu,1,2 Weihong Huang,2 Feng Wu,2 Honghai Zong,2 Huaifang Li,3 Hongbing He2,41School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Pine & Power Biotech Co. Ltd., 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shanghai Tongji Hospital, Tongji University, 4Section of Tissue Engineering, Institute of Peripheral Vascular Surgery, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Synthetic and biological materials are commonly used for pelvic floor reconstruction. In this study, host tissue response and biomechanical properties of mesh fabricated from co-electrospun poly(L-lactide-co-caprolactone (PLCL and fibrinogen (Fg were compared with those of polypropylene mesh (PPM in a canine abdominal defect model. Macroscopic, microscopic, histological, and biomechanical evaluations were performed over a 24-week period. The results showed that PLCL/Fg mesh had similar host tissue responses but better initial vascularization and graft site tissue organization than PPM. The efficacy of the PLCL/Fg mesh was further examined in human pelvic floor reconstruction. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss, and pelvic organ prolapse quantification during 6-month follow-up were compared for patients receiving PLCL/Fg mesh versus PPM. According to the pelvic organ prolapse quantification scores, the anterior vaginal wall 3 cm proximal to the hymen point (Aa point, most distal edge of the cervix or vaginal cuff scar point (C point, and posterior fornix point (D point showed significant improvement (P<0.01 at 1, 3, and 6 months for both groups compared with preoperatively. At 6 months, improvements at the Aa point in the PLCL/Fg group were significantly more (P<0.005 than the PPM group, indicating that, while both materials improve the patient symptoms, PLCL/Fg mesh resulted in more obvious

  10. Potential commercial use of the International Space Station by the biotechnology/pharmaceutical/biomedical sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, George W.; Stodieck, Louis

    1999-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the linch-pin of NASA's future space plans. It emphasizes scientific research by providing a world-class scientific laboratory in which to perform long-term basic science experiments in the space environment of microgravity, radiation, vacuum, vantage-point, etc. It will serve as a test-bed for determining human system response to long-term space flight and for developing the life support equipment necessary for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise. The ISS will also provide facilities (up to 30% of the U.S. module) for testing material, agricultural, cellular, human, aquatic, and plant/animal systems to reveal phenomena heretofore shrouded by the veil of 1-g. These insights will improve life on Earth and will provide a commercial basis for new products and services. In fact, some products, e.g., rare metal-alloys, semiconductor chips, or protein crystals that cannot now be produced on Earth may be found to be sufficiently valuable to be manufactured on-orbit. Biotechnology, pharmaceutical and biomedical experiments have been regularly flown on 10-16 day Space Shuttle flights and on three-month Mir flights for basic science knowledge and for life support system and commercial product development. Since 1985, NASA has created several Commercial Space Centers (CSCs) for the express purpose of bringing university, government and industrial researchers together to utilize space flight and space technology to develop new industrial products and processes. BioServe Space Technologies at the University of Colorado at Boulder and Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas, is such a NASA sponsored CSC that has worked with over 65 companies and institutions in the Biotech Sector in the past 11 years and has successfully discovered and transferred new product and process information to its industry partners. While tests in the space environment have been limited to about two weeks on Shuttle or a few

  11. Genetically Modified Organism Trade Route and Biosafety-Is It a Failing Synthesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debdatta Dobe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: GM regulations have spawned international conflicting reactions especially between US and EU, with countries requiring food aid caught midway. This article covers the following issues: Whether biotechnology policies of other countries affect the developing countries’ trade in agricultural crops?” Does unregulated GM expansion and contamination, render the system fallacious? Can there be synthesis between trade and environment? Approach: This article also explores “long term effects of trading substitute GM components. Extensive research has been followed to identify the key areas of international trade and environment pertaining to GMO’s which require immediate international attention. Results: The biotech war emerged with the Cartagena Protocol which permits countries to ban unsafe GM products and requires labeling of shipments that threaten traditional crops or biodiversity. In response to stricter stand of EU banning most GMOs, the US initiated litigation before WTO which in a preliminary ruling declared EU restriction violative of trade rules. Fear of export losses discourages Asia to approve new GMOs. U N reports that, Asia’s regulatory framework is flawed and large number of tests, required to approve GMO’s safe release are not conducted causing “irreversible loss of genetic diversity”. Governments address these concerns differentially. Countries like Canada, China, and US incorporated GMOs commercially. While EU and Japan wait for full environmental assessment, the EU has issued a Directive on release and commercialization of GM crops. The EU view sharply contrasts to the WTO’s, whose contribution to sustainable development of the environment lies in trade opening in goods and innovations like GM crops. WTO does not accept the process of production as cause for trade restrictions, narrowly interpreting the exception to trade rules under Article XX. International regulations on GMOs, (considered similar to

