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Sample records for biosynthetic mutants reveals

  1. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Heme Biosynthetic Mutants Utilize Heme and Hemoglobin as a Heme Source but Fail To Grow within Epithelial Cells

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    Turner, Paul C; Thomas, Christopher E.; Elkins, Christopher; Clary, Susan; Sparling, P F

    1998-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens, including pathogenic neisseriae, can use heme as an iron source for growth. To study heme utilization by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, two heme biosynthetic mutants were constructed, one with a mutation in hemH (the gene encoding ferrochelatase) and one with a mutation in hemA (the gene encoding γ-glutamyl tRNA reductase). The hemH mutant failed to grow without an exogenous supply of heme or hemoglobin, whereas the hemA mutant failed to grow unless heme, hemoglobin, or heme...

  2. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

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    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  3. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

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    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  4. A red pigment synthesized by an Aspergillus parasiticus mutant as a possible new intermediate in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, M E; Herce, M D; Blanco, J L; Suárez, G

    1994-11-01

    The isolation of a red pigment from an Aspergillus parasiticus mutant obtained by 366 nm u.v. light treatment of A. parasiticus NRRL 2999 is described. Studies of conversion in aflatoxin B1 and G1 suggest that the red pigment could be a possible new intermediate in the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway not described to date, and this has been verified by studies in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The solubility and stability characteristics under refrigeration storage, and the influence of the temperature and the pH on its production by the A. parasiticus mutant were also studied. It grew best at 30 degrees C and pH 6. The red pigment was most soluble in ethyl acetate. The results obtained in water are emphasized where there was high stability. PMID:8002480

  5. An eight-step synthesis of epicolactone reveals its biosynthetic origin

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    Ellerbrock, Pascal; Armanino, Nicolas; Ilg, Marina K.; Webster, Robert; Trauner, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Epicolactone is a recently isolated fungal metabolite that is highly complex for its size, and yet racemic. With its array of quaternary stereocentres, high degree of functionalization and intricate polycyclic structure, it poses a considerable challenge to synthesis, a challenge that can be met by understanding its biosynthetic origin. If drawn in a certain way, epicolactone reveals a pattern that resembles purpurogallin, the archetype of ubiquitous natural colourants formed via oxidative dimerization. Based on this insight, we designed a biomimetic synthesis of epicolactone that proceeds in only eight steps from vanillyl alcohol. We have isolated a key intermediate that supports our biosynthetic hypothesis and anticipate that an isomer of epicolactone stemming from our synthetic efforts could also be found as a natural product.

  6. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

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    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  7. Analysis of Vascular Development in the hydra Sterol Biosynthetic Mutants of Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullen, Margaret; Clark, Nick; Zarinkamar, Fatemeh; Topping, Jennifer; Lindsey, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Background The control of vascular tissue development in plants is influenced by diverse hormonal signals, but their interactions during this process are not well understood. Wild-type sterol profiles are essential for growth, tissue patterning and signalling processes in plant development, and are required for regulated vascular patterning. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigate the roles of sterols in vascular tissue development, through an analysis of the Arabidopsis mutants hydra1 and fackel/hydra2, which are defective in the enzymes sterol isomerase and sterol C-14 reductase respectively. We show that defective vascular patterning in the shoot is associated with ectopic cell divisions. Expression of the auxin-regulated AtHB8 homeobox gene is disrupted in mutant embryos and seedlings, associated with variably incomplete vascular strand formation and duplication of the longitudinal axis. Misexpression of the auxin reporter proIAA2∶GUS and mislocalization of PIN proteins occurs in the mutants. Introduction of the ethylene-insensitive ein2 mutation partially rescues defective cell division, localization of PIN proteins, and vascular strand development. Conclusions The results support a model in which sterols are required for correct auxin and ethylene crosstalk to regulate PIN localization, auxin distribution and AtHB8 expression, necessary for correct vascular development. PMID:20808926

  8. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

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    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana auxotrophs reveal a tryptophan-independent biosynthetic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Normanly, J; Cohen, J D; Fink, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    We used tryptophan auxotrophs of the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana (wall cress) to determine whether tryptophan has the capacity to serve as a precursor to the auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). Quantitative gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS) revealed that the trp2-1 mutant, which is defective in the conversion of indole to tryptophan, accumulated amide- and ester-linked IAA at levels 38-fold and 19-fold, respectively, above those of the wild type. Tryptopha...

  10. Functionalities of expressed messenger RNAs revealed from mutant phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ben-Yang; Weng, Meng-Pin

    2016-07-01

    Total messenger RNAs mRNAs that are produced from a given gene under a certain set of conditions include both functional and nonfunctional transcripts. The high prevalence of nonfunctional mRNAs that have been detected in cells has raised questions regarding the functional implications of mRNA expression patterns and divergences. Phenotypes that result from the mutagenesis of protein-coding genes have provided the most straightforward descriptions of gene functions, and such data obtained from model organisms have facilitated investigations of the functionalities of expressed mRNAs. Mutant phenotype data from mouse tissues have revealed various attributes of functional mRNAs, including tissue-specificity, strength of expression, and evolutionary conservation. In addition, the role that mRNA expression evolution plays in driving morphological evolution has been revealed from studies designed to exploit morphological and physiological phenotypes of mouse mutants. Investigations into yeast essential genes (defined by an absence of colony growth after gene deletion) have further described gene regulatory strategies that reduce protein expression noise by mediating the rates of transcription and translation. In addition to the functional significance of expressed mRNAs as described in the abovementioned findings, the functionalities of other type of RNAs (i.e., noncoding RNAs) remain to be characterized with systematic mutations and phenotyping of the DNA regions that encode these RNA molecules. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:416-427. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1329 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26748449

  11. Bioactivity-guided genome mining reveals the lomaiviticin biosynthetic gene cluster in Salinispora tropica

    OpenAIRE

    Kersten, Roland D.; Lane, Amy L.; Nett, Markus; Richter, Taylor K. S.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Moore, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of genome sequences has become routine in guiding the discovery and identification of microbial natural products and their biosynthetic pathways. In silico prediction of molecular features, such as metabolic building blocks, physico-chemical properties or biological functions, from orphan gene clusters has opened up the characterization of many new chemo- and genotypes in genome mining approaches. Here, we guided our genome mining of two predicted enediyne pathways in Salinispora trop...

  12. Biosynthetic investigation of phomopsins reveals a widespread pathway for ribosomal natural products in Ascomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Liu, Wan-Qiu; Jia, Youli; Li, Yongzhen; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Zhang, Qi

    2016-03-29

    Production of ribosomally synthesized and posttranslationally modified peptides (RiPPs) has rarely been reported in fungi, even though organisms of this kingdom have a long history as a prolific source of natural products. Here we report an investigation of the phomopsins, antimitotic mycotoxins. We show that phomopsin is a fungal RiPP and demonstrate the widespread presence of a pathway for the biosynthesis of a family of fungal cyclic RiPPs, which we term dikaritins. We characterize PhomM as an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent α-N-methyltransferase that converts phomopsin A to anN,N-dimethylated congener (phomopsin E), and show that the methyltransferases involved in dikaritin biosynthesis have evolved differently and likely have broad substrate specificities. Genome mining studies identified eight previously unknown dikaritins in different strains, highlighting the untapped capacity of RiPP biosynthesis in fungi and setting the stage for investigating the biological activities and unknown biosynthetic transformations of this family of fungal natural products. PMID:26979951

  13. Novel Two-Step Hierarchical Screening of Mutant Pools Reveals Mutants under Selection in Chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Reynolds, M Megan; Porwollik, Steffen; Cheng, Pui; Xia, Xiao-Qin; McClelland, Michael; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

    2016-04-01

    Contaminated chicken/egg products are major sources of human salmonellosis, yet the strategies used bySalmonellato colonize chickens are poorly understood. We applied a novel two-step hierarchical procedure to identify new genes important for colonization and persistence ofSalmonella entericaserotype Typhimurium in chickens. A library of 182S.Typhimurium mutants each containing a targeted deletion of a group of contiguous genes (for a total of 2,069 genes deleted) was used to identify regions under selection at 1, 3, and 9 days postinfection in chicks. Mutants in 11 regions were under selection at all assayed times (colonization mutants), and mutants in 15 regions were under selection only at day 9 (persistence mutants). We assembled a pool of 92 mutants, each deleted for a single gene, representing nearly all genes in nine regions under selection. Twelve single gene deletion mutants were under selection in this assay, and we confirmed 6 of 9 of these candidate mutants via competitive infections and complementation analysis in chicks.STM0580,STM1295,STM1297,STM3612,STM3615, andSTM3734are needed forSalmonellato colonize and persist in chicks and were not previously associated with this ability. One of these key genes,STM1297(selD), is required for anaerobic growth and supports the ability to utilize formate under these conditions, suggesting that metabolism of formate is important during infection. We report a hierarchical screening strategy to interrogate large portions of the genome during infection of animals using pools of mutants of low complexity. Using this strategy, we identified six genes not previously known to be needed during infection in chicks, and one of these (STM1297) suggests an important role for formate metabolism during infection. PMID:26857572

  14. Biosynthetic Pathway of the Reduced Polyketide Product Citreoviridin in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus Revealed by Heterologous Expression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Shyang; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Wang, Clay C C

    2016-03-18

    Citreoviridin (1) belongs to a class of F1-ATPase β-subunit inhibitors that are synthesized by highly reducing polyketide synthases. These potent mycotoxins share an α-pyrone polyene structure, and they include aurovertin, verrucosidin, and asteltoxin. The identification of the citreoviridin biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus terreus var. aureus and its reconstitution using heterologous expression in Aspergillus nidulans are reported. Two intermediates were isolated that allowed the proposal of the biosynthetic pathway of citreoviridin. PMID:26954888

  15. Live four-dimensional optical coherence tomography reveals embryonic cardiac phenotype in mouse mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Andrew L., III; Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.; Overbeek, Paul A.; Larina, Irina V.

    2015-09-01

    Efficient phenotyping of developmental defects in model organisms is critical for understanding the genetic specification of normal development and congenital abnormalities in humans. We previously reported that optical coherence tomography (OCT) combined with live embryo culture is a valuable tool for mouse embryo imaging and four-dimensional (4-D) cardiodynamic analysis; however, its capability for analysis of mouse mutants with cardiac phenotypes has not been previously explored. Here, we report 4-D (three-dimensional+time) OCT imaging and analysis of the embryonic heart in a Wdr19 mouse mutant, revealing a heart looping defect. Quantitative analysis of cardiac looping revealed a statistically significant difference between mutant and control embryos. Our results indicate that live 4-D OCT imaging provides a powerful phenotyping approach to characterize embryonic cardiac function in mouse models.

  16. Genetic variation in gamma ray induced mutants in blackgram as revealed by RAPD and ISSR markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were used to study the DNA polymorphism in 12 gamma ray induced morphological mutants of blackgram [Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper]. Of the 35 random and eight ISSR primers used, 15 random and five ISSR primers detected polymorphism among the mutants. Total number of bands varied from 2 to 9 for RAPD and from 6 to 10 for ISSR. The number of polymorphic bands varied from 1 to 3 for RAPD and from 1 to 6 for ISSR. Percentage of polymorphism ranged from 12.5 to 50.0 for RAPD and 12.5 to 44.4 for ISSR. Significant DNA polymorphism among the mutants were observed using RAPD (25.8%) and ISSR (33.3%) marker. An young leaf chlorine mutant and a smooth pod mutant showed more DNA polymorphism as compared to the parent. DNA polymorphism data revealed by RAPD and ISSR could facilitate selection of mutants to be involved in cross breeding and genome mapping

  17. Novel aspects of COP9 signalosome functions revealed through analysis of hypomorphic csn mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jane E

    2009-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a conserved eukaryotic protein complex implicated in the regulation of cullin-RING type E3 ubiquitin ligases by cleaving the small peptide RUB/Nedd8 from cullins. However, detailed analysis of CSN physiological functions in Arabidopsis has been hampered by the early seedling-lethality of csn null mutants. We and others have now identified a number of viable hypomorphic csn mutants which start to reveal novel CSN-dependent activities in adult Arabidopsis plants.1 Here, we present a detailed comparative analysis of the csn5a-1 and csn2-5 mutants as a mean to improve understanding of CSN functions in plant cells. Our observations point to CSN-independent activities of CSN5 and suggest a role of the CSN in cytoskeleton assembly/organization. PMID:19847120

  18. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in Chili pepper leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zhen ezhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, the expression of multiple genes was altered in the silenced leaves. The expression of MYC was significantly lower in CaMYB-silenced leaves, whereas WD40 showed the opposite pattern. Most structural genes including CHS, CHI, F3H, F3’5’H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, ANP and GST were repressed in CaMYB-silenced foliage with the exception of PAL, C4H and 4CL. These results indicated that MYB plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic related genes. Besides CaMYB silenced leaves rendered more sporulation of Phytophthora capsici Leonian indicating that CaMYB might be involved in the defense response to pathogens.

  19. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in chili pepper leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Da-Wei; Jin, Jing-Hao; Yin, Yan-Xu; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Chai, Wei-Guo; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, the expression of multiple genes was altered in the silenced leaves. The expression of MYC was significantly lower in CaMYB-silenced leaves, whereas WD40 showed the opposite pattern. Most structural genes including CHS, CHI, F3H, F3'5'H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, ANP, and GST were repressed in CaMYB-silenced foliage with the exception of PAL, C4H, and 4CL. These results indicated that MYB plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic related genes. Besides CaMYB silenced leaves rendered more sporulation of Phytophthora capsici Leonian indicating that CaMYB might be involved in the defense response to pathogens. PMID:26217354

  20. Transcriptomic comparison of Drosophila snRNP biogenesis mutants reveals mutant-specific changes in pre-mRNA processing: implications for spinal muscular atrophy.

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    Garcia, Eric L; Wen, Ying; Praveen, Kavita; Matera, A Gregory

    2016-08-01

    Survival motor neuron (SMN) functions in the assembly of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that catalyze pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we used disruptions in Smn and two additional snRNP biogenesis genes, Phax and Ars2, to classify RNA processing differences as snRNP-dependent or gene-specific in Drosophila Phax and Smn mutants exhibited comparable reductions in snRNAs, and comparison of their transcriptomes uncovered shared sets of RNA processing changes. In contrast, Ars2 mutants displayed only small decreases in snRNA levels, and RNA processing changes in these mutants were generally distinct from those identified in Phax and Smn animals. Instead, RNA processing changes in Ars2 mutants support the known interaction of Ars2 protein with the cap-binding complex, as splicing changes showed a clear bias toward the first intron. Bypassing disruptions in snRNP biogenesis, direct knockdown of spliceosomal proteins caused similar changes in the splicing of snRNP-dependent events. However, these snRNP-dependent events were largely unaltered in three Smn mutants expressing missense mutations that were originally identified in human spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients. Hence, findings here clarify the contributions of Phax, Smn, and Ars2 to snRNP biogenesis in Drosophila, and loss-of-function mutants for these proteins reveal differences that help disentangle cause and effect in SMA model flies. PMID:27268418

  1. Cloning and sequencing of the kedarcidin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 revealing new insights into biosynthesis of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R.; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Horsman, Geoffrey P.; Dilfer, Paul E.; Huang, Tingting; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Enediyne natural product biosynthesis is characterized by a convergence of multiple pathways, generating unique peripheral moieties that are appended onto the distinctive enediyne core. Kedarcidin (KED) possesses two unique peripheral moieties, a (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and an iso-propoxy-bearing 2-naphthonate moiety, as well as two deoxysugars. The appendage pattern of these peripheral moieties to the enediyne core in KED differs from the other enediynes studied to date with respect to stereochemical configuration. To investigate the biosynthesis of these moieties and expand our understanding of enediyne core formation, the biosynthetic gene cluster for KED was cloned from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis of the ked cluster revealed the presence of the conserved genes encoding for enediyne core biosynthesis, type I and type II polyketide synthase loci likely responsible for 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthonate formation, and enzymes known for deoxysugar biosynthesis. Genes homologous to those responsible for the biosynthesis, activation, and coupling of the L-tyrosine-derived moieties from C-1027 and maduropeptin and of the naphthonate moiety from neocarzinostatin are present in the ked cluster, supporting 2-aza-L-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as precursors, respectively, for the (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and the 2-naphthonate moieties in KED biosynthesis. PMID:23360970

  2. Cloning and sequencing of the kedarcidin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 revealing new insights into biosynthesis of the enediyne family of antitumor antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Jeremy R; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Horsman, Geoffrey P; Dilfer, Paul E; Huang, Tingting; Chen, Yihua; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Shen, Ben

    2013-03-01

    Enediyne natural product biosynthesis is characterized by a convergence of multiple pathways, generating unique peripheral moieties that are appended onto the distinctive enediyne core. Kedarcidin (KED) possesses two unique peripheral moieties, a (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and an iso-propoxy-bearing 2-naphthonate moiety, as well as two deoxysugars. The appendage pattern of these peripheral moieties to the enediyne core in KED differs from the other enediynes studied to date with respect to stereochemical configuration. To investigate the biosynthesis of these moieties and expand our understanding of enediyne core formation, the biosynthetic gene cluster for KED was cloned from Streptoalloteichus sp. ATCC 53650 and sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis of the ked cluster revealed the presence of the conserved genes encoding for enediyne core biosynthesis, type I and type II polyketide synthase loci likely responsible for 2-aza-l-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthonate formation, and enzymes known for deoxysugar biosynthesis. Genes homologous to those responsible for the biosynthesis, activation, and coupling of the l-tyrosine-derived moieties from C-1027 and maduropeptin and of the naphthonate moiety from neocarzinostatin are present in the ked cluster, supporting 2-aza-l-tyrosine and 3,6,8-trihydroxy-2-naphthoic acid as precursors, respectively, for the (R)-2-aza-3-chloro-β-tyrosine and the 2-naphthonate moieties in KED biosynthesis. PMID:23360970

  3. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Laila, Rawnak; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Kim, Hye Ran; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA). The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062) and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total glucosinolates detected

  4. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Hasan Khan Robin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA. The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062 and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total

  5. Lmo mutants reveal a novel role for circadian pacemaker neurons in cocaine-induced behaviors.

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    Linus T-Y Tsai

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila has been developed recently as a model system to investigate the molecular and neural mechanisms underlying responses to drugs of abuse. Genetic screens for mutants with altered drug-induced behaviors thus provide an unbiased approach to define novel molecules involved in the process. We identified mutations in the Drosophila LIM-only (LMO gene, encoding a regulator of LIM-homeodomain proteins, in a genetic screen for mutants with altered cocaine sensitivity. Reduced Lmo function increases behavioral responses to cocaine, while Lmo overexpression causes the opposite effect, reduced cocaine responsiveness. Expression of Lmo in the principal Drosophila circadian pacemaker cells, the PDF-expressing ventral lateral neurons (LN(vs, is sufficient to confer normal cocaine sensitivity. Consistent with a role for Lmo in LN(vfunction,Lmomutants also show defects in circadian rhythms of behavior. However, the role for LN(vs in modulating cocaine responses is separable from their role as pacemaker neurons: ablation or functional silencing of the LN(vs reduces cocaine sensitivity, while loss of the principal circadian neurotransmitter PDF has no effect. Together, these results reveal a novel role for Lmo in modulating acute cocaine sensitivity and circadian locomotor rhythmicity, and add to growing evidence that these behaviors are regulated by shared molecular mechanisms. The finding that the degree of cocaine responsiveness is controlled by the Drosophila pacemaker neurons provides a neuroanatomical basis for this overlap. We propose that Lmo controls the responsiveness of LN(vs to cocaine, which in turn regulate the flies' behavioral sensitivity to the drug.

  6. Metabolite profiling reveals abiotic stress tolerance in Tn5 mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

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    Vasvi Chaudhry

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR; however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic

  7. Ribosomal protein uS19 mutants reveal its role in coordinating ribosome structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Alicia M; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Moomau, Christine A; Gulay, Suna P; Mirvis, Mary; Dinman, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Prior studies identified allosteric information pathways connecting functional centers in the large ribosomal subunit to the decoding center in the small subunit through the B1a and B1b/c intersubunit bridges in yeast. In prokaryotes a single SSU protein, uS13, partners with H38 (the A-site finger) and uL5 to form the B1a and B1b/c bridges respectively. In eukaryotes, the SSU component was split into 2 separate proteins during the course of evolution. One, also known as uS13, participates in B1b/c bridge with uL5 in eukaryotes. The other, called uS19 is the SSU partner in the B1a bridge with H38. Here, polyalanine mutants of uS19 involved in the uS19/uS13 and the uS19/H38 interfaces were used to elucidate the important amino acid residues involved in these intersubunit communication pathways. Two key clusters of amino acids were identified: one located at the junction between uS19 and uS13, and a second that appears to interact with the distal tip of H38. Biochemical analyses reveal that these mutations shift the ribosomal rotational equilibrium toward the unrotated state, increasing ribosomal affinity for tRNAs in the P-site and for ternary complex in the A-site, and inhibit binding of the translocase, eEF2. These defects in turn affect specific aspects of translational fidelity. These findings suggest that uS19 plays a critical role as a conduit of information exchange between the large and small ribosomal subunits directly through the B1a, and indirectly through the B1b/c bridges. PMID:26824029

  8. Gene transcript profiles of the TIA biosynthetic pathway in response to ethylene and copper reveal their interactive role in modulating TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Jia; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Research on transcriptional regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis of the medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, has largely been focused on gene function and not clustering analysis of multiple genes at the transcript level. Here, more than ten key genes encoding key enzyme of alkaloid synthesis in TIA biosynthetic pathways were chosen to investigate the integrative responses to exogenous elicitor ethylene and copper (Cu) at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. The ethylene-induced gene transcripts in leaves and roots, respectively, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the results showed the overall expression of TIA pathway genes indicated as the Q value followed a standard normal distribution after ethylene treatments. Peak gene expression was at 15-30 μM of ethephon, and the pre-mature leaf had a higher Q value than the immature or mature leaf and root. Treatment with elicitor Cu found that Cu up-regulated overall TIA gene expression more in roots than in leaves. The combined effects of Cu and ethephon on TIA gene expression were stronger than their separate effects. It has been documented that TIA gene expression is tightly regulated by the transcriptional factor (TF) ethylene responsive factor (ERF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis for the genes of C. roseus showed that expression of the MPK gene correlated with strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine b-D-glucosidase(SGD). In addition, ERF expression correlated with expression of secologanin synthase (SLS) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), specifically in roots, whereas MPK and myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) correlated with STR and SGD genes. In conclusion, the ERF regulates the upstream pathway genes in response to heavy metal Cu mainly in C. roseus roots, while the MPK mainly participates in regulating the STR gene in response to ethylene in pre-mature leaf. Interestingly, the

  9. Quadruple zebrafish mutant reveals different roles of Mesp genes in somite segmentation between mouse and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Taijiro; Hoshijima, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takada, Shinji

    2016-08-01

    The segmental pattern of somites is generated by sequential conversion of the temporal periodicity provided by the molecular clock. Whereas the basic structure of this clock is conserved among different species, diversity also exists, especially in terms of the molecular network. The temporal periodicity is subsequently converted into the spatial pattern of somites, and Mesp2 plays crucial roles in this conversion in the mouse. However, it remains unclear whether Mesp genes play similar roles in other vertebrates. In this study, we generated zebrafish mutants lacking all four zebrafish Mesp genes by using TALEN-mediated genome editing. Contrary to the situation in the mouse Mesp2 mutant, in the zebrafish Mesp quadruple mutant embryos the positions of somite boundaries were clearly determined and morphological boundaries were formed, although their formation was not completely normal. However, each somite was caudalized in a similar manner to the mouse Mesp2 mutant, and the superficial horizontal myoseptum and lateral line primordia were not properly formed in the quadruple mutants. These results clarify the conserved and species-specific roles of Mesp in the link between the molecular clock and somite morphogenesis. PMID:27385009

  10. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  11. Chlamydomonas fla mutants reveal a link between deflagellation and intraflagellar transport

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    Quarmby Lynne

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cilia and flagella are often lost in anticipation of mitosis or in response to stress. There are two ways that a cell can lose its flagella: resorption or deflagellation. Deflagellation involves active severing of the axoneme at the base of the flagellum; this process is defective in Chlamydomonas fa mutants. In contrast, resorption has been thought to occur as a consequence of constitutive disassembly at the tip in the absence of continued assembly, which requires intraflagellar transport (IFT. Chlamydomonas fla mutants are unable to build and maintain flagella due to defects in IFT. Results fla10 cells, which are defective in kinesin-II, the anterograde IFT motor, resorb their flagella at the restrictive temperature (33°C, as previously reported. We find that in standard media containing ~300 microM calcium, fla10 cells lose flagella by deflagellation at 33°C. This temperature-induced deflagellation of a fla mutant is not predicted by the IFT-based model for flagellar length control. Other fla mutants behave similarly, losing their flagella by deflagellation instead of resorption, if adequate calcium is available. These data suggest a new model whereby flagellar resorption involves active disassembly at the base of the flagellum via a mechanism with components in common with the severing machinery of deflagellation. As predicted by this model, we discovered that deflagellation stimuli induce resorption if deflagellation is blocked either by mutation in a FA gene or by lack of calcium. Further support for this model comes from our discovery that fla10-fa double mutants resorb their flagella more slowly than fla10 mutants. Conclusions Deflagellation of the fla10 mutant at the restrictive temperature is indicative of an active disassembly signal, which can manifest as either resorption or deflagellation. We propose that when IFT is halted by either an inactivating mutation or a cellular signal, active flagellar disassembly

  12. Characterization of a null allelic mutant of the rice NAL1 gene reveals its role in regulating cell division.

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    Dan Jiang

    Full Text Available Leaf morphology is closely associated with cell division. In rice, mutations in Narrow leaf 1 (NAL1 show narrow leaf phenotypes. Previous studies have shown that NAL1 plays a role in regulating vein patterning and increasing grain yield in indica cultivars, but its role in leaf growth and development remains unknown. In this report, we characterized two allelic mutants of NARROW LEAF1 (NAL1, nal1-2 and nal1-3, both of which showed a 50% reduction in leaf width and length, as well as a dwarf culm. Longitudinal and transverse histological analyses of leaves and internodes revealed that cell division was suppressed in the anticlinal orientation but enhanced in the periclinal orientation in the mutants, while cell size remained unaltered. In addition to defects in cell proliferation, the mutants showed abnormal midrib in leaves. Map-based cloning revealed that nal1-2 is a null allelic mutant of NAL1 since both the whole promoter and a 404-bp fragment in the first exon of NAL1 were deleted, and that a 6-bp fragment was deleted in the mutant nal1-3. We demonstrated that NAL1 functions in the regulation of cell division as early as during leaf primordia initiation. The altered transcript level of G1- and S-phase-specific genes suggested that NAL1 affects cell cycle regulation. Heterogeneous expression of NAL1 in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe further supported that NAL1 affects cell division. These results suggest that NAL1 controls leaf width and plant height through its effects on cell division.

  13. Arabidopsis decuple mutant reveals the importance of SnRK2 kinases in osmotic stress responses in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Hiroaki

    2011-01-10

    Osmotic stress associated with drought or salinity is a major factor that limits plant productivity. Protein kinases in the SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) family are activated by osmotic stress, suggesting that the kinases are involved in osmotic stress signaling. However, due to functional redundancy, their contribution to osmotic stress responses remained unclear. In this report, we constructed an Arabidopsis line carrying mutations in all 10 members of the SnRK2 family. The decuple mutant snrk2.1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 grew poorly under hyperosmotic stress conditions but was similar to the wild type in culture media in the absence of osmotic stress. The mutant was also defective in gene regulation and the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), proline, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate under osmotic stress. In addition, analysis of mutants defective in the ABA-activated SnRK2s (snrk2.2/3/6) and mutants defective in the rest of the SnRK2s (snrk2.1/4/5/7/8/9/10) revealed that SnRK2s are a merging point of ABA-dependent and -independent pathways for osmotic stress responses. These results demonstrate critical functions of the SnRK2s in mediating osmotic stress signaling and tolerance.

  14. Mutational scanning of the human serotonin transporter reveals fast translocating serotonin transporter mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Larsen, Mads B; Johnsen, Laust B;

    2004-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) belongs to a family of sodium-chloride-dependent transporters responsible for uptake of amino acids and biogenic amines from the extracellular space. SERT represents a major pharmacological target in the treatment of several clinical conditions, including depression......(m) values were both several-fold higher than wild-type while binding affinities and inhibitory potencies decreased considerably for several drugs. Ion dependency increased and only at hyperosmotic concentrations were K(m) values partly restored. For the double mutant, T178A/F263C, shifts in uptake kinetics...... and ligand affinities, as well as ion dependencies, were drastic. Effects were synergistic compared to the corresponding single mutants. In conclusion, we suggest that mutating threonine-178 to an alanine and phenylalanine-263 to a cysteine mainly alter the overall uptake kinetics of SERT by affecting...

  15. New genes of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri involved in pathogenesis and adaptation revealed by a transposon-based mutant library

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    Silva Ana CR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus canker is a disease caused by the phytopathogens Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. aurantifolli and Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis. The first of the three species, which causes citrus bacterial canker type A, is the most widely spread and severe, attacking all citrus species. In Brazil, this species is the most important, being found in practically all areas where citrus canker has been detected. Like most phytobacterioses, there is no efficient way to control citrus canker. Considering the importance of the disease worldwide, investigation is needed to accurately detect which genes are related to the pathogen-host adaptation process and which are associated with pathogenesis. Results Through transposon insertion mutagenesis, 10,000 mutants of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 (Xcc were obtained, and 3,300 were inoculated in Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia leaves. Their ability to cause citrus canker was analyzed every 3 days until 21 days after inoculation; a set of 44 mutants showed altered virulence, with 8 presenting a complete loss of causing citrus canker symptoms. Sequencing of the insertion site in all 44 mutants revealed that 35 different ORFs were hit, since some ORFs were hit in more than one mutant, with mutants for the same ORF presenting the same phenotype. An analysis of these ORFs showed that some encoded genes were previously known as related to pathogenicity in phytobacteria and, more interestingly, revealed new genes never implicated with Xanthomonas pathogenicity before, including hypothetical ORFs. Among the 8 mutants with no canker symptoms are the hrpB4 and hrpX genes, two genes that belong to type III secretion system (TTSS, two hypothetical ORFS and, surprisingly, the htrA gene, a gene reported as involved with the virulence process in animal-pathogenic bacteria but not described as involved in phytobacteria virulence. Nucleic acid hybridization using

  16. Identification of a Pantoea biosynthetic cluster that directs the synthesis of an antimicrobial natural product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walterson, Alyssa M; Smith, Derek D N; Stavrinides, John

    2014-01-01

    Fire Blight is a destructive disease of apple and pear caused by the enteric bacterial pathogen, Erwinia amylovora. E. amylovora initiates infection by colonizing the stigmata of apple and pear trees, and entering the plants through natural openings. Epiphytic populations of the related enteric bacterium, Pantoea, reduce the incidence of disease through competition and antibiotic production. In this study, we identify an antibiotic from Pantoea ananatis BRT175, which is effective against E. amylovora and select species of Pantoea. We used transposon mutagenesis to create a mutant library, screened approximately 5,000 mutants for loss of antibiotic production, and recovered 29 mutants. Sequencing of the transposon insertion sites of these mutants revealed multiple independent disruptions of an 8.2 kb cluster consisting of seven genes, which appear to be coregulated. An analysis of the distribution of this cluster revealed that it was not present in any other of our 115 Pantoea isolates, or in any of the fully sequenced Pantoea genomes, and is most closely related to antibiotic biosynthetic clusters found in three different species of Pseudomonas. This identification of this biosynthetic cluster highlights the diversity of natural products produced by Pantoea. PMID:24796857

  17. Neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to the supply and demand for neuropeptides as revealed in NSF mutant zebrafish

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    Baier Herwig

    2009-06-01

    reveal an unexpected role for NSF in hypothalamic development, with mutant 5 days post-fertilization larvae exhibiting a stage-dependent loss of neuroendocrine transcripts and a corresponding accumulation of neuropeptides in the soma. Based on our collective findings, we speculate that neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to both the supply and demand for neuropeptides to ensure adequate homeostatic responses.

  18. Integrative transcriptome, proteome, phosphoproteome and genetic mapping reveals new aspects in a fiberless mutant of cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qi-Feng; Wu, Chun-Hui; Wu, Man; Pei, Wen-Feng; Li, Xing-Li; Wang, Wen-Kui; Zhang, Jinfa; Yu, Ji-Wen; Yu, Shu-Xun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanisms of fiber initiation in cotton (Gossypium spp.), an integrated approach combining transcriptome, iTRAQ-based proteome and genetic mapping was taken to compare the ovules of the Xuzhou 142 wild type (WT) with its fuzzless-lintless (fl) mutant at -3 and 0 day post-anthesis. A total of 1,953 mRNAs, 187 proteins, and 131 phosphoproteins were differentially expressed (DE) between WT and fl, and the levels of transcripts and their encoded proteins and phosphoproteins were highly congruent. A functional analysis suggested that the abundance of proteins were mainly involved in amino sugar, nucleotide sugar and fatty acid metabolism, one carbon pool for folate metabolism and flavonoid biosynthesis. qRT-PCR, Western blotting, and enzymatic assays were performed to confirm the regulation of these transcripts and proteins. A molecular mapping located the lintless gene li3 in the fl mutant on chromosome 26 for the first time. A further in-silico physical mapping of DE genes with sequence variations between fl and WT identified one and four candidate genes in the li3 and n2 regions, respectively. Taken together, the transcript abundance, phosphorylation status of proteins at the fiber initiation stage and candidate genes have provided insights into regulatory processes underlying cotton fiber initiation. PMID:27075604

  19. Structural analysis reveals the substrate-binding mechanism for the expanded substrate specificity of mutant meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weidong; Guo, Rey-Ting; Chen, Xi; Li, Zhe; Gao, Xiuzhen; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Wu, Qiaqing; Feng, Jinhui; Zhu, Dunming

    2015-04-13

    A meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenase (DAPDH) from Clostridium tetani E88 (CtDAPDH) was found to have low activity toward the D-amino acids other than its native substrate. Site-directed mutagenesis similar to that carried out on the residues mutated by Vedha-Peters et al. resulted in a mutant enzyme with highly improved catalytic ability for the synthesis of D-amino acids. The crystal structures of the CtDAPDH mutant in apo form and in complex with meso-diaminopimelate (meso-DAP), D-leucine (D-leu), and 4-methyl-2-oxopentanoic acid (MOPA) were solved. meso-DAP was found in an area outside the catalytic cavity; this suggested a possible two-step substrate-binding mechanism for meso-DAP. D-leu and MOPA each bound both to Leu154 and to Gly155 in the open form of CtDAPDH, and structural analysis revealed the molecular basis for the expanded substrate specificity of the mutant meso-diaminopimelate dehydrogenases. PMID:25754803

  20. Nuclear localization signal deletion mutants of lamin A and progerin reveal insights into lamin A processing and emerin targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Flannery, Andrew R; Cai, Helen; Ko, Eunae; Cao, Kan

    2014-01-01

    Lamin A is a major component of the lamina, which creates a dynamic network underneath the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the lamin A gene (LMNA) cause severe genetic disorders, one of which is Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a disease triggered by a dominant mutant named progerin. Unlike the wild-type lamin A, whose farnesylated C-terminus is excised during post-translational processing, progerin retains its farnesyl tail and accumulates on the nuclear membrane, resulting in abnormal nuclear morphology during interphase. In addition, membrane-associated progerin forms visible cytoplasmic aggregates in mitosis. To examine the potential effects of cytoplasmic progerin, nuclear localization signal (NLS) deleted progerin and lamin A (PGΔNLS and LAΔNLS, respectively) have been constructed. We find that both ΔNLS mutants are farnesylated in the cytosol and associate with a sub-domain of the ER via their farnesyl tails. While the farnesylation on LAΔNLS can be gradually removed, which leads to its subsequent release from the ER into the cytoplasm, PGΔNLS remains permanently farnesylated and membrane-bounded. Moreover, both ΔNLS mutants dominantly affect emerin’s nuclear localization. These results reveal new insights into lamin A biogenesis and lamin A-emerin interaction. PMID:24637396

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

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    Mayilvahanan Shanmugam

    Full Text Available Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P 1.5. Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  2. Analysis of knockout mutants reveals non-redundant functions of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoforms in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuong Anh; Wahl, Vanessa; Tohge, Takayuki; de Souza, Laise Rosado; Zhang, Youjun; Do, Phuc Thi; Olas, Justyna J; Stitt, Mark; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) has a dual function being involved both in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and being a constituent of the NAD(+) salvage pathway. To date most studies, both in plant and non-plant systems, have focused on the signaling role of PARP in poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation rather than any role that can be ascribed to its metabolic function. In order to address this question we here used a combination of expression, transcript and protein localization studies of all three PARP isoforms of Arabidopsis alongside physiological analysis of the corresponding mutants. Our analyses indicated that whilst all isoforms of PARP were localized to the nucleus they are also present in non-nuclear locations with parp1 and parp3 also localised in the cytosol, and parp2 also present in the mitochondria. We next isolated and characterized insertional knockout mutants of all three isoforms confirming a complete knockout in the full length transcript levels of the target genes as well as a reduced total leaf NAD hydrolase activity in the two isoforms (PARP1, PARP2) that are highly expressed in leaves. Physiological evaluation of the mutant lines revealed that they displayed distinctive metabolic and root growth characteristics albeit unaltered leaf morphology under optimal growth conditions. We therefore conclude that the PARP isoforms play non-redundant non-nuclear metabolic roles and that their function is highly important in rapidly growing tissues such as the shoot apical meristem, roots and seeds. PMID:26428915

  3. Revealing of complex system of starch synthetic metabolism in higher plants using rice mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this presentation, the concept and perspective of molecular mutation breeding of starch biosynthesis are discussed. Amylopectin, a major component of starch, has a distinct highly-ordered structure referred to as 'tamdem-cluster structure'. The starch synthesis system has developed during the process of evolution of plants, and key enzymes involved in the construction of amylopectin tamdem-cluster structure have differentiated into multiple isozymes with specific functions. Detailed analyses of changes in the structure of amylopectin and the physicochemical properties of starch granules in rice endosperm induced by lesion of each isoform of starch branching enzyme, starch synthase, starch debranching enzymes and others have established that the individual mutants exhibit distinct characteristics in terms of the starch structure and properties. These patterns of changes reflected by the specific functions of enzymes in starch biosynthesis enable us to expect to what extent and how the structure and properties of starch can be engineered. In fact, numerous rice mutant lines could be used in the industrial purpose in the future by the production of novel starches in endosperm. Transcriptome analysis established that changes in the transcript levels of starch synthesizing enzyme genes in rice endosperm are largely divided into two patterns. One group of genes are highly expressed in the very early stage of the endosperm development prior to the onset of the rapid starch production whereas the other group genes are greatly expressed in accord with the start of a great amount of starch accumulation in the endosperm. These results strongly suggest that the initiation process of starch biosynthesis and the accumulationen process of increases in number of starch molecules and starch granule are regulated by different mechanisms with varied sets of isozymes. Our recent studies showed that plastidial phosphorylase plays a crucial role in the initial stage of starch

  4. AHR2 mutant reveals functional diversity of aryl hydrocarbon receptors in zebrafish.

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    Britton C Goodale

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is well known for mediating the toxic effects of TCDD and has been a subject of intense research for over 30 years. Current investigations continue to uncover its endogenous and regulatory roles in a wide variety of cellular and molecular signaling processes. A zebrafish line with a mutation in ahr2 (ahr2(hu3335, encoding the AHR paralogue responsible for mediating TCDD toxicity in zebrafish, was developed via Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING and predicted to express a non-functional AHR2 protein. We characterized AHR activity in the mutant line using TCDD and leflunomide as toxicological probes to investigate function, ligand binding and CYP1A induction patterns of paralogues AHR2, AHR1A and AHR1B. By evaluating TCDD-induced developmental toxicity, mRNA expression changes and CYP1A protein in the AHR2 mutant line, we determined that ahr2(hu3335 zebrafish are functionally null. In silico modeling predicted differential binding of TCDD and leflunomide to the AHR paralogues. AHR1A is considered a non-functional pseudogene as it does not bind TCCD or mediate in vivo TCDD toxicity. Homology modeling, however, predicted a ligand binding conformation of AHR1A with leflunomide. AHR1A-dependent CYP1A immunohistochemical expression in the liver provided in vivo confirmation of the in silico docking studies. The ahr2(hu3335 functional knockout line expands the experimental power of zebrafish to unravel the role of the AHR during development, as well as highlights potential activity of the other AHR paralogues in ligand-specific toxicological responses.

  5. Zebrafish eda and edar mutants reveal conserved and ancestral roles of ectodysplasin signaling in vertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Harris

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of the development and variation of adult form of vertebrates is not well understood. To address this problem, we performed a mutant screen to identify genes essential for the formation of adult skeletal structures of the zebrafish. Here, we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of a set of mutants showing loss of adult structures of the dermal skeleton, such as the rays of the fins and the scales, as well as the pharyngeal teeth. The mutations represent adult-viable, loss of function alleles in the ectodysplasin (eda and ectodysplasin receptor (edar genes. These genes are frequently mutated in the human hereditary disease hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; OMIM 224900, 305100 that affects the development of integumentary appendages such as hair and teeth. We find mutations in zebrafish edar that affect similar residues as mutated in human cases of HED and show similar phenotypic consequences. eda and edar are not required for early zebrafish development, but are rather specific for the development of adult skeletal and dental structures. We find that the defects of the fins and scales are due to the role of Eda signaling in organizing epidermal cells into discrete signaling centers of the scale epidermal placode and fin fold. Our genetic analysis demonstrates dose-sensitive and organ-specific response to alteration in levels of Eda signaling. In addition, we show substantial buffering of the effect of loss of edar function in different genetic backgrounds, suggesting canalization of this developmental system. We uncover a previously unknown role of Eda signaling in teleosts and show conservation of the developmental mechanisms involved in the formation and variation of both integumentary appendages and limbs. Lastly, our findings point to the utility of adult genetic screens in the zebrafish in identifying essential developmental processes involved in human disease and in morphological evolution.

  6. Zebrafish eda and edar Mutants Reveal Conserved and Ancestral Roles of Ectodysplasin Signaling in Vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Matthew P.; Rohner, Nicolas; Schwarz, Heinz; Perathoner, Simon; Konstantinidis, Peter; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    The genetic basis of the development and variation of adult form of vertebrates is not well understood. To address this problem, we performed a mutant screen to identify genes essential for the formation of adult skeletal structures of the zebrafish. Here, we describe the phenotypic and molecular characterization of a set of mutants showing loss of adult structures of the dermal skeleton, such as the rays of the fins and the scales, as well as the pharyngeal teeth. The mutations represent adult-viable, loss of function alleles in the ectodysplasin (eda) and ectodysplasin receptor (edar) genes. These genes are frequently mutated in the human hereditary disease hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED; OMIM 224900, 305100) that affects the development of integumentary appendages such as hair and teeth. We find mutations in zebrafish edar that affect similar residues as mutated in human cases of HED and show similar phenotypic consequences. eda and edar are not required for early zebrafish development, but are rather specific for the development of adult skeletal and dental structures. We find that the defects of the fins and scales are due to the role of Eda signaling in organizing epidermal cells into discrete signaling centers of the scale epidermal placode and fin fold. Our genetic analysis demonstrates dose-sensitive and organ-specific response to alteration in levels of Eda signaling. In addition, we show substantial buffering of the effect of loss of edar function in different genetic backgrounds, suggesting canalization of this developmental system. We uncover a previously unknown role of Eda signaling in teleosts and show conservation of the developmental mechanisms involved in the formation and variation of both integumentary appendages and limbs. Lastly, our findings point to the utility of adult genetic screens in the zebrafish in identifying essential developmental processes involved in human disease and in morphological evolution. PMID:18833299

  7. Revealing the Complex System of Starch Biosynthesis in Higher Plants Using Rice Mutants and Transformants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starch is the end product of photosynthesis and a primary material for food and industrial uses. Starch has a variety of distinct physico-chemical properties such as gelatinization and pasting properties, and these features are strongly related to the molecular structure of amylopectin and the formation of starch granules, whose morphology depends on the plant species. The multi-dimensional, unique structure of starch is achieved by concerted reactions catalyzed by multiple isozymes of a set of enzymes that include starch synthase, starch branching enzyme and starch debranching enzyme. The action mechanism of each of these isozymes is currently being studied. This paper summarizes recent results of biochemical and genetic analyses of starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm obtained from various mutants and transformants, and dis- cusses ideas about the regulation of starch biosynthesis in plants. Starch is glucose polymer with two α-glucosidic linkages, linearly linked α-1,4-glucosidic chains are branched by α-1,4-glucosidic linkages, and it comprises linear or rarely branched amylose and highly branched amylopectin. Amylopectin has a distinct highly ordered structure called a 'tandem-cluster structure', in which most of side chains are arranged in parallel and neighboring chains form double helices when linear portions of facing chains reach the length equivalent to degree of polymerization (DP) ≥ 10. The formation of double helices in the amylopectin cluster dramatically induces its hydrophobicity and crystallinity. These specific features of amylopectin fine structure are enabled by the localization of branch positions within the restricted region of the cluster. The starch synthesis system has developed during the evolution of plants and key enzymes involved in the construction of amylopectin tandem-cluster structure have differentiated into multiple isozymes with distinct functions, whereas in glycogen synthesizing organisms, such as bacteria and animals

  8. A mutant human proinsulin is secreted from islets of Langerhans in increased amounts via an unregulated pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, R. J.; Hammer, R. E.; Chan, S J; Swift, H H; Rubenstein, A H; Steiner, D F

    1988-01-01

    A coding mutation in the human insulin gene (His-B10----Asp) is associated with familial hyperproinsulinemia. To model this syndrome, we have produced transgenic mice that express high levels of the mutant prohormone in their islets of Langerhans. Strain 24-6 mice, containing about 100 copies of the mutant gene, were normoglycemic but had marked increases of serum human proinsulin immunoreactive components. Biosynthetic studies on isolated islets revealed that approximately 65% of the proinsu...

  9. Evolved streptavidin mutants reveal key role of loop residue in high-affinity binding

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Maria L. B.; Czekster, Clarissa Melo; Guan, Rong; Malashkevich, Vladimir N.; Almo, Steven C.; Levy, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    We have performed a detailed analysis of streptavidin variants with altered specificity towards desthiobiotin. In addition to changes in key residues which widen the ligand binding pocket and accommodate the more structurally flexible desthiobiotin, the data revealed the role of a key, non-active site mutation at the base of the flexible loop (S52G) which slows dissociation of this ligand by approximately sevenfold. Our data suggest that this mutation results in the loss of a stabilizing cont...

  10. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  11. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  12. Target-specific identification and characterization of the putative gene cluster for brasilinolide biosynthesis revealing the mechanistic insights and combinatorial synthetic utility of 2-deoxy-l-fucose biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsien-Tai; Weng, Chien-Pao; Lin, Yu-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Hung

    2016-02-14

    Brasilinolides exhibiting potent immunosuppressive and antifungal activities with remarkably low toxicity are structurally characterized by an unusual modified 2-deoxy-l-fucose (2dF) attached to a type I polyketide (PK-I) macrolactone. From the pathogenic producer Nocardia terpenica (Nocardia brasiliensis IFM-0406), a 210 kb genomic fragment was identified by target-specific degenerate primers and subsequently sequenced, revealing a giant nbr gene cluster harboring genes (nbrCDEF) required for TDP-2dF biosynthesis and those for PK-I biosynthesis, modification and regulation. The results showed that the genetic and domain arrangements of nbr PK-I synthases agreed colinearly with the PK-I structures of brasilinolides. Subsequent heterologous expression of nbrCDEF in Escherichia coli accomplished in vitro reconstitution of TDP-2dF biosynthesis. The catalytic functions and mechanisms of NbrCDEF enzymes were further characterized by systematic mix-and-match experiments. The enzymes were revealed to display remarkable substrate and partner promiscuity, leading to the establishment of in vitro hybrid deoxysugar biosynthetic pathways throughout an in situ one-pot (iSOP) method. This study represents the first demonstration of TDP-2dF biosynthesis at the enzyme and molecular levels, and provides new hope for expanding the structural diversity of brasilinolides by combinatorial biosynthesis. PMID:26754528

  13. Systemic gene transfer reveals distinctive muscle transduction profile of tyrosine mutant AAV-1, -6, and -9 in neonatal dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Hakim, Chady H.; Yue, Yongping; Shin, Jin-Hong; Williams, Regina R; Zhang, Keqing; Smith, Bruce F; Duan, Dongsheng

    2014-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of devastating genetic disorders that affect both skeletal and cardiac muscle. An effective gene therapy for these diseases requires bodywide muscle delivery. Tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been considered as a class of highly potent gene transfer vectors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that systemic delivery of tyrosine mutant AAV can result in bodywide muscle transduction in newborn dogs. Three tyrosine mutant AAV vectors (Y445F/Y731F A...

  14. Flexibility in Anaerobic Metabolism as Revealed in a Mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Lacking Hydrogenase Activity*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Dubini, Alexandra; Mus, Florence; Seibert, Michael; Grossman, Arthur R.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2009-01-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has a network of fermentation pathways that become active when cells acclimate to anoxia. Hydrogenase activity is an important component of this metabolism, and we have compared metabolic and regulatory responses that accompany anaerobiosis in wild-type C. reinhardtii cells and a null mutant strain for the HYDEF gene (hydEF-1 mutant), which encodes an [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation protein. This mutant has no hydrogenase activity...

  15. Trehalose Polyphleates Are Produced by a Glycolipid Biosynthetic Pathway Conserved across Phylogenetically Distant Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaud, Sophie; Laval, Françoise; Lemassu, Anne; Daffé, Mamadou; Guilhot, Christophe; Chalut, Christian

    2016-02-18

    Mycobacteria synthesize a variety of structurally related glycolipids with major biological functions. Common themes have emerged for the biosynthesis of these glycolipids, including several families of proteins. Genes encoding these proteins are usually clustered on bacterial chromosomal islets dedicated to the synthesis of one glycolipid family. Here, we investigated the function of a cluster of five genes widely distributed across non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Using defined mutant analysis and in-depth structural characterization of glycolipids from wild-type or mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium abscessus, we established that they are involved in the formation of trehalose polyphleates (TPP), a family of compounds originally described in Mycobacterium phlei. Comparative genomics and lipid analysis of strains distributed along the mycobacterial phylogenetic tree revealed that TPP is synthesized by a large number of non-tuberculous mycobacteria. This work unravels a novel glycolipid biosynthetic pathway in mycobacteria and extends the spectrum of bacteria that produce TPP. PMID:27028886

  16. Genetic Screening Identifies Cyanogenesis-Deficient Mutants of Lotus japonicus and Reveals Enzymatic Specificity in Hydroxynitrile Glucoside Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takos, A.; Lai, D.; Mikkelsen, L.; Abou Hachem, Maher; Shelton, D.; Motawia, M.S.; Olsen, C.E.; Wang, T.L.; Martin, C.; Rook, F.

    2010-01-01

    . We developed a high-throughput screening method and used it to identify cyanogenesis deficient (cyd) mutants in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Mutants in both biosynthesis and catabolism of cyanogenic glucosides were isolated and classified following metabolic profiling of cyanogenic glucoside...

