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Sample records for biosynthetic mutants reveals

  1. Arabidopsis brassinosteroid biosynthetic mutant dwarf7-1 exhibits slower rates of cell division and shoot induction

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    Schulz Burkhard

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant growth depends on both cell division and cell expansion. Plant hormones, including brassinosteroids (BRs, are central to the control of these two cellular processes. Despite clear evidence that BRs regulate cell elongation, their roles in cell division have remained elusive. Results Here, we report results emphasizing the importance of BRs in cell division. An Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic mutant, dwarf7-1, displayed various characteristics attributable to slower cell division rates. We found that the DWARF4 gene which encodes for an enzyme catalyzing a rate-determining step in the BR biosynthetic pathways, is highly expressed in the actively dividing callus, suggesting that BR biosynthesis is necessary for dividing cells. Furthermore, dwf7-1 showed noticeably slower rates of callus growth and shoot induction relative to wild-type control. Flow cytometric analyses of the nuclei derived from either calli or intact roots revealed that the cell division index, which was represented as the ratio of cells at the G2/M vs. G1 phases, was smaller in dwf7-1 plants. Finally, we found that the expression levels of the genes involved in cell division and shoot induction, such as PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN2 (PCNA2 and ENHANCER OF SHOOT REGENERATION2 (ESR2, were also lower in dwf7-1 as compared with wild type. Conclusions Taken together, results of callus induction, shoot regeneration, flow cytometry, and semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis suggest that BRs play important roles in both cell division and cell differentiation in Arabidopsis.

  2. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Epipolythiodioxopiperazine Acetylaranotin in Aspergillus terreus Revealed by Genome-based Deletion Analysis

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    Guo, Chun-Jun; Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Sanchez, James F.; Chang, ShuLin; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-04-15

    Abstract Epipolythiodioxopiperazines (ETPs) are a class of fungal secondary metabolites derived from cyclic peptides. Acetylaranotin belongs to one structural subgroup of ETPs characterized by the presence of a seven-membered dihydrooxepine ring. Defining the genes involved in acetylaranotin biosynthesis should provide a means to increase production of these compounds and facilitate the engineering of second-generation molecules. The filamentous fungus Aspergillus terreus produces acetylaranotin and related natural products. Using targeted gene deletions, we have identified a cluster of 9 genes including one nonribosomal peptide synthase gene, ataP, that is required for acetylaranotin biosynthesis. Chemical analysis of the wild type and mutant strains enabled us to isolate seventeen natural products that are either intermediates in the normal biosynthetic pathway or shunt products that are produced when the pathway is interrupted through mutation. Nine of the compounds identified in this study are novel natural products. Our data allow us to propose a complete biosynthetic pathway for acetylaranotin and related natural products.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Filamentous Fungus Aspergillus westerdijkiae Reveals the Putative Biosynthetic Gene Cluster of Ochratoxin A

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    Chakrabortti, Alolika; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a common mycotoxin that contaminates food and agricultural products. Sequencing of the complete genome of Aspergillus westerdijkiae, a major producer of OTA, reveals more than 50 biosynthetic gene clusters, including a putative OTA biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes a dozen of enzymes, transporters, and regulatory proteins. PMID:27635003

  4. Novel polyoxins generated by heterologously expressing polyoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the sanN inactivated mutant of Streptomyces ansochromogenes

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    Li Jine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyoxins are potent inhibitors of chitin synthetases in fungi and insects. The gene cluster responsible for biosynthesis of polyoxins has been cloned and sequenced from Streptomyces cacaoi and tens of polyoxin analogs have been identified already. Results The polyoxin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces cacaoi was heterologously expressed in the sanN inactivated mutant of Streptomyces ansochromogenes as a nikkomycin producer. Besides hybrid antibiotics (polynik A and polyoxin N and some known polyoxins, two novel polyoxin analogs were accumulated. One of them is polyoxin P that has 5-aminohexuronic acid with N-glycosidically bound thymine as the nucleoside moiety and dehydroxyl-carbamoylpolyoxic acid as the peptidyl moiety. The other analog is polyoxin O that contains 5-aminohexuronic acid bound thymine as the nucleoside moiety, but recruits polyoximic acid as the sole peptidyl moiety. Bioassay against phytopathogenic fungi showed that polyoxin P displayed comparatively strong inhibitory activity, whereas the inhibitory activity of polyoxin O was weak under the same testing conditions. Conclusion Two novel polyoxin analogs (polyoxin P and O were generated by the heterologous expression of polyoxin biosynthetic gene cluster in the sanN inactivated mutant of Streptomyces ansochromogenes. Polyoxin P showed potent antifungal activity,while the activity of polyoxin O was weak. The strategy presented here may be available for other antibiotics producers.

  5. Genome sequence of Thermofilum pendens reveals an exceptional loss of biosynthetic pathways without genome reduction

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    Kyrpides, Nikos; Anderson, Iain; Rodriguez, Jason; Susanti, Dwi; Porat, Iris; Reich, Claudia; Ulrich, Luke E.; Elkins, James G.; Mavromatis, Kostas; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kim, Edwin; Thompson, Linda S.; Nolan, Matt; Land, Miriam; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Detter, Chris; Zhulin, Igor B.; Olsen, Gary J.; Whitman, William; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Bristow, James; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We report the complete genome of Thermofilum pendens, a deep-branching, hyperthermophilic member of the order Thermoproteales within the archaeal kingdom Crenarchaeota. T. pendens is a sulfur-dependent, anaerobic heterotroph isolated from a solfatara in Iceland. It is an extracellular commensal, requiring an extract of Thermoproteus tenax for growth, and the genome sequence reveals that biosynthetic pathways for purines, most amino acids, and most cofactors are absent. In fact T. pendens has fewer biosynthetic enzymes than obligate intracellular parasites, although it does not display other features common among obligate parasites and thus does not appear to be in the process of becoming a parasite. It appears that T. pendens has adapted to life in an environment rich in nutrients. T. pendens was known to utilize peptides as an energy source, but the genome reveals substantial ability to grow on carbohydrates. T. pendens is the first crenarchaeote and only the second archaeon found to have a transporter of the phosphotransferase system. In addition to fermentation, T. pendens may gain energy from sulfur reduction with hydrogen and formate as electron donors. It may also be capable of sulfur-independent growth on formate with formate hydrogenlyase. Additional novel features are the presence of a monomethylamine:corrinoid methyltransferase, the first time this enzyme has been found outside of Methanosarcinales, and a presenilin-related protein. Predicted highly expressed proteins do not include housekeeping genes, and instead include ABC transporters for carbohydrates and peptides, and CRISPR-associated proteins.

  6. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity.

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    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E; Goff, Randal D; Bingman, Craig A; Thorson, Jon S; Phillips, George N

    2011-10-25

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  7. Complete set of glycosyltransferase structures in the calicheamicin biosynthetic pathway reveals the origin of regiospecificity

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    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Helmich, Kate E.; Goff, Randal D.; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    Glycosyltransferases are useful synthetic catalysts for generating natural products with sugar moieties. Although several natural product glycosyltransferase structures have been reported, design principles of glycosyltransferase engineering for the generation of glycodiversified natural products has fallen short of its promise, partly due to a lack of understanding of the relationship between structure and function. Here, we report structures of all four calicheamicin glycosyltransferases (CalG1, CalG2, CalG3, and CalG4), whose catalytic functions are clearly regiospecific. Comparison of these four structures reveals a conserved sugar donor binding motif and the principles of acceptor binding region reshaping. Among them, CalG2 possesses a unique catalytic motif for glycosylation of hydroxylamine. Multiple glycosyltransferase structures in a single natural product biosynthetic pathway are a valuable resource for understanding regiospecific reactions and substrate selectivities and will help future glycosyltransferase engineering.

  8. Labellum transcriptome reveals alkene biosynthetic genes involved in orchid sexual deception and pollination-induced senescence.

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    Monteiro, Filipa; Sebastiana, Mónica; Figueiredo, Andreia; Sousa, Lisete; Cotrim, Helena C; Pais, Maria Salomé

    2012-11-01

    One of the most remarkable pollination strategy in orchids biology is pollination by sexual deception, in which the modified petal labellum lures pollinators by mimicking the chemical (e.g. sex pheromones), visual (e.g. colour and shape/size) and tactile (e.g. labellum trichomes) cues of the receptive female insect species. The present study aimed to characterize the transcriptional changes occurring after pollination in the labellum of a sexually deceptive orchid (Ophrys fusca Link) in order to identify genes involved on signals responsible for pollinator attraction, the major goal of floral tissues. Novel information on alterations in the orchid petal labellum gene expression occurring after pollination demonstrates a reduction in the expression of alkene biosynthetic genes using O. fusca Link as the species under study. Petal labellum transcriptional analysis revealed downregulation of transcripts involved in both pigment machinery and scent compounds, acting as visual and olfactory cues, respectively, important in sexual mimicry. Regulation of petal labellum senescence was revealed by transcripts related to macromolecules breakdown, protein synthesis and remobilization of nutrients.

  9. Genome Analysis of Two Pseudonocardia Phylotypes Associated with Acromyrmex Leafcutter Ants Reveals Their Biosynthetic Potential.

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    Holmes, Neil A; Innocent, Tabitha M; Heine, Daniel; Bassam, Mahmoud Al; Worsley, Sarah F; Trottmann, Felix; Patrick, Elaine H; Yu, Douglas W; Murrell, J C; Schiøtt, Morten; Wilkinson, Barrie; Boomsma, Jacobus J; Hutchings, Matthew I

    2016-01-01

    The attine ants of South and Central America are ancient farmers, having evolved a symbiosis with a fungal food crop >50 million years ago. The most evolutionarily derived attines are the Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutter ants, which harvest fresh leaves to feed their fungus. Acromyrmex and many other attines vertically transmit a mutualistic strain of Pseudonocardia and use antifungal compounds made by these bacteria to protect their fungal partner against co-evolved fungal pathogens of the genus Escovopsis. Pseudonocardia mutualists associated with the attines Apterostigma dentigerum and Trachymyrmex cornetzi make novel cyclic depsipeptide compounds called gerumycins, while a mutualist strain isolated from derived Acromyrmex octospinosus makes an unusual polyene antifungal called nystatin P1. The novelty of these antimicrobials suggests there is merit in exploring secondary metabolites of Pseudonocardia on a genome-wide scale. Here, we report a genomic analysis of the Pseudonocardia phylotypes Ps1 and Ps2 that are consistently associated with Acromyrmex ants collected in Gamboa, Panama. These were previously distinguished solely on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing but genome sequencing of five Ps1 and five Ps2 strains revealed that the phylotypes are distinct species and each encodes between 11 and 15 secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). There are signature BGCs for Ps1 and Ps2 strains and some that are conserved in both. Ps1 strains all contain BGCs encoding nystatin P1-like antifungals, while the Ps2 strains encode novel nystatin-like molecules. Strains show variations in the arrangement of these BGCs that resemble those seen in gerumycin gene clusters. Genome analyses and invasion assays support our hypothesis that vertically transmitted Ps1 and Ps2 strains have antibacterial activity that could help shape the cuticular microbiome. Thus, our work defines the Pseudonocardia species associated with Acromyrmex ants and supports the hypothesis

  10. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

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    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis.

  11. Transcriptome and Metabolite analysis reveal candidate genes of the cardiac glycoside biosynthetic pathway from Calotropis procera

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    Pandey, Akansha; Swarnkar, Vishakha; Pandey, Tushar; Srivastava, Piush; Kanojiya, Sanjeev; Mishra, Dipak Kumar; Tripathi, Vineeta

    2016-01-01

    Calotropis procera is a medicinal plant of immense importance due to its pharmaceutical active components, especially cardiac glycosides (CG). As genomic resources for this plant are limited, the genes involved in CG biosynthetic pathway remain largely unknown till date. Our study on stage and tissue specific metabolite accumulation showed that CG’s were maximally accumulated in stems of 3 month old seedlings. De novo transcriptome sequencing of same was done using high throughput Illumina HiSeq platform generating 44074 unigenes with average mean length of 1785 base pair. Around 66.6% of unigenes were annotated by using various public databases and 5324 unigenes showed significant match in the KEGG database involved in 133 different pathways of plant metabolism. Further KEGG analysis resulted in identification of 336 unigenes involved in cardenolide biosynthesis. Tissue specific expression analysis of 30 putative transcripts involved in terpenoid, steroid and cardenolide pathways showed a positive correlation between metabolite and transcript accumulation. Wound stress elevated CG levels as well the levels of the putative transcripts involved in its biosynthetic pathways. This result further validated the involvement of identified transcripts in CGs biosynthesis. The identified transcripts will lay a substantial foundation for further research on metabolic engineering and regulation of cardiac glycosides biosynthesis pathway genes. PMID:27703261

  12. Novel key metabolites reveal further branching of the roquefortine/meleagrin biosynthetic pathway.

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    Ries, Marco I; Ali, Hazrat; Lankhorst, Peter P; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M; Vreeken, Rob J

    2013-12-27

    Metabolic profiling and structural elucidation of novel secondary metabolites obtained from derived deletion strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum were used to reassign various previously ascribed synthetase genes of the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway to their corresponding products. Next to the structural characterization of roquefortine F and neoxaline, which are for the first time reported for P. chrysogenum, we identified the novel metabolite roquefortine L, including its degradation products, harboring remarkable chemical structures. Their biosynthesis is discussed, questioning the exclusive role of glandicoline A as key intermediate in the pathway. The results reveal that further enzymes of this pathway are rather unspecific and catalyze more than one reaction, leading to excessive branching in the pathway with meleagrin and neoxaline as end products of two branches.

  13. Characterization of the Biosynthetic Gene Cluster for Benzoxazole Antibiotics A33853 Reveals Unusual Assembly Logic.

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    Lv, Meinan; Zhao, Junfeng; Deng, Zixin; Yu, Yi

    2015-10-22

    A33853, which shows excellent bioactivity against Leishmania, is a benzoxazole-family compound formed from two moieties of 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid and one 3-hydroxypicolinic acid. In this study, we have identified the gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of A33853 in Streptomyces sp. NRRL12068 through genome mining and heterologous expression. Bioinformatics analysis and functional characterization of the orfs contained in the gene cluster revealed that the biosynthesis of A33853 is directed by a group of unusual enzymes. In particular, BomK, annotated as a ketosynthase, was found to catalyze the amide bond formation between 3-hydroxypicolinic and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid during the assembly of A33853. BomJ, a putative ATP-dependent coenzyme A ligase, and BomN, a putative amidohydrolase, were further proposed to be involved in the benzoxazole formation in A33853 according to gene deletion experiments. Finally, we have successfully utilized mutasynthesis to generate two analogs of A33853, which were reported previously to possess excellent anti-leishmanial activity.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis using high papaverine mutant of Papaver somniferum reveals pathway and uncharacterized steps of papaverine biosynthesis.

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    Sumya Pathak

    Full Text Available The benzylisoquinoline alkaloid papaverine, synthesized in low amount in most of the opium poppy varieties of Papaver somniferum, is used as a vasodilator muscle relaxant and antispasmodic. Papaverine biosynthesis remains controversial as two different routes utilizing either (S-coclaurine or (S-reticuline have been proposed with uncharacterized intermediate steps. In an attempt to elucidate papaverine biosynthesis and identify putative genes involved in uncharacterized steps, we carried out comparative transcriptome analysis of high papaverine mutant (pap1 and normal cultivar (BR086 of P. somniferum. This natural mutant synthesizes more than 12-fold papaverine in comparison to BR086. We established more than 238 Mb transcriptome data separately for pap1 and BR086. Assembly of reads generated 127,342 and 106,128 unigenes in pap1 and BR086, respectively. Digital gene expression analysis of transcriptomes revealed 3,336 differentially expressing unigenes. Enhanced expression of (S-norcoclaurine-6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT, (S-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase (4'OMT, norreticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (N7OMT and down-regulation of reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase (7OMT in pap1 in comparison to BR086 suggest (S-coclaurine as the route for papaverine biosynthesis. We also identified several methyltransferases and dehydrogenases with enhanced expression in pap1 in comparison to BR086. Our analysis using natural mutant, pap1, concludes that (S-coclaurine is the branch-point intermediate and preferred route for papaverine biosynthesis. Differentially expressing methyltransferases and dehydrogenases identified in this study will help in elucidating complete biosynthetic pathway of papaverine. The information generated will be helpful in developing strategies for enhanced biosynthesis of papaverine through biotechnological approaches.

  15. Reverse genetic screening reveals poor correlation between morpholino-induced and mutant phenotypes in zebrafish.

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    Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; Ni, Chih-Wen; Gupta, Ankit; Grosse, Ann S; van Impel, Andreas; Kirchmaier, Bettina C; Peterson-Maduro, Josi; Kourkoulis, George; Male, Ira; DeSantis, Dana F; Sheppard-Tindell, Sarah; Ebarasi, Lwaki; Betsholtz, Christer; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Wolfe, Scot A; Lawson, Nathan D

    2015-01-12

    The widespread availability of programmable site-specific nucleases now enables targeted gene disruption in the zebrafish. In this study, we applied site-specific nucleases to generate zebrafish lines bearing individual mutations in more than 20 genes. We found that mutations in only a small proportion of genes caused defects in embryogenesis. Moreover, mutants for ten different genes failed to recapitulate published Morpholino-induced phenotypes (morphants). The absence of phenotypes in mutant embryos was not likely due to maternal effects or failure to eliminate gene function. Consistently, a comparison of published morphant defects with the Sanger Zebrafish Mutation Project revealed that approximately 80% of morphant phenotypes were not observed in mutant embryos, similar to our mutant collection. Based on these results, we suggest that mutant phenotypes become the standard metric to define gene function in zebrafish, after which Morpholinos that recapitulate respective phenotypes could be reliably applied for ancillary analyses.

  16. Characterization of an echinocandin B-producing strain blocked for sterigmatocystin biosynthesis reveals a translocation in the stcW gene of the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway.

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    Hodges, R L; Kelkar, H S; Xuei, X; Skatrud, P L; Keller, N P; Adams, T H; Kaiser, R E; Vinci, V A; McGilvray, D

    2000-12-01

    Echinocandin B (ECB), a lipopolypeptide used as a starting material for chemical manufacture of the anti-Candida agent LY303366, is produced by fermentation using a strain of Aspergillus nidulans. In addition to ECB, the wild-type strain also produces a significant level of sterigmatocystin (ST), a potent carcinogen structurally related to the aflatoxins. Characterization of a mutant designated A42355-OC-1 (OC-1), which is blocked in ST biosynthesis, was the result of a chromosomal translocation. The chromosomal regions containing the breakpoints of the translocation were isolated and DNA sequencing and PCR analysis of the chromosomal breakpoints demonstrated the translocation occurred within the stcW gene of the ST biosynthetic pathway, resulting in disruption of the open reading frame for this gene. Biochemical feeding studies indicate the involvement of this gene product in the conversion of averufin to 1-hydroxy versicolorone. This work demonstrates an effective synergy between classical strain improvement methods and molecular genetics.

  17. New molecular phenotypes in the dst mutants of Arabidopsis revealed by DNA microarray analysis.

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    Pérez-Amador, M A; Lidder, P; Johnson, M A; Landgraf, J; Wisman, E; Green, P J

    2001-12-01

    In this study, DNA microarray analysis was used to expand our understanding of the dst1 mutant of Arabidopsis. The dst (downstream) mutants were isolated originally as specifically increasing the steady state level and the half-life of DST-containing transcripts. As such, txhey offer a unique opportunity to study rapid sequence-specific mRNA decay pathways in eukaryotes. These mutants show a threefold to fourfold increase in mRNA abundance for two transgenes and an endogenous gene, all containing DST elements, when examined by RNA gel blot analysis; however, they show no visible aberrant phenotype. Here, we use DNA microarrays to identify genes with altered expression levels in dst1 compared with the parental plants. In addition to verifying the increase in the transgene mRNA levels, which were used to isolate these mutants, we were able to identify new genes with altered mRNA abundance in dst1. RNA gel blot analysis confirmed the microarray data for all genes tested and also was used to catalog the first molecular differences in gene expression between the dst1 and dst2 mutants. These differences revealed previously unknown molecular phenotypes for the dst mutants that will be helpful in future analyses. Cluster analysis of genes altered in dst1 revealed new coexpression patterns that prompt new hypotheses regarding the nature of the dst1 mutation and a possible role of the DST-mediated mRNA decay pathway in plants.

  18. Capture of micrococcin biosynthetic intermediates reveals C-terminal processing as an obligatory step for in vivo maturation

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    Bewley, Kathryn D.; Bennallack, Philip R.; Burlingame, Mark A.; Robison, Richard A.; Griffitts, Joel S.

    2016-01-01

    Thiopeptides, including micrococcins, are a growing family of bioactive natural products that are ribosomally synthesized and heavily modified. Here we use a refactored, modular in vivo system containing the micrococcin P1 (MP1) biosynthetic genes (TclIJKLMNPS) from Macrococcus caseolyticus str 115 in a genetically tractable Bacillus subtilis strain to parse the processing steps of this pathway. By fusing the micrococcin precursor peptide to an affinity tag and coupling it with catalytically defective enzymes, biosynthetic intermediates were easily captured for analysis. We found that two major phases of molecular maturation are separated by a key C-terminal processing step. Phase-I conversion of six Cys residues to thiazoles (TclIJN) is followed by C-terminal oxidative decarboxylation (TclP). This TclP-mediated oxidative decarboxylation is a required step for the peptide to progress to phase II. In phase II, Ser/Thr dehydration (TclKL) and peptide macrocycle formation (TclM) occurs. A C-terminal reductase, TclS, can optionally act on the substrate peptide, yielding MP1, and is shown to act late in the pathway. This comprehensive characterization of the MP1 pathway prepares the way for future engineering efforts. PMID:27791142

  19. VIGS approach reveals the modulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes by CaMYB in Chili pepper leaves

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    zhen ezhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purple coloration of pepper leaves arises from the accumulation of anthocyanin. Three regulatory and 12 structural genes have been characterized for their involvement in the anthocyanin biosynthesis. Examination of the abundance of these genes in leaves showed that the majority of them differed between anthocyanin pigmented line Z1 and non-pigmented line A3. Silencing of the R2R3-MYB transcription factor CaMYB in pepper leaves of Z1 resulted in the loss of anthocyanin accumulation. Moreover, the expression of multiple genes was altered in the silenced leaves. The expression of MYC was significantly lower in CaMYB-silenced leaves, whereas WD40 showed the opposite pattern. Most structural genes including CHS, CHI, F3H, F3’5’H, DFR, ANS, UFGT, ANP and GST were repressed in CaMYB-silenced foliage with the exception of PAL, C4H and 4CL. These results indicated that MYB plays an important role in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthetic related genes. Besides CaMYB silenced leaves rendered more sporulation of Phytophthora capsici Leonian indicating that CaMYB might be involved in the defense response to pathogens.

  20. A Lesion-Mimic Syntaxin Double Mutant in Arabidopsis Reveals Novel Complexity of Pathogen Defense Signaling

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    Ziguo Zhang; Hans Thordal-Christensen; Andrea Lenk; Mats X. Andersson; Torben Gjetting; Carsten Pedersen; Mads E. Nielsen; Marl-Anne Newman; Bi-Huei Hou; Shauna C. Somerville

    2008-01-01

    The lesion-mimicArabidopsis mutant, syp121 syp122, constitutively expresses the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway and has low penetration resistance to powdery mildew fungi. Genetic analyses of the lesion-mimic phenotype have expanded our understanding of programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. Inactivation of SA signaling genes in syp121 syp 122 only partially rescues the lesion-mimic phenotype, indicating that additional defenses contribute to the PCD. Whole genome transcriptome analysis confirmed that SA-induced transcripts, as well as numerous other known pathogenresponse transcripts, are up-regulated after inactivation of the syntaxin genes. A suppressor mutant analysis of syp121 syp122 revealed that FMO1, ALD1, and PAD4 are important for lesion development. Mutant alleles of EDS1, NDR1, RAR1, and SGT1b also partially rescued the lesion-mimic phenotype, suggesting that mutating syntaxin genes stimulates TIR-NB-LRR and CC-NB-LRR-type resistances. The syntaxin double knockout potentiated a powdery mildewinduced HR-like response. This required functional PAD4 but not functional SA signaling. However, SA signaling potentiated the PAD4-dependent HR-like response. Analyses of quadruple mutants suggest that EDS5 and SID2 confer separate SA-independent signaling functions, and that FMO1 and ALD1 mediate SA-independent signals that are NPRl-dependent.These studies highlight the contribution of multiple pathways to defense and point to the complexity of their interactions.

  1. Comparisons of Caenorhabditis Fucosyltransferase Mutants Reveal a Multiplicity of Isomeric N-Glycan Structures.

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    Yan, Shi; Jin, Chunsheng; Wilson, Iain B H; Paschinger, Katharina

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown a remarkable degree of plasticity in the N-glycome of the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans; ablation of glycosylation-relevant genes can result in radically altered N-glycan profiles despite only minor biological phenotypic effects. Up to four fucose residues and five different linkages of fucose are known on the N-glycans of C. elegans. Due to the complexity in the wild type, we established three mutant strains defective in two core fucosyltransferases each (fut-1;fut-6, fut-1;fut-8, and fut-6;fut-8). Enzymatically released N-glycans were subject to HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS/MS, in combination with various treatments, to verify structural details. The N-glycome of the fut-1;fut-6 mutant was the most complex of the three double-mutant strains due to the extension of the core α1,6-fucose as well as the presence of fucose on the bisecting galactose. In contrast, maximally two fucoses were found on N-glycans of the fut-1;fut-8 and fut-6;fut-8 strains. The different locations and capping of fucose meant that up to 13 isomeric structures, many highly galactosylated, were determined for some single masses. These data not only show the high variability of the N-glycomic capacity of a "simple" nematode but also exemplify the need for multiple approaches to reveal individual glycan structures within complex invertebrate glycomes.