  12. The Burden of JAK2V617F Mutated Allele in Turkish Patients With Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonal-Hindilerden, Ipek; Daglar-Aday, Aynur; Akadam-Teker, Basak; Yilmaz, Ceylan; Nalcaci, Meliha; Yavuz, Akif Selim; Sargin, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies regarding the impact of JAK2V617F allele burden on phenotypic properties and clinical course in Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph-negative MPNs) have reported variable results. We aimed to analyze the association of mutated JAK2V617F allele burden with laboratory characteristics and clinical phenotype in Turkish patients (107 essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 77 primary myelofibrosis (PMF)). Methods Peripheral blood samples of 184 patients with Ph-negative MPNs were analyzed for JAK2V617F allele status and burden. JAK2 MutaScreen assay (Ipsogen, Luminy Biotech, Marseille, France) was used to detect the JAK2V617F status and quantitative JAK2V617F allele burdens in genomic DNA using TaqMan allelic discrimination. Results Frequency of JAK2V617F-positive patients with high mutation load (allele burden > 50%) was higher in PMF compared to ET (23.4% and 4.7%, respectively; P = 0.001). We found significant association between ET patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and lower hemoglobin (Hgb) and hematocrit (Hct), higher LDH levels and more prevalent massive splenomegaly (P = 0.001, P = 0.001, P = 0.012 and P = 0.015, respectively). ET patients with high mutation load displayed higher prevalence of bleeding compared to low mutation load and wild-type mutational status (P = 0.003). Rate of DVT was significantly higher in ET patients with mutant allele burden in upper half compared to lower half and wild-type (P = 0.029). We observed significant association between PMF patients with high JAK2V617F allele burden and higher Hgb, Hct levels and leukocyte counts (P = 0.003, P = 0.021 and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Our study demonstrated JAK2V617F allele burden correlates with clinical features in ET and PMF. We conclude quantification of JAK2V617F mutation contributes to the workup of Ph-negative MPNs. PMID:25584101

  13. The theoretical advantage of affinity membrane-based immunoadsorption therapy of hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Therapy of hypercholesterolemia using immunoadsorption of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) to a gel substrate is a current clinical technique (Bosch T., Biomat., Art. Cells and Immob. Biotech, 20: 1165- 1169, 1992). Recently, Affinity Membranes have been proposed as an alternate substrate for immunoadsorption (Brandt S and others, Bio Technology, 6:779-782, 1988). Potentially, the overall rate of adsorption to a membrane may be faster than to a gel because of the different geometry (ibid). This implies that for the same conditions, a membrane-based device will have a higher Number of Transfer Units, more efficient adsorption and a smaller device size than a gel. To test this hypothesis, we calculated two key theoretical design parameters: Separation Factor, R, and the Number of Transfer Units, N, for a functioning clinical-scale affinity membrane device: R=Kd/Kd+C0. Kd: Equilibrium Dissociation Constant (M) and Co: Feed Concentration (M) N=kaQmaxVm/F. ka: Intrinsic reaction rate constant (M-1 min-1), Qmax: Substrate capacity (M), Vm: Membrane volume (m1) and F: Flow Rate (m1 min-1). We assumed 1 hr treatment time during which 1 plasma volume (3L) is treated, hence F=50 (m1 min-1). If we assume 2/3 of LDL is removed from an initial level of 3 g/L, we can calculate an average feed concentration Co = 2 g / L. There is some data available in the literature for typical values of Kd (10-8 M) and ka ( 103 M-1s-1 to 3 x 105 M-1 s-1 ) (Olsen WC and others, Molec. Immun: 26: 129-136, 1989). Since the intrinsic reaction kinetics may vary from very slow (103 M) to very fast (3 x 105 M), the Number of Transfer Units, N may vary from small (2) to large (650). Hence for a membrane device, we must select the antibody with the fastest reaction, ka, and highest capacity (Qmax) otherwise, there may be no advantage in a membrane-based device over a gel-based device

  14. Set-Up and Validation of a Dynamic Solid/Gas Bioreactor

    KAUST Repository

    Lloyd-Randol, Jennifer D.