  17. RNA interference targeting CYP76AH1 in hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza reveals its key role in the biosynthetic pathway of tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Hui; Meng, Fan-Yun; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Guo, Juan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Plant cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are well known as the largest family of enzymes that contribute to both primary metabolism and the chemical diversity of plant secondary metabolites. It is important to elucidate the in vivo role of CYPs in secondary metabolism, in order to apply them in the production of valuable metabolites in medicinal plants via metabolic engineering. CYP76AH1 has been suggested to catalyze the conversion of the carbon skeleton miltiradiene into the intermediate ferruginol, which is involved in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, the chief bioactive ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza. However, its role in planta remains to be elucidated. In this work, we constructed a CYP76AH1 RNAi system for hairy roots. Metabolic analysis of RNAi-AH1 hairy root lines showed a significantly increased accumulation of miltiradiene compared to the control lines. At the same time, the concentration of ferruginol decreased revealing the in vivo catalytic activity of CYP76AH1. The content of tanshinones decreased significantly after silencing of CYP76AH1, which verified its key role in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, and indicated that it could be used as a target for metabolic engineering. PMID:27291148

  18. Revealing differences in metabolic flux distributions between a mutant strain and its parent strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhong

    Full Text Available A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 using DEC (diethyl sulfate and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0% compared with parent strain (17.0%. It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53-6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain.

  19. Comparative transcripts profiling reveals new insight into molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in a sweet orange (Citrus sinensis red-flesh mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianchen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in lycopene metabolism and regulation is growing rapidly because accumulative studies have suggested an important role for lycopene in human health promotion. However, little is known about the molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in fruits other than tomato so far. Results On a spontaneous sweet orange bud mutant with abnormal lycopene accumulation in fruits and its wild type, comparative transcripts profiling was performed using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS. A total of 6,877,027 and 6,275,309 reliable signatures were obtained for the wild type (WT and the mutant (MT, respectively. Interpretation of the MPSS signatures revealed that the total number of transcribed gene in MT is 18,106, larger than that in WT 17,670, suggesting that newly initiated transcription occurs in the MT. Further comparison of the transcripts abundance between MT and WT revealed that 3,738 genes show more than two fold expression difference, and 582 genes are up- or down-regulated at 0.05% significance level by more than three fold difference. Functional assignments of the differentially expressed genes indicated that 26 reliable metabolic pathways are altered in the mutant; the most noticeable ones are carotenoid biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and citrate cycle. These data suggest that enhanced photosynthesis and partial impairment of lycopene downstream flux are critical for the formation of lycopene accumulation trait in the mutant. Conclusion This study provided a global picture of the gene expression changes in a sweet orange red-flesh mutant as compared to the wild type. Interpretation of the differentially expressed genes revealed new insight into the molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in the sweet orange red-flesh mutant.

  20. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  1. Functional genomics of fuzzless-lintless mutant of Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. MCU5 reveal key genes and pathways involved in cotton fibre initiation and elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmalatha Kethireddy Venkata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fuzzless-lintless cotton mutants are considered to be the ideal material to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in fibre cell development. Although there are few reports on transcriptome and proteome analyses in cotton at fibre initiation and elongation stages, there is no comprehensive comparative transcriptome analysis of fibre-bearing and fuzzless-lintless cotton ovules covering fibre initiation to secondary cell wall (SCW synthesis stages. In the present study, a comparative transcriptome analysis was carried out using G. hirsutum L. cv. MCU5 wild-type (WT and it’s near isogenic fuzzless-lintless (fl mutant at fibre initiation (0 dpa/days post anthesis, elongation (5, 10 and 15 dpa and SCW synthesis (20 dpa stages. Results Scanning electron microscopy study revealed the delay in the initiation of fibre cells and lack of any further development after 2 dpa in the fl mutant. Transcriptome analysis showed major down regulation of transcripts (90% at fibre initiation and early elongation (5 dpa stages in the fl mutant. Majority of the down regulated transcripts at fibre initiation stage in the fl mutant represent calcium and phytohormone mediated signal transduction pathways, biosynthesis of auxin and ethylene and stress responsive transcription factors (TFs. Further, transcripts involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms, mitochondrial electron transport system (mETS and cell wall loosening and elongation were highly down-regulated at fibre elongation stage (5–15 dpa in the fl mutant. In addition, cellulose synthases and sucrose synthase C were down-regulated at SCW biosynthesis stage (15–20 dpa. Interestingly, some of the transcripts (~50% involved in phytohormone signalling and stress responsive transcription factors that were up-regulated at fibre initiation stage in the WT were found to be up-regulated at much later stage (15 dpa in fl mutant. Conclusions Comparative transcriptome analysis of WT and

  2. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  3. Deciphering the Late Biosynthetic Steps of Antimalarial Compound FR-900098

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes, Tyler W.; DeSieno, Matthew A.; Griffin, Benjamin M.; Thomas, Paul M.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Metcalf, William W.; Zhao, Huimin

    2010-01-01

    FR-900098 is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of malaria. Here we report the heterologous production of this compound in E. coli by re-constructing the entire biosynthetic pathway using a three plasmid system. Based on this system, whole cell feeding assays in combination with in vitro enzymatic activity assays reveal an unprecedented functional role of nucleotide conjugation and lead to the complete elucidation of the previously unassigned late biosynthetic steps. These stud...

  4. Cortical microtubule patterning in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana primary cell wall mutants reveals the bidirectional interplay with cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteris, Emmanuel; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis S; Daras, Gerasimos; Rigas, Stamatis

    2015-01-01

    Cell elongation requires directional deposition of cellulose microfibrils regulated by transverse cortical microtubules. Microtubules respond differentially to suppression of cell elongation along the developmental zones of Arabidopsis thaliana root apex. Cortical microtubule orientation is particularly affected in the fast elongation zone but not in the meristematic or transition zones of thanatos and pom2-4 cellulose-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we report that a uniform phenotype is established among the primary cell wall mutants, as cortical microtubules of root epidermal cells of rsw1 and prc1 mutants exhibit the same pattern described in thanatos and pom2-4. Whether cortical microtubules assume transverse orientation or not is determined by the demand for cellulose synthesis, according to each root zone's expansion rate. It is suggested that cessation of cell expansion may provide a biophysical signal resulting in microtubule reorientation. PMID:26042727

  5. Insight into the early steps of root hair formation revealed by the procuste1 cellulose synthase mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Manoj

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Formation of plant root hairs originating from epidermal cells involves selection of a polar initiation site and production of an initial hair bulge which requires local cell wall loosening. In Arabidopsis the polar initiation site is located towards the basal end of epidermal cells. However little is currently understood about the mechanism for the selection of the hair initiation site or the mechanism by which localised hair outgrowth is achieved. The Arabidopsis procuste1 (prc1-1 cellulose synthase mutant was studied in order to investigate the role of the cell wall loosening during the early stages of hair formation. Results The prc1-1 mutant exhibits uncontrolled, preferential bulging of trichoblast cells coupled with mislocalised hair positioning. Combining the prc1-1 mutant with root hair defective6-1 (rhd6-1, which on its own is almost completely devoid of root hairs results in a significant restoration of root hair formation. The pEXPANSIN7::GFP (pEXP7::GFP marker which is specifically expressed in trichoblast cell files of wild-type roots, is absent in the rhd6-1 mutant. However, pEXP7::GFP expression in the rhd6-1/prc1-1 double mutant is restored in a subset of epidermal cells which have either formed a root hair or exhibit a bulged phenotype consistent with a function for EXP7 during the early stages of hair formation. Conclusion These results show that RHD6 acts upstream of the normal cell wall loosening event which involves EXP7 expression and that in the absence of a functional RHD6 the loosening and accompanying EXP7 expression is blocked. In the prc1-1 mutant background, the requirement for RHD6 during hair initiation is reduced which may result from a weaker cell wall structure mimicking the cell wall loosening events during hair formation.

  6. The deoxyhypusine synthase mutant dys1-1 reveals the association of eIF5A and Asc1 with cell wall integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Carrilho Galvão

    Full Text Available The putative eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A is a highly conserved protein among archaea and eukaryotes that has recently been implicated in the elongation step of translation. eIF5A undergoes an essential and conserved posttranslational modification at a specific lysine to generate the residue hypusine. The enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (Dys1 and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (Lia1 catalyze this two-step modification process. Although several Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF5A mutants have importantly contributed to the study of eIF5A function, no conditional mutant of Dys1 has been described so far. In this study, we generated and characterized the dys1-1 mutant, which showed a strong depletion of mutated Dys1 protein, resulting in more than 2-fold decrease in hypusine levels relative to the wild type. The dys1-1 mutant demonstrated a defect in total protein synthesis, a defect in polysome profile indicative of a translation elongation defect and a reduced association of eIF5A with polysomes. The growth phenotype of dys1-1 mutant is severe, growing only in the presence of 1 M sorbitol, an osmotic stabilizer. Although this phenotype is characteristic of Pkc1 cell wall integrity mutants, the sorbitol requirement from dys1-1 is not associated with cell lysis. We observed that the dys1-1 genetically interacts with the sole yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1 and Asc1, a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The dys1-1 mutant was synthetically lethal in combination with asc1Δ and overexpression of TIF51A (eIF5A or DYS1 is toxic for an asc1Δ strain. Moreover, eIF5A is more associated with translating ribosomes in the absence of Asc1 in the cell. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity to cell wall-perturbing compounds revealed a more similar behavior of the dys1-1 and asc1Δ mutants in comparison with the pkc1Δ mutant. These data suggest a correlated role for eIF5A and Asc1 in coordinating the translational control of a subset of m

  7. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of an Fd-GOGAT1/GLU1 mutant in Arabidopsis thaliana reveals a multiple stress response and extensive reprogramming of the transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Størseth Trond R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate plays a central position in the synthesis of a variety of organic molecules in plants and is synthesised from nitrate through a series of enzymatic reactions. Glutamate synthases catalyse the last step in this pathway and two types are present in plants: NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent. Here we report a genome wide microarray analysis of the transcriptional reprogramming that occurs in leaves and roots of the A. thaliana mutant glu1-2 knocked-down in the expression of Fd-GOGAT1 (GLU1; At5g04140, one of the two genes of A. thaliana encoding ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase. Results Transcriptional profiling of glu1-2 revealed extensive changes with the expression of more than 5500 genes significantly affected in leaves and nearly 700 in roots. Both genes involved in glutamate biosynthesis and transformation are affected, leading to changes in amino acid compositions as revealed by NMR metabolome analysis. An elevated glutamine level in the glu1-2 mutant was the most prominent of these changes. An unbiased analysis of the gene expression datasets allowed us to identify the pathways that constitute the secondary response of an FdGOGAT1/GLU1 knock-down. Among the most significantly affected pathways, photosynthesis, photorespiratory cycle and chlorophyll biosynthesis show an overall downregulation in glu1-2 leaves. This is in accordance with their slight chlorotic phenotype. Another characteristic of the glu1-2 transcriptional profile is the activation of multiple stress responses, mimicking cold, heat, drought and oxidative stress. The change in expression of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis is also revealed. The expression of a substantial number of genes encoding stress-related transcription factors, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, glutathione S-transferases and UDP-glycosyltransferases is affected in the glu1-2 mutant. This may indicate an induction of the detoxification of secondary metabolites in the

  9. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    OpenAIRE

    Del Rizzo, Paul A; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransfer...

  10. Modeling ALS with iPSCs Reveals that Mutant SOD1 Misregulates Neurofilament Balance in Motor Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Qian, Kun; Du, Zhongwei; Cao, Jingyuan; Petersen, Andrew; Liu, Huisheng; Blackbourn, Lisle W.; Huang, CindyTzu-Ling; Errigo, Anthony; Yin, Yingnan; Lu, Jianfeng; Ayala, Melvin; Zhang, Su-Chun

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) presents motoneuron (MN)-selective protein inclusions and axonal degeneration but the underlying mechanisms of such are unknown. Using induced pluripotent cells (iPSCs) from patients with mutation in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1)gene, we show that spinal MNs, but rarely non-MNs, exhibited neurofilament (NF) aggregation followed by neurite degeneration when glia were not present. These changes were associated with decreased stability of NF-L mRNA and binding of its 3′ UTR by mutant SOD1 and thus altered protein proportion of NF subunits. Such MN-selective changes were mimicked by expression of a single copy of the mutant SOD1 in human embryonic stem cells and were prevented by genetic correction of the SOD1 mutation in patient’s iPSCs. Importantly, conditional expression of NF-L in the SOD1 iPSC-derived MNs corrected the NF subunit proportion, mitigating NF aggregation and neurite degeneration. Thus, NF misregulation underlies mutant SOD1-mediated NF aggregation and axonal degeneration in ALS MNs. PMID:24704493

  11. Drosophila mauve mutants reveal a role of LYST homologs late in the maturation of phagosomes and autophagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mokhlasur; Haberman, Adam; Tracy, Charles; Ray, Sanchali; Krämer, Helmut

    2012-12-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a lethal disease caused by mutations that inactivate the lysosomal trafficking regulator protein (LYST). Patients suffer from diverse symptoms including oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent infections, neutropenia and progressive neurodegeneration. These defects have been traced back to over-sized lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) in different cell types. Here, we explore mutants in the Drosophila mauve gene as a new model system for CHS. The mauve gene (CG42863) encodes a large BEACH domain protein of 3535 amino acids similar to LYST. This reflects a functional homology between these proteins as mauve mutants also display enlarged LROs, such as pigment granules. This Drosophila model also replicates the enhanced susceptibility to infections and we show a defect in the cellular immune response. Early stages of phagocytosis proceed normally in mauve mutant hemocytes but, unlike in wild type, late phagosomes fuse and generate large vacuoles containing many bacteria. Autophagy is similarly affected in mauve fat bodies as starvation-induced autophagosomes grow beyond their normal size. Together these data suggest a model in which Mauve functions to restrict homotypic fusion of different pre-lysosomal organelles and LROs. PMID:22934826

  12. Transcriptome profiling of a Sinorhizobium meliloti fadD mutant reveals the role of rhizobactin 1021 biosynthesis and regulation genes in the control of swarming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares José

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming is a multicellular phenomenom characterized by the coordinated and rapid movement of bacteria across semisolid surfaces. In Sinorhizobium meliloti this type of motility has been described in a fadD mutant. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the process of swarming in rhizobia, we compared the transcriptome of a S. meliloti fadD mutant grown under swarming inducing conditions (semisolid medium to those of cells grown under non-swarming conditions (broth and solid medium. Results More than a thousand genes were identified as differentially expressed in response to growth on agar surfaces including genes for several metabolic activities, iron uptake, chemotaxis, motility and stress-related genes. Under swarming-specific conditions, the most remarkable response was the up-regulation of iron-related genes. We demonstrate that the pSymA plasmid and specifically genes required for the biosynthesis of the siderophore rhizobactin 1021 are essential for swarming of a S. meliloti wild-type strain but not in a fadD mutant. Moreover, high iron conditions inhibit swarming of the wild-type strain but not in mutants lacking either the iron limitation response regulator RirA or FadD. Conclusions The present work represents the first transcriptomic study of rhizobium growth on surfaces including swarming inducing conditions. The results have revealed major changes in the physiology of S. meliloti cells grown on a surface relative to liquid cultures. Moreover, analysis of genes responding to swarming inducing conditions led to the demonstration that iron and genes involved in rhizobactin 1021 synthesis play a role in the surface motility shown by S. meliloti which can be circumvented in a fadD mutant. This work opens a way to the identification of new traits and regulatory networks involved in swarming by rhizobia.

  13. Biosynthetic Analysis of the Petrobactin Siderophore Pathway from Bacillus anthracis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jung Yeop; Janes, Brian K.; Passalacqua, Karla D; Pfleger, Brian F.; Bergman, Nicholas H; Liu, Haichuan; Håkansson, Kristina; Somu, Ravindranadh V.; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Cendrowski, Stephen; Hanna, Philip C.; Sherman, David H.

    2006-01-01

    The asbABCDEF gene cluster from Bacillus anthracis is responsible for biosynthesis of petrobactin, a catecholate siderophore that functions in both iron acquisition and virulence in a murine model of anthrax. We initiated studies to determine the biosynthetic details of petrobactin assembly based on mutational analysis of the asb operon, identification of accumulated intermediates, and addition of exogenous siderophores to asb mutant strains. As a starting point, in-frame deletions of each of...

  14. Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Hyung Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in either the TSC1 (encodes hamartin or TSC2 (encodes tuberin genes. Patients with TSC have hamartomas in various organs throughout the whole body, most notably in the brain, skin, eye, heart, kidney and lung. To study the development of hamartomas, we generated a zebrafish model of TSC featuring a nonsense mutation (vu242 in the tsc2 gene. This tsc2vu242 allele encodes a truncated Tuberin protein lacking the GAP domain, which is required for inhibition of Rheb and of the TOR kinase within TORC1. We show that tsc2vu242 is a recessive larval-lethal mutation that causes increased cell size in the brain and liver. Greatly elevated TORC1 signaling is observed in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous zebrafish, and is moderately increased in tsc2vu242/+ heterozygotes. Forebrain neurons are poorly organized in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous mutants, which have extensive gray and white matter disorganization and ectopically positioned cells. Genetic mosaic analyses demonstrate that tsc2 limits TORC1 signaling in a cell-autonomous manner. However, in chimeric animals, tsc2vu242/vu242 mutant cells also mislocalize wild-type host cells in the forebrain in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These results demonstrate a highly conserved role of tsc2 in zebrafish and establish a new animal model for studies of TSC. The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC.

  15. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  16. Water stress responses of tomato mutants impaired in hormone biosynthesis reveal abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMuñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG transgenic (SA-deficient line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1 and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3 expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1 was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress.

  17. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A; López-Climent, María F; Casaretto, José A; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  18. Intra-epidemic evolutionary dynamics of a Dengue virus type 1 population reveal mutant spectra that correlate with disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Koo, Carmen; Kek, Relus; Xu, Helen; Lai, Yee Ling; Liu, Lilac; Kok, Suet Yheng; Shi, Yuan; Chuen, Raphael Lee Tze; Lee, Kim-Sung; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Ng, Lee Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogen. DENVs naturally exist as highly heterogeneous populations. Even though the descriptions on DENV diversity are plentiful, only a few studies have narrated the dynamics of intra-epidemic virus diversity at a fine scale. Such accounts are important to decipher the reciprocal relationship between viral evolutionary dynamics and disease transmission that shape dengue epidemiology. In the current study, we present a micro-scale genetic analysis of a monophyletic lineage of DENV-1 genotype III (epidemic lineage) detected from November 2012 to May 2014. The lineage was involved in an unprecedented dengue epidemic in Singapore during 2013-2014. Our findings showed that the epidemic lineage was an ensemble of mutants (variants) originated from an initial mixed viral population. The composition of mutant spectrum was dynamic and positively correlated with case load. The close interaction between viral evolution and transmission intensity indicated that tracking genetic diversity through time is potentially a useful tool to infer DENV transmission dynamics and thereby, to assess the epidemic risk in a disease control perspective. Moreover, such information is salient to understand the viral basis of clinical outcome and immune response variations that is imperative to effective vaccine design. PMID:26940650

  19. SET7/9 catalytic mutants reveal the role of active site water molecules in lysine multiple methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M A; Strunk, Bethany S; Roiko, Marijo S; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Houtz, Robert L; Trievel, Raymond C

    2010-10-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ε-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ε-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ε-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  20. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M. A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2010-01-01

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine ϵ-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine ϵ-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated ϵ-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes. PMID:20675860

  1. SET7/9 Catalytic Mutants Reveal the Role of Active Site Water Molecules in Lysine Multiple Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Rizzo, Paul A.; Couture, Jean-François; Dirk, Lynnette M.A.; Strunk, Bethany S.; Roiko, Marijo S.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Houtz, Robert L.; Trievel, Raymond C. (Michigan); (NWU); (Kentucky)

    2010-11-15

    SET domain lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) methylate specific lysine residues in histone and non-histone substrates. These enzymes also display product specificity by catalyzing distinct degrees of methylation of the lysine {epsilon}-amino group. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this specificity, we have characterized the Y245A and Y305F mutants of the human KMT SET7/9 (also known as KMT7) that alter its product specificity from a monomethyltransferase to a di- and a trimethyltransferase, respectively. Crystal structures of these mutants in complex with peptides bearing unmodified, mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysines illustrate the roles of active site water molecules in aligning the lysine {epsilon}-amino group for methyl transfer with S-adenosylmethionine. Displacement or dissociation of these solvent molecules enlarges the diameter of the active site, accommodating the increasing size of the methylated {epsilon}-amino group during successive methyl transfer reactions. Together, these results furnish new insights into the roles of active site water molecules in modulating lysine multiple methylation by SET domain KMTs and provide the first molecular snapshots of the mono-, di-, and trimethyl transfer reactions catalyzed by these enzymes.

  2. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process

  3. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Shao, Yiming [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, and National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xinqi, E-mail: liu2008@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of transgenic poplar dwarf mutant reveals numerous differentially expressed genes involved in energy flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Su; Bai, Shuang; Liu, Guifeng; Li, Huiyu; Jiang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    In our previous research, the Tamarix androssowii LEA gene (Tamarix androssowii late embryogenesis abundant protein Mrna, GenBank ID: DQ663481) was transferred into Populus simonii × Populus nigra. Among the eleven transgenic lines, one exhibited a dwarf phenotype compared to the wild type and other transgenic lines, named dwf1. To uncover the mechanisms underlying this phenotype, digital gene expression libraries were produced from dwf1, wild-type, and other normal transgenic lines, XL-5 and XL-6. Gene expression profile analysis indicated that dwf1 had a unique gene expression pattern in comparison to the other two transgenic lines. Finally, a total of 1246 dwf1-unique differentially expressed genes were identified. These genes were further subjected to gene ontology and pathway analysis. Results indicated that photosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism related genes were significantly affected. In addition, many transcription factors genes were also differentially expressed in dwf1. These various differentially expressed genes may be critical for dwarf mutant formation; thus, the findings presented here might provide insight for our understanding of the mechanisms of tree growth and development. PMID:25192286

  5. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  6. Functional analysis of (4S)-limonene synthase mutants reveals determinants of catalytic outcome in a model monoterpene synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srividya, Narayanan; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney B; Lange, B Markus

    2015-03-17

    Crystal structural data for (4S)-limonene synthase [(4S)-LS] of spearmint (Mentha spicata L.) were used to infer which amino acid residues are in close proximity to the substrate and carbocation intermediates of the enzymatic reaction. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of 48 amino acids combined with enzyme fidelity analysis [percentage of (-)-limonene produced] indicated which residues are most likely to constitute the active site. Mutation of residues W324 and H579 caused a significant drop in enzyme activity and formation of products (myrcene, linalool, and terpineol) characteristic of a premature termination of the reaction. A double mutant (W324A/H579A) had no detectable enzyme activity, indicating that either substrate binding or the terminating reaction was impaired. Exchanges to other aromatic residues (W324H, W324F, W324Y, H579F, H579Y, and H579W) resulted in enzyme catalysts with significantly reduced activity. Sequence comparisons across the angiosperm lineage provided evidence that W324 is a conserved residue, whereas the position equivalent to H579 is occupied by aromatic residues (H, F, or Y). These results are consistent with a critical role of W324 and H579 in the stabilization of carbocation intermediates. The potential of these residues to serve as the catalytic base facilitating the terminal deprotonation reaction is discussed. PMID:25733883

  7. Long-Distance Signaling in bypass1 Mutants:Bioassay Development Reveals the bps Signal to Be a Metabolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emma Adhikari; Dong-Keun Lee; Patrick Giavalisco; Leslie E. Sieburth

    2013-01-01

    Root-to-shoot signaling is used by plants to coordinate shoot development with the conditions experienced by the roots.A mobile and biologically active compound,the bps signal,is over-produced in roots of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant called bypass1 (bps1),and might also be a normally produced signaling molecule in wild-type plants.Our goal is to identify the bps signal chemically,which will then allow us to assess its production in normal plants.To identify any signaling molecule,a bioassay is required,and here we describe the development of a robust,simple,and quantitative bioassay for the bps signal.The developed bioassay follows the growth-reducing activity of the bps signal using the pCYCB1;1::GUS cell cycle marker.Wild-type plants carrying this marker,and provided the bps signal through either grafts or metabolite extracts,showed reduced cell division.By contrast,control grafts and treatment with control extracts showed no change in pCYCB1;1::GUS expression.To determine the chemical nature of the bps signal,extracts were treated with RNase A,Proteinase K,or heat.None of these treatments diminished the activity of bps1 extracts,suggesting that the active molecule might be a metabolite.This bioassay will be useful for future biochemical fractionation and analysis directed toward bps signal identification.

  8. Characterization of tub4P287L, a b-tubulin mutant, revealed new aspects of microtubule regulation in shade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yu; Hong Qiu; Xin Liu; Meiling Wang; Yongli Gao; Joanne Chory; Yi Tao

    2015-01-01

    When sun plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, are under canopy shade, elongation of stems/petioles will be induced as one of the most prominent responses. Plant hormones mediate the elongation growth. However, how environmental and hormonal signals are translated into cell expansion activity that leads to the elongation growth remains elusive. Through forward genetic study, we identi-fied shade avoidance2 (sav2) mutant, which contains a P287L mutation in b-TUBULIN 4. Cortical microtubules (cMTs) play a key role in anisotropic cell growth. Hypocotyls of sav2 are wild type-like in white light, but are short and highly swollen in shade and dark. We showed that shade not only induces cMT rearrangement, but also affects cMT stability and dynamics of plus ends. Even though auxin and brassinosteroids are required for shade-induced hypocotyl elongation, they had little effect on shade-induced rearrangement of cMTs. Blocking auxin transport suppressed dark phenotypes of sav2, while overexpressing EB1b-GFP, a microtubule plus-end binding protein, rescued sav2 in both shade and dark, suggesting that tub4P287L represents a unique type of tubulin mutation that does not affect cMT function in supporting cell elongation, but may affect the ability of cMTs to respond properly to growth promoting stimuli.

  9. Negative staining and immunoelectron microscopy of adhesion-deficient mutants of Streptococcus salivarius reveal that the adhesive protein antigens are separate classes of cell surface fibril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerkamp, A H; Handley, P S; Baars, A; Slot, J W

    1986-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of the cell wall-associated protein antigens of Streptococcus salivarius HB, which are involved in specific adhesive properties of the cells, was studied. Mutants which had lost the adhesive properties and lacked the antigens at the cell surface were compared with the parent strain. Immunoelectron microscopy of cryosections of cells labeled with affinity-purified, specific antisera and colloidal gold-protein A complexes was used to locate the antigens. Antigen C (AgC), a glycoprotein involved in attachment to host surfaces, was mainly located in the fibrillar layer outside the cell wall. A smaller amount of label was also found throughout the cytoplasmic area in the form of small clusters of gold particles, which suggests a macromolecular association. Mutant HB-7, which lacks the wall-associated AgC, accumulated AgC reactivity intracellularly. Intracellular AgC was often found associated with isolated areas of increased electron density, but sometimes seemed to fill the entire interior of the cell. Antigen B (AgB), a protein responsible for interbacterial coaggregation, was also located in the fibrillar layer, although its distribution differed from that of the wall-associated AgC since AgB was found predominantly in the peripheral areas. A very small amount of label was also found in the cytoplasmic area as discrete gold particles. Mutant HB-V5, which lacks wall-associated AgB, was not labeled in the fibrillar coat, but showed the same weak intracellular label as the parent strain. Immunolabeling with serum against AgD, another wall-associated protein but of unknown function, demonstrated its presence in the fibrillar layer of strain HB. Negatively stained preparations of whole cells of wild-type S. salivarius and mutants that had lost wall-associated AgB or AgC revealed that two classes of short fibrils are carried on the cell surface at the same time. AgB and AgC are probably located on separate classes of short, protease

  10. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  11. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Sandate, Colby R; Chesham, Johanna E; Barnard, Alun R; Parsons, Michael J; Vibert, Jennifer L; Joynson, Greg M; Partch, Carrie L; Hastings, Michael H; Nolan, Patrick M

    2016-03-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1-CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER-CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2(Edo/Edo) mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2(Edo) complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (<19 h) but robust circadian rhythms in Per2(Edo/Edo); Csnk1e(Tau/Tau) mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2(Edo) reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping. PMID:26903623

  12. Iron-molybdenum cofactor synthesis in Azotobacter vinelandii Nif- mutants.

    OpenAIRE

    Imperial, J; Shah, V K; Ugalde, R A; Ludden, P W; Brill, W J

    1987-01-01

    Nif- mutants of Azotobacter vinelandii defective in dinitrogenase activity synthesized iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) and accumulated it in two protein-bound forms: inactive dinitrogenase and a possible intermediate involved in the FeMo-co biosynthetic pathway. FeMo-co from both these proteins could activate apo-dinitrogenase from FeMo-co-deficient mutants.

  13. The zebrafish sf3b1b460 mutant reveals differential requirements for the sf3b1 pre-mRNA processing gene during neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Min; Henion, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    The functions of gene regulatory networks that control embryonic cell diversification occur on a background of constitutively active molecular machinery necessary for the elaboration of genetic interactions. The essential roles of subsets of such "housekeeping" genes in the regulation of specific aspects of development have become increasingly clear. Pre-mRNA processing is essential for production of functional transcripts by, for example, excision of introns. We have cloned the zebrafish toast(b460) locus and found that it encodes splicing factor 3b, subunit 1 (sf3b1). The sf3b1(b460) mutation causes aberrant splicing of sf3b1 resulting in functional and predicted non-functional transcripts and a 90% reduction in full-length Sf3b1 protein. The sf3b1(b460) mutation was isolated in a mutagenesis screen based on the absence of neural crest-derived melanophores. Further analysis revealed specific earlier defects in neural crest development, whereas the early development of other ectodermal populations appears unaffected. The expression of essential transcriptional regulators of neural crest development are severely disrupted in sf3b1(b460) mutants, due in part to defects in pre-mRNA processing of a subset of these factors, leading to defects in neural crest sublineage specification, survival and migration. Misexpression of a subset of these factors rescues aspects of neural crest development in mutant embryos. Our results indicate that although sf3b1 is a ubiquitously essential gene, the degree to which it is required exhibits tissue-type specificity during early embryogenesis. Further, the developmental defects caused by the sf3b1(b460) mutation provide insights into genetic interactions among members of the gene regulatory network controlling neural crest development. PMID:22562198

  14. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process. PMID:25689133

  15. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías Castro

    Full Text Available An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs. We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319 that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  16. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available Chalcone synthase (CHS catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1 encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants.

  17. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, Joshua A V; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-06-29

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identification of the frontalamide biosynthetic gene cluster and several biosynthetic intermediates. The biosynthetic locus for the frontalamides' mixed polyketide/amino acid structure encodes a hybrid polyketide synthase nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS), which resembles iterative enzymes known in fungi. No such mixed iterative PKS-NRPS enzymes have been characterized in bacteria. Genome-mining efforts revealed strikingly conserved frontalamide-like biosynthetic clusters in the genomes of phylogenetically diverse bacteria ranging from proteobacteria to actinomycetes. Screens for environmental actinomycete isolates carrying frontalamide-like biosynthetic loci led to the isolation of a number of positive strains, the majority of which produced candidate frontalamide-like compounds under suitable growth conditions. These results establish the prevalence of frontalamide-like gene clusters in diverse bacterial types, with medicinally important Streptomyces species being particularly enriched. PMID:20547882

  18. In vivo recruitment analysis and a mutant strain without any group 2 σ factor reveal roles of different σ factors in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Satu; Hakkila, Kaisa; Gunnelius, Liisa; Kurkela, Juha; Wada, Hajime; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2016-01-01

    In eubacteria, replacement of one σ factor in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme by another one changes the transcription pattern. Cyanobacteria are eubacteria characterized by oxygenic photosynthesis, and they typically encode numerous group 2 σ factors that closely resemble the essential primary σ factor. A mutant strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 without functional group 2 σ factors (named as ΔsigBCDE) could not acclimate to heat, high salt or bright light stress, but in standard conditions ΔsigBCDE grew only 9% slower than the control strain. One-fifth of the genes in ΔsigBCDE was differently expressed compared with the control strain in standard growth conditions and several physiological changes in photosynthesis, and pigment and lipid compositions were detected. To directly analyze the σ factor content of RNAP holoenzyme in vivo, a His-tag was added to the γ subunit of RNAP in Synechocystis and RNAPs were collected. The results revealed that all group 2 σ factors were recruited by RNAP in standard conditions, but recruitment of SigB and SigC increased in heat stress, SigD in bright light, SigE in darkness and SigB, SigC and SigE in high salt, explaining the poor acclimation of ΔsigBCDE to these stress conditions. PMID:26354085

  19. Interconnections Between RNA-Processing Pathways Revealed by a Sequencing-Based Genetic Screen for Pre-mRNA Splicing Mutants in Fission Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Amy; Fair, Benjamin Jung; Pleiss, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is an essential component of eukaryotic gene expression and is highly conserved from unicellular yeasts to humans. Here, we present the development and implementation of a sequencing-based reverse genetic screen designed to identify nonessential genes that impact pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an organism that shares many of the complex features of splicing in higher eukaryotes. Using a custom-designed barcoding scheme, we simultaneously queried ∼3000 mutant strains for their impact on the splicing efficiency of two endogenous pre-mRNAs. A total of 61 nonessential genes were identified whose deletions resulted in defects in pre-mRNA splicing; enriched among these were factors encoding known or predicted components of the spliceosome. Included among the candidates identified here are genes with well-characterized roles in other RNA-processing pathways, including heterochromatic silencing and 3' end processing. Splicing-sensitive microarrays confirm broad splicing defects for many of these factors, revealing novel functional connections between these pathways. PMID:27172183

  20. Enriching the Environment of [alpha]CaMKII[superscript T286A] Mutant Mice Reveals that LTD Occurs in Memory Processing but Must be Subsequently Reversed by LTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Florentina; Giese, K. Peter; Edwards, Frances A.; Parsley, Stephanie L.; Pilgram, Sara M.

    2007-01-01

    [alpha]CaMKII[superscript T286A] mutant mice lack long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 region and are impaired in spatial learning. In situ hybridization confirms that the mutant mice show the same developmental expression of [alpha]CaMKII as their wild-type littermates. A simple hypothesis would suggest that if LTP is a substrate…

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of Friedreich's Ataxia Mutants Reveals Determinants of Frataxin Binding and Activation of the Fe-S Assembly Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Winn, Andrew M; Barondeau, David P [TAM

    2012-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with the loss of function of the protein frataxin (FXN) that results from low FXN levels due to a GAA triplet repeat expansion or, occasionally, from missense mutations in the FXN gene. Here biochemical and structural properties of FXN variants, including three FRDA missense mutations (N146K, Q148R, and R165C) and three related mutants (N146A, Q148G, and Q153A), were determined in an effort to understand the structural basis for the loss of function. In vitro assays revealed that although the three FRDA missense mutations exhibited similar losses of cysteine desulfurase and Fe-S cluster assembly activities, the causes for these activation defects were distinct. The R165C variant exhibited a kcat/KM higher than that of native FXN but weak binding to the NFS1, ISD11, and ISCU2 (SDU) complex, whereas the Q148R variant exhibited the lowest kcat/KM of the six tested FXN variants and only a modest binding deficiency. The order of the FXN binding affinities for the SDU Fe-S assembly complex was as follows: FXN > Q148R > N146A > Q148G > N146K > Q153A > R165C. Four different classes of FXN variants were identified on the basis of their biochemical properties. Together, these structure-function studies reveal determinants for the binding and allosteric activation of the Fe-S assembly complex and provide insight into how FRDA missense mutations are functionally compromised.

  2. The structure of mAG, a monomeric mutant of the green fluorescent protein Azami-Green, reveals the structural basis of its stable green emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal structure of a monomeric mutant of Azami-Green (mAG) from G. fascicularis was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. Monomeric Azami-Green (mAG) from the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis is the first known monomeric green-emitting fluorescent protein that is not a variant of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP). These two green fluorescent proteins are only 27% identical in their amino-acid sequences. mAG is more similar in its amino-acid sequence to four fluorescent proteins: Dendra2 (a green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein), Dronpa (a bright-and-dark reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein), KikG (a tetrameric green-emitting fluorescent protein) and Kaede (another green-to-red irreversibly photoconverting fluorescent protein). To reveal the structural basis of stable green emission by mAG, the 2.2 Å crystal structure of mAG has been determined and compared with the crystal structures of avGFP, Dronpa, Dendra2, Kaede and KikG. The structural comparison revealed that the chromophore formed by Gln62-Tyr63-Gly64 (QYG) and the fixing of the conformation of the imidazole ring of His193 by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts involving His193, Arg66 and Thr69 are likely to be required for the stable green emission of mAG. The crystal structure of mAG will contribute to the design and development of new monomeric fluorescent proteins with faster maturation, brighter fluorescence, improved photostability, new colours and other preferable properties as alternatives to avGFP and its variants

  3. Isolation and characterization of Arabidopsis mutants defective in the induction of ethylene biosynthesis by cytokinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J. P.; Schuerman, P.; Woeste, K.; Brandstatter, I.; Kieber, J. J.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Cytokinins elevate ethylene biosynthesis in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings via a post-transcriptional modification of one isoform of the key biosynthetic enzyme ACC synthase. In order to begin to dissect the signaling events leading from cytokinin perception to this modification, we have isolated a series of mutants that lack the ethylene-mediated triple response in the presence of cytokinin due to their failure to increase ethylene biosynthesis. Analysis of genetic complementation and mapping revealed that these Cin mutants (cytokinin-insensitive) represent four distinct complementation groups, one of which, cin4, is allelic to the constitutive photomorphogenic mutant fus9/cop10. The Cin mutants have subtle effects on the morphology of adult plants. We further characterized the Cin mutants by analyzing ethylene biosynthesis in response to various other inducers and in adult tissues, as well as by assaying additional cytokinin responses. The cin3 mutant did not disrupt ethylene biosynthesis under any other conditions, nor did it disrupt any other cytokinin responses. Only cin2 disrupted ethylene biosynthesis in multiple circumstances. cin1 and cin2 made less anthocyanin in response to cytokinin. cin1 also displayed reduced shoot initiation in tissue culture in response to cytokinin, suggesting that it affects a cytokinin signaling element.

  4. Analysis of mutants from a genetic screening reveals the control of intestine and liver development by many common genes in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Faming; Chen, Jiehui; Ma, Xirui; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Shicheng; Wang, Fei; Li, Li; Luo, Lingfei; Ruan, Hua; Huang, Honghui

    2015-05-01

    Both the intestine and liver develop from the endoderm, yet little is known how these two digestive organs share and differ in their developmental programs, at the molecular level. A classical forward genetic screen, with no gene bias, is an effective way to address this question by examining the defects of the intestine and liver in obtained mutants to assess mutated genes responsible for the development of either organ or both. We report here such a screen in zebrafish. ENU was used as the mutagen because of its high mutagenic efficiency and no site preference. Embryos were collected at 3.5 dpf for RNA whole mount in situ hybridization with a cocktail probe of the intestine marker ifabp and the liver marker lfabp to check phenotypes and determine their parental heterozygosis. A total of 52 F2 putative mutants were identified, and those with general developmental defects were aborted. To rule out non-inheritable phenotypes caused by high mutation background, F2 putative mutants were outcrossed with wild type fish and a re-screen in F3 generations was performed. After complementation tests between F3 mutants with similar phenotypes originating from the same F2 families, a total of 37 F3 mutant lines originated from 22 F2 families were identified after screening 78 mutagenized genomes. Classification of mutant phenotypes indicated that 31 out of the 37 mutants showed defects in both the intestine and liver. In addition, four "intestine specific mutants" and two "liver specific mutants" showed selectively more severe phenotype in the intestine and liver respectively. These results suggested that the intestine and liver share a substantial number of essential genes during both organs development in zebrafish. Further studies of the mutants are likely to shed more insights into the molecular basis of the digestive system development in the zebrafish and vertebrate. PMID:25824031

  5. Common biosynthetic origins for polycyclic tetramate macrolactams from phylogenetically diverse bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Blodgett, Joshua A. V.; Oh, Dong-Chan; Cao, Shugeng; Currie, Cameron R.; Kolter, Roberto; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-01

    A combination of small molecule chemistry, biosynthetic analysis, and genome mining has revealed the unexpected conservation of polycyclic tetramate macrolactam biosynthetic loci in diverse bacteria. Initially our chemical analysis of a Streptomyces strain associated with the southern pine beetle led to the discovery of frontalamides A and B, two previously undescribed members of this antibiotic family. Genome analyses and genetic manipulation of the producing organism led to the identificati...

  6. Engineering and Directed Evolution of a Ca2+ Binding Site A-Deficient AprE Mutant Reveal an Essential Contribution of the Loop Leu75–Leu82 to Enzyme Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Eliel R. Romero-García; Alfredo Téllez-Valencia; María F. Trujillo; José G. Sampedro; Hugo Nájera; Arturo Rojo-Domínguez; Jesús García-Soto; Mario Pedraza-Reyes

    2009-01-01

    An aprE mutant from B. subtilis 168 lacking the connecting loop Leu75–Leu82 which is predicted to encode a Ca2+ binding site was constructed. Expression of the mutant gene (aprEΔLeu75–Leu82) produced B. subtilis colonies lacking protease activity. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis revealed spectral differences between wild-type AprE and AprEΔL75–L82. An AprEΔL75–L82 variant with reestablished enzyme activity was selected by directed evolution. The no...

  7. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the HeT-A retrotransposon in mutant and wild type stocks reveals high sequence variability at Drosophila telomeres and other unusual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piñeyro David

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomere replication in Drosophila depends on the transposition of a domesticated retroelement, the HeT-A retrotransposon. The sequence of the HeT-A retrotransposon changes rapidly resulting in differentiated subfamilies. This pattern of sequence change contrasts with the essential function with which the HeT-A is entrusted and brings about questions concerning the extent of sequence variability, the telomere contribution of different subfamilies, and whether wild type and mutant Drosophila stocks show different HeT-A scenarios. Results A detailed study on the variability of HeT-A reveals that both the level of variability and the number of subfamilies are higher than previously reported. Comparisons between GIII, a strain with longer telomeres, and its parental strain Oregon-R indicate that both strains have the same set of HeT-A subfamilies. Finally, the presence of a highly conserved splicing pattern only in its antisense transcripts indicates a putative regulatory, functional or structural role for the HeT-A RNA. Interestingly, our results also suggest that most HeT-A copies are actively expressed regardless of which telomere and where in the telomere they are located. Conclusions Our study demonstrates how the HeT-A sequence changes much faster than previously reported resulting in at least nine different subfamilies most of which could actively contribute to telomere extension in Drosophila. Interestingly, the only significant difference observed between Oregon-R and GIII resides in the nature and proportion of the antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism that would in part explain the longer telomeres of the GIII stock.

  9. Mutants of Streptomyces coeruleorubidus impaired in the biosynthesis of daunomycinone glycosides and related metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutants of Streptomyces coeruleorubidus, blocked in the biosynthesis of anthracycline antibiotics of the daunomycine complex, were isolated from the production strains after treatment with UV light, γ-radiation, nitrous acid, and after natural selection; according to their different biosynthetic activity the mutants were divided into five phenotypic groups. Mutants of two of these groups produced compounds that had not yet been described in Streptomyces coeruleorubidus (aklavinone, 7-deoxyaklavinone, zeta-rhodomycinone and glycosides of epsilon-rhodomycinone). The mutants differed from the parent strains and also mutually in morphological characteristics but no direct correlation between these changes and the biosynthetic activity could be observed in most cases. (author)

  10. Gene profiling of postnatal Mfrprd6 mutant eyes reveals differential accumulation of Prss56, visual cycle and phototransduction mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani Soundararajan

    Full Text Available Mutations in the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP/Mfrp gene, specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and ciliary body, cause nanophthalmia or posterior microphthalmia with retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. To better understand MFRP function, microarray analysis was performed on eyes of homozygous Mfrprd6 and C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0 and P14, prior to photoreceptor loss. Data analysis revealed no changes at P0 but significant differences in RPE and retina-specific transcripts at P14, suggesting a postnatal influence of the Mfrprd6 allele. A subset of these transcripts was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. In Mfrprd6 eyes, a significant 1.5- to 2.0-fold decrease was observed among transcripts of genes linked to retinal degeneration, including those involved in visual cycle (Rpe65, Lrat, Rgr, phototransduction (Pde6a, Guca1b, Rgs9, and photoreceptor disc morphogenesis (Rpgrip1 and Fscn2. Levels of RPE65 were significantly decreased by 2.0-fold. Transcripts of Prss56, a gene associated with angle-closure glaucoma, posterior microphthalmia and myopia, were increased in Mfrprd6 eyes by 17-fold. Validation by qRT-PCR indicated a 3.5-, 14- and 70-fold accumulation of Prss56 transcripts relative to controls at P7, P14 and P21, respectively. This trend was not observed in other RPE or photoreceptor mutant mouse models with similar disease progression, suggesting that Prss56 upregulation is a specific attribute of the disruption of Mfrp. Prss56 and Glul in situ hybridization directly identified Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer as the cell type expressing Prss56. In summary, the Mfrprd6 allele causes significant postnatal changes in transcript and protein levels in the retina and RPE. The link between Mfrp deficiency and Prss56 up-regulation, together with the genetic association of human MFRP or PRSS56 variants and ocular size, raises the possibility that

  11. The multiple use of barley endosperm mutants in plant breeding for quality and for revealing functionality in nutrition and food technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    but also to understand functionality in nutrition and in food processing and even to overview gene expression for improved genetic theory. A high lysine barley mutant Risoe 1508 (lys3.a) cross breeding material developed at Carlsberg 1973-1988 is used to demonstrate how Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) spectra evaluated by a Principal Component analysis (PCA) score plot can visualize an improved chemical composition due to a changed mutant gene background. By introducing starch and yield improved high lysine lys3.a recombinants in pig feeding, protein concentration in the feed and nitrogen load on the animal and also importantly on environment could be reduced by 15-20% without compromising meat production. The decreased nitrogen load on the animal spares the energy that is necessary to catabolize the surplus of non essential aminoacids. The less carbohydrates and lower energy digestibility in the improved lys3.a lines is thus likely to be compensated by a more efficient energy metabolisation of the protein.Thus the high lysine mutants are contributing to the understanding of animal physiology. In analogy the technological importance of slender cellwalls and low β-glucan was elucidated by a mutant M-737 from Carlsberg speeding up malt modification to spare 1-2 days. The vast majority of mutation scientists are traditionally rather pessimistic regarding the possibility to repair negative pleiotropic effects of mutants by engaging in the hard and time consuming work of cross breeding. An open holistic exploratory strategy is necessary in order to evaluate the great complexity of the pleiotropic effects of a mutant gene that can not be forcasted by prior scientific knowledge. This is now possible by exploiting NIR Spectrocopy as a coarse overview of the phenotype (Phenome) on the level of chemical bonds. (author)

  12. Distinct Retinoid Metabolic Functions for Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genes Adh1 and Adh4 in Protection against Vitamin A Toxicity or Deficiency Revealed in Double Null Mutant Mice*

    OpenAIRE

    Molotkov, Andrei; Deltour, Louise; Foglio, Mario H.; Cuenca, Arnold E.; Duester, Gregg

    2002-01-01

    The ability of class I alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH1) and class IV alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH4) to metabolize retinol to retinoic acid is supported by genetic studies in mice carrying Adh1 or Adh4 gene disruptions. To differentiate the physiological roles of ADH1 and ADH4 in retinoid metabolism we report here the generation of an Adh1/4 double null mutant mouse and its comparison to single null mutants. We demonstrate that loss of both ADH1 and ADH4 does not have additive effects, either for pr...

  13. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Michelle Smith-Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6 gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG, a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be a tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of three day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell was of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  14. The functional integrity of the serpin domain of C1-inhibitor depends on the unique N-terminal domain, as revealed by a pathological mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Ineke G A; Lubbers, Yvonne T P; Roem, Dorina; Abrahams, Jan Pieter; Hack, C Erik; Eldering, Eric

    2003-08-01

    C1-inhibitor (C1-Inh) is a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) with a unique, non-conserved N-terminal domain of unknown function. Genetic deficiency of C1-Inh causes hereditary angioedema. A novel type of mutation (Delta 3) in exon 3 of the C1-Inh gene, resulting in deletion of Asp62-Thr116 in this unique domain, was encountered in a hereditary angioedema pedigree. Because the domain is supposedly not essential for inhibitory activity, the unexpected loss-of-function of this deletion mutant was further investigated. The Delta 3 mutant and three additional mutants starting at Pro76, Gly98, and Ser115, lacking increasing parts of the N-terminal domain, were produced recombinantly. C1-Inh76 and C1-Inh98 retained normal conformation and interaction kinetics with target proteases. In contrast, C1-Inh115 and Delta 3, which both lack the connection between the serpin and the non-serpin domain via two disulfide bridges, were completely non-functional because of a complex-like and multimeric conformation, as demonstrated by several criteria. The Delta 3 mutant also circulated in multimeric form in plasma from affected family members. The C1-Inh mutant reported here is unique in that deletion of an entire amino acid stretch from a domain not shared by other serpins leads to a loss-of-function. The deletion in the unique N-terminal domain results in a "multimerization phenotype" of C1-Inh, because of diminished stability of the central beta-sheet. This phenotype, as well as the location of the disulfide bridges between the serpin and the non-serpin domain of C1-Inh, suggests that the function of the N-terminal region may be similar to one of the effects of heparin in antithrombin III, maintenance of the metastable serpin conformation. PMID:12773530

  15. Biosynthetic Enzyme GMP Synthetase Cooperates with Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 7 in Transcriptional Regulation of Ecdysteroid Target Genes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Kozhevnikova, Elena; Langenberg, Karin; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Verrijzer, C. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila GMP synthetase binds ubiquitin-specific protease 7 (USP7) and is required for its ability to deubiquitylate histone H2B. Previously, we showed that the GMPS/USP7 complex cooperates with the Polycomb silencing system through removal of the active ubiquitin mark from histone H2B (H2Bub). Here, we explored the interplay between GMPS and USP7 further and assessed their role in hormone-regulated gene expression. Genetic analysis established a strong cooperation between GMPS and USP7, which is counteracted by the histone H2B ubiquitin ligase BRE1. Loss of either GMPS or USP7 led to increased levels of histone H2Bub in mutant animals. These in vivo analyses complement our earlier biochemical results, establishing that GMPS/USP7 mediates histone H2B deubiquitylation. We found that GMPS/USP7 binds ecdysone-regulated loci and that mutants display severe misregulation of ecdysone target genes. Ecdysone receptor (EcR) interacts biochemically and genetically with GMPS/USP7. Genetic and gene expression analyses suggested that GMPS/USP7 acts as a transcriptional corepressor. These results revealed the cooperation between a biosynthetic enzyme and a ubiquitin protease in developmental gene control by hormone receptors. PMID:19995917

  16. A quadruple mutant of Arabidopsis reveals a β-carotene hydroxylation activity for LUT1/CYP97C1 and a regulatory role of xanthophylls on determination of the PSI/PSII ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiore Alessia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xanthophylls are oxygenated carotenoids playing an essential role as structural components of the photosynthetic apparatus. Xanthophylls contribute to the assembly and stability of light-harvesting complex, to light absorbance and to photoprotection. The first step in xanthophyll biosynthesis from α- and β-carotene is the hydroxylation of ε- and β-rings, performed by both non-heme iron oxygenases (CHY1, CHY2 and P450 cytochromes (LUT1/CYP97C1, LUT5/CYP97A3. The Arabidopsis triple chy1chy2lut5 mutant is almost completely depleted in β-xanthophylls. Results Here we report on the quadruple chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant, additionally carrying the lut2 mutation (affecting lycopene ε-cyclase. This genotype lacks lutein and yet it shows a compensatory increase in β-xanthophylls with respect to chy1chy2lut5 mutant. Mutant plants show an even stronger photosensitivity than chy1chy2lut5, a complete lack of qE, the rapidly reversible component of non-photochemical quenching, and a peculiar organization of the pigment binding complexes into thylakoids. Biochemical analysis reveals that the chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant is depleted in Lhcb subunits and is specifically affected in Photosystem I function, showing a deficiency in PSI-LHCI supercomplexes. Moreover, by analyzing a series of single, double, triple and quadruple Arabidopsis mutants in xanthophyll biosynthesis, we show a hitherto undescribed correlation between xanthophyll levels and the PSI-PSII ratio. The decrease in the xanthophyll/carotenoid ratio causes a proportional decrease in the LHCII and PSI core levels with respect to PSII. Conclusions The physiological and biochemical phenotype of the chy1chy2lut2lut5 mutant shows that (i LUT1/CYP97C1 protein reveals a major β-carotene hydroxylase activity in vivo when depleted in its preferred substrate α-carotene; (ii xanthophylls are needed for normal level of Photosystem I and LHCII accumulation.