  2. Endogenous gibberellins in Arabidopsis thaliana and possible steps blocked in the biosynthetic pathways of the semidwarf ga4 and ga5 mutants

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    Talon, M. Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA)); Koornneef, M. (Agricultural Univ., (Netherlands))

    1990-10-01

    Twenty gibberellins (GAs) have been identified in extracts from shoots of the Landsberg erecta line of Arabidopsis thaliana by full-scan gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and Kovats retention indices. Eight of them are members of the early-13-hydroxylation pathway (GA{sub 53}, GA{sub 44}, GA{sub 19}, GA{sub 17}, GA{sub 20}, GA{sub 1}, GA{sub 29}, and GA{sub 8}), six are members of the early-3-hydroxylation pathway (GA{sub 37}, GA{sub 27}, GA{sub 36}, GA{sub 13}, GA{sub 4}, and GA{sub 34}), and the remaining six are members of the non-3,13-hydroxylation pathway (GA{sub 12}, GA{sub 15}, GA{sub 24}, GA{sub 25}, GA{sub 9}, and GFA{sub 51}). Seven of these GAs were quantified in the Landsberg erecta line of Arabidopsis and in the semidwarf ga4 and ga5 mutants by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring (SIM) using internal standards. The relative levels of the remaining 13 GAs were compared by the use of ion intensities only. The growth-response data, as well as the accumulation of GA{sub 9} in the ga4 mutant, indicate that GA{sub 9} is not active in Arabidopsis, but it must be 3{beta}-hydroxytlated to GA{sub 4} to become bioactive. It is concluded that the reduced levels of the 3{beta}-hydroxy-GAs, GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 4}, are the cause of the semidwarf growth habit of both mutants.

  3. The biosynthetic pathway of curcuminoid in turmeric (Curcuma longa) as revealed by 13C-labeled precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomoko; Imai, Shinsuke; Sawada, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Hidehiko; Seto, Haruo

    2008-07-01

    In order to investigate the biosynthesis of curcuminoid in rhizomes of turmeric (Curcuma longa), we established an in vitro culture system of turmeric plants for feeding (13)C-labeled precursors. Analyses of labeled desmethoxycurcumin (DMC), an unsymmetrical curcuminoid, by (13)C-NMR, revealed that one molecule of acetic acid or malonic acid and two molecules of phenylalanine or phenylpropanoids, but not tyrosine, were incorporated into DMC. The incorporation efficiencies of the same precursors into DMC and curcumin were similar, and were in the order malonic acid > acetic acid, and cinnamic acid > p-coumaric acid > ferulic acid. These results suggest the possibility that the pathway to curcuminoids utilized two cinnamoyl CoAs and one malonyl CoA, and that hydroxy- and methoxy-functional groups on the aromatic rings were introduced after the formation of the curcuminoid skeleton.

  4. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Hasan Khan Robin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA. The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062 and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total

  5. Photoactivation of Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 2 Reveals Rapid Cancer-Associated Metabolic and Epigenetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Olivia S; Elsässer, Simon J; Mahesh, Mohan; Bachman, Martin; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Chin, Jason W

    2016-01-27

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase is mutated at a key active site arginine residue (Arg172 in IDH2) in many cancers, leading to the synthesis of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). To investigate the early events following acquisition of this mutation in mammalian cells we created a photoactivatable version of IDH2(R172K), in which K172 is replaced with a photocaged lysine (PCK), via genetic code expansion. Illumination of cells expressing this mutant protein led to a rapid increase in the levels of 2HG, with 2HG levels reaching those measured in patient tumor samples, within 8 h. 2HG accumulation is closely followed by a global decrease in 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) in DNA, demonstrating that perturbations in epigenetic DNA base modifications are an early consequence of mutant IDH2 in cells. Our results provide a paradigm for rapidly and synchronously uncloaking diverse oncogenic mutations in live cells to reveal the sequence of events through which they may ultimately cause transformation.

  6. Secretome analysis revealed adaptive and non-adaptive responses of the Staphylococcus carnosus femB mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nega, Mulugeta; Dube, Linda; Kull, Melanie; Ziebandt, Anne-Kathrin; Ebner, Patrick; Albrecht, Dirk; Krismer, Bernhard; Rosenstein, Ralf; Hecker, Michael; Götz, Friedrich

    2015-04-01

    FemABX peptidyl transferases are involved in non-ribosomal pentaglycine interpeptide bridge biosynthesis. Here, we characterized the phenotype of a Staphylococcus carnosus femB deletion mutant, which was affected in growth and showed pleiotropic effects such as enhanced methicillin sensitivity, lysostaphin resistance, cell clustering, and decreased peptidoglycan cross-linking. However, comparative secretome analysis revealed a most striking difference in the massive secretion or release of proteins into the culture supernatant in the femB mutant than the wild type. The secreted proteins can be categorized into typical cytosolic proteins and various murein hydrolases. As the transcription of the murein hydrolase genes was up-regulated in the mutant, they most likely represent an adaption response to the life threatening mutation. Even though the transcription of the cytosolic protein genes was unaltered, their high abundance in the supernatant of the mutant is most likely due to membrane leakage triggered by the weakened murein sacculus and enhanced autolysins.

  7. Phenotypic comparison of samdc and spe mutants reveals complex relationships of polyamine metabolism in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Santiago, Laura; Cervantes-Chávez, José Antonio; Winkler, Robert; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-03-01

    Synthesis of spermidine involves the action of two enzymes, spermidine synthase (Spe) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (Samdc). Previously we cloned and disrupted the gene encoding Spe as a first approach to unravel the biological function of spermidine in Ustilago maydis. With this background, the present study was designed to provide a better understanding of the role played by Samdc in the regulation of the synthesis of this polyamine. With this aim we proceeded to isolate and delete the gene encoding Samdc from U. maydis, and made a comparative analysis of the phenotypes of samdc and spe mutants. Both spe and samdc mutants behaved as spermidine auxotrophs, and were more sensitive than the wild-type strain to different stress conditions. However, the two mutants displayed significant differences: in contrast to spe mutants, samdc mutants were more sensitive to LiCl stress, high spermidine concentrations counteracted their dimorphic deficiency, and they were completely avirulent. It is suggested that these differences are possibly related to differences in exogenous spermidine uptake or the differential location of the respective enzymes in the cell. Alternatively, since samdc mutants accumulate higher levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), whereas spe mutants accumulate decarboxylated SAM, the known opposite roles of these metabolites in the processes of methylation and differentiation offer an additional attractive hypothesis to explain the phenotypic differences of the two mutants, and provide insights into the additional roles of polyamine metabolism in the physiology of the cell.

  8. Metabolite profiling reveals abiotic stress tolerance in Tn5 mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasvi Chaudhry

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR; however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic

  9. Metabolite profiling reveals abiotic stress tolerance in Tn5 mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Vasvi; Bhatia, Anil; Bharti, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Mishra, Aradhana; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR); however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5) mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC) and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE) and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS) pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA) on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic stress

  10. Xenopus mutant reveals necessity of rax for specifying the eye field which otherwise forms tissue with telencephalic and diencephalic character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Margaret B; Nakayama, Takuya; Fisher, Marilyn; Hirsch, Nicolas; Cox, Amanda; Reeder, Rollin; Carruthers, Samantha; Hall, Amanda; Stemple, Derek L; Grainger, Robert M

    2014-11-15

    The retinal anterior homeobox (rax) gene encodes a transcription factor necessary for vertebrate eye development. rax transcription is initiated at the end of gastrulation in Xenopus, and is a key part of the regulatory network specifying anterior neural plate and retina. We describe here a Xenopus tropicalis rax mutant, the first mutant analyzed in detail from a reverse genetic screen. As in other vertebrates, this nonsense mutation results in eyeless animals, and is lethal peri-metamorphosis. Tissue normally fated to form retina in these mutants instead forms tissue with characteristics of diencephalon and telencephalon. This implies that a key role of rax, in addition to defining the eye field, is in preventing alternative forebrain identities. Our data highlight that brain and retina regions are not determined by the mid-gastrula stage but are by the neural plate stage. An RNA-Seq analysis and in situ hybridization assays for early gene expression in the mutant revealed that several key eye field transcription factors (e.g. pax6, lhx2 and six6) are not dependent on rax activity through neurulation. However, these analyses identified other genes either up- or down-regulated in mutant presumptive retinal tissue. Two neural patterning genes of particular interest that appear up-regulated in the rax mutant RNA-seq analysis are hesx1 and fezf2. These genes were not previously known to be regulated by rax. The normal function of rax is to partially repress their expression by an indirect mechanism in the presumptive retina region in wildtype embryos, thus accounting for the apparent up-regulation in the rax mutant. Knock-down experiments using antisense morpholino oligonucleotides directed against hesx1 and fezf2 show that failure to repress these two genes contributes to transformation of presumptive retinal tissue into non-retinal forebrain identities in the rax mutant.

  11. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I catalytic mutants reveal an alternative nucleophile that can catalyze substrate cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Evan Q; Cuya, Selma M; Kojima, Kyoko; Jafari, Nauzanene; Wanzeck, Keith C; Mobley, James A; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; van Waardenburg, Robert C A M

    2015-03-01

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) catalyzes the repair of 3'-DNA adducts, such as the 3'-phosphotyrosyl linkage of DNA topoisomerase I to DNA. Tdp1 contains two conserved catalytic histidines: a nucleophilic His (His(nuc)) that attacks DNA adducts to form a covalent 3'-phosphohistidyl intermediate and a general acid/base His (His(gab)), which resolves the Tdp1-DNA linkage. A His(nuc) to Ala mutant protein is reportedly inactive, whereas the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease SCAN1 has been attributed to the enhanced stability of the Tdp1-DNA intermediate induced by mutation of His(gab) to Arg. However, here we report that expression of the yeast His(nuc)Ala (H182A) mutant actually induced topoisomerase I-dependent cytotoxicity and further enhanced the cytotoxicity of Tdp1 His(gab) mutants, including H432N and the SCAN1-related H432R. Moreover, the His(nuc)Ala mutant was catalytically active in vitro, albeit at levels 85-fold less than that observed with wild type Tdp1. In contrast, the His(nuc)Phe mutant was catalytically inactive and suppressed His(gab) mutant-induced toxicity. These data suggest that the activity of another nucleophile when His(nuc) is replaced with residues containing a small side chain (Ala, Asn, and Gln), but not with a bulky side chain. Indeed, genetic, biochemical, and mass spectrometry analyses show that a highly conserved His, immediately N-terminal to His(nuc), can act as a nucleophile to catalyze the formation of a covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate. These findings suggest that the flexibility of Tdp1 active site residues may impair the resolution of mutant Tdp1 covalent phosphohistidyl intermediates and provide the rationale for developing chemotherapeutics that stabilize the covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate.

  12. Distinct Rayleigh scattering from hot spot mutant p53 proteins reveals cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ho Joon; Nguyen, Anh H; Kim, Yeul Hong; Park, Kyong Hwa; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Sim, Sang Jun

    2014-07-23

    The scattering of light redirects and resonances when an electromagnetic wave interacts with electrons orbits in the hot spot core protein and oscillated electron of the gold nanoparticles (AuNP). This report demonstrates convincingly that resonant Rayleigh scattering generated from hot spot mutant p53 proteins is correspondence to cancer cells. Hot spot mutants have unique local electron density changes that affect specificity of DNA binding affinity compared with wild types. Rayleigh scattering changes introduced by hot-spot mutations were monitored by localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) shift changes. The LSPR λmax shift for hot-spot mutants ranged from 1.7 to 4.2 nm for mouse samples and from 0.64 nm to 2.66 nm for human samples, compared to 9.6 nm and 15 nm for wild type and mouse and human proteins, respectively with a detection sensitivity of p53 concentration at 17.9 nM. It is interesting that hot-spot mutants, which affect only interaction with DNA, launches affinitive changes as considerable as wild types. These changes propose that hot-spot mutants p53 proteins can be easily detected by local electron density alterations that disturbs the specificity of DNA binding of p53 core domain on the surface of the DNA probed-nanoplasmonic sensor.

  13. Transcriptomic analyses of maize ys1 and ys3 mutants reveal maize iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozoye, Tomoko; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2015-09-01

    To acquire iron (Fe), graminaceous plants secrete mugineic acid family phytosiderophores (MAs) (Takagi, 1976 [1]) through the MAs efflux transporter TOM1 (Nozoye et al., 2011 [2]) and take up Fe in the form of Fe(III)-MAs complexes through the Fe(III)-MAs transporter YS1 (Curie et al., 2001 [3]). Yellow stripe 1 (ys1) and ys3 are recessive mutants of maize (Zea mays L.) that result in symptoms typical of Fe deficiency, i.e., interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. The ys1 mutant is defective in the YS1 transporter and is therefore unable to take up Fe(III)-MAs complexes. While the ys3 mutant has been shown to be defective in MA release, the causative gene has not been identified. The objective of the present work was to identify the genes responsible for the ys1 and ys3 phenotypes, so as to extend our understanding of Fe homeostasis in maize by qRT-PCR. In agreement with previous reports, the expression level of YS1 was decreased in the ys1 mutant. Moreover, we identified that the expression level of a homolog of TOM1 in maize (ZmTOM1) was significantly decreased in the ys3 mutant. Here described the quality control and analysis that were performed on the dataset. The data is publicly available through the GEO database with accession number GSE44557. The interpretation and description of these data are included in a manuscript (Nozoye et al., 2013 [4]).

  14. A suite of Lotus japonicus starch mutants reveals both conserved and novel features of starch metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriet, Cécile; Welham, Tracey; Brachmann, Andreas; Pike, Marilyn; Pike, Jodie; Perry, Jillian; Parniske, Martin; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Smith, Alison M; Wang, Trevor L

    2010-10-01

    The metabolism of starch is of central importance for many aspects of plant growth and development. Information on leaf starch metabolism other than in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is scarce. Furthermore, its importance in several agronomically important traits exemplified by legumes remains to be investigated. To address this issue, we have provided detailed information on the genes involved in starch metabolism in Lotus japonicus and have characterized a comprehensive collection of forward and TILLING (for Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) reverse genetics mutants affecting five enzymes of starch synthesis and two enzymes of starch degradation. The mutants provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glucan, water dikinase1 in particular. Analyses of the mutant phenotypes indicate that the pathways of leaf starch metabolism in L. japonicus and Arabidopsis are largely conserved. However, the importance of these pathways for plant growth and development differs substantially between the two species. Whereas essentially starchless Arabidopsis plants lacking plastidial phosphoglucomutase grow slowly relative to wild-type plants, the equivalent mutant of L. japonicus grows normally even in a 12-h photoperiod. In contrast, the loss of GLUCAN, WATER DIKINASE1, required for starch degradation, has a far greater effect on plant growth and fertility in L. japonicus than in Arabidopsis. Moreover, we have also identified several mutants likely to be affected in new components or regulators of the pathways of starch metabolism. This suite of mutants provides a substantial new resource for further investigations of the partitioning of carbon and its importance for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, legume seed development, and perenniality and vegetative regrowth.

  15. Arabidopsis haiku mutants reveal new controls of seed size by endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Damien; Saingery, Virginie; Chambrier, Pierre; Mayer, Ulrike; Jürgens, Gerd; Berger, Frédéric

    2003-04-01

    In flowering plants, maternal seed integument encloses the embryo and the endosperm, which are both derived from double fertilization. Although the development of these three components must be coordinated, we have limited knowledge of mechanisms involved in such coordination. The endosperm may play a central role in these mechanisms as epigenetic modifications of endosperm development, via imbalance of dosage between maternal and paternal genomes, affecting both the embryo and the integument. To identify targets of such epigenetic controls, we designed a genetic screen in Arabidopsis for mutants that phenocopy the effects of dosage imbalance in the endosperm. The two mutants haiku 1 and haiku 2 produce seed of reduced size that resemble seed with maternal excess in the maternal/paternal dosage. Homozygous haiku seed develop into plants indistinguishable from wild type. Each mutation is sporophytic recessive, and double-mutant analysis suggests that both mutations affect the same genetic pathway. The endosperm of haiku mutants shows a premature arrest of increase in size that causes precocious cellularization of the syncytial endosperm. Reduction of seed size in haiku results from coordinated reduction of endosperm size, embryo proliferation, and cell elongation of the maternally derived integument. We present further evidence for a control of integument development mediated by endosperm-derived signals.

  16. An alphavirus temperature-sensitive capsid mutant reveals stages of nucleocapsid assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Yan, E-mail: yzheng15@students.kgi.edu; Kielian, Margaret, E-mail: margaret.kielian@einstein.yu.edu

    2015-10-15

    Alphaviruses have a nucleocapsid core composed of the RNA genome surrounded by an icosahedral lattice of capsid protein. An insertion after position 186 in the capsid protein produced a strongly temperature-sensitive growth phenotype. Even when the structural proteins were synthesized at the permissive temperature (28 °C), subsequent incubation of the cells at the non-permissive temperature (37 °C) dramatically decreased mutant capsid protein stability and particle assembly. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic nucleocapsids in mutant-infected cells cultured at the permissive temperature, but these nucleocapsids were not stable to sucrose gradient separation. In contrast, nucleocapsids isolated from mutant virus particles had similar stability to that of wildtype virus. Our data support a model in which cytoplasmic nucleocapsids go through a maturation step during packaging into virus particles. The insertion site lies in the interface between capsid proteins in the assembled nucleocapsid, suggesting the region where such a stabilizing transition occurs. - Highlights: • We characterize an alphavirus capsid insertion mutation. • These capsid mutants are highly temperature sensitive for growth. • The insertion affects nucleocapsid stability. • Results suggest that the nucleocapsid is stabilized during virus budding.

  17. Parallel analysis of Arabidopsis circadian clock mutants reveals different scales of transcriptome and proteome regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; Coman, Diana; Walsh, Sean; Flis, Anna; Stitt, Mark; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates physiological processes central to growth and survival. To date, most plant circadian clock studies have relied on diurnal transcriptome changes to elucidate molecular connections between the circadian clock and observable phenotypes in wild-type plants. Here, we have integrated RNA-sequencing and protein mass spectrometry data to comparatively analyse the lhycca1, prr7prr9, gi and toc1 circadian clock mutant rosette at the end of day and end of night. Each mutant affects specific sets of genes and proteins, suggesting that the circadian clock regulation is modular. Furthermore, each circadian clock mutant maintains its own dynamically fluctuating transcriptome and proteome profile specific to subcellular compartments. Most of the measured protein levels do not correlate with changes in their corresponding transcripts. Transcripts and proteins that have coordinated changes in abundance are enriched for carbohydrate- and cold-responsive genes. Transcriptome changes in all four circadian clock mutants also affect genes encoding starch degradation enzymes, transcription factors and protein kinases. The comprehensive transcriptome and proteome datasets demonstrate that future system-driven research of the circadian clock requires multi-level experimental approaches. Our work also shows that further work is needed to elucidate the roles of post-translational modifications and protein degradation in the regulation of clock-related processes. PMID:28250106

  18. Drosophila Mutant Model of Parkinson's Disease Revealed an Unexpected Olfactory Performance: Morphofunctional Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rose, Francescaelena; Corda, Valentina; Belcari, Antonio; Poddighe, Simone; Marrosu, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the clinical triad: tremor, akinesia, and rigidity. Several studies have suggested that PD patients show disturbances in olfaction as one of the earliest, nonspecific nonmotor symptoms of disease onset. We sought to use the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism to explore olfactory function in LRRK loss-of-function mutants, which was previously demonstrated to be a useful model for PD. Surprisingly, our results showed that the LRRK mutant, compared to the wild flies, presents a dramatic increase in the amplitude of the electroantennogram responses and this is coupled with a higher number of olfactory sensilla. In spite of the above reported results, the behavioural response to olfactory stimuli in mutant flies is impaired compared to that obtained in wild type flies. Thus, behaviour modifications and morphofunctional changes in the olfaction of LRRK loss-of-function mutants might be used as an index to explore the progression of parkinsonism in this specific model, also with the aim of studying and developing new treatments. PMID:27648340

  19. Chlamydomonas fla mutants reveal a link between deflagellation and intraflagellar transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quarmby Lynne

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cilia and flagella are often lost in anticipation of mitosis or in response to stress. There are two ways that a cell can lose its flagella: resorption or deflagellation. Deflagellation involves active severing of the axoneme at the base of the flagellum; this process is defective in Chlamydomonas fa mutants. In contrast, resorption has been thought to occur as a consequence of constitutive disassembly at the tip in the absence of continued assembly, which requires intraflagellar transport (IFT. Chlamydomonas fla mutants are unable to build and maintain flagella due to defects in IFT. Results fla10 cells, which are defective in kinesin-II, the anterograde IFT motor, resorb their flagella at the restrictive temperature (33°C, as previously reported. We find that in standard media containing ~300 microM calcium, fla10 cells lose flagella by deflagellation at 33°C. This temperature-induced deflagellation of a fla mutant is not predicted by the IFT-based model for flagellar length control. Other fla mutants behave similarly, losing their flagella by deflagellation instead of resorption, if adequate calcium is available. These data suggest a new model whereby flagellar resorption involves active disassembly at the base of the flagellum via a mechanism with components in common with the severing machinery of deflagellation. As predicted by this model, we discovered that deflagellation stimuli induce resorption if deflagellation is blocked either by mutation in a FA gene or by lack of calcium. Further support for this model comes from our discovery that fla10-fa double mutants resorb their flagella more slowly than fla10 mutants. Conclusions Deflagellation of the fla10 mutant at the restrictive temperature is indicative of an active disassembly signal, which can manifest as either resorption or deflagellation. We propose that when IFT is halted by either an inactivating mutation or a cellular signal, active flagellar disassembly

  20. Transcriptomic analyses of maize ys1 and ys3 mutants reveal maize iron homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Nozoye

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To acquire iron (Fe, graminaceous plants secrete mugineic acid family phytosiderophores (MAs (Takagi, 1976 [1] through the MAs efflux transporter TOM1 (Nozoye et al., 2011 [2] and take up Fe in the form of Fe(III–MAs complexes through the Fe(III-MAs transporter YS1 (Curie et al., 2001 [3]. Yellow stripe 1 (ys1 and ys3 are recessive mutants of maize (Zea mays L. that result in symptoms typical of Fe deficiency, i.e., interveinal chlorosis of the leaves. The ys1 mutant is defective in the YS1 transporter and is therefore unable to take up Fe(III–MAs complexes. While the ys3 mutant has been shown to be defective in MA release, the causative gene has not been identified. The objective of the present work was to identify the genes responsible for the ys1 and ys3 phenotypes, so as to extend our understanding of Fe homeostasis in maize by qRT-PCR. In agreement with previous reports, the expression level of YS1 was decreased in the ys1 mutant. Moreover, we identified that the expression level of a homolog of TOM1 in maize (ZmTOM1 was significantly decreased in the ys3 mutant. Here described the quality control and analysis that were performed on the dataset. The data is publicly available through the GEO database with accession number GSE44557. The interpretation and description of these data are included in a manuscript (Nozoye et al., 2013 [4].

  1. Reconstructing fungal natural product biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, C M; Williams, K; Bailey, A M

    2014-10-01

    Large scale fungal genome sequencing has revealed a multitude of potential natural product biosynthetic pathways that remain uncharted. Here we describe some of the methods that have been used to explore them via heterologous gene expression. We focus on filamentous fungal hosts and discuss the technological challenges and successes behind the reconstruction of fungal natural product pathways. Optimised, efficient heterologous expression of reconstructed biosynthetic pathways promises progress in the discovery of novel compounds that could be utilised by the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries.

  2. Arabidopsis decuple mutant reveals the importance of SnRK2 kinases in osmotic stress responses in vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Fujii, Hiroaki

    2011-01-10

    Osmotic stress associated with drought or salinity is a major factor that limits plant productivity. Protein kinases in the SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) family are activated by osmotic stress, suggesting that the kinases are involved in osmotic stress signaling. However, due to functional redundancy, their contribution to osmotic stress responses remained unclear. In this report, we constructed an Arabidopsis line carrying mutations in all 10 members of the SnRK2 family. The decuple mutant snrk2.1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8/9/10 grew poorly under hyperosmotic stress conditions but was similar to the wild type in culture media in the absence of osmotic stress. The mutant was also defective in gene regulation and the accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), proline, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate under osmotic stress. In addition, analysis of mutants defective in the ABA-activated SnRK2s (snrk2.2/3/6) and mutants defective in the rest of the SnRK2s (snrk2.1/4/5/7/8/9/10) revealed that SnRK2s are a merging point of ABA-dependent and -independent pathways for osmotic stress responses. These results demonstrate critical functions of the SnRK2s in mediating osmotic stress signaling and tolerance.