    2012-05-01

    The limited availability of fossil resourses mandates the development of new energy vectors, which is one of the Grand Challenges of the 21st Century [1]. Biocatalytic energy conversion is a promising solution to meet the increased energy demand of industrialized societies. Applications of biocatalysis in the gas-phase are so far limited to production of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals. However, this technology has the potential for large scale biocatalytic applications [2], e.g. for the formation of novel energy carriers. The so-called solid/gas biocatalysis is defined as the application of a biocatalyst immobilized on solid-phase support acting on gaseous substrates [3]. This process combines the advantages of bio-catalysis (green chemistry, mild reaction conditions, high specicity & selectivity) and heterogeneous dynamic gas-phase processes (low diffusion limitation, high conversion, simple scale-up). This work presents the modifications of a PID Microactivity Reference reactor in order to make it suitable for solid/gas biocatalysis. The reactor design requirements are based on previously published laboratory scale solid/gas systems with a feed of saturated vapors [4]. These vapors are produced in saturation flasks, which were designed and optimized during this project. Other modifications included relocation of the gas mixing chamber, redesigning the location and heating mechanism for the reactor tube, and heating of the outlet gas line. The modified reactor system was verified based on the Candida antarctica lipase B catalyzed transesterication of ethyl acetate with 1-hexanol to hexyl acetate and ethanol and results were compared to liquid-phase model reactions. Products were analyzed on line by a gas chromatograph with a flame ionization detector. C. antarc- tica physisorbed on silica particles produced a 50% conversion of hexanol at 40 C in the gas-phase. A commercial immobilized lipase from Iris Biotech produced 99% and 97% conversions of hexanol in

  15. Expression of cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 in the hippocampus of vascular dementia mice after cerebral ischemia and reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianjun Wang; Peiyuan Lü; Hezhen Zhang; Hebo Wang; Wei Jin; Zongcheng Guo; Changlin Liu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The p25-activated cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 (Cdk5) may induce neuronal cell death and cause the development of dementia following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. OBJECTIVE: To observe changes in the expression of Cdk5 and p25 in hippocampal tissue of vascular dementia mice at different time points following cerebral ischemia and reperfusion. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled animal experiment was performed in the clinical trial center of Hebei Provincial People's Hospital between September 2007 and October 2008.MATERIALS: Cdk5 rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibody, p35 rabbit anti-mouse polyclonal antibody, and β-actin mouse monoclonal antibody were purchased from Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc., USA; horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG and horseradish peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mice IgG were offered by Beijing Zhongshan Goldenbridye Biotechnology Co.,Ltd., China; the protein quantitative kit was produced by Applygen Gene Technology Corp., Beijing, China; cDNA reverse transcription and PCR amplification reagents were products of TianGen&Biotech (Beijing) Co.,Ltd., China.METHODS: One hundred and sixty male Kunming mice were randomly divided into two groups: a sham-operated group (n=65) and a model group (n=95). Vascular dementia was induced with three periods of transient ischemia and reperfusion of the bilateral common carotid arteries. In the sham-operated group, the bilateral common carotid arteries were not blocked.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Behavioral tests were done at four and six weeks post surgery. Pathological changes in the hippocampal CA1 region were observed with hematoxylin-eosin staining. Cdk5 mRNA expression was examined by RT-PCR, and Western blots were used to evaluate Cdk5 and p25 expression. Learning and memory performance were assayed using the Morris water maze. RESULTS: Vascular dementia reduced learning and memory performance at 4 and 6 weeks post surgery. Vascular dementia also caused

  16. Functional fusion of living systems with synthetic electrode interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufer, Oskar; Weber, Sebastian; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar; Spatz, Joachim P; Rustom, Amin