  17. An Arabidopsis mutant impaired in coenzyme A biosynthesis is sugar dependent for seedling establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Silvia; Larson, Tony R; Gonzalez-Guzman, Miguel; Alejandro, Santiago; Graham, Ian A; Serrano, Ramón; Rodriguez, Pedro L

    2006-03-01

    Once the plant coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway has been elucidated by comparative genomics, it is feasible to analyze the physiological relevance of CoA biosynthesis in plant life. To this end, we have identified and characterized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) T-DNA knockout mutants of two CoA biosynthetic genes, HAL3A and HAL3B. The HAL3A gene encodes a 4'-phosphopantothenoyl-cysteine decarboxilase that generates 4'-phosphopantetheine. A second gene, HAL3B, whose gene product is 86% identical to that of HAL3A, is present in the Arabidopsis genome. HAL3A appears to have a predominant role over HAL3B according to their respective mRNA expression levels. The hal3a-1, hal3a-2, and hal3b mutants were viable and showed a similar growth rate as that in wild-type plants; in contrast, a hal3a-1 hal3b double mutant was embryo lethal. Unexpectedly, seedlings that were null for HAL3A and heterozygous for HAL3B (aaBb genotype) displayed a sucrose (Suc)-dependent phenotype for seedling establishment, which is in common with mutants defective in beta-oxidation. This phenotype was genetically complemented in aaBB siblings of the progeny and chemically complemented by pantethine. In contrast, seedling establishment of Aabb plants was not Suc dependent, proving a predominant role of HAL3A over HAL3B at this stage. Total fatty acid and acyl-CoA measurements of 5-d-old aaBb seedlings in medium lacking Suc revealed stalled storage lipid catabolism and impaired CoA biosynthesis; in particular, acetyl-CoA levels were reduced by approximately 80%. Taken together, these results provide in vivo evidence for the function of HAL3A and HAL3B, and they point out the critical role of CoA biosynthesis during early postgerminative growth. PMID:16415216

  18. DNA sequencing with MspA: Molecular Dynamics simulations reveal free-energy differences between sequencing and non-sequencing mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Richard M A; Wallace, E Jayne; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    MspA has been identified as a promising candidate protein as a component of a nanopore-based DNA-sequencing device. However the wildtype protein must be engineered to incorporate all of the features desirable for an accurate and efficient device. In the present study we have utilized atomistic molecular dynamics to perform umbrella-sampling calculations to calculate the potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for translocation of the four DNA nucleotides through MspA. We show there is an energetic barrier to translocation of individual nucleotides through a mutant that closely resembles the wildtype protein, but not through a mutant engineered for the purpose of sequencing. Crucially we are able to quantify the change in free energy for mutating key residues. Thus providing a quantitative characterisation of the energetic impact of individual amino acid sidechains on nucleotide translocation through the pore of MspA. PMID:26255609

  19. The Multiple Uses of Barley Endosperm Mutants in Plant Breeding for Quality and for Revealing Functionality in Nutrition and Food Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes, with examples, how biochemical seed mutations can be used not only to improve quality in cereals, but also to understand functionality in nutrition and in food processing, and even to provide an overview of gene expression for improved genetic theory. A high lysine barley mutant Riso 1508 (lys3.a) cross breeding material developed at Carlsberg between 1973 and 1988 is used to demonstrate how Near Infrared Reflectance (NIR) spectra evaluated by a Principal Component analysis (PCA) score plot can visualize an improved chemical composition resulting from an altered genotype. By introducing high lysine lys3.a recombinants with increased starch and yield to pig feeding, protein concentration in the feed, nitrogen load on the animal and, also, importantly nitrogen load on environment could be reduced by 15-20% without compromising meat production. The decreased nitrogen load on the animal spares the energy that is necessary to catabolize the surplus of non-essential amino acids. The lower carbohydrate content and lower energy digestibility in the improved lys3.a lines is likely to be compensated by a more efficient metabolism of the protein. Thus, the high lysine mutants are contributing to the understanding of animal physiology. Similarly, the technological importance of slender cell walls and low β-glucan was elucidated using mutant M-737 from Carlsberg, which accelerated malt modification to spare one to two days. The vast majority of scientists are traditionally rather pessimistic about the possibility of repairing the negative pleiotropic effects of mutations by engaging in the hard and time-consuming work of cross breeding. An open holistic exploratory strategy is necessary in order to evaluate the great complexity of the pleiotropic effects of a mutant gene that can not be forecasted by prior scientific knowledge. This is now possible by exploiting NIR Spectroscopy as a coarse overview of the phenotype (Phenome) on the level of chemical

  20. Poly specific trans-acyltransferase machinery revealed via engineered acyl-CoA synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koryakina, Irina; McArthur, John; Randall, Shan; Draelos, Matthew M; Musiol, Ewa M; Muddiman, David C; Weber, Tilmann; Williams, Gavin J

    2013-01-18

    Polyketide synthases construct polyketides with diverse structures and biological activities via the condensation of extender units and acyl thioesters. Although a growing body of evidence suggests that polyketide synthases might be tolerant to non-natural extender units, in vitro and in vivo studies aimed at probing and utilizing polyketide synthase specificity are severely limited to only a small number of extender units, owing to the lack of synthetic routes to a broad variety of acyl-CoA extender units. Here, we report the construction of promiscuous malonyl-CoA synthetase variants that can be used to synthesize a broad range of malonyl-CoA extender units substituted at the C2-position, several of which contain handles for chemoselective ligation and are not found in natural biosynthetic systems. We highlighted utility of these enzymes by probing the acyl-CoA specificity of several trans-acyltransferases, leading to the unprecedented discovery of poly specificity toward non-natural extender units, several of which are not found in naturally occurring biosynthetic pathways. These results reveal that polyketide biosynthetic machinery might be more tolerant to non-natural substrates than previously established, and that mutant synthetases are valuable tools for probing the specificity of biosynthetic machinery. Our data suggest new synthetic biology strategies for harnessing this promiscuity and enabling the regioselective modification of polyketides. PMID:23083014

  1. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses. PMID:20079505

  2. OsWOX3A is involved in negative feedback regulation of the gibberellic acid biosynthetic pathway in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Hwan; Kang, Kiyoon; Lee, Sang-Hwa; Lee, In-Jung; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2016-04-01

    The plant-specific WUSCHEL-related homeobox (WOX) nuclear proteins have important roles in the transcriptional regulation of many developmental processes. Among the rice (Oryza sativa) WOX proteins, a loss of OsWOX3A function in narrow leaf2 (nal2) nal3 double mutants (termed nal2/3) causes pleiotropic effects, such as narrow and curly leaves, opened spikelets, narrow grains, more tillers, and fewer lateral roots, but almost normal plant height. To examine OsWOX3A function in more detail, transgenic rice overexpressing OsWOX3A (OsWOX3A-OX) were generated; unexpectedly, all of them consistently exhibited severe dwarfism with very short and wide leaves, a phenotype that resembles that of gibberellic acid (GA)-deficient or GA-insensitive mutants. Exogenous GA3 treatment fully rescued the developmental defects of OsWOX3A-OX plants, suggesting that constitutive overexpression of OsWOX3A downregulates GA biosynthesis. Quantitative analysis of GA intermediates revealed significantly reduced levels of GA20 and bioactive GA1 in OsWOX3A-OX, possibly due to downregulation of the expression of KAO, which encodes ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase, a GA biosynthetic enzyme. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that OsWOX3A directly interacts with the KAO promoter. OsWOX3A expression is drastically and temporarily upregulated by GA3 and downregulated by paclobutrazol, a blocker of GA biosynthesis. These data indicate that OsWOX3A is a GA-responsive gene and functions in the negative feedback regulation of the GA biosynthetic pathway for GA homeostasis to maintain the threshold levels of endogenous GA intermediates throughout development. PMID:26767749

  3. A buoyancy-based screen of Drosophila larvae for fat-storage mutants reveals a role for Sir2 in coupling fat storage to nutrient availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Reis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has a strong genetic component, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity are known. Genetic screens in invertebrates have the potential to identify genes and pathways that regulate the levels of stored fat, many of which are likely to be conserved in humans. To facilitate such screens, we have developed a simple buoyancy-based screening method for identifying mutant Drosophila larvae with increased levels of stored fat. Using this approach, we have identified 66 genes that when mutated increase organismal fat levels. Among these was a sirtuin family member, Sir2. Sirtuins regulate the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids by deacetylating key regulatory proteins. However, since mammalian sirtuins function in many tissues in different ways, it has been difficult to define their role in energy homeostasis accurately under normal feeding conditions. We show that knockdown of Sir2 in the larval fat body results in increased fat levels. Moreover, using genetic mosaics, we demonstrate that Sir2 restricts fat accumulation in individual cells of the fat body in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistent with this function, changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes in Sir2 mutants point to a shift away from catabolism. Surprisingly, although Sir2 is typically upregulated under conditions of starvation, Sir2 mutant larvae survive better than wild type under conditions of amino-acid starvation as long as sugars are provided. Our findings point to a Sir2-mediated pathway that activates a catabolic response to amino-acid starvation irrespective of the sugar content of the diet.

  4. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  5. Interrogation of brain miRNA and mRNA expression profiles reveals a molecular regulatory network that is perturbed by mutant huntingtin

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jing; Cheng, Yong; Zhang, Yongqing; Wood, William; Peng, Qi; Hutchison, Emmette; Mattson, Mark P; Becker, Kevin G.; Duan, Wenzhen

    2012-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs) may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease (HD). To identify the individual miRNAs that are altered in HD and may therefore regulate a gene network underlying mutant huntingtin-induced neuronal dysfunction in HD, we performed miRNA array analysis combined with mRNA profiling in the cerebral cortex from N171-82Q HD mice. Expression profiles of miRNAs as well as mRNAs in HD mouse cerebral cortex were analyzed and co...

  6. Near infrared spectra indicate specific mutant endosperm genes and reveal a new mechanism for substituting starch with (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Møller, B.; Jacobsen, Susanne; Søndergaard, Ib

    2004-01-01

    region. The characteristic spectral signatures representing the lys5 locus (Riso mutants 13 and 29) were found to be associated with large changes in percentage of starch and (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan. These alleles compensated for a low level of starch (down to 30%) by a high level of (1...... the high (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan BG lys5 cluster in a PCA. Their high (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan and low starch content was verified. It is concluded that genetic diversity such as from gene regulated polysaccharide and storage protein pathways in the endosperm tissue can be discovered directly...

  7. Desaturase mutants reveal that membrane rigidification acts as a cold perception mechanism upstream of the diacylglycerol kinase pathway in Arabidopsis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaultier, Marie-Noëlle; Cantrel, Catherine; Vergnolle, Chantal; Justin, Anne-Marie; Demandre, Chantal; Benhassaine-Kesri, Ghouziel; Ciçek, Dominique; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2006-07-24

    Membrane rigidification could be the first step of cold perception in poikilotherms. We have investigated its implication in diacylglycerol kinase (DAGK) activation by cold stress in suspension cells from Arabidopsis mutants altered in desaturase activities. By lateral diffusion assay, we showed that plasma membrane rigidification with temperature decrease was steeper in cells deficient in oleate desaturase than in wild type cells and in cells overexpressing linoleate desaturase. The threshold for the activation of the DAGK pathway in each type of cells correlated with this order of rigidification rate, suggesting that cold induced-membrane rigidification is upstream of DAGK pathway activation. PMID:16839551

  8. Transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis associated with red/green skin color mutant of pear (Pyrus communis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan eYang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin concentration is the key determinant for red skin color in pear fruit. However, the molecular basis for development of red skin is complicated and has not been well understood thus far. ‘Starkrimson’ (Pyrus communis L., an introduced red pear cultivated in the north of China and its green mutant provides a desirable red/green pair for identification of candidate genes involved in color variation. Here, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome for the red /green color mutant at three stages of development using Illumina RNA-seq technology. The total number of mapped reads ranged from 26 to 46 million in six libraries. About 70.11-71.95% of clean reads could be mapped to the reference genome. Compared with green colored fruit, a total of 2,230 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in red fruit. Gene Ontology (GO terms were defined for 4,886 differential transcripts involved in 15 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. Three DEGs were identified as candidate genes in the flavonoid pathway, LAR, ANR and C3H. Tellingly, higher expression was found for genes encoding ANR and LAR in the green color mutant, promoting the proanthocyanidin (PA pathway and leading to lower anthocyanin. MYB-binding cis-motifs were identified in the promoter region of LAR and ANR. Based on these findings, we speculate that the regulation of PA biosynthesis might be a key factor for this red/green color mutant. Besides the known MYB and MADS transcription families, two new families, AP2 and WRKY, were identified as having high correlation with anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned pear. In addition, qRT-PCR was used to confirm the transcriptome results for 17 DEGs, high correlation of gene expression, further proved that AP2 and WARK regulated the anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned ‘Starkrimson’, and ANR and LAR promote PA biosynthesis and contribute to the green skinned variant. This study can serve as a valuable

  9. Origin of saxitoxin biosynthetic genes in cyanobacteria.

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    Ahmed Moustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP is a potentially fatal syndrome associated with the consumption of shellfish that have accumulated saxitoxin (STX. STX is produced by microscopic marine dinoflagellate algae. Little is known about the origin and spread of saxitoxin genes in these under-studied eukaryotes. Fortuitously, some freshwater cyanobacteria also produce STX, providing an ideal model for studying its biosynthesis. Here we focus on saxitoxin-producing cyanobacteria and their non-toxic sisters to elucidate the origin of genes involved in the putative STX biosynthetic pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a draft genome assembly of the saxitoxin-producing (STX+ cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis ACBU02 and searched for 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes (named sxtA to sxtZ that were recently identified in the toxic strain Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3. We also generated a draft assembly of the non-toxic (STX- sister Anabaena circinalis ACFR02 to aid the identification of saxitoxin-specific genes. Comparative phylogenomic analyses revealed that nine putative STX genes were horizontally transferred from non-cyanobacterial sources, whereas one key gene (sxtA originated in STX+ cyanobacteria via two independent horizontal transfers followed by fusion. In total, of the 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes, 13 are of cyanobacterial provenance and are monophyletic among the STX+ taxa, four are shared amongst STX+ and STX-cyanobacteria, and the remaining nine genes are specific to STX+ cyanobacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that the assembly of STX genes in ACBU02 involved multiple HGT events from different sources followed presumably by coordination of the expression of foreign and native genes in the common ancestor of STX+ cyanobacteria. The ability to produce saxitoxin was subsequently lost multiple independent times resulting in a nested relationship of STX+ and STX- strains among Anabaena

  10. Near infrared spectra indicate specific mutant endosperm genes and reveal a new mechanism for substituting starch with (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Møller, B.; Jacobsen, Susanne;

    2004-01-01

    region. The characteristic spectral signatures representing the lys5 locus (Riso mutants 13 and 29) were found to be associated with large changes in percentage of starch and (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan. These alleles compensated for a low level of starch (down to 30%) by a high level of (1......-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan (up to 15-20%), thus, maintaining a constant production of polysaccharides at 50-55%, within the range of normal barley.The spectral tool was tested by an independent data set with six mutants with unknown polysaccharide composition. Spectral data from four of these were classified within...... the high (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan BG lys5 cluster in a PCA. Their high (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan and low starch content was verified. It is concluded that genetic diversity such as from gene regulated polysaccharide and storage protein pathways in the endosperm tissue can be discovered directly...

  11. Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Brassinosteroid Biosynthetic Enzyme Gene, GhDWF1, from Cotton (Gossypium hirsuturm L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are an important class of plant steroidal hormones that are essential in a wide variety of physiological processes. To determine the effects of BRs on the development of cotton fibers, through screening cotton fiber EST database and contigging the candidate ESTs, a key gene (GhDWF1) involved in the upstream biosynthetic pathway of BRs was cloned from developing fibers of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cv. Xuzhou 142. The full length of the cloned cDNA is 1 849 bp, including a 37 bp 5'-untranslated region, an ORF of 1692 bp, and a 120 bp 3'-untranslated region.The cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 563 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 65 kD. The deduced amino acid sequence has high homology with the BR biosynthetic enzyme, DWARF1/DIMINUTO, from rice, maize, pea,tomato, and Arabidopsis. Furthermore, the typical conserved structures, such as the transmembrane domain, the FAD-dependent oxidase domain, and the FAD-binding site, are present in the GhDWF1 protein. The Southern blot indicated that the GhDWF1 gene is a single copy in upland cotton genome. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the highest level of GhDWF1 expression was detected in 0 DPA (day post anthesis) ovule (with fibers) while the lowest level was observed in cotyledon. The GhDWF1 gene presents high expression levels in root, young stem, and fiber, especially, at the fiber developmental stage of secondary cell wall accumulation. Moreover, the expression level was higher in ovules (with fibers) of wildtype (Xuzhou 142) than in ovules of fuzzless-lintless mutant at the same developmental stages (0 and 4 DPA). The results suggest that the GhDWF1 gene plays a crucial role in fiber development.

  12. Microarray Analysis of Rice d1 (RGA1) Mutant Reveals the Potential Role of G-Protein Alpha Subunit in Regulating Multiple Abiotic Stresses Such as Drought, Salinity, Heat, and Cold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangam, Annie P; Pathak, Ravi R; Raghuram, Nandula

    2016-01-01

    The genome-wide role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in abiotic stress response in rice has not been examined from a functional genomics perspective, despite the availability of mutants and evidences involving individual genes/processes/stresses. Our rice whole transcriptome microarray analysis (GSE 20925 at NCBI GEO) using the G-alpha subunit (RGA1) null mutant (Daikoku 1 or d1) and its corresponding wild type (Oryza sativa Japonica Nipponbare) identified 2270 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Out of them, we mined for all the potentially abiotic stress-responsive genes using Gene Ontology terms, STIFDB2.0 and Rice DB. The first two approaches produced smaller subsets of the 1886 genes found at Rice DB. The GO approach revealed similar regulation of several families of stress-responsive genes in RGA1 mutant. The Genevestigator analysis of the stress-responsive subset of the RGA1-regulated genes from STIFDB revealed cold and drought-responsive clusters. Meta data analysis at Rice DB revealed large stress-response categories such as cold (878 up/810 down), drought (882 up/837 down), heat (913 up/777 down), and salt stress (889 up/841 down). One thousand four hundred ninety-eight of them are common to all the four abiotic stresses, followed by fewer genes common to smaller groups of stresses. The RGA1-regulated genes that uniquely respond to individual stresses include 111 in heat stress, eight each in cold only and drought only stresses, and two genes in salt stress only. The common DEGs (1498) belong to pathways such as the synthesis of polyamine, glycine-betaine, proline, and trehalose. Some of the common DEGs belong to abiotic stress signaling pathways such as calcium-dependent pathway, ABA independent and dependent pathway, and MAP kinase pathway in the RGA1 mutant. Gene ontology of the common stress responsive DEGs revealed 62 unique molecular functions such as transporters, enzyme regulators, transferases, hydrolases, carbon and protein metabolism

  13. Microarray Analysis of Rice d1 (RGA1) Mutant Reveals the Potential Role of G-Protein Alpha Subunit in Regulating Multiple Abiotic Stresses Such as Drought, Salinity, Heat, and Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jangam, Annie P.; Pathak, Ravi R.; Raghuram, Nandula

    2016-01-01

    The genome-wide role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in abiotic stress response in rice has not been examined from a functional genomics perspective, despite the availability of mutants and evidences involving individual genes/processes/stresses. Our rice whole transcriptome microarray analysis (GSE 20925 at NCBI GEO) using the G-alpha subunit (RGA1) null mutant (Daikoku 1 or d1) and its corresponding wild type (Oryza sativa Japonica Nipponbare) identified 2270 unique differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Out of them, we mined for all the potentially abiotic stress-responsive genes using Gene Ontology terms, STIFDB2.0 and Rice DB. The first two approaches produced smaller subsets of the 1886 genes found at Rice DB. The GO approach revealed similar regulation of several families of stress-responsive genes in RGA1 mutant. The Genevestigator analysis of the stress-responsive subset of the RGA1-regulated genes from STIFDB revealed cold and drought-responsive clusters. Meta data analysis at Rice DB revealed large stress-response categories such as cold (878 up/810 down), drought (882 up/837 down), heat (913 up/777 down), and salt stress (889 up/841 down). One thousand four hundred ninety-eight of them are common to all the four abiotic stresses, followed by fewer genes common to smaller groups of stresses. The RGA1-regulated genes that uniquely respond to individual stresses include 111 in heat stress, eight each in cold only and drought only stresses, and two genes in salt stress only. The common DEGs (1498) belong to pathways such as the synthesis of polyamine, glycine-betaine, proline, and trehalose. Some of the common DEGs belong to abiotic stress signaling pathways such as calcium-dependent pathway, ABA independent and dependent pathway, and MAP kinase pathway in the RGA1 mutant. Gene ontology of the common stress responsive DEGs revealed 62 unique molecular functions such as transporters, enzyme regulators, transferases, hydrolases, carbon and protein metabolism

  14. The structures of mutant forms of Hfq from Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveal the importance of the conserved His57 for the protein hexamer organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results obtained demonstrate the great importance of solvent-inaccessible conserved hydrogen bonds between the Hfq monomers in the stabilization of the hexamer structure. The bacterial Sm-like protein Hfq forms homohexamers both in solution and in crystals. The monomers are organized as a continuous β-sheet passing through the whole hexamer ring with a common hydrophobic core. Analysis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hfq (PaeHfq) hexamer structure suggested that solvent-inaccessible intermonomer hydrogen bonds created by conserved amino-acid residues should also stabilize the quaternary structure of the protein. In this work, one such conserved residue, His57, in PaeHfq was replaced by alanine, threonine or asparagine. The crystal structures of His57Thr and His57Ala Hfq were determined and the stabilities of all of the mutant forms and of the wild-type protein were measured. The results obtained demonstrate the great importance of solvent-inaccessible conserved hydrogen bonds between the Hfq monomers in stabilization of the hexamer structure

  15. A novel ATP-dependent conformation in p97 N-D1 fragment revealed by crystal structures of disease-related mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wai Kwan; Li, Dongyang; Li, Chou-chi; Esser, Lothar; Dai, Renming; Guo, Liang; Xia1, Di (IIT); (NIH)

    2010-11-11

    Mutations in p97, a major cytosolic AAA (ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities) chaperone, cause inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). IBMPFD mutants have single amino-acid substitutions at the interface between the N-terminal domain (N-domain) and the adjacent AAA domain (D1), resulting in a reduced affinity for ADP. The structures of p97 N-D1 fragments bearing IBMPFD mutations adopt an atypical N-domain conformation in the presence of Mg{sup 2+} {center_dot} ATP{gamma}S, which is reversible by ADP, showing for the first time the nucleotide-dependent conformational change of the N-domain. The transition from the ADP- to the ATP{gamma}S-bound state is accompanied by a loop-to-helix conversion in the N-D1 linker and by an apparent re-ordering in the N-terminal region of p97. X-ray scattering experiments suggest that wild-type p97 subunits undergo a similar nucleotide-dependent N-domain conformational change. We propose that IBMPFD mutations alter the timing of the transition between nucleotide states by destabilizing the ADP-bound form and consequently interfere with the interactions between the N-domains and their substrates.

  16. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-04-04

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. Finally, this restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity.

  17. LC-MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1 Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert G.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-02-20

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity and metabolism in C. elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2); daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the up-regulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complex I, II, III and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative for spatio-temporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves, possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways, in order to sustain longevity.

  18. Polyketide synthase chemistry does not direct biosynthetic divergence between 9- and 10-membered enediynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Geoff P; Chen, Yihua; Thorson, Jon S; Shen, Ben

    2010-06-22

    Enediynes are potent antitumor antibiotics that are classified as 9- or 10-membered according to the size of the enediyne core structure. However, almost nothing is known about enediyne core biosynthesis, and the determinants of 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence remain elusive. Previous work identified enediyne-specific polyketide synthases (PKSEs) that can be phylogenetically distinguished as being involved in 9- versus 10-membered enediyne biosynthesis, suggesting that biosynthetic divergence might originate from differing PKSE chemistries. Recent in vitro studies have identified several compounds produced by the PKSE and associated thioesterase (TE), but condition-dependent product profiles make it difficult to ascertain a true catalytic difference between 9- and 10-membered PKSE-TE systems. Here we report that PKSE chemistry does not direct 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence as revealed by comparing the products from three 9-membered and two 10-membered PKSE-TE systems under identical conditions using robust in vivo assays. Three independent experiments support a common catalytic function for 9- and 10-membered PKSEs by the production of a heptaene metabolite from: (i) all five cognate PKSE-TE pairs in Escherichia coli; (ii) the C-1027 and calicheamicin cognate PKSE-TEs in Streptomyces lividans K4-114; and (iii) selected native producers of both 9- and 10-membered enediynes. Furthermore, PKSEs and TEs from different 9- and 10-membered enediyne biosynthetic machineries are freely interchangeable, revealing that 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence occurs beyond the PKSE-TE level. These findings establish a starting point for determining the origins of this biosynthetic divergence. PMID:20534556

  19. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandra, L.; Abou Hachem, Maher; Gyemant, G.; Kramhoft, B.; Svensson, Birte

    2006-01-01

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites as b...

  20. Biosynthetic multitasking facilitates thalassospiramide structural diversity in marine bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ross, Avena C.

    2013-01-23

    Thalassospiramides A and B are immunosuppressant cyclic lipopeptides first reported from the marine α-proteobacterium Thalassospira sp. CNJ-328. We describe here the discovery and characterization of an extended family of 14 new analogues from four Tistrella and Thalassospira isolates. These potent calpain 1 protease inhibitors belong to six structure classes in which the length and composition of the acylpeptide side chain varies extensively. Genomic sequence analysis of the thalassospiramide-producing microbes revealed related, genus-specific biosynthetic loci encoding hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthases consistent with thalassospiramide assembly. The bioinformatics analysis of the gene clusters suggests that structural diversity, which ranges from the 803.4 Da thalassospiramide C to the 1291.7 Da thalassospiramide F, results from a complex sequence of reactions involving amino acid substrate channeling and enzymatic multimodule skipping and iteration. Preliminary biochemical analysis of the N-terminal nonribosomal peptide synthetase module from the Thalassospira TtcA megasynthase supports a biosynthetic model in which in cis amino acid activation competes with in trans activation to increase the range of amino acid substrates incorporated at the N terminus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Structural Insights Into the Evolutionary Paths of Oxylipin Biosynthetic Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.-S.; Nioche, P.; Hamberg, M.; Raman, C.S.

    2009-05-20

    The oxylipin pathway generates not only prostaglandin-like jasmonates but also green leaf volatiles (GLVs), which confer characteristic aromas to fruits and vegetables. Although allene oxide synthase (AOS) and hydroperoxide lyase are atypical cytochrome P450 family members involved in the synthesis of jasmonates and GLVs, respectively, it is unknown how these enzymes rearrange their hydroperoxide substrates into different products. Here we present the crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana AOS, free and in complex with substrate or intermediate analogues. The structures reveal an unusual active site poised to control the reactivity of an epoxyallylic radical and its cation by means of interactions with an aromatic {pi}-system. Replacing the amino acid involved in these steps by a non-polar residue markedly reduces AOS activity and, unexpectedly, is both necessary and sufficient for converting AOS into a GLV biosynthetic enzyme. Furthermore, by combining our structural data with bioinformatic and biochemical analyses, we have discovered previously unknown hydroperoxide lyase in plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, AOS in coral, and epoxyalcohol synthase in amphioxus. These results indicate that oxylipin biosynthetic genes were present in the last common ancestor of plants and animals, but were subsequently lost in all metazoan lineages except Placozoa, Cnidaria and Cephalochordata.

  2. Anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ning; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Liu, Bo; Zheng, Shuning; Liang, Jianli; Wang, Xiaowu

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthocyanins are a group of flavonoid compounds. As a group of important secondary metabolites, they perform several key biological functions in plants. Anthocyanins also play beneficial health roles as potentially protective factors against cancer and heart disease. To elucidate the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Brassica rapa, we conducted comparative genomic analyses between Arabidopsis thaliana and B. rapa on a genome-wide level. Results In total, we identified 73 genes in...

  3. Biosynthetic engineering of nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kries, Hajo

    2016-09-01

    From the evolutionary melting pot of natural product synthetase genes, microorganisms elicit antibiotics, communication tools, and iron scavengers. Chemical biologists manipulate these genes to recreate similarly diverse and potent biological activities not on evolutionary time scales but within months. Enzyme engineering has progressed considerably in recent years and offers new screening, modelling, and design tools for natural product designers. Here, recent advances in enzyme engineering and their application to nonribosomal peptide synthetases are reviewed. Among the nonribosomal peptides that have been subjected to biosynthetic engineering are the antibiotics daptomycin, calcium-dependent antibiotic, and gramicidin S. With these peptides, incorporation of unnatural building blocks and modulation of bioactivities via various structural modifications have been successfully demonstrated. Natural product engineering on the biosynthetic level is not a reliable method yet. However, progress in the understanding and manipulation of biosynthetic pathways may enable the routine production of optimized peptide drugs in the near future. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27465074

  4. Mapping of a Cellulose-Deficient Mutant Named dwarf1-1 in Sorghum bicolor to the Green Revolution Gene gibberellin20-oxidase Reveals a Positive Regulatory Association between Gibberellin and Cellulose Biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Carloalberto; Hirano, Ko; Stork, Jozsef; DeBolt, Seth

    2015-09-01

    Here, we show a mechanism for expansion regulation through mutations in the green revolution gene gibberellin20 (GA20)-oxidase and show that GAs control biosynthesis of the plants main structural polymer cellulose. Within a 12,000 mutagenized Sorghum bicolor plant population, we identified a single cellulose-deficient and male gametophyte-dysfunctional mutant named dwarf1-1 (dwf1-1). Through the Sorghum propinquum male/dwf1-1 female F2 population, we mapped dwf1-1 to a frameshift in GA20-oxidase. Assessment of GAs in dwf1-1 revealed ablation of GA. GA ablation was antagonistic to the expression of three specific cellulose synthase genes resulting in cellulose deficiency and growth dwarfism, which were complemented by exogenous bioactive gibberellic acid application. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we found that GA was positively regulating the expression of a subset of specific cellulose synthase genes. To cross reference data from our mapped Sorghum sp. allele with another monocotyledonous plant, a series of rice (Oryza sativa) mutants involved in GA biosynthesis and signaling were isolated, and these too displayed cellulose deficit. Taken together, data support a model whereby suppressed expansion in green revolution GA genes involves regulation of cellulose biosynthesis. PMID:26198258

  5. Engineering and Directed Evolution of a Ca2+ Binding Site A-Deficient AprE Mutant Reveal an Essential Contribution of the Loop Leu75–Leu82 to Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliel R. Romero-García

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An aprE mutant from B. subtilis 168 lacking the connecting loop Leu75–Leu82 which is predicted to encode a Ca2+ binding site was constructed. Expression of the mutant gene (aprEΔLeu75–Leu82 produced B. subtilis colonies lacking protease activity. Intrinsic fluorescence analysis revealed spectral differences between wild-type AprE and AprEΔL75–L82. An AprEΔL75–L82 variant with reestablished enzyme activity was selected by directed evolution. The novel mutations Thr66Met/Gly102Asp located in positions which are predicted to be important for catalytic activity were identified in this variant. Although these mutations restored hydrolysis, they had no effect with respect to thermal inactivation of AprEΔL75–L82  T66M  G102D. These results support the proposal that in addition to function as a calcium binding site, the loop that connects β-sheet e3 with α-helix c plays a structural role on enzyme activity of AprE from B. subtilis 168.

  6. Characterization and Fine Mapping of a Necrotic Leaf Mutant in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijing Wang; Shuai Han; Shiyi Zhong; Haizhong Wei; Yanjun Zhang; Yan Zhao; Baoshen Liu

    2013-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a commercially important crop.Its yield can be reduced by mutations in biosynthetic and degradative pathways that cause death.In this paper,we describe the necrotic leaf (nec-t) mutant,which was obtained from an inbred line,81647.The nec-t mutant plants had yellow leaves with necrotic spots,reduced chlorophyll content,and the etiolated seedlings died under normal growth conditions.Transmission electron microscopy revealed scattered thylakoids,and reduced numbers of grana lamellae and chloroplasts per cell.Histochemical staining suggested that spot formation of nec-t leaves might be due to cell death.Genetic analysis showed that necrosis was caused by the mutation of a recessive locus.Using simple sequence repeat markers,the Nec-t gene was mapped between mmc0111 and bnlg2277 on the short arm of chromosome 2.A total of 1287 individuals with the mutant phenotype from a F2 population were used for physical mapping.The Nec-t gene was located between markers T31 and H8 within a physical region of 131.7 kb.

  7. Induced High Lysine Mutants in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doll, Hans; Køie, B.; Eggum, B. O.

    1974-01-01

    Screening of mutagenically treated materials by combined Kjeldahl nitrogen and dye-binding capacity determinations disclosed fourteen barley mutants, which have from a few to about 40 per cent more lysine in the protein and one mutant with 10 per cent less lysine in the protein than the parent...... variety. Comparisons of six high lysine mutants with the parent variety showed that grain yield and seed size of the mutants are reduced between 10 and 30 per cent. However, the most promising mutant had the lowest reduction in grain yield, and the absolute lysine yield of this mutant was some 30 per cent...... above that of the parent variety. Feeding tests with rats revealed substantial increases in the biological value of the high lysine mutant protein. Also the net protein utilization was improved but less so because of a somewhat reduced digestibility of the mutant protein....

  8. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana;

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform (p...... penetrance. p42-deficient leukemia could be transferred by a Mac1+c-Kit+ population that gave rise only to myeloid cells in recipient mice. Expression profiling of this population against normal Mac1+c-Kit+ progenitors revealed a signature shared with MLL-AF9-transformed AML.......42) while retaining the 30kDa isoform (p30)-we modified the mouse Cebpa locus to express only p30. p30 supported the formation of granulocyte-macrophage progenitors. However, p42 was required for control of myeloid progenitor proliferation, and p42-deficient mice developed AML with complete...

  9. Characterization of sophorolipid biosynthetic enzymes from Starmerella bombicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerens, Karen M J; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Soetaert, Wim

    2015-11-01

    Altering glycolipid structure by genetic engineering of Starmerella bombicola is a recently started research topic and worthy alternative to the unsuccessful selective feeding strategies conventionally applied to reach this goal. One question to be addressed when expressing heterologous proteins in S. bombicola is the activity of the subsequent biosynthetic enzymes toward such modified substrates. In this scope, we studied the substrate specificity of the UDP-glucosyltransferases UgtA1 and UgtB1, responsible for the stepwise synthesis of sophorolipids from a hydroxylated fatty acid, and that of the acetyltransferase, responsible for acetylation of the sophorolipid molecule. All enzymes showed specificity toward a C18:1 chained acceptor and both glucosyltransferases were highly selective toward the UDP-glucose donor. Severe product inhibition of the glucosyltransferases explains the limited accumulation of sophorolipid intermediates by earlier created single deletion mutants of S. bombicola. Finally, a more detailed study of the acetylation of sophorolipid intermediates sheds light on the enzymatic cascade during synthesis. PMID:26298016

  10. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Chao Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together

  11. Sugars as the optimal biosynthetic carbon substrate of aqueous life throughout the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber, 1997). Redox disproportionation--the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis--is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful high energy electrons/carbon atom while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry--primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  12. Artificial Chromosomes to Explore and to Exploit Biosynthetic Capabilities of Actinomycetes

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Alduina; Giuseppe Gallo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomycetes are an important source of biologically active compounds, like antibiotics, antitumor agents, and immunosuppressors. Genome sequencing is revealing that this class of microorganisms has larger genomes relative to other bacteria and uses a considerable fraction of its coding capacity (5–10%) for the production of mostly cryptic secondary metabolites. To access actinomycetes biosynthetic capabilities or to improve the pharmacokinetic properties and production yields of these chemi...

  13. Identification and characterization of a new erythromycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Actinopolyspora erythraea YIM90600, a novel erythronolide-producing halophilic actinomycete isolated from salt field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Chen

    Full Text Available Erythromycins (Ers are clinically potent macrolide antibiotics in treating pathogenic bacterial infections. Microorganisms capable of producing Ers, represented by Saccharopolyspora erythraea, are mainly soil-dwelling actinomycetes. So far, Actinopolyspora erythraea YIM90600, a halophilic actinomycete isolated from Baicheng salt field, is the only known Er-producing extremophile. In this study, we have reported the draft genome sequence of Ac. erythraea YIM90600, genome mining of which has revealed a new Er biosynthetic gene cluster encoding several novel Er metabolites. This Er gene cluster shares high identity and similarity with the one of Sa. erythraea NRRL2338, except for two absent genes, eryBI and eryG. By correlating genotype and chemotype, the biosynthetic pathways of 3'-demethyl-erythromycin C, erythronolide H (EH and erythronolide I have been proposed. The formation of EH is supposed to be sequentially biosynthesized via C-6/C-18 epoxidation and C-14 hydroxylation from 6-deoxyerythronolide B. Although an in vitro enzymatic activity assay has provided limited evidence for the involvement of the cytochrome P450 oxidase EryFAc (derived from Ac. erythraea YIM90600 in the catalysis of a two-step oxidation, resulting in an epoxy moiety, the attempt to construct an EH-producing Sa. erythraea mutant via gene complementation was not successful. Characterization of EryKAc (derived from Ac. erythraea YIM90600 in vitro has confirmed its unique role as a C-12 hydroxylase, rather than a C-14 hydroxylase of the erythronolide. Genomic characterization of the halophile Ac. erythraea YIM90600 will assist us to explore the great potential of extremophiles, and promote the understanding of EH formation, which will shed new insights into the biosynthesis of Er metabolites.

  14. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be e...

  15. L-Tryptophan Production by Auxotrophic and Analogue Resistant Mutants of Aureobacterium flavescens

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, A; S.K. Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    A number of tyrosine plus phenylalanine double auxotrophic mutants were isolated by N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment of a locally isolated strain of Aureobacterium flavescens of which 11A39 and 11A17 were selected on the basis of their tryptophan production in a mineral salt medium over other isolated mutant strains. The mutational block in the aromatic amino acid biosynthetic pathway of the selected double auxotrophs were determined. By controlling pH of the production me...

  16. Lipidome analysis reveals antifungal polyphenol curcumin affects membrane lipid homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Monika; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Prasad, Rajendra

    2012-01-01

    This study shows that antifungal curcumin (CUR), significantly depletes ergosterol levels in Candida albicans. CUR while displaying synergy with fluconazole (FLC) lowers ergosterol. However, CUR alone at its synergistic concentration (lower than MIC50), could not affect ergosterol contents. For deeper insight of CUR effects on lipids, we performed high throughput mass spectroscopy (MS) based lipid profiling of C. albicans cells. The lipidome analysis revealed that there were no major changes in phosphoglycerides (PGLs) composition following CUR treatment of Candida, however, significant differences in molecular species of PGLs were detected. Among major SPLs, CUR treatment resulted in the reduction of ceramide and accumulation of IPCs levels. The lipidome of CUR treated cells confirmed a dramatic drop in the ergosterol levels with a simultaneous accumulation of its biosynthetic precursors. This was further supported by the fact that the mutants defective in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG2 and ERG11) and those lacking the transcription factor regulating ergosterol biosynthesis, UPC2, were highly susceptible to CUR. Our study first time shows that CUR, for its antifungal activity, targets and down regulates delta 5, 6 desaturase (ERG3) resulting in depletion of ergosterol. This results in parallel accumulation of ergosterol biosynthetic precursors, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death. PMID:22201946

  17. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  18. Transgenic evaluation of activated mutant alleles of SOS2 reveals a critical requirement for its kinase activity and C-terminal regulatory domain for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Kang; Quintero-Toscano, Francisco Javier; Pardo-Prieto, Jose Manuel; Qiu, Quansheng; Schumaker, Karen Sue; Ohta, Masaru; Zhang, Changqing; Guo, Yan

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides a method of increasing salt tolerance in a plant by overexpressing a gene encoding a mutant SOS2 protein in at least one cell type in the plant. The present invention also provides for transgenic plants expressing the mutant SOS2 proteins.

  19. Allele Specific p53 Mutant Reactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xin; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J.; Carpizo, Darren R.

    2012-01-01

    Rescuing the function of mutant p53 protein is an attractive cancer therapeutic strategy. Using the NCI anticancer drug screen data, we identified two compounds from the thiosemicarbazone family that manifest increased growth inhibitory activity in mutant p53 cells, particularly for the p53R175 mutant. Mechanistic studies reveal that NSC319726 restores WT structure and function to the p53R175 mutant. This compound kills p53R172H knock-in mice with extensive apoptosis and inhibits xenograft tu...

  20. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant air1 implicates SOS3 in the regulation of anthocyanins under salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Van Oosten, Michael James

    2013-08-08

    The accumulation of anthocyanins in plants exposed to salt stress has been largely documented. However, the functional link and regulatory components underlying the biosynthesis of these molecules during exposure to stress are largely unknown. In a screen of second site suppressors of the salt overly sensitive3-1 (sos3-1) mutant, we isolated the anthocyanin-impaired-response-1 (air1) mutant. air1 is unable to accumulate anthocyanins under salt stress, a key phenotype of sos3-1 under high NaCl levels (120 mM). The air1 mutant showed a defect in anthocyanin production in response to salt stress but not to other stresses such as high light, low phosphorous, high temperature or drought stress. This specificity indicated that air1 mutation did not affect anthocyanin biosynthesis but rather its regulation in response to salt stress. Analysis of this mutant revealed a T-DNA insertion at the first exon of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding for a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor. air1 mutants displayed higher survival rates compared to wild-type in oxidative stress conditions, and presented an altered expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes such as F3H, F3′H and LDOX in salt stress conditions. The results presented here indicate that AIR1 is involved in the regulation of various steps of the flavonoid and anthocyanin accumulation pathways and is itself regulated by the salt-stress response signalling machinery. The discovery and characterization of AIR1 opens avenues to dissect the connections between abiotic stress and accumulation of antioxidants in the form of flavonoids and anthocyanins. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  1. Biosynthetic origin of acetic acid using SNIF-NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work is to describe the use of the technique Site-Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation of hydrogen (SNIF-NMR), using 2H and 1H NMR spectroscopy, to investigate the biosynthetic origin of acetic acid in commercial samples of Brazilian vinegar. This method is based on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio at a specific position (methyl group) of acetic acid obtained by fermentation, through different biosynthetic mechanisms, which result in different isotopic ratios. We measured the isotopic ratio of vinegars obtained through C3, C4, and CAM biosynthetic mechanisms, blends of C3 and C4 (agrins) and synthetic acetic acid. (author)

  2. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  3. Biosynthetic porphyrins and the origin of photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzerall, D.; Ley, A.; Mercer-Smith, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Since the prebiotic atmosphere was anaerobic, if not reducing, a useful function of primordial photosynthesis would have been to photooxidize reduced substrates such as Fe(+2), S(-2) or reduced organic molecules and to emit hydrogen. Experiments have shown that the early biogenic pigments uroporphyrin and coproporphyrin do photooxidize organic compounds and emit hydrogen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. These experiments were carried out in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH under anaerobic atmosphere, and quantum yields near 10-2 were obtained. Thus relevant prebiotic conditions were maintained. Rather then to further optimize conditions, attempts were made to replace the platinum catalyst by a more prebiotically suitable catalyst. Trials with an Fe4S4(SR)4 cluster, in analogy to the present hydrogenase and nitrogenase, were not successful. However, experiments using cobalt complexes to catalyze the formation of hydrogen are promising. In analogy with biological photosynthetic systems which group pigments, electron transfer molecules and enzymes in clusters for efficiency, it was found that binding the biogenic porphyrins to the polyvinyl alcohol used to support the platinum catalyst did increase the quantum yield of the reaction. It was also found that ultraviolet light can serve to photo-oxidize porphyrinogens to porphyrins under anaerobic conditions. Thus the formation of the colorless porphyriogens by the extraordinarily simple biosynthetic pathway would not be a problem because of the prevalence of UV light in the prebiotic, anoxic atmosphere.

  4. Distribution of δ-aminolevulinic acid biosynthetic pathways among phototrophic and related bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two biosynthetic pathways are known for the universal tetrapyrrole precursor, δ-aminolevulinic acid (ALA): condensation of glycine and succinyl-CoA to form ALA with the loss of C-1 of glycine as CO2, and conversion of the intact carbon skeleton of glutamate to ALA in a process requiring tRNAGlu, ATP, Mg2+, NADPH, and pyridoxal phosphate. The distribution of the two ALA biosynthetic pathways among various bacterial genera was determined, using cell-free extracts obtained from representative organisms. Evidence for the operation of the glutamate pathway was obtained by the measurement of RNase-sensitive label incorporation from glutamate into ALA using 3,4-[3H]glutamate and 1-[14C]glutamate as substrate. The glycine pathway was indicated by RNase-insensitive incorporation of level from 2-[14C]glycine into ALA. The distribution of the two pathways among the bacteria tested was in general agreement with their previously phylogenetic relationships and clearly indicates that the glutamate pathway is the more ancient process, whereas the glycine pathway probably evolved much later. The glutamate pathway is the more widely utilized one among bacteria, while the glycine pathway is apparently limited to the α subgroup of purple bacteria (including Rhodobacter, Rhodospirillum, and Rhizobium). E. coli was found ALA via the glutamate pathway. The ALA-requiring hemA mutant of E. coli was determined to lack the dehydrogenase activity that utilizes glutamyl-tRNA as a substrate

  5. A genomics based discovery of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borui Pi

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites (SMs produced by Aspergillus have been extensively studied for their crucial roles in human health, medicine and industrial production. However, the resulting information is almost exclusively derived from a few model organisms, including A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, but little is known about rare pathogens. In this study, we performed a genomics based discovery of SM biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus, a rare human pathogen. A total of 52 gene clusters were identified in the draft genome of A. ustus 3.3904, such as the sterigmatocystin biosynthesis pathway that was commonly found in Aspergillus species. In addition, several SM biosynthetic gene clusters were firstly identified in Aspergillus that were possibly acquired by horizontal gene transfer, including the vrt cluster that is responsible for viridicatumtoxin production. Comparative genomics revealed that A. ustus shared the largest number of SM biosynthetic gene clusters with A. nidulans, but much fewer with other Aspergilli like A. niger and A. oryzae. These findings would help to understand the diversity and evolution of SM biosynthesis pathways in genus Aspergillus, and we hope they will also promote the development of fungal identification methodology in clinic.

  6. Production of the Streptomyces scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins involves a novel biosynthetic pathway with an F420 -dependent oxidoreductase and a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Luke; Altowairish, Mead S; Fyans, Joanna K; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-07-01

    Coronafacoyl phytotoxins are secondary metabolites that are produced by various phytopathogenic bacteria, including several pathovars of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas syringae as well as the Gram-positive potato scab pathogen Streptomyces scabies. The phytotoxins are composed of the polyketide coronafacic acid (CFA) linked via an amide bond to amino acids or amino acid derivatives, and their biosynthesis involves the cfa and cfa-like gene clusters that are found in P. syringae and S. scabies, respectively. The S. scabies cfa-like gene cluster was previously reported to contain several genes that are absent from the P. syringae cfa gene cluster, including one (oxr) encoding a putative F420 -dependent oxidoreductase, and another (sdr) encoding a predicted short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase. Using gene deletion analysis, we demonstrated that both oxr and sdr are required for normal production of the S. scabies coronafacoyl phytotoxins, and structural analysis of metabolites that accumulated in the Δsdr mutant cultures revealed that Sdr is directly involved in the biosynthesis of the CFA moiety. Our results suggest that S. scabies and P. syringae use distinct biosynthetic pathways for producing coronafacoyl phytotoxins, which are important mediators of host-pathogen interactions in various plant pathosystems. PMID:26991928

  7. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Yao; Leopold, Alex L; Sander, Guy W; Shanks, Jacqueline V; Zhao, Le; Gibson, Susan I

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Toward this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a "fine-tune" regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression. PMID:26483828

  8. CrBPF1 overexpression alters transcript levels of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic and regulatory genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Yao eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus is a complex and highly regulated process. Understanding the biochemistry and regulation of the TIA pathway is of particular interest as it may allow the engineering of plants to accumulate higher levels of pharmaceutically important alkaloids. Towards this end, we generated a transgenic C. roseus hairy root line that overexpresses the CrBPF1 transcriptional activator under the control of a β-estradiol inducible promoter. CrBPF1 is a MYB-like protein that was previously postulated to help regulate the expression of the TIA biosynthetic gene STR. However, the role of CrBPF1 in regulation of the TIA and related pathways had not been previously characterized. In this study, transcriptional profiling revealed that overexpression of CrBPF1 results in increased transcript levels for genes from both the indole and terpenoid biosynthetic pathways that provide precursors for TIA biosynthesis, as well as for genes in the TIA biosynthetic pathway. In addition, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increases in the transcript levels for 11 out of 13 genes postulated to act as transcriptional regulators of genes from the TIA and TIA feeder pathways. Interestingly, overexpression of CrBPF1 causes increased transcript levels for both TIA transcriptional activators and repressors. Despite the fact that CrBPF1 overexpression affects transcript levels of a large percentage of TIA biosynthetic and regulatory genes, CrBPF1 overexpression has only very modest effects on the levels of the TIA metabolites analyzed. This finding may be due, at least in part, to the up-regulation of both transcriptional activators and repressors in response to CrBPF1 overexpression, suggesting that CrBPF1 may serve as a fine-tune regulator for TIA biosynthesis, acting to help regulate the timing and amplitude of TIA gene expression.