  3. Visualizing allele-specific expression in single cells reveals epigenetic mosaicism in an H19 loss-of-imprinting mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginart, Paul; Kalish, Jennifer M; Jiang, Connie L; Yu, Alice C; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Raj, Arjun

    2016-03-01

    Imprinting is a classic mammalian epigenetic phenomenon that results in expression from a single parental allele. Imprinting defects can lead to inappropriate expression from the normally silenced allele, but it remains unclear whether every cell in a mutant organism follows the population average, which would have profound implications for human imprinting disorders. Here, we apply a new fluorescence in situ hybridization method that measures allele-specific expression in single cells to address this question in mutants exhibiting aberrant H19/Igf2 (insulin-like growth factor 2) imprinting. We show that mutant primary embryonic mouse fibroblasts are comprised of two subpopulations: one expressing both H19 alleles and another expressing only the maternal copy. Only in the latter cell population is Igf2 expression detected. Furthermore, the two subpopulations are stable in that cells do not interconvert between the two expression patterns. Combined small input methylation analysis and transcriptional imaging revealed that these two mutant subpopulations exhibit distinct methylation patterns at their imprinting control regions. Consistently, pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation reduced the proportion of monoallelic cells. Importantly, we observed that the same two subpopulations are also present in vivo within murine cardiac tissue. Our results establish that imprinting disorders can display striking single-cell heterogeneity in their molecular phenotypes and suggest that such heterogeneity may underlie epigenetic mosaicism in human imprinting disorders.

  4. MitoRCA-seq reveals unbalanced cytocine to thymine transition in Polg mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Ting; Wei, Gang; Shen, Ting; Han, Miao; Lian, Yaru; Fu, Haihui; Luo, Yan; Yang, Yanqin; Liu, Jie; Wakabayashi, Yoshi; Li, Zheng; Finkel, Toren; Xu, Hong; Zhu, Jun

    2015-07-27

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can lead to a wide range of human diseases. We have developed a deep sequencing strategy, mitoRCA-seq, to detect low-frequency mtDNA point mutations starting with as little as 1 ng of total DNA. It employs rolling circle amplification, which enriches the full-length circular mtDNA by either custom mtDNA-specific primers or a commercial kit, and minimizes the contamination of nuclear encoded mitochondrial DNA (Numts). By analyzing the mutation profiles of wild-type and Polg (mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ) mutant mice, we found that mice with the proofreading deficient mtDNA polymerase have a significantly higher mutation load by expanding the number of mutation sites and to a lesser extent by elevating the mutation frequency at existing sites even before the premature aging phenotypes appear. Strikingly, cytocine (C) to thymine (T) transitions are found to be overrepresented in the mtDNA of Polg mutated mice. The C → T transition, compared to other types of mutations, tends to increase the hydrophobicity of the underlying amino acids, and may contribute to the impaired protein function of the Polg mutant mice. Taken together, our findings may provide clues to further investigate the molecular mechanism underlying premature aging phenotype in Polg mutant mice.

  5. The Analysis of Pendolino (peo) Mutants Reveals Differences in the Fusigenic Potential among Drosophila Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Giovanni; Ciapponi, Laura; Marzullo, Marta; Raffa, Grazia D; Morciano, Patrizia; Raimondo, Domenico; Burla, Romina; Saggio, Isabella; Gatti, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Drosophila telomeres are sequence-independent structures that are maintained by transposition to chromosome ends of three specialized retroelements (HeT-A, TART and TAHRE; collectively designated as HTT) rather than telomerase activity. Fly telomeres are protected by the terminin complex (HOAP-HipHop-Moi-Ver) that localizes and functions exclusively at telomeres and by non-terminin proteins that do not serve telomere-specific functions. Although all Drosophila telomeres terminate with HTT arrays and are capped by terminin, they differ in the type of subtelomeric chromatin; the Y, XR, and 4L HTT are juxtaposed to constitutive heterochromatin, while the XL, 2L, 2R, 3L and 3R HTT are linked to the TAS repetitive sequences; the 4R HTT is associated with a chromatin that has features common to both euchromatin and heterochromatin. Here we show that mutations in pendolino (peo) cause telomeric fusions (TFs). The analysis of several peo mutant combinations showed that these TFs preferentially involve the Y, XR and 4th chromosome telomeres, a TF pattern never observed in the other 10 telomere-capping mutants so far characterized. peo encodes a non-terminin protein homologous to the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. The Peo protein directly interacts with the terminin components, but peo mutations do not affect telomeric localization of HOAP, Moi, Ver and HP1a, suggesting that the peo-dependent telomere fusion phenotype is not due to loss of terminin from chromosome ends. peo mutants are also defective in DNA replication and PCNA recruitment. However, our results suggest that general defects in DNA replication are unable to induce TFs in Drosophila cells. We thus hypothesize that DNA replication in Peo-depleted cells results in specific fusigenic lesions concentrated in heterochromatin-associated telomeres. Alternatively, it is possible that Peo plays a dual function being independently required for DNA replication and telomere capping.

  6. The Analysis of Pendolino (peo Mutants Reveals Differences in the Fusigenic Potential among Drosophila Telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Cenci

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila telomeres are sequence-independent structures that are maintained by transposition to chromosome ends of three specialized retroelements (HeT-A, TART and TAHRE; collectively designated as HTT rather than telomerase activity. Fly telomeres are protected by the terminin complex (HOAP-HipHop-Moi-Ver that localizes and functions exclusively at telomeres and by non-terminin proteins that do not serve telomere-specific functions. Although all Drosophila telomeres terminate with HTT arrays and are capped by terminin, they differ in the type of subtelomeric chromatin; the Y, XR, and 4L HTT are juxtaposed to constitutive heterochromatin, while the XL, 2L, 2R, 3L and 3R HTT are linked to the TAS repetitive sequences; the 4R HTT is associated with a chromatin that has features common to both euchromatin and heterochromatin. Here we show that mutations in pendolino (peo cause telomeric fusions (TFs. The analysis of several peo mutant combinations showed that these TFs preferentially involve the Y, XR and 4th chromosome telomeres, a TF pattern never observed in the other 10 telomere-capping mutants so far characterized. peo encodes a non-terminin protein homologous to the E2 variant ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. The Peo protein directly interacts with the terminin components, but peo mutations do not affect telomeric localization of HOAP, Moi, Ver and HP1a, suggesting that the peo-dependent telomere fusion phenotype is not due to loss of terminin from chromosome ends. peo mutants are also defective in DNA replication and PCNA recruitment. However, our results suggest that general defects in DNA replication are unable to induce TFs in Drosophila cells. We thus hypothesize that DNA replication in Peo-depleted cells results in specific fusigenic lesions concentrated in heterochromatin-associated telomeres. Alternatively, it is possible that Peo plays a dual function being independently required for DNA replication and telomere capping.

  7. Neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to the supply and demand for neuropeptides as revealed in NSF mutant zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baier Herwig

    2009-06-01

    reveal an unexpected role for NSF in hypothalamic development, with mutant 5 days post-fertilization larvae exhibiting a stage-dependent loss of neuroendocrine transcripts and a corresponding accumulation of neuropeptides in the soma. Based on our collective findings, we speculate that neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to both the supply and demand for neuropeptides to ensure adequate homeostatic responses.

  8. Mutational scanning of the human serotonin transporter reveals fast translocating serotonin transporter mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Larsen, Mads B; Johnsen, Laust B;

    2004-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) belongs to a family of sodium-chloride-dependent transporters responsible for uptake of amino acids and biogenic amines from the extracellular space. SERT represents a major pharmacological target in the treatment of several clinical conditions, including depression...... and anxiety. In the present study we have undertaken a mutational scanning of human SERT in order to identify residues that are responsible for individual differences among related monoamine transporters. One mutant, G100A, was inactive in transport. However, ligand binding affinity was similar to wild...

  9. Transcript profiling of crown rootless1 mutant stem base reveals new elements associated with crown root development in rice

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    Van Anh Le Thi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In rice, the major part of the post-embryonic root system is made of stem-derived roots named crown roots (CR. Among the few characterized rice mutants affected in root development, crown rootless1 mutant is unable to initiate crown root primordia. CROWN ROOTLESS1 (CRL1 is induced by auxin and encodes an AS2/LOB-domain transcription factor that acts upstream of the gene regulatory network controlling CR development. Results To identify genes involved in CR development, we compared global gene expression profile in stem bases of crl1 mutant and wild-type (WT plants. Our analysis revealed that 250 and 236 genes are down- and up-regulated respectively in the crl1 mutant. Auxin induces CRL1 expression and consequently it is expected that auxin also alters the expression of genes that are early regulated by CRL1. To identify genes under the early control of CRL1, we monitored the expression kinetics of a selected subset of genes, mainly chosen among those exhibiting differential expression, in crl1 and WT following exogenous auxin treatment. This analysis revealed that most of these genes, mainly related to hormone, water and nutrient, development and homeostasis, were likely not regulated directly by CRL1. We hypothesized that the differential expression for these genes observed in the crl1 mutant is likely a consequence of the absence of CR formation. Otherwise, three CRL1-dependent auxin-responsive genes: FSM (FLATENNED SHOOT MERISTEM/FAS1 (FASCIATA1, GTE4 (GENERAL TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR GROUP E4 and MAP (MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN were identified. FSM/FAS1 and GTE4 are known in rice and Arabidopsis to be involved in the maintenance of root meristem through chromatin remodelling and cell cycle regulation respectively. Conclusion Our data showed that the differential regulation of most genes in crl1 versus WT may be an indirect consequence of CRL1 inactivation resulting from the absence of CR in the crl1 mutant. Nevertheless

  10. Identification of a Pantoea biosynthetic cluster that directs the synthesis of an antimicrobial natural product.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa M Walterson

    Full Text Available Fire Blight is a destructive disease of apple and pear caused by the enteric bacterial pathogen, Erwinia amylovora. E. amylovora initiates infection by colonizing the stigmata of apple and pear trees, and entering the plants through natural openings. Epiphytic populations of the related enteric bacterium, Pantoea, reduce the incidence of disease through competition and antibiotic production. In this study, we identify an antibiotic from Pantoea ananatis BRT175, which is effective against E. amylovora and select species of Pantoea. We used transposon mutagenesis to create a mutant library, screened approximately 5,000 mutants for loss of antibiotic production, and recovered 29 mutants. Sequencing of the transposon insertion sites of these mutants revealed multiple independent disruptions of an 8.2 kb cluster consisting of seven genes, which appear to be coregulated. An analysis of the distribution of this cluster revealed that it was not present in any other of our 115 Pantoea isolates, or in any of the fully sequenced Pantoea genomes, and is most closely related to antibiotic biosynthetic clusters found in three different species of Pseudomonas. This identification of this biosynthetic cluster highlights the diversity of natural products produced by Pantoea.

  11. The structure of a thermostable mutant of pro-papain reveals its activation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sumana; Choudhury, Debi; Aich, Pulakesh; Dattagupta, Jiban K; Biswas, Sampa

    2012-12-01

    Papain is the archetype of a broad class of cysteine proteases (clan C1A) that contain a pro-peptide in the zymogen form which is required for correct folding and spatio-temporal regulation of proteolytic activity in the initial stages after expression. This study reports the X-ray structure of the zymogen of a thermostable mutant of papain at 2.6 Å resolution. The overall structure, in particular that of the mature part of the protease, is similar to those of other members of the family. The structure provides an explanation for the molecular basis of the maintenance of latency of the proteolytic activity of the zymogen by its pro-segment at neutral pH. The structural analysis, together with biochemical and biophysical studies, demonstrated that the pro-segment of the zymogen undergoes a rearrangement in the form of a structural loosening at acidic pH which triggers the proteolytic activation cascade. This study further explains the bimolecular stepwise autocatalytic activation mechanism by limited proteolysis of the zymogen of papain at the molecular level. The possible factors responsible for the higher thermal stability of the papain mutant have also been analyzed.

  12. Structure of a mutant [beta] toxin from Staphylococcus aureus reveals domain swapping and conformational flexibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruse, Andrew C.; Huseby, Medora J.; Shi, Ke; Digre, Jeff; Ohlendorf, Douglas H.; Earhart, Cathleen A. (UMM)

    2011-09-16

    The 3.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a mutant form of the staphylococcal sphingomyelinase {beta} toxin in which a conserved hydrophobic {beta}-hairpin has been deleted is reported. It is shown that this mutation induces domain swapping of a C-terminal {beta}-strand, leading to the formation of dimers linked by a conformationally flexible hinge region. Eight dimers are seen in the asymmetric unit, exhibiting a broad spectrum of conformations trapped in place by intermolecular contacts within the crystal lattice. Furthermore, the 16 monomers within each asymmetric unit exhibit a remarkable heterogeneity in thermal factors, which can be accounted for by the varying degrees to which each monomer interacts with other molecules in the crystal. This structure provides a unique example of the challenges associated with crystallographic study of flexible proteins.

  13. Bright mutants of Vibrio fischeri ES114 reveal conditions and regulators that control bioluminescence and expression of the lux operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Dunn, Anne K; Bose, Jeffrey L; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-10-01

    Vibrio fischeri ES114, an isolate from the Euprymna scolopes light organ, produces little bioluminescence in culture but is ∼1,000-fold brighter when colonizing the host. Cell-density-dependent regulation alone cannot explain this phenomenon, because cells within colonies on solid medium are much dimmer than symbiotic cells despite their similar cell densities. To better understand this low luminescence in culture, we screened ∼20,000 mini-Tn5 mutants of ES114 for increased luminescence and identified 28 independent "luminescence-up" mutants with insertions in 14 loci. Mutations affecting the Pst phosphate uptake system led to the discovery that luminescence is upregulated under low-phosphate conditions by PhoB, and we also found that ainS, which encodes an autoinducer synthase, mediates repression of luminescence during growth on plates. Other novel luminescence-up mutants had insertions in acnB, topA, tfoY, phoQ, guaB, and two specific tRNA genes. Two loci, hns and lonA, were previously described as repressors of bioluminescence in transgenic Escherichia coli carrying the light-generating lux genes, and mutations in arcA and arcB were consistent with our report that Arc represses lux. Our results reveal a complex regulatory web governing luminescence and show how certain environmental conditions are integrated into regulation of the pheromone-dependent lux system.

  14. Analysis of knockout mutants reveals non-redundant functions of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoforms in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Phuong Anh; Wahl, Vanessa; Tohge, Takayuki; de Souza, Laise Rosado; Zhang, Youjun; Do, Phuc Thi; Olas, Justyna J; Stitt, Mark; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2015-11-01

    The enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) has a dual function being involved both in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and being a constituent of the NAD(+) salvage pathway. To date most studies, both in plant and non-plant systems, have focused on the signaling role of PARP in poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation rather than any role that can be ascribed to its metabolic function. In order to address this question we here used a combination of expression, transcript and protein localization studies of all three PARP isoforms of Arabidopsis alongside physiological analysis of the corresponding mutants. Our analyses indicated that whilst all isoforms of PARP were localized to the nucleus they are also present in non-nuclear locations with parp1 and parp3 also localised in the cytosol, and parp2 also present in the mitochondria. We next isolated and characterized insertional knockout mutants of all three isoforms confirming a complete knockout in the full length transcript levels of the target genes as well as a reduced total leaf NAD hydrolase activity in the two isoforms (PARP1, PARP2) that are highly expressed in leaves. Physiological evaluation of the mutant lines revealed that they displayed distinctive metabolic and root growth characteristics albeit unaltered leaf morphology under optimal growth conditions. We therefore conclude that the PARP isoforms play non-redundant non-nuclear metabolic roles and that their function is highly important in rapidly growing tissues such as the shoot apical meristem, roots and seeds.

  15. The maize milkweed pod1 mutant reveals a mechanism to modify organ morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robyn; Candela, Héctor; Hake, Sarah; Foster, Toshi

    2010-07-01

    Plant lateral organs, such as leaves, have three primary axes of growth-proximal-distal, medial--lateral and adaxial-abaxial (dorsal-ventral). Although most leaves are planar, modified leaf forms, such as the bikeeled grass prophyll, can be found in nature. A detailed examination of normal prophyll development indicates that polarity is established differently in the keels than in other parts of the prophyll. Analysis of the maize HD-ZIPIII gene rolled leaf1 (rld1) suggests that altered expression patterns are responsible for keel outgrowth. Recessive mutations in the maize (Zea mays) KANADI (KAN) gene milkweed pod1 (mwp1), which promotes abaxial cell identity, strongly affect development of the prophyll and silks (fused carpels). The prophyll is reduced to two unfused midribs and the silks are narrow and misshapen. Our data indicate that the prophyll and other fused organs are particularly sensitive to disruptions in adaxial-abaxial polarity. In addition, lateral and proximal-distal growth of most lateral organs is reduced in the mwp1-R mutant, supporting a role for the adaxial-abaxial boundary in promoting growth along both axes. We propose that the adaxial-abaxial patterning mechanism has been co-opted during evolution to generate diverse organ morphologies.

  16. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis.

  17. The characterization of transgenic tomato overexpressing gibberellin 20-oxidase reveals induction of parthenocarpic fruit growth, higher yield, and alteration of the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hurtado, Noemí; Carrera, Esther; Ruiz-Rivero, Omar; López-Gresa, Maria Pilar; Hedden, Peter; Gong, Fan; García-Martínez, José Luis

    2012-10-01

    Fruit-set and growth in tomato depend on the action of gibberellins (GAs). To evaluate the role of the GA biosynthetic enzyme GA 20-oxidase (GA20ox) in that process, the citrus gene CcGA20ox1 was overexpressed in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) cv Micro-Tom. The transformed plants were taller, had non-serrated leaves, and some flowers displayed a protruding stigma due to a longer style, thus preventing self-pollination, similar to GA(3)-treated plants. Flowering was delayed compared with wild-type (WT) plants. Both yield and number of fruits per plant, some of them seedless, were higher in the transgenic plants. The Brix index value of fruit juice was also higher due to elevated citric acid content, but not glucose or fructose content. When emasculated, 14-30% of ovaries from transgenic flowers developed parthenocarpically, whereas no parthenocarpy was found in emasculated WT flowers. The presence of early-13-hydroxylation and non-13-hydroxylation GA pathways was demonstrated in the shoot and fruit of Micro-Tom, as well as in two tall tomato cultivars (Ailsa Craig and UC-82). The transgenic plants had altered GA profiles containing higher concentrations of GA(4), from the non-13-hydroxylation pathway, which is generally a minor active GA in tomato. The effect of GA(4) application in enhancing stem growth and parthenocarpic fruit development was proportional to dose, with the same activity as GA(1). The results support the contention that GA20ox overexpression diverts GA metabolism from the early-13-hydroxylation pathway to the non-13-hydroxylation pathway. This led to enhanced GA(4) synthesis and higher yield, although the increase in GA(4) content in the ovary was not sufficient to induce full parthenocarpy.

  18. Mutational analysis of the thienamycin biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Miriam; Núñez, Luz Elena; Braña, Alfredo F; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Blanco, Gloria

    2011-04-01

    The generation of non-thienamycin-producing mutants with mutations in the thnL, thnN, thnO, and thnI genes within the thn gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya and their involvement in thienamycin biosynthesis and regulation were previously reported. Four additional mutations were independently generated in the thnP, thnG, thnR, and thnT genes by insertional inactivation. Only the first two genes were found to play a role in thienamycin biosynthesis, since these mutations negatively or positively affect antibiotic production. A mutation of thnP results in the absence of thienamycin production, whereas a 2- to 3-fold increase in thienamycin production was observed for the thnG mutant. On the other hand, mutations in thnR and thnT showed that although these genes were previously reported to participate in this pathway, they seem to be nonessential for thienamycin biosynthesis, as thienamycin production was not affected in these mutants. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of all available mutants revealed some putative intermediates in the thienamycin biosynthetic pathway. A compound with a mass corresponding to carbapenam-3-carboxylic acid was detected in some of the mutants, suggesting that the assembly of the bicyclic nucleus of thienamycin might proceed in a way analogous to that of the simplest natural carbapenem, 1-carbapen-2-em-3-carboxylic acid biosynthesis. The accumulation of a compound with a mass corresponding to 2,3-dihydrothienamycin in the thnG mutant suggests that it might be the last intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway. These data, together with the establishment of cross-feeding relationships by the cosynthesis analysis of the non-thienamycin-producing mutants, lead to a proposal for some enzymatic steps during thienamycin assembly.

  19. Polyglutamine- and temperature-dependent conformational rigidity in mutant huntingtin revealed by immunoassays and circular dichroism spectroscopy.

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    Valentina Fodale

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Huntington's disease, expansion of a CAG triplet repeat occurs in exon 1 of the huntingtin gene (HTT, resulting in a protein bearing>35 polyglutamine residues whose N-terminal fragments display a high propensity to misfold and aggregate. Recent data demonstrate that polyglutamine expansion results in conformational changes in the huntingtin protein (HTT, which likely influence its biological and biophysical properties. Developing assays to characterize and measure these conformational changes in isolated proteins and biological samples would advance the testing of novel therapeutic approaches aimed at correcting mutant HTT misfolding. Time-resolved Förster energy transfer (TR-FRET-based assays represent high-throughput, homogeneous, sensitive immunoassays widely employed for the quantification of proteins of interest. TR-FRET is extremely sensitive to small distances and can therefore provide conformational information based on detection of exposure and relative position of epitopes present on the target protein as recognized by selective antibodies. We have previously reported TR-FRET assays to quantify HTT proteins based on the use of antibodies specific for different amino-terminal HTT epitopes. Here, we investigate the possibility of interrogating HTT protein conformation using these assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By performing TR-FRET measurements on the same samples (purified recombinant proteins or lysates from cells expressing HTT fragments or full length protein at different temperatures, we have discovered a temperature-dependent, reversible, polyglutamine-dependent conformational change of wild type and expanded mutant HTT proteins. Circular dichroism spectroscopy confirms the temperature and polyglutamine-dependent change in HTT structure, revealing an effect of polyglutamine length and of temperature on the alpha-helical content of the protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The temperature- and polyglutamine

  20. Characterization of a spontaneous nonmagnetic mutant of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense reveals a large deletion comprising a putative magnetosome island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schübbe, Sabrina; Kube, Michael; Scheffel, André; Wawer, Cathrin; Heyen, Udo; Meyerdierks, Anke; Madkour, Mohamed H; Mayer, Frank; Reinhardt, Richard; Schüler, Dirk

    2003-10-01

    Frequent spontaneous loss of the magnetic phenotype was observed in stationary-phase cultures of the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. A nonmagnetic mutant, designated strain MSR-1B, was isolated and characterized. The mutant lacked any structures resembling magnetosome crystals as well as internal membrane vesicles. The growth of strain MSR-1B was impaired under all growth conditions tested, and the uptake and accumulation of iron were drastically reduced under iron-replete conditions. A large chromosomal deletion of approximately 80 kb was identified in strain MSR-1B, which comprised both the entire mamAB and mamDC clusters as well as further putative operons encoding a number of magnetosome-associated proteins. A bacterial artificial chromosome clone partially covering the deleted region was isolated from the genomic library of wild-type M. gryphiswaldense. Sequence analysis of this fragment revealed that all previously identified mam genes were closely linked with genes encoding other magnetosome-associated proteins within less than 35 kb. In addition, this region was remarkably rich in insertion elements and harbored a considerable number of unknown gene families which appeared to be specific for magnetotactic bacteria. Overall, these findings suggest the existence of a putative large magnetosome island in M. gryphiswaldense and other magnetotactic bacteria.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy and serial reconstructions reveal novel meiotic phenotypes for the ahp2 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Nazia; Stronghill, Patti; Hasenkampf, Clare

    2013-03-01

    We have found novel phenotypes for the previously studied Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. meiotic mutant ahp2. These phenotypes were revealed by analysis of reconstructions of normal and ahp2 nuclei that were imaged using transmission electron microscopy. Previous studies of the ahp2 mutant demonstrated that it has a general failure to form synaptonemal complexes, except for the nucleolus organizing regions, and it fails to complete reciprocal genetic exchange. Here, we show that even though the ahp2 chromosome axes have only 5% of the normal amount of synaptonemal complex formation, it nonetheless has slightly more than 40% of the axes involved in close alignment. We also observed two striking nuclear envelope associated abnormalities. Wild type nuclei contain two nucleoli, one nucleolus-like structure, and nuclear envelope associated structures that we refer to as nuclear envelope associated disks. The ahp2 nuclei have the two nucleoli, but they lack the third nucleolus-like structure and instead have a previously uncharacterized structure that spans the nuclear envelope. Additionally, ahp2 meiocytes have nuclear envelope associated disks that are narrower and more numerous (∼2×) than those seen in wild type, and unlike the wild type disks, they are in direct contact with the nuclear envelope.

  2. Lethality in PARP-1/Ku80 double mutant mice reveals physiologicalsynergy during early embryogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrie, Melinda S.; Kurimasa, Akihiro; Burma, Sandeep; Menissier-de Murcia, Josiane; de Murcia, Gilbert; Li, Gloria C.; Chen,David J.