    2016-01-01

    The functional fusion of "living" biomaterial (such as cells) with synthetic systems has developed into a principal ambition for various scientific disciplines. In particular, emerging fields such as bionics and nanomedicine integrate advanced nanomaterials with biomolecules, cells and organisms in order to develop novel strategies for applications, including energy production or real-time diagnostics utilizing biomolecular machineries "perfected" during billion years of evolution. To date, hardware-wetware interfaces that sample or modulate bioelectric potentials, such as neuroprostheses or implantable energy harvesters, are mostly based on microelectrodes brought into the closest possible contact with the targeted cells. Recently, the possibility of using electrochemical gradients of the inner ear for technical applications was demonstrated using implanted electrodes, where 1.12 nW of electrical power was harvested from the guinea pig endocochlear potential for up to 5 h (Mercier, P.; Lysaght, A.; Bandyopadhyay, S.; Chandrakasan, A.; Stankovic, K. Nat. Biotech. 2012, 30, 1240-1243). More recent approaches employ nanowires (NWs) able to penetrate the cellular membrane and to record extra- and intracellular electrical signals, in some cases with subcellular resolution (Spira, M.; Hai, A. Nat. Nano. 2013, 8, 83-94). Such techniques include nanoelectric scaffolds containing free-standing silicon NWs (Robinson, J. T.; Jorgolli, M.; Shalek, A. K.; Yoon, M. H.; Gertner, R. S.; Park, H. Nat Nanotechnol. 2012, 10, 180-184) or NW field-effect transistors (Qing, Q.; Jiang, Z.; Xu, L.; Gao, R.; Mai, L.; Lieber, C. Nat. Nano. 2013, 9, 142-147), vertically aligned gallium phosphide NWs (Hällström, W.; Mårtensson, T.; Prinz, C.; Gustavsson, P.; Montelius, L.; Samuelson, L.; Kanje, M. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 2960-2965) or individually contacted, electrically active carbon nanofibers. The latter of these approaches is capable of recording electrical responses from oxidative events

  17. Gasoline Biodesulfurization DE-FC07-97ID13570 FINAL REPORT; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine strains were identified to grow with gasoline as sole sulfur source. Two different genes were cloned from Gordonia terrae KGB1 and tested for the ability to support gasoline BDS. The first of these, fmoA, was cloned by screening a KGB1 gene library for the ability to convert indole to indigo (a sulfur-regulated capability in KGB1). The fmoA gene was overexpressed in a gasoline tolerant strain of Pseudomonas putida PpG1 and the recombinant strain was shown to convert thiophene to a dimer of thiophene sulfoxide at rates nearly two orders of magnitude higher than KGB1 could catalyze the reaction. Despite this high activity the recombinant PpG1 was unable to demonstrate any activity against gasoline either in shake flask or in bench-scale gasoline BDS bioreactor. A second gene (toeA) was cloned from KGB1 and shown to support growth of Rhodococcus erythropolis JB55 on gasoline. The toeA gene was also identified in another gasoline strain T. wratislaviensis EMT4, and was identified as a homolog of dszA from R. erythropolis IGTS8. Expression of this gene in JB55 supported conversion of DBTO2 (the natural substrate for DszA) to HPBS, but activity against gasoline was low and BDS results were inconsistent. It appeared that activity was directed against C2- and C3-thiophenes. Efforts to increase gene expression by plasmid manipulation, by addition of flavin reductase genes, or by expression in PpG1 were unsuccessful. The DszC protein (DBT monooxygenase) from IGTS8 has very little activity against the sulfur compounds in gasoline, but a mutant enzyme with a substitution of phenylalanine for valine at position 261 was shown to have an altered substrate range. This alteration resulted in increased activity against gasoline, with activity towards mainly C3- and C4-thiophenes and benzothiophene. A mutant library of dszB was constructed by RACHITT (W. C. Coco et al., DNA shuffling method for generating highly recombined genes and evolved enzymes. 2001. Nature Biotech. 19

  18. The UBC{sup TM} test may be useful for diagnosis of recurred urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Do Young; Jung, Se Il; Hwang, Joon Seong; Gil, Myung Cheol; Yoon, Jin Han; Kim, Duk Kyu [College of Medicine, Donga Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Previously we reported the usefulness of UBC{sup TM} test compared to urinary cytology for diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder in patients with hematuria. Now we evaluated the usefulness of the UBC{sup TM} test for diagnosis of recurred urinary bladder cancer. 146 patients with hematuria were included in our study. UNC{sup TM} test (IDL Biotech, Sweden) were assayed in mid-stream urine according to the ordinary assay protocol. 33 patients were confirmed as TCC by cystoscopic examination and underwent transurethral resection (Group A). Other patients had various benign urinary tract conditions (Group B). Samples were considered positive as the UBC concentration was greater than 12 {mu} g/L. We compared UBC{sup TM} level with previous value 6 months later in patients whom diagnosed with TCC. UBC levels were significantly different between group A (95.9{+-}166.4 {mu} g/L) and group B (19.2{+-}85.6 {mu} g/L) (p<0.001). Sensitivity for diagnosis of TCC was 78.8% (26/33) in UBC test and 39.4% (13/33) in cytology (p<0.05). Specificity for diagnosis of TCC was 82.5% (80/97) in UBC{sup TM} test and 100% (97/97) in cytology. UBC{sup TM} test was significantly more sensitive in stage Ta. T{sub 1} tumors (80 vs 20 %, p<0.05) ad in grade I (80% vs 10%, p<0.05) than cytology, UBC{sup TM} test showed tendency to be more sensitive as the stage and grade was higher (80% in Ta, 83.3% in T1 and 100% in T2, 80% in Grade I, 85.7% in Grade II and 100% in Grade III). We follow-up UBC{sup TM} test in 5 patients after 6 months. UBC{sup TM} levels and recurrence were correlated in 4 patient (80%). Follow-up levels of UBC{sup TM} were increased in two recurred patients and normalized in non-recurred patients. One patient showed increased level of UBC{sup TM} test but clinically no evidence of recurrence. Although Also our patients were small, UBC{sup TM} test may be useful method for detecting the recurrence of TCC and further follow-up is necessary.