  9. Biochemical and histological characterization of tomato mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C. Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical responses inherent to antioxidant systems as well morphological and anatomical properties of photomorphogenic, hormonal and developmental tomato mutants were investigated. Compared to the non-mutant Micro-Tom (MT, we observed that the malondialdehyde (MDA content was enhanced in the diageotropica (dgt and lutescent (l mutants, whilst the highest levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were observed in high pigment 1 (hp1 and aurea (au mutants. The analyses of antioxidant enzymes revealed that all mutants exhibited reduced catalase (CAT activity when compared to MT. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX was enhanced in both sitiens (sit and notabilis (not mutants, whereas in not mutant there was an increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Based on PAGE analysis, the activities of glutathione reductase (GR isoforms III, IV, V and VI were increased in l leaves, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoform III was reduced in leaves of sit, epi, Never ripe (Nr and green flesh (gf mutants. Microscopic analyses revealed that hp1 and au showed an increase in leaf intercellular spaces, whereas sit exhibited a decrease. The au and hp1 mutants also exhibited a decreased in the number of leaf trichomes. The characterization of these mutants is essential for their future use in plant development and ecophysiology studies, such as abiotic and biotic stresses on the oxidative metabolism.Neste trabalho, analisamos as respostas bioquímicas inerentes ao sistema antioxidante, assim como propriedades morfológicas e anatômicas de mutantes fotomorfogenéticos e hormonais de tomateiro. Comparados ao não mutante Micro-Tom (MT, observamos que o conteúdo de malondialdeído (MDA aumentou nos mutantes diageotropica (dgt e lutescent (l, enquanto os maiores níveis de H2O2 foram encontrados nos mutantes high pigment 1 (hp1 e aurea (au. Análises de enzimas antioxidantes mostraram que todos os mutantes reduziram a atividade de catalase (CAT quando comparado a MT. A

  10. Induced Dwarf Mutant in Catharanthus roseus with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, A.K.; Singh, R R

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis.

  11. Induced dwarf mutant in Catharanthus roseus with enhanced antibacterial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verma A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis.

  12. Induced Dwarf Mutant in Catharanthus roseus with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Singh, R. R.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis. PMID:21695004

  13. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  14. Comparison of tryptophan biosynthetic operon regulation in different Gram-positive bacterial species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

    2007-09-01

    The tryptophan biosynthetic operon has been widely used as a model system for studying transcription regulation. In Bacillus subtilis, the trp operon is primarily regulated by a tryptophan-activated RNA-binding protein, TRAP. Here we show that in many other Gram-positive species the trp operon is regulated differently, by tRNA(Trp) sensing by the RNA-based T-box mechanism, with T-boxes arranged in tandem. Our analyses reveal an apparent relationship between trp operon organization and the specific regulatory mechanism(s) used. PMID:17555843

  15. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo, E-mail: shinks@dju.kr [Division of Life Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon, 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Biomedical Omics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Ohcang, 368-883 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae-Hyuk, E-mail: jyu1@wisc.edu [Departments of Bacteriology and Genetics, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  16. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

  17. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  18. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  19. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  20. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammeltoft, S.

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-/sup 125/I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity.

  1. Receptor binding of biosynthetic human insulin on isolated pig hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human insulin (BHI) and pancreatic human insulin were compared with respect to receptor binding in a heterologous assay system: displacement of pork A14-125I-monoiodoinsulin from receptors on pig hepatocytes. The concentrations of human insulin giving half-maximal displacement were identical for both preparations, i.e., 0.5 nM. Their relative potency was 1.01 +/- 0.14 (SD, N . 5), suggesting that biosynthetic and pancreatic human insulin exert the same biologic activity

  2. Characterization of the biosynthetic operon for the antibacterial peptide herbicolin in Pantoea vagans biocontrol strain C9-1 and incidence in Pantoea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamber, Tim; Lansdell, Theresa A; Stockwell, Virginia O; Ishimaru, Carol A; Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2012-06-01

    Pantoea vagans C9-1 is a biocontrol strain that produces at least two antibiotics inhibiting the growth of Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight disease of pear and apple. One antibiotic, herbicolin I, was purified from culture filtrates of P. vagans C9-1 and determined to be 2-amino-3-(oxirane-2,3-dicarboxamido)-propanoyl-valine, also known as N(ß)-epoxysuccinamoyl-DAP-valine. A plasposon library was screened for mutants that had lost the ability to produce herbicolin I. It was shown that mutants had reduced biocontrol efficacy in immature pear assays. The biosynthetic gene cluster in P. vagans C9-1 was identified by sequencing the flanking regions of the plasposon insertion sites. The herbicolin I biosynthetic gene cluster consists of 10 coding sequences (CDS) and is located on the 166-kb plasmid pPag2. Sequence comparisons identified orthologous gene clusters in Pantoea agglomerans CU0119 and Serratia proteamaculans 568. A low incidence of detection of the biosynthetic cluster in a collection of 45 Pantoea spp. from biocontrol, environmental, and clinical origins showed that this is a rare trait among the tested strains. PMID:22504810

  3. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-07-10

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD(+) synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. PMID:26018082

  4. Dual responsive physical networks from asymmetric biosynthetic triblock copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.H.T.

    2013-01-01

      The aim of the project is to develop biosynthetically produced amino acid polymers which are composed of three distinct blocks A-C-B, each with a separate function. A is a first self-assembling block capable of ‘recognizing’ (upon a trigger) other A blocks; C is an inert, random

  5. Refinement of the manumycin-type antibiotics biosynthetic model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petříček, Miroslav; Yu, T.-W.; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Petříčková, Kateřina; Krištůfek, Václav

    Newcastle upon Tyne: International Commitee, UK body, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, 2007. s. 167. [International Symposium on the Biology of Actinomycetes /14./. 26.08.2007-30.08.2007, The Sage Gateshead] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : manumycin-type antibiotics * biosynthetic model Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  6. Variation in the Trichothecene Mycotoxin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are produced by some plant pathogenic species of the fungus Fusarium and can contribute to its virulence on some plants. In Fusarium graminearum and F. sporotrichioides trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes are encoded at three loci: the single-gene TRI101 locus; the two-gene ...

  7. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...

  8. Functional characterization of the vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme UBIAD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yoshihisa; Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natsumi; Okuda, Naoko; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Uchino, Yuri; Kimoto, Takashi; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Kamao, Maya; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein 1 (UBIAD1) plays a significant role in vitamin K2 (MK-4) synthesis. We investigated the enzymological properties of UBIAD1 using microsomal fractions from Sf9 cells expressing UBIAD1 by analysing MK-4 biosynthetic activity. With regard to UBIAD1 enzyme reaction conditions, highest MK-4 synthetic activity was demonstrated under basic conditions at a pH between 8.5 and 9.0, with a DTT ≥0.1 mM. In addition, we found that geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate were also recognized as a side-chain source and served as a substrate for prenylation. Furthermore, lipophilic statins were found to directly inhibit the enzymatic activity of UBIAD1. We analysed the aminoacid sequences homologies across the menA and UbiA families to identify conserved structural features of UBIAD1 proteins and focused on four highly conserved domains. We prepared protein mutants deficient in the four conserved domains to evaluate enzyme activity. Because no enzyme activity was detected in the mutants deficient in the UBIAD1 conserved domains, these four domains were considered to play an essential role in enzymatic activity. We also measured enzyme activities using point mutants of the highly conserved aminoacids in these domains to elucidate their respective functions. We found that the conserved domain I is a substrate recognition site that undergoes a structural change after substrate binding. The conserved domain II is a redox domain site containing a CxxC motif. The conserved domain III is a hinge region important as a catalytic site for the UBIAD1 enzyme. The conserved domain IV is a binding site for Mg2+/isoprenyl side-chain. In this study, we provide a molecular mapping of the enzymological properties of UBIAD1. PMID:25874989

  9. Mutagenesis as a Functional Genomics Platform for Pharmaceutical Alkaloid Biosynthetic Gene Discovery in Opium Poppy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) accumulates the analgesic benzyl-isoquinoline alkaloids morphine, codeine and thebaine, and remains one of the world's most important medicinal plants. The development of varieties that accumulate valuable compounds, such as thebaine and codeine, but not morphine precludes the illicit synthesis of heroin (O,O-diacetylmorphine) and has led to the establishment of alternative cash crops. Novel cDNAs encoding a growing number of biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated, and various -omics resources including EST databases and DNA microarray chips have been established. However, the full potential of functional genomics as a tool for gene discovery in opium poppy remains limited by the relative inefficiency of genetic transformation protocols, which also restricts the application of metabolic engineering for both experimental and commercial purposes. We are establishing an effective functional genomics initiative based on induced mutagenesis and recently developed reverse genetics methodology, such as TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes), with the aim of identifying biosynthetic genes that can be used to engineer opium poppy for the production of copious levels of high-value pharmaceutical alkaloids. Mutagenesis involves the treatment of seeds with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or by fast-neutron bombardment (FNB). In preliminary experiments with EMS-treated seeds, the screening of 1,250 independent M2 plants led to the isolation of four mutants that displayed two distinctly altered alkaloid profiles. Two lines accumulated the central pathway intermediate reticuline and relatively low levels of morphine, codeine and thebaine compared to wild-type plants. Two other lines showed the unusual accumulation in the latex of the antimicrobial alkaloid sanguinarine, which is the product of a branch pathway distinct from that leading to morphine. The present status of -omics resources and functional genomics platforms available to

  10. Mutagenesis as a functional genomics platform for pharmaceutical alkaloid biosynthetic gene discovery in opium poppy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) accumulates the analgesic alkaloids morphine, codeine and thebaine, and remains one of the world's most important medicinal plants. The development of varieties that accumulate valuable compounds, such as thebaine and codeine, but not morphine precludes the illicit synthesis of heroin (O,O-diacetylmorphine) and has created opportunities to establish alternative cash crops. Novel cDNAs encoding more than a dozen biosynthetic enzymes have been isolated, and substantial EST databases and DNA microarray chips have been established. The full potential of functional genomics as a tool for gene discovery in opium poppy remains limited by the relative inefficiency of genetic transformation protocols, which also restricts the application of metabolic engineering for both experimental and commercial purposes. We are establishing an effective functional genomics initiative based on induced mutagenesis and TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) and with the aim of identifying biosynthetic genes that can be used to engineer opium poppy to produce copious levels of high-value pharmaceutical alkaloids. Mutagenesis involves the treatment of seeds by fast-neutron bombardment (FNB) or with ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). Mutagenized opium poppy plants are cultivated in a secure underground growth facility in partnership with a Canadian biotechnology company. In preliminary experiments with EMS-treated seeds, the screening of 1,250 independent M2 plants led to the isolation of four mutants that displayed two distinctly altered alkaloid profiles. Two lines accumulated the central pathway intermediate (S)- reticuline and only low levels of morphine, codeine and thebaine. Two other lines showed the unusual accumulation of the antimicrobial alkaloid sanguinarine, which is the product of a branch pathway distinct from that leading to morphine, in the latex. The present status of -omics resources and functional genomics platforms available to

  11. Biosynthesis of Antibiotic Leucinostatins in Bio-control Fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum and Their Inhibition on Phytophthora Revealed by Genome Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erfeng; Mao, Zhenchuan; Ling, Jian; Yang, Yuhong; Yin, Wen-Bing; Xie, Bingyan

    2016-01-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum of Ophiocordycipitaceae is one of the most promising and commercialized agents for controlling plant parasitic nematodes, as well as other insects and plant pathogens. However, how the fungus functions at the molecular level remains unknown. Here, we sequenced two isolates (PLBJ-1 and PLFJ-1) of P. lilacinum from different places Beijing and Fujian. Genomic analysis showed high synteny of the two isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis indicated they were most related to the insect pathogen Tolypocladium inflatum. A comparison with other species revealed that this fungus was enriched in carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), proteases and pathogenesis related genes. Whole genome search revealed a rich repertoire of secondary metabolites (SMs) encoding genes. The non-ribosomal peptide synthetase LcsA, which is comprised of ten C-A-PCP modules, was identified as the core biosynthetic gene of lipopeptide leucinostatins, which was specific to P. lilacinum and T. ophioglossoides, as confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, gene expression level was analyzed when PLBJ-1 was grown in leucinostatin-inducing and non-inducing medium, and 20 genes involved in the biosynthesis of leucionostatins were identified. Disruption mutants allowed us to propose a putative biosynthetic pathway of leucinostatin A. Moreover, overexpression of the transcription factor lcsF increased the production (1.5-fold) of leucinostatins A and B compared to wild type. Bioassays explored a new bioactivity of leucinostatins and P. lilacinum: inhibiting the growth of Phytophthora infestans and P. capsici. These results contribute to our understanding of the biosynthetic mechanism of leucinostatins and may allow us to utilize P. lilacinum better as bio-control agent. PMID:27416025

  12. Biosynthetic Functional Gene Analysis of Bis-Indole Metabolites from 25D7, a Clone Derived from a Deep-Sea Sediment Metagenomic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xia; Tang, Xi-Xiang; Qin, Dan; Yi, Zhi-Wei; Fang, Mei-Juan; Wu, Zhen; Qiu, Ying-Kun

    2016-01-01

    This work investigated the metabolites and their biosynthetic functional hydroxylase genes of the deep-sea sediment metagenomic clone 25D7. 5-Bromoindole was added to the 25D7 clone derived Escherichia coli fermentation broth. The new-generated metabolites and their biosynthetic byproducts were located through LC-MS, in which the isotope peaks of brominated products emerged. Two new brominated bis-indole metabolites, 5-bromometagenediindole B (1), and 5-bromometagenediindole C (2) were separated under the guidance of LC-MS. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectra (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC). The biosynthetic functional genes of the two new compounds were revealed through LC-MS and transposon mutagenesis analysis. 5-Bromometagenediindole B (1) also demonstrated moderately cytotoxic activity against MCF7, B16, CNE2, Bel7402, and HT1080 tumor cell lines in vitro. PMID:27258289

  13. A transcript profiling approach reveals an abscisic acid-specific glycosyltransferase (UGT73C14 induced in developing fiber of Ligon lintless-2 mutant of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew K Gilbert

    Full Text Available Ligon lintless-2, a monogenic dominant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. fiber mutation, causing extreme reduction in lint fiber length with no pleiotropic effects on vegetative growth, represents an excellent model system to study fiber elongation. A UDP-glycosyltransferase that was highly expressed in developing fibers of the mutant Ligon lintless-2 was isolated. The predicted amino acid sequence showed ~53% similarity with Arabidopsis UGT73C sub-family members and the UDP-glycosyltransferase was designated as UGT73C14. When expressed in Escherichia coli as a recombinant protein with a maltose binding protein tag, UGT73C14 displayed enzymatic activity toward ABA and utilized UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose as the sugar donors. The recombinant UGT73C14 converted natural occurring isoform (+-cis, trans-ABA better than (+-trans, trans-ABA and (--cis, trans-ABA. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants constitutively overexpressing UGT73C14 did not show phenotypic changes under standard growth conditions. However, the increased glycosylation of ABA resulted in phenotypic changes in post-germinative growth and seedling establishment, confirming in vivo activity of UGT73C14 for ABA. This suggests that the expression level of UGT73C14 is regulated by the observed elevated levels of ABA in developing fibers of the Li 2 mutant line and may be involved in the regulation of ABA homeostasis.

  14. Expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in developing endosperm of Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Keyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal and spatial expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes are associated with the accumulation of storage lipids in the seeds of oil plants. In jatropha (Jatropha curcas L., a potential biofuel plant, the storage lipids are mainly synthesized and accumulated in the endosperm of seeds. Although the fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha have been identified, the expression of these genes at different developing stages of endosperm has not been systemically investigated. Results Transmission electron microscopy study revealed that the oil body formation in developing endosperm of jatropha seeds initially appeared at 28 days after fertilization (DAF, was actively developed at 42 DAF and reached to the maximum number and size at 56 DAF. Sixty-eight genes that encode enzymes, proteins or their subunits involved in fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis were identified from a normalized cDNA library of jatropha developing endosperm. Gene expression with quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the 68 genes could be collectively grouped into five categories based on the patterns of relative expression of the genes during endosperm development. Category I has 47 genes and they displayed a bell-shaped expression pattern with the peak expression at 28 or 42 DAF, but low expression at 14 and 56 DAF. Category II contains 8 genes and expression of the 8 genes was constantly increased from 14 to 56 DAF. Category III comprises of 2 genes and both genes were constitutively expressed throughout endosperm development. Category IV has 9 genes and they showed a high expression at 14 and 28 DAF, but a decreased expression from 42 to 56 DAF. Category V consists of 2 genes and both genes showed a medium expression at 14 DAF, the lowest expression at 28 or 42 DAF, and the highest expression at 56 DAF. In addition, genes encoding enzymes or proteins with similar function were

  15. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohito Yoshida

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase, the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed.

  16. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed. PMID:27187420

  17. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Yotsu-Yamashita, Mari; Mizutani, Masaharu; Seki, Hikaru; Saito, Kazuki; Muranaka, Toshiya

    2016-08-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  18. Structure determination and interception of biosynthetic intermediates for the plantazolicin class of highly discriminating antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molohon, Katie J; Melby, Joel O; Lee, Jaeheon; Evans, Bradley S; Dunbar, Kyle L; Bumpus, Stefanie B; Kelleher, Neil L; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2011-12-16

    The soil-dwelling, plant growth-promoting bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 is a prolific producer of complex natural products. Recently, a new FZB42 metabolite, plantazolicin (PZN), has been described as a member of the growing thiazole/oxazole-modified microcin (TOMM) family. TOMMs are biosynthesized from inactive, ribosomal peptides and undergo a series of cyclodehydrations, dehydrogenations, and other modifications to become bioactive natural products. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry, chemoselective modification, genetic interruptions, and other spectroscopic tools, we have determined the molecular structure of PZN. In addition to two conjugated polyazole moieties, the amino-terminus of PZN has been modified to N(α),N(α)-dimethylarginine. PZN exhibited a highly selective antibiotic activity toward Bacillus anthracis, but no other tested human pathogen. By altering oxygenation levels during fermentation, PZN analogues were produced that bear variability in their heterocycle content, which yielded insight into the order of biosynthetic events. Lastly, genome-mining has revealed the existence of four additional PZN-like biosynthetic gene clusters. Given their structural uniqueness and intriguing antimicrobial specificity, the PZN class of antibiotics may hold pharmacological value. PMID:21950656

  19. Accessing natural product biosynthetic processes by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumpus, Stefanie B; Kelleher, Neil L

    2008-10-01

    Two important classes of natural products are made by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs). With most biosynthetic intermediates covalently tethered during biogenesis, protein mass spectrometry (MS) has proven invaluable for their interrogation. New mass spectrometric assay formats (such as selective cofactor ejection and proteomics style LC-MS) are showcased here in the context of functional insights into new breeds of NRPS/PKS enzymes, including the first characterization of an 'iterative' PKS, the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotics, the study of a new strategy for PKS initiation via a GNAT-like mechanism, and the analysis of branching strategies in the so-called 'AT-less' NRPS/PKS hybrid systems. The future of MS analysis of NRPS and PKS biosynthetic pathways lies in adoption and development of methods that continue bridging enzymology with proteomics as both fields continue their post-genomic acceleration. PMID:18706516

  20. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  1. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mie Bech Lukassen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine. Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS2, a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster.

  2. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukassen, Mie Bech; Saei, Wagma; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Tamminen, Anu; Kumar, Abhishek; Kempken, Frank; Wiebe, Marilyn G; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-07-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1), a polyketide synthase (PKS2), a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster. PMID:26184239

  3. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism are coordina...... of these amino acids for targeted stress-tolerant enzyme bioengineering.......Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA Mutants Implicate GAUT Genes in the Biosynthesis of Pectin and Xylan in Cell Walls and Seed Testa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerry H. Caffall; Sivakumar Pattathil; Sarah E. Phillips; Michael G. Hahn; Debra Mohnen

    2009-01-01

    Galacturonosyltransferase 1 (GAUT1) is an α1,4-D-galacturonosyltransferase that transfers galacturonic acid from uridine 5'-diphosphogalacturonic acid onto the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan (Sterling et al., 2006). The 25-member Arabidopsis thaliana GAUT1-related gene family encodes 15 GAUT and 10 GAUT-like (GATL) proteins with, respectively, 56-84 and 42-53% amino acid sequence similarity to GAUT1. Previous phylogenetic analyses of AtGAUTs indicated three clades: A through C. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis, poplar and rice GAUT families has sub-classified the GAUTs into seven clades: clade A-1 (GAUTs 1 to 3); A-2 (GAUT4); A-3 (GAUTs 5 and 6); A-4 (GAUT7); B-1(GAUTs 8 and 9); B-2 (GAUTs 10 and 11); and clade C (GAUTs 12 to 15). The Arabidopsis GAUTs have a distribution com-parable to the poplar orthologs, with the exception of GAUT2, which is absent in poplar. Rice, however, has no orthologs of GAUTs 2 and 12 and has multiple apparent orthologs of GAUTs 1, 4, and 7 compared with eitherArabidopsis or poplar. The cell wall glycosyl residue compositions of 26 homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for 13 of 15 Arabidopsis GAUTgenes reveal significantly and reproducibly different cell walls in specific tissues of gaut mutants 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 from that of wild-type Arabidopsis walls. Pectin and xylan polysaccharides are affected by the loss of GAUT function, as dem-onstrated by the altered galacturonic acid, xylose, rhamnose, galactose, and arabinose composition of distinct gaut mu-tant walls. The wall glycosyl residue compositional phenotypes observed among the gaut mutants suggest that at least six different biosynthetic linkages in pectins and/or xylans are affected by the lesions in these GAUTgenes. Evidence is also presented to support a role for GAUT11 in seed mucilage expansion and in seed wall and mucilage composition.

  5. Pictet–Spengler reaction-based biosynthetic machinery in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wei; Ge, Hui Ming; Wang, Gang; Jiang, Nan; Mei, Ya Ning; Jiang, Rong; Li, Sui Jun; Chen, Chao Jun; Jiao, Rui Hua; Xu, Qiang; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The Pictet–Spengler (PS) reaction constructs many important phytochemicals such as morphine and camptothecin, but it has not yet been noticed in the fungal kingdom. Here, the startup of the PS reaction-based silent fungal biosynthetic machinery is presented to generate unforeseeably “unnatural” natural products of unprecedented carbon skeletons with antibacterial and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities. The gene-implied enzyme inhibition strategy is introduced to facilitate understandi...

  6. Enhancement of epidermal regeneration by biosynthetic epidermal growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal regeneration depends on mitosis and migration of keratinocytes. Epidermal growth factor is known to stimulate growth of keratinocytes in vitro, thus it might be expected to promote wound healing. The results of this study show that topical application of biosynthetic human epidermal growth factor accelerates epidermal regeneration in split-thickness wounds and partial-thickness burns. The significant enhancement of epidermal regeneration suggests the potential for clinical use of ep...

  7. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

    OpenAIRE

    Mie Bech Lukassen; Wagma Saei; Teis Esben Sondergaard; Anu Tamminen; Abhishek Kumar; Frank Kempken; Wiebe, Marilyn G.; Jens Laurids Sørensen

    2015-01-01

    Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl) attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine). Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus n...

  8. The cobalamin (coenzyme B12) biosynthetic genes of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, J. G.; Roth, J R

    1995-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Escherichia coli synthesizes cobalamin (coenzyme B12) only when provided with the complex intermediate cobinamide. Three cobalamin biosynthetic genes have been cloned from Escherichia coli K-12, and their nucleotide sequences have been determined. The three genes form an operon (cob) under the control of several promoters and are induced by cobinamide, a precursor of cobalamin. The cob operon of E. coli comprises the cobU gene, encoding the bifunctional cobinamide kinase...

  9. THE CAROTENOID BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY: THINKING IN ALL DIMENSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2013-01-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signalling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavour of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and...

  10. Biosynthetic origin of mycobacterial cell wall arabinosyl residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Scherman, M.; Weston, A; Duncan, K; Whittington, A; Upton, R; Deng, L.; Comber, R; Friedrich, J D; McNeil, M

    1995-01-01

    Designing new drugs that inhibit the biosynthesis of the D-arabinan moiety of the mycobacterial cell wall arabinogalactan is one important basic approach for treatment of mycobacterial diseases. However, the biosynthetic origin of the D-arabinosyl monosaccharide residues themselves is not known. To obtain information on this issue, mycobacteria growing in culture were fed glucose labeled with 14C or 3H in specific positions. The resulting radiolabeled cell walls were isolated and hydrolyzed, ...

  11. Productive mutants of niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeds of six niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass.) varieties ('GA-10', 'ONS-8', 'IGP-72', 'N-71', 'NB-9' and 'UN-4') were treated with 0.5, 0.75 and 1% ethyl methanesulphonate. After four generations of selection, 29 mutant lines were developed and those were evaluated from 1990-92 during Kharif (July to October) and Rabi (December to March) seasons. Average plant characteristics and yield data of four high yielding mutants along with 'IGP-76' (National Check), GA-10 (Zonal Check) and 'Semiliguda Local' (Local Check) are presented

  12. Metabolite profiling of induced mutants of rice and soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study objects of the investigation were two low phytic acid (lpa) rice (Os-lpa-XS110-1, Os-lpa-XS110-2) and soybean (Gm-lpa-TW-75-1, Gm-lpa-ZC-2) mutants generated by irradiation. The aim was to compare these mutants to the corresponding wild-types by means of capillary gas chromatography metabolite profiling and to explore the usefulness of this approach to assist in the elucidation of the types of mutation resulting in the reduced contents of phytic acid. Metabolite profiling aspires to provide a comprehensive picture of the metabolites present in biological systems. It aims at extracting, detecting, identifying, and quantifying a broad spectrum of compounds in a single sample to provide a deeper insight into complex biological systems. The extraction and fractionation method used in the study allowed a comprehensive coverage of a broad spectrum of low molecular weight metabolites ranging from lipophilic (fatty acids methyl esters, hydrocarbons, free fatty acids, sterols, tocopherols) to hydrophilic (sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, amino acids) compounds. For rice, considerable amounts of the peaks detected were statistically significantly different between wild-types and lpa mutants within one field trial. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed in all analyzed field trials indicating a strong influence of the biological variability. Metabolites shown to be consistently statistically significantly different between wild-type and lpa rice mutants were found to be closely related to the biogenetic pathways leading to phytic acid. This allowed a prediction of the mutation targets for the lpa rice mutants in the biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid. Similar effects, e.g. clustering of wild-types and lpa mutants on the basis of metabolite profiling data, were observed for soybean. (author)

  13. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci: evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway that converts tryptophan to PRN is composed of four genes, prnA through D, whose diversity, genomic context and spread over bacterial genomes are poorly understood. Therefore, we launched an endeavour aimed at retrieving, by in vitro and in silico means, diverse bacteria carrying the prnABCD biosynthetic loci in their genomes. Analysis of polymorphisms of the prnD gene sequences revealed a high level of conservation between Burkholderia, Pseudomonas and Serratia spp. derived sequences. Whole-operon- and prnD-based phylogeny resulted in tree topologies that are incongruent with the taxonomic status of the evaluated strains as predicted by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny. The genomic composition of c. 20 kb DNA fragments containing the PRN operon varied in different strains. Highly conserved and distinct transposase-encoding genes surrounding the PRN biosynthetic operons of Burkholderia pseudomallei strains were found. A prnABCD-deprived genomic region in B. pseudomallei strain K96243 contained the same gene composition as, and shared high homology with, the flanking regions of the PRN operon in B. pseudomallei strains 668, 1106a and 1710b. Our results strongly suggest that the PRN biosynthetic operon is mobile. The extent, frequency and promiscuity of this mobility remain to be understood. PMID:18793314

  14. Analysis of canthaxanthin and related pigments from Gordonia jacobaea mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, T; Sieiro, C; Poza, M; Villa, T G

    2001-03-01

    A collection of 43 mutant strains of the bacterium Gordonia jacobaea was obtained by means of ethyl methanesulfonate treatment, and the strains were selected for their different pigmentation with respect to the wild-type strain. None of the mutants showed auxotrophy. They all showed good genetic stability and a growth rate similar to that of the parental strain. Canthaxanthin and other carotenoids from these mutants were extracted with acetone and ethanol and separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These HPLC analyses, together with spectrophotometric detection at 480 nm, revealed variations in the pigment contents of the different mutant strains. PMID:11312835

  15. A biosynthetic model of cytochrome c oxidase as an electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sohini; Mukherjee, Arnab; Bhagi-Damodaran, Ambika; Mukherjee, Manjistha; Lu, Yi; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    Creating an artificial functional mimic of the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) has been a long-term goal of the scientific community as such a mimic will not only add to our fundamental understanding of how CcO works but may also pave the way for efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells. Here we develop an electrocatalyst for reducing oxygen to water under ambient conditions. We use site-directed mutants of myoglobin, where both the distal Cu and the redox-active tyrosine residue present in CcO are modelled. In situ Raman spectroscopy shows that this catalyst features very fast electron transfer rates, facile oxygen binding and O–O bond lysis. An electron transfer shunt from the electrode circumvents the slow dissociation of a ferric hydroxide species, which slows down native CcO (bovine 500 s−1), allowing electrocatalytic oxygen reduction rates of 5,000 s−1 for these biosynthetic models. PMID:26455726

  16. Generation of the natamycin analogs by gene engineering of natamycin biosynthetic genes in Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui-Ping; Yuan, Peng-Hui; Wang, Yue-Yue; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Zhou, Zhen-Xing; Bu, Qing-ting; Yu, Pin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-04-01

    The polyene antibiotic natamycin is widely used as an antifungal agent in both human therapy and the food industry. Here we obtained four natamycin analogs with high titers, including two new compounds, by engineering of six post-polyketide synthase (PKS) tailoring enzyme encoding genes in a natamycin industrial producing strain, Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10. Precise analysis of S. chattanoogensis L10 culture identified natamycin and two natamycin analogs, 4,5-deepoxy-natamycin and 4,5-deepoxy-natamycinolide. The scnD deletion mutant of S. chattanoogensis L10 did not produce natamycin but increased the titer of 4,5-deepoxy-natamycin. Inactivation of each of scnK, scnC, and scnJ in S. chattanoogensis L10 abolished natamycin production and accumulated 4,5-deepoxy-natamycinolide. Deletion of scnG in S. chattanoogensis L10 resulted in production of two new compounds, 4,5-deepoxy-12-decarboxyl-12-methyl-natamycin and its dehydration product without natamycin production. Inactivation of the ScnG-associated ferredoxin ScnF resulted in impaired production of natamycin. Bioassay of these natamycin analogs showed that three natamycin analogs remained antifungal activities. We found that homologous glycosyltransferases genes including amphDI and nysDI can partly complement the ΔscnK mutant. Our results here also support that ScnG, ScnK, and ScnD catalyze carboxylation, glycosylation, and epoxidation in turn in the natamycin biosynthetic pathway. Thus this paper provided a method to generate natamycin analogs and shed light on the natamycin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:25801968

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  18. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin eWu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5, deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation.

  19. Serrated leaf mutant in mungbean (Vigna radiata (L) Wilczek)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry dormant seeds of mungbean (Vigna radiata (L) Wilczek) were treated with gamma rays (15, 30 and 60 kR). The serrated leaf mutation was noticed in M2 of cultivar Pak 32 treated with 60 kR. Cf 14 plants, 3 showed the altered leaf structure and the others were normal. The feature of this mutant was the deep serration of leaflet margins. The mutant had large thick leaflets with prominent venation. The mutant bred true in the M3 and successive generation. Details of the morphological characteristics of the mutant are presented. The mutant exhibited slower growth particularly during the early stages of development, flowered later and attained shorter height. There was an increase in the number of pods, in seed weight and in seed protein content, but number of seed per pod was considerably reduced. The seed coat colour showed a change from green to yellowish green. In the mutant's flowers the stamina were placed much below the stigma level and the stigma sometimes protruded the corolla. Outcrossing of 4% recorded in some of the mutant lines revealed a reduced cleistogamy. The low number of seeds per pod in the mutant could be due to reduced pollen fertility. The mutant behaved as monogenic recessive. The symbols SL/sl are proposed for this allelic pair. The mutant may have use as a green manure crop because of its large foliage and for the breeders as a genetic marker

  20. Development of high yielding mutants in lentil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) locally known as Masoor, is the second most important rabi pulse crop, after chickpea, in Pakistan. It is cultivated on an area of over 63,400 ha, which constitutes about 4.83% of the total area under pulses. The annual production of the crop is 28,200 tones with an average yield of 445 kg/ha. Yield at the national level is very low, about one-half of the world's yield, which is mainly due to non-availability of high yield potential genotypes. Keeping in view the importance of mutants in developing a large number of new varieties, an induced mutations programme was initiated at AEARC, Tandojam during 1987-88, to develop high yielding varieties in lentil. For this, seeds of two lentil varieties, 'Masoor-85' and 'ICARDA-8' had been irradiated with gamma-rays ranging from 100-600 Gy in NIAB, Faisalabad during 1990. Selections were made in M2 on the basis of earliness, plant height, branches/plant and 100 grain weight. After confirming these mutants in M3 they were promoted in station yield trials and studied continuously for three consecutive years (1993- 1995). Overall results revealed that these mutants have consistent improvement of earliness in flowering and maturity. Plant height also increased in all mutant lines except AEL 23/40/91 where reduction in this attribute was observed as compared to parent variety. Mutant lines AEL 49/20/91 and AEL 13/30/91 showed improvement in 100 grain weight. The improvement of some agronomic characters enhanced the yield of mutant lines in comparison to parent varieties (Masoor-85 and ICARDA-8). The diversity in yield over the respective parents was computed from 6.94 to 60.12%. From these encouraging results it is hoped that mutant lines like AEL 12/30/91 and AEL 49/20/91 may serve as potential lentil genotypes in future. (author)

  1. THE MUTANT STRAINS OF MICROORGANISMS ‒ PRODUCERS OF LYSINE AND THREONINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. S. Andriiash

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Strains-producers of essential amino acids of aspartate family such as Corynebacterium glutamicum, Brevibacterium flavum, Brevibacterium sp. 90, Brevibacterium sp. 90H, Brevibacterium sp. E531 from «Collections strains and lines of plants for food and agricultural biotechnology» of «Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine» for biosynthetic activity for lysine and threonine were investigated. Active strains-producers of amino acids were obtained after UV irradiation, biological characteristics of these organisms were studied and their biosynthetic efficiency was estimated. New mutant strains of threonine and lysine were selected using analysis of regulatory and analogorezistent auxotrophy. Sensitivity of output and mutant strain-producers to penicillins, macrolides, cephalosporins, tetracyclines, and other groups of antibiotics was investigated. Biosynthetic activity of obtained threonine producers – Brevibacterium flavum IMВ B-7446 and lysine – Brevibacterium sp. IMВ B-7447 on the production of target amino acids was determined. Strains are deposited in the «National Depository microorganisms» of the Institute of Microbiology and Virology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine.

  2. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  3. Morphological mutants of garlic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, A.D.; Dnyansagar, V.R. (Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Botany)

    1982-01-01

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativuum Linn.) were exposed to gamma rays with various doses and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (dES) and ethylene imine (EI). In the second and third generations, 16 types of morphological mutants were recorded with varied frequencies. Of all the mutagens used, gamma rays were found to be the most effective in inducing the maximum number of mutations followed EI, EMS and dES in that order.

  4. Morphological mutants of garlic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloves of garlic (Allium sativuum Linn.) were exposed to gamma rays with various doses and different concentrations of ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS), diethyl sulphate (dES) and ethylene imine (EI). In the second and third generations, 16 types of morphological mutants were recorded with varied frequencies. Of all the mutagens used, gamma rays were found to be the most effective in inducing the maximum number of mutations followed EI, EMS and dES in that order. (author)

  5. Irradiation of mutants of rose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced Reddish-orange (R) and Pink (P) flowered mutants of the rose cultivar Montezuma were subjected to a second treatment of gamma radiation. Effects of this treatment were recorded on bud-take, growth, survival, flowering and essential oil content. The P mutant was more radiosensitive than the R mutant. The occurrence of certain early flowering and flower yielding plants in the latter mutant proved the efficiency of this technique for inducing genetic variability in garden roses. (author)

  6. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EricCBeyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  7. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...... of the IPNS by glutathione. The model predicted flux through the pathway corresponds well with the measured rate of penicillin biosynthesis. From the kinetic model the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients are calculated throughout a fed-batch cultivation, and it is found that...

  8. Dual responsive physical networks from asymmetric biosynthetic triblock copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    T.H.T Pham

    2013-01-01

      The aim of the project is to develop biosynthetically produced amino acid polymers which are composed of three distinct blocks A-C-B, each with a separate function. A is a first self-assembling block capable of ‘recognizing’ (upon a trigger) other A blocks; C is an inert, random coil-like connector, and B is a second self-assembling block. A and B have to be chosen such that they do not cross-assemble. With these molecules it should be possible to fabricate hydrogels in whi...

  9. Metabolite Profiling of Induced Mutants of Rice and Soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The low phytic acid (lpa) rice (Os-lpa-XS110-1, Os-lpa-XS110-2) and soybean (Gm-lpa-TW-75-1, Gm-lpa-ZC-2) mutants generated by γ-irradiation were studied, aimed at comparing these mutants to the corresponding wild-types by means of metabolite profiling based on capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The usefulness of this approach to assist in the elucidation of the types of mutation resulting in reduced contents of phytic acid should be explored. Metabolite profiling aspires to provide a comprehensive picture of the metabolites present in biological systems. It aims at extracting, detecting, identifying, and quantifying a broad spectrum of compounds in a single sample, to provide a deeper insight into complex biological systems. The extraction and fractionation method used allowed a comprehensive coverage of a broad spectrum of low molecular weight metabolites ranging from lipophilic (fatty acids methyl esters, hydrocarbons, free fatty acids, sterols, tocopherols) to hydrophilic (sugars, sugar alcohols, organic acids, amino acids) compounds. For rice, considerable amounts of the peaks detected were statistically significantly different between wild-types and lpa mutants grown in the same field trial. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed in all analyzed field trials, indicating a strong influence of the biological variability. Metabolites consistently shown to be significantly different between wild-type and lpa rice mutants, were found to be closely related to the biogenetic pathways leading to phytic acid. This allowed a prediction of the mutation targets for the lpa rice mutants in the biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid. Similar effects, i.e. statistically significantly different levels of metabolites closely related to the biosynthesis of phytic acid, were consistently observed for soybean. (author)

  10. Insights into the evolution of macrolactam biosynthesis through cloning and comparative analysis of the biosynthetic gene cluster for a novel macrocyclic lactam, ML-449.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hanne; Degnes, Kristin F; Dikiy, Alexander; Fjaervik, Espen; Klinkenberg, Geir; Zotchev, Sergey B

    2010-01-01

    A new compound, designated ML-449, structurally similar to the known 20-membered macrolactam BE-14106, was isolated from a marine sediment-derived Streptomyces sp. Cloning and sequencing of the 83-kb ML-449 biosynthetic gene cluster revealed its high level of similarity to the BE-14106 gene cluster. Comparison of the respective biosynthetic pathways indicated that the difference in the compounds' structures stems from the incorporation of one extra acetate unit during the synthesis of the acyl side chain. A phylogenetic analysis of the beta-ketosynthase (KS) domains from polyketide synthases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolactams pointed to a common ancestry for the two clusters. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrated the formation of a macrolactam-specific subclade for the majority of the KS domains from several macrolactam-biosynthetic gene clusters, indicating a closer relationship between macrolactam clusters than with the macrolactone clusters included in the analysis. Some KS domains from the ML-449, BE-14106, and salinilactam gene clusters did, however, show a closer relationship with KS domains from the polyene macrolide clusters, suggesting potential acquisition rather than duplication of certain PKS genes. Comparison of the ML-449, BE-14106, vicenistatin, and salinilactam biosynthetic gene clusters indicated an evolutionary relationship between them and provided new insights into the processes governing the evolution of small-ring macrolactam biosynthesis. PMID:19854930

  11. Insights into the Evolution of Macrolactam Biosynthesis through Cloning and Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Cluster for a Novel Macrocyclic Lactam, ML-449 ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hanne; Degnes, Kristin F.; Dikiy, Alexander; Fjærvik, Espen; Klinkenberg, Geir; Zotchev, Sergey B.

    2010-01-01

    A new compound, designated ML-449, structurally similar to the known 20-membered macrolactam BE-14106, was isolated from a marine sediment-derived Streptomyces sp. Cloning and sequencing of the 83-kb ML-449 biosynthetic gene cluster revealed its high level of similarity to the BE-14106 gene cluster. Comparison of the respective biosynthetic pathways indicated that the difference in the compounds' structures stems from the incorporation of one extra acetate unit during the synthesis of the acyl side chain. A phylogenetic analysis of the β-ketosynthase (KS) domains from polyketide synthases involved in the biosynthesis of macrolactams pointed to a common ancestry for the two clusters. Furthermore, the analysis demonstrated the formation of a macrolactam-specific subclade for the majority of the KS domains from several macrolactam-biosynthetic gene clusters, indicating a closer relationship between macrolactam clusters than with the macrolactone clusters included in the analysis. Some KS domains from the ML-449, BE-14106, and salinilactam gene clusters did, however, show a closer relationship with KS domains from the polyene macrolide clusters, suggesting potential acquisition rather than duplication of certain PKS genes. Comparison of the ML-449, BE-14106, vicenistatin, and salinilactam biosynthetic gene clusters indicated an evolutionary relationship between them and provided new insights into the processes governing the evolution of small-ring macrolactam biosynthesis. PMID:19854930

  12. Phenylpropanoids accumulation in eggplant fruit: characterization of biosynthetic genes and regulation by a MYB transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eDocimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenylpropanoids are major secondary metabolites in eggplant (Solanum melongena fruits. Chlorogenic acid (CGA accounts for 70 to 90% of total phenolics in flesh tissues, while anthocyanins are mainly present in the fruit skin. As a contribution to the understanding of the peculiar accumulation of these health-promoting metabolites in eggplant, we report on metabolite abundance, regulation of CGA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, and characterization of candidate CGA biosynthetic genes in S. melongena.Higher contents of CGA, Delphinidin 3-rutinoside and rutin were found in eggplant fruits compared to other tissues, associated to an elevated transcript abundance of structural genes such as PAL, HQT, DFR and ANS, suggesting that active in situ biosynthesis contributes to anthocyanin and CGA accumulation in fruit tissues. Putative orthologs of the two CGA biosynthetic genes PAL and HQT, as well as a variant of a MYB1 transcription factor showing identity with group 6 MYBs, were isolated from an Occidental S. melongena traditional variety and demonstrated to differ from published sequences from Asiatic varieties.In silico analysis of the isolated SmPAL1, SmHQT1, SmANS, and SmMyb1 promoters revealed the presence of several Myb regulatory elements for the biosynthetic genes and unique elements for the TF, suggesting its involvement in other physiological roles beside phenylpropanoid biosynthesis regulation.Transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of SmMyb1 and of a C-terminal SmMyb1 truncated form (SmMyb1Δ9 resulted in anthocyanin accumulation only of SmMyb1 agro-infiltrated leaves. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed the interaction of both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 with an anthocyanin-related potato bHLH1 TF. Interestingly, a doubled amount of CGA was detected in both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 agro-infiltrated leaves, thus suggesting that the N-terminal region of SmMyb1 is sufficient to activate its synthesis. These data suggest that a deletion of

  13. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  14. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway: thinking in all dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumskaya, Maria; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2013-07-01

    The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway serves manifold roles in plants related to photosynthesis, photoprotection, development, stress hormones, and various volatiles and signaling apocarotenoids. The pathway also produces compounds that impact human nutrition and metabolic products that contribute to fragrance and flavor of food and non-food crops. It is no surprise that the pathway has been a target of metabolic engineering, most prominently in the case of Golden Rice. The future success and predictability of metabolic engineering of carotenoids rests in the ability to target carotenoids for specific physiological purposes as well as to simultaneously modify carotenoids along with other desired traits. Here, we ask whether predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway is indeed possible. Despite a long history of research on the pathway, at this point in time we can only describe the pathway as a parts list and have almost no knowledge of the location of the complete pathway, how it is assembled, and whether there exists any trafficking of the enzymes or the carotenoids themselves. We discuss the current state of knowledge regarding the "complete" pathway and make the argument that predictive metabolic engineering of the carotenoid pathway (and other pathways) will require investigation of the three dimensional state of the pathway as it may exist in plastids of different ultrastructures. Along with this message we point out the need to develop new types of visualization tools and resources that better reflect the dynamic nature of biosynthetic pathways. PMID:23683930

  15. Evolutionary Conservation of Xylan Biosynthetic Genes in Selaginella moellendorffii and Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighat, Marziyeh; Teng, Quincy; Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Xylan is a major cross-linking hemicellulose in secondary walls of vascular tissues, and the recruitment of xylan as a secondary wall component was suggested to be a pivotal event for the evolution of vascular tissues. To decipher the evolution of xylan structure and xylan biosynthetic genes, we analyzed xylan substitution patterns and characterized genes mediating methylation of glucuronic acid (GlcA) side chains in xylan of the model seedless vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and investigated GT43 genes from S. moellendorffii and the model non-vascular plant, Physcomitrella patens, for their roles in xylan biosynthesis. Using nuclear magentic resonance spectroscopy, we have demonstrated that S. moellendorffii xylan consists of β-1,4-linked xylosyl residues subsituted solely with methylated GlcA residues and that xylans from both S. moellendorffii and P. patens are acetylated at O-2 and O-3. To investigate genes responsible for GlcA methylation of xylan, we identified two DUF579 genes in the S. moellendorffii genome and showed that one of them, SmGXM, encodes a glucuronoxylan methyltransferase capable of adding the methyl group onto the GlcA side chain of xylooligomers. Furthermore, we revealed that the two GT43 genes in S. moellendorffii, SmGT43A and SmGT43B, are functional orthologs of the Arabidopsis xylan backbone biosynthetic genes IRX9 and IRX14, respectively, indicating the evolutionary conservation of the involvement of two functionally non-redundant groups of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis between seedless and seed vascular plants. Among the five GT43 genes in P. patens, PpGT43A was found to be a functional ortholog of Arabidopsis IRX9, suggesting that the recruitment of GT43 genes in xylan backbone biosynthesis occurred when non-vascular plants appeared on land. PMID:27345025

  16. Identification of a novel ga-related bush mutant in pumpkin (cucurbita moschata duchesne)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duchesne) bush mutant plants were characterized by short stems. The sensitivity of pumpkin bush mutant plants to exogenous hormones was identified in this study. Results revealed that internode elongation of bush mutant plants could respond to gibberellins (GA4+7 and GA3), but not to indole acetic acid (IAA) and brassinosteroids (BR); by contrast, the mutant phenotype of bush mutant plants could not be fully rescued by GA4+7 and GA3. The internode of bush mutant plants yielded a lower KS expression level than that of vine plants. Therefore, pumpkin bush mutant plants were designated as GA-related mutant plants eliciting a partial response to GAs; the action of IAA and BR might not be involved in the internode growth of pumpkin bush mutant plants, specifically Cucurbita moschata Duch. (author)

  17. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, George N.

    2011-01-01

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (C...

  18. Characterization and manipulation of the pathway-specific late regulator AlpW reveals Streptomyces ambofaciens as a new producer of Kinamycins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunet, Robert; Song, Lijiang; Mendes, Marta Vaz; Corre, Christophe; Hotel, Laurence; Rouhier, Nicolas; Framboisier, Xavier; Leblond, Pierre; Challis, Gregory L; Aigle, Bertrand

    2011-03-01

    The genome sequence of Streptomyces ambofaciens, a species known to produce the congocidine and spiramycin antibiotics, has revealed the presence of numerous gene clusters predicted to be involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Among them, the type II polyketide synthase-encoding alp cluster was shown to be responsible for the biosynthesis of a compound with antibacterial activity. Here, by means of a deregulation approach, we gained access to workable amounts of the antibiotics for structure elucidation. These compounds, previously designated as alpomycin, were shown to be known members of kinamycin family of antibiotics. Indeed, a mutant lacking AlpW, a member of the TetR regulator family, was shown to constitutively produce kinamycins. Comparative transcriptional analyses showed that expression of alpV, the essential regulator gene required for activation of the biosynthetic genes, is strongly maintained during the stationary growth phase in the alpW mutant, a stage at which alpV transcripts and thereby transcripts of the biosynthetic genes normally drop off. Recombinant AlpW displayed DNA binding activity toward specific motifs in the promoter region of its own gene and that of alpV and alpZ. These recognition sequences are also targets for AlpZ, the γ-butyrolactone-like receptor involved in the regulation of the alp cluster. However, unlike that of AlpZ, the AlpW DNA-binding ability seemed to be insensitive to the signaling molecules controlling antibiotic biosynthesis. Together, the results presented in this study reveal S. ambofaciens to be a new producer of kinamycins and AlpW to be a key late repressor of the cellular control of kinamycin biosynthesis. PMID:21193612

  19. Functional roles of three cutin biosynthetic acyltransferases in cytokinin responses and skotomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    Full Text Available Cytokinins (CKs regulate plant development and growth via a two-component signaling pathway. By forward genetic screening, we isolated an Arabidopsis mutant named grow fast on cytokinins 1 (gfc1, whose seedlings grew larger aerial parts on MS medium with CK. gfc1 is allelic to a previously reported cutin mutant defective in cuticular ridges (dcr. GFC1/DCR encodes a soluble BAHD acyltransferase (a name based on the first four enzymes characterized in this family: Benzylalcohol O-acetyltransferase, Anthocyanin O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase, anthranilate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase and Deacetylvindoline 4-O-acetyltransferase with diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT activity in vitro and is necessary for normal cuticle formation on epidermis in vivo. Here we show that gfc1 was a CK-insensitive mutant, as revealed by its low regeneration frequency in vitro and resistance to CK in adventitious root formation and dark-grown hypocotyl inhibition assays. In addition, gfc1 had de-etiolated phenotypes in darkness and was therefore defective in skotomorphogenesis. The background expression levels of most type-A Arabidopsis Response Regulator (ARR genes were higher in the gfc1 mutant. The gfc1-associated phenotypes were also observed in the cutin-deficient glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4/8 (gpat4/8 double mutant [defective in glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P acyltransferase enzymes GPAT4 and GPAT8, which redundantly catalyze the acylation of G3P by hydroxyl fatty acid (OH-FA], but not in the cutin-deficient mutant cytochrome p450, family 86, subfamily A, polypeptide 2/aberrant induction of type three 1 (cyp86A2/att1, which affects the biosynthesis of some OH-FAs. Our results indicate that some acyltransferases associated with cutin formation are involved in CK responses and skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  20. Induced dwarf mutant in Catharanthus roseus with enhanced antibacterial activity

    OpenAIRE

    Verma A; Singh R

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of an ethyl methane sulphonate-induced dwarf mutant of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don revealed that the mutant exhibited marked variation in morphometric parameters. The in vitro antibacterial activity of the aqueous and alcoholic leaf extracts of the mutant and control plants was investigated against medically important bacteria. The mutant leaf extracts showed enhanced antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria except Bacillus subtilis.