    2002-09-24

    Ku is an abundant heterodimeric nuclear protein, consisting of 70-kDa and 86-kDa tightly associated subunits that comprise the DNA binding component of DNA-dependent protein kinase. Poly(ADP)ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a 113-kDa protein that catalyzes the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) on target proteins. Both Ku and PARP-1 recognize and bind to DNA ends. Ku functions in the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway whereas PARP-1 functions in the single strand break repair and base excision repair (BER) pathways. Recent studies have revealed that PARP-1 and Ku80 interact in vitro. To determine whether the association of PARP-1 and Ku80 has any physiological significance or synergistic function in vivo, mice lacking both PARP-1 and Ku80 were generated. The resulting offspring died during embryonic development displaying abnormalities around the gastrulation stage. In addition, PARP-1-/-Ku80-/- cultured blastocysts had an increased level of apoptosis. These data suggest that the functions of both Ku80 and PARP-1 are essential for normal embryogenesis and that a loss of genomic integrity leading to cell death through apoptosis is likely the cause of the embryonic lethality observed in these mice.

  3. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  4. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdoes, J.C.; Sandmann, G.; Visser, H.; Diaz, M.; Mossel, van M.; Ooyen, van A.J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both si

  5. Structural and Functional Studies of the Rap1 C-Terminus Reveal Novel Separation-of-Function Mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feeser, Elizabeth A.; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU-MED)

    2010-02-19

    The yeast Rap1 protein plays an important role in transcriptional silencing and in telomere length homeostasis. Rap1 mediates silencing at the HM loci and at telomeres by recruiting the Sir3 and Sir4 proteins to chromatin via a Rap1 C-terminal domain, which also recruits the telomere length regulators, Rif1 and Rif2. We report the 1.85 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the Rap1 C-terminus, which adopts an all-helical fold with no structural homologues. The structure was used to engineer surface mutations in Rap1, and the effects of these mutations on silencing and telomere length regulation were assayed in vivo. Our surprising finding was that there is no overlap between mutations affecting mating-type and telomeric silencing, suggesting that Rap1 plays distinct roles in silencing at the silent mating-type loci and telomeres. We also found novel Rap1 phenotypes and new separation-of-function mutants, which provide new tools for studying Rap1 function. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to determine how specific mutations affect recruitment of Sir3, Rif1, and Rif2. A comparison of the yeast two-hybrid and functional data reveals patterns of protein interactions that correlate with each Rap1 phenotype. We find that Sir3 interactions are important for telomeric silencing, but not mating type silencing, and that Rif1 and Rif2 interactions are important in different subsets of telomeric length mutants. Our results show that the role of Rap1 in silencing differs between the HM loci and the telomeres and offer insight into the interplay between HM silencing, telomeric silencing, and telomere length regulation. These findings suggest a model in which competition and multiple recruitment events modulate silencing and telomere length regulation.

  6. Comparison of carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression between Valencia and Rohde Red Valencia sweet oranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotenoid accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression levels during fruit maturation were compared between ordinary Valencia (VAL) and its more deeply colored mutant Rohde Red Valencia orange (RRV). The two cultivars exhibited different carotenoid profiles and regulatory mechanisms in flavedo and...

  7. Isolation and characterization of a low phytic acid rice mutant reveals a mutation in the rice orthologue of maize mik.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using a forward genetics approach, we isolated two independent low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants, N15-186 and N15-375. Both mutants are caused by single gene, recessive non-lethal mutations which result in approximately 75% (N15-186) and 43% (N15-375) reductions in seed phytic acid (inositol hexaki...

  8. RNA interference targeting CYP76AH1 in hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza reveals its key role in the biosynthetic pathway of tanshinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Ma, Xiao-Hui; Meng, Fan-Yun; Zhan, Zhi-Lai; Guo, Juan; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2016-08-19

    Plant cytochrome P450s (CYPs) are well known as the largest family of enzymes that contribute to both primary metabolism and the chemical diversity of plant secondary metabolites. It is important to elucidate the in vivo role of CYPs in secondary metabolism, in order to apply them in the production of valuable metabolites in medicinal plants via metabolic engineering. CYP76AH1 has been suggested to catalyze the conversion of the carbon skeleton miltiradiene into the intermediate ferruginol, which is involved in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, the chief bioactive ingredients of Salvia miltiorrhiza. However, its role in planta remains to be elucidated. In this work, we constructed a CYP76AH1 RNAi system for hairy roots. Metabolic analysis of RNAi-AH1 hairy root lines showed a significantly increased accumulation of miltiradiene compared to the control lines. At the same time, the concentration of ferruginol decreased revealing the in vivo catalytic activity of CYP76AH1. The content of tanshinones decreased significantly after silencing of CYP76AH1, which verified its key role in the biosynthesis of tanshinones, and indicated that it could be used as a target for metabolic engineering.

  9. Genetic Screening Identifies Cyanogenesis-Deficient Mutants of Lotus japonicus and Reveals Enzymatic Specificity in Hydroxynitrile Glucoside Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takos, A.; Lai, D.; Mikkelsen, L.;

    2010-01-01

    content. L. japonicus produces two cyanogenic glucosides: linamarin (derived from Val) and lotaustralin (derived from Ile). Their biosynthesis may involve the same set of enzymes for both amino acid precursors. However, in one class of mutants, accumulation of lotaustralin and linamarin was uncoupled....... We developed a high-throughput screening method and used it to identify cyanogenesis deficient (cyd) mutants in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Mutants in both biosynthesis and catabolism of cyanogenic glucosides were isolated and classified following metabolic profiling of cyanogenic glucoside....... Catabolic mutants could be placed in two complementation groups, one of which, cyd2, encoded the beta-glucosidase BGD2. Despite the identification of nine independent cyd2 alleles, no mutants involving the gene encoding a closely related beta-glucosidase, BGD4, were identified. This indicated that BGD4...

  10. Longevity Genes Revealed by Integrative Analysis of Isoform-Specific daf-16/FoxO Mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Albert Tzong-Yang; Guo, Chunfang; Itani, Omar A; Budaitis, Breane G; Williams, Travis W; Hopkins, Christopher E; McEachin, Richard C; Pande, Manjusha; Grant, Ana R; Yoshina, Sawako; Mitani, Shohei; Hu, Patrick J

    2015-10-01

    FoxO transcription factors promote longevity across taxa. How they do so is poorly understood. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the A- and F-isoforms of the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16 extend life span in the context of reduced DAF-2 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR) signaling. To elucidate the mechanistic basis for DAF-16/FoxO-dependent life span extension, we performed an integrative analysis of isoform-specific daf-16/FoxO mutants. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that DAF-16F plays a more prominent role in life span control than DAF-16A, isoform-specific daf-16/FoxO mutant phenotypes and whole transcriptome profiling revealed a predominant role for DAF-16A over DAF-16F in life span control, stress resistance, and target gene regulation. Integration of these datasets enabled the prioritization of a subset of 92 DAF-16/FoxO target genes for functional interrogation. Among 29 genes tested, two DAF-16A-specific target genes significantly influenced longevity. A loss-of-function mutation in the conserved gene gst-20, which is induced by DAF-16A, reduced life span extension in the context of daf-2/IGFR RNAi without influencing longevity in animals subjected to control RNAi. Therefore, gst-20 promotes DAF-16/FoxO-dependent longevity. Conversely, a loss-of-function mutation in srr-4, a gene encoding a seven-transmembrane-domain receptor family member that is repressed by DAF-16A, extended life span in control animals, indicating that DAF-16/FoxO may extend life span at least in part by reducing srr-4 expression. Our discovery of new longevity genes underscores the efficacy of our integrative strategy while providing a general framework for identifying specific downstream gene regulatory events that contribute substantially to transcription factor functions. As FoxO transcription factors have conserved functions in promoting longevity and may be dysregulated in aging-related diseases, these findings promise to illuminate fundamental

  11. The Neurospora crassa mutant NcΔEgt-1 identifies an ergothioneine biosynthetic gene and demonstrates that ergothioneine enhances conidial survival and protects against peroxide toxicity during conidial germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Marco H; Barrera-Perez, Viviana; Morin, Dexter; Epstein, Lynn

    2012-02-01

    Ergothioneine (EGT) is a histidine derivative with sulfur on the imidazole ring and a trimethylated amine; it is postulated to have an antioxidant function. Although EGT apparently is only produced by fungi and some prokaryotes, it is acquired by animals and plants from the environment, and is concentrated in animal tissues in cells with an EGT transporter. Monobromobimane derivatives of EGT allowed conclusive identification of EGT by LC/MS and the quantification of EGT in Colletotrichum graminicola and Neurospora crassa conidia and mycelia. EGT concentrations were significantly (α=0.05) higher in conidia than in mycelia, with approximately 17X and 5X more in C. graminicola and N. crassa, respectively. The first EGT biosynthetic gene in a fungus was identified by quantifying EGT in N. crassa wild type and knockouts in putative homologs of actinomycete EGT biosynthetic genes. NcΔEgt-1, a strain with a knockout in gene NCU04343, does not produce EGT, in contrast to the wild type. To determine the effects of EGT in vivo, we compared NcΔEgt-1 to the wild type. NcΔEgt-1 is not pleiotropically affected in rate of hyphal elongation in Vogel's medium either with or without ammonium nitrate and in the rate of germination of macroconidia on Vogel's medium. The superoxide-producer menadione had indistinguishable effects on conidial germination between the two strains. Cupric sulfate also had indistinguishable effects on conidial germination and on hyphal growth between the two strains. In contrast, germination of NcΔEgt-1 conidia was significantly more sensitive to tert-butyl hydroperoxide than the wild type; germination of 50% (GI(50)) of the NcΔEgt-1 conidia was prevented at 2.7 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide whereas the GI(50) for the wild type was 4.7 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide, or at a 1.7X greater concentration. In the presence of tert-butyl hydroperoxide and the fluorescent reactive oxygen species indicator 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein

  12. Revealing differences in metabolic flux distributions between a mutant strain and its parent strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zhong

    Full Text Available A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955 using DEC (diethyl sulfate and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0% compared with parent strain (17.0%. It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53-6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain.

  13. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  14. Comparative transcripts profiling reveals new insight into molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in a sweet orange (Citrus sinensis red-flesh mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jianchen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interest in lycopene metabolism and regulation is growing rapidly because accumulative studies have suggested an important role for lycopene in human health promotion. However, little is known about the molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in fruits other than tomato so far. Results On a spontaneous sweet orange bud mutant with abnormal lycopene accumulation in fruits and its wild type, comparative transcripts profiling was performed using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS. A total of 6,877,027 and 6,275,309 reliable signatures were obtained for the wild type (WT and the mutant (MT, respectively. Interpretation of the MPSS signatures revealed that the total number of transcribed gene in MT is 18,106, larger than that in WT 17,670, suggesting that newly initiated transcription occurs in the MT. Further comparison of the transcripts abundance between MT and WT revealed that 3,738 genes show more than two fold expression difference, and 582 genes are up- or down-regulated at 0.05% significance level by more than three fold difference. Functional assignments of the differentially expressed genes indicated that 26 reliable metabolic pathways are altered in the mutant; the most noticeable ones are carotenoid biosynthesis, photosynthesis, and citrate cycle. These data suggest that enhanced photosynthesis and partial impairment of lycopene downstream flux are critical for the formation of lycopene accumulation trait in the mutant. Conclusion This study provided a global picture of the gene expression changes in a sweet orange red-flesh mutant as compared to the wild type. Interpretation of the differentially expressed genes revealed new insight into the molecular processes regulating lycopene accumulation in the sweet orange red-flesh mutant.

  15. Genetic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Impaired in Plastid Lipid Import Reveals a Role of Membrane Lipids in Chloroplast Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.; Xu, C.

    2011-03-01

    The biogenesis of photosynthetic membranes in plants relies largely on lipid import from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and this lipid transport process is mediated by TGD proteins in Arabidopsis. Such a dependency of chloroplast biogenesis on ER-to-plastid lipid transport was recently exemplified by analyzing double mutants between tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 and fad6 mutants. The fad6 mutants are defective in the desaturation of membrane lipids in chloroplasts and therefore dependent on import of polyunsaturated lipid precursors from the ER for constructing a competent thylakoid membrane system. In support of a critical role of TGD proteins in ER-to-plastid lipid trafficking, we showed that the introduction of the tgd mutations into fad6 mutant backgrounds led to drastic reductions in relative amounts of thylakoid lipids. Moreover, the tgd1-1 fad6 and tgd4-3 fad6 double mutants were deficient in polyunsaturated fatty acids in chloroplast membrane lipids, and severely compromised in the biogenesis of photosynthetic membrane systems. Here we report that these double mutants are severely impaired in chloroplast division. The possible role of membrane lipids in chloroplast division is discussed.

  16. Molecular characterization of the viaB locus encoding the biosynthetic machinery for Vi capsule formation in Salmonella Typhi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wetter

    Full Text Available The Vi capsular polysaccharide (CPS of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of human typhoid, is important for infectivity and virulence. The Vi biosynthetic machinery is encoded within the viaB locus composed of 10 genes involved in regulation of expression (tviA, polymer synthesis (tviB-tviE, and cell surface localization of the CPS (vexA-vexE. We cloned the viaB locus from S. Typhi and transposon insertion mutants of individual viaB genes were characterized in Escherichia coli DH5α. Phenotype analysis of viaB mutants revealed that tviB, tviC, tviD and tviE are involved in Vi polymer synthesis. Furthermore, expression of tviB-tviE in E. coli DH5α directed the synthesis of cytoplasmic Vi antigen. Mutants of the ABC transporter genes vexBC and the polysaccharide copolymerase gene vexD accumulated the Vi polymer within the cytoplasm and productivity in these mutants was greatly reduced. In contrast, de novo synthesis of Vi polymer in the export deficient vexA mutant was comparable to wild-type cells, with drastic effects on cell stability. VexE mutant cells exported the Vi, but the CPS was not retained at the cell surface. The secreted polymer of a vexE mutant had different physical characteristics compared to the wild-type Vi.

  17. A factor linking floral organ identity and growth revealed by characterization of the tomato mutant unfinished flower development (ufd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poyatos-Pertíñez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Floral organogenesis requires coordinated interactions between genes specifying floral organ identity and those regulating growth and size of developing floral organs. With the aim to isolate regulatory genes linking both developmental processes (i.e. floral organ identity and growth in the tomato model species, a novel mutant altered in the formation of floral organs was further characterized. Under normal growth conditions, floral organ primordia of mutant plants were correctly initiated, however, they were unable to complete their development impeding the formation of mature and fertile flowers. Thus, the growth of floral buds was blocked at an early stage of development; therefore, we named this mutant as unfinished flower development (ufd. Genetic analysis performed in a segregating population of 543 plants showed that the abnormal phenotype was controlled by a single recessive mutation. Global gene expression analysis confirmed that several MADS-box genes regulating floral identity as well as other genes participating in cell division and different hormonal pathways were affected in their expression patterns in ufd mutant plants. Moreover, ufd mutant inflorescences showed higher hormone contents, particularly ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and strigol compared to wild type. Such results indicate that UFD may have a key function as positive regulator of the development of floral primordia once they have been initiated in the four floral whorls. This function should be performed by affecting the expression of floral organ identity and growth genes, together with hormonal signalling pathways.

  18. A Factor Linking Floral Organ Identity and Growth Revealed by Characterization of the Tomato Mutant unfinished flower development (ufd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos-Pertíñez, Sandra; Quinet, Muriel; Ortíz-Atienza, Ana; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Pons, Clara; Giménez, Estela; Angosto, Trinidad; Granell, Antonio; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Floral organogenesis requires coordinated interactions between genes specifying floral organ identity and those regulating growth and size of developing floral organs. With the aim to isolate regulatory genes linking both developmental processes (i.e., floral organ identity and growth) in the tomato model species, a novel mutant altered in the formation of floral organs was further characterized. Under normal growth conditions, floral organ primordia of mutant plants were correctly initiated, however, they were unable to complete their development impeding the formation of mature and fertile flowers. Thus, the growth of floral buds was blocked at an early stage of development; therefore, we named this mutant as unfinished flower development (ufd). Genetic analysis performed in a segregating population of 543 plants showed that the abnormal phenotype was controlled by a single recessive mutation. Global gene expression analysis confirmed that several MADS-box genes regulating floral identity as well as other genes participating in cell division and different hormonal pathways were affected in their expression patterns in ufd mutant plants. Moreover, ufd mutant inflorescences showed higher hormone contents, particularly ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and strigol compared to wild type. Such results indicate that UFD may have a key function as positive regulator of the development of floral primordia once they have been initiated in the four floral whorls. This function should be performed by affecting the expression of floral organ identity and growth genes, together with hormonal signaling pathways.

  19. Arabidopsis lonely guy (LOG) multiple mutants reveal a central role of the LOG-dependent pathway in cytokinin activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Hiroki; Kojima, Mikiko; Kuroha, Takeshi; Ishida, Takashi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Kiba, Takatoshi; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that play key roles in the maintenance of stem cell activity in plants. Although alternative single-step and two-step activation pathways for cytokinin have been proposed, the significance of the single-step pathway which is catalyzed by LONELY GUY (LOG), is not fully understood. We analyzed the metabolic flow of cytokinin activation in Arabidopsis log multiple mutants using stable isotope-labeled tracers and characterized the mutants' morphological and developmental phenotypes. In tracer experiments, cytokinin activation was inhibited most pronouncedly by log7, while the other log mutations had cumulative effects. Although sextuple or lower-order mutants did not show drastic phenotypes in vegetative growth, the log1log2log3log4log5log7log8 septuple T-DNA insertion mutant in which the LOG-dependent pathway is impaired, displayed severe retardation of shoot and root growth with defects in the maintenance of the apical meristems. Detailed observation of the mutants showed that LOG7 was required for the maintenance of shoot apical meristem size. LOG7 was also suggested to play a role for normal primary root growth together with LOG3 and LOG4. These results suggest a dominant role of the single-step activation pathway mediated by LOGs for cytokinin production, and overlapping but differentiated functions of the members of the LOG gene family in growth and development.

  20. Lipid droplet pattern and nondroplet-like structure in two fat mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans revealed by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Ma, Tian-Hsiang; Liu, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chang, Ta-Chau; Lo, Szecheng J.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid is an important energy source and essential component for plasma and organelle membranes in all kinds of cells. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is a label-free and nonlinear optical technique that can be used to monitor the lipid distribution in live organisms. Here, we utilize CARS microscopy to investigate the pattern of lipid droplets in two live Caenorhabditis elegans mutants (fat-2 and fat-3). The CARS images showed a striking decrease in the size, number, and content of lipid droplets in the fat-2 mutant but a slight difference in the fat-3 mutant as compared with the wild-type worm. Moreover, a nondroplet-like structure with enhanced CARS signal was detected for the first time in the uterus of fat-2 and fat-3 mutants. In addition, transgenic fat-2 mutant expressing a GFP fusion protein of vitellogenin-2 (a yolk lipoprotein) revealed that the enhanced CARS signal colocalized with the GFP signal, which suggests that the nondroplet-like structure is primarily due to the accumulation of yolk lipoproteins. Together, this study implies that CARS microscopy is a potential tool to study the distribution of yolk lipoproteins, in addition to lipid droplets, in live animals.

  1. Global transcription analysis of Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle mutants reveals an alternating pattern of gene expression and effects on hypoxic and oxidative genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, Mark T; Epstein, Charles B; Przybyla-Zawislak, Beata; McAlister-Henn, Lee; Butow, Ronald A

    2003-03-01

    To understand the many roles of the Krebs tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in cell function, we used DNA microarrays to examine gene expression in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. mRNA was analyzed from yeast strains harboring defects in each of 15 genes that encode subunits of the eight TCA cycle enzymes. The expression of >400 genes changed at least threefold in response to TCA cycle dysfunction. Many genes displayed a common response to TCA cycle dysfunction indicative of a shift away from oxidative metabolism. Another set of genes displayed a pairwise, alternating pattern of expression in response to contiguous TCA cycle enzyme defects: expression was elevated in aconitase and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutants, diminished in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA ligase mutants, elevated again in succinate dehydrogenase and fumarase mutants, and diminished again in malate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase mutants. This pattern correlated with previously defined TCA cycle growth-enhancing mutations and suggested a novel metabolic signaling pathway monitoring TCA cycle function. Expression of hypoxic/anaerobic genes was elevated in alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase mutants, whereas expression of oxidative genes was diminished, consistent with a heme signaling defect caused by inadequate levels of the heme precursor, succinyl-CoA. These studies have revealed extensive responses to changes in TCA cycle function and have uncovered new and unexpected metabolic networks that are wired into the TCA cycle.

  2. Dissection of the complex phenotype in cuticular mutants of Arabidopsis reveals a role of SERRATE as a mediator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry Voisin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in LACERATA (LCR, FIDDLEHEAD (FDH, and BODYGUARD (BDG cause a complex developmental syndrome that is consistent with an important role for these Arabidopsis genes in cuticle biogenesis. The genesis of their pleiotropic phenotypes is, however, poorly understood. We provide evidence that neither distorted depositions of cutin, nor deficiencies in the chemical composition of cuticular lipids, account for these features, instead suggesting that the mutants alleviate the functional disorder of the cuticle by reinforcing their defenses. To better understand how plants adapt to these mutations, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. We found that apparent compensatory transcriptional responses in these mutants involve the induction of wax, cutin, cell wall, and defense genes. To gain greater insight into the mechanism by which cuticular mutations trigger this response in the plants, we performed an overlap meta-analysis, which is termed MASTA (MicroArray overlap Search Tool and Analysis, of differentially expressed genes. This suggested that different cell integrity pathways are recruited in cesA cellulose synthase and cuticular mutants. Using MASTA for an in silico suppressor/enhancer screen, we identified SERRATE (SE, which encodes a protein of RNA-processing multi-protein complexes, as a likely enhancer. In confirmation of this notion, the se lcr and se bdg double mutants eradicate severe leaf deformations as well as the organ fusions that are typical of lcr and bdg and other cuticular mutants. Also, lcr does not confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in a se mutant background. We propose that there is a role for SERRATE-mediated RNA signaling in the cuticle integrity pathway.

  3. Comparative Proteomic and Physiological Analysis Reveals the Variation Mechanisms of Leaf Coloration and Carbon Fixation in a Xantha Mutant of Ginkgo biloba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinliang Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Yellow-green leaf mutants are common in higher plants, and these non-lethal chlorophyll-deficient mutants are ideal materials for research on photosynthesis and plant development. A novel xantha mutant of Ginkgo biloba displaying yellow-colour leaves (YL and green-colour leaves (GL was identified in this study. The chlorophyll content of YL was remarkably lower than that in GL. The chloroplast ultrastructure revealed that YL had less dense thylakoid lamellae, a looser structure and fewer starch grains than GL. Analysis of the photosynthetic characteristics revealed that YL had decreased photosynthetic activity with significantly high nonphotochemical quenching. To explain these phenomena, we analysed the proteomic differences in leaves and chloroplasts between YL and GL of ginkgo using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE coupled with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In total, 89 differential proteins were successfully identified, 82 of which were assigned functions in nine metabolic pathways and cellular processes. Among them, proteins involved in photosynthesis, carbon fixation in photosynthetic organisms, carbohydrate/energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, and protein metabolism were greatly enriched, indicating a good correlation between differentially accumulated proteins and physiological changes in leaves. The identifications of these differentially accumulated proteins indicates the presence of a specific different metabolic network in YL and suggests that YL possess slower chloroplast development, weaker photosynthesis, and a less abundant energy supply than GL. These studies provide insights into the mechanism of molecular regulation of leaf colour variation in YL mutants.

  4. The deoxyhypusine synthase mutant dys1-1 reveals the association of eIF5A and Asc1 with cell wall integrity.

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    Fabio Carrilho Galvão

    Full Text Available The putative eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A is a highly conserved protein among archaea and eukaryotes that has recently been implicated in the elongation step of translation. eIF5A undergoes an essential and conserved posttranslational modification at a specific lysine to generate the residue hypusine. The enzymes deoxyhypusine synthase (Dys1 and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase (Lia1 catalyze this two-step modification process. Although several Saccharomyces cerevisiae eIF5A mutants have importantly contributed to the study of eIF5A function, no conditional mutant of Dys1 has been described so far. In this study, we generated and characterized the dys1-1 mutant, which showed a strong depletion of mutated Dys1 protein, resulting in more than 2-fold decrease in hypusine levels relative to the wild type. The dys1-1 mutant demonstrated a defect in total protein synthesis, a defect in polysome profile indicative of a translation elongation defect and a reduced association of eIF5A with polysomes. The growth phenotype of dys1-1 mutant is severe, growing only in the presence of 1 M sorbitol, an osmotic stabilizer. Although this phenotype is characteristic of Pkc1 cell wall integrity mutants, the sorbitol requirement from dys1-1 is not associated with cell lysis. We observed that the dys1-1 genetically interacts with the sole yeast protein kinase C (Pkc1 and Asc1, a component of the 40S ribosomal subunit. The dys1-1 mutant was synthetically lethal in combination with asc1Δ and overexpression of TIF51A (eIF5A or DYS1 is toxic for an asc1Δ strain. Moreover, eIF5A is more associated with translating ribosomes in the absence of Asc1 in the cell. Finally, analysis of the sensitivity to cell wall-perturbing compounds revealed a more similar behavior of the dys1-1 and asc1Δ mutants in comparison with the pkc1Δ mutant. These data suggest a correlated role for eIF5A and Asc1 in coordinating the translational control of a subset of m

  5. Transcriptomic and physiological characterization of the fefe mutant of melon (Cucumis melo) reveals new aspects of iron-copper crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Brian M; McInturf, Samuel A; Amundsen, Keenan

    2014-09-01

    Iron (Fe) and copper (Cu) homeostasis are tightly linked across biology. In previous work, Fe deficiency interacted with Cu-regulated genes and stimulated Cu accumulation. The C940-fe (fefe) Fe-uptake mutant of melon (Cucumis melo) was characterized, and the fefe mutant was used to test whether Cu deficiency could stimulate Fe uptake. Wild-type and fefe mutant transcriptomes were determined by RNA-seq under Fe and Cu deficiency. FeFe-regulated genes included core Fe uptake, metal homeostasis, and transcription factor genes. Numerous genes were regulated by both Fe and Cu. The fefe mutant was rescued by high Fe or by Cu deficiency, which stimulated ferric-chelate reductase activity, FRO2 expression, and Fe accumulation. Accumulation of Fe in Cu-deficient plants was independent of the normal Fe-uptake system. One of the four FRO genes in the melon and cucumber (Cucumis sativus) genomes was Fe-regulated, and one was Cu-regulated. Simultaneous Fe and Cu deficiency synergistically up-regulated Fe-uptake gene expression. Overlap in Fe and Cu deficiency transcriptomes highlights the importance of Fe-Cu crosstalk in metal homeostasis. The fefe gene is not orthologous to FIT, and thus identification of this gene will provide clues to help understand regulation of Fe uptake in plants.