  19. Joseph A. Burton Forum Award Lecture: Managing Nuclear and Biological Risks: Building Resilience through International Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregenzer, Arian

    2012-03-01

    International technical cooperation has long been an important nonproliferation strategy, especially since the 1990s when cooperative threat reduction (CTR) to prevent theft or illicit transfer of nuclear weapons, material and expertise in the former Soviet Union became a keystone of U.S. policy. The CTR approach expanded to include engagement with scientists and engineers with expertise relevant to biological and chemical weapons, and continued in the 2000s with efforts in Iraq and Libya, and cooperation with a wide range of countries on export control and nuclear and biological security. In general, the goal of such efforts has been to prevent proliferation or WMD terrorism. In most cases, the United States (or the West) defines the threat, and then funds partner countries to implement solutions. This presentation will argue that the future requires a new approach. Nuclear capabilities are more widely available than ever before, repercussions of the A.Q. Khan network continue to unfurl, and countries such as the DPRK engage in illicit cooperation. In addition, there has been a global boom in biotechnology with many nations, particularly across South and East Asia, investing in the biotech industry as a source of fuels, food, and materials for their rapidly expanding populations. Compared to the 1990s, today's threat is more diffuse, and the line between legitimate and illegitimate technical capability is no longer so clear. In addition, the West has many fewer resources to invest due to the global economic downturn. In this environment, full commitment of all countries that benefit from nuclear and biological advances will be required to assure the safety and security of all. Technical cooperation can continue to play an important role, but with some significant changes: First, challenges should be defined from a local perspective to ensure full commitment and participation. Second, the goal of cooperation should shift from preventing specific threats to building

  20. The distinctive vertical heterophoria of dyslexics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quercia P

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Quercia,1,2 Madeleine Quercia,3 Léonard J Feiss,3 François Allaert4 1Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, 2INSERM U1093, University Bourgogne Franche-Comté, Dijon, 3Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, 4CEN Biotech, Dijon, France Abstract: In this study, we looked for the presence of vertical heterophoria (VH in 42 dyslexic children (22 males and 20 females aged 118.5±12.9 months who were compared with a control group of 22 nondyslexic children (eleven males and eleven females aged 112±9.8 months. Dyslexics presented a low-level (always <1 prism diopter VH combined with torsion. This oculomotor feature clearly separates the dyslexic group from the normal readers group. It is independent of the type of dyslexia. The essential feature of this VH is a lability that appears during specific stimulation of sensory receptors involved in postural regulation. This lability is demonstrated using a vertical Maddox test conducted under very specific conditions in which postural sensors are successively stimulated in a predetermined order. A quantitative variation in this VH may be seen during the Bielchowsky Head Tilt Test, which reveals hypertonia of the lower or upper oblique muscles. Vertical orthophoria can be achieved by placing low-power prisms asymmetrically within the direction of action of the superior or inferior oblique muscles. The selection of power and axis is not only guided by elements of the eye examination but also from observation of postural muscle tone. All these elements suggest that the VH could be of postural origin and somehow related to the vertical action of the oblique muscles. VH and torsion are not harmful per se. There is no statistical relationship between their level and the various parameters used to assess the reading skills of dyslexic children. VH and torsion could be a clinical marker of global proprioceptive dysfunction responsible for high-level multisensory disturbances secondary to poor