  1. Photorepair mutants of Arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UV radiation induces two major DNA damage products, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and, at a lower frequency, the pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidinone dimer (6-4 product). Although Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae produce a CPD-specific photolyase that eliminates only this class of dimer, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Crotalus atrox, and Xenopus laevis have recently been shown to photoreactivate both CPDs and 6-4 products. We describe the isolation and characterization of two new classes of mutants of Arabidopsis, termed uvr2 and uvr3, that are defective in the photoreactivation of CPDs and 6-4 products, respectively. We demonstrate that the CPD photolyase mutation is genetically linked to a DNA sequence encoding a type II (metazoan) CPD photolyase. In addition, we are able to generate plants in which only CPDs or 6-4 products are photoreactivated in the nuclear genome by exposing these mutants to UV light and then allowing them to repair one or the other class of dimers. This provides us with a unique opportunity to study the biological consequences of each of these two major UV-induced photoproducts in an intact living system

  2. Nonlinear Biosynthetic Gene Cluster Dose Effect on Penicillin Production by Penicillium chrysogenum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, Jeroen G.; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Remon; Bovenberg, Roel A. L.; Driessen, Arnold J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the beta-lactam biosynthetic p

  3. Stereoselective synthesis of deuterium-labeled (2S)-cyclohexenyl alanines, biosynthetic intermediates of cinnabaramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbie, Philipp; Huo, Liujie; Müller, Rolf; Kazmaier, Uli

    2012-12-01

    Dideuterated β-cyclohexenylalanines, proposed biosynthetic intermediates of the cinnabaramides, can be obtained from chiral alkynols via a sequence of Irland-Claisen rearrangement, ring closing metathesis, and radical decarboxylation. Feeding experiments indicate that both (2S)-β-cyclohexenylalanines can be incorporated into cinnabaramide, while the configuration at the cyclohexenyl ring does not restrict biosynthetic processing. PMID:23163839

  4. Variability in mycotoxin biosynthetic genes in Fusarium and its effect on mycotoxin contamination of crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fusarium metabolites fumonisins and trichothecenes are among the mycotoxins of greatest concern to food and feed safety worldwide. As is the case for other fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic genes, mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are often located adjacent to one another in gene clusters. Thu...

  5. The flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in plants: function and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flavonoids are a class of low molecular weight phenolic compounds that is widely distributed in the plant kingdom. They exhibit a diverse spectrum of biological functions and play an important role in the interaction between plants and their environment. Flavonoids not only protect the plant from the harmful effects of UV irradiation but also play a crucial role in the sexual reproduction process. A special class of flavonoid polymers, the tannins, plays a structural role in the plant. Yet other classes of flavonoids, flavonols and anthocyanins, have been implicated in the attraction of pollinators. Certain flavonoids participate in the interaction between plants and other organisms such as symbiotic bacteria and parasites. This raises the intriguing question as to how these different compounds arose and evolved. Based on taxonomy and molecular analysis of gene expression patterns it is possible to deduce a putative sequence of acquisition of the different branches of the biosynthetic pathway and their regulators. (author)

  6. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos;

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplasts found in plants and algae, and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria, are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused...... on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals, as well as complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression...... of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the production levels to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons...

  7. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mori

    Full Text Available NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT, which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS. First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide. In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  8. Comparative Transcriptomics Reveals Jasmonic Acid-Associated Metabolism Related to Cotton Fiber Initiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liman Wang

    Full Text Available Analysis of mutants and gene expression patterns provides a powerful approach for investigating genes involved in key stages of plant fiber development. In this study, lintless-fuzzless XinWX and linted-fuzzless XinFLM with a single genetic locus difference for lint were used to identify differentially expressed genes. Scanning electron microscopy showed fiber initiation in XinFLM at 0 days post anthesis (DPA. Fiber transcriptional profiling of the lines at three initiation developmental stages (-1, 0, 1 DPA was performed using an oligonucleotide microarray. Loop comparisons of the differentially expressed genes within and between the lines was carried out, and functional classification and enrichment analysis showed that gene expression patterns during fiber initiation were heavily associated with hormone metabolism, transcription factor regulation, lipid transport, and asparagine biosynthetic processes, as previously reported. Further, four members of the allene-oxide cyclase (AOC family that function in jasmonate biosynthesis were parallel up-regulation in fiber initiation, especially at -1 DPA, compared to other tissues and organs in linted-fuzzed TM-1. Real time-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR analysis in different fiber mutant lines revealed that AOCs were up-regulated higher at -1 DPA in lintless-fuzzless than that in linted-fuzzless and linted-fuzzed materials, and transcription of the AOCs was increased under jasmonic acid (JA treatment. Expression analysis of JA biosynthesis-associated genes between XinWX and XinFLM showed that they were up-regulated during fiber initiation in the fuzzless-lintless mutant. Taken together, jasmonic acid-associated metabolism was related to cotton fiber initiation. Parallel up-regulation of AOCs expression may be important for normal fiber initiation development, while overproduction of AOCs might disrupt normal fiber development.

  9. Differential involvement of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness of Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manulis, S; Haviv-Chesner, A; Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E; Barash, I

    1998-07-01

    Erwinia herbicola pv. gypsophilae (Ehg), which induces galls on Gypsophila paniculata, harbors two major pathways for indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) synthesis, the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-pyruvate (IPyA) routes, as well as cytokinin biosynthetic genes. Mutants were generated in which the various biosynthetic routes were disrupted separately or jointly in order to assess the contribution of IAA of various origins and cytokinins to pathogenicity and epiphytic fitness. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin biosynthesis caused the largest reduction in gall size. Inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a minor, nonsignificant decrease in pathogenicity. No further reduction in gall size was observed by the simultaneous inactivation of both IAA pathways only or in combination with that of cytokinin production. However, inactivation of the IPyA pathway caused a 14-fold reduction in the population of Ehg on bean plants. Inactivation of the IAM pathway or cytokinin production did not affect epiphytic fitness. While the apparent transcriptional activity of iaaM-inaZ fusion increased slightly in cells of Ehg on bean and gypsophila leaves, compared with that in culture, very high levels of induction were observed in cells injected into gypsophila stems. In contrast, moderate levels of induction of ipdC-inaZ in Ehg were observed on leaves of these plants and in gypsophila stems, when compared with that in culture. These results suggest that the IAM pathway is involved primarily in gall formation and support the main contribution of the IpyA pathway to the epiphytic fitness of this bacterial species. PMID:9650296

  10. Lens Extrusion from Laminin Alpha 1 Mutant Zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Mallika Pathania; Semina, Elena V; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    We report analysis of the ocular lens phenotype of the recessive, larval lethal zebrafish mutant, lama1 a69/a69 . Previous work revealed that this mutant has a shortened body axis and eye defects including a defective hyaloid vasculature, focal corneal dysplasia, and loss of the crystalline lens. While these studies highlight the importance of laminin α1 in lens development, a detailed analysis of the lens defects seen in these mutants was not reported. In the present study, we analyze the le...

  11. Targeting oncogenic mutant p53 for cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoo eIwakuma; Alejandro eParrales

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function (GOF) activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p...

  12. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in ...

  13. IDH1 mutant structures reveal a mechanism of dominant inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimin Zhao; Kun-Liang Guan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pioneered by a major cancer genome sequencing project [1] and followed by numerous cancer genomic sequencing studies [2-4], the cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) gene and mitochondria isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) gene are found to be frequently mutated in low grade gliomas and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and to a much lower frequency in other types of tumors.

  14. Human liver cell trafficking mutants: characterization and whole exome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yuan

    Full Text Available The HuH7 liver cell mutant Trf1 is defective in membrane trafficking and is complemented by the casein kinase 2α subunit CK2α''. Here we identify characteristic morphologies, trafficking and mutational changes in six additional HuH7 mutants Trf2-Trf7. Trf1 cells were previously shown to be severely defective in gap junction functions. Using a Lucifer yellow transfer assay, remarkable attenuation of gap junction communication was revealed in each of the mutants Trf2-Trf7. Electron microscopy and light microscopy of thiamine pyrophosphatase showed that several mutants exhibited fragmented Golgi apparatus cisternae compared to parental HuH7 cells. Intracellular trafficking was investigated using assays of transferrin endocytosis and recycling and VSV G secretion. Surface binding of transferrin was reduced in all six Trf2-Trf7 mutants, which generally correlated with the degree of reduced expression of the transferrin receptor at the cell surface. The mutants displayed the same transferrin influx rates as HuH7, and for efflux rate, only Trf6 differed, having a slower transferrin efflux rate than HuH7. The kinetics of VSV G transport along the exocytic pathway were altered in Trf2 and Trf5 mutants. Genetic changes unique to particular Trf mutants were identified by exome sequencing, and one was investigated in depth. The novel mutation Ile34Phe in the GTPase RAB22A was identified in Trf4. RNA interference knockdown of RAB22A or overexpression of RAB22AI34F in HuH7 cells caused phenotypic changes characteristic of the Trf4 mutant. In addition, the Ile34Phe mutation reduced both guanine nucleotide binding and hydrolysis activities of RAB22A. Thus, the RAB22A Ile34Phe mutation appears to contribute to the Trf4 mutant phenotype.

  15. Cloning, Characterization and Heterologous Expression of the Indolocarbazole Biosynthetic Gene Cluster from Marine-Derived Streptomyces sanyensis FMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Li

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The indolocarbazole (ICZ alkaloids have attracted much attention due to their unique structures and potential therapeutic applications. A series of ICZs were recently isolated and identified from a marine-derived actinomycete strain, Streptomyces sanyensis FMA. To elucidate the biosynthetic machinery associated with ICZs production in S. sanyensis FMA, PCR using degenerate primers was carried out to clone the FAD-dependent monooxygenase gene fragment for ICZ ring formation, which was used as a probe to isolate the 34.6-kb DNA region containing the spc gene cluster. Sequence analysis revealed genes for ICZ ring formation (spcO, D, P, C, sugar unit formation (spcA, B, E, K, J, I, glycosylation (spcN, G, methylation (spcMA, MB, as well as regulation (spcR. Their involvement in ICZ biosynthesis was confirmed by gene inactivation and heterologous expression in Streptomyces coelicolor M1152. This work represents the first cloning and characterization of an ICZ gene cluster isolated from a marine-derived actinomycete strain and would be helpful for thoroughly understanding the biosynthetic mechanism of ICZ glycosides.

  16. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  17. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifer Susanne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1. Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1 derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization.

  18. The Swedish mutant barley collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Swedish mutation research programme in barley began about 50 years ago and has mainly been carried out at Svaloev in co-operation with the institute of Genetics at the University of Lund. The collection has been produced from different Swedish high-yielding spring barley varieties, using the following mutagens: X-rays, neutrons, several organic chemical compounds such as ethyleneimine, several sulfonate derivatives and the inorganic chemical mutagen sodium azide. Nearly 10,000 barley mutants are stored in the Nordic Gene Bank and documented in databases developed by Udda Lundquist, Svaloev AB. The collection consists of the following nine categories with 94 different types of mutants: 1. Mutants with changes in the spike and spikelets; 2. Changes in culm length and culm composition; 3. Changes in growth types; 4. Physiological mutants; 5. Changes in awns; 6. Changes in seed size and shape; 7. Changes in leaf blades; 8. Changes in anthocyanin and colour; 9. Resistance to barley powdery mildew. Barley is one of the most thoroughly investigated crops in terms of induction of mutations and mutation genetics. So far, about half of the mutants stored at the Nordic Gene Bank, have been analysed genetically; They constitute, however, only a minority of the 94 different mutant types. The genetic analyses have given valuable insights into the mutation process but also into the genetic architecture of various characters. A number of mutants of two-row barley have been registered and commercially released. One of the earliest released, Mari, an early maturing, daylength neutral, straw stiff mutant, is still grown in Iceland. The Swedish mutation material has been used in Sweden, but also in other countries, such as Denmark, Germany, and USA, for various studies providing a better understanding of the barley genome. The collection will be immensely valuable for future molecular genetical analyses of clone mutant genes. (author)

  19. Effect of different immunosuppressive drugs on calcineurin and its mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Several mutants in Loop7 region and near Loop7 region of calcineurin A (CN A) subunit have been constructed and purified using site-directed mutagenesis.Their phosphatase activity and the corresponding solution conformation were examined.Their phosphatase activities between wild-type CN and mutants were compared to identify the interaction of different immunosuppressive drugs with CN.The results showed that the phosphatase activities of the mutants at Loop7 were much higher than the one of wild-type CN.Furthermore,circular dichroism spectra of the mutants revealed that their solution conformations gave rise in changes in native structure of the protein.Cyclophilin-CyclosporinA (CyP-CsA) significantly inhibited the phosphatase activity of wild-type CN,and had no effects on the phosphatase activity of mutants in Loop7 region,which indicates that the site-directed mutagenesis at Loop7 region made a significant change in the interaction between CyP-CsA and CN.Examination of the activities of these mutants resulted in the presence of immunosuppressive component from traditional Chinese drugs.The component of Chinese drug,ZIP1,could directly inhibit both CN and CN mutants without drug binding protein.These results suggest that the Loop7 region is an important structural area involved in the inhibition by CyP-CsA.It is valuable to further study the inhibition by ZIP1.

  20. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Wlodarczyk, Artur Jacek; Gnanasekaran, Thiyagarajan; Perestrello Ramos H de Jesus, Maria; King, Brian Christopher; Bakowski, Kamil; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2016-07-01

    Chloroplasts in plants and algae and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals and complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression of the appropriate pathways, but this requires optimization of carbon flux and reducing power, and a thorough understanding of regulatory pathways. Secretion or storage of the compounds produced can be exploited for the isolation or confinement of the desired compounds. In this review, we explore the use of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the levels of production to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons derived from the photosynthetic light reactions, appears to be non-limiting, but redirection of the fixed carbon via precursor molecules presents a challenge. We also discuss the available synthetic biology tools and the need to expand the molecular toolbox to facilitate cellular reprogramming for increased production yields in both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. PMID:27005523

  1. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1 is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established.

  2. Reconstitution of Biosynthetic Machinery for the Synthesis of the Highly Elaborated Indole Diterpene Penitrem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chengwei; Tagami, Koichi; Minami, Atsushi;

    2015-01-01

    KULNJ). Importantly, without conventional gene disruption, reconstitution of the biosynthetic machinery provided sufficient data to determine the pathway. It was thus demonstrated that the Aspergillus oryzae reconstitution system is a powerful method for studying the biosynthesis of complex natural products....

  3. Coordinated regulation of biosynthetic and regulatory genes coincides with anthocyanin accumulation in developing eggplant fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violet to black pigmentation of eggplant (Solanum melongena) fruit is attributed to anthocyanin accumulation. Model systems support the interaction of biosynthetic and regulatory genes for anthocyanin biosynthesis. Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one m...

  4. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1, a Gramicidin S- and d-Phenylalanyl-l-Propyl Diketopiperazine-Deficient Mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belbahri, Lassaad; Alenezi, Faizah N; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E; Woodward, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1 mutant deficient in gramicidin S (GS) and d-phenylalanyl-l-propyl diketopiperazine (DKP) formation. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (6,301,904 bp, 43.20% G+C content) without any plasmid. The complete genome sequence enables further investigation of the biosynthetic mechanism and the biological function of gramicidin S. PMID:26679577

  6. Insulin Biosynthetic Interaction Network Component, TMEM24, Facilitates Insulin Reserve Pool Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pottekat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin homeostasis in pancreatic β cells is now recognized as a critical element in the progression of obesity and type II diabetes (T2D. Proteins that interact with insulin to direct its sequential synthesis, folding, trafficking, and packaging into reserve granules in order to manage release in response to elevated glucose remain largely unknown. Using a conformation-based approach combined with mass spectrometry, we have generated the insulin biosynthetic interaction network (insulin BIN, a proteomic roadmap in the β cell that describes the sequential interacting partners of insulin along the secretory axis. The insulin BIN revealed an abundant C2 domain-containing transmembrane protein 24 (TMEM24 that manages glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from a reserve pool of granules, a critical event impaired in patients with T2D. The identification of TMEM24 in the context of a comprehensive set of sequential insulin-binding partners provides a molecular description of the insulin secretory pathway in β cells.

  7. Accumulation of Kaempferitrin and Expression of Phenyl-Propanoid Biosynthetic Genes in Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicheng Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus is cultivated worldwide for its fiber; however, the medicinal properties of this plant are currently attracting increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of genes involved in the biosynthesis of kaempferitrin, a compound with many biological functions, in different kenaf organs. We found that phenylalanine ammonia lyase (HcPAL was more highly expressed in stems than in other organs. Expression levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (HcC4H and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (Hc4CL were highest in mature leaves, followed by stems and young leaves, and lowest in roots and mature flowers. The expression of chalcone synthase (HcCHS, chalcone isomerase (HcCHI, and flavone 3-hydroxylase (HcF3H was highest in young flowers, whereas that of flavone synthase (HcFLS was highest in leaves. An analysis of kaempferitrin accumulation in the different organs of kenaf revealed that the accumulation of this compound was considerably higher (>10-fold in leaves than in other organs. On the basis of a comparison of kaempferitrin contents with the expression levels of different genes in different organs, we speculate that HcFLS plays an important regulatory role in the kaempferitrin biosynthetic pathway in kenaf.

  8. Cloning, sequencing and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of sanglifehrin A, a potent cyclophilin inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xudong; Jiang, Nan; Xu, Fei; Shao, Lei; Tang, Gongli; Wilkinson, Barrie; Liu, Wen

    2011-03-01

    Sanglifehrin A (SFA), a potent cyclophilin inhibitor produced by Streptomyces flaveolus DSM 9954, bears a unique [5.5] spirolactam moiety conjugated with a 22-membered, highly functionalized macrolide through a linear carbon chain. SFA displays a diverse range of biological activities and offers significant therapeutic potential. However, the structural complexity of SFA poses a tremendous challenge for new analogue development via chemical synthesis. Based on a rational prediction of its biosynthetic origin, herein we report the cloning, sequencing and characterization of the gene cluster responsible for SFA biosynthesis. Analysis of the 92 776 bp contiguous DNA region reveals a mixed polyketide synthase (PKS)/non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) pathway which includes a variety of unique features for unusual PKS and NRPS building block formation. Our findings suggest that SFA biosynthesis requires a crotonyl-CoA reductase/carboxylase (CCR) for generation of the putative unusual PKS starter unit (2R)-2-ethylmalonamyl-CoA, an iterative type I PKS for the putative atypical extender unit (2S)-2-(2-oxo-butyl)malonyl-CoA and a phenylalanine hydroxylase for the NRPS extender unit (2S)-m-tyrosine. A spontaneous ketalization of significant note, may trigger spirolactam formation in a stereo-selective manner. This study provides a framework for the application of combinatorial biosynthesis methods in order to expand the structural diversity of SFA. PMID:21416665

  9. Location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in the gliding bacteria Cytophaga hutchinsonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the recently published genome sequence of Cytophagahutchinsonii revealed an unusual collection of genes for an organism that can attackcrystalline cellulose. Consequently, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists, as towhat mechanism this organism uses to degrade its insoluble substrates. Cellulose, being ahighly polymeric compound and insoluble in water, cannot enter the cell walls ofmicroorganisms. Cellulose-degrading enzymes have therefore to be located on the surface ofthe cell wall or released extracellularly. The location of most cellulase enzymes has beenstudied. However, basic information on C. hutchinsonii cellulases is almost non-existent. Inthe present study, the location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in C.hutchinsonii were demonstrated on different substrates. Various fractions isolated from C.hutchinsonii after cell rupture were assayed for carboxymethyl-cellulase activity (CMC.The cellulases were found to be predominantly cell-free during active growth on solka-flok,although 30% of activity was recorded on cell-bound enzymes. Relatively little CM-cellulase was formed when cells were grown on glucose and cellobiose. Apparently glucoseor labile substrates such as cellobiose seem to repress the formation of CM-cellulase. Thesefindings should provide some insight into possible hydrolysis mechanisms by C.hutchinsonii.

  10. Multivariate analysis for selecting apple mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutlivariate analysis of four year records on several vegetative and productive traits of twenty-one apple mutants (3 of 'Jonathan', 3 of 'Ozark Gold', 14 of 'Mollie's Delicious', 1 of 'Neipling's Early Stayman)' induced by gamma radiations showed that observation of some traits of one-year-old shoots is the most efficient way to reveal compact growing apple mutants. In particular, basal cross-section area, total length and leaf area resulted the most appropriate parameters, while internode length together with conopy height and width are less appropriate. The most interesting mutants we found are: one of 'Mollie's Delicious for the best balance among tree and fruit traits and for high skin color; one of 'Neipling's Early Stayman' with an earlier and more extensively red colored apple than the original clone. (author)

  11. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Mautusi

    2013-01-01

    The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl) and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel) which inserts Mg 2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto) to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto), the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2) which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 (chli1-1) mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1-1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1-1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before. PMID:24555064

  12. Precise cloning and tandem integration of large polyketide biosynthetic gene cluster using Streptomyces artificial chromosome system

    OpenAIRE

    Nah, Hee-Ju; Woo, Min-Woo; Choi, Si-Sun; Kim, Eung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct cloning combined with heterologous expression of a secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene cluster has become a useful strategy for production improvement and pathway modification of potentially valuable natural products present at minute quantities in original isolates of actinomycetes. However, precise cloning and efficient overexpression of an entire biosynthetic gene cluster remains challenging due to the ineffectiveness of current genetic systems in manipulating large-si...

  13. Spook and Spookier code for stage-specific components of the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway in Diptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ono, Hajime; Rewitz, Kim; Shinoda, Tetsu;

    2006-01-01

    that catalyze the terminal hydroxylation steps in the conversion of cholesterol to the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. These P450s are conserved in other insects and each is thought to function throughout development as the sole mediator of a particular biosynthetic step since, where analyzed, each...... Bombyx and Manduca that is expressed in both embryos and larva. These studies suggest an evolutionary split between Diptera and Lepidoptera in how the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway is regulated during development....

  14. Root hair mutants of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barley mutants without root hairs or with short or reduced root hairs were isolated among M2 seeds of 'Lux' barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) after acidified sodium azide mutagenesis. Root hair mutants are investigated intensively in Arabidopsis where about 40 genes are known. A few root hair mutants are known in maize, rice, barley and tomato. Many plants without root hairs grow quite well with good plant nutrition, and mutants have been used for investigations of uptake of strongly bound nutrients like phosphorus, iron, zinc and silicon. Seed of 'Lux' barley (Sejet Plant Breeding, Denmark) were soaked overnight, and then treated with 1.5-millimolarsodium azide in 0.1 molar sodium phosphate buffer, pH 3, for 2.5 hours according to the IAEA Manual on Mutation Breeding (2nd Ed.). After rinsing in tap water and air-drying, the M2 seeds were sown in the field the same day. Spikes, 4-6 per M1 plant, were harvested. The mutation frequency was similar to that obtained with other barley cultivars from which low-phytate mutants were isolated [5]. Seeds were germinated on black filter paper in tap water for 3 or 4 days before scoring for root hair mutants

  15. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  16. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ran; Chen, Jian; Logothetis, Diomedes E; Zhang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack) genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel's sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na(+) ([Na(+)]i) concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po). We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na(+)]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects. PMID:26725113

  17. Targeted Gene Disruption of the Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces sp. US24 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Sioud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated a new actinomycete strain from Tunisian soil called Streptomyces sp. US24, and have shown that it produces two bioactive molecules including a Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro diketopiperazine (DKP. To identify the structural genes responsible for the synthesis of this DKP derivative, a PCR amplification (696 bp was carried out using the Streptomyces sp. US24 genomic DNA as template and two degenerate oligonucleotides designed by analogy with genes encoding peptide synthetases (NRPS. The detection of DKP derivative biosynthetic pathway of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain was then achieved by gene disruption via homologous recombination using a suicide vector derived from the conjugative plasmid pSET152 and containing the PCR product. Chromatography analysis, biological tests and spectroscopic studies of supernatant cultures of the wild-type Streptomyces sp. US24 strain and three mutants obtained by this gene targeting disruption approach showed that the amplified DNA fragment is required for Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. US24 strain. This DKP derivative seems to be produced either directly via a nonribosomal pathway or as a side product in the course of nonribosomal synthesis of a longer peptide.

  18. Expression of the bacterial type III effector DspA/E in Saccharomyces cerevisiae down-regulates the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway leading to growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamer, Sabrina; Guillas, Isabelle; Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Kunz, Caroline; Hall, Michael N; Barny, Marie-Anne

    2014-06-27

    Erwinia amylovora, the bacterium responsible for fire blight, relies on a type III secretion system and a single injected effector, DspA/E, to induce disease in host plants. DspA/E belongs to the widespread AvrE family of type III effectors that suppress plant defense responses and promote bacterial growth following infection. Ectopic expression of DspA/E in plant or in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is toxic, indicating that DspA/E likely targets a cellular process conserved between yeast and plant. To unravel the mode of action of DspA/E, we screened the Euroscarf S. cerevisiae library for mutants resistant to DspA/E-induced growth arrest. The most resistant mutants (Δsur4, Δfen1, Δipt1, Δskn1, Δcsg1, Δcsg2, Δorm1, and Δorm2) were impaired in the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Exogenously supplied sphingolipid precursors such as the long chain bases (LCBs) phytosphingosine and dihydrosphingosine also suppressed the DspA/E-induced yeast growth defect. Expression of DspA/E in yeast down-regulated LCB biosynthesis and induced a rapid decrease in LCB levels, indicating that serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway, was repressed. SPT down-regulation was mediated by dephosphorylation and activation of Orm proteins that negatively regulate SPT. A Δcdc55 mutation affecting Cdc55-PP2A protein phosphatase activity prevented Orm dephosphorylation and suppressed DspA/E-induced growth arrest. PMID:24828506

  19. Fructan Biosynthetic and Breakdown Enzymes in Dicots Evolved From Different Invertases. Expression of Fructan Genes Throughout Chicory Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Van den Ende

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructans are fructose-based oligo- and polymers that serve as reserve carbohydrates in many plant species. The biochemistry of fructan biosynthesis in dicots has been resolved, and the respective cDNAs have been cloned. Recent progress has now succeeded in elucidating the biochemistry and molecular biology of fructan biodegradation in chicory, an economically important species used for commercial inulin extraction. Unlike fructan biosynthetic genes that originated from vacuolar-type invertase, fructan exohydrolases (FEHs seem to have evolved from a cell-wall invertase ancestor gene that later obtained a low iso-electric point and a vacuolar targeting signal. Expression analysis reveals that fructan enzymes are controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Using chicory as a model system, northern analysis was consistent with enzymatic activity measurements and observed carbohydrate changes throughout its development.

  20. New Role of Rosea1 in Regulating Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Hairy Root of Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in hairy roots system by ectopically expressing Rosea1 and Delila and we found something different from previous research. The RT-PCR results revealed that Rosea1 could activate early and late biosynthetic genes tested, including CHS, DFR and ANS. Delila enhanced the expression of CHS weakly, but did not influence DFR or ANS. The two regulators, Rosea1 and Delila, failed to interplay each other. It was speculated that Delila would be ineffective in the absence of Rosea1, another MYB factor specifically controlling CHS may exist. This investigation provided a new way to increase anthocyanin content by over expressing a MYB factor, potentially to be used in the field of agriculture and food

  1. Stable and High Ajmalicine or Serpentine Production of Gamma Radiation Induction Mutant Catharantus Roseus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catharantus roseus Mutant have been selected by gamma irradiation with 20 krad doses of radiation and characterized as biochemical mutant with anti-feed back inhibition mechanism of tritophan decarboxylase (TDR) enzyme in biosynthetic path way of indole alkaloid. Production of indole alkaloid mainly ajmalicine with high economical values as a pharmaceutical drug for heart attack have been studied by using cell suspension cultures with several variation of medium, elicitors and stress osmosis. This treatment produced variation of indole alkaloid ajmalicine and serpentine. Several induction methods using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and polyethylene glycol PEG (6000) 1 to 7%, with hormones concentration of 2,4-D and kinetin as (10 : 1), showed optimal results of ajmalicine range between 20 and 50 nmol/gFW, and serpentine 10 to 60 nmol/gFW. This production increases ten time in mutant (20 Krad) by stress osmotic condition and performed long term stability in culture without subculture. In this paper explanation in detail about the selection methods, stability of mutant and the production of indole alkaloid ajmalicine and serpentine during growth phase, such as adaptation, log, and stationar in suspention culture of mutan cells. (author)

  2. Mutant Varieties of Crop Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1969, the Joint PAO/IAEA Division undertakes to collect and publish information on varieties of crop plants that were developed directly from induced mutants or by using mutants in cross breeding (Micke 1972 and Sigurbjörnsson and Micke (1969, 1974). The purpose of this undertaking is to assess realistically the potential of induced mutation techniques to contribute towards progress in plant breeding. Varieties which have successfully passed official trials and were approved or recommended by national governmental authorities for cultivation, appear to be good indicators of practical success. By 1 October 1978, we know about 195 of such varieties in agricultural crop plants). They belong to 37 different plant species and come from 30 different countries. In addition, there are more than 120 mutant cultivars of ornamental plants known, which represent a considerable economic value for countries with developed horticulture (Broertjes and van Harten 1978)

  3. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  4. Stimulus-responsive hydrogels made from biosynthetic fibrinogen conjugates for tissue engineering: structural characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Ilya; Shachaf, Yonatan; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2011-06-01

    Nanostructured hydrogels based on "smart" polymer conjugates of poloxamers and protein molecules were developed in order to form stimulus-responsive materials with bioactive properties for 3-D cell culture. Functionalized Pluronic F127 was covalently attached to a fibrinopeptide backbone and cross-linked into a structurally versatile and mechanically stable polymer network endowed with bioactivity and temperature-responsive structural features. Small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy combined with rheology were used to characterize the structural and mechanical features of this biosynthetic conjugate, both in solution and in hydrogel form. The temperature at which the chemical cross-linking of F127-fibrinopeptide conjugates was initiated had a profound influence on the mechanical properties of the thermo-responsive hydrogel. The analysis of the scattering data revealed modification in the structure of the protein backbone resulting from increases in ambient temperature, whereas the structure of the polymer was not affected by ambient temperature. The hydrogel cross-linking temperature also had a major influence on the modulus of the hydrogel, which was rationally correlated to the molecular structure of the polymer network. The hydrogel structure exhibited a small mesh size when cross-linked at low temperatures and a larger mesh size when cross-linked at higher temperatures. The mesh size was nicely correlated to the mechanical properties of the hydrogels at the respective cross-linking temperatures. The schematic charts that model this material's behavior help to illustrate the relationship that exists between the molecular structure, the cross-linking temperature, and the temperature-responsive features for this class of protein-polymer conjugates. The precise control over structural and mechanical properties that can be achieved with this bioactive hydrogel material is essential in designing a tissue-engineering scaffold for clinical

  5. Nanostructuring biosynthetic hydrogels for tissue engineering: a cellular and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisman, Ilya; Seliktar, Dror; Bianco-Peled, Havazelet

    2012-01-01

    The nanostructuring of hydrogel scaffolds used in tissue engineering provides the ability to control cellular fate and tissue morphogenesis through cell-matrix interactions. Here we describe a method to provide nanostructure to a biosynthetic hydrogel scaffold made from crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol)-fibrinogen conjugates (PEG-fibrinogen), by modifying them with the block-copolymer Pluronic® F127. The copolymeric additive self-assembled into micelles at certain concentrations and temperatures, thereby creating nanostructures within the crosslinked hydrogel. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy at cryogenic temperature were used to detect Pluronic® F127 micelles embedded within the crosslinked PEG-fibrinogen hydrogels. The density and order of the micelles within the hydrogel matrix increased as the relative Pluronic® F127 concentration was raised. The transient stability of the micelles within the hydrogel network was analyzed using time-dependent swelling and Pluronic® F127 release measurements. These characterizations revealed that most of the Pluronic® F127 molecules diffuse out of the hydrogels after 4 days in aqueous buffer and SAXS analysis confirmed a significant change in the structure and interactions of the micelles during this time. Cell culture experiments evaluating the three-dimensional fibroblast morphology within the matrix indicated a strong correlation between cell spreading and the hydrogel's characteristic mesh size. The present research thereby provides a more quantitative understanding of how structural features in an encapsulating hydrogel environment can affect cell morphogenesis towards tissue regeneration. PMID:21855662

  6. A method to obtain mutants in outcrossing cucumber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Due to the chimerism within the apical meristem in the seed embryo, seed irradiation is not an efficient method of mutation breeding in the outcrossing cucumber, which develops male and female flowers separately. To solve the problem, the pollen irradiation method was examined, expecting non-chimeric mutant genotypes among the seeds. Pollen irradiated with 1kR to 10kR of gamma rays was used to pollinate the same variety. The M1 plants were self-pollinated. Examination of these selfed lines revealed several mutants. (author)

  7. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129 and Miy...

  8. Localization and interactions between Arabidopsis auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Hawes, Chris

    2016-07-01

    The growth regulator auxin is involved in all key developmental processes in plants. A complex network of a multiplicity of potential biosynthetic pathways as well as transport, signalling plus conjugation and deconjugation lead to a complex and multifaceted system system for auxin function. This raises the question how such a system can be effectively organized and controlled. Here we report that a subset of auxin biosynthetic enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER microsomal fractions also contain a significant percentage of auxin biosynthetic activity. This could point toward a model of auxin function using ER membrane location and subcellular compartmentation for supplementary layers of regulation. Additionally we show specific protein-protein interactions between some of the enzymes in the TAA/YUC route of auxin biosynthesis. PMID:27208541

  9. Identification of a 12-gene Fusaric Acid Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Fusarium Species Through Comparative and Functional Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daren W; Lee, Seung-Ho; Kim, Lee-Han; Ryu, Jae-Gee; Lee, Soohyung; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Young Ho; Busman, Mark; Yun, Sung-Hwan; Proctor, Robert H; Lee, Theresa

    2015-03-01

    In fungi, genes involved in biosynthesis of a secondary metabolite (SM) are often located adjacent to one another in the genome and are coordinately regulated. These SM biosynthetic gene clusters typically encode enzymes, one or more transcription factors, and a transport protein. Fusaric acid is a polyketide-derived SM produced by multiple species of the fungal genus Fusarium. This SM is of concern because it is toxic to animals and, therefore, is considered a mycotoxin and may contribute to plant pathogenesis. Preliminary descriptions of the fusaric acid (FA) biosynthetic gene (FUB) cluster have been reported in two Fusarium species, the maize pathogen F. verticillioides and the rice pathogen F. fujikuroi. The cluster consisted of five genes and did not include a transcription factor or transporter gene. Here, analysis of the FUB region in F. verticillioides, F. fujikuroi, and F. oxysporum, a plant pathogen with multiple hosts, indicates the FUB cluster consists of at least 12 genes (FUB1 to FUB12). Deletion analysis confirmed that nine FUB genes, including two Zn(II)2Cys6 transcription factor genes, are required for production of wild-type levels of FA. Comparisons of FUB cluster homologs across multiple Fusarium isolates and species revealed insertion of non-FUB genes at one or two locations in some homologs. Although the ability to produce FA contributed to the phytotoxicity of F. oxysporum culture extracts, lack of production did not affect virulence of F. oxysporum on cactus or F. verticillioides on maize seedlings. These findings provide new insights into the genetic and biochemical processes required for FA production. PMID:25372119

  10. Comprehensive curation and analysis of fungal biosynthetic gene clusters of published natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong Fuga; Tsai, Kathleen J S; Harvey, Colin J B; Li, James Jian; Ary, Beatrice E; Berlew, Erin E; Boehman, Brenna L; Findley, David M; Friant, Alexandra G; Gardner, Christopher A; Gould, Michael P; Ha, Jae H; Lilley, Brenna K; McKinstry, Emily L; Nawal, Saadia; Parry, Robert C; Rothchild, Kristina W; Silbert, Samantha D; Tentilucci, Michael D; Thurston, Alana M; Wai, Rebecca B; Yoon, Yongjin; Aiyar, Raeka S; Medema, Marnix H; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Charkoudian, Louise K

    2016-04-01

    Microorganisms produce a wide range of natural products (NPs) with clinically and agriculturally relevant biological activities. In bacteria and fungi, genes encoding successive steps in a biosynthetic pathway tend to be clustered on the chromosome as biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). Historically, "activity-guided" approaches to NP discovery have focused on bioactivity screening of NPs produced by culturable microbes. In contrast, recent "genome mining" approaches first identify candidate BGCs, express these biosynthetic genes using synthetic biology methods, and finally test for the production of NPs. Fungal genome mining efforts and the exploration of novel sequence and NP space are limited, however, by the lack of a comprehensive catalog of BGCs encoding experimentally-validated products. In this study, we generated a comprehensive reference set of fungal NPs whose biosynthetic gene clusters are described in the published literature. To generate this dataset, we first identified NCBI records that included both a peer-reviewed article and an associated nucleotide record. We filtered these records by text and homology criteria to identify putative NP-related articles and BGCs. Next, we manually curated the resulting articles, chemical structures, and protein sequences. The resulting catalog contains 197 unique NP compounds covering several major classes of fungal NPs, including polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, terpenoids, and alkaloids. The distribution of articles published per compound shows a bias toward the study of certain popular compounds, such as the aflatoxins. Phylogenetic analysis of biosynthetic genes suggests that much chemical and enzymatic diversity remains to be discovered in fungi. Our catalog was incorporated into the recently launched Minimum Information about Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) repository to create the largest known set of fungal BGCs and associated NPs, a resource that we anticipate will guide future genome mining and

  11. nitrate non-utilizing (nit mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Aiuchi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycotal and Vertalec are mass-produced fungal strains for insect control. Strain B-2, which was isolated in Japan, has high epiphytic ability on cucumber leaves. Protoplast fusion was performed using these strains of Verticillium lecanii to obtain new strains possessing useful characteristics as biological control agents (BCAs. We used nit mutants for visually selecting the protoplasts. Hybrid strains were subjected to molecular analysis using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs and arbitrarily primed-PCR (AP-PCR in order to determine protoplast fusion and/or genetic recombination. We detected 126, 44, and 4 hybrid strains from the combinations of Vertalec × Mycotal, B-2 × Mycotal, and B-2 × Vertalec, respectively. Morphological characteristics of hybrid strains differed from those of their parental nit mutants. Protoplast fusion of hybrid strains was confifi rmed in genomic DNA, but not in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA. A uniform biased tendency of the DNA banding pattern was observed depending on the combination of parental strains. The molecular analysis also revealed genetic recombination. These results showed a novel method for producing hybrid strains of the entomopathogenic fungus V. lecanii.

  12. An Integrated Metabolomic and Genomic Mining Workflow to Uncover the Biosynthetic Potential of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Vynne, Nikolaj Grønnegaard; Klitgaard, Andreas;

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are a rich source of bioactives; however, chemical identification is a major bottleneck. Strategies that can prioritize the most prolific microbial strains and novel compounds are of great interest. Here, we present an integrated approach to evaluate the biosynthetic richness in...... bacteria and mine the associated chemical diversity. Thirteen strains closely related to Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea isolated from all over the Earth were analyzed using an untargeted metabolomics strategy, and metabolomic profiles were correlated with whole-genome sequences of the strains. We found......, integrative strategy for elucidating the chemical richness of a given set of bacteria and link the chemistry to biosynthetic genes....

  13. Isolation of pigmentation mutants of the green filamentous photosynthetic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutants deficient in the production of bateriochlorophyll c (Bchl c) and one mutant lacking colored carotenoids were isolated from the filamentous gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, Mutagenesis was achieved by using UV radiation or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Several clones were isolated that were deficient in Bchl c synthesis. All reverted. One double mutant deficient both in Bchl c synthesis and in the synthesis of colored carotenoids under anaerobic conditions was isolated. Isolation of a revertant in Bchl c synthesis from this double mutant produced a mutant strain of Chloroflexus that grew photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions and lacked colored carotenoids. Analysis of pigment contents and growth rates of the mutants revealed a positive association between growth rate and content of Bchl c under light-limiting conditions. 11 references, 4 figures, 3 tables

  14. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  15. Comparative Analysis of the Biosynthetic Gene Clusters and Pathways for Three Structurally Related Antitumor Antibiotics Bleomycin, Tallysomycin and Zorbamycin†

    OpenAIRE

    Galm, Ute; Wendt-Pienkowski, Evelyn; Wang, Liyan; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Unsin, Claudia; Tao, Meifeng; Coughlin, Jane M.; Shen, Ben

    2011-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene clusters for the glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics bleomycin (BLM), tallysomycin (TLM), and zorbamycin (ZBM) have been recently cloned and characterized from Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003, Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158, and Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, respectively. The striking similarities and differences among the biosynthetic gene clusters for the three structurally related glycopeptide antitumor antibiotics prompted us to compare and...

  16. Variability in mycotoxin biosynthetic genes and gene clusters in Fusarium and its implications for mycotoxin contamination of crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fusarium metabolites fumonisins and trichothecenes are among the mycotoxins of greatest concern to food and feed safety worldwide. As with other fungal secondary metabolites, mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are often located adjacent to one another in gene clusters. Thus, fumonisin biosynthetic gen...

  17. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  18. Effect of different immunosuppressive drugs on calcineurin and its mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎力君; 于翠娟; 张丽芳; 魏群

    2000-01-01

    Several mutants in Loop7 region and near Loop7 region of calcineurin A (CN A) subunit have been constructed and purified using site-directed mutagenesis. Their phosphatase activity and the corresponding solution conformation were examined. Their phosphatase activities between wild-type CN and mutants were compared to identify the interaction of different immuno-suppressive drugs with CN. The results showed that the phosphatase activities of the mutants at Loop7 were much higher than the one of wild-type CN. Furthermore, circular dichroism spectra of the mutants revealed that their solution conformations gave rise in changes in native structure of the protein. Cyclophilin-CyclosporinA (CyP-CsA) significantly inhibited the phosphatase activity of wild-type CN, and had no effects on the phosphatase activity of mutants in Loop7 region, which indicates that the site-directed mutagenesis at Loop7 region made a significant change in the interaction between CyP-CsA and CN. Examination of the activities of these

  19. Yeast mutants auxotrophic for choline or ethanolamine.

    OpenAIRE

    Atkinson, K D; Jensen, B.; Kolat, A I; Storm, E M; Henry, S. A.; Fogel, S

    1980-01-01

    Three mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae which require exogenous ethanolamine or choline were isolated. The mutants map to a single locus (cho1) on chromosome V. The lipid composition suggests that cho1 mutants do not synthesize phosphatidylserine under any growth conditions. If phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylcholine, which are usually derived from phosphatidylserine, were synthesized from exogenous ethanolamine or choline, the mutants grew and divided relatively normally....

  20. Towards a "Golden Standard" for computing globin stability: Stability and structure sensitivity of myoglobin mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    benchmarking of six protein stability calculators (POPMUSIC 2.1, I-Mutant 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0, CUPSAT, SDM, and mCSM) against 134 experimental stability changes for mutations of sperm-whale myoglobin. Six different high-resolution structures were used to test structure sensitivity that may impair protein...... performances reveal room for improvement, but I-Mutant 2.0 is proficient for this purpose, as further validated against a data set of related cytochrome c like proteins. The results also emphasize the importance of high-quality crystal structures and reveal structure-dependent effects even in the near...

  1. Characterization of indigoidine biosynthetic genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi and role of this blue pigment in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, Sylvie; Rouanet, Carine; Expert, Dominique; Nasser, William

    2002-02-01

    In the plant-pathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi production of pectate lyases, the main virulence determinant, is modulated by a complex network involving several regulatory proteins. One of these regulators, PecS, also controls the synthesis of a blue pigment identified as indigoidine. Since production of this pigment is cryptic in the wild-type strain, E. chrysanthemi ind mutants deficient in indigoidine synthesis were isolated by screening a library of Tn5-B21 insertions in a pecS mutant. These ind mutations were localized close to the regulatory pecS-pecM locus, immediately downstream of pecM. Sequence analysis of this DNA region revealed three open reading frames, indA, indB, and indC, involved in indigoidine biosynthesis. No specific function could be assigned to IndA. In contrast, IndB displays similarity to various phosphatases involved in antibiotic synthesis and IndC reveals significant homology with many nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS). The IndC product contains an adenylation domain showing the signature sequence DAWCFGLI for glutamine recognition and an oxidation domain similar to that found in various thiazole-forming NRPS. These data suggest that glutamine is the precursor of indigoidine. We assume that indigoidine results from the condensation of two glutamine molecules that have been previously cyclized by intramolecular amide bond formation and then dehydrogenated. Expression of ind genes is strongly derepressed in the pecS background, indicating that PecS is the main regulator of this secondary metabolite synthesis. DNA band shift assays support a model whereby the PecS protein represses indA and indC expression by binding to indA and indC promoter regions. The regulatory link, via pecS, between indigoidine and virulence factor production led us to explore a potential role of indigoidine in E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity. Mutants impaired in indigoidine production were unable to cause systemic invasion of potted Saintpaulia ionantha

  2. The oxalic acid biosynthetic activity of Burkholderia mallei is encoded by a single locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although it is known that oxalic acid provides a selective advantage to the secreting microbe, our understanding of how this acid is biosynthesized remains incomplete. This study reports the identification, cloning, and partial characterization of the oxalic acid biosynthetic enzyme from the animal ...

  3. Heterologous stable expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes using the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Søren Spanner; King, Brian Christopher; Zhan, Xin; Simonsen, Henrik Toft; Hamberger, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Heterologous and stable expression of genes encoding terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes in planta is an important tool for functional characterization and is an attractive alternative to expression in microbial hosts for biotechnological production. Despite improvements to the procedure, such as streamlining of large scale Agrobacterium infiltration and upregulation of the upstream pathways, transient in planta heterologous expression quickly reaches limitations when used for production of terpenoids. Stable integration of transgenes into the nuclear genome of the moss Physcomitrella patens has already been widely recognized as a viable alternative for industrial-scale production of biopharmaceuticals. For expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, and reconstruction of heterologous pathways, Physcomitrella has unique attributes that makes it a very promising biotechnological host. These features include a high native tolerance to terpenoids, a simple endogenous terpenoid profile, convenient genome editing using homologous recombination, and cultivation techniques that allow up-scaling from single cells in microtiter plates to industrial photo-bioreactors. Beyond its use for functional characterization of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, engineered Physcomitrella can be a green biotechnological platform for production of terpenoids. Here, we describe two complementary and simple procedures for stable nuclear transformation of Physcomitrella with terpenoid biosynthetic genes, selection and cultivation of transgenic lines, and metabolite analysis of terpenoids produced in transgenic moss lines. We also provide tools for metabolic engineering through genome editing using homologous recombination. PMID:24777804

  4. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF BIOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTS BY PERTRACTION - CHALLENGE FOR THE “WHITE BIOTECHNOLOGY”

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Cascaval; Anca-Irina Galaction

    2010-01-01

    This review presents our original results on selective separation of some biosynthetic products (antibiotics, carboxylic acids, amino acids) by free or facilitated pertraction (extraction and transport through liquid membranes). Selecting the optimum conditions, for all studied cases these pertraction technique simplify the technologies applied at industrial scale for separation and purification, allows to reaching high selectivity and reducing the overall cost of the products.

  5. Design-based re-engineering of biosynthetic gene clusters : plug-and-play in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gago, Federico; Parayil, Ajikumar

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology is revolutionizing the way in which the biosphere is explored for natural products. Through computational genome mining, thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters are being identified in microbial genomes, which constitute a rich source of potential novel pharmaceuticals. New methods

  6. Multi-responsive physical gels formed by a biosynthetic asymmetric triblock protein polymer and a polyanion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, T.H.T.; Wang, J.; Werten, M.W.T.; Snijkers, F.; Wolf, de F.A.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Gucht, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the design, production and characterization of a biosynthetic asymmetric triblock copolymer which consists of one collagen-like and one cationic block spaced by a hydrophilic random coiled block. The polymer associates into micelles when a polyanion is added due to the electrostatic intera

  7. Quantification of trichothecene biosynthetic genes during the growth cycle of Fusarium sporotrichioides in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are secondary metabolites produced by several species of phytopathogenic fungi, and are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis. The genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of T-2 toxin in Fusarium sporotrichioides have been characterized and are located in four identi...

  8. Binding of insulin to rat pancreatic islets: comparison between pancreatic human insulin and biosynthetic human insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verspohl, E.J.; Ammon, H.P.

    Human pancreatic insulin, biosynthetic human insulin (BHI), and pork insulin were compared in terms of their binding characteristics to insulin receptors on rat pancreatic islets. There was no difference in binding or on biologic effect, i.e., ability to inhibit insulin secretion.

  9. HPLC-SPE-NMR for combinatorial biosynthetic investigations – Expanding the landscape of diterpene structural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Hamberger, Björn Robert;

    In this work, the analytical technique, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR was used for the first time in combination with combinatorial biosynthetic investigations in N. benthamiana. This efficient setup allowed for identification of several diterpene synthase (diTPS) combinations responsible for stereospecific...

  10. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola;

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew tha...

  11. Phytochemical and Biosynthetic Studies of Lignans, with a Focus on Indonesian Medicinal Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfahmi, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis phytochemical and biosynthetic studies of lignans are described. The focus is on the Indonesian medicinal plants Phyllanthus niruri and Piper cubeba and on two Linum species, Linum flavum and L. leonii, native to European countries. Both Indonesian plants are used in jamu. Jamu is the

  12. The Biosynthetic Pathways of Tanshinones and Phenolic Acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites from plants play key roles in human medicine and chemical industries. Due to limited accumulation of secondary metabolites in plants and their important roles, characterization of key enzymes involved in biosynthetic pathway will enable metabolic engineering or synthetic biology to improve or produce the compounds in plants or microorganisms, which provides an alternative for production of these valuable compounds. Salvia miltiorrhiza, containing tanshinones and phenolic acids as its active compounds, has been widely used for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. The biosynthetic analysis of secondary metabolites in S. miltiorrhiza has made great progress due to the successful genetic transformation system, simplified hairy roots system, and high-throughput sequencing. The cloned genes in S. miltiorrhiza had provided references for functional characterization of the post-modification steps involved in biosynthesis of tanshinones and phenolic acids, and further utilization of these steps in metabolic engineering. The strategies used in these studies could provide solid foundation for elucidation of biosynthetic pathways of diterpenoids and phenolic acids in other species. The present review systematically summarizes recent advances in biosynthetic pathway analysis of tanshinones and phenolic acids as well as synthetic biology and metabolic engineering applications of the rate-limiting genes involved in the secondary metabolism in S. miltiorrhiza.

  13. New erythromycin derivatives from Saccharopolyspora erythraea using sugar O-methyltransferases from the spinosyn biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisser, S; Lill, R; Wirtz, G; Grolle, F; Staunton, J; Leadlay, P F

    2001-09-01

    Using a previously developed expression system based on the erythromycin-producing strain of Saccharopolyspora erythraea, O-methyltransferases from the spinosyn biosynthetic gene cluster of Saccharopolyspora spinosa have been shown to modify a rhamnosyl sugar attached to a 14-membered polyketide macrolactone. The spnI, spnK and spnH methyltransferase genes were expressed individually in the S. erythraea mutant SGT2, which is blocked both in endogenous macrolide biosynthesis and in ery glycosyltransferases eryBV and eryCIII. Exogenous 3-O-rhamnosyl-erythronolide B was efficiently converted into 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B by the S. erythraea SGT2 (spnI) strain only. When 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was, in turn, fed to a culture of S. erythraea SGT2 (spnK), 3-O-(2',3'-bis-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was identified in the culture supernatant, whereas S. erythraea SGT2 (spnH) was without effect. These results confirm the identity of the 2'- and 3'-O-methyltransferases, and the specific sequence in which they act, and they demonstrate that these methyltransferases may be used to methylate rhamnose units in other polyketide natural products with the same specificity as in the spinosyn pathway. In contrast, 3-O-(2',3'-bis-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythronolide B was found not to be a substrate for the 4'-O-methyltransferase SpnH. Although rhamnosylerythromycins did not serve directly as substrates for the spinosyn methyltransferases, methylrhamnosyl-erythromycins were obtained by subsequent conversion of the corresponding methylrhamnosyl-erythronolide precursors using the S. erythraea strain SGT2 housing EryCIII, the desosaminyltransferase of the erythromycin pathway. 3-O-(2'-O-methylrhamnosyl)-erythromycin D was tested and found to be significantly active against a strain of erythromycin-sensitive Bacillus subtilis. PMID:11555300

  14. An extra early mutant of pigeonpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redgram (Cajanus cajan (L.) Huth) variety 'Prabhat DT' was gamma irradiated with 100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy doses. Several mutants have been identified viz., extra early mutants, monostem mutants, obcordifoliate mutants and bi-stigmatic mutants. The extra early mutant was obtained when treated with 100 Gy dose. The mutant was selfed and forwarded from M2 to M4 generation. In the M4 generation the mutant line was raised along with the parental variety. Normal cultural practices were followed and the biometrical observations were recorded. It was observed that for the characters viz., total number of branches per plant, number of pods per plants, seeds per pod, 100 seed weight and seed yield per plant there was no difference between the mutant and parent variety. Whereas, regarding the days to flowering and maturity the mutants were earlier than the parents. The observation was recorded from two hundred plants each. The mutant gives the same yield in 90 days as that of the parent variety in 107 days, which make it an economic mutant

  15. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  16. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Susan I.