  6. Crystal structure and characterization of esterase Est25 mutants reveal improved enantioselectivity toward (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinyeong; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Hong, Eunsoo; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Ryu, Yeonwoo

    2017-03-01

    Esterases comprise a group of enzymes that catalyze the cleavage and synthesis of ester bonds. They are important in biotechnological applications owing to their enantioselectivity, regioselectivity, broad substrate specificity, and the fact that they do not require cofactors. In a previous study, we isolated the esterase Est25 from a metagenomic library. Est25 showed catalytic activity toward the (R,S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester but had low enantioselectivity toward the (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester. Because (S)-ketoprofen has stronger anti-inflammatory effects and fewer side effects than (R)-ketoprofen, enantioselectivity of this esterase is important. In this study, we generated Est25 mutants with improved enantioselectivity toward the (S)-ketoprofen ethyl ester; improved enantioselectivity of mutants was established by analysis of their crystal structures. The enantioselectivity of mutants was influenced by substitution of Phe72 and Leu255. Substituting these residues changed the size of the binding pocket and the entrance hole that leads to the active site. The enantioselectivity of Est25 (E = 1.1 ± 0.0) was improved in the mutants F72G (E = 1.9 ± 0.2), L255W (E = 16.1 ± 1.1), and F72G/L255W (E = 60.1 ± 0.5). Finally, characterization of Est25 mutants was performed by determining the optimum reaction conditions, thermostability, effect of additives, and substrate specificity after substituting Phe72 and Leu255.

  7. Analysis of Candida albicans mutants defective in the Cdk8 module of mediator reveal links between metabolism and biofilm formation.

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    Allia K Lindsay

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans biofilm formation is a key virulence trait that involves hyphal growth and adhesin expression. Pyocyanin (PYO, a phenazine secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, inhibits both C. albicans biofilm formation and development of wrinkled colonies. Using a genetic screen, we identified two mutants, ssn3Δ/Δ and ssn8Δ/Δ, which continued to wrinkle in the presence of PYO. Ssn8 is a cyclin-like protein and Ssn3 is similar to cyclin-dependent kinases; both proteins are part of the heterotetrameric Cdk8 module that forms a complex with the transcriptional co-regulator, Mediator. Ssn3 kinase activity was also required for PYO sensitivity as a kinase dead mutant maintained a wrinkled colony morphology in the presence of PYO. Furthermore, similar phenotypes were observed in mutants lacking the other two components of the Cdk8 module-Srb8 and Srb9. Through metabolomics analyses and biochemical assays, we showed that a compromised Cdk8 module led to increases in glucose consumption, glycolysis-related transcripts, oxidative metabolism and ATP levels even in the presence of PYO. In the mutant, inhibition of respiration to levels comparable to the PYO-treated wild type inhibited wrinkled colony development. Several lines of evidence suggest that PYO does not act through Cdk8. Lastly, the ssn3 mutant was a hyperbiofilm former, and maintained higher biofilm formation in the presence of PYO than the wild type. Together these data provide novel insights into the role of the Cdk8 module of Mediator in regulation of C. albicans physiology and the links between respiratory activity and both wrinkled colony and biofilm development.

  8. Gene expression profile analysis of Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) mutant reveals important genes and pathways in cotton leaf and fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingquan; Jiang, Yurong; Cao, Yuefen; Lin, Lifeng; He, Shae; Zhou, Wei; Rong, Junkang

    2014-02-10

    Ligon lintless-1 (Li1) is a monogenic dominant mutant of Gossypium hirsutum (upland cotton) with a phenotype of impaired vegetative growth and short lint fibers. Despite years of research involving genetic mapping and gene expression profile analysis of Li1 mutant ovule tissues, the gene remains uncloned and the underlying pathway of cotton fiber elongation is still unclear. In this study, we report the whole genome-level deep-sequencing analysis of leaf tissues of the Li1 mutant. Differentially expressed genes in leaf tissues of mutant versus wild-type (WT) plants are identified, and the underlying pathways and potential genes that control leaf and fiber development are inferred. The results show that transcription factors AS2, YABBY5, and KANDI-like are significantly differentially expressed in mutant tissues compared with WT ones. Interestingly, several fiber development-related genes are found in the downregulated gene list of the mutant leaf transcriptome. These genes include heat shock protein family, cytoskeleton arrangement, cell wall synthesis, energy, H2O2 metabolism-related genes, and WRKY transcription factors. This finding suggests that the genes are involved in leaf morphology determination and fiber elongation. The expression data are also compared with the previously published microarray data of Li1 ovule tissues. Comparative analysis of the ovule transcriptomes of Li1 and WT reveals that a number of pathways important for fiber elongation are enriched in the downregulated gene list at different fiber development stages (0, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18dpa). Differentially expressed genes identified in both leaf and fiber samples are aligned with cotton whole genome sequences and combined with the genetic fine mapping results to identify a list of candidate genes for Li1.

  9. The preliminary research for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Chang Hyun; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is to elucidate the solution to the production of bioactive substance using biotransformation process from core technology of biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology. And, this strategy will provide core technology for development of drugs as new concept and category. Research scopes and contents of project include 1) The development of mutant for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 2) The development of host for biosynthetic engineering by radiation fusion technology 3) The preliminary study for biosynthetic engineering of isoflavone by radiation fusion technology. The results are as follows. Isoflavone compounds(daidzein, hydroxylated isoflavone) were analyzed by GC-MS. The study of radiation doses and p-NCA high-throughput screening for mutant development were elucidated. And, it was carried out the study of radiation doses for host development. Furthermore, the study of redox partner and construction of recombinant strain for region-specific hydroxylation(P450, redox partner). In addition, the biological effect of 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone as an anti-obesity agent was elucidated in this study.

  10. Bright luminescence of Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutants reveals a connection between citrate and the Gac/Csr regulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Whistler, Cheryl; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    The Gac/Csr regulatory system is conserved throughout the γ-proteobacteria and controls key pathways in central carbon metabolism, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence in important plant and animal pathogens. Here we show that elevated intracellular citrate levels in a Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutant correlate with activation of the Gac/Csr cascade and induction of bright luminescence. Spontaneous or directed mutations in the gene that encodes citrate synthase reversed the bright luminescence of aconitase mutants, eliminated their citrate accumulation and reversed their elevated expression of CsrB. Our data elucidate a correlative link between central metabolic and regulatory pathways, and they suggest that the Gac system senses a blockage at the aconitase step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either through elevated citrate levels or a secondary metabolic effect of citrate accumulation, and responds by modulating carbon flow and various functions associated with host colonization, including bioluminescence.

  11. Gating Competence of Constitutively Open CLC-0 Mutants Revealed by the Interaction with a Small Organic Inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Sonia; Elia, Laura; Pusch, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Opening of CLC chloride channels is coupled to the translocation of the permeant anion. From the recent structure determination of bacterial CLC proteins in the closed and open configuration, a glutamate residue was hypothesized to form part of the Cl−-sensitive gate. The negatively charged side-chain of the glutamate was suggested to occlude the permeation pathway in the closed state, while opening of a single protopore of the double-pore channel would reflect mainly a movement of this side-chain toward the extracellular pore vestibule, with little rearrangement of the rest of the channel. Here we show that mutating this critical residue (Glu166) in the prototype Torpedo CLC-0 to alanine, serine, or lysine leads to constitutively open channels, whereas a mutation to aspartate strongly slowed down opening. Furthermore, we investigated the interaction of the small organic channel blocker p-chlorophenoxy-acetic acid (CPA) with the mutants E166A and E166S. Both mutants were strongly inhibited by CPA at negative voltages with a >200-fold larger affinity than for wild-type CLC-0 (apparent KD at −140 mV ∼4 μM). A three-state linear model with an open state, a low-affinity and a high-affinity CPA-bound state can quantitatively describe steady-state and kinetic properties of the CPA block. The parameters of the model and additional mutagenesis suggest that the high-affinity CPA-bound state is similar to the closed configuration of the protopore gate of wild-type CLC-0. In the E166A mutant the glutamate side chain that occludes the permeation pathway is absent. Thus, if gating consists only in movement of this side-chain the mutant E166A should not be able to assume a closed conformation. It may thus be that fast gating in CLC-0 is more complex than anticipated from the bacterial structures. PMID:12913089

  12. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Valentina; Bucciarelli, Elisabetta; Lattao, Ramona; Piergentili, Roberto; Gatti, Maurizio; Bonaccorsi, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on slight differences

  13. The analysis of mutant alleles of different strength reveals multiple functions of topoisomerase 2 in regulation of Drosophila chromosome structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Mengoli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II is a major component of mitotic chromosomes but its role in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes is rather controversial, as different chromosomal phenotypes have been observed in various organisms and in different studies on the same organism. In contrast to vertebrates that harbor two partially redundant Topo II isoforms, Drosophila and yeasts have a single Topo II enzyme. In addition, fly chromosomes, unlike those of yeast, are morphologically comparable to vertebrate chromosomes. Thus, Drosophila is a highly suitable system to address the role of Topo II in the assembly and structural maintenance of chromosomes. Here we show that modulation of Top2 function in living flies by means of mutant alleles of different strength and in vivo RNAi results in multiple cytological phenotypes. In weak Top2 mutants, meiotic chromosomes of males exhibit strong morphological abnormalities and dramatic segregation defects, while mitotic chromosomes of larval brain cells are not affected. In mutants of moderate strength, mitotic chromosome organization is normal, but anaphases display frequent chromatin bridges that result in chromosome breaks and rearrangements involving specific regions of the Y chromosome and 3L heterochromatin. Severe Top2 depletion resulted in many aneuploid and polyploid mitotic metaphases with poorly condensed heterochromatin and broken chromosomes. Finally, in the almost complete absence of Top2, mitosis in larval brains was virtually suppressed and in the rare mitotic figures observed chromosome morphology was disrupted. These results indicate that different residual levels of Top2 in mutant cells can result in different chromosomal phenotypes, and that the effect of a strong Top2 depletion can mask the effects of milder Top2 reductions. Thus, our results suggest that the previously observed discrepancies in the chromosomal phenotypes elicited by Topo II downregulation in vertebrates might depend on

  14. Albino T-DNA tomato mutant reveals a key function of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS1) in plant development and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alcázar, Manuel; Giménez, Estela; Pineda, Benito; Capel, Carmen; García-Sogo, Begoña; Sánchez, Sibilla; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J.; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Moreno, Vicente; Lozano, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Photosynthetic activity is indispensable for plant growth and survival and it depends on the synthesis of plastidial isoprenoids as chlorophylls and carotenoids. In the non-mevalonate pathway (MEP), the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase 1 (DXS1) enzyme has been postulated to catalyze the rate-limiting step in the formation of plastidial isoprenoids. In tomato, the function of DXS1 has only been studied in fruits, and hence its functional relevance during plant development remains unknown. Here we report the characterization of the wls-2297 tomato mutant, whose severe deficiency in chlorophylls and carotenoids promotes an albino phenotype. Additionally, growth of mutant seedlings was arrested without developing vegetative organs, which resulted in premature lethality. Gene cloning and silencing experiments revealed that the phenotype of wls-2297 mutant was caused by 38.6 kb-deletion promoted by a single T-DNA insertion affecting the DXS1 gene. This was corroborated by in vivo and molecular complementation assays, which allowed the rescue of mutant phenotype. Further characterization of tomato plants overexpressing DXS1 and comparative expression analysis indicate that DXS1 may play other important roles besides to that proposed during fruit carotenoid biosynthesis. Taken together, these results demonstrate that DXS1 is essentially required for the development and survival of tomato plants. PMID:28350010

  15. Comparative proteomics of a tor inducible Aspergillus fumigatus mutant reveals involvement of the Tor kinase in iron regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldin, Clara; Valiante, Vito; Krüger, Thomas; Schafferer, Lukas; Haas, Hubertus; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-07-01

    The Tor (target of rapamycin) kinase is one of the major regulatory nodes in eukaryotes. Here, we analyzed the Tor kinase in Aspergillus fumigatus, which is the most important airborne fungal pathogen of humans. Because deletion of the single tor gene was apparently lethal, we generated a conditional lethal tor mutant by replacing the endogenous tor gene by the inducible xylp-tor gene cassette. By both 2DE and gel-free LC-MS/MS, we found that Tor controls a variety of proteins involved in nutrient sensing, stress response, cell cycle progression, protein biosynthesis and degradation, but also processes in mitochondria, such as respiration and ornithine metabolism, which is required for siderophore formation. qRT-PCR analyses indicated that mRNA levels of ornithine biosynthesis genes were increased under iron limitation. When tor was repressed, iron regulation was lost. In a deletion mutant of the iron regulator HapX also carrying the xylp-tor cassette, the regulation upon iron deprivation was similar to that of the single tor inducible mutant strain. In line, hapX expression was significantly reduced when tor was repressed. Thus, Tor acts either upstream of HapX or independently of HapX as a repressor of the ornithine biosynthesis genes and thereby regulates the production of siderophores.

  16. Functional importance of stripping in NFκB signaling revealed by a stripping-impaired IκBα mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembinski, Holly E; Wismer, Kevin; Vargas, Jesse D; Suryawanshi, Gajendra W; Kern, Nadja; Kroon, Gerard; Dyson, H Jane; Hoffmann, Alexander; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-21

    Stress-response transcription factors such as NFκB turn on hundreds of genes and must have a mechanism for rapid cessation of transcriptional activation. We recently showed that the inhibitor of NFκB signaling, IκBα, dramatically accelerates the dissociation of NFκB from transcription sites, a process we have called "stripping." To test the role of the IκBα C-terminal PEST (rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine residues) sequence in NFκB stripping, a mutant IκBα was generated in which five acidic PEST residues were mutated to their neutral analogs. This IκBα(5xPEST) mutant was impaired in stripping NFκB from DNA and formed a more stable intermediate ternary complex than that formed from IκBα(WT) because DNA dissociated more slowly. NMR and amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry showed that the IκBα(5xPEST) appears to be "caught in the act of stripping" because it is not yet completely in the folded and NFκB-bound state. When the mutant was introduced into cells, the rate of postinduction IκBα-mediated export of NFκB from the nucleus decreased markedly.

  17. Transcriptome profiling of a Sinorhizobium meliloti fadD mutant reveals the role of rhizobactin 1021 biosynthesis and regulation genes in the control of swarming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivares José

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming is a multicellular phenomenom characterized by the coordinated and rapid movement of bacteria across semisolid surfaces. In Sinorhizobium meliloti this type of motility has been described in a fadD mutant. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the process of swarming in rhizobia, we compared the transcriptome of a S. meliloti fadD mutant grown under swarming inducing conditions (semisolid medium to those of cells grown under non-swarming conditions (broth and solid medium. Results More than a thousand genes were identified as differentially expressed in response to growth on agar surfaces including genes for several metabolic activities, iron uptake, chemotaxis, motility and stress-related genes. Under swarming-specific conditions, the most remarkable response was the up-regulation of iron-related genes. We demonstrate that the pSymA plasmid and specifically genes required for the biosynthesis of the siderophore rhizobactin 1021 are essential for swarming of a S. meliloti wild-type strain but not in a fadD mutant. Moreover, high iron conditions inhibit swarming of the wild-type strain but not in mutants lacking either the iron limitation response regulator RirA or FadD. Conclusions The present work represents the first transcriptomic study of rhizobium growth on surfaces including swarming inducing conditions. The results have revealed major changes in the physiology of S. meliloti cells grown on a surface relative to liquid cultures. Moreover, analysis of genes responding to swarming inducing conditions led to the demonstration that iron and genes involved in rhizobactin 1021 synthesis play a role in the surface motility shown by S. meliloti which can be circumvented in a fadD mutant. This work opens a way to the identification of new traits and regulatory networks involved in swarming by rhizobia.

  18. Zebrafish model of tuberous sclerosis complex reveals cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions of mutant tuberin

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    Seok-Hyung Kim

    2011-03-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in either the TSC1 (encodes hamartin or TSC2 (encodes tuberin genes. Patients with TSC have hamartomas in various organs throughout the whole body, most notably in the brain, skin, eye, heart, kidney and lung. To study the development of hamartomas, we generated a zebrafish model of TSC featuring a nonsense mutation (vu242 in the tsc2 gene. This tsc2vu242 allele encodes a truncated Tuberin protein lacking the GAP domain, which is required for inhibition of Rheb and of the TOR kinase within TORC1. We show that tsc2vu242 is a recessive larval-lethal mutation that causes increased cell size in the brain and liver. Greatly elevated TORC1 signaling is observed in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous zebrafish, and is moderately increased in tsc2vu242/+ heterozygotes. Forebrain neurons are poorly organized in tsc2vu242/vu242 homozygous mutants, which have extensive gray and white matter disorganization and ectopically positioned cells. Genetic mosaic analyses demonstrate that tsc2 limits TORC1 signaling in a cell-autonomous manner. However, in chimeric animals, tsc2vu242/vu242 mutant cells also mislocalize wild-type host cells in the forebrain in a non-cell-autonomous manner. These results demonstrate a highly conserved role of tsc2 in zebrafish and establish a new animal model for studies of TSC. The finding of a non-cell-autonomous function of mutant cells might help explain the formation of brain hamartomas and cortical malformations in human TSC.

  19. A Novel Bmal1 Mutant Mouse Reveals Essential Roles of the C-Terminal Domain on Circadian Rhythms.

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    Noheon Park

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock is an endogenous biological timer comprised of transcriptional/translational feedback loops of clock genes. Bmal1 encodes an indispensable transcription factor for the generation of circadian rhythms. Here, we report a new circadian mutant mouse from gene-trapped embryonic stem cells harboring a C-terminus truncated Bmal1 (Bmal1GTΔC allele. The homozygous mutant (Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice immediately lost circadian behavioral rhythms under constant darkness. The heterozygous (Bmal1+/GTΔC mice displayed a gradual loss of rhythms, in contrast to Bmal1+/- mice where rhythms were sustained. Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice also showed arrhythmic mRNA and protein expression in the SCN and liver. Lack of circadian reporter oscillation was also observed in cultured fibroblast cells, indicating that the arrhythmicity of Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice resulted from impaired molecular clock machinery. Expression of clock genes exhibited distinct responses to the mutant allele in Bmal1+/GTΔC and Bmal1GTΔC/GTΔC mice. Despite normal cellular localization and heterodimerization with CLOCK, overexpressed BMAL1GTΔC was unable to activate transcription of Per1 promoter and BMAL1-dependent CLOCK degradation. These results indicate that the C-terminal region of Bmal1 has pivotal roles in the regulation of circadian rhythms and the Bmal1GTΔC mice constitute a novel model system to evaluate circadian functional mechanism of BMAL1.

  20. Water stress responses of tomato mutants impaired in hormone biosynthesis reveal abscisic acid, jasmonic acid and salicylic acid interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria eMuñoz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG transgenic (SA-deficient line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1 and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3 expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1 was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress.

  1. Water Stress Responses of Tomato Mutants Impaired in Hormone Biosynthesis Reveal Abscisic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Salicylic Acid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espinoza, Valeria A.; López-Climent, María F.; Casaretto, José A.; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the putative crosstalk between JA and ABA in Solanum lycopersicum plants in response to drought, suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2, JA-deficient) and flacca (flc, ABA-deficient) mutants together with the naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) transgenic (SA-deficient) line were used. Hormone profiling and gene expression of key enzymes in ABA, JA and SA biosynthesis were analyzed during early stages of drought. ABA accumulation was comparable in spr2 and wild type (WT) plants whereas expression of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase 1 (NCED1) and NCED2 was different, implying a compensation mechanism between NCED genes and an organ-specific regulation of NCED1 expression. JA levels and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase 3 (OPR3) expression in flc plants suggest that ABA regulates the induction of the OPR3 gene in roots. By contrast, ABA treatment to flc plants leads to a reduction of JA and SA contents. Furthermore, different pattern of SA accumulation (and expression of isochorismate synthase and phenylalanine ammonia lyase 1) was observed between WT seedlings and mutants, suggesting that SA plays an important role on the early response of tomato plants to drought and also that JA and ABA modulate its biosynthesis. Finally, hormone profiling in spr2 and NahG plants indicate a crosstalk between JA and SA that could enhance tolerance of tomato to water stress. PMID:26635826

  2. EGL-1 BH3 mutants reveal the importance of protein levels and target affinity for cell-killing potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E F; Chen, L; Yang, H; Colman, P M; Huang, D C S; Fairlie, W D

    2008-10-01

    Studies of the cell death pathway in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans provided the first evidence of the evolutionary conservation of apoptosis signalling. Here we show that the worm Bcl-2 homology domain-3 (BH3)-only protein EGL-1 binds mammalian pro-survival proteins very poorly, but can be converted into a high-affinity ligand for Bcl-2 and Bcl-x(L) by subtle mutation of the cysteine residue at position 62 within the BH3 domain. A 100-fold increase in affinity was observed following a single atom change (cysteine to serine substitution), and a further 10-fold increase by replacement with glycine. The low affinity of wild-type EGL-1 for mammalian pro-survival proteins and its poor expression correlates with its weak killing activity in mammalian cells whereas the high-affinity C62G mutant is a very potent killer of cells lacking Mcl-1. Cell killing by the C62S mutant with intermediate affinity only occurs when this EGL-1 BH3 domain is placed in a more stable context, namely that of Bim(S), which allows higher expression, though the kinetics of cell death now vary depending on whether Mcl-1 is neutralized by Noxa or genetically deleted. These results demonstrate how levels of BH3-only proteins, target affinity and the spectrum of neutralization of pro-survival proteins all contribute to killing activity.

  3. Intra-epidemic evolutionary dynamics of a Dengue virus type 1 population reveal mutant spectra that correlate with disease transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige Chanditha; Koo, Carmen; Kek, Relus; Xu, Helen; Lai, Yee Ling; Liu, Lilac; Kok, Suet Yheng; Shi, Yuan; Chuen, Raphael Lee Tze; Lee, Kim-Sung; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Ng, Lee Ching

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is currently the most prevalent mosquito-borne viral pathogen. DENVs naturally exist as highly heterogeneous populations. Even though the descriptions on DENV diversity are plentiful, only a few studies have narrated the dynamics of intra-epidemic virus diversity at a fine scale. Such accounts are important to decipher the reciprocal relationship between viral evolutionary dynamics and disease transmission that shape dengue epidemiology. In the current study, we present a micro-scale genetic analysis of a monophyletic lineage of DENV-1 genotype III (epidemic lineage) detected from November 2012 to May 2014. The lineage was involved in an unprecedented dengue epidemic in Singapore during 2013-2014. Our findings showed that the epidemic lineage was an ensemble of mutants (variants) originated from an initial mixed viral population. The composition of mutant spectrum was dynamic and positively correlated with case load. The close interaction between viral evolution and transmission intensity indicated that tracking genetic diversity through time is potentially a useful tool to infer DENV transmission dynamics and thereby, to assess the epidemic risk in a disease control perspective. Moreover, such information is salient to understand the viral basis of clinical outcome and immune response variations that is imperative to effective vaccine design.

  4. The Arabidopsis szl1 mutant reveals a critical role of β-carotene in photosystem I photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, Stefano; Li, Zhirong; Niyogi, Krishna K; Bassi, Roberto; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2012-08-01

    Carotenes and their oxygenated derivatives, the xanthophylls, are structural determinants in both photosystems (PS) I and II. They bind and stabilize photosynthetic complexes, increase the light-harvesting capacity of chlorophyll-binding proteins, and have a major role in chloroplast photoprotection. Localization of carotenoid species within each PS is highly conserved: Core complexes bind carotenes, whereas peripheral light-harvesting systems bind xanthophylls. The specific functional role of each xanthophyll species has been recently described by genetic dissection, however the in vivo role of carotenes has not been similarly defined. Here, we have analyzed the function of carotenes in photosynthesis and photoprotection, distinct from that of xanthophylls, by characterizing the suppressor of zeaxanthin-less (szl) mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) which, due to the decreased activity of the lycopene-β-cyclase, shows a lower carotene content than wild-type plants. When grown at room temperature, mutant plants showed a lower content in PSI light-harvesting complex I complex than the wild type, and a reduced capacity for chlorophyll fluorescence quenching, the rapidly reversible component of nonphotochemical quenching. When exposed to high light at chilling temperature, szl1 plants showed stronger photoxidation than wild-type plants. Both PSI and PSII from szl1 were similarly depleted in carotenes and yet PSI activity was more sensitive to light stress than PSII as shown by the stronger photoinhibition of PSI and increased rate of singlet oxygen release from isolated PSI light-harvesting complex I complexes of szl1 compared with the wild type. We conclude that carotene depletion in the core complexes impairs photoprotection of both PS under high light at chilling temperature, with PSI being far more affected than PSII.

  5. Effects on hippocampus of lifelong absence of glucocorticoids in the pro-opiomelanocortin null mutant mouse reveal complex relationship between glucocorticoids and hippocampal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Dirk; Karpac, Jason; Hochgeschwender, Ute

    2006-01-01

    In humans changes in serum cortisol levels have been observed with aging, stress, and with affective disorders such as major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Corticosteroids are known to influence hippocampal structure and function; specifically, plasma corticosteroid levels have been inversely correlated with hippocampal cell proliferation, cell death, and impaired memory function. The relationship between corticosteroids and structure and function of the hippocampus has been studied in experimental systems in adult animals by increasing or decreasing corticosterone levels through pharmacological supplementation and through surgical removal of the adrenal gland. Here, we utilized the genetically engineered pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) null mutant mouse, which because of the lack of all POMC peptides has no corticosterone from birth throughout life. The effect of this lifelong absence of corticosterone on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is a decrease in granule cell density, which correlated with a decrease in cell proliferation but not an increase in cell degeneration. Fine morphology of granule cells was unaltered. Analyses of gene expression revealed no changes in POMC null mutant vs wild-type hippocampus with respect to levels of expression of corticoid receptor genes or genes known to be regulated by corticosterone. Spatial learning as tested by the Morris water maze was not altered in the POMC null mutant mouse. Taken together with findings from other studies of the effects of altered levels of corticosteroids on the hippocampus, our results argue for a complex homeostasis in which disturbances of any one factor can offset the system in varying ways.

  6. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Shao, Yiming [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, and National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xinqi, E-mail: liu2008@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  7. A Novel fry1 Allele Reveals the Existence of a Mutant Phenotype Unrelated to 5′->3′ Exoribonuclease (XRN) Activities in Arabidopsis thaliana Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Judith; Estavillo, Gonzalo M.; Javot, Hélène; Chiarenza, Serge; Mallory, Allison C.; Maizel, Alexis; Declerck, Marie; Pogson, Barry J.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Crespi, Martin; Desnos, Thierry; Thibaud, Marie-Christine; Nussaume, Laurent; Marin, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the FRY1/SAL1 Arabidopsis locus are highly pleiotropic, affecting drought tolerance, leaf shape and root growth. FRY1 encodes a nucleotide phosphatase that in vitro has inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase and 3′,(2′),5′-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activities. It is not clear which activity mediates each of the diverse biological functions of FRY1 in planta. Principal Findings A fry1 mutant was identified in a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants deregulated in the expression of Pi High affinity Transporter 1;4 (PHT1;4). Histological analysis revealed that, in roots, FRY1 expression was restricted to the stele and meristems. The fry1 mutant displayed an altered root architecture phenotype and an increased drought tolerance. All of the phenotypes analyzed were complemented with the AHL gene encoding a protein that converts 3′-polyadenosine 5′-phosphate (PAP) into AMP and Pi. PAP is known to inhibit exoribonucleases (XRN) in vitro. Accordingly, an xrn triple mutant with mutations in all three XRNs shared the fry1 drought tolerance and root architecture phenotypes. Interestingly these two traits were also complemented by grafting, revealing that drought tolerance was primarily conferred by the rosette and that the root architecture can be complemented by long-distance regulation derived from leaves. By contrast, PHT1 expression was not altered in xrn mutants or in grafting experiments. Thus, PHT1 up-regulation probably resulted from a local depletion of Pi in the fry1 stele. This hypothesis is supported by the identification of other genes modulated by Pi deficiency in the stele, which are found induced in a fry1 background. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the 3′,(2′),5′-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activity of FRY1 is involved in long-distance as well as local regulatory activities in roots. The local up-regulation of PHT1 genes transcription in roots likely results from local depletion of Pi

  8. A novel fry1 allele reveals the existence of a mutant phenotype unrelated to 5'->3' exoribonuclease (XRN activities in Arabidopsis thaliana roots.

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    Judith Hirsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in the FRY1/SAL1 Arabidopsis locus are highly pleiotropic, affecting drought tolerance, leaf shape and root growth. FRY1 encodes a nucleotide phosphatase that in vitro has inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase and 3',(2',5'-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activities. It is not clear which activity mediates each of the diverse biological functions of FRY1 in planta. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A fry1 mutant was identified in a genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants deregulated in the expression of Pi High affinity Transporter 1;4 (PHT1;4. Histological analysis revealed that, in roots, FRY1 expression was restricted to the stele and meristems. The fry1 mutant displayed an altered root architecture phenotype and an increased drought tolerance. All of the phenotypes analyzed were complemented with the AHL gene encoding a protein that converts 3'-polyadenosine 5'-phosphate (PAP into AMP and Pi. PAP is known to inhibit exoribonucleases (XRN in vitro. Accordingly, an xrn triple mutant with mutations in all three XRNs shared the fry1 drought tolerance and root architecture phenotypes. Interestingly these two traits were also complemented by grafting, revealing that drought tolerance was primarily conferred by the rosette and that the root architecture can be complemented by long-distance regulation derived from leaves. By contrast, PHT1 expression was not altered in xrn mutants or in grafting experiments. Thus, PHT1 up-regulation probably resulted from a local depletion of Pi in the fry1 stele. This hypothesis is supported by the identification of other genes modulated by Pi deficiency in the stele, which are found induced in a fry1 background. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the 3',(2',5'-bisphosphate nucleotide phosphatase activity of FRY1 is involved in long-distance as well as local regulatory activities in roots. The local up-regulation of PHT1 genes transcription in roots likely results from local depletion of

  9. Transcriptome Comparative Profiling of Barley eibi1 Mutant Reveals Pleiotropic Effects of HvABCG31 Gene on Cuticle Biogenesis and Stress Responsive Pathways

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    Eviatar Nevo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Wild barley eibi1 mutant with HvABCG31 gene mutation has low capacity to retain leaf water, a phenotype associated with reduced cutin deposition and a thin cuticle. To better understand how such a mutant plant survives, we performed a genome-wide gene expression analysis. The leaf transcriptomes between the near-isogenic lines eibi1 and the wild type were compared using the 22-k Barley1 Affymetrix microarray. We found that the pleiotropic effect of the single gene HvABCG31 mutation was linked to the co-regulation of metabolic processes and stress-related system. The cuticle development involved cytochrome P450 family members and fatty acid metabolism pathways were significantly up-regulated by the HvABCG31 mutation, which might be anticipated to reduce the levels of cutin monomers or wax and display conspicuous cuticle defects. The candidate genes for responses to stress were induced by eibi1 mutant through activating the jasmonate pathway. The down-regulation of co-expressed enzyme genes responsible for DNA methylation and histone deacetylation also suggested that HvABCG31 mutation may affect the epigenetic regulation for barley development. Comparison of transcriptomic profiling of barley under biotic and abiotic stresses revealed that the functions of HvABCG31 gene to high-water loss rate might be different from other osmotic stresses of gene mutations in barley. The transcriptional profiling of the HvABCG31 mutation provided candidate genes for further investigation of the physiological and developmental changes caused by the mutant.

  10. Long-Distance Signaling in bypass1 Mutants:Bioassay Development Reveals the bps Signal to Be a Metabolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emma Adhikari; Dong-Keun Lee; Patrick Giavalisco; Leslie E. Sieburth

    2013-01-01

    Root-to-shoot signaling is used by plants to coordinate shoot development with the conditions experienced by the roots.A mobile and biologically active compound,the bps signal,is over-produced in roots of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant called bypass1 (bps1),and might also be a normally produced signaling molecule in wild-type plants.Our goal is to identify the bps signal chemically,which will then allow us to assess its production in normal plants.To identify any signaling molecule,a bioassay is required,and here we describe the development of a robust,simple,and quantitative bioassay for the bps signal.The developed bioassay follows the growth-reducing activity of the bps signal using the pCYCB1;1::GUS cell cycle marker.Wild-type plants carrying this marker,and provided the bps signal through either grafts or metabolite extracts,showed reduced cell division.By contrast,control grafts and treatment with control extracts showed no change in pCYCB1;1::GUS expression.To determine the chemical nature of the bps signal,extracts were treated with RNase A,Proteinase K,or heat.None of these treatments diminished the activity of bps1 extracts,suggesting that the active molecule might be a metabolite.This bioassay will be useful for future biochemical fractionation and analysis directed toward bps signal identification.

  11. Cancer-associated p53 tetramerization domain mutants: quantitative analysis reveals a low threshold for tumor suppressor inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamada, R.; Anderson, C.; Nomura, T.; Sakaguchi, K.

    2011-01-07

    The tumor suppressor p53, a 393-amino acid transcription factor, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. Its inactivation via the mutation of its gene is a key step in tumor progression, and tetramer formation is critical for p53 post-translational modification and its ability to activate or repress the transcription of target genes vital in inhibiting tumor growth. About 50% of human tumors have TP53 gene mutations; most are missense ones that presumably lower the tumor suppressor activity of p53. In this study, we explored the effects of known tumor-derived missense mutations on the stability and oligomeric structure of p53; our comprehensive, quantitative analyses encompassed the tetramerization domain peptides representing 49 such substitutions in humans. Their effects on tetrameric structure were broad, and the stability of the mutant peptides varied widely ({Delta}T{sub m} = 4.8 {approx} -46.8 C). Because formation of a tetrameric structure is critical for protein-protein interactions, DNA binding, and the post-translational modification of p53, a small destabilization of the tetrameric structure could result in dysfunction of tumor suppressor activity. We suggest that the threshold for loss of tumor suppressor activity in terms of the disruption of the tetrameric structure of p53 could be extremely low. However, other properties of the tetramerization domain, such as electrostatic surface potential and its ability to bind partner proteins, also may be important.

  12. iTRAQ protein profile analysis of tomato green-ripe mutant reveals new aspects critical for fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Zhu, Benzhong; Zhu, Hongliang; Chen, Yuexi; Tian, Huiqin; Luo, Yunbo; Fu, Daqi

    2014-04-01

    Green-ripe (Gr) tomato carries a dominant mutation and yields a nonripening fruit phenotype. The mutation results from a 334 bp deletion in a gene of unknown function at the Gr locus. The putative influence of Gr gene-deletion mutation on biochemical changes underlying the nonripening phenotype remains largely unknown. Respiration of Gr fruit was found to be reduced at mature green and breaker stage of ripening, while the fruit softening was dramatically prolonged. We studied the proteome of Gr mutant fruit using high-throughput iTRAQ and high-resolution mass spectrometry and identified 43 proteins representing 43 individual genes as potential influence-targets of Gr mutated fruit. The identified proteins are involved in several ripening-related pathways including cell-wall metabolism, photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism, protein synthesis, and processing. Affected protein levels are correlated with the corresponding gene transcript levels. The modulation in the accumulation levels of PI(U1)P, PGIP, and PG2 supported the delayed softening phenotype of the Gr fruit. Further investigation in GR gene-silencing fruit ascertained the doubtless modulation of these targets by the deletion mutation of GR gene.

  13. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  14. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Stewart, Paul A; Borne, Adam L; Fang, Bin; Welsh, Eric A; Chen, Yian Ann; Eschrich, Steven A; Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B

    2016-06-01

    One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  15. Activity-Based Proteomics Reveals Heterogeneous Kinome and ATP-Binding Proteome Responses to MEK Inhibition in KRAS Mutant Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Young Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way cancer cells can escape from targeted agents is through their ability to evade drug effects by rapidly rewiring signaling networks. Many protein classes, such as kinases and metabolic enzymes, are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis. We hypothesized that a system-level profiling of drug-induced alterations in ATP-binding proteomes could offer novel insights into adaptive responses. Here, we mapped global ATP-binding proteomes perturbed by two clinical MEK inhibitors, AZD6244 and MEK162, in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells as a model system harnessing a desthiobiotin-ATP probe coupled with LC-MS/MS. We observed strikingly unique ATP-binding proteome responses to MEK inhibition, which revealed heterogeneous drug-induced pathway signatures in each cell line. We also identified diverse kinome responses, indicating each cell adapts to MEK inhibition in unique ways. Despite the heterogeneity of kinome responses, decreased probe labeling of mitotic kinases and an increase of kinases linked to autophagy were identified to be common responses. Taken together, our study revealed a diversity of adaptive ATP-binding proteome and kinome responses to MEK inhibition in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells, and our study further demonstrated the utility of our approach to identify potential candidates of targetable ATP-binding enzymes involved in adaptive resistance and to develop rational drug combinations.

  16. Genetic engineering, high resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy elucidate the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Birgit; Studt, Lena; Wiemann, Philipp; Osmanov, Helena; Kleigrewe, Karin; Köhler, Jens; Krug, Isabel; Tudzynski, Bettina; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-11-01

    Secondary metabolites of filamentous fungi can be highly bioactive, ranging from antibiotic to cancerogenic properties. In this study we were able to identify a new, yet unknown metabolite produced by Fusarium fujikuroi, an ascomycetous rice pathogen. With the help of genomic engineering and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) followed by isolation and detailed structure elucidation, the new substance could be designated as an unknown bikaverin precursor, missing two methyl- and one hydroxy group, hence named oxo-pre-bikaverin. Though the bikaverin gene cluster has been extensively studied in the past, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway remained elusive due to a negative feedback loop that regulates the genes within the cluster. To decipher the bikaverin biosynthetic pathway and to overcome these negative regulation circuits, the structural cluster genes BIK2 and BIK3 were overexpressed independently in the ΔΔBIK2/BIK3+OE::BIK1 mutant background by using strong constitutive promoters. Using the software tool MZmine 2, the metabolite profile of the generated mutants obtained by HPLC-HRMS was compared, revealing further intermediates.

  17. Chikungunya virus neutralization antigens and direct cell-to-cell transmission are revealed by human antibody-escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia Yin Lee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an alphavirus responsible for numerous epidemics throughout Africa and Asia, causing infectious arthritis and reportedly linked with fatal infections in newborns and elderly. Previous studies in animal models indicate that humoral immunity can protect against CHIKV infection, but despite the potential efficacy of B-cell-driven intervention strategies, there are no virus-specific vaccines or therapies currently available. In addition, CHIKV has been reported to elicit long-lasting virus-specific IgM in humans, and to establish long-term persistence in non-human primates, suggesting that the virus might evade immune defenses to establish chronic infections in man. However, the mechanisms of immune evasion potentially employed by CHIKV remain uncharacterized. We previously described two human monoclonal antibodies that potently neutralize CHIKV infection. In the current report, we have characterized CHIKV mutants that escape antibody-dependent neutralization to identify the CHIKV E2 domain B and fusion loop "groove" as the primary determinants of CHIKV interaction with these antibodies. Furthermore, for the first time, we have also demonstrated direct CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission, as a mechanism that involves the E2 domain A and that is associated with viral resistance to antibody-dependent neutralization. Identification of CHIKV sub-domains that are associated with human protective immunity, will pave the way for the development of CHIKV-specific sub-domain vaccination strategies. Moreover, the clear demonstration of CHIKV cell-to-cell transmission and its possible role in the establishment of CHIKV persistence, will also inform the development of future anti-viral interventions. These data shed new light on CHIKV-host interactions that will help to combat human CHIKV infection and inform future studies of CHIKV pathogenesis.

  18. Alanylclavam Biosynthetic Genes Are Clustered Together with One Group of Clavulanic Acid Biosynthetic Genes in Streptomyces clavuligerus▿ §

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelyas, Nathan J.; Cai, Hui; Kwong, Thomas; Jensen, Susan E.

    2008-01-01

    Streptomyces clavuligerus produces at least five different clavam metabolites, including clavulanic acid and the methionine antimetabolite, alanylclavam. In vitro transposon mutagenesis was used to analyze a 13-kb region upstream of the known paralogue gene cluster. The paralogue cluster includes one group of clavulanic acid biosynthetic genes in S. clavuligerus. Twelve open reading frames (ORFs) were found in this area, and mutants were generated in each using either in vitro transposon or PCR-targeted mutagenesis. Mutants with defects in any of the genes orfA, orfB, orfC, or orfD were unable to produce alanylclavam but could produce all of the other clavams, including clavulanic acid. orfA encodes a predicted hydroxymethyltransferase, orfB encodes a YjgF/YER057c/UK114-family regulatory protein, orfC encodes an aminotransferase, and orfD encodes a dehydratase. All of these types of proteins are normally involved in amino acid metabolism. Mutants in orfC or orfD also accumulated a novel clavam metabolite instead of alanylclavam, and a complemented orfC mutant was able to produce trace amounts of alanylclavam while still producing the novel clavam. Mass spectrometric analyses, together with consideration of the enzymes involved in its production, led to tentative identification of the novel clavam as 8-OH-alanylclavam, an intermediate in the proposed alanylclavam biosynthetic pathway. PMID:18931110

  19. Early doors (Edo) mutant mouse reveals the importance of period 2 (PER2) PAS domain structure for circadian pacemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militi, Stefania; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Sandate, Colby R; Chesham, Johanna E; Barnard, Alun R; Parsons, Michael J; Vibert, Jennifer L; Joynson, Greg M; Partch, Carrie L; Hastings, Michael H; Nolan, Patrick M

    2016-03-08

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) defines 24 h of time via a transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loop in which transactivation of Per (period) and Cry (cryptochrome) genes by BMAL1-CLOCK complexes is suppressed by PER-CRY complexes. The molecular/structural basis of how circadian protein complexes function is poorly understood. We describe a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced mutation, early doors (Edo), in the PER-ARNT-SIM (PAS) domain dimerization region of period 2 (PER2) (I324N) that accelerates the circadian clock of Per2(Edo/Edo) mice by 1.5 h. Structural and biophysical analyses revealed that Edo alters the packing of the highly conserved interdomain linker of the PER2 PAS core such that, although PER2(Edo) complexes with clock proteins, its vulnerability to degradation mediated by casein kinase 1ε (CSNK1E) is increased. The functional relevance of this mutation is revealed by the ultrashort (Edo/Edo); Csnk1e(Tau/Tau) mice and the SCN. These periods are unprecedented in mice. Thus, Per2(Edo) reveals a direct causal link between the molecular structure of the PER2 PAS core and the pace of SCN circadian timekeeping.

  20. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

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    Patricia Müller-Moulé

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance.

  1. YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are required for Arabidopsis shade avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Moulé, Patricia; Nozue, Kazunari; Pytlak, Melissa L.; Palmer, Christine M.; Covington, Michael F.; Wallace, Andreah D.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants respond to neighbor shade by increasing stem and petiole elongation. Shade, sensed by phytochrome photoreceptors, causes stabilization of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR proteins and subsequent induction of YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes. To investigate the role of YUCCA genes in phytochrome-mediated elongation, we examined auxin signaling kinetics after an end-of-day far-red (EOD-FR) light treatment, and found that an auxin responsive reporter is rapidly induced within 2 hours of far-red exposure. YUCCA2, 5, 8, and 9 are all induced with similar kinetics suggesting that they could act redundantly to control shade-mediated elongation. To test this hypothesis we constructed a yucca2, 5, 8, 9 quadruple mutant and found that the hypocotyl and petiole EOD-FR and shade avoidance responses are completely disrupted. This work shows that YUCCA auxin biosynthetic genes are essential for detectable shade avoidance and that YUCCA genes are important for petiole shade avoidance. PMID:27761349

  2. Crystal Structures of Wild-type and Mutant Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Dihydrofolate Reductase Reveal an Alternative Conformation of NADPH that may be Linked to Trimethoprim Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, K.; Liu, J; Lombardo, M; Bolstad, D; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Both hospital- and community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infections have become major health concerns in terms of morbidity, suffering and cost. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is an alternative treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. However, TMP-resistant strains have arisen with point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the target for TMP. A single point mutation, F98Y, has been shown biochemically to confer the majority of this resistance to TMP. Using a structure-based approach, we have designed a series of novel propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors that are active against several trimethoprim-resistant enzymes. We screened this series against wild-type and mutant (F98Y) S. aureus DHFR and found that several are active against both enzymes and specifically that the meta-biphenyl class of these inhibitors is the most potent. In order to understand the structural basis of this potency, we determined eight high-resolution crystal structures: four each of the wild-type and mutant DHFR enzymes bound to various propargyl-linked DHFR inhibitors. In addition to explaining the structure-activity relationships, several of the structures reveal a novel conformation for the cofactor, NADPH. In this new conformation that is predominantly associated with the mutant enzyme, the nicotinamide ring is displaced from its conserved location and three water molecules complete a network of hydrogen bonds between the nicotinamide ring and the protein. In this new position, NADPH has reduced interactions with the inhibitor. An equilibrium between the two conformations of NADPH, implied by their occupancies in the eight crystal structures, is influenced both by the ligand and the F98Y mutation. The mutation induced equilibrium between two NADPH-binding conformations may contribute to decrease TMP binding and thus may be responsible for TMP resistance.

  3. Phosphoproteomics of collagen receptor networks reveals SHP-2 phosphorylation downstream of wild-type DDR2 and its lung cancer mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Leo K; Payne, Leo S; Luczynski, Maciej T; Chang, Francis; Xu, Huifang; Clinton, Ryan W; Paul, Angela; Esposito, Edward A; Gridley, Scott; Leitinger, Birgit; Naegle, Kristen M; Huang, Paul H

    2013-09-15

    Collagen is an important extracellular matrix component that directs many fundamental cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation and motility. The signalling networks driving these processes are propagated by collagen receptors such as the β1 integrins and the DDRs (discoidin domain receptors). To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of collagen receptor signalling, we have performed a quantitative analysis of the phosphorylation networks downstream of collagen activation of integrins and DDR2. Temporal analysis over seven time points identified 424 phosphorylated proteins. Distinct DDR2 tyrosine phosphorylation sites displayed unique temporal activation profiles in agreement with in vitro kinase data. Multiple clustering analysis of the phosphoproteomic data revealed several DDR2 candidate downstream signalling nodes, including SHP-2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2), NCK1 (non-catalytic region of tyrosine kinase adaptor protein 1), LYN, SHIP-2 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2], PIK3C2A (phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 2α) and PLCL2 (phospholipase C-like 2). Biochemical validation showed that SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation is dependent on DDR2 kinase activity. Targeted proteomic profiling of a panel of lung SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) DDR2 mutants demonstrated that SHP-2 is tyrosine-phosphorylated by the L63V and G505S mutants. In contrast, the I638F kinase domain mutant exhibited diminished DDR2 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation levels which have an inverse relationship with clonogenic potential. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that SHP-2 is a key signalling node downstream of the DDR2 receptor which may have therapeutic implications in a subset of DDR2 mutations recently uncovered in genome-wide lung SCC sequencing screens.

  4. Pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway of Baccillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, B W; Kelleher, R J; Gooder, H

    1975-08-01

    Biochemical and genetic data were obtained from a series of 51 Pyr- strains of Bacillus subtilis. The observed enzymatic deficiencies allowed the mutants to be placed into 12 clases, some of which represent defects in more than one of the six known pyrimidine biosynthetic enzymes. Mapping analysis by transformation has shown that all the Pyr- mutations are located in a single small area of the B. subtilis genome. A correlation of the biochemical defects and the genetic data has been made. Those mutations conferring similar enzymatic deficiencies were found to be contiguous on the B. subtilis map. Regulatory aspects of the pyrimidine pathway have also been investigated and are compared to previously reported results from other organisms. Evidence is presented which bears upon the possible physical association of the first three enzymes and the association of at least some of the enzymes of this pathway with particulate elements of the cell. A model for the organization of the enzymes is presented with dihydroorotate dehydrogenase as the central enzyme in a proposed aggregate.

  5. Diguanylate cyclase null mutant reveals that C-Di-GMP pathway regulates the motility and adherence of the extremophile bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Matías; Deane, Shelly M; Ruiz, Lina; Rawlings, Douglas E; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    An understanding of biofilm formation is relevant to the design of biological strategies to improve the efficiency of the bioleaching process and to prevent environmental damages caused by acid mine/rock drainage. For this reason, our laboratory is focused on the characterization of the molecular mechanisms involved in biofilm formation in different biomining bacteria. In many bacteria, the intracellular levels of c-di-GMP molecules regulate the transition from the motile planktonic state to sessile community-based behaviors, such as biofilm development, through different kinds of effectors. Thus, we recently started a study of the c-di-GMP pathway in several biomining bacteria including Acidithiobacillus caldus. C-di-GMP molecules are synthesized by diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) and degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). We previously reported the existence of intermediates involved in c-di-GMP pathway from different Acidithiobacillus species. Here, we report our work related to At. caldus ATCC 51756. We identified several putative-ORFs encoding DGC and PDE and effector proteins. By using total RNA extracted from At. caldus cells and RT-PCR, we demonstrated that these genes are expressed. We also demonstrated the presence of c-di-GMP by mass spectrometry and showed that genes for several of the DGC enzymes were functional by heterologous genetic complementation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants. Moreover, we developed a DGC defective mutant strain (Δc1319) that strongly indicated that the c-di-GMP pathway regulates the swarming motility and adherence to sulfur surfaces by At. caldus. Together, our results revealed that At. caldus possesses a functional c-di-GMP pathway which could be significant for ores colonization during the bioleaching process.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  7. Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in flavonoid biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    Full Text Available Chalcone synthase (CHS catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1 encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants.