    2009-06-08

    . Characterization of mutant and wild-type plants has revealed that sugars inhibit breakdown of seed storage lipids. In addition, high concentrations of exogenous sugars largely eliminate the development of mature chloroplasts by developing seedlings. Affymetrix GeneChip experiments have revealed that expression of many plant genes is partially regulated by sugar levels, with approximately two percent of genes exhibiting alterations in steady-state mRNA levels in response to changing sugar concentrations. Ultimately, a better understanding of plant sugar responses may allow improvements in rates of carbon fixation and manipulation of carbon partitioning. These improvements will be needed to help make production of energy from biomass more economically attractive.

  17. Changes in the biosynthetic pathways involved in selenium assimilation in wheat from a seleniferous area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    weight), which appear to be the highest selenium concentrations ever recorded in grains for human consumption. Selenium speciation revealed complex changes in the relative dominance of the biosynthetic pathways involved in selenium assimilation when uptake from soil increases. The preliminary results of this study also indicate that actions to limit the exposure of the population in the study area to excessive selenium are needed. On the other hand, it is clear that a proactive approach to tackle the problems of the local agricultural system is needed. Exploring the opportunities for producing naturally enriched products as selenium supplements for human and animal nutrition in areas worldwide with a low selenium status is part of this approach and will continue to be the subject of research.

  18. PNRI mutant variety: Cordyline 'Afable'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordyline 'Afable', registered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute as NSIC 2009 Or-83, is an induced mutant developed from Cordyline 'Kiwi' by treating stem cuttings with acute gamma radiation from a Cobalt-60 source. The new mutant is identical to Cordyline 'Kiwi' in growth habit but differs in foliage color, and exhibits field resistance to Phytophthora sp., a fungus that causes leaf blight and rot in Ti plants. Results of this mutation breeding experiment showed that leaf color was altered by gamma irradiation and resistance to fungal diseases was improved. It also demonstrated how mutations that occur in nature may be generated artificially. Propagation of cordyline 'Afable' is true-to-type by vegetative propagation methods, such as separation of suckers and offshoots, shoot tip cutting, and top cutting. Aside from landscaping material, terrarium or dish-garden plant, it is ideal as containerized plant for indoor and outdoor use. The leaves or shoots may be harvested as cut foliage for flower arrangements. (author)

  19. Gamma ray induced mutants in Coleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The germplasm collection of Chinese potato (Coleus parviflorus Benth) contains almost no variation for yield contributing traits. The crop does not produce seeds. Treatment of underground tubers with 1 kR, 2 kR, 3 kR and 4 kR gamma rays resulted in 50 morphologically different mutants which are maintained as mutant clones. In the M1V1 generation, suspected mutant sprouts, were carefully removed and grown separately. The most interesting mutant types are the following: (i) erect mutant with spoon shaped light green leaves, 30 cm long inflorescences against 20 cm in the control, cylindrical tubers measuring ca. 7.0 cm long and 3 cm girth against 4 cm and 2.5 cm in the control (ii) early mutants 1 and 2, one having less leaf serration, the other having light green small leaves and dwarf type (iii) fleshy leaf mutant, dark green, thick and smooth leaves. Control plants spread almost in 1 m2 area and bear tubers from the nodes of branches. In the early mutants tuber formation is mainly restricted to the base of the plant, which makes harvest easier. The crop usually matures within 150 - 160 days, the early mutants are ready for harvest 100 days after planting. As the mutants are less spreading, the yield could be increased by closer spacing

  20. Cloning of the staurosporine biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274 and its heterologous expression in Streptomyces lividans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2002-12-01

    Staurosporine is a representative member of indolocarbazole antibiotics. The entire staurosporine biosynthetic and regulatory gene cluster spanning 20-kb was cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274 and sequenced. The gene cluster consists of 14 ORFs and the amino acid sequence homology search revealed that it contains three genes, staO, staD, and staP, coding for the enzymes involved in the indolocarbazole aglycone biosynthesis, two genes, staG and staN, for the bond formation between the aglycone and deoxysugar, eight genes, staA, staB, staE, staJ, staI, staK, staMA, and staMB, for the deoxysugar biosynthesis and one gene, staR is a transcriptional regulator. Heterologous gene expression of a 38-kb fragment containing a complete set of the biosynthetic genes for staurosporine cloned into pTOYAMAcos confirmed its role in staurosporine biosynthesis. Moreover, the distribution of the gene for chromopyrrolic acid synthase, the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of indolocarbazole aglycone, in actinomycetes was investigated, and rebD homologs were shown to exist only in the strains producing indolocarbazole antibiotics. PMID:12617516

  1. Characterization of cyanobacterial hydrocarbon composition and distribution of biosynthetic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cameron Coates

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to naturally produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids. Hydrocarbon compositions of thirty-two strains of cyanobacteria were characterized to reveal novel structural features and insights into hydrocarbon biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. This investigation revealed new double bond (2- and 3-heptadecene and methyl group positions (3-, 4- and 5-methylheptadecane for a variety of strains. Additionally, results from this study and literature reports indicate that hydrocarbon production is a universal phenomenon in cyanobacteria. All cyanobacteria possess the capacity to produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids yet not all accomplish this through the same metabolic pathway. One pathway comprises a two-step conversion of fatty acids first to fatty aldehydes and then alkanes that involves a fatty acyl ACP reductase (FAAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. The second involves a polyketide synthase (PKS pathway that first elongates the acyl chain followed by decarboxylation to produce a terminal alkene (olefin synthase, OLS. Sixty-one strains possessing the FAAR/ADO pathway and twelve strains possessing the OLS pathway were newly identified through bioinformatic analyses. Strains possessing the OLS pathway formed a cohesive phylogenetic clade with the exception of three Moorea strains and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 which may have acquired the OLS pathway via horizontal gene transfer. Hydrocarbon pathways were identified in one-hundred-forty-two strains of cyanobacteria over a broad phylogenetic range and there were no instances where both the FAAR/ADO and the OLS pathways were found together in the same genome, suggesting an unknown selective pressure maintains one or the other pathway, but not both.

  2. Mutants of GABA transaminase (POP2 suppress the severe phenotype of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ssadh mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ludewig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gamma-aminubutyrate (GABA shunt bypasses two steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and is present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, the pathway is composed of the calcium/calmodulin-regulated cytosolic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, the mitochondrial enzymes GABA transaminase (GABA-T; POP2 and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. We have previously shown that compromising the function of the GABA-shunt, by disrupting the SSADH gene of Arabidopsis, causes enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs and cell death in response to light and heat stress. However, to date, genetic investigations of the relationships between enzymes of the GABA shunt have not been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the role of succinic semialdehyde (SSA, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and GABA in the accumulation of ROIs, we combined two genetic approaches to suppress the severe phenotype of ssadh mutants. Analysis of double pop2 ssadh mutants revealed that pop2 is epistatic to ssadh. Moreover, we isolated EMS-generated mutants suppressing the phenotype of ssadh revealing two new pop2 alleles. By measuring thermoluminescence at high temperature, the peroxide contents of ssadh and pop2 mutants were evaluated, showing that only ssadh plants accumulate peroxides. In addition, pop2 ssadh seedlings are more sensitive to exogenous SSA or GHB relative to wild type, because GHB and/or SSA accumulate in these plants. SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the lack of supply of succinate and NADH to the TCA cycle is not responsible for the oxidative stress and growth retardations of ssadh mutants. Rather, we suggest that the accumulation of SSA, GHB, or both, produced downstream of the GABA-T transamination step, is toxic to the plants, resulting in high ROI levels and impaired development.

  3. Rest Mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Cara E.; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F.; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I.

    2015-01-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest. PMID:25712696

  4. Characterization of lipooligosaccharide-biosynthetic loci of Campylobacter jejuni reveals new lipooligosaccharide classes: Evidence of mosaic organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Parker (Craig); M. Gilbert (Michel); N. Yuki (Nobuhiro); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); R.E. Mandrell (Robert)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis region is one of the more variable genomic regions between strains of Campylobacter jejuni. Indeed, eight classes of LOS biosynthesis loci have been established previously based on gene content and organization. In this study, we characterize ad

  5. Characterization of lipooligosaccharide-biosynthetic loci of Campylobacter jejuni reveals new lipooligosaccharide classes: Evidence of mosaic organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Craig; Gilbert, Michel; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Endtz, Hubert; Mandrell, Robert

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThe lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis region is one of the more variable genomic regions between strains of Campylobacter jejuni. Indeed, eight classes of LOS biosynthesis loci have been established previously based on gene content and organization. In this study, we characterize additional classes of LOS biosynthesis loci and analyze various mechanisms that result in changes to LOS structures. To gain further insights into the genomic diversity of C. jejuni LOS biosynthesis ...

  6. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in chili pepper leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhen; Li, Da-Wei; Jin, Jing-Hao; Yin, Yan-Xu; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Chai, Wei-Guo; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreov...

  7. Deep Sequencing of the Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Transcriptome Reveals Flavonoid Biosynthetic Profiling and Organ-Specific Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxin Liu

    Full Text Available Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi has long been used in traditional medicine to treat various such widely varying diseases and has been listed in the Chinese Pharmacopeia, the Japanese Pharmacopeia, the Korean Pharmacopoeia and the European Pharmacopoeia. Flavonoids, especially wogonin, wogonoside, baicalin, and baicalein, are its main functional ingredients with various pharmacological activities. Although pharmaological studies for these flavonoid components have been well conducted, the molecular mechanism of their biosynthesis remains unclear in S. baicalensis. In this study, Illumina/Solexa deep sequencing generated more than 91 million paired-end reads and 49,507 unigenes from S. baicalensis roots, stems, leaves and flowers. More than 70% unigenes were annotated in at least one of the five public databases and 13,627 unigenes were assigned to 3,810 KEGG genes involved in 579 different pathways. 54 unigenes that encode 12 key enzymes involved in the pathway of flavonoid biosynthesis were discovered. One baicalinase and three baicalein 7-O-glucuronosyltransferases genes potentially involved in the transformation between baicalin/wogonoside and baicalein/wogonin were identified. Four candidate 6-hydroxylase genes for the formation of baicalin/baicalein and one candidate 8-O-methyltransferase gene for the biosynthesis of wogonoside/wogonin were also recognized. Our results further support the conclusion that, in S. baicalensis, 3,5,7-trihydroxyflavone was the precursor of the four above compounds. Then, the differential expression models and simple sequence repeats associated with these genes were carefully analyzed. All of these results not only enrich the gene resource but also benefit research into the molecular genetics and functional genomics in S. baicalensis.

  8. Deep Sequencing of the Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi Transcriptome Reveals Flavonoid Biosynthetic Profiling and Organ-Specific Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Jinxin Liu; Jingyi Hou; Chao Jiang; Geng Li; Heng Lu; Fanyun Meng; Linchun Shi

    2015-01-01

    Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi has long been used in traditional medicine to treat various such widely varying diseases and has been listed in the Chinese Pharmacopeia, the Japanese Pharmacopeia, the Korean Pharmacopoeia and the European Pharmacopoeia. Flavonoids, especially wogonin, wogonoside, baicalin, and baicalein, are its main functional ingredients with various pharmacological activities. Although pharmaological studies for these flavonoid components have been well conducted, the molec...

  9. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuiter Afnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Findings Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis were used to design primers suitable for the amplification of DNA fragments from 10 candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in PAs biosynthesis in C. aronia. DNA sequencing results proved the utility of the designed primers. The primers were used successfully to amplify DNA fragments of different PAs biosynthesis genes in different Rosaceae plants. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of the alignment PCR approach to isolate DNA sequences encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes in Rosaceae plants.

  10. Gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors make human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum cells swell and rupture to death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Toyama

    Full Text Available Malaria remains as one of the most devastating infectious disease, and continues to exact an enormous toll in medical cost and days of labor lost especially in the tropics. Effective malaria control and eventual eradication remain a huge challenge, with efficacious antimalarials as important intervention/management tool. Clearly new alternative drugs that are more affordable and with fewer side effects are desirable. After preliminary in vitro assays with plant growth regulators and inhibitors, here, we focus on biosynthetic inhibitors of gibberellin, a plant hormone with many important roles in plant growth, and show their inhibitory effect on the growth of both apicomplexa, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with the gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors resulted in marked morphological changes that can be reversed to a certain degree under hyperosmotic environment. These unique observations suggest that changes in the parasite membrane permeability may explain the pleiotropic effects observed within the intracellular parasites.

  11. Reassembled biosynthetic pathway for large-scale carbohydrate synthesis: alpha-Gal epitope producing "superbug".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Zhang, Wei; Kowal, Przemyslaw; Wang, Peng George

    2002-01-01

    A metabolic pathway engineered Escherichia coli strain (superbug) containing one plasmid harboring an artificial gene cluster encoding all the five enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway of Galalpha l,3Lac through galactose metabolism has been developed. The plasmid contains a lambda promoter, a c1857 repressor gene, an ampicillin resistance gene, and a T7 terminator. Each gene was preceded by a Shine - Dalgarno sequence for ribosome binding. In a reaction catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli strain, Galalpha 1,3Lac trisaccharide accumulated at concentrations of 14.2 mM (7.2 gL(-1)) in a reaction mixture containing galactose, glucose, lactose, and a catalytic amount of uridine 5'-diphosphoglucose. This work demonstrates that large-scale synthesis of complex oligosaccharides can be achieved economically and efficiently through a single, biosynthetic pathway engineered microorganism. PMID:17590953

  12. Water splitting-biosynthetic system with CO2 reduction efficiencies exceeding photosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chong; Colon, Brendan Cruz; Ziesack, Marika; Silver, Pamela A.; Nocera, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Artificial photosynthetic systems can store solar energy and chemically reduce CO2. We developed a hybrid water splitting–biosynthetic system based on a biocompatible Earth-abundant inorganic catalyst system to split water into molecular hydrogen and oxygen (H2 and O2) at low driving voltages. When grown in contact with these catalysts, Ralstonia eutropha consumed the produced H2 to synthesize biomass and fuels or chemical products from low CO2 concentration in the presence of O2. This scalab...

  13. Polyketide synthase chemistry does not direct biosynthetic divergence between 9- and 10-membered enediynes

    OpenAIRE

    Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua; Thorson, Jon S.; Shen, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Enediynes are potent antitumor antibiotics that are classified as 9- or 10-membered according to the size of the enediyne core structure. However, almost nothing is known about enediyne core biosynthesis, and the determinants of 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence remain elusive. Previous work identified enediyne-specific polyketide synthases (PKSEs) that can be phylogenetically distinguished as being involved in 9- versus 10-membered enediyne biosynthesis, suggesting ...

  14. Accessing Natural Product Biosynthetic Processes by Mass Spectrometry (Truncated Title: MS Analysis of Thiotemplate Biosynthesis)

    OpenAIRE

    Bumpus, Stefanie B.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2008-01-01

    Two important classes of natural products are made by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs). With most biosynthetic intermediates covalently tethered during biogenesis, protein mass spectrometry (MS) has proven invaluable for their interrogation. New mass spectrometric assay formats (such as selective cofactor ejection and proteomics-style LC-MS) are showcased here in the context of functional insights into new breeds of NRPS/PKS enzymes, including the firs...

  15. Design-based re-engineering of biosynthetic gene clusters: plug-and-play in practice

    OpenAIRE

    Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gago, Federico; Parayil, Ajikumar

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology is revolutionizing the way in which the biosphere is explored for natural products. Through computational genome mining, thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters are being identified in microbial genomes, which constitute a rich source of potential novel pharmaceuticals. New methods are currently being devised to prioritize these gene clusters in terms of their potential for yielding biochemical novelty. High-potential gene clusters from any biological source can then be acti...

  16. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF BIOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTS BY PERTRACTION - CHALLENGE FOR THE “WHITE BIOTECHNOLOGY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cascaval

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review presents our original results on selective separation of some biosynthetic products (antibiotics, carboxylic acids, amino acids by free or facilitated pertraction (extraction and transport through liquid membranes. Selecting the optimum conditions, for all studied cases these pertraction technique simplify the technologies applied at industrial scale for separation and purification, allows to reaching high selectivity and reducing the overall cost of the products.

  17. An improved in vivo deuterium labeling method for measuring the biosynthetic rate of cytokinins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tarkowski, Petr; Floková, K.; Václavíková, Kateřina; Jaworek, P.; Raus, M.; Nordström, A.; Novák, Ondřej; Doležal, Karel; Šebela, M.; Frébortová, Jitka

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 12 (2010), s. 9214-9229. ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/08/0920; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR GA301/08/1649 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytokinin * deuterium labelling * biosynthetic rate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.988, year: 2010

  18. Biosynthetic Studies on Water-Soluble Derivative 5c (DTX5c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Fernández

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The dinoflagellate Prorocentrum belizeanum is responsible for the production of several toxins involved in the red tide phenomenon known as Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP. In this paper we report on the biosynthetic origin of an okadaic acid water-soluble ester derivative, DTX5c, on the basis of the spectroscopical analysis of 13C enriched samples obtained by addition of labelled sodium [l-13C], [2-13C] acetate to artificial cultures of this dinoflagellate.

  19. Contribution of trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress tolerance of Capparis ovata Desf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, S; Ozdemir, F; Bor, M

    2015-03-01

    Trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway are important contributors and regulators of stress responses in plants. Among recent findings for trehalose and its metabolism, the role of signalling in the regulation of growth and development and its potential for use as a storage energy source can be listed. The xerophytic plant Capparis ovata (caper) is well adapted to drought and high temperature stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the Mediterranean. The contribution of trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway to drought stress responses and tolerance in C. ovata are not known. We investigated the effects of PEG-mediated drought stress in caper plants and analysed physiological parameters and trehalose biosynthetic pathway components, trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (TPS), trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase (TPP), trehalase activity, trehalose and proline content in drought stress-treated and untreated plants. Our results indicated that trehalose and the trehalose biosynthetic pathway contributed to drought stress tolerance of C. ovata. Overall growth and leaf water status were not dramatically affected by drought, as both high relative growth rate and relative water content were recorded even after 14 days of drought stress. Trehalose accumulation increased in parallel to induced TPS and TPP activities and decreased trehalase activity in caper plants on day 14. Constitutive trehalose levels were 28.75 to 74.75 μg·g·FW(-1) , and drought stress significantly induced trehalose accumulation (385.25 μg·g·FW(-1) on day 14) in leaves of caper. On day 14 of drought, proline levels were lower than on day 7. Under drought stress the discrepancy between trehalose and proline accumulation trends might result from the mode of action of these osmoprotectant molecules in C. ovata. PMID:25294040

  20. Hybrid Biosynthetic Autograft Extender for Use in Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Safety and Clinical Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Chedid, Mokbel K; Tundo, Kelly M; Block, Jon E; Muir, Jeffrey M

    2015-01-01

    Autologous iliac crest bone graft is the preferred option for spinal fusion, but the morbidity associated with bone harvest and the need for graft augmentation in more demanding cases necessitates combining local bone with bone substitutes. The purpose of this study was to document the clinical effectiveness and safety of a novel hybrid biosynthetic scaffold material consisting of poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 75:25) combined by lyophilization with unmodified high molecular weight hya...

  1. Dothistroma pini, a Forest Pathogen, Contains Homologs of Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Pathway Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Bradshaw, Rosie E.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Ganley, Rebecca J.; Gillman, Carmel J.; Brendon J. Monahan; Seconi, Janet M.

    2002-01-01

    Homologs of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes have been identified in the pine needle pathogen Dothistroma pini. D. pini produces dothistromin, a difuranoanthraquinone toxin with structural similarity to the aflatoxin precursor versicolorin B. Previous studies with purified dothistromin suggest a possible role for this toxin in pathogenicity. By using an aflatoxin gene as a hybridization probe, a genomic D. pini clone was identified that contained four dot genes with similarity to genes in aflatox...

  2. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia

    OpenAIRE

    Zuiter Afnan; Sawwan Jammal; Al Abdallat Ayed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs) and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Findings Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis...

  3. Human insulin by tryptic transpeptidations of porcine insulin and biosynthetic precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markussen, J.

    1987-01-01

    The combination of enzymatic semisynthesis with recombinant DNA techniques opens up new ways to tailor biosynthetic precursors in order to achieve the desired product, human insulin. The many factors which influence the course of these enzymatic processes have been studied systematically. This book, illustrated by 77 tables and 37 figures, reports these studies in detail. The book also reviews the thermodynamics behind enzymatic peptide synthesis, where methods are still being evolved.

  4. Phytochemical and Biosynthetic Studies of Lignans, with a Focus on Indonesian Medicinal Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Elfahmi,

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis phytochemical and biosynthetic studies of lignans are described. The focus is on the Indonesian medicinal plants Phyllanthus niruri and Piper cubeba and on two Linum species, Linum flavum and L. leonii, native to European countries. Both Indonesian plants are used in jamu. Jamu is the Indonesian traditional herbal medicine, practised for many centuries in the Indonesian community to maintain good health and to treat diseases. The manufacturing of jamu is shifting more and more ...

  5. DNA-guided assembly of biosynthetic pathways promotes improved catalytic efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Benčina, Mojca; Hodnik, Vesna; Mori, Jerneja; Koprivnjak, Tomaž; Gaber, Rok; Tomšič, Nejc; Turnšek, Jernej; Lebar, Tina; Conrado, Robert J.; Jerala, Roman; Glavnik, Vesna; Avbelj, Monika; Vovk, Irena; Anderluh, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic scaffolds that permit spatial and temporal organization of enzymes in living cells are a promising post-translational strategy for controlling the flow of information in both metabolic and signaling pathways. Here, we describe the use of plasmid DNA as a stable, robust and configurable scaffold for arranging biosynthetic enzymes in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. This involved conversion of individual enzymes into custom DNA-binding proteins by genetic fusion to zinc-finger domai...

  6. Characterization of the cobalamin (vitamin B12) biosynthetic genes of Salmonella typhimurium.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, J R; Lawrence, J. G.; Rubenfield, M; Kieffer-Higgins, S; Church, G M

    1993-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium synthesizes cobalamin (vitamin B12) de novo under anaerobic conditions. Of the 30 cobalamin synthetic genes, 25 are clustered in one operon, cob, and are arranged in three groups, each group encoding enzymes for a biochemically distinct portion of the biosynthetic pathway. We have determined the DNA sequence for the promoter region and the proximal 17.1 kb of the cob operon. This sequence includes 20 translationally coupled genes that encode the enzymes involved in part...

  7. Arabidopsis cytochrome P450 cyp83B1 mutations activate the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Smolen, Gromoslaw; Bender, Judith

    2002-01-01

    In plants, the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway provides a number of important secondary metabolites including the growth regulator indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole glucosinolate defense compounds. Genes encoding tryptophan pathway enzymes are transcriptionally induced by a variety of stress signals, presumably to increase the production of both tryptophan and secondary metabolites during defense responses. To understand the mechanism of transcriptional induction, we isolated altered tryp...

  8. Biosynthetic origin of geosmin in red beets (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guiping; Edwards, Charles G; Fellman, John K; Mattinson, D Scott; Navazio, John

    2003-02-12

    Geosmin provides the characteristic but sometimes undesirable "earthy" flavor to red table beets. To date, it is not known whether geosmin is a byproduct of beet metabolism or synthesized by soil-borne microorganisms and taken up by the beets during maturation. Analysis of mature beet roots revealed that peels contained 6 times the amount of geosmin compared to the bodies and cores. Sterilized beet seeds were aseptically grown in a basal medium prior to analysis for the presence of geosmin. Using a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSPME) method, the relative recovery of geosmin from beet seedling extracts was 72.0 +/- 4.2% with (-)-menthone as the internal standard. The presence of geosmin in aseptically grown beet seedlings was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using authentic geosmin as the standard. During aseptic growth, the concentration of geosmin in seedlings remained constant for up to 5 months but increased at 6 months. Geosmin added to the growth medium was not absorbed by the seedlings. These studies support the conclusion that red beets are capable of endogenous synthesis of geosmin. PMID:12568567

  9. Rice mutant cultivar SCS114 Andosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development process and its yield, quality performance of the mutant rice variety SCS Andosan 114 was described. SCS Andosan 114 was selected from the mutant progeny of IR 841 after treatment of 150 Gy gamma rays; It had a 7.4 ∼ 9.6% yield increase over IR 841 and a higher amylase content (28%) than IR 841 (19%). The mutant variety also showed high tolerance to iron toxicity and resistance to blast disease. (author)

  10. Identification and analysis of the paulomycin biosynthetic gene cluster and titer improvement of the paulomycins in Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jine Li

    Full Text Available The paulomycins are a group of glycosylated compounds featuring a unique paulic acid moiety. To locate their biosynthetic gene clusters, the genomes of two paulomycin producers, Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115 and Streptomyces sp. YN86, were sequenced. The paulomycin biosynthetic gene clusters were defined by comparative analyses of the two genomes together with the genome of the third paulomycin producer Streptomyces albus J1074. Subsequently, the identity of the paulomycin biosynthetic gene cluster was confirmed by inactivation of two genes involved in biosynthesis of the paulomycose branched chain (pau11 and the ring A moiety (pau18 in Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115. After determining the gene cluster boundaries, a convergent biosynthetic model was proposed for paulomycin based on the deduced functions of the pau genes. Finally, a paulomycin high-producing strain was constructed by expressing an activator-encoding gene (pau13 in S. paulus, setting the stage for future investigations.

  11. Atropurpuran – Missing Biosynthetic Link Leading to the Hetidine and Arcutine C20-Diterpenoid Alkaloids or an Oxidative Degradation Product?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Manuel; Owens, Kyle; Sarpong, Richmond

    2015-01-01

    A possible biosynthetic link between atropurpuran, the hetidine diterpenoid alkaloids and the alkaloid arcutine and congeners is proposed. The feasibility of aspects of this biosynthesis, especially key 1,2-rearrangements, have been examined computationally. PMID:26028789

  12. Transgenic rice seed expressing flavonoid biosynthetic genes accumulate glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in protein bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Ogo, Yuko; Mori, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Saito, Kazuki; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Highlight Glycosylated and/or acylated flavonoids in transgenic rice seeds were characterized by metabolome analysis, suggesting that ectopic expression of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes can be used as a tool to expand their structural diversity.

  13. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  14. Depth-related distribution of a key gene of the tetraether lipid biosynthetic pathway in marine Thaumarchaeota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGT) lipids synthesized by Thaumarchaeota has been shown to be temperature-dependent in world oceans. Depth-related differences in the ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) of Thaumarchaeota have led to the classification of 'shallow' and 'deep water' clusters, potentially affecting GDGT distributions. Here, we investigate if this classification is also reflected in a key gene of the thaumarchaeotal lipid biosynthetic pathway coding for geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase. We investigated metagenomic databases, suspended particulate matter and surface sediment of the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone. These revealed significant differences in amoA and GGGP synthase between 'shallow' and 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. Intriguingly, amoA and GGGP synthase sequences of benthic Thaumarchaeota clustered with the 'shallow water' rather than with 'deep water' Thaumarchaeota. This suggests that pressure and temperature are unlikely factors that drive the differentiation, and suggests an important role of ammonia concentration that is higher in benthic and 'shallow water' niches. Analysis of the relative abundance of GDGTs in the Arabian Sea and in globally distributed surface sediments showed differences in GDGT distributions from subsurface to deep waters that may be explained by differences in the GGGP synthase, suggesting a genetic control on GDGT distributions. PMID:24813867

  15. Identification and functional characterization of genes encoding omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic activities from unicellular microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, Royah; Napier, Johnathan A; Sayanova, Olga

    2013-12-01

    In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative "front-end" desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4) from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs) in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15). These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in marine microalgae. PMID:24351909

  16. A flower-specific Myb protein activates transcription of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sablowski, R W; Moyano, E; Culianez-Macia, F A; Schuch, W; Martin, C; Bevan, M

    1994-01-01

    Synthesis of flavonoid pigments in flowers requires the co-ordinated expression of genes encoding enzymes in th phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. Some cis-elements involved in the transcriptional control of these genes have been defined. We report binding of petal-specific activities from tobacco and Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon) to an element conserved in promoters of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and implicated in expression in flowers. These binding activities were inhibited by antibodies raised against Myb305, a flower-specific Myb protein previously cloned from Antirrhinum by sequence homology. Myb305 bound to the same element and formed a DNA-protein complex with the same mobility as the Antirrhinum petal protein in electrophoretic mobility shift experiments. Myb305 activated expression from its binding site in yeast and in tobacco protoplasts. In protoplasts, activation also required a G-box-like element, suggesting co-operation with other elements and factors. The results strongly suggest a role for Myb305-related proteins in the activation of phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes in flowers. This is consistent with the genetically demonstrated role of plant Myb proteins in the regulation of genes involved in flavonoid synthesis. PMID:8306956

  17. Cloning and characterization of the goadsporin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0584.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Nakaho, Mizuho; Hayashi, Keiko; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2005-12-01

    The biosynthetic gene cluster of goadsporin, a polypeptide antibiotic containing thiazole and oxazole rings, was cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0584. The cluster contains a structural gene, godA, and nine god (goadsporin) genes involved in post-translational modification, immunity and transcriptional regulation. Although the gene organization is similar to typical bacteriocin biosynthetic gene clusters, each goadsporin biosynthetic gene shows low homology to these genes. Goadsporin biosynthesis is initiated by the translation of godA, and the subsequent cyclization, dehydration and acetylation are probably catalysed by godD, godE, godF, godG and godH gene products. godI shows high similarity to the 54 kDa subunit of the signal recognition particle and plays an important role in goadsporin immunity. Furthermore, four goadsporin analogues were produced by site-directed mutagenesis of godA, suggesting that this biosynthesis machinery is used for the heterocyclization of peptides. PMID:16339937

  18. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways. (paper)

  19. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways.

  20. Butenyl-spinosyns, a natural example of genetic engineering of antibiotic biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Donald R; Gustafson, Gary; Waldron, Clive; Bullard, Brian; Jackson, James D; Mitchell, Jon

    2006-02-01

    Spinosyns, a novel class of insect active macrolides produced by Saccharopolyspora spinosa, are used for insect control in a number of commercial crops. Recently, a new class of spinosyns was discovered from S. pogona NRRL 30141. The butenyl-spinosyns, also called pogonins, are very similar to spinosyns, differing in the length of the side chain at C-21 and in the variety of novel minor factors. The butenyl-spinosyn biosynthetic genes (bus) were cloned on four cosmids covering a contiguous 110-kb region of the NRRL 30141 chromosome. Their function in butenyl-spinosyn biosynthesis was confirmed by a loss-of-function deletion, and subsequent complementation by cloned genes. The coding sequences of the butenyl-spinosyn biosynthetic genes and the spinosyn biosynthetic genes from S. spinosa were highly conserved. In particular, the PKS-coding genes from S. spinosa and S. pogona have 91-94% nucleic acid identity, with one notable exception. The butenyl-spinosyn gene sequence codes for one additional PKS module, which is responsible for the additional two carbons in the C-21 tail. The DNA sequence of spinosyn genes in this region suggested that the S. spinosa spnA gene could have been the result of an in-frame deletion of the S. pogona busA gene. Therefore, the butenyl-spinosyn genes represent the putative parental gene structure that was naturally engineered by deletion to create the spinosyn genes. PMID:16179985

  1. L-Glutamate production by lysozyme-sensitive Corynebacterium glutamicum ltsA mutant strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai Kazuo

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A non-pathogenic species of coryneform bacteria, Corynebacterium glutamicum, was originally isolated as an L-glutamate producing bacterium and is now used for fermentative production of various amino acids. A mutation in the C. glutamicum ltsA gene caused susceptibility to lysozyme, temperature-sensitive growth, and L-glutamate production. Results The characteristics of eight lysozyme-sensitive mutants which had been isolated after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis were examined. Complementation analysis with the cloned wild-type ltsA gene and DNA sequencing of the ItsA region revealed that four mutants had a mutation in the ltsA gene. Among them, two mutants showed temperature-sensitive growth and overproduced L-glutamate at higher temperatures, as well as the previously reported ltsA mutant. Other two showed temperature-resistant growth: one missense mutant produced L-glutamate to some extent but the other nonsense mutant did not. These two mutants remained temperature-resistant in spite of introduction of ltsA::kan mutation that causes temperature-sensitive growth in the wild-type background. Conclusions These results indicate that a defect caused by the ltsA mutations is responsible for temperature-sensitive growth and L-glutamate overproduction by C. glutamicum. The two temperature-resistant mutants seem to carry suppressor mutations that rendered cells temperature-resistance and abolished L-glutamate overproduction.

  2. Expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in developing endosperm of Jatropha curcas

    OpenAIRE

    Gu Keyu; Yi Chengxin; Tian Dongsheng; Sangha Jatinder; Hong Yan; Yin Zhongchao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Temporal and spatial expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes are associated with the accumulation of storage lipids in the seeds of oil plants. In jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.), a potential biofuel plant, the storage lipids are mainly synthesized and accumulated in the endosperm of seeds. Although the fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha have been identified, the expression of these genes at different developing stages of endosperm has not been...

  3. Global regulation of nucleotide biosynthetic genes by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The c-Myc transcription factor is a master regulator and integrates cell proliferation, cell growth and metabolism through activating thousands of target genes. Our identification of direct c-Myc target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP coupled with pair-end ditag sequencing analysis (ChIP-PET revealed that nucleotide metabolic genes are enriched among c-Myc targets, but the role of Myc in regulating nucleotide metabolic genes has not been comprehensively delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the majority of genes in human purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway were induced and directly bound by c-Myc in the P493-6 human Burkitt's lymphoma model cell line. The majority of these genes were also responsive to the ligand-activated Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein, Myc-ER, in a Myc null rat fibroblast cell line, HO.15 MYC-ER. Furthermore, these targets are also responsive to Myc activation in transgenic mouse livers in vivo. To determine the functional significance of c-Myc regulation of nucleotide metabolism, we sought to determine the effect of loss of function of direct Myc targets inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 on c-Myc-induced cell growth and proliferation. In this regard, we used a specific IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA and found that MPA dramatically inhibits c-Myc-induced P493-6 cell proliferation through S-phase arrest and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate the direct induction of nucleotide metabolic genes by c-Myc in multiple systems. Our finding of an S-phase arrest in cells with diminished IMPDH activity suggests that nucleotide pool balance is essential for c-Myc's orchestration of DNA replication, such that uncoupling of these two processes create DNA replication stress and apoptosis.

  4. Fission yeast 26S proteasome mutants are multi-drug resistant due to stabilization of the Pap1transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penney, Mary; Samejima, Itaru; Wilkinson, Caroline;

    2012-01-01

    Here we report the result of a genetic screen for mutants resistant to the microtubule poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl carbamate (MBC) that were also temperature sensitive for growth. In total the isolated mutants were distributed in ten complementation groups. Cloning experiments revealed that...

  5. Characterization of induced mutants of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L) for confectionary and quality traits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sesame induced mutants were isolated from gamma irradiation of a local variety DS-1. The promising mutants for high yield and bold seed were utilized for assessing lignan profiles mainly sesamin, sesamolin and gamma tocopherol.mutant-1022 exhibited 146 per cent improvement over the parent, Since, the sesame possess numerous health benefits, the value added confectionary products were prepared. The studies revealed that, the biscuits prepared by using 100 per cent sesame flour exhibited very good spreading quality and baking strength. Organoleptic score indicated that 80% of the evaluators accepted biscuits prepared from pure sesame flour. (author)

  6. Evaluation of Yield and Chemical Characteristics of some Peanut Mutants Induced by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to evaluate some promising mutants in peanut for yielding ability over three generation (M5, M6 and M7) and to evaluate yield attributes as will as chemical characteristics of these mutants in M7 generation induced by 100 Gy gamma radiation. The obtained results showed that the increase of yield / plot over three generation as a percentage of control was 5% for mutant 7, 10.2 % for mutant 10; 22% for mutant 9 and 22.9% for mutant 8. This increase in yield may be due to increase of one or more of yield attributes for most mutant lines. The significant increase for. No .of pods and seeds/ plant, weight of pods and seeds/ plant and 100- seed weight in M7 as compared to the control. For saturated fatty acid composition, results revealed that total saturated fatty acids ranged from 17.79% for mutant 8 to 21.75 for mutant 2 compared to 24.21% for control. Reduction of total saturated fatty acid was noticed for different mutants compared to that of the original variety. However, for total unsaturated fatty acids, results indicated that total unsaturated fatty acid composition ranged from 77.95% for mutant 9 to 82.09% for mutant 8 compared to 75.49% for control. Higher total unsaturated fatty acids for all mutant lines were obtained than that of the control, however, total saturated (TS)/ total unsaturated (TU) ratio was decreased for all mutants compared to control. The physical and chemical contents of Peanut oils showed that the refractive indices were ranged from 1.4620 to 1.4718 specific gravity were in range of 0.9146 to 0.9177. Acid value was range from 0.54 to 0.89% lodine value was ranged from 94.56 to 101.85. Saponification value was ranged from 185.2 to 190.7 and unsaponifiable matter was ranged from 0.98 to 1.33. The peroxide values ranged from 1.15 to 2.33 meq/kg oil. Also, fortified yoghurt made with replaced mutant peanut oil by 50% as milk fat substitute. Data showed that chemical composition and organolyptic properties had the

  7. Cellular Responses during Morphological Transformation in Azospirillum brasilense and Its flcA Knockout Mutant

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Xingsheng; McMillan, Mary; Joëlle V. F. Coumans; Poljak, Anne; Raftery, Mark J.; Pereg, Lily

    2014-01-01

    FlcA is a response regulator controlling flocculation and the morphological transformation of Azospirillum cells from vegetative to cyst-like forms. To understand the cellular responses of Azospirillum to conditions that cause morphological transformation, proteins differentially expressed under flocculation conditions in A. brasilense Sp7 and its flcA knockout mutant were investigated. Comparison of 2-DE protein profiles of wild-type (Sp7) and a flcA deletion mutant (Sp7-flcAΔ) revealed a to...

  8. Skin morphology of the mutant hairless USP mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massironi S.M.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of the skin of the mutant hairless USP mouse was studied by histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical methods and compared to the skin of BALB/c mice. Representative sections of the dorsal skin from mice of both strains aged 18 days, and 1, 3, 6, and 8 months were studied. Sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin showed cystic formations called utricles and dermal cysts in the dermis that increased in size and number during growth. Skin thickness increased significantly at 8 months. Sections stained with picrosirius and examined with polarized light, displayed different colors, suggesting different thicknesses of dermal collagen fibers (probably types I and III. Weigert, Verhoeff and resorcin-fuchsin stains revealed fibers of the elastic system. The PAS and Alcian blue methods revealed neutral and acid glycosaminoglycans in the skin ground substance of both mouse strains. Immunohistochemical staining for fibronectin and laminin did not show differences between the mutant and BALB/c mice. Mast cells stained by the Gomori method and macrophages positive for HAM 56 antibodies were observed in both mouse strains. Except for the presence of enlarged cysts in the hairless strain, no qualitative differences were found during development of the skin of BALB/c and the mutant hairless mice.

  9. Dwarfism and increased adiposity in the gh1 mutant zebrafish vizzini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Sarah K; Minchin, James E N; Gordon, Tiffany N; Rawls, John F; Parichy, David M

    2013-04-01

    Somatic growth and adipogenesis are closely associated with the development of obesity in humans. In this study, we identify a zebrafish mutant, vizzini, that exhibits both a severe defect in somatic growth and increased accumulation of adipose tissue. Positional cloning of vizzini revealed a premature stop codon in gh1. Although the effects of GH are largely through igfs in mammals, we found no decrease in the expression of igf transcripts in gh1 mutants during larval development. As development progressed, however, we found overall growth to be progressively retarded and the attainment of specific developmental stages to occur at abnormally small body sizes relative to wild type. Moreover, both subcutaneous (sc) and visceral adipose tissues underwent precocious development in vizzini mutants, and at maturity, the sizes of different fat deposits were greatly expanded relative to wild type. In vivo confocal imaging of sc adipose tissue (SAT) expansion revealed that vizzini mutants exhibit extreme enlargement of adipocyte lipid droplets without a corresponding increase in lipid droplet number. These findings suggest that GH1 signaling restricts SAT hypertrophy in zebrafish. Finally, nutrient deprivation of vizzini mutants revealed that SAT mobilization was greatly diminished during caloric restriction, further implicating GH1 signaling in adipose tissue homeostasis. Overall, the zebrafish gh1 mutant, vizzini, exhibits decreased somatic growth, increased adipose tissue accumulation, and disrupted adipose plasticity after nutrient deprivation and represents a novel model to investigate the in vivo dynamics of vertebrate obesity. PMID:23456361

  10. Dynamic void distribution in myoglobin and five mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingying; Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Sanchez, Isaac C

    2014-01-01

    Globular proteins contain cavities/voids that play specific roles in controlling protein function. Elongated cavities provide migration channels for the transport of ions and small molecules to the active center of a protein or enzyme. Using Monte Carlo and Molecular Dynamics on fully atomistic protein/water models, a new computational methodology is introduced that takes into account the protein's dynamic structure and maps all the cavities in and on the surface. To demonstrate its utility, the methodology is applied to study cavity structure in myoglobin and five of its mutants. Computed cavity and channel size distributions reveal significant differences relative to the wild type myoglobin. Computer visualization of the channels leading to the heme center indicates restricted ligand access for the mutants consistent with the existing interpretations. The new methodology provides a quantitative measure of cavity structure and distributions and can become a valuable tool for the structural characterization of proteins. PMID:24500195

  11. Molecular Variability in Barley Structural Mutants Produced by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to survey gamma ray induced genetic variation in a set of 13 originally produced structural barley (H. vulgare L.) mutants from cv. Freya; including 8 single translocation lines, 3 double translocation lines and 2 multiple reconstructed karyotypes. Both marker systems contributed to the evaluation of the radiation induced DNA alterations and revealed in general 0.49% polymorphisms in the studied genotypes. AFLPs were observed with 3 out of 10 PstI/MseI primer combinations. Transmissible microsatellite instability at loci with perfect (AT)n repeats located in the introns of the rubisco activase and waxy was documented in three mutant lines. The results emphasize that in addition to point mutations, small indels (2bp) form the major group of the gamma induced DNA alterations. (author)

  12. The Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein can induce transcription termination in the leader region of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp operon independent of the trp attenuator RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie M McAdams

    Full Text Available In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the TRAP protein binds to the 5' leader region of the nascent trp mRNA and induces transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind and the operon is transcribed. Two competing RNA secondary structures termed the antiterminator and terminator (attenuator can form in the leader region RNA. In prior attenuation models, the only role of TRAP binding was to alter the RNA secondary structure to allow formation of the attenuator, which has been thought function as an intrinsic transcription terminator. However, recent studies have shown that the attenuator is not an effective intrinsic terminator. From these studies it was not clear whether TRAP functions independently or requires the presence of the attenuator RNA structure. Hence we have further examined the role of the attenuator RNA in TRAP-mediated transcription termination. TRAP was found to cause efficient transcription termination in the trp leader region in vivo when the attenuator was mutated or deleted. However, TRAP failed to induce transcription termination at these mutant attenuators in a minimal in vitro transcription system with B. subtilis RNA polymerase. Further studies using this system showed that NusA as well as the timing of TRAP binding to RNA play a role in the observed differences in vivo and in vitro.

  13. The Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein can induce transcription termination in the leader region of the tryptophan biosynthetic (trp) operon independent of the trp attenuator RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Natalie M; Gollnick, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, transcription of the tryptophan biosynthetic operon is regulated by an attenuation mechanism. When intracellular tryptophan levels are high, the TRAP protein binds to the 5' leader region of the nascent trp mRNA and induces transcription termination prior to the structural genes. In limiting tryptophan, TRAP does not bind and the operon is transcribed. Two competing RNA secondary structures termed the antiterminator and terminator (attenuator) can form in the leader region RNA. In prior attenuation models, the only role of TRAP binding was to alter the RNA secondary structure to allow formation of the attenuator, which has been thought function as an intrinsic transcription terminator. However, recent studies have shown that the attenuator is not an effective intrinsic terminator. From these studies it was not clear whether TRAP functions independently or requires the presence of the attenuator RNA structure. Hence we have further examined the role of the attenuator RNA in TRAP-mediated transcription termination. TRAP was found to cause efficient transcription termination in the trp leader region in vivo when the attenuator was mutated or deleted. However, TRAP failed to induce transcription termination at these mutant attenuators in a minimal in vitro transcription system with B. subtilis RNA polymerase. Further studies using this system showed that NusA as well as the timing of TRAP binding to RNA play a role in the observed differences in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24505391

  14. Radiation-sensitive mutants of yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomenclature for various radiosensitive mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is briefly discussed. Tables are presented to show results of allelism tests of most of the radiosensitive mutants isolated by various investigators together with a standardized rad locus designation and map positions of a number of rad loci in yeast

  15. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress. PMID:26442073

  16. Determination of hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents among Escherichia coli single gene knockout mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becket, Elinne; Chen, Frank; Tamae, Cindy; Miller, Jeffrey H

    2010-09-01

    We have tested the KEIO collection of 3985 different viable single gene knockouts in Escherichia coli to identify genes whose loss increases sensitivity to one or more of six different chemotherapeutic agents and mutagens: Bleomycin (BLM), Cisplatin (CPT), ICR-191 (ICR), 5-azacytidine (5AZ), Zebularine (ZEB), and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (5BdU). We discovered a set of 156 strains that display a significant increase in sensitivity to at least one of the agents tested. Each genotoxic agent generates a distinct "sensitivity profile" that is characteristic of the agent. Comparison with an independent study of sensitivity profiles for an extensive set of antibiotics pinpoints those effects that are relatively specific for each agent. In some cases engineered double mutants have greatly increased effects. These results provide insight into the mechanism of action of each agent, and define targets for the design of co-drugs that can potentiate these agents. An example is the finding that mutants lacking one of several genes in the folate biosynthetic pathway are hypersensitive to ZEB, leading to a demonstration of synergy between trimethoprim and ZEB. PMID:20674514

  17. Mathematics revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Elizabeth

    1979-01-01

    Mathematics Revealed focuses on the principles, processes, operations, and exercises in mathematics.The book first offers information on whole numbers, fractions, and decimals and percents. Discussions focus on measuring length, percent, decimals, numbers as products, addition and subtraction of fractions, mixed numbers and ratios, division of fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. The text then examines positive and negative numbers and powers and computation. Topics include division and averages, multiplication, ratios, and measurements, scientific notation and estim

  18. Revealed Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Masatlioglu, Yusufcan; NAKAJIMA, Daisuke; Ozbay, Erkut Y

    2012-01-01

    The standard revealed preference argument relies on an implicit assumption that a decision maker considers all feasible alternatives. The marketing and psychology literatures, however, provide wellestablished evidence that consumers do not consider all brands in a given market before making a purchase (Limited Attention). In this paper, we illustrate how one can deduce both the decision maker's preference and the alternatives to which she pays attention and inattention from the observed behav...

  19. Revealed Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Yusufcan Masatlioglu; Daisuke Nakajima; Ozbay, Erkut Y

    2012-01-01

    The standard revealed preference argument relies on an implicit assumption that a decision maker considers all feasible alternatives. The marketing and psychology literatures, however, provide well-established evidence that consumers do not consider all brands in a given market before making a purchase (Limited Attention). In this paper, we illustrate how one can deduce both the decision maker's preference and the alternatives to which she pays attention and inattention from the observed beha...

  20. Distinct cellular properties of oncogenic KIT receptor tyrosine kinase mutants enable alternative courses of cancer cell inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiarong; Sousa, Leiliane P; Mandel-Bausch, Elizabeth M; Tome, Francisco; Reshetnyak, Andrey V; Hadari, Yaron; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lax, Irit

    2016-08-16

    Large genomic sequencing analysis as part of precision medicine efforts revealed numerous activating mutations in receptor tyrosine kinases, including KIT. Unfortunately, a single approach is not effective for inhibiting cancer cells or treating cancers driven by all known oncogenic KIT mutants. Here, we show that each of the six major KIT oncogenic mutants exhibits different enzymatic, cellular, and dynamic properties and responds distinctly to different KIT inhibitors. One class of KIT mutants responded well to anti-KIT antibody treatment alone or in combination with a low dose of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). A second class of KIT mutants, including a mutant resistant to imatinib treatment, responded well to a combination of TKI with anti-KIT antibodies or to anti-KIT toxin conjugates, respectively. We conclude that the preferred choice of precision medicine treatments for cancers driven by activated KIT and other RTKs may rely on clear understanding of the dynamic properties of oncogenic mutants. PMID:27482095

  1. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas quinolone signal biosynthetic enzyme, in complex with anthranilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Asim K; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C; Parsons, James F

    2009-09-15

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is derived either from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear, though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor, however. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical approximately 170-residue alphabetaalphabetaalpha domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an approximately 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and

  2. Temperature-sensitive rubisco mutant of Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant 68-4PP is a temperature-sensitive mutant that lacks photosynthetic ability at 350C, but is able to grow photosynthetically at 250C. Genetic analysis indicated that 68-4PP is a chloroplast mutant that is allelic with known Rubisco large-subunit structural-gene mutants, implying that 68-4PP also resulted from a mutation in the large-subunit gene. The 68-4PP mutant has about 35% of the wild-type level of Rubisco holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 250C, but it has less than 10% of normal holoenzyme and carboxylase activity when grown at 350C. However, [35S]-sulfate pulse labeling showed that Rubisco subunits were synthesized at normal rates at both temperatures. More significantly, the ratio of carboxylase activity in the absence and presence of oxygen at a limiting CO2 concentration (6.6 μM) was about 2.2 for the mutant enzyme, as compared to about 3.0 for the wild-type enzyme. The decreased ratio of the mutant enzyme is maternally inherited, indicating that this reduced oxygen sensitivity results from a mutation in chloroplast DNA. The authors have recently cloned the 68-4PP Rubisco large-subunit gene, and DNA sequencing is in progress

  3. Induction of Mutants in Durum Wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation presents a breeding program for induction and development of a new genotype of durum wheat, resistant to lodging with high yield, by irradiation durum wheat hybrids (F2) with gamma rays 100 Gy, during 1990-1997 cultivation seasons. This program involves: induction of variability, selection evaluation of the mutants at three locations: Twaitha (Baghdad) Latifya ( Babylon) and Swari (Kutt). All mutants showed resistance to lodging and there was a significant reduction in plant height. Mutant SIXIZ-22 surpassed other mutants and its origin in lodging resistance and plant height (83.5,82.8 and 89.4 cm) in the three locations at generation M5 and M6, respectively. Also, there were significant differences between mutant and their origin in the number of spikes/M2 and grain yild during the two successive generation. On the other hand, mutant IZxCO-105 surpassed other mutants in the number of spikes/M2 (231.8,242.3 and 292) and grain yield (4336,3376 and 5232 kg/ha) in all testing location, respectively . (authors) 14 refs., 4 tabs

  4. Genes encoding chimeras of Neurospora crassa erg-3 and human TM7SF2 proteins fail to complement Neurospora and yeast sterol C-14 reductase mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Prakash; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2002-03-01

    The human gene TM7SF2 encodes a polypeptide (SR-1) with high sequence similarity to sterol C-14 reductase, a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme in fungi, plants and mammals. In Neurospora and yeast this enzyme is encoded by the erg-3 and erg24 genes respectively. In an effort to demonstrate sterol C-14 reductase activity for SR-1 we constructed six recombinant genes coding for chimeras of the Neurospora erg-3 and SR-1 protein sequences and tested them for complementation of the Neurospora erg-3 mutant. To our surprise, all the chimeras failed to complement erg-3. A few of the chimeric proteins were also tested against the yeast erg24 mutant, but again there was no complementation. We discuss some reasons that might account for these unexpected findings.