  8. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandra, L.; Abou Hachem, Maher; Gyemant, G.;

    2006-01-01

    as binding barriers. Barley a-amylase I mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile...

  9. Structure-Function Analysis of Friedreich's Ataxia Mutants Reveals Determinants of Frataxin Binding and Activation of the Fe-S Assembly Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Winn, Andrew M; Barondeau, David P [TAM

    2012-08-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with the loss of function of the protein frataxin (FXN) that results from low FXN levels due to a GAA triplet repeat expansion or, occasionally, from missense mutations in the FXN gene. Here biochemical and structural properties of FXN variants, including three FRDA missense mutations (N146K, Q148R, and R165C) and three related mutants (N146A, Q148G, and Q153A), were determined in an effort to understand the structural basis for the loss of function. In vitro assays revealed that although the three FRDA missense mutations exhibited similar losses of cysteine desulfurase and Fe-S cluster assembly activities, the causes for these activation defects were distinct. The R165C variant exhibited a kcat/KM higher than that of native FXN but weak binding to the NFS1, ISD11, and ISCU2 (SDU) complex, whereas the Q148R variant exhibited the lowest kcat/KM of the six tested FXN variants and only a modest binding deficiency. The order of the FXN binding affinities for the SDU Fe-S assembly complex was as follows: FXN > Q148R > N146A > Q148G > N146K > Q153A > R165C. Four different classes of FXN variants were identified on the basis of their biochemical properties. Together, these structure-function studies reveal determinants for the binding and allosteric activation of the Fe-S assembly complex and provide insight into how FRDA missense mutations are functionally compromised.

  10. Analysis of mutants from a genetic screening reveals the control of intestine and liver development by many common genes in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Faming; Chen, Jiehui; Ma, Xirui; Huang, Chao; Zhu, Shicheng; Wang, Fei; Li, Li; Luo, Lingfei; Ruan, Hua; Huang, Honghui

    2015-05-01

    Both the intestine and liver develop from the endoderm, yet little is known how these two digestive organs share and differ in their developmental programs, at the molecular level. A classical forward genetic screen, with no gene bias, is an effective way to address this question by examining the defects of the intestine and liver in obtained mutants to assess mutated genes responsible for the development of either organ or both. We report here such a screen in zebrafish. ENU was used as the mutagen because of its high mutagenic efficiency and no site preference. Embryos were collected at 3.5 dpf for RNA whole mount in situ hybridization with a cocktail probe of the intestine marker ifabp and the liver marker lfabp to check phenotypes and determine their parental heterozygosis. A total of 52 F2 putative mutants were identified, and those with general developmental defects were aborted. To rule out non-inheritable phenotypes caused by high mutation background, F2 putative mutants were outcrossed with wild type fish and a re-screen in F3 generations was performed. After complementation tests between F3 mutants with similar phenotypes originating from the same F2 families, a total of 37 F3 mutant lines originated from 22 F2 families were identified after screening 78 mutagenized genomes. Classification of mutant phenotypes indicated that 31 out of the 37 mutants showed defects in both the intestine and liver. In addition, four "intestine specific mutants" and two "liver specific mutants" showed selectively more severe phenotype in the intestine and liver respectively. These results suggested that the intestine and liver share a substantial number of essential genes during both organs development in zebrafish. Further studies of the mutants are likely to shed more insights into the molecular basis of the digestive system development in the zebrafish and vertebrate.

  11. Identification and characterization of the soybean IPK1 ortholog of a low phytic acid mutant reveals an exon-excluding splice-site mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Feng-Jie; Zhu, Dan-Hua; Tan, Yuan-Yuan; Dong, De-Kun; Fu, Xu-Jun; Zhu, Shen-Long; Li, Bai-Quan; Shu, Qing-Yao

    2012-11-01

    Phytic acid (myo-inositol 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 hexakisphosphate) is an important constituent of soybean meal. Since phytic acid and its mineral salts (phytates) are almost indigestible for monogastrics, their abundance in grain food/feed causes nutritional and environmental problems; interest in breeding low phytic acid has therefore increased considerably. Based on gene mapping and the characteristics of inositol polyphosphates profile in the seeds of a soybean mutant line Gm-lpa-ZC-2, the soybean ortholog of inositol 1,3,4,5,6 pentakisphosphate (InsP(5)) 2-kinase (IPK1), which transforms InsP(5) into phytic acid, was first hypothesized as the candidate gene responsible for the low phytic acid alteration in Gm-lpa-ZC-2. One IPK1 ortholog (Glyma14g07880, GmIPK1) was then identified in the mapped region on chromosome 14. Sequencing revealed a G → A point mutation in the genomic DNA sequence and the exclusion of the entire fifth exon in the cDNA sequence of GmIPK1 in Gm-lpa-ZC-2 compared with its wild-type progenitor Zhechun No. 3. The excluded exon encodes 37 amino acids that spread across two conserved IPK1 motifs. Furthermore, complete co-segregation of low phytic acid phenotype with the G → A mutation was observed in the F(2) population of ZC-lpa x Zhexiandou No. 4 (a wild-type cultivar). Put together, the G → A point mutation affected the pre-mRNA splicing and resulted in the exclusion of the fifth exon of GmIPK1 which is expected to disrupt the GmIPK1 functionality, leading to low phytic acid level in Gm-lpa-ZC-2. Gm-lpa-ZC-2, would be a good germplasm source in low phytic acid soybean breeding.

  12. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes.

  13. Transcriptional analysis of the HeT-A retrotransposon in mutant and wild type stocks reveals high sequence variability at Drosophila telomeres and other unusual features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piñeyro David

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomere replication in Drosophila depends on the transposition of a domesticated retroelement, the HeT-A retrotransposon. The sequence of the HeT-A retrotransposon changes rapidly resulting in differentiated subfamilies. This pattern of sequence change contrasts with the essential function with which the HeT-A is entrusted and brings about questions concerning the extent of sequence variability, the telomere contribution of different subfamilies, and whether wild type and mutant Drosophila stocks show different HeT-A scenarios. Results A detailed study on the variability of HeT-A reveals that both the level of variability and the number of subfamilies are higher than previously reported. Comparisons between GIII, a strain with longer telomeres, and its parental strain Oregon-R indicate that both strains have the same set of HeT-A subfamilies. Finally, the presence of a highly conserved splicing pattern only in its antisense transcripts indicates a putative regulatory, functional or structural role for the HeT-A RNA. Interestingly, our results also suggest that most HeT-A copies are actively expressed regardless of which telomere and where in the telomere they are located. Conclusions Our study demonstrates how the HeT-A sequence changes much faster than previously reported resulting in at least nine different subfamilies most of which could actively contribute to telomere extension in Drosophila. Interestingly, the only significant difference observed between Oregon-R and GIII resides in the nature and proportion of the antisense transcripts, suggesting a possible mechanism that would in part explain the longer telomeres of the GIII stock.

  14. A thirteen-year analysis of Plasmodium falciparum populations reveals high conservation of the mutant pfcrt haplotype despite the withdrawal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Gabon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Frank; N. Lehners; P.I. Mayengue; J. Gabor; M. Dal-Bianco; D.U. Kombila; G.M. Ngoma; C. Supan; B. Lell; F. Ntoumi; M.P. Grobusch; K. Dietz; P.G. Kremsner

    2011-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance (CR) decreased after the removal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Malawi, Kenia and Tanzania. In this investigation the prevalence of the chloroquine resistance (CQR) conferring mutant pfcrt allele and its associated chromosomal haplotype were determined be

  15. Mutation in cpsf6/CFIm68 (Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor Subunit 6) causes short 3'UTRs and disturbs gene expression in developing embryos, as revealed by an analysis of primordial germ cell migration using the medaka mutant naruto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasado, Takao; Kondoh, Hisato; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies analyzing medaka mutants defective in primordial germ cell (PGC) migration identified cxcr4b and cxcr7, which are both receptors of the chemokine sdf1/cxcl12, as key regulators of PGC migration. Among PGC migration mutants, naruto (nar) is unique in that the mutant phenotype includes gross morphological abnormalities of embryos, suggesting that the mutation affects a broader range of processes. A fine genetic linkage mapping and genome sequencing showed the nar gene encodes Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor subunit 6 (CPSF6/CFIm68). CPSF6 is a component of the Cleavage Factor Im complex (CFIm) which plays a key role in pre-mRNA 3'-cleavage and polyadenylation. 3'RACE of sdf1a/b and cxcr7 transcripts in the mutant embryos indicated shorter 3'UTRs with poly A additions occurring at more upstream positions than wild-type embryos, suggesting CPSF6 functions to prevent premature 3'UTR cleavage. In addition, expression of the coding region sequences of sdf1a/b in nar mutants was more anteriorly extended in somites than wild-type embryos, accounting for the abnormally extended distribution of PGCs in nar mutants. An expected consequence of shortening 3'UTR is the escape from the degradation mechanism mediated by microRNAs interacting with distal 3'UTR sequence. The abnormal expression pattern of sdf1a coding sequence may be at least partially accounted for by this mechanism. Given the pleiotropic effects of nar mutation, further analysis using the nar mutant will reveal processes in which CPSF6 plays essential regulatory roles in poly A site selection and involvement of 3'UTRs in posttranscriptional gene regulation in various genes in vivo.

  16. Mutation in cpsf6/CFIm68 (Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor Subunit 6) causes short 3'UTRs and disturbs gene expression in developing embryos, as revealed by an analysis of primordial germ cell migration using the medaka mutant naruto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondoh, Hisato; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Naruse, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Our previous studies analyzing medaka mutants defective in primordial germ cell (PGC) migration identified cxcr4b and cxcr7, which are both receptors of the chemokine sdf1/cxcl12, as key regulators of PGC migration. Among PGC migration mutants, naruto (nar) is unique in that the mutant phenotype includes gross morphological abnormalities of embryos, suggesting that the mutation affects a broader range of processes. A fine genetic linkage mapping and genome sequencing showed the nar gene encodes Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor subunit 6 (CPSF6/CFIm68). CPSF6 is a component of the Cleavage Factor Im complex (CFIm) which plays a key role in pre-mRNA 3'-cleavage and polyadenylation. 3'RACE of sdf1a/b and cxcr7 transcripts in the mutant embryos indicated shorter 3’UTRs with poly A additions occurring at more upstream positions than wild-type embryos, suggesting CPSF6 functions to prevent premature 3’UTR cleavage. In addition, expression of the coding region sequences of sdf1a/b in nar mutants was more anteriorly extended in somites than wild-type embryos, accounting for the abnormally extended distribution of PGCs in nar mutants. An expected consequence of shortening 3'UTR is the escape from the degradation mechanism mediated by microRNAs interacting with distal 3’UTR sequence. The abnormal expression pattern of sdf1a coding sequence may be at least partially accounted for by this mechanism. Given the pleiotropic effects of nar mutation, further analysis using the nar mutant will reveal processes in which CPSF6 plays essential regulatory roles in poly A site selection and involvement of 3'UTRs in posttranscriptional gene regulation in various genes in vivo. PMID:28253363

  17. Gene profiling of postnatal Mfrprd6 mutant eyes reveals differential accumulation of Prss56, visual cycle and phototransduction mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Won, Jungyeon; Stearns, Timothy M; Charette, Jeremy R; Hicks, Wanda L; Collin, Gayle B; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP/Mfrp) gene, specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and ciliary body, cause nanophthalmia or posterior microphthalmia with retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. To better understand MFRP function, microarray analysis was performed on eyes of homozygous Mfrprd6 and C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P) 0 and P14, prior to photoreceptor loss. Data analysis revealed no changes at P0 but significant differences in RPE and retina-specific transcripts at P14, suggesting a postnatal influence of the Mfrprd6 allele. A subset of these transcripts was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In Mfrprd6 eyes, a significant 1.5- to 2.0-fold decrease was observed among transcripts of genes linked to retinal degeneration, including those involved in visual cycle (Rpe65, Lrat, Rgr), phototransduction (Pde6a, Guca1b, Rgs9), and photoreceptor disc morphogenesis (Rpgrip1 and Fscn2). Levels of RPE65 were significantly decreased by 2.0-fold. Transcripts of Prss56, a gene associated with angle-closure glaucoma, posterior microphthalmia and myopia, were increased in Mfrprd6 eyes by 17-fold. Validation by qRT-PCR indicated a 3.5-, 14- and 70-fold accumulation of Prss56 transcripts relative to controls at P7, P14 and P21, respectively. This trend was not observed in other RPE or photoreceptor mutant mouse models with similar disease progression, suggesting that Prss56 upregulation is a specific attribute of the disruption of Mfrp. Prss56 and Glul in situ hybridization directly identified Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer as the cell type expressing Prss56. In summary, the Mfrprd6 allele causes significant postnatal changes in transcript and protein levels in the retina and RPE. The link between Mfrp deficiency and Prss56 up-regulation, together with the genetic association of human MFRP or PRSS56 variants and ocular size, raises the possibility that these genes

  18. Gene profiling of postnatal Mfrprd6 mutant eyes reveals differential accumulation of Prss56, visual cycle and phototransduction mRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani Soundararajan

    Full Text Available Mutations in the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP/Mfrp gene, specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and ciliary body, cause nanophthalmia or posterior microphthalmia with retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. To better understand MFRP function, microarray analysis was performed on eyes of homozygous Mfrprd6 and C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0 and P14, prior to photoreceptor loss. Data analysis revealed no changes at P0 but significant differences in RPE and retina-specific transcripts at P14, suggesting a postnatal influence of the Mfrprd6 allele. A subset of these transcripts was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. In Mfrprd6 eyes, a significant 1.5- to 2.0-fold decrease was observed among transcripts of genes linked to retinal degeneration, including those involved in visual cycle (Rpe65, Lrat, Rgr, phototransduction (Pde6a, Guca1b, Rgs9, and photoreceptor disc morphogenesis (Rpgrip1 and Fscn2. Levels of RPE65 were significantly decreased by 2.0-fold. Transcripts of Prss56, a gene associated with angle-closure glaucoma, posterior microphthalmia and myopia, were increased in Mfrprd6 eyes by 17-fold. Validation by qRT-PCR indicated a 3.5-, 14- and 70-fold accumulation of Prss56 transcripts relative to controls at P7, P14 and P21, respectively. This trend was not observed in other RPE or photoreceptor mutant mouse models with similar disease progression, suggesting that Prss56 upregulation is a specific attribute of the disruption of Mfrp. Prss56 and Glul in situ hybridization directly identified Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer as the cell type expressing Prss56. In summary, the Mfrprd6 allele causes significant postnatal changes in transcript and protein levels in the retina and RPE. The link between Mfrp deficiency and Prss56 up-regulation, together with the genetic association of human MFRP or PRSS56 variants and ocular size, raises the possibility that

  19. Non-invasive, whole-plant imaging of chloroplast movement and chlorophyll fluorescence reveals photosynthetic phenotypes independent of chloroplast photorelocation defects in chloroplast division mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Siddhartha; Cruz, Jeffrey A; Jiao, Yuhua; Chen, Jin; Kramer, David M; Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2015-10-01

    Leaf chloroplast movement is thought to optimize light capture and to minimize photodamage. To better understand the impact of chloroplast movement on photosynthesis, we developed a technique based on the imaging of reflectance from leaf surfaces that enables continuous, high-sensitivity, non-invasive measurements of chloroplast movement in multiple intact plants under white actinic light. We validated the method by measuring photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis chloroplast division mutants with drastically enlarged chloroplasts, and in phototropin mutants with impaired photorelocation but normal chloroplast morphology, under different light regimes. Additionally, we expanded our platform to permit simultaneous image-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and chloroplast movement. We show that chloroplast division mutants with enlarged, less-mobile chloroplasts exhibit greater photosystem II photodamage than is observed in the wild type, particularly under fluctuating high levels of light. Comparison between division mutants and the severe photorelocation mutant phot1-5 phot2-1 showed that these effects are not entirely attributable to diminished photorelocation responses, as previously hypothesized, implying that altered chloroplast morphology affects other photosynthetic processes. Our dual-imaging platform also allowed us to develop a straightforward approach to correct non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) calculations for interference from chloroplast movement. This correction method should be generally useful when fluorescence and reflectance are measured in the same experiments. The corrected data indicate that the energy-dependent (qE) and photoinhibitory (qI) components of NPQ contribute differentially to the NPQ phenotypes of the chloroplast division and photorelocation mutants. This imaging technology thus provides a platform for analyzing the contributions of chloroplast movement, chloroplast morphology and other phenotypic attributes to the

  20. Regulated expression of CXCR4 constitutive active mutants revealed the up-modulated chemotaxis and up-regulation of genes crucial for CXCR4 mediated homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available SDF-1/CXCR4 axis plays a principle role in the homing and engraftment of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs, a process that defines cells ability to reach and seed recipient bone marrow niche following their intravenous infusion. However, the proper functioning of CXCR4 downstream signaling depends upon consistent optimal expression of both SDF-1 ligand and its receptor CXCR4, which in turn is variable and regulated by several factors. The constitutive active mutants of CXCR4 (N119A and N119S being able to induce autonomous downstream signaling, overcome the limitation of ligand-receptor interaction for induction of CXCR4 signaling. Therefore, we intended to explore their potential in chemotaxis; a key cellular process which crucially regulates cells homing to bone marrow. In present study, Tet-on inducible gene expression vector system was used for doxycycline inducible regulated transgene expression of CXCR4 active mutants in hematopoietic stem progenitor cell line K-562. Both of these mutants revealed significantly enhanced chemotaxis to SDF-1 gradient as compared to wild type. Furthermore, gene expression profiling of these genetically engineered cells as assessed by microarray analysis revealed the up-regulation of group of genes that are known to play a crucial role in CXCR4 mediated cells homing and engraftment. Hence, this study suggest the potential prospects of CXCR4 active mutants in research and development aimed to improve the efficiency of cells in the mechanism of homing and engraftment process.

  1. New biosynthetic pathway for pink pigments from uncultured oceanic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Benjamin; Béjà, Oded; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2016-12-01

    The pink open-chain tetrapyrrole pigment phycoerythrobilin (PEB) is employed by marine cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptophytes as a light-harvesting chromophore in phycobiliproteins. Genes encoding biosynthesis proteins for PEB have also been discovered in cyanophages, viruses that infect cyanobacteria, and mimic host pigment biosynthesis with the exception of PebS which combines the enzymatic activities of two host enzymes. In this study, we have identified novel members of the PEB biosynthetic enzyme families, heme oxygenases and ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases. Encoding genes were found in metagenomic datasets and could be traced back to bacteriophage but not cyanophage origin. While the heme oxygenase exhibited standard activity, a new bilin reductase with highest homology to the teal pigment producing enzyme PcyA revealed PEB biosynthetic activity. Although PcyX possesses PebS-like activity both enzymes share only 9% sequence identity and likely catalyze the reaction via two independent mechanisms. Our data point towards the presence of phycobilin biosynthetic genes in phages that probably infect alphaproteobacteria and, therefore, further support a role of phycobilins outside oxygenic phototrophs.

  2. The phenome analysis of mutant alleles in Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase genes in rice reveals new potential targets for stress tolerant cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dievart, Anne; Perin, Christophe; Hirsch, Judith; Bettembourg, Mathilde; Lanau, Nadège; Artus, Florence; Bureau, Charlotte; Noel, Nicolas; Droc, Gaétan; Peyramard, Matthieu; Pereira, Serge; Courtois, Brigitte; Morel, Jean-Benoit; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses that reduce their fitness and performance. At the molecular level, the perception of extracellular stimuli and the subsequent activation of defense responses require a complex interplay of signaling cascades, in which protein phosphorylation plays a central role. Several studies have shown that some members of the Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor-Like Kinase (LRR-RLK) family are involved in stress and developmental pathways. We report here a systematic analysis of the role of the members of this gene family by mutant phenotyping in the monocotyledon model plant rice, Oryza sativa. We have then targeted 176 of the ∼320 LRR-RLK genes (55.7%) and genotyped 288 mutant lines. Position of the insertion was confirmed in 128 lines corresponding to 100 LRR-RLK genes (31.6% of the entire family). All mutant lines harboring homozygous insertions have been screened for phenotypes under normal conditions and under various abiotic stresses. Mutant plants have been observed at several stages of growth, from seedlings in Petri dishes to flowering and grain filling under greenhouse conditions. Our results show that 37 of the LRR-RLK rice genes are potential targets for improvement especially in the generation of abiotic stress tolerant cereals.

  3. A thirteen-year analysis of Plasmodium falciparum populations reveals high conservation of the mutant pfcrt haplotype despite the withdrawal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoma Ghyslain

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine resistance (CR decreased after the removal of chloroquine from national treatment guidelines in Malawi, Kenia and Tanzania. In this investigation the prevalence of the chloroquine resistance (CQR conferring mutant pfcrt allele and its associated chromosomal haplotype were determined before and after the change in Gabonese national treatment guidelines from chloroquine (CQ to artesunate plus amodiaquine (AQ in 2003. Methods The prevalence of the wild type pfcrt allele was assessed in 144 isolates from the years 2005 - 07 by PCR fragment restriction digest and direct sequencing. For haplotype analysis of the chromosomal regions flanking the pfcrt locus, microsatellite analysis was done on a total of 145 isolates obtained in 1995/96 (43 isolates, 2002 (47 isolates and 2005 - 07 (55 isolates. Results The prevalence of the mutant pfcrt allele decreased from 100% in the years 1995/96 and 2002 to 97% in 2005 - 07. Haplotype analysis showed that in 1995/96 79% of the isolates carried the same microsatellite alleles in a chromosomal fragment spanning 39 kb surrounding the pfcrt locus. In 2002 and 2005 - 07 the prevalence of this haplotype was 62% and 58%, respectively. Pfcrt haplotype analysis showed that all wild type alleles were CVMNK. Conclusion Four years after the withdrawal of CQ from national treatment guidelines the prevalence of the mutant pfcrt allele remains at 97%. The data suggest that the combination of artesunate plus AQ may result in continued selection for the mutant pfcrt haplotype even after discontinuance of CQ usage.

  4. Near infrared spectra indicate specific mutant endosperm genes and reveal a new mechanism for substituting starch with (1-->3,1-->4)-[beta]-glucan in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, L.; Møller, B.; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2004-01-01

    Near Infrared Reflectance spectroscopy was tested as a screening method to characterise high lysine mutants from a barley collection by classification through Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Mean spectra of the samples within each cluster identified gene-specific patterns in the 2270-2360 nm ...

  5. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the epsilon subunit of the F1-F0 ATP synthase from Escherichia coli reveals two classes of mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, H; Vik, S B

    1995-10-06

    Alanine-scanning mutagenesis was applied to the epsilon subunit of the F1-F0 ATP synthase from E. coli. Nineteen amino acid residues were changed to alanine, either singly or in pairs, between residues 10 and 93. All mutants, when expressed in the epsilon deletion strain XH1, were able to grow on succinate minimal medium. Membranes were prepared from all mutants and assayed for ATP-driven proton translocation, ATP hydrolysis +/- lauryldiethylamine oxide, and sensitivity of ATPase activity to N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Most of the mutants fell into 2 distinct classes. The first group had inhibited ATPase activity, with near normal levels of membrane-bound F1, but decreased sensitivity to DCCD. The second group had stimulated ATPase activity, with a reduced level of membrane-bound F1, but normal sensitivity to DCCD. Membranes from all mutants were further characterized by immunoblotting using 2 monoclonal antibodies. A model for the secondary structure of epsilon and its role in the function of the ATP synthase has been developed. Some residues are important for the binding of epsilon to F1 and therefore for inhibition. Other residues, from Glu-59 through Glu-70, are important for the release of inhibition by epsilon that is part of the normal enzyme cycle.

  6. High-throughput sequencing of Campylobacter jejuni insertion mutant libraries reveals mapA as a fitness factor for chicken colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Livny, Jonathan; Dirita, Victor J

    2014-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of gastrointestinal infections worldwide, due primarily to its ability to asymptomatically colonize the gastrointestinal tracts of agriculturally relevant animals, including chickens. Infection often occurs following consumption of meat that was contaminated by C. jejuni during harvest. Because of this, much interest lies in understanding the mechanisms that allow C. jejuni to colonize the chicken gastrointestinal tract. To address this, we generated a C. jejuni transposon mutant library that is amenable to insertion sequencing and introduced this mutant pool into day-of-hatch chicks. Following deep sequencing of C. jejuni mutants in the cecal outputs, several novel factors required for efficient colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract were identified, including the predicted outer membrane protein MapA. A mutant strain lacking mapA was constructed and found to be significantly reduced for chicken colonization in both competitive infections and monoinfections. Further, we found that mapA is required for in vitro competition with wild-type C. jejuni but is dispensable for growth in monoculture.