  5. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  6. A new Arabidopsis mutant induced by ion beams affects flavonoid synthesis with spotted pigmentation in testa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new stable mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with a spotted pigment in the seed coat, named anthocyanin spotted testa (ast), was induced by carbon ion irradiation. The spotted pigmentation of ast mutant was observed in immature seeds from 1-2 days after flowering (DAF), at the integument of the ovule, and spread as the seed coat formed. Anthocyanin accumulation was about 6 times higher in ast mutant than in the wild-type at 6 DAF of the immature seeds, but was almost the same in mature dry seeds. A higher anthocyanin accumulation was not observed in the seedlings, leaves or floral buds of ast mutant compared with the wild-type, which suggests that a high accumulation of anthocyanins is specific to the seed coat of the immature ast seeds. Reciprocal crosses between ast mutant and the wild-type indicated that ast is a single recessive gene mutation and segregates as a delayed inheritance. The results of crossing with tt7 and ttg mutants also confirmed that the AST gene is probably a regulatory locus that controls flavonoid biosynthesis. A mapping analysis revealed that the gene is located on chromosome I and is closely linked to the SSLP DNA marker nga280 with a distance of 3.2 cM. AST has been registered as a new mutant of Arabidopsis

  7. Characterization and RNA-seq analysis of underperformer, an activation-tagged potato mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Sukhwinder S; Veilleux, Richard E; Dickerman, Allan W; Tang, Guozhu; Flinn, Barry S

    2014-04-01

    The potato cv. Bintje and a Bintje activation-tagged mutant, underperformer (up) were compared. Mutant up plants grown in vitro were dwarf, with abundant axillary shoot growth, greater tuber yield, altered tuber traits and early senescence compared to wild type. Under in vivo conditions, the dwarf and early senescence phenotypes of the mutant remained, but the up plants exhibited a lower tuber yield and fewer axillary shoots compared to wild type. Southern blot analyses indicated a single T-DNA insertion in the mutant, located on chromosome 10. Initial PCR-based gene expression studies indicated transcriptional activation/repression of several genes in the mutant flanking the insertion. The gene immediately flanking the right border of the T-DNA insertion, which encoded an uncharacterized Broad complex, Tramtrac, Bric-a-brac; also known as Pox virus and Zinc finger (BTB/POZ) domain-containing protein (StBTB/POZ1) containing an Armadillo repeat region, was up-regulated in the mutant. Global gene expression comparisons between Bintje and up using RNA-seq on leaves from 60 day-old plants revealed a dataset of over 1,600 differentially expressed genes. Gene expression analyses suggested a variety of biological processes and pathways were modified in the mutant, including carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, cell division and cell cycle activity, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and proteolysis. PMID:24306493

  8. TP53 mutants in the tower of babel of cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Alessandra; Ciribilli, Yari; Fronza, Gilberto; Inga, Alberto; Monti, Paola

    2014-06-01

    Loss-of-function, partial-function, altered-function, dominant-negative, temperature sensitive, interfering, contact, structural, unfolded, misfolded, dimeric, monomeric, non-cooperative, unstable, supertrans, superstable, intragenic suppressor. TP53 mutants are many, more than 2,000 in fact, and they can be very diverse. Sporadic; germline; gain-of-function (GoF); oncogenic; rebel-angel; yin and yang; prion-like; metastasis-inducer; mediator of chemo-resistance; modifier of stemness. TP53 mutants can impact important cancer clinical variables, in multiple, often subtle ways, as revealed by cell-based assays as well as animal models. Here, we review studies investigating TP53 mutants for their effect on sequence-specific transactivation function, and especially recent findings on how TP53 mutants can exhibit GoF properties. We also review reports on TP53 mutants' impact on cancer cell transcriptomes and studies with Li-Fraumeni patients trying to classify and predict phenotypes in relation to experimentally determined transcription fingerprints. Finally, we provide an example of the complexity of correlating TP53 mutant functionality to clinical variables in sporadic cancer patients. Conflicting results and limitations of experimental approaches notwithstanding, the study of TP53 mutants has provided a rich body of knowledge, mostly available in the public domain and accessible through databases, which is beginning to impact cancer intervention strategies. PMID:24449472

  9. Diversity and Stability Study on Rice Mutants Induced in Space Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Lu; Xin-Zhu Wang; Qi Zheng; Shuang-Hong Guan; Ping Xin; Ye-Qing Sun

    2008-01-01

    To further study the characteristics of changes on the molecular level of rice mutants induced in space environment, we analyzed proteins in leaves and seeds of four rice mutants (two high-tillering and two low-tillering) in the 8th and 9th generations after a 15-day spaceflight, and compared with their ground controls by two-dimentional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). In addition, the albumin, globulin, prolamine, glutelin, and amylose of the mutant seeds were analyzed by RPLC and ultra-violet spectrometry. The results showed that the low-abundance proteins of leaves in the peak tillering stage are more likely to be induced compared with their corresponding controls. The albumin, globulin, and prolamine of the mutant seeds revealed changes when compared with their controls, and the characteristics of changes in different mutants were stably inherited in the 8th and 9th generations, suggesting that they can be used as biomarkers to identity the mutants induced by spaceflight. Moreover, two proteins (SSP9111 and SSP6302) were found to be expressed with high intensity (two-fold change) in different mutants, which were both correlated with photosystem according to mass spectrometry and database searching.

  10. Induction of mutants in Durum Wheat by hybridization and irradiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation presents a breeding program for induction and development a new genotypes of durum wheat, resistant to lodging with high yield, by irradiated seeds (F2) of durum wheat hybrid's (Sin Al-jemal X Izraa, Sin Al-Jemal X Cocorat and Izraa X Cocorat) with gamma rays 100 Gy dose. This program involves: Induction of variability, selection, evaluation of the best mutants at three different locations, Twaitha(Baghdad), Latifya (Babylon) and Swari (Kutt), for the period 1990-1999. Results revealed that the mutants ( Si X Iz-7, Si X Iz-22, Si X Co-43, Si X Co-48, Si X Co-50, Si X Co- 87, Iz X Co-95 and Iz X Co-105) showed resistance to lodging with a significant reduction in plant heigth, but mutant Si X Iz-22 surpassed the other mutants and it is origin in lodging resistance and reduction in plant heigth (84.8, 81.9 and 86.3 cm) at Twaitha, Latifya and Babylon respectively in M7 and M8 generations. Also there were a significant differences between the mutants and their origin in yield and yield components during the two successive generations, on the other hand mutant Iz X Co-105 surpassed the other mutants in spikes/m2 ( 278.8, 263.3 and 289) and grain yield (4950, 4820 and 5320 kg/ha) in the testing locations respectively

  11. Productive potentials of short stemmed wheat mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air dry F2 seeds of the cross Skorospelka-35xMexipak were gamma irradiated (5 krad). It was established that the new short-stemmed wheat mutants can olay an important role both in hybrid combination breeding and as direct cultivars. Some of these mutants (No. 65, 67-I, 67-II, etc.), proved very promising because of their high productivity combined with other valuable biological and economic characters. The results obtained show also the great potentials and the perspectives of the method of combining hybrid and induced mutant variability. (author)

  12. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico;

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT...... key abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone biosynthetic gene NCED3. ChIP-qPCR and expression analysis showed that ATAF1 binding to the NCED3 promoter correlated with increased NCED3 expression and ABA hormone levels. These results indicate that ATAF1 regulates ABA biosynthesis....

  13. Vitamin K2 Biosynthetic Enzyme, UBIAD1 Is Essential for Embryonic Development of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kimie Nakagawa; Natsumi Sawada; Yoshihisa Hirota; Yuri Uchino; Yoshitomo Suhara; Tomoka Hasegawa; Norio Amizuka; Tadashi Okamoto; Naoko Tsugawa; Maya Kamao; Nobuaki Funahashi; Toshio Okano

    2014-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) is a novel vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme screened and identified from the human genome database. UBIAD1 has recently been shown to catalyse the biosynthesis of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in zebrafish and human cells. To investigate the function of UBIAD1 in vivo, we attempted to generate mice lacking Ubiad1, a homolog of human UBIAD1, by gene targeting. Ubiad1-deficient (Ubiad1(-/-)) mouse embryos failed to survive beyond embryonic day 7.5, exhib...

  14. Biosynthetic 20-kilodalton methionyl-human growth hormone has diabetogenic and insulin-like activities.

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyo, J L; Cameron, C M; Olson, K.C.; Jones, A J; Pai, R C

    1985-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland produces a 20-kilodalton (kDa) variant of human growth hormone (hGH) that differs from the predominant 22-kDa form of hGH in that amino acid residues 32-46 are deleted. Previous work has suggested that the 20-kDa variant possesses the full growth-promoting and lactogenic activities of 22-kDa hGH but lacks its intrinsic diabetogenic and insulin-like activities. In the present study, recombinant DNA techniques were used to prepare biosynthetic 20-kDa hGH, and some o...

  15. 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the studies of biosynthetic routes of natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last five decades, as a result of an interaction between natural product chemistry, synthetic organic chemistry, molecular biology and spectroscopy, scientists reached an extraordinary level of comprehension about the natural processes by which living organisms build up complex molecules. In this context, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, allied with isotopic labeling, played a determinant role. Nowadays, the widespread use of modern NMR techniques allows an even more detailed picture of the biochemical steps by accurate manipulation of the atomic nuclei. This article focuses on the development of such techniques and their impact on biosynthetic studies. (author)

  16. Vitamin K2 Biosynthetic Enzyme, UBIAD1 Is Essential for Embryonic Development of Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Kimie; Sawada, Natsumi; Hirota, Yoshihisa; Uchino, Yuri; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Amizuka, Norio; Okamoto, Tadashi; Tsugawa,Naoko; Kamao, Maya; Funahashi, Nobuaki; Okano, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    UbiA prenyltransferase domain containing 1 (UBIAD1) is a novel vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme screened and identified from the human genome database. UBIAD1 has recently been shown to catalyse the biosynthesis of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in zebrafish and human cells. To investigate the function of UBIAD1 in vivo, we attempted to generate mice lacking Ubiad1, a homolog of human UBIAD1, by gene targeting. Ubiad1-deficient (Ubiad1 −/−) mouse embryos failed to survive beyond embryonic day 7.5, exhibi...

  17. The Using of Millimeter Waves for Biosynthetic Processes Stimulation in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usatîi Agafia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of influence of three frequencies of electromagnetic radiation of highfrequency range (EMR EHF on the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, β-glucan, proteins, catalase activity by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNMN -Y-20 yeast strain were analysed. It was established that frequency of f= 53,33 GHz stimulates the biosynthesis of carbohydrates, including β-glucan and frequency of f= 42,19 GHz promotes the increase of protein content and catalase. The indicated frequencies of EMR EHF are offered for the use in the biotechnology of cultivation of yeasts with the purpose to increase biosynthetic properties of yeast strain

  18. Toxicity of a furanocoumarin to armyworms: a case of biosynthetic escape from insect herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenbaum, M

    1978-08-11

    When the linear furanocoumarin xanthotoxin, found in many plants of the families Rutaceae and Umbelliferae, was administered to larvae of Spodoptera eridania, a generalist insect herbivore, it displayed toxic properties lacking in its biosynthetic precursor umbelliferone. Reduced toxicity observed in the absence of ultraviolet light is consistent with the known mechanism of photoinactivation of DNA by furanocoumarins through ultraviolet-catalyzed cross-linkage of strands. Thus, the ability of a plant to convert umbelliferone to linear furanocoumarins appears to confer broader protection against insect herbivores. PMID:17790440

  19. A re-evaluation of the archaeal membrane lipid biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Laura; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    Archaea produce unique membrane lipids in which isoprenoid alkyl chains are bound to glycerol moieties via ether linkages. As cultured representatives of the Archaea have become increasingly available throughout the past decade, archaeal genomic and membrane lipid-composition data have also become available. In this Analysis article, we compare the amino acid sequences of the key enzymes of the archaeal ether-lipid biosynthesis pathway and critically evaluate past studies on the biochemical functions of these enzymes. We propose an alternative archaeal lipid biosynthetic pathway that is based on a 'multiple-key, multiple-lock' mechanism. PMID:24801941

  20. Cloning, mutagenesis, and nucleotide sequence of a siderophore biosynthetic gene (amoA) from Aeromonas hydrophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Barghouthi, S; Payne, S M; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1991-01-01

    Many isolates of the Aeromonas species produce amonabactin, a phenolate siderophore containing 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHB). An amonabactin biosynthetic gene (amoA) was identified (in a Sau3A1 gene library of Aeromonas hydrophila 495A2 chromosomal DNA) by its complementation of the requirement of Escherichia coli SAB11 for exogenous 2,3-DHB to support siderophore (enterobactin) synthesis. The gene amoA was subcloned as a SalI-HindIII 3.4-kb DNA fragment into pSUP202, and the complete n...

  1. Impact of lead ions on biosynthetic capacity of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2p-15 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different concentrations of Pb ions on biosynthetical ability of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2P-15, which is the producer of compound complex of extracellular enzymes and growth stimulators, was studied. It has been showed, that Pb ions introduced in agar medium have had a stimulative effect on production of surface and depth mycelia. The Pb ions, which have been inoculated into liquid fermentative medium in concentration of 1,0–2,0 mg/l realized directed synthesis of bacterio- and proteolytic enzymes, had an influence on qualitative and quantitative composition of produced enzymes.

  2. Morphological Characterization and Assessment of Genetic Variability, Character Association, and Divergence in Soybean Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Malek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is important for crop improvement. An experiment was conducted during 2011 to study genetic variability, character association, and genetic diversity among 27 soybean mutants and four mother genotypes. Analysis of variance revealed significant differences among the mutants and mothers for nine morphological traits. Eighteen mutants performed superiorly to their mothers in respect to seed yield and some morphological traits including yield attributes. Narrow differences between phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation (PCV and GCV for most of the characters revealed less environmental influence on their expression. High values of heritability and genetic advance with high GCV for branch number, plant height, pod number, and seed weight can be considered as favorable attributes for soybean improvement through phenotypic selection and high expected genetic gain can be achieved. Pod and seed number and maturity period appeared to be the first order traits for higher yield and priority should be given in selection due to their strong associations and high magnitudes of direct effects on yield. Cluster analysis grouped 31 genotypes into five groups at the coefficient value of 235. The mutants/genotypes from cluster I and cluster II could be used for hybridization program with the mutants of clusters IV and V in order to develop high yielding mutant-derived soybean varieties for further improvement.

  3. Products of the iron-molybdenum cofactor-specific biosynthetic genes, nifE and nifN, are structurally homologous to the products of the nitrogenase molybdenum-iron protein genes, nifD and nifK.

    OpenAIRE

    Brigle, K E; Weiss, M C; Newton, W E; Dean, D R

    1987-01-01

    The genes from Azotobacter vinelandii, which are homologous to the iron-molybdenum cofactor biosynthetic genes, nifE and nifN, from Klebsiella pneumoniae, have been cloned and sequenced. These genes comprise a single transcription unit and are located immediately downstream from the nitrogenase structural gene cluster (nifHDK). DNA sequence analysis has revealed that the products of the nifE and nifN genes contain considerable homology when compared with the nifD (MoFe protein alpha subunit) ...

  4. Design of an ectoine-responsive AraC mutant and its application in metabolic engineering of ectoine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shan; Jiang, Peixia; Yao, Jun; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Gui, Xiwu; Dong, Zhiyang; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-07-01

    Advanced high-throughput screening methods for small molecules may have important applications in the metabolic engineering of the biosynthetic pathways of these molecules. Ectoine is an excellent osmoprotectant that has been widely used in cosmetics. In this study, the Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC was engineered to recognize ectoine as its non-natural effector and to activate transcription upon ectoine binding. As an endogenous reporter of ectoine, the mutated AraC protein was successfully incorporated into high-throughput screening of ectoine hyper-producing strains. The ectoine biosynthetic cluster from Halomonas elongata was cloned into E. coli. By engineering the rate-limiting enzyme L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), ectoine production and the specific activity of the EctB mutant were increased. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering regulatory proteins into sensitive and rapid screening tools for small molecules and highlighted the importance and efficacy of directed evolution strategies applied to the engineering of genetic components for yield improvement in the biosynthesis of small molecules. PMID:26051748

  5. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/1ic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip B Grovenstein

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel which inserts Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto, the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2 which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 (chli1-1 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1-1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1-1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before.

  6. Identification and molecular characterization of a novel Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant defective in chlorophyll biosynthesis [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/17x

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip B Grovenstein

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The green micro-alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an elegant model organism to study all aspects of oxygenic photosynthesis. Chlorophyll (Chl and heme are major tetrapyrroles that play an essential role in energy metabolism in photosynthetic organisms and are synthesized via a common branched tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway. One of the enzymes in the pathway is Mg chelatase (MgChel which inserts Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX (PPIX, proto to form magnesium-protoporphyrin IX (MgPPIX, Mgproto, the first biosynthetic intermediate in the Chl branch. MgChel is a multimeric enzyme that consists of three subunits designated CHLD, CHLI and CHLH. Plants have two isozymes of CHLI (CHLI1 and CHLI2 which are 70%-81% identical in protein sequences. Although the functional role of CHLI1 is well characterized, that of CHLI2 is not. We have isolated a non-photosynthetic light sensitive mutant 5A7 by random DNA insertional mutagenesis that is devoid of any detectable Chl. PCR based analyses show that 5A7 is missing the CHLI1 gene and at least eight additional functionally uncharacterized genes. 5A7 has an intact CHLI2 gene. Complementation with a functional copy of the CHLI1 gene restored Chl biosynthesis, photo-autotrophic growth and light tolerance in 5A7. We have identified the first chli1 mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in green algae. Our results show that in the wild type Chlamydomonas CHLI2 protein amount is lower than that of CHLI1 and the chli1 mutant has a drastic reduction in CHLI2 protein levels although it possesses the CHLI2 gene. Our chli1 mutant opens up new avenues to explore the functional roles of CHLI1 and CHLI2 in Chl biosynthesis and chloroplast to nucleus retrograde signaling in Chlamydomonas, which has never been studied before.

  7. Rhizobium japonicum mutants induced by gamma rays and some chemical mutagens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous symbiotic mutants of R.japonicum were isolated after UV irradiation or nitrosoguanidine mutagensis. Cultures of R.japonicum GM 377 were irradiated with 0, 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 175, 200, 250 and 300 krad of gamma-rays. As for chemical mutagensis, cultures were treated with Sodium azide and colchicin at concentration of 1x10-6, 1x10-5, 5x10-5, 1x10-4, 5x10-4, 1x10-3 and 5x10-3 mol. Results revealed that gentamicin at concentration of 24.0 Mg/ml was able to kill all the populations of R.japonicum. Therefore, this concentration was used for mutants selection. However, numerous mutants at different freguencies were identified. The highest percentage of mutant was obtained with Sodium azide at 1x10-4 mol

  8. Induced mutant for male sterility in niger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass.), an important oilseed crop of the family Compositae is highly cross-pollinated due to the twin mechanisms of protandry and incompatibility. Studies revealed the functional nature of protandry and the breakdown of incompatibility with alteration in temperature. It has very small flowers (disc florets) arranged in a capitulum that open on 3-4 consecutive days which pose problems in emasculation for cross-breeding. To induce mutations, seeds of variety 'IGP-76' were irradiated with γ-rays 200 to 1000 Gy. All seeds of M1 plants were sown separately in individual plant-to progeny rows. The results of screening of M2 segregating material indicated that γ-ray treatment was effective in induction of male sterility. Frequency of visible mutations were higher in sibbed progeny as compared to open pollinated population and male sterile plants were observed only in sibbed population (1000 Gy). Male sterile plants could easily be identified at the flowering stage by their altered floral morphology (disc florets transformed into ligulate ray florets) and complete absence or presence of a rudimentary anther column. Seeds were collected following sib-mating with the fertile counterparts. Progeny segregated in a ration of 3 normal : 1 male sterile. Further work on the mechanism of sterility, maintenance and linkage relationships with associated characters is under progress. This is the first report of induction of male sterility in niger through the use of physical mutagens. The availability of this mutant will be of great value for exploitation of heterosis on commercial basis. (author)

  9. Induction and isolation of mutants in sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the progress made on the induction of mutations in sugarcane at the Sugarcane Breeding Institute, Coimbatore, is presented. A description of some of the mutants is given. A few disease-resistant mutants have been obtained. Yield of C.C.S./ha of some of the mutants has surpassed the parent variety. Selection based on individual canes has increased the mutation rate and stability of mutants. Different techniques such as decapitation, closer planting and growing vM1 generation at different N levels have been observed to be promising methods to increase mutation rate. Raising of plants from mutated tissues by in vitro culture seems to be a potential tool in induced mutagenesis in sugarcane. (author)

  10. Rhodopsin mutant P23H destabilizes rod photoreceptor disk membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Haeri

    Full Text Available Mutations in rhodopsin cause retinitis pigmentosa in humans and retinal degeneration in a multitude of other animals. We utilized high-resolution live imaging of the large rod photoreceptors from transgenic frogs (Xenopus to compare the properties of fluorescently tagged rhodopsin, Rho-EGFP, and Rho(P23H-EGFP. The mutant was abnormally distributed both in the inner and outer segments (OS, accumulating in the OS to a concentration of ∼0.1% compared to endogenous opsin. Rho(P23H-EGFP formed dense fluorescent foci, with concentrations of mutant protein up to ten times higher than other regions. Wild-type transgenic Rho-EGFP did not concentrate in OS foci when co-expressed in the same rod with Rho(P23H-EGFP. Outer segment regions containing fluorescent foci were refractory to fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, while foci in the inner segment exhibited recovery kinetics similar to OS regions without foci and Rho-EGFP. The Rho(P23H-EGFP foci were often in older, more distal OS disks. Electron micrographs of OS revealed abnormal disk membranes, with the regular disk bilayers broken into vesiculotubular structures. Furthermore, we observed similar OS disturbances in transgenic mice expressing Rho(P23H, suggesting such structures are a general consequence of mutant expression. Together these results show that mutant opsin disrupts OS disks, destabilizing the outer segment possibly via the formation of aggregates. This may render rods susceptible to mechanical injury or compromise OS function, contributing to photoreceptor loss.

  11. Gamma radiation induced mutant for improved yield components in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunflower has become an important oilseed in the Indian vegetable oil pool following its introduction from Russia in 1969. It can be used for all quality products useful to humans. The need for genetic variability and new useful gene sources has necessitated that sunflower breeders and geneticists utilize a wide range of germplasm in their breeding programmes. The induction of mutations in sunflower by physical and chemical mutagens has been practiced quite intensively in the last two decades. The results recorded to date suggest that utilization of mutagenesis could be a great advantage in improving the sunflower crop. An induced mutation programme was undertaken to generate variability in the variety 'Morden' using gamma rays. The certified and genetically pure seeds were irradiated with 50, 100, and 150 Gy gamma rays and used for further studies. Selection in M2 generations, raised from different treatments, revealed the presence of an erectophylly leaf mutant from 50 Gy treatment. The isolated mutant showed improved yield components like head diameter, 100- seed weight and yield per plant. The mutant was a plant with short petiole length and erect leaves. This type of leaf get sunlight throughout the day. From morning to afternoon, the first half of the leaf gets sunlight, and from afternoon to evening the second half of the leaf gets sunlight. As a result of getting sunlight the whole day, the plant had more photosynthetic products and grew vigorously. Plant height, head diameter and 100-seed weight had direct effect on seed yield, and the number of leaves and stem diameter influenced the seed yield indirectly. In the M3 generation, the mutant showed an almost two-fold increase over the parent variety for all investigated characters, except that of the yield per plant where there was a three-fold increase. The present investigation has shown that there are remarkable possibilities of increasing the yield components in sunflower by induced mutations

  12. Radiation induced promising mutants in Cowpea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) is an important legume crop of the tropics and subtropics of Asia, Africa and America. Breeding objectives in recent years have been to combine high yields with upright growth habit, bushy dwarf determinate plant type, early maturity and large seed size in addition to resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. With a view to achieving these objectives and creating additional - variability, the seeds of an elite variety V-130 were irradiated with 200 Gy of gamma rays, and a number of morphological mutants were isolated. The mutants with desirable characters like erect growth habit, dwarf, large seed size, and high pod number were isolated in the M2 generation and studied further in subsequent generations for their yield potential and other characteristics. The dwarf plant mutant TCM 77-4, characterised by reduced plant height, bushy growth, large seed size and absence of tendril bred true when grown in rabi seasons, but behaved like parent in respect of growth habit in kharif season. It was far superior to the parent in respect of seed size in all the seasons. The mutant is envisaged to be the most suitable for rice fallows. Among the several promising mutants with large seed size, the mutant TCM 13-5 showed a test weight of 16.8 g against 8.8 g of the parent. A mutant with large pod number designated as TCM 121-8 showed promise with its very high yield, when grown in summer albeit with delayed maturity. Several mutants with maturity similar to that of the parent have shown higher seed yield. The variability generated through the radiation- induced mutation is being utilised for creating novel high yielding early maturing varieties of cowpea. (author)

  13. Induced mutants for rice functional genomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Induced mutations have been playing important roles in both crop germplasm enhancement and new variety development. With the completion of the rice genome sequence, the study on functional genomics in rice has become a major task. Construction of rice mutant library is an essential approach for rice functional genomics study. This paper briefly reviewed several common techniques for generation of rice mutant library and its application in rice functional research, taking examples of developing rice chloroplast development related mutant library to provide the basic materials for functional genes cloning. A rice Chlorophyll (Chl) deficient mutant, yellow-green leaf1 (ygl1), was isolated, which showed yellow-green leaves in young plants with decreased Chl synthesis, increased level of tetrapyrrole intermediates, and delayed chloroplast development. Genetic analysis demonstrated that the phenotype of ygl1 was caused by a recessive mutation in a nuclear gene. The ygl1 locus was mapped to chromosome 5. A missense mutation was found in a highly conserved residue of YGL1 in the ygl1 mutant, resulting in reduction of the enzymatic activity. Another green-revertible albino leaf (gral) mutant involved in chloroplast development was screened from a M2 population induced by 300Gy 60Co gamma rays irradiation to the seeds of rice male sterile line PA64S with the collaboration of Zhejiang University. The mutant seedling leaves exhibit albino firstly but turn to normal green after the sixth leaf extended thoroughly. Systematical research including photosynthetic pigment, chloroplast microscopic observation and gene cloning was carried out on the gral mutant. (author)

  14. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  15. [Evaluation of penicillin expandase mutants and complex substrate inhibition characteristics at high concentrations of penicillin G].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linjun; Fan, Keqiang; Ji, Junjie; Yang, Keqian

    2015-12-01

    Penicillin expandase, also known as deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase (DAOCS), is an essential enzyme involved in cephalosporin C biosynthesis. To evaluate the catalytic behaviors of penicillin expandase under high penicillin G concentration and to identify mutants suitable for industrial applications, the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and several mutants with increased activities toward penicillin G were determined by HPLC under high penicillin G concentrations. Their specific activity profiles were compared with theoretical predictions by different catalytic dynamics models. We evaluated the specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and previous reported high-activity mutants H4, H5, H6 and H7 at concentrations ranging from 5.6 to 500 mmol/L penicillin G. The specific activities of wild-type DAOCS and mutant H4 increased as penicillin G concentration increased, but decreased when concentrations of substrate go above 200 mmol/L. Other mutants H5, H6 and H7 showed more complex behaviors under high concentration of penicillin G. Among all tested enzymes, mutant H6 showed the highest activity when concentration of penicillin G is above 100 mmol/L. Our results revealed that the substrate inhibition to wild-type DAOCS' by penicillin G is noncompetitive. Other DAOCS mutants showed more complex trends in their specific activities at high concentration of penicillin G (>100 mmol/L), indicating more complex substrate inhibition mechanism might exist. The substrate inhibition and activity of DAOCS mutants at high penicillin G concentration provide important insight to help select proper mutants for industrial application. PMID:27093832

  16. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Dick

    Full Text Available Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP, suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  17. Barley mutant line with high protein yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutation breeding was initiated in 1969 at the Agricultural Research Institute, Nicosia, aiming at developing high yielding barley lines having also high protein or lysine content. The final results were reported at the FAO/IAEA Research Co-ordination Meeting at Nicosia in 1980. At that time some lines were superior to their mother line in grain yield, protein content or protein yield. However, high yield is essential for feed-barley as there is no premium price for protein content or quality. In the experiments reported earlier, the mean grain yield of mutant M-Att-73-337-1 was 3202 kg/ha, 9.9% higher than the mother variety 'Attiki'. The Kjeldahl protein content was 12.7% for the mutant line and 13.4% for the mother variety. The mutant line was further evaluated in field trials (11 m2 plots and 6 replications) during 1983-88, along with other promising material from the breeding programme. The mutant line outyielded its mother variety by 9.7% in grain yield and 16% in straw yield. These increases are apparently the result of increased 1000-grain weight and a higher number of culms per m2. Protein content of the mutant line was slightly lower, but its protein yield was 5.5% higher. The yield of the mutant line over 16 trials during 1983-88 was also 4% higher than the yield of the main commercially grown variety Athenais

  18. Evolution of tryptophan biosynthetic pathway in microbial genomes: a comparative genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, V K; Sarkar, Susmita; Sinha, Somdatta

    2014-03-01

    Biosynthetic pathway evolution needs to consider the evolution of a group of genes that code for enzymes catalysing the multiple chemical reaction steps leading to the final end product. Tryptophan biosynthetic pathway has five chemical reaction steps that are highly conserved in diverse microbial genomes, though the genes of the pathway enzymes show considerable variations in arrangements, operon structure (gene fusion and splitting) and regulation. We use a combined bioinformatic and statistical analyses approach to address the question if the pathway genes from different microbial genomes, belonging to a wide range of groups, show similar evolutionary relationships within and between them. Our analyses involved detailed study of gene organization (fusion/splitting events), base composition, relative synonymous codon usage pattern of the genes, gene expressivity, amino acid usage, etc. to assess inter- and intra-genic variations, between and within the pathway genes, in diverse group of microorganisms. We describe these genetic and genomic variations in the tryptophan pathway genes in different microorganisms to show the similarities across organisms, and compare the same genes across different organisms to find the possible variability arising possibly due to horizontal gene transfers. Such studies form the basis for moving from single gene evolution to pathway evolutionary studies that are important steps towards understanding the systems biology of intracellular pathways. PMID:24592292

  19. Metabolic and functional diversity of saponins, biosynthetic intermediates and semi-synthetic derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tessa; Papadopoulou, Kalliope K; Osbourn, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Saponins are widely distributed plant natural products with vast structural and functional diversity. They are typically composed of a hydrophobic aglycone, which is extensively decorated with functional groups prior to the addition of hydrophilic sugar moieties, to result in surface-active amphipathic compounds. The saponins are broadly classified as triterpenoids, steroids or steroidal glycoalkaloids, based on the aglycone structure from which they are derived. The saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates display a variety of biological activities of interest to the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food sectors. Although their relevance in industrial applications has long been recognized, their role in plants is underexplored. Recent research on modulating native pathway flux in saponin biosynthesis has demonstrated the roles of saponins and their biosynthetic intermediates in plant growth and development. Here, we review the literature on the effects of these molecules on plant physiology, which collectively implicate them in plant primary processes. The industrial uses and potential of saponins are discussed with respect to structure and activity, highlighting the undoubted value of these molecules as therapeutics. PMID:25286183

  20. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  1. Exploring complex pheromone biosynthetic processes in the bumblebee male labial gland by RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buček, A; Brabcová, J; Vogel, H; Prchalová, D; Kindl, J; Valterová, I; Pichová, I

    2016-06-01

    Male marking pheromones (MPs) are used by the majority of bumblebee species (Hymenoptera: Apidae), including a commercially important greenhouse pollinator, the buff-tailed bumblebee (Bombus terrestris), to attract conspecific females. MP biosynthetic processes in the cephalic part of the bumblebee male labial gland (LG) are of extraordinary complexity, involving enzymes of fatty acid and isoprenoid biosynthesis, which jointly produce more than 50 compounds. We employed a differential transcriptomic approach to identify candidate genes involved in MP biosynthesis by sequencing Bombus terrestris LG and fat body (FB) transcriptomes. We identified 12 454 abundantly expressed gene products (reads per kilobase of exon model per million mapped reads value > 1) that had significant hits in the GenBank nonredundant database. Of these, 876 were upregulated in the LG (> 4-fold difference). We identified more than 140 candidate genes potentially involved in MP biosynthesis, including esterases, fatty acid reductases, lipases, enzymes involved in limited fatty acid chain shortening, neuropeptide receptors and enzymes involved in biosynthesis of triacylglycerols, isoprenoids and fatty acids. For selected candidates, we confirmed their abundant expression in LG using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Our study shows that the Bombus terrestris LG transcriptome reflects both fatty acid and isoprenoid MP biosynthetic processes and identifies rational gene targets for future studies to disentangle the molecular basis of MP biosynthesis. Additionally, LG and FB transcriptomes enrich the available transcriptomic resources for Bombus terrestris. PMID:26945888

  2. Alterations in the heme biosynthetic pathway as an index of exposure to toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, G.S.; Zelt, D.T.; Cole, S.P.

    1982-07-01

    Under normal circumstances the heme biosynthetic pathway is carefully controlled and porphyrins are formed in only trace amounts. When control mechanisms are disturbed by xenobiotics, porphyrins may be formed and serve as a signal of the interaction between a xenobiotic and the heme biosynthetic pathway. For example, porphyrinuria was an early manifestation of a hexachlorobenzene-induced porphyria outbreak in Turkey. In humans exposed to polybrominated biphenyls and to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin the urinary porphyrin pattern was significantly different from normal in a large number of exposed individuals. The question is raised whether measurement of urinary porphyrin profiles by improved methods will enable an estimate to be made of the extent of exposure to haloaromatic hydrocarbons in the human population. A wide variety of xenobiotics interact with the prosthetic heme of cytochrome P-450 forming novel N-alkylporphyrins. Identification of these N-alkylporphyrins in body fluids might provide a means of assessing exposure to a variety of xenobiotics in human populations.

  3. Indole-3-acetic acid in Fusarium graminearum: Identification of biosynthetic pathways and characterization of physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kun; Rocheleau, Hélène; Qi, Peng-Fei; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Ouellet, Thérèse

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a devastating pathogenic fungus causing fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat. This fungus can produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and a very large amount of IAA accumulates in wheat head tissues during the first few days of infection by F. graminearum. Using liquid culture conditions, we have determined that F. graminearum can use tryptamine (TAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) as biosynthetic intermediates to produce IAA. It is the first time that F. graminearum is shown to use the l-tryptophan-dependent TAM and IAN pathways rather than the indole-3-acetamide or indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways to produce IAA. Our experiments also showed that exogenous IAA was metabolized by F. graminearum. Exogenous IAA, TAM, and IAN inhibited mycelial growth; IAA and IAN also affected the hyphae branching pattern and delayed macroconidium germination. IAA and TAM had a small positive effect on the production of the mycotoxin 15-ADON while IAN inhibited its production. Our results showed that IAA and biosynthetic intermediates had a significant effect on F. graminearum physiology and suggested a new area of exploration for fungicidal compounds. PMID:27567719

  4. Effects of Cerium on Accumulation of Anthocyanins and Expression of Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Genes in Potato Cell Tissue Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Ce (Ⅳ) on callus growth, anthocyanin content, and expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in callus suspension cultures of Solanum tuberosum cv. Chieftain were studied by the measurement of fresh weight, spectrophotometric assays, and semiquantitative RT-PCR. The results indicate that 0.1 mmol·L-1 Ce (Ⅳ) can promote callus growth, increase the accumulation of anthocyanins, and enhance the expression of five anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (CHS, F3H, F3′5′H, DFR, and 3GT) most efficiently. At high concentrations of 1 mmol·L-1, Ce (Ⅳ) partially inhibits callus growth and at 2 mmol·L-1 eventually lends to cell death. The results show that Ce(Ⅳ) can induce the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes to produce and accumulate anthocyanins and increase the yield of anthocyanins.

  5. Changes in Thermostability of Photosystem Ⅱ and Leaf Lipid Composition of Rice Mutant with Deficiency of Light-harvesting Chlorophyll Protein Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlai Tang; Mei Chen; Yinong Xu; Tingyun Kuang

    2007-01-01

    We studied the difference in thermostability of photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) and leaf lipid composition between a T-DNA insertion mutant rice (Oryza sativa L.) VG28 and its wild type Zhonghua11. Native green gel and SDS-PAGE electrophoreses revealed that the mutant VG28 lacked all light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes. Both the mutant and wild type were sensitive to high temperatures, and the maximal efficiency of PSⅡ photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and oxygen-evolving activity of PSⅡ in leaves significantly decreased with increasing temperature. However, the PSⅡ activity of the mutant was markedly more sensitive to high temperatures than that of the wild type. Lipid composition analysis showed that the mutant had less phosphatidylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol compared with the wild type. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the mutant had an obvious decrease in the content of unsaturation of membrane lipids on the thermostability of PSll are discussed.

  6. Invitro Synthesis of Barley Endosperm Proteins on Wild Type and Mutant Templates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, A.; Ingversen, J.

    1976-01-01

    an increased content of some hordein polypeptides catalyzed a preferential synthesis of these polypeptides in vitro. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the in vitro template activities of the free polyribosomes from the wild type and mutant endosperms were very similar. The......Membrane bound and free polyribosomes were isolated from 20 day old barley endosperms. Sucrose gradient analysis revealed distinct polysomal peaks up to heptamers. The isolated polysomes were active in a cell-free protein synthesizing system employing wheat germ extract. SDS-polyacrylamide gel......-migration with native hordein on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Membrane bound endosperm polysomes from a barley mutant defective in hordein synthesis produced in the cell-free protein synthesizing system only a small amount of hordein. Conversely membrane bound polysomes from the endosperm of a mutant giving rise to...

  7. Transcriptome analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti nodule bacteria in nifA mutant background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhexian; WANG Yiping; ZOU Huasong; LI Jian; ZHANG Yuantao; LIU Ying; YU Guanqiao; ZHU Jiabi; R(U)BERG Silvia; BECKER Anke

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 nifA mutant and wild type nodule bacteria were compared using whole genome microarrays. The results revealed a large scale alteration of gene expression (601 genes) in the nifA minus background. The loss of NifA altered the expression of many functional groups of genes (macromolecular metabolism, TCA cycle and respiration,nodulation and nitrogen fixation) and may lead to quite different life stages of the nodule bacteria.Upregulation of fixK and its associated genes was observed in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria. Additional quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed that the transcript levels of fixLJ were significantly upshifted in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria.Putative NifA binding sites were predicted by a statistical method in the upstream sequences of 13 differentially regulated genes from the nifA- transcriptome.

  8. Officially released mutant varieties in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of mutation techniques for crop improvement in China has a long and well-established tradition of more than 50 years. As the result of intensive research in many institutes dealing with application of nuclear technologies more than 620 cultivars of 44 crop species have been released. Numerous mutant varieties have been grown on a large scale bringing significant economic impact, sustaining crop production and greatly contributing to increase of food production also in stress prone areas of the country. However, there is still missing information not only on the number of mutant varieties released in particular crop species but also on mutagens applied, selection approaches and on the use of mutants in cross breeding. Numerous Chinese scientists collected and systematized this information. Results of their work were often published in local scientific journals in the Chinese language and as such were unavailable to breeders from other countries. Having this in mind, we requested Dr. Liu Luxiang, the Director of the Department of Plant Mutation Breeding and Genetics, Institute for Application of Atomic Energy, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing to help us in finding as much information as possible on mutant varieties officially released in China. The data has been collected in close collaboration with his colleagues from various institutions all over the country and then evaluated, edited and prepared for publication by our team responsible for the FAO/IAEA Database of Officially Released Mutant Varieties. We would like to thank all Chinese colleagues who contributed to this list of Chinese mutant varieties. We hope that this publication will stimulate plant breeders in China to collect more information on released mutant varieties and especially on the use of mutated genes in cross breeding. (author)

  9. Hepatitis B surface gene 145 mutant as a minor population in hepatitis B virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsu Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV can have mutations that include the a determinant, which causes breakthrough infection. In particular, a single mutation at amino acid 145 of the surface protein (G145 is frequently reported in the failure of prophylactic treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the a determinant mutants, especially the G145 variant, in Japan, where universal vaccination has not been adopted. Methods The present study was a retrospective study. The study cohorts were defined as follows: group 1, children with failure to prevent mother-to-child transmission despite immunoprophylaxis (n = 18, male/female = 8/10, age 1-14 years; median 6 years; group 2, HBV carriers who had not received vaccination or hepatitis B immunoglobulin (n = 107, male/female = 107, age 1-52 years; median 16 years. To detect the G145R and G145A mutants in patients, we designed 3 probes for real-time PCR. We also performed direct sequencing and cloning of PCR products. Results By mutant-specific real-time PCR, one subject (5.6% was positive for the G145R mutant in group 1, while the G145 mutant was undetectable in group 2. The a determinant mutants were detected in one (5.6% of the group 1 subjects and 10 (9.3% of the group 2 subjects using direct sequencing, but direct sequencing did not reveal the G145 mutant as a predominant strain in the two groups. However, the subject who was positive according to the mutant-specific real-time PCR in group 1 had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. In group 2, 11 patients had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Cloning of PCR products allowed detection of the G145R mutant as a minor strain in 7 (group 1: 1 subject, group 2: 6 subjects of 12 subjects who had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Conclusions The frequency of the a determinant mutants was not high in Japan. However, the G145R mutant was often present as a minor population in

  10. Increased somatic cell mutant frequency in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequencies of mutant T-cells in peripheral blood, which are deficient in the activity of hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were determined for atomic bomb survivors by direct clonal assay using a previously reported method. Results from 30 exposed survivors (exposed to more than 1 rad) and 17 age- and sex-matched controls (exposed to less than 1 rad) were analyzed. The mean mutant frequency (Mf) in the exposed (5.2 x 10-6; range 0.8 - 14.4 x 10-6) was significantly higher than in controls (3.4 x 10-6; range 1.3 - 9.3 x 10-6), a fact not attributable to lower nonmutant cell cloning efficiencies in the exposed group since cell cloning efficiencies were virtually identical in both groups. An initial analysis of the data did not reveal a significant correlation between individual Mfs and individual radiation dose estimates when the latter were defined by the original, tentative estimates (T65D), even though there was a significant positive correlation of Mfs with individual frequency of lymphocytes bearing chromosome aberration. However, reanalysis using the newer revised individual dose estimates (DS86) for 27 exposed survivors and 17 controls did reveal a significant but shallow positive correlation between T-cell Mf values and individual exposure doses. These results indicate that HPRT mutation in vivo in human T-cells could be detected in these survivors 40 years after the presumed mutational event. (author)

  11. Impairment in motor learning of somatostatin null mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeyda, T; Diehl, N; Paylor, R; Brennan, M B; Hochgeschwender, U

    2001-07-01

    Somatostatin was first identified as a hypothalamic factor which inhibits the release of growth hormone from the anterior pituitary (somatotropin release inhibitory factor, SRIF). Both SRIF and its receptors were subsequently found widely distributed within and outside the nervous system, in the adult as well as in the developing organism. Reflecting this wide distribution, somatostatin has been implicated regulating a diverse array of biological processes. These include body growth, homeostasis, sensory perception, autonomous functions, rate of intestinal absorption, behavior, including cognition and memory, and developmental processes. We produced null mutant mice lacking somatostatin through targeted mutagenesis. The mutant mice are healthy, fertile, and superficially indistinguishable from their heterozygous and wildtype littermates. A 'first round' phenotype screen revealed that mice lacking somatostatin have elevated plasma growth hormone levels, despite normal body size, and have elevated basal plasma corticosterone levels. In order to uncover subtle and unexpected differences, we carried out a systematic behavioral phenotype screen which identified a significant impairment in motor learning revealed when increased demands were made on motor coordination. Motor coordination and motor learning require an intact cerebellum. While somatostatin is virtually absent from the adult cerebellum, the ligand and its receptor(s) are transiently expressed at high levels in the developing cerebellum. This result suggests the functional significance of transient expression of SRIF and its receptors in the development of the cerebellum. PMID:11430867

  12. Agronomically valuable mutant lines of castor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of four castor varieties (VNIIMK 165-improved, VNIIMK 18, Chervonnaya and Antika) were treated with six chemical mutagens, N-nitroso-N-methyl urea (NMU), N-nitroso-N-ethyl urea (NEU), dimethyl sulphate (DMS), diethyl sulphate (DES), ethylenimine (EI) and 1,4-bis-diazoacetyl-butane (DAB) in various doses during 18 hours. About 40,000 plants were studied in M2 and 80 types of mutations were found, including a number of valuable mutants: short-stemmed, semi-dwarf, dwarf, early maturing, with female and interspersed types of racemes, highly productive etc. Based on trials in M3-M4, on small plots with two or three replications, the superior mutant lines were identified. The best mutants are presented in the table. Early maturation is very important for growing castor in the USSR, as it is the predecessor of winter wheat in crop rotation. The mutants M2-323 and Ml-83 are of great value as they show early maturation and high yield. Their productivity is mainly conditioned by a high percentage of interspersed plants. The reduction of plant height is of great importance for the successful combine harvesting of castor. Mutant lines M2-119 and Ml-284 characterised by low plant height and high yield are very interesting in this respect. The obtained initial material will be used in further breeding work

  13. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  14. Molecular flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosome recycling factor and its functional consequences: An exploration involving mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj; A Govindan; A Seshadri; B Dubey; U Varshney; M Vijayan

    2013-12-01

    Internal mobility of the two domain molecule of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is known to be important for its action. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RRF does not complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF (in the presence of E. coli EF-G alone). Crystal structure had revealed higher rigidity of the M. tuberculosis RRF due to the presence of additional salt bridges between domains. Two inter-domain salt bridges and one between the linker region and the domain containing C-terminal residues were disrupted by appropriate mutations. Except for a C-terminal deletion mutant, all mutants showed RRF activity in E. coli when M. tuberculosis EF-G was also co-expressed. The crystal structures of the point mutants, that of the C-terminal deletion mutant and that of the protein grown in the presence of a detergent, were determined. The increased mobility resulting from the disruption of the salt bridge involving the hinge region allows the appropriate mutant to weakly complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF even in the absence of simultaneous expression of the mycobacterial EF-G. The loss of activity of the C-terminal deletion mutant appears to be partly due to the rigidification of the molecule consequent to changes in the hinge region.

  15. Directed mutagenesis in Candida albicans: one-step gene disruption to isolate ura3 mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for introducing specific mutations into the diploid Candida albicans by one-step gene disruption and subsequent UV-induced recombination was developed. The cloned C. albicans URA3 gene was disrupted with the C. albicans ADE2 gene, and the linearized DNA was used for transformation of two ade2 mutants, SGY-129 and A81-Pu. Both an insertional inactivation of the URA3 gene and a disruption which results in a 4.0-kilobase deletion were made. Southern hybridization analyses demonstrated that the URA3 gene was disrupted on one of the chromosomal homologs in 15 of the 18 transformants analyzed. These analyses also revealed restriction site dimorphism of EcoRI at the URA3 locus which provides a unique marker to distinguish between chromosomal homologs. This enabled us to show that either homolog could be disrupted and that disrupted transformants of SGY-129 contained more than two copies of the URA3 locus. The A81-Pu transformants heterozygous for the ura3 mutations were rendered homozygous and Ura- by UV-induced recombination. The homozygosity of a deletion mutant and an insertion mutant was confirmed by Southern hybridization. Both mutants were transformed to Ura+ with plasmids containing the URA3 gene and in addition, were resistant to 5-fluoro-orotic acid, a characteristic of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura3 mutants as well as of orotidine-5'-phosphate decarboxylase mutants of other organisms

  16. Phenotypical and structural characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant involved in shoot apical meristem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe HU; Ping LI; Jinfang MA; Yunlong WANG; Xinyu WANG; Chongying WANG

    2008-01-01

    An Arabidopsis mutant induced by T-DNA insertion was studied with respect to its phenotype, micro-structure of shoot apical meristem (SAM) and histo-chemical localization of the GUS gene in comparison with the wild type. Phenotypical observation found that the mutant exhibited a dwarf phenotype with smaller organs (such as smaller leaves, shorter petioles), and slower development and flowering time compared to the wild type. Optical microscopic analysis of the mutant showed that it had a smaller and more flattened SAM, with reduced cell layers and a shortened distance between two leaf primordia compared with the wild type. In addi-tion, analysis of the histo-chemical localization of the GUS gene revealed that it was specifically expressed in the SAM and the vascular tissue of the mutant, which suggests that the gene trapped by T-DNA may function in the SAM, and T-DNA insertion could influence the functional activity of the related gene in the mutant, lead-ing to alterations in the SAM and a series of phenotypes in the mutant.

  17. Comparative docking studies of CYP1b1 and its PCG-associated mutant forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malkaram Sridhar Achary; Hampapathalu Adimurthy Nagarajaram

    2008-12-01

    Molecular docking has been used to compare and contrast the binding modes of oestradiol with the wild-type and some disease-associated mutant forms of the human CYP1b1 protein. The receptor structures used for docking were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of homology-modelled structures. Earlier studies involving molecular dynamics and principal component analysis indicated that mutations could have a disruptive effect on function, by destabilizing the native properties of the functionally important regions, especially those of the haem-binding and substrate-binding regions, which constitute the site of catalytic activity of the enzyme. In order to gain more insights into the possible differences in substrate-binding and catalysis between the wild-type and mutant proteins, molecular docking studies were carried out. Mutants showed altered protein–ligand interactions compared with the wild-type as a consequence of changes in the geometry of the substrate-binding region and in the position of haem relative to the active site. An important difference in ligand–protein interactions between the wild-type and mutants is the presence of stacking interaction with phenyl residues in the wild-type, which is either completely absent or considerably weaker in mutants. The present study revealed essential differences in the interactions between ligand and protein in wild-type and disease mutants, and helped in understanding the deleterious nature of disease mutations at the level of molecular function.

  18. Genetic analysis of plant height in induced mutants of aromatic rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inheritance of plant height in five gamma-ray induced mutants of aromatic rice cultivar Gobindabhog was studied through 6 x 6 diallel cross and segregation analyses. Diallel analysis revealed presence of additive and non-additive gene action with the preponderance of the latter. Proportion of dominant and recessive alleles was distributed unequally among the parents. The direction of dominance was towards tallness. The number of groups of genes was found to be three. The segregation analysis indicated the role of a single major recessive gene for height reduction in three mutants and, in another mutant, a single major recessive gene with negative modifiers. The other semi-dwarf mutant had two major recessive genes with almost equal effect in height reduction. The mutant allele(s) of the latter two mutants were non-allelic to sd sub(1) gene, which could be used as an alternative source of Dee Gee Woo Gen to widen the genetic diversity in semi-dwarfism

  19. Extended region of nodulation genes in Rhizobium meliloti 1021. I. Phenotypes of Tn5 insertion mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhizobium meliloti Nod- mutant WL131, a derivative of wild-type strain 102F51, was complemented by a clone bank of wild-type R. meliloti 1021 DNA, and clone pRmJT5 was recovered. Transfer of pRmJT5 conferred alfalfa nodulation on other Rhizobium species, indicating a role in host range determination for pRmJT5. Mutagenesis of pRmJT5 revealed several segments in which transposon insertion causes delay in nodulation, and/or marked reduction of the number of nodules formed on host alfalfa plants. The set of mutants indicated five regions in which nod genes are located; one mutant, nod-216, is located in a region not previously reported to encode a nodulation gene. Other mutant phenotypes correlated with the positions of open reading frames for nodH, nodF and nodE, and with a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. A mutant in nodG had no altered phenotype in this strain. One nodulation mutant was shown to be a large deletion of the common nod gene region. The authors present a discussion comparing the various studies made on this extended nod gene region

  20. The Crusade against Mutant p53: Does the COMPASS Point to the Holy Grail?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Christopher G; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2015-10-12

    Mutations in the TP53 gene not only inactivate its tumor suppressor function but also confer this transcription factor with gain-of-function oncogenic properties. A recent paper by Zhu and colleagues reveals a novel molecular pathway driven by mutant p53 and the COMPASS chromatin-modifying complex that is amenable to pharmacological inhibition. PMID:26461087

  1. Novel dnaG mutation in a dnaP mutant of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Y.; Nagata, T; Schwarz, W.; Wada, C.; Yura, T

    1985-01-01

    Reexamination of the dnaP18 mutant strain of Escherichia coli revealed that the mutation responsible for the arrest of DNA replication and cell growth at high temperatures resides in the dnaG gene rather than in the dnaP locus as previously thought; this mutation has been designated dnaG2903.

  2. Repressor Mutant Forms of the Azospirillum brasilense NtrC Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Huergo, Luciano F.; Assumpção, Marcelo C.; Emanuel M. Souza; Steffens, M. Berenice R.; Yates, M. Geoffrey; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O.

    2004-01-01

    The Azospirillum brasilense mutant strains FP8 and FP9, after treatment with nitrosoguanidine, showed a null Nif phenotype and were unable to use nitrate as their sole nitrogen source. Sequencing of the ntrC genes revealed single nucleotide mutations in the NtrC nucleotide-binding site. The phenotypes of these strains are discussed in relation to their genotypes.

  3. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  4. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  5. Amphid defective mutant of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riso, L; Ristoratore, F; Sebastiano, M; Bazzicalupo, P

    1994-01-01

    Studies are reported on a chemoreception mutant which arose in a mutator strain. The mutant sensory neurons do not stain with fluoresceine isothiocyanate (Dyf phenotype), hence the name, dyf-1, given to the gene it identifies. The gene maps on LGI, 0.4 map units from dpy-5 on the unc-11 side. The response of mutant worms to various repellents has been studied and shown to be partially altered. Other chemoreception based behaviors are less affected. The cilia of the sensory neurons of the amphid are shorter than normal and the primary defect may be in the capacity of the sheath cells to secrete the matrix material that fills the space between cilia in the amphid channel. Progress toward the molecular cloning of the gene is also reported. Relevant results from other laboratories are briefly reviewed. PMID:7896139

  6. Water splitting-biosynthetic system with CO₂ reduction efficiencies exceeding photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Colón, Brendan C; Ziesack, Marika; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2016-06-01

    Artificial photosynthetic systems can store solar energy and chemically reduce CO2 We developed a hybrid water splitting-biosynthetic system based on a biocompatible Earth-abundant inorganic catalyst system to split water into molecular hydrogen and oxygen (H2 and O2) at low driving voltages. When grown in contact with these catalysts, Ralstonia eutropha consumed the produced H2 to synthesize biomass and fuels or chemical products from low CO2 concentration in the presence of O2 This scalable system has a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~50% when producing bacterial biomass and liquid fusel alcohols, scrubbing 180 grams of CO2 per kilowatt-hour of electricity. Coupling this hybrid device to existing photovoltaic systems would yield a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~10%, exceeding that of natural photosynthetic systems. PMID:27257255

  7. Biosynthetic origin of the isoprene units in chromenes of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metabolic studies involving the incorporation of [1-13C]-D-glucose into intact leaves of Piper aduncum (Piperaceae) have indicated that both the mevalonate (MVA) and the pyruvate-triose (MEP) non-mevalonate pathways are implicated in the biosynthesis of isoprene moieties present in methyl 2,2-dimethyl-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylate (1) and methyl 2,2-dimethyl-8-(3'-methyl- 2'-butenyl)-2H-1-chromene-6-carboxylate (2). The pattern of incorporation of label from [1- 13C]-D-glucose into these chromenes was determined by quantitative 13C NMR spectroscopy. The results confirmed that biosynthetic compartment of 1 and 2 could either be the plastid and/ or the cytosol or, possibly, an additional compartment such as the plastid inter-membrane space. (author)

  8. Elucidation of the Vanillin Biosynthetic Pathway in Vanilla planifolia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallage, Nethaji Janeshawari

    harvested pods are processed by curing to stop the natural vegetative process and to initiate the enzymes that are responsible for the formation of the well-known aromatic flavour constituents. Vanillin (3-methoxy-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde) is the main flavour component of vanilla extract from cured vanilla...... pods. As vanillin is toxic to living organisms in high concentrations, vanilla plants store vanillin almost entirely as the glucose conjugated form, vanillin-β-D-glucoside. The highest concentration of vanillin glucoside is localized in the inner part of the pod including mesocarp and placenta 6 months...... after the pollination. Subcellular localization of vanillin and its glucoside was speculated to be in the vacuole. Despite the popularity of the flavour, the vanillin biosynthetic pathway has remained elusive, presumably due to lack of genetic and genomic resources during past few decades. The research...

  9. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes. PMID:26972005

  10. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijana Upadhyay

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  11. Phenotypes and gene expression profiles of Saccharopolyspora erythraea rifampicin-resistant (rif mutants affected in erythromycin production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bicciato Silvio

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence from previous works that bacterial secondary metabolism may be stimulated by genetic manipulation of RNA polymerase (RNAP. In this study we have used rifampicin selection as a strategy to genetically improve the erythromycin producer Saccharopolyspora erythraea. Results Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (rif mutants were isolated from the parental strain NRRL2338 and two rif mutations mapping within rpoB, S444F and Q426R, were characterized. With respect to the parental strain, S444F mutants exhibited higher respiratory performance and up to four-fold higher final erythromycin yields; in contrast, Q426R mutants were slow-growing, developmental-defective and severely impaired in erythromycin production. DNA microarray analysis demonstrated that these rif mutations deeply changed the transcriptional profile of S. erythraea. The expression of genes coding for key enzymes of carbon (and energy and nitrogen central metabolism was dramatically altered in turn affecting the flux of metabolites through erythromycin feeder pathways. In particular, the valine catabolic pathway that supplies propionyl-CoA for biosynthesis of the erythromycin precursor 6-deoxyerythronolide B was strongly up-regulated in the S444F mutants, while the expression of the biosynthetic gene cluster of erythromycin (ery was not significantly affected. In contrast, the ery cluster was down-regulated ( Conclusion Rifampicin selection is a simple and reliable tool to investigate novel links between primary and secondary metabolism and morphological differentiation in S. erythraea and to improve erythromycin production. At the same time genome-wide analysis of expression profiles using DNA microarrays allowed information to be gained about the mechanisms underlying the stimulatory/inhibitory effects of the rif mutations on erythromycin production.

  12. Genomics of pyrrolnitrin biosynthetic loci : evidence for conservation and whole-operon mobility within Gram-negative bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Costa, Rodrigo; van Aarle, Ingrid M.; Mendes, Rodrigo; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Pyrrolnitrin (PRN) is a tryptophan-derived secondary metabolite produced by a narrow range of Gram-negative bacteria. The PRN biosynthesis by rhizobacteria presumably has a key role in their life strategies and in the biocontrol of plant diseases. The biosynthetic operon that encodes the pathway tha

  13. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  14. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh;

    2015-01-01

    anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer׳s disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin...

  15. Increased glycopeptide production after overexpression of shikimate pathway genes being part of the balhimycin biosynthetic gene cluster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thykær, Jette; Nielsen, Jens; Wohlleben, W.;

    2010-01-01

    Amycolatopsis balhimycina produces the vancomycin-analogue balhimycin. The strain therefore serves as a model strain for glycopeptide antibiotic production. Previous characterisation of the balhimycin biosynthetic cluster had shown that the border sequences contained both, a putative 3-deoxy-d-ar...

  16. Narrow-spectrum inhibitors targeting an alternative menaquinone biosynthetic pathway of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Matsui, Hidenori; Yamaji, Kenzaburo; Takahashi, Tetsufumi; Øverby, Anders; Nakamura, Masahiko; Matsumoto, Atsuko; Nonaka, Kenichi; Sunazuka, Toshiaki; Ōmura, Satoshi; Nakano, Hirofumi

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to identify narrow-spectrum natural compounds that specifically inhibit an alternative menaquinone (MK; vitamin K2) biosynthetic pathway (the futalosine pathway) of Helicobacter pylori. Culture broth samples of 6183 microbes were examined using the paper disc method with different combinations of 2 of the following 3 indicator microorganisms: Bacillus halodurans C-125 and Kitasatospora setae KM-6054(T), which have only the futalosine pathway of MK biosynthesis, and Bacillus subtilis H17, which has only the canonical MK biosynthetic pathway. Most of the active compounds isolated from culture broth samples were from the families of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Only one compound isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. K12-1112, siamycin I (a 21-residue lasso peptide antibiotic), targeted the futalosine pathway. The inhibitory activities of representative PUFAs and siamycin I against the growth of B. halodurans or K. setae were abrogated by supplementation with MK. Thereafter, the growth of H. pylori strains SS1 and TN2GF4 in broth cultures was dose-dependently suppressed by eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), or siamycin I, and these inhibitory effects were reduced by supplementation with MK. Daily administration of EPA (100 μM), DHA (100 μM), or siamycin I (2.5 μM) in drinking water reduced the H. pylori SS1 colonization in the gastric mucosa of C57BL/6 mice by 96%, 78%, and 68%, respectively. These data suggest that EPA, DHA, and siamycin I prevented H. pylori infection by inhibiting the futalosine pathway of MK biosynthesis. PMID:27346378

  17. Stress and developmental responses of terpenoid biosynthetic genes in Cistus creticus subsp. creticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irene; Kanellis, Angelos K

    2010-06-01

    Plants, and specially species adapted in non-friendly environments, produce secondary metabolites that help them to cope with biotic or abiotic stresses. These metabolites could be of great pharmaceutical interest because several of those show cytotoxic, antibacterial or antioxidant activities. Leaves' trichomes of Cistus creticus ssp. creticus, a Mediterranean xerophytic shrub, excrete a resin rich in several labdane-type diterpenes with verified in vitro and in vivo cytotoxic and cytostatic activity against human cancer cell lines. Bearing in mind the properties and possible future exploitation of these natural products, it seemed interesting to study their biosynthesis and its regulation, initially at the molecular level. For this purpose, genes encoding enzymes participating in the early steps of the terpenoids biosynthetic pathways were isolated and their gene expression patterns were investigated in different organs and in response to various stresses and defence signals. The genes studied were the CcHMGR from the mevalonate pathway, CcDXS and CcDXR from the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway and the two geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthases (CcGGDPS1 and 2) previously characterized from this species. The present work indicates that the leaf trichomes are very active biosynthetically as far as it concerns terpenoids biosynthesis, and the terpenoid production from this tissue seems to be transcriptionally regulated. Moreover, the CcHMGR and CcDXS genes (the rate-limiting steps of the isoprenoids' pathways) showed an increase during mechanical wounding and application of defence signals (like meJA and SA), which is possible to reflect an increased need of the plant tissues for the corresponding metabolites. PMID:20364257

  18. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Fletcher

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes. By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  19. Betacyanin biosynthetic genes and enzymes are differentially induced by (abiotic stress in Amaranthus hypochondriacus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Casique-Arroyo

    Full Text Available An analysis of key genes and enzymes of the betacyanin biosynthetic pathway in Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Ah was performed. Complete cDNA sequence of Ah genes coding for cyclo-DOPA 5-O glucosyltransferase (AhcDOPA5-GT, two 4, 5-DOPA-extradiol-dioxygenase isoforms (AhDODA-1 and AhDODA-2, respectively, and a betanidin 5-O-glucosyltransferase (AhB5-GT, plus the partial sequence of an orthologue of the cytochrome P-450 R gene (CYP76AD1 were obtained. With the exception AhDODA-2, which had a closer phylogenetic relationship to DODA-like genes in anthocyanin-synthesizing plants, all genes analyzed closely resembled those reported in related Caryophyllales species. The measurement of basal gene expression levels, in addition to the DOPA oxidase tyrosinase (DOT activity, in different tissues of three Ah genotypes having contrasting pigmentation levels (green to red-purple was determined. Additional analyses were performed in Ah plants subjected to salt and drought stress and to two different insect herbivory regimes. Basal pigmentation accumulation in leaves, stems and roots of betacyanic plants correlated with higher expression levels of AhDODA-1 and AhB5-GT, whereas DOT activity levels coincided with pigment accumulation in stems and roots and with the acyanic nature of green plants, respectively, but not with pigmentation in leaves. Although the abiotic stress treatments tested produced changes in pigment levels in different tissues, pigment accumulation was the highest in leaves and stems of drought stressed betacyanic plants, respectively. However, tissue pigment accumulation in stressed Ah plants did not always correlate with betacyanin biosynthetic gene expression levels and/or DOT activity. This effect was tissue- and genotype-dependent, and further suggested that other unexamined factors were influencing pigment content in stressed Ah. The results obtained from the insect herbivory assays, particularly in acyanic plants, also support the

  20. Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Monophyletic Origin of the Ergot Alkaloid Gene dmaW in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Miao Liu; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Schardl, Christopher L.

    2009-01-01

    Ergot alkaloids are indole-derived mycotoxins that are important in agriculture and medicine. Ergot alkaloids are produced by a few representatives of two distantly related fungal lineages, the Clavicipitaceae and the Trichocomaceae. Comparison of the ergot alkaloid gene clusters from these two lineages revealed differences in the relative positions and orientations of several genes. The question arose: is ergot alkaloid biosynthetic capability from a common origin? We used a molecular phylog...

  1. Genetic and metabolomic dissection of the ergothioneine and selenoneine biosynthetic pathway in the fission yeast, S. pombe, and construction of an overproduction system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Pluskal

    Full Text Available Ergothioneine is a small, sulfur-containing metabolite (229 Da synthesized by various species of bacteria and fungi, which can accumulate to millimolar levels in tissues or cells (e.g. erythrocytes of higher eukaryotes. It is commonly marketed as a dietary supplement due to its proposed protective and antioxidative functions. In this study we report the genes forming the two-step ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified the first gene, egt1+ (SPBC1604.01, by sequence homology to previously published genes from Neurospora crassa and Mycobacterium smegmatis. We showed, using metabolomic analysis, that the Δegt1 deletion mutant completely lacked ergothioneine and its precursors (trimethyl histidine/hercynine and hercynylcysteine sulfoxide. Since the second step of ergothioneine biosynthesis has not been characterized in eukaryotes, we examined four putative homologs (Nfs1/SPBC21D10.11c, SPAC11D3.10, SPCC777.03c, and SPBC660.12c of the corresponding mycobacterial enzyme EgtE. Among deletion mutants of these genes, only one (ΔSPBC660.12c, designated Δegt2 showed a substantial decrease in ergothioneine, accompanied by accumulation of its immediate precursor, hercynylcysteine sulfoxide. Ergothioneine-deficient strains exhibited no phenotypic defects during vegetative growth or quiescence. To effectively study the role of ergothioneine, we constructed an egt1+ overexpression system by replacing its native promoter with the nmt1+ promoter, which is inducible in the absence of thiamine. We employed three versions of the nmt1 promoter with increasing strength of expression and confirmed corresponding accumulations of ergothioneine. We quantified the intracellular concentration of ergothioneine in S. pombe (0.3, 157.4, 41.6, and up to 1606.3 µM in vegetative, nitrogen-starved, glucose-starved, and egt1+-overexpressing cells, respectively and described its gradual accumulation under long

  2. Absence of Malolactic Activity Is a Characteristic of H+-ATPase-Deficient Mutants of the Lactic Acid Bacterium Oenococcus oeni

    OpenAIRE

    Galland, Delphine; Tourdot-Maréchal, Raphaëlle; Abraham, Maud; Chu, Ky Son; Guzzo, Jean

    2003-01-01

    The lack of malolactic activity in H+-ATPase-deficient mutants of Oenococcus oeni selected previously was analyzed at the molecular level. Western blot experiments revealed a spot at 60 kDa corresponding to the malolactic enzyme only in the parental strain. Moreover, the mleA transcript encoding the malolactic enzyme was not detected by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis of mutants. These results suggest that the malolactic operon was not transcribed in ATPase-deficient mutants. The mleR...

  3. Proteomic and Transcriptomic Elucidation of the Mutant Ralstonia eutropha G+1 with Regard to Glucose Utilization▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Raberg, Matthias; Peplinski, Katja; Heiss, Silvia; Ehrenreich, Armin; Voigt, Birgit; Döring, Christina; Bömeke, Mechthild; Hecker, Michael; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    By taking advantage of the available genome sequence of Ralstonia eutropha H16, glucose uptake in the UV-generated glucose-utilizing mutant R. eutropha G+1 was investigated by transcriptomic and proteomic analyses. Data revealed clear evidence that glucose is transported by a usually N-acetylglucosamine-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS)-type transport system, which in this mutant is probably overexpressed due to a derepression of the encoding nag operon by an identified insertion mutat...

  4. Proteome Analysis of the Wild and YX-1 Male Sterile Mutant Anthers of Wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Rui; Sijun Yue,; Xu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Jianyu; Xu, Qing; Wang, Xiaolin; Han, Lu; Yu, Deyue

    2012-01-01

    Pollen development is disturbed in the early tetrad stage of the YX-1 male sterile mutant of wolfberry (Lycium barbarum L.). The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed anther proteins and to reveal their possible roles in pollen development and male sterility. To address this question, the proteomes of the wild-type (WT) and YX-1 mutant were compared. Approximately 1760 protein spots on two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) gels were detected. A number o...

  5. Activation of the thrombopoietin receptor by mutant calreticulin in CALR-mutant myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Marito; Yang, Yinjie; Masubuchi, Nami; Hironaka, Yumi; Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Mizukami, Yoshihisa; Kan, Shin; Shirane, Shuichi; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2016-03-10

    Recurrent somatic mutations of calreticulin (CALR) have been identified in patients harboring myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, their role in tumorigenesis remains elusive. Here, we found that the expression of mutant but not wild-type CALR induces the thrombopoietin (TPO)-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. We demonstrated that c-MPL, the TPO receptor, is required for this cytokine-independent growth of UT-7/TPO cells. Mutant CALR preferentially associates with c-MPL that is bound to Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) over the wild-type protein. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutant-specific carboxyl terminus portion of CALR interferes with the P-domain of CALR to allow the N-domain to interact with c-MPL, providing an explanation for the gain-of-function property of mutant CALR. We showed that mutant CALR induces the phosphorylation of JAK2 and its downstream signaling molecules in UT-7/TPO cells and that this induction was blocked by JAK2 inhibitor treatment. Finally, we demonstrated that c-MPL is required for TPO-independent megakaryopoiesis in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoietic stem cells harboring the CALR mutation. These findings imply that mutant CALR activates the JAK2 downstream pathway via its association with c-MPL. Considering these results, we propose that mutant CALR promotes myeloproliferative neoplasm development by activating c-MPL and its downstream pathway. PMID:26817954

  6. Mutations in four glycosyl hydrolases reveal a highly coordinated pathway for rhodopsin biosynthesis and N-glycan trimming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica E Rosenbaum

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As newly synthesized glycoproteins move through the secretory pathway, the asparagine-linked glycan (N-glycan undergoes extensive modifications involving the sequential removal and addition of sugar residues. These modifications are critical for the proper assembly, quality control and transport of glycoproteins during biosynthesis. The importance of N-glycosylation is illustrated by a growing list of diseases that result from defects in the biosynthesis and processing of N-linked glycans. The major rhodopsin in Drosophila melanogaster photoreceptors, Rh1, is highly unique among glycoproteins, as the N-glycan appears to be completely removed during Rh1 biosynthesis and maturation. However, much of the deglycosylation pathway for Rh1 remains unknown. To elucidate the key steps in Rh1 deglycosylation in vivo, we characterized mutant alleles of four Drosophila glycosyl hydrolases, namely α-mannosidase-II (α-Man-II, α-mannosidase-IIb (α-Man-IIb, a β-N-acetylglucosaminidase called fused lobes (Fdl, and hexosaminidase 1 (Hexo1. We have demonstrated that these four enzymes play essential and unique roles in a highly coordinated pathway for oligosaccharide trimming during Rh1 biosynthesis. Our results reveal that α-Man-II and α-Man-IIb are not isozymes like their mammalian counterparts, but rather function at distinct stages in Rh1 maturation. Also of significance, our results indicate that Hexo1 has a biosynthetic role in N-glycan processing during Rh1 maturation. This is unexpected given that in humans, the hexosaminidases are typically lysosomal enzymes involved in N-glycan catabolism with no known roles in protein biosynthesis. Here, we present a genetic dissection of glycoprotein processing in Drosophila and unveil key steps in N-glycan trimming during Rh1 biosynthesis. Taken together, our results provide fundamental advances towards understanding the complex and highly regulated pathway of N-glycosylation in vivo and reveal novel insights

  7. Sensory mother cell division is specifically affected in a Cyclin-A mutant of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, R; Togashi, S; Takahisa, M; Tsurumura, S; Mikuni, M; Kondo, K.(Yamagata University, Yamagata, 992-8510, Japan); Miyake, T

    1992-01-01

    Cyclin proteins are one of the important components of the mechanism regulating mitosis in eukaryotic cells. We isolated a Drosophila Cyclin-A mutant in which the progenitor cells of the peripheral nervous system (the sensory mother cells) do not divide properly, causing the loss and other abnormalities of mechanosensory organs in the adult fly. Sequence analysis of the mutant genome reveals that a P element is inserted into the first intron of the Cyclin-A gene. A 13 kb wild-type genomic DNA...

  8. Straight Mutants of Spirillum volutans Can Swim

    OpenAIRE

    Padgett, P. J.; Friedman, M. W.; Krieg, N R

    1983-01-01

    Nonhelical mutant cells of Spirillum volutans ATCC 19554 can swim as fast as the helical cells. Consequently, a helical cell shape is not required for motility of this species, and the function of the polar flagellar fascicles is not merely to cause rotation, and therefore translocation, of the corkscrew-shaped cell.

  9. A dominant semi dwarf mutant in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In the winter of 1997, a semi dwarf mutant was found in the F6 population of M9056/ R8018 xuan in Hainan Province. In the spring of 1998, the seeds were sown in Hefei, Anhui Province and the plant height of the population was measured at maturity.

  10. Induced mutants for cereal grain protein improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 17 papers and one summary presented, six dealing with the genetic improvement of seed protein using ionizing radiations fall within the INIS subject scope. Other topics discussed were non-radiation induced mutants used for cereal grain protein improvement

  11. Regulatory Citrate Lyase Mutants of Salmonella typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Kulla, Hans G.

    1983-01-01

    Citrate lyase, the key enzyme of anaerobic citrate catabolism, could not be deleted from Salmonella typhimurium. The only class of mutants found had a mode of covalent regulation that strongly resembled the Escherichia coli system: citrate lyase was only active, i.e., acetylated, when a cosubstrate was present.

  12. Regulatory citrate lyase mutants of Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, H G

    1983-01-01

    Citrate lyase, the key enzyme of anaerobic citrate catabolism, could not be deleted from Salmonella typhimurium. The only class of mutants found had a mode of covalent regulation that strongly resembled the Escherichia coli system: citrate lyase was only active, i.e., acetylated, when a cosubstrate was present. PMID:6336740

  13. Molecular Genetic Identification Of Some Flax Mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five flax genotypes (Linum usitatissimum L.) i.e., commercial cultivar Sakha 2, the mother variety Giza 4 and three mutant types induced by gamma rays, were screened for their salinity tolerance in field experiments (salinity concentration was 8600 and 8300 ppm for soil and irrigation water, respectively). Mutation 6 was the most salt tolerant as compared to the other four genotypes.RAPD technique was used to detect some molecular markers associated with salt tolerance in flax (Mut 6), RAPD-PCR results using 12 random primers exhibited 149 amplified fragments; 91.9% of them were polymorphic and twelve molecular markers (8.1%) for salt tolerant (mutant 6) were identified with molecular size ranged from 191 to 4159 bp and only eight primers successes to amplify these specific markers. Concerning the other mutants, Mut 15 and Mut 25 exhibited 4.3% and 16.2% specific markers, respectively. The induced mutants exhibited genetic similarity to the parent variety were about 51%, 58.3% and 61.1% for Mut 25, Mut 6 and Mut 15, respectively. These specific markers (SM) are used for identification of the induced mutations and it is important for new variety registration.

  14. Systematic Triple-Mutant Analysis Uncovers Functional Connectivity between Pathways Involved in Chromosome Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Haber

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interactions reveal the functional relationships between pairs of genes. In this study, we describe a method for the systematic generation and quantitation of triple mutants, termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA. We have used this approach to interrogate partially redundant pairs of genes in S. cerevisiae, including ASF1 and CAC1, two histone chaperones. After subjecting asf1Δ cac1Δ to TMA, we found that the Swi/Snf Rdh54 protein compensates for the absence of Asf1 and Cac1. Rdh54 more strongly associates with the chromatin apparatus and the pericentromeric region in the double mutant. Moreover, Asf1 is responsible for the synthetic lethality observed in cac1Δ strains lacking the HIRA-like proteins. A similar TMA was carried out after deleting both CLB5 and CLB6, cyclins that regulate DNA replication, revealing a strong functional connection to chromosome segregation. This approach can reveal functional redundancies that cannot be uncovered through traditional double-mutant analyses.

  15. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organo pollutants in soils and aqueous media. Most of the organic compounds are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, bio pulping, bio bleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated, or are hyper producers or super secretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through UV-light and γ-ray mutagenesis, we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants, 76UV, produced 272 U of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity/L after 9 d under high nitrogen (although the parent strain does not produce this enzyme under these conditions). The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments, the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 d

  16. Evaluation of high yielding mungbean mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungbean is the second major (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) pulse crop in Pakistan, after chickpea, and is the main pulse crop grown during the spring season in the province of Sindh. Its yield is very low (450 kg/ha) which is mainly due to the non-availability of pure seed of high yield potential genotypes. Keeping in view the importance of induced mutations in all field crops and particularly in the evolution of mungbean cultivars, an induced mutation programme was initiated at AEARC, Tandojam during 1985. Since then a large number of mutants have been developed and are at various stages of evaluation. Among them two mungbean mutants (AEM 6/20 and AEM 32/20) isolated from the treated population of a local cultivar '6601' with 200 Gy gamma-ray treatment gave very encouraging performance in station as well as zonal trials. On the basis of these results they were promoted in the National Trials, where they remained under evaluation for four years during spring as well as summer seasons. The pool data of four consecutive years of both seasons indicated that mutant lines AEM 32/20 and AEM 6/20 produced 1298 and 1246 kg/ha grain yield respectively as compared to the check variety 'NM 121-25' (1055 kg/ha) evolved at NIAB, Faisalabad through induced mutations. The seed yield increase over the check variety ranged from 18-23%. These two mungbean mutants have short stature combined with short duration and synchrony in maturity. Keeping in view the outstanding performance of these mutant lines, variety release proposals are being submitted to the Technical Sub-Committee for approval of varieties and techniques

  17. Iron deficiency anemia's effect on bone formation in zebrafish mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Lin; Liu, Zhichun; Zhong, Yingbin; Huang, Jian; Chen, Bin; Wang, Han; Xu, Youjia

    2016-07-01

    Iron is one of the essential elements of life. Iron metabolism is related to bone metabolism. Previous studies have confirmed that iron overload is a risk factor for osteoporosis. But the correlation between iron deficiency and bone metabolism remains unclear. Ferroportin 1 is identified as a cellular iron exporter and required for normal iron cycling. In zebrafish, the mutant of ferroportin 1 gene (fpn1), weh(tp85c) exhibited the defective iron transport, leading to developing severe hypochromic anemia. We used weh(tp85c) as a model for investigating iron deficiency and bone metabolism. In this study, we examined the morphology of the developing cartilage and vertebrae of the Weh(tp85) compared to the wild type siblings by staining the larvae with alcian blue for cartilage and alizarin red for the bone. In addition, we evaluated the expression patterns of the marker genes of bone development and cell signaling in bone formation. Our results showed that weh(tp85c) mutant larvae exhibited the defects in bone formation, revealing by decreases in the number of calcified vertebrae along with decreased expression of osteoblast novel genes: alpl, runx2a and col1a1a and BMPs signaling genes in osteoblast differentiation: bmp2a and bmp2b. Our data suggest that iron deficiency anemia affects bone formation, potentially through the BMPs signaling pathway in zebrafish. PMID:27184405

  18. Analysis of Arabidopsis mutants deficient in flavonoid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eleven loci that play a role in the synthesis of flavonoids in Arabidopsis are described. Mutations at these loci, collectively named transparent testa (tt), disrupt the synthesis of brown pigments in the seed coat (testa). Several of these loci (tt3, tt4, tt5 and ttg) are also required for the accumulation of purple anthocyanins in leaves and stems and one locus (ttg) plays additional roles in trichome and root hair development. Specific functions were previously assigned to tt1-7 and ttg. Here, the results of additional genetic, biochemical and molecular analyses of these mutants are described. Genetic map positions were determined for tt8, tt9 and tt10. Thin-layer chromatography identified tissue- and locus-specific differences in the flavonols and anthocyanidins synthesized by mutant and wild-type plants. It was found that UV light reveals distinct differences in the floral tissues of tt3, tt4, tt5, tt6 and ttg, even though these tissues are indistinguishable under visible light. Evidence was also uncovered that tt8 and ttg specifically affect dihydroflavonol reductase gene expression. A summary of these and previously published results are incorporated into an overview of the genetics of flavonoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

  19. Structural dataset for the PPARγ V290M mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Puhl

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutation V290M in the ligand-binding domain of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ is associated with a ligand resistance syndrome (PLRS, characterized by partial lipodystrophy and severe insulin resistance. In this data article we discuss an X-ray diffraction dataset that yielded the structure of PPARγ LBD V290M mutant refined at 2.3 Å resolution, that allowed building of 3D model of the receptor mutant with high confidence and revealed continuous well-defined electron density for the partial agonist diclofenac bound to hydrophobic pocket of the PPARγ. These structural data provide significant insights into molecular basis of PLRS caused by V290M mutation and are correlated with the receptor disability of rosiglitazone binding and increased affinity for corepressors. Furthermore, our structural evidence helps to explain clinical observations which point out to a failure to restore receptor function by the treatment with a full agonist of PPARγ, rosiglitazone.

  20. Genetic study of necrotic leaf pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four pea (Pisum sativum L.) mutants characterized by necrotic leaves were isolated following mutagenesis. The mutants were shown to have single-gene recessive inheritance, characterized morphologically and for seed production. New mutants 1/704, 1/711M, XV/915 and 2/352 had similar phenotypes, respectively, to previously named mutants dgl (degenerating leaves), nec (necrosis), bls (brown leaf spots) and bls (brown leaf), but no allelism tests were made between the new and the previously reported mutants. Mutants 1/704 and 1/711M were shown to be non-allelic. The mutation in line 2/352 may be useful as a genetic marker

  1. [Biofilm Formation by the Nonflagellated flhB1 Mutant of Azospirillum brasilense Sp245].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelud'ko, A V; Filip'echeva, Yu A; Shumiliva, E M; Khlebtsov, B N; Burov, A M; Petrova, L P; Katsy, E I

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with mixed flagellation are able to form biofilms on various surfaces. A nonflagellated mutant of this strain with inactivated chromosomal copy of the flhB gene (flhB1) was shown to exhibit specific traits at the later stages of biofilm formation on a hydrophilic (glass) surface. Mature biofilms of the flhB1::Omegon-Km mutant Sp245.1063 were considerably thinner than those of the parent strain Sp245. The biofilms of the mutant were more susceptible to the forces of hydrodynamic shear. A. brasilense Sp245 cells in biofilms were not found to possess lateral flagella. Cells with polar flagella were, however, revealed by atomic force microscopy of mature native biofilms of strain Sp245. Preservation of a polar flagellum (probably nonmotile) on the cells of A. brasilense Sp245 may enhance the biofilm stability. PMID:26263623

  2. Establishment of screening techniques for mutant cell and base sequence analysis of its mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aimed at an effective assessment of radiation dose, evaluation for human risk in detail and development of risk reducing techniques. The role of p53 in the mutation inducing mechanism of radiation was investigated in human lymphoblasts. The frequency of gene mutation in p53 mutant cells was more than 30-fold higher than that in the normal cell and most of the mutants were produced through transduction. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that chromosomal translocation occurred frequently in those mutants through heterologous recombination. Abnormalities in p53 were found to increase homologous recombination and reduce its fidelity, resulting to induce LOH-type mutation and chromosomal translocation. The cleavages of double strand DNA induced by radiation are thought to be repaired by such homologous recombination. Therefore, it seemed important to clarify the role of p53 for evaluating the radiation risk. (M.N.)

  3. Diversity of Culturable Thermophilic Actinobacteria in Hot Springs in Tengchong, China and Studies of their Biosynthetic Gene Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lan; Salam, Nimaichand; Jiao, Jian-Yu; Jiang, Hong-Chen; Zhou, En-Min; Yin, Yi-Rui; Ming, Hong; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-07-01

    The class Actinobacteria has been a goldmine for the discovery of antibiotics and has attracted interest from both academics and industries. However, an absence of novel approaches during the last few decades has limited the discovery of new microbial natural products useful for industries. Scientists are now focusing on the ecological aspects of diverse environments including unexplored or underexplored habitats and extreme environments in the search for new metabolites. This paper reports on the diversity of culturable actinobacteria associated with hot springs located in Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, southwestern China. A total of 58 thermophilic actinobacterial strains were isolated from the samples collected from ten hot springs distributed over three geothermal fields (e.g., Hehua, Rehai, and Ruidian). Phylogenetic positions and their biosynthetic profiles were analyzed by sequencing 16S rRNA gene and three biosynthetic gene clusters (KS domain of PKS-I, KSα domain of PKS-II and A domain of NRPS). On the basis of 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis, the 58 strains were affiliated with 12 actinobacterial genera: Actinomadura Micromonospora, Microbispora, Micrococcus, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Promicromonospora, Pseudonocardia, Streptomyces, Thermoactinospora, Thermocatellispora, and Verrucosispora, of which the two novel genera Thermoactinospora and Thermocatellisopora were recently described from among these strains. Considering the biosynthetic potential of these actinobacterial strains, 22 were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the three biosynthetic gene clusters (PKS-I, PKS-II, and NRPS). These actinobacteria were further subjected to antimicrobial assay against five opportunistic human pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis). All of the 22 strains that were positive for PCR amplification of at least one of the biosynthetic gene domains exhibited

  4. A Bentazon and Sulfonylurea-sensitive Mutant in Rice and its Application in Hybrid Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rice bentazon-lethal mutant 8077S obtained by radiation, is being utilized in developing new hybrid rice systems. Genetic analysis revealed that the bentazon-lethal mutant was controlled by a single recessive gene, which is named bel. The mutant can be killed at the seedling stage by bentazon with a lethal dosage at 300 mg/l or above, while this dosage is safe for its F1 hybrids and all other normal rice. This mutant is also sensitive to all the tested sulfonylurea herbicides and this sensitivity is also controlled by bel. Interestingly, another rice bentazon-lethal mutant Norin8m also obtained by radiation in Japan, was controlled by the allelic locus of bel, which is named as bsl. These two mutant genes were cloned by map-based cloning. Both mutant alleles had a single-base deletion respectively. There is a G deletion in the bel. and a C deletion in the bsl. The wild-type gene bel. encodes a novel cytochrome P450 monooxgenase, named CYP81A6. Otherwise, the use of photo-thermogenic male sterility (P/TGMS) system in two-line hybrid rice breeding is affected greatly by the sterility instability of P/TGMS lines caused by temperature fluctuation beyond their critical temperatures for fertility reversion. To prevent the hybrid seed contamination, we have developed three bentazon-lethal P/TGMS lines using 8077S by backcross and three new hybrid rice varieties using these P/TGMS lines had been registered. When these P/TGMS lines selfed by temperature fluctuation, the seedlings from the selfed seeds can be killed by spraying bentazon at seedling stage but the hybrid seedlings are safety. These new hybrid rice varieties have been cultivated in five provinces in China. (author)

  5. A higher yielding mutant of black gram with improved nodule formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry seeds of black gram (Vigna mungo (L) Hopper) var. T9 with 12.2% moisture content were irradiated at 10, 20 and 30 krad of gamma rays. This was followed by combined treatment of one set in each dose with freshly prepared 0. 25% EMS in phosphate buffer at 7.0 pH at 30± deg. C for 6 hours. In M2 population of 20 krad two mutants with pentafoliate instead of trifoliate leaves were found. This character was true breeding in M3 M6 generation. Crosses revealed monogenic recessive inheritance of this character. The proposed gene symbol is p5. This mutant has normal maturity period and the plant height is the same as T9 (ca. 50 cm). Preliminary yield trials indicate superiority of the mutant line over control. The mutant line also shows a significant improvement in number and weight of root nodules, potentially improving green manuring value. Improvement of root nodulation in mungbean mutants was reported before by others

  6. Evaluation of some wheat mutants for yield characters and susceptibility to infestation by Siltophilus Granarius (L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight mutant lines induced by gamma rays and their parental cultivar were evaluated in M8 generation to study spike length, spike yield, weight of 1000 kernels, grain yield per plant and susceptibility of grain to infestation by the granary weevil, Sitophilus Granarius (L.). The obtained results indicated that wheat genotypes (L 19-1 and L 50-2) which had the most weight of 1000 kernels were more susceptible to infestation by the granary weevil than the other ones. The lines of high spike yield had also high yield/plant such as L 30-2 which showed moderate resistance to this insect. Four mutant lines (L 30-2, L 19-1 L 14-3 and L 12-1) significantly surpassed the parental cultivar in grain yield/plant. Only two of them (L 12-1 and L 14-3) were resistant to this weevil. The granary weevil showed preference to mutant lines of wheat L 19-1 and L-50-2 as compared with the other ones. The weevils reared on resistant mutant lines of wheat had greater mortality, weight loss and produced fewer number of progeny than the susceptible ones. Sakha 69 (as a control) had less spike yield, spike length and grain yield per plant than the other mutant lines and revealed intermediate to infestation by the granary weevil. 3 tabs

  7. Elevated oxidative membrane damage associated with genetic modifiers of Lyst-mutant phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colleen M Trantow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available LYST is a large cytosolic protein that influences the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles, and mutation of the encoding gene, LYST, can cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Recently, Lyst-mutant mice were recognized to also exhibit an iris disease resembling exfoliation syndrome, a common cause of glaucoma in humans. Here, Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes were used in a search for genes that influence Lyst pathways. In a candidate gene-driven approach, albino Lyst-mutant mice homozygous for a mutation in Tyr, whose product is key to melanin synthesis within melanosomes, exhibited complete rescue of Lyst-mutant iris phenotypes. In a genetic background-driven approach using a DBA/2J strain of congenic mice, an interval containing Tyrp1 enhanced Lyst-dependent iris phenotypes. Thus, both experimental approaches implicated the melanosome, an organelle that is a potential source of oxidative stress, as contributing to the disease phenotype. Confirming an association with oxidative damage, Lyst mutation resulted in genetic context-sensitive changes in iris lipid hydroperoxide levels, being lowest in albino and highest in DBA/2J mice. Surprisingly, the DBA/2J genetic background also exposed a late-onset neurodegenerative phenotype involving cerebellar Purkinje-cell degeneration. These results identify an association between oxidative damage to lipid membranes and the severity of Lyst-mutant phenotypes, revealing a new mechanism that contributes to pathophysiology involving LYST.

  8. Selection of Bacillus subtilis mutants impaired in ammonia assimilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dean, D R; Aronson, A I

    1980-01-01

    The selection of Bacillus subtilis mutants capable of using D-histidine to fulfill a requirement for L-histidine resulted in mutants with either no glutamate synthase activity or increased amounts of an altered glutamine synthetase.

  9. PNRI mutant variety: sansevieria 'Sword of Ibe'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansevieria 'Sword of Ibe,' registered by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute as NSIC 2008 Or-66, is a chlorophyll mutant of Sansevieria trifasciata 'Moonshine' developed by treating its suckers or shoots arising from a rhizome with acute gamma radiation from a Cobalt-60 source. The new mutant is identical in growth habit and vigor to Sansevieria 'Moonshine,' also known as Moonglow. Results of this mutation breeding experiment showed that leaf color and flowering were altered by gamma irradiation without changing the other characteristics of the plant. Propagation is true-to-type by separation of sucker and top cutting. The plant is recommended for use as landscaping material and as pot plant for indoor and outdoor use. The leaves may be harvested as cut foliage for Japanese flower arrangements. (author)

  10. Serine:glyoxylate aminotransferase mutant of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A photorespiratory mutant of barley (LaPr 85/84), deficient in both of the major peaks of serine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activity detected in the wild type, also lacks serine:pyruvate and asparagine:glyoxylate aminotransferase activities. Genetic analysis of the mutation demonstrated that these three activities are all carried on the same enzyme. The mutant, when placed in air, accumulated a large pool of serine, showed the expected rate (50%) of ammonia release during photorespiration but produced CO2 at twice the wild type rate when it was fed [14C] glyoxylate. Compared with the wild type, LaPr 85/84 exhibited abnormal transient changes in chlorophyll a fluorescence when the CO2 concentration of the air was altered, indicating that the rates of the fluorescence quenching mechanisms were affected in vivo by the lack of this enzyme

  11. Nutritive value of horse gram mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-rays induced mutation of seeds in horse gram Var. DPL-1 resulted in significant increase in crude protein and crude fibre content in grain. Fat and ash contents were also increased in some of the mutants. Induced mutation, however, did not show beneficial effect on methionine and tryptophan content of the grain. Both these limiting amino acids were deficient in all the genotypes. The mutant ACCK-304 and ACCL-302 appeared to be superior in respect of crude protein content (21.9% and 21.5%), grain yield (15.7 and 15.6 q/ha) and protein yield (3.4 and 3.3 q/ha), respectively. (author)

  12. Fibrinolytic Activity of Recombinant Mutant Streptokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboobeh Mobarrez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Streptokinase is a bacterial protein produced by different beta hemolytic streptococci and widely used in thrombolytic treatment. The main disadvantage of using streptokinase is antibody formation which causes allergic reaction to neutralize effects of streptokinase therapy. Aim of this study was investigate of recombinant mutant streptokinase fibrinolytic activity.Materials and Methods: In this study recombinant mutant streptokinase without 42 amino acids from the C terminal region was purified by affinity S-Tag column chromatography and its fibrinolytic activity was studied.Results: The concentration of expressed and purified protein was 10 mg/ml. Its enzyme activity was assayed using zymography, radial caseinolytic activity and fibrin plate test methods and estimated quantitatively by casein digestion method compared to a commercial form.Conclusion: It was found that this product had the more volume and more enzymatic activity.

  13. 钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株构建及其缺失对精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因转录水平的影响%Construction of Corynebacterium crenatum AS 1.542△argR and analysis of transcriptional levels of the related genes of arginine biosynthetic pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雪岚; 汤立; 焦海涛; 徐峰; 熊勇华

    2013-01-01

    [Objective] ArgR, coded by the argR gene from Corynebacterium crenatum AS 1. 542, acts as a negative regulator in arginine biosynthetic pathway. However, the effect of argR on transcriptional levels of the related biosynthetic genes has not been reported. Here, we constructed a deletion mutant of argR gene; C. Crenatum AS 1.542 △argR using marker-less knockout technology, and compared the changes of transcriptional levels of the arginine biosynthetic genes between the mutant strain and the wild-type strain. [Methods] We used marker-less knockout technology to construct C. Crenatum AS 1. 542△argR and analyzed the changes of the relate genes at the transcriptional level using real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. [Results] C. Crenatum AS 1. 542△argR was successfully obtained and the transcriptional level of arginine biosynthetic genes in this mutant increased significantly with an average of about 162. 1 folds. [Conclusion] The arginine biosynthetic genes in C. Crenatum are clearly controlled by the negative regulator ArgR. However, the deletion of this regulator does not result in a clear change in arginine production in the bacteria.%[目的]钝齿棒杆菌AS 1.542中argR基因编码的蛋白ArgR在精氨酸生物合成途径中扮演负调控的角色,但其对相关基因在转录水平的影响还未见报道.因此,本课题组构建了钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株,并在转录水平上比较野生株与缺失株精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因的变化.[方法]采用无痕敲除的方法构建了钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株,并采用荧光定量PCR方法分析缺失株和野生株精氨酸生物合成途径相关基因在转录水平的变化.[结果]利用pK18mobsacB质粒中蔗糖致死基因sacB反向筛选标记及PCR方法成功筛选到钝齿棒杆菌argR基因缺失株;荧光定量PCR结果表明,argR基因缺失株精氨酸生物合成途径中相关基因在转录水平获得大量提高,平均约上调162.13倍.[结论]

  14. Genetic Analysis of Dictyostelium Slug Phototaxis Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Darcy, P. K.; Wilczynska, Z.; Fisher, P R

    1994-01-01

    Mapping and complementation analysis with 17 phototaxis mutations has established 11 complementation groups phoA-phoK distributed over six linkage groups. Statistical calculations from the complementation data yielded 17 as the maximum likelihood estimate of the number of pho genes assuming all loci are equally mutable. Most of the phototaxis mutants were found to exhibit bimodal phototaxis and all were found to be impaired in positive thermotaxis supporting convergence of the photosensory an...

  15. Endonuclease IV (nfo) mutant of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, R P; Saporito, S M; Spitzer, S G; Weiss, B

    1986-01-01

    A cloned gene, designated nfo, caused overproduction of an EDTA-resistant endonuclease specific for apurinic-apyrimidinic sites in DNA. The sedimentation coefficient of the enzyme was similar to that of endonuclease IV. An insertion mutation was constructed in vitro and transferred from a plasmid to the Escherichia coli chromosome. nfo mutants had an increased sensitivity to the alkylating agents methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C and to the oxidants tert-butyl hydroperoxide and bleomyci...

  16. Recombination-deficient mutant of Streptococcus faecalis.

    OpenAIRE

    Yagi, Y; Clewell, D B

    1980-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation-sensitive derivative of Streptococcus faecalis strain JH2-2 was isolated and found to be deficient in recombination, using a plasmid-plasmid recombination system. The strain was sensitive to chemical agents which interact with deoxyribonucleic acid and also underwent deoxyribonucleic acid degradation after ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, the mutant has properties similar to those of recA strains of Escherichia coli.

  17. Heterologous production of glidobactins/luminmycins in Escherichia coli Nissle containing the glidobactin biosynthetic gene cluster from Burkholderia DSM7029.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Xiaoying; Huang, Fan; Wang, Hailong; Klefisch, Thorsten; Müller, Rolf; Zhang, Youming

    2014-10-13

    Natural product peptide-based proteasome inhibitors show great potential as anticancer drugs. Here we have cloned the biosynthetic gene cluster of a potent proteasome inhibitor-glidobactin from Burkholderia DSM7029-and successfully detected glidobactins/luminmycins in E. coli Nissle. We have also improved the yield of glidobactin A tenfold by promoter change in a heterologous host. In addition, two new biosynthetic intermediates were identified by comparative MS/MS fragmentation analysis. Identification of acyclic luminmycin E implies substrate specificity of the TE domain for cyclization. The establishment of a heterologous expression system for syrbactins provided the basis for the generation of new syrbactins as proteasome inhibitors by molecular engineering, but the TE domain's specificity cannot be ignored. PMID:25147087

  18. Novel application of a hormone biosynthetic inhibitor for the corrosion resistance enhancement of copper in synthetic seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → A novel hormone biosynthetic inhibitor was studied as corrosion inhibitor for copper. → Corrosion inhibition under various conditions were evaluated. → Surface appearances after corrosion were investigated by SEM and EDS. → Uniconazole shows extremely high inhibition efficiency. - Abstract: Effects of a hormone biosynthetic inhibitor on corrosion resistance of copper in synthetic seawater under various conditions were evaluated via quantum chemistry calculations, weight loss, electrochemical techniques, SEM, EDS, and FTIR. Comparable results show that uniconazole acts as a mixed-type inhibitor, suppressing charge transfer process by adsorption on copper surface. Thermodynamic calculation indicates that chemisorption is in accordance with Langmuir isotherm and adsorption amount increases with immersion time. The corrosion resistance with inhibitor under alkaline conditions is better than that under acidic or neutral conditions. Good inhibition performances at different temperatures and during a long time immersion are observed.

  19. IMG-ABC: An Atlas of Biosynthetic Gene Clusters to Fuel the Discovery of Novel Secondary Metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-Min; Chu, Ken; Ratner, Anna; Palaniappan, Krishna; Huang, Jinghua; Reddy, T. B.K.; Cimermancic, Peter; Fischbach, Michael; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Pati, Amrita

    2014-10-28

    In the discovery of secondary metabolites (SMs), large-scale analysis of sequence data is a promising exploration path that remains largely underutilized due to the lack of relevant computational resources. We present IMG-ABC (https://img.jgi.doe.gov/abc/) -- An Atlas of Biosynthetic gene Clusters within the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system1. IMG-ABC is a rich repository of both validated and predicted biosynthetic clusters (BCs) in cultured isolates, single-cells and metagenomes linked with the SM chemicals they produce and enhanced with focused analysis tools within IMG. The underlying scalable framework enables traversal of phylogenetic dark matter and chemical structure space -- serving as a doorway to a new era in the discovery of novel molecules.

  20. Subcloning of the enterobactin biosynthetic gene entB: Expression, purification, characterization, and substrate specificity of isochorismatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Escherichia coli entB, coding for the enterobactin biosynthetic enzyme isochorismatase, has been subcloned into the multicopy plasmid pKK223-3 under the control of the tac promoter. The resulting recombinant plasmid pFR1 expresses isochorismatase amounting to over 50% of the total cellular protein. The enzyme has been purified to homogeneity and a convenient assay developed. The enzyme has a Km for isochorismate of 14.7 μM and a turnover number of 600 min-1. By use of 1H NMR spectroscopy, the progress of the reaction was followed with the expected formation of 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybenzoate product. Several substrate analogues were also utilized by the enzyme including chorismic acid, the immediate precursor to isochorismic acid in the enterobactin biosynthetic pathway