  7. Genome-wide CRISPR screens reveal a Wnt-FZD5 signaling circuit as a druggable vulnerability of RNF43-mutant pancreatic tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhart, Zachary; Pavlovic, Zvezdan; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Hart, Traver; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Robitaille, Mélanie; Brown, Kevin R; Jaksani, Sridevi; Overmeer, René; Boj, Sylvia F; Adams, Jarrett; Pan, James; Clevers, Hans; Sidhu, Sachdev; Moffat, Jason; Angers, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetic screens with CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing enable high-resolution detection of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer cells. We conducted genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screens in RNF43-mutant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which rely on Wnt signaling for proliferation. Through thes

  8. Functional Analysis of the Fusarielin Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

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    Aida Droce

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusarielins are polyketides with a decalin core produced by various species of Aspergillus and Fusarium. Although the responsible gene cluster has been identified, the biosynthetic pathway remains to be elucidated. In the present study, members of the gene cluster were deleted individually in a Fusarium graminearum strain overexpressing the local transcription factor. The results suggest that a trans-acting enoyl reductase (FSL5 assists the polyketide synthase FSL1 in biosynthesis of a polyketide product, which is released by hydrolysis by a trans-acting thioesterase (FSL2. Deletion of the epimerase (FSL3 resulted in accumulation of an unstable compound, which could be the released product. A novel compound, named prefusarielin, accumulated in the deletion mutant of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase FSL4. Unlike the known fusarielins from Fusarium, this compound does not contain oxygenized decalin rings, suggesting that FSL4 is responsible for the oxygenation.

  9. Altered expression of the caffeine synthase gene in a naturally caffeine-free mutant of Coffea arabica

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    Mirian Perez Maluf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we studied the biosynthesis of caffeine by examining the expression of genes involved in this biosynthetic pathway in coffee fruits containing normal or low levels of this substance. The amplification of gene-specific transcripts during fruit development revealed that low-caffeine fruits had a lower expression of the theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase genes and also contained an extra transcript of the caffeine synthase gene. This extra transcript contained only part of exon 1 and all of exon 3. The sequence of the mutant caffeine synthase gene revealed the substitution of isoleucine for valine in the enzyme active site that probably interfered with enzymatic activity. These findings indicate that the absence of caffeine in these mutants probably resulted from a combination of transcriptional regulation and the presence of mutations in the caffeine synthase amino acid sequence.

  10. Structural characterization of a mixed-linkage glucan deficient mutant reveals alteration in cellulose microfibril orientation in rice coleoptile mesophyll cell walls

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    Andreia Michelle Smith-Moritz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The CELLULOSE SYNTHASE-LIKE F6 (CslF6 gene was previously shown to mediate the biosynthesis of mixed-linkage glucan (MLG, a cell wall polysaccharide that is hypothesized to be a tightly associated with cellulose and also have a role in cell expansion in the primary cell wall of young seedlings in grass species. We have recently shown that loss-of-function cslf6 rice mutants do not accumulate MLG in most vegetative tissues. Despite the absence of a structurally important polymer, MLG, these mutants are unexpectedly viable and only show a moderate growth compromise compared to wild type. Therefore these mutants are ideal biological systems to test the current grass cell wall model. In order to gain a better understanding of the role of MLG in the primary wall, we performed in-depth compositional and structural analyses of the cell walls of three day-old rice seedlings using various biochemical and novel microspectroscopic approaches. We found that cellulose content as well as matrix polysaccharide composition was not significantly altered in the MLG deficient mutant. However, we observed a significant change in cellulose microfibril bundle organization in mesophyll cell walls of the cslf6 mutant. Using synchrotron source Fourier Transform Mid-Infrared Spectromicroscopy for high-resolution imaging, we determined that the bonds associated with cellulose and arabinoxylan, another major component of the primary cell was of grasses, were in a lower energy configuration compared to wild type, suggesting a slightly weaker primary wall in MLG deficient mesophyll cells. Taken together, these results suggest that MLG may influence cellulose deposition in mesophyll cell walls without significantly affecting anisotropic growth thus challenging MLG importance in cell wall expansion.

  11. Phenotype and transcriptome analysis reveals chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis together influenced the leaf color formation in mutants of Anthurium andraeanum ‘Sonate’

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    Yuxia eYang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf color is one of the well-sought traits in breeding program for Anthurium andraeanum Lind.. Knowledge of mechanisms in anthuriums to produce leaves with different shades of green would help to effectively select desirable traits. In this study, the micro- and ultra-structural and physiological features of leaves on wild type and leaf color mutants (dark green, rubescent, etiolated, albino in A. andraeanum ‘Sonate’ were analyzed. Results show that chloroplasts of leaf color mutants exhibited abnormal morphology and distribution. Using next generation sequencing technology followed by de novo assembly, leaf transcriptomes comprising of 41,017 unigenes with an average sequence length of 768bp were produced from wild type and rubescent mutant. From the 27,539 (67.1% unigenes with annotated functions, 858 significantly differently expressed genes (DEGs were identified, consisting of 446 up-regulated genes and 412 down-regulated genes. Genes that affect chloroplasts development and division, and chlorophyll biosynthesis were included in the down-regulated DEGs. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis validated that the expression level of those genes was significantly lower in the rubescent, etiolated and albino mutant compared to wild type plants, which concurs with the differences in micro- and ultra-structures and physiological features between these two types of plants. Conclusively, the leaf color formation is greatly affected by the activity of chloroplast development and pigment biosynthesis. And the possible formation pathway of leaf color mutant of Anthurium andraeanum ‘Sonate’ is deduced based on our results.

  12. Purine biosynthetic genes are required for cadmium tolerance in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speiser, D.M.; Ortiz, D.F.; Kreppel, L.; Scheel, G.; McDonald, G.; Ow, D.W. (Dept. of Agriculture, Albany, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are metal-chelating peptides produced in plants and some fungi in response to heavy metal exposure. A Cd-sensitive mutant of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, defective in production of a PC-Cd-sulfide complex essential for metal tolerance, was found to harbor mutations in specific genes of the purine biosynthetic pathway. Genetic analysis of the link between metal complex accumulation and purine biosynthesis enzymes revealed that genetic lesions blocking two segments of the pathway, before and after the IMP branchpoint, are required to produce the Cd-sensitive phenotype. The biochemical functions of these two segments of the pathway are similar, and a model based on the alternate use of a sulfur analog substrate is presented. The novel participation of purine biosynthesis enzymes in the conversion of the PC-Cd complex to the PC-Cd-sulfide complex in the fission yeast raises an intriguing possibility that these same enzymes might have a role in sulfur metabolism in the fission yeast S. pombe, and perhaps in other biological systems. 41 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Ligand-induced movements of inner transmembrane helices of Glut1 revealed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants.

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    Mike Mueckler

    Full Text Available The relative orientation and proximity of the pseudo-symmetrical inner transmembrane helical pairs 5/8 and 2/11 of Glut1 were analyzed by chemical cross-linking of di-cysteine mutants. Thirteen functional di-cysteine mutants were created from a C-less Glut1 reporter construct containing cysteine substitutions in helices 5 and 8 or helices 2 and 11. The mutants were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and the sensitivity of each mutant to intramolecular cross-linking by two homobifunctional thiol-specific reagents was ascertained by protease cleavage followed by immunoblot analysis. Five of 9 mutants with cysteine residues predicted to lie in close proximity to each other were susceptible to cross-linking by one or both reagents. None of 4 mutants with cysteine substitutions predicted to lie on opposite faces of their respective helices was susceptible to cross-linking. Additionally, the cross-linking of a di-cysteine pair (A70C/M420C, helices 2/11 predicted to lie near the exoplasmic face of the membrane was stimulated by ethylidene glucose, a non-transported glucose analog that preferentially binds to the exofacial substrate-binding site, suggesting that the binding of this ligand stimulates the closure of helices at the exoplasmic face of the membrane. In contrast, the cross-linking of a second di-cysteine pair (T158C/L325, helices 5/8, predicted to lie near the cytoplasmic face of the membrane, was stimulated by cytochalasin B, a glucose transport inhibitor that competitively inhibits substrate efflux, suggesting that this compound recruits the transporter to a conformational state in which closure of inner helices occurs at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. This observation provides a structural explanation for the competitive inhibition of substrate efflux by cytochalasin B. These data indicate that the binding of competitive inhibitors of glucose efflux or influx induce occluded states in the transporter in which substrate is excluded from

  14. The amino-terminal region of the neuraminidase protein from avian H5N1 influenza virus is important for its biosynthetic transport to the host cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Guomin; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Li, Hua; Wei, Haitao; Zhu, Xiaomei; Chen, Yuhai; Chen, Ji-Long

    2014-12-01

    Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA) is a major viral envelope glycoprotein, which plays a critical role in viral infection. Although NA functional domains have been determined previously, the precise role of the amino acids located at the N-terminus of avian H5N1 NA for protein expression and intracellular transport to the host plasma membrane is not fully understood. In the present study, a series of N-terminal truncation or deletion mutants of H5N1 NA were generated and their expression and intracellular trafficking were investigated. Protein expression from mutants NAΔ20, NAΔ35, NAΔ40, NAΔ7-20 and NAΔ7-35 was undetectable by immunoblotting and by performing NA activity assays. Mutants NAΔ6, NAΔ11 and NAΔ15-20 showed a marked decreased in protein expression, whereas mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15 displayed a slight increase in protein expression, compared with that of the native NA protein. These data suggest that amino acid residues 16-20 are vital for NA protein expression, while amino acids 7-15 might suppress NA protein expression. In deletion mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15 there was an accumulation of NA protein at the juxta-nuclear region, with reduced expression of NA at the cell surface. Although active Cdc42 could promote transport of wild-type NA to the host cell surface, this member of the Rho family of GTPases failed to regulate transport of mutants NAΔ7-15 and NAΔ15. The results of the study reveal that amino acid residues 7-15 of H5N1 NA are critical for its biosynthetic transport to the host cell surface.

  15. Seed shape in model legumes: approximation by a cardioid reveals differences in ethylene insensitive mutants of Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Emilio; Martín, José Javier; Chan, Pick Kuen; Gresshoff, Peter M; Tocino, Ángel

    2012-09-15

    Seed shape in the model legumes Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula is described. Based in previous work with Arabidopsis, the outline of the longitudinal sections of seeds is compared with a cardioid curve. L. japonicus seeds adjust well to an unmodified cardioid, whereas accurate adjustment in M. truncatula is obtained by the simple transformation of scaling the vertical axis by a factor equal to the Golden Ratio. Adjustments of seed shape measurements with simple geometrical forms are essential tools for the statistical analysis of variations in seed shape under different conditions or in mutants. The efficiency of the adjustment to a cardioid in the model plants suggests that seed morphology may be related to genome complexity. Seeds of ethylene insensitive mutants present differences in size and shape as well as altered responses to imbibition. The biological implication and meaning of these relationships are discussed.

  16. Analysis of an Arabidopsis heat-sensitive mutant reveals that chlorophyll synthase is involved in reutilization of chlorophyllide during chlorophyll turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yao-Pin; Lee, Tsung-yuan; Tanaka, Ayumi; Charng, Yee-yung

    2014-10-01

    Chlorophylls, the most abundant pigments in the photosynthetic apparatus, are constantly turned over as a result of the degradation and replacement of the damage-prone reaction center D1 protein of photosystem II. Results from isotope labeling experiments suggest that chlorophylls are recycled by reutilization of chlorophyllide and phytol, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, by characterization of a heat-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant we provide evidence of a salvage pathway for chlorophyllide a. A missense mutation in CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG) was identified and confirmed to be responsible for a light-dependent, heat-induced cotyledon bleaching phenotype. Following heat treatment, mutant (chlg-1) but not wild-type seedlings accumulated a substantial level of chlorophyllide a, which resulted in a surge of phototoxic singlet oxygen. Immunoblot analysis suggested that the mutation destabilized the chlorophyll synthase proteins and caused a conditional blockage of esterification of chlorophyllide a after heat stress. Accumulation of chlorophyllide a after heat treatment occurred during recovery in the dark in the light-grown but not the etiolated seedlings, suggesting that the accumulated chlorophyllides were not derived from de novo biosynthesis but from de-esterification of the existing chlorophylls. Further analysis of the triple mutant harboring the CHLG mutant allele and null mutations of CHLOROPHYLLASE1 (CLH1) and CLH2 indicated that the known chlorophyllases are not responsible for the accumulation of chlorophyllide a in chlg-1. Taken together, our results show that chlorophyll synthase acts in a salvage pathway for chlorophyll biosynthesis by re-esterifying the chlorophyllide a produced during chlorophyll turnover.

  17. Metabolic flux analysis of Escherichia coli creB and arcA mutants reveals shared control of carbon catabolism under microaerobic growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I; Zhu, Jiangfeng; San, Ka-Yiu; Méndez, Beatriz S; Bennett, George N

    2009-09-01

    Escherichia coli has several elaborate sensing mechanisms for response to availability of oxygen and other electron acceptors, as well as the carbon source in the surrounding environment. Among them, the CreBC and ArcAB two-component signal transduction systems are responsible for regulation of carbon source utilization and redox control in response to oxygen availability, respectively. We assessed the role of CreBC and ArcAB in regulating the central carbon metabolism of E. coli under microaerobic conditions by means of (13)C-labeling experiments in chemostat cultures of a wild-type strain, DeltacreB and DeltaarcA single mutants, and a DeltacreB DeltaarcA double mutant. Continuous cultures were conducted at D = 0.1 h(-1) under carbon-limited conditions with restricted oxygen supply. Although all experimental strains metabolized glucose mainly through the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, mutant strains had significantly lower fluxes in both the oxidative and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathways. Significant differences were also found at the pyruvate branching point. Both pyruvate-formate lyase and the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex contributed to acetyl-coenzyme A synthesis from pyruvate, and their activity seemed to be modulated by both ArcAB and CreBC. Strains carrying the creB deletion showed a higher biomass yield on glucose compared to the wild-type strain and its DeltaarcA derivative, which also correlated with higher fluxes from building blocks to biomass. Glyoxylate shunt and lactate dehydrogenase were active mainly in the DeltaarcA strain. Finally, it was observed that the tricarboxylic acid cycle reactions operated in a rather cyclic fashion under our experimental conditions, with reduced activity in the mutant strains.

  18. Characterization of multiple SPS knockout mutants reveals redundant functions of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase isoforms in plant viability, and strongly indicates that enhanced respiration and accelerated starch turnover can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaji, Abdellatif; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Muñoz, Francisco José; Romero, Jose M; Ruiz, María Teresa; Baslam, Marouane; Almagro, Goizeder; Sesma, María Teresa; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-09-01

    We characterized multiple knock-out mutants of the four Arabidopsis sucrose phosphate synthase (SPSA1, SPSA2, SPSB and SPSC) isoforms. Despite their reduced SPS activity, spsa1/spsa2, spsa1/spsb, spsa2/spsb, spsa2/spsc, spsb/spsc, spsa1/spsa2/spsb and spsa2/spsb/spsc mutants displayed wild type (WT) vegetative and reproductive morphology, and showed WT photosynthetic capacity and respiration. In contrast, growth of rosettes, flowers and siliques of the spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc mutants was reduced compared with WT plants. Furthermore, these plants displayed a high dark respiration phenotype. spsa1/spsb/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsb/spsc seeds poorly germinated and produced aberrant and sterile plants. Leaves of all viable sps mutants, except spsa1/spsc and spsa1/spsa2/spsc, accumulated WT levels of nonstructural carbohydrates. spsa1/spsc leaves possessed high levels of metabolic intermediates and activities of enzymes of the glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid cycle pathways, and accumulated high levels of metabolic intermediates of the nocturnal starch-to-sucrose conversion process, even under continuous light conditions. Results presented in this work show that SPS is essential for plant viability, reveal redundant functions of the four SPS isoforms in processes that are important for plant growth and nonstructural carbohydrate metabolism, and strongly indicate that accelerated starch turnover and enhanced respiration can alleviate the blockage of sucrose biosynthesis in spsa1/spsc leaves.

  19. Genetic Correction of SOD1 Mutant iPSCs Reveals ERK and JNK Activated AP1 as a Driver of Neurodegeneration in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

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    Akshay Bhinge

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although mutations in several genes with diverse functions have been known to cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, it is unknown to what extent causal mutations impinge on common pathways that drive motor neuron (MN-specific neurodegeneration. In this study, we combined induced pluripotent stem cells-based disease modeling with genome engineering and deep RNA sequencing to identify pathways dysregulated by mutant SOD1 in human MNs. Gene expression profiling and pathway analysis followed by pharmacological screening identified activated ERK and JNK signaling as key drivers of neurodegeneration in mutant SOD1 MNs. The AP1 complex member JUN, an ERK/JNK downstream target, was observed to be highly expressed in MNs compared with non-MNs, providing a mechanistic insight into the specific degeneration of MNs. Importantly, investigations of mutant FUS MNs identified activated p38 and ERK, indicating that network perturbations induced by ALS-causing mutations converge partly on a few specific pathways that are drug responsive and provide immense therapeutic potential.

  20. Metabolic Flux Analysis of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 ΔnrtABCD Mutant Reveals a Mechanism for Metabolic Adaptation to Nitrogen-Limited Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tsubasa; Yoshikawa, Katsunori; Toya, Yoshihiro; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Metabolic flux redirection during nitrogen-limited growth was investigated in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 glucose-tolerant (GT) strain under photoautotrophic conditions by isotopically non-stationary metabolic flux analysis (INST-MFA). A ΔnrtABCD mutant of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was constructed to reproduce phenotypes arising during nitrogen starvation. The ΔnrtABCD mutant and the wild-type GT strain were cultured under photoautotrophic conditions by a photobioreactor. Intracellular metabolites were labeled over a time course using NaH13CO3 as a carbon source. Based on these data, the metabolic flux distributions in the wild-type and ΔnrtABCD cells were estimated by INST-MFA. The wild-type GT and ΔnrtABCD strains displayed similar distribution patterns, although the absolute levels of metabolic flux were lower in ΔnrtABCD. Furthermore, the relative flux levels for glycogen metabolism, anaplerotic reactions and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway were increased in ΔnrtABCD. This was probably due to the increased expression of enzyme genes that respond to nitrogen depletion. Additionally, we found that the ratio of ATP/NADPH demand increased slightly in the ΔnrtABCD mutant. These results indicated that futile ATP consumption increases under nitrogen-limited conditions because the Calvin-Benson cycle and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway form a metabolic futile cycle that consumes ATP without CO2 fixation and NADPH regeneration.

  1. Acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of fALS-linked SOD1 mutants as revealed using circular dichroism and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Nishiya, Ken; Miura, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu

    2016-11-01

    The acquisition of pro-oxidant activity of the mutated form of human Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) has been investigated to clarify the relationship between mutations in SOD1 and the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Ala4 → Val (A4V) and Gly93 → Ala (G93A) mutants, which are representative ALS-linked SOD1 mutants, have been found to exhibit both the denaturation and the gain of pro-oxidant activity after incubation in the apo-form at a physiological condition of 37 °C and pH 7.4 and the rebinding of Cu2+. These characteristics are similar to those previously reported for the His43 → Arg (H43R) mutant. UV-resonance Raman spectra indicated that the coordination structure of the Cu-binding site catalyzing the oxidation reaction is the same among the denatured A4V, G93A, and H43R. Since wild-type SOD1 does not exhibit the denaturation in its apo-form at 37 °C and pH 7.4, the instability of the protein structure due to mutation can be considered as a significant factor that induces the denaturation and the subsequent pro-oxidant activity.

  2. Survey of volatile oxylipins and their biosynthetic precursors in bryophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2010-04-01

    Oxylipins are metabolites which are derived from the oxidative fragmentation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. These metabolites play central roles in plant hormonal regulation and defense. Here we survey the production of volatile oxylipins in bryophytes and report the production of a high structural variety of C5, C6, C8 and C9 volatiles of mosses. In liverworts and hornworts oxylipin production was not as pronounced as in the 23 screened mosses. A biosynthetic investigation revealed that both, C18 and C20 fatty acids serve as precursors for the volatile oxylipins that are mainly produced after mechanical wounding of the green tissue of mosses.

  3. Origin of saxitoxin biosynthetic genes in cyanobacteria.

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    Ahmed Moustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP is a potentially fatal syndrome associated with the consumption of shellfish that have accumulated saxitoxin (STX. STX is produced by microscopic marine dinoflagellate algae. Little is known about the origin and spread of saxitoxin genes in these under-studied eukaryotes. Fortuitously, some freshwater cyanobacteria also produce STX, providing an ideal model for studying its biosynthesis. Here we focus on saxitoxin-producing cyanobacteria and their non-toxic sisters to elucidate the origin of genes involved in the putative STX biosynthetic pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated a draft genome assembly of the saxitoxin-producing (STX+ cyanobacterium Anabaena circinalis ACBU02 and searched for 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes (named sxtA to sxtZ that were recently identified in the toxic strain Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii T3. We also generated a draft assembly of the non-toxic (STX- sister Anabaena circinalis ACFR02 to aid the identification of saxitoxin-specific genes. Comparative phylogenomic analyses revealed that nine putative STX genes were horizontally transferred from non-cyanobacterial sources, whereas one key gene (sxtA originated in STX+ cyanobacteria via two independent horizontal transfers followed by fusion. In total, of the 26 candidate saxitoxin-genes, 13 are of cyanobacterial provenance and are monophyletic among the STX+ taxa, four are shared amongst STX+ and STX-cyanobacteria, and the remaining nine genes are specific to STX+ cyanobacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence that the assembly of STX genes in ACBU02 involved multiple HGT events from different sources followed presumably by coordination of the expression of foreign and native genes in the common ancestor of STX+ cyanobacteria. The ability to produce saxitoxin was subsequently lost multiple independent times resulting in a nested relationship of STX+ and STX- strains among Anabaena

  4. Genetic localization and in vivo characterization of a Monascus azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bijinu; Karki, Suman; Chiu, Shih-Hau; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Jae-Won; Nam, Bora; Yoon, Yeo-Min; Chen, Chien-Chi; Kwon, Hyung-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Monascus spp. produce several well-known polyketides such as monacolin K, citrinin, and azaphilone pigments. In this study, the azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster was identified through T-DNA random mutagenesis in Monascus purpureus. The albino mutant W13 bears a T-DNA insertion upstream of a transcriptional regulator gene (mppR1). The transcription of mppR1 and the nearby polyketide synthase gene (MpPKS5) was significantly repressed in the W13 mutant. Targeted inactivation of MpPKS5 also gave rise to an albino mutant, confirming that mppR1 and MpPKS5 belong to an azaphilone pigment biosynthetic gene cluster. This M. purpureus sequence was used to identify the whole biosynthetic gene cluster in the Monascus pilosus genome. MpPKS5 contains SAT/KS/AT/PT/ACP/MT/R domains, and this domain organization is preserved in other azaphilone polyketide synthases. This biosynthetic gene cluster also encodes fatty acid synthase (FAS), which is predicted to assist the synthesis of 3-oxooactanoyl-CoA and 3-oxodecanoyl-CoA. These 3-oxoacyl compounds are proposed to be incorporated into the azaphilone backbone to complete the pigment biosynthesis. A monooxygenase gene (an azaH and tropB homolog) that is located far downstream of the FAS gene is proposed to be involved in pyrone ring formation. A homology search on other fungal genome sequences suggests that this azaphilone pigment gene cluster also exists in the Penicillium marneffei and Talaromyces stipitatus genomes.

  5. Dietary immunosuppressants do not enhance UV-induced skin carcinogenesis, and reveal discordance between p53-mutant early clones and carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskamp, Pieter; Bodmann, Carolien A; Koehl, Gudrun E; Rebel, Heggert G; Van Olderen, Marjolein G E; Gaumann, Andreas; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoel; Tensen, Cornelis P; Bavinck, Jan N Bouwes; Willemze, Rein; Geissler, Edward K; De Gruijl, Frank R

    2013-02-01

    Immunosuppressive drugs are thought to cause the dramatically increased risk of carcinomas in sun-exposed skin of organ transplant recipients. These drugs differ in local effects on skin. We investigated whether this local impact is predictive of skin cancer risk and may thus provide guidance on minimizing the risk. Immunosuppressants (azathioprine, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and rapamycin) were assessed on altering the UV induction of apoptosis in human skin models and of p53 mutant cell clones (putative tumor precursors) and ensuing skin carcinomas (with mutant p53) in the skin of hairless mice. Rapamycin was found to increase apoptosis (three-fold), whereas cyclosporine decreased apoptosis (three-fold). Correspondingly, a 1.5- to five-fold reduction (P = 0.07) or a two- to three-fold increase (P UV-exposed skin of mice that had been fed rapamycin or cyclosporine, respectively. Deep sequencing showed, however, that the allelic frequency (∼5%) of the hotspot mutations in p53 (codons 270 and 275) remained unaffected. The majority of cells with mutated p53 seemed not to overexpress the mutated protein. Unexpectedly, none of the immunosuppressants admixed in high dosages to the diet accelerated tumor development, and cyclosporine even delayed tumor onset by approximately 15% (P < 0.01). Thus, in contrast to earlier findings, the frequency of p53-mutant cells was not predictive of the incidence of skin carcinoma. Moreover, the lack of any accelerative effect on tumor development suggests that immunosuppressive medication is not the sole cause of the dramatic increase in skin cancer risk in organ transplant recipients.

  6. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  7. A buoyancy-based screen of Drosophila larvae for fat-storage mutants reveals a role for Sir2 in coupling fat storage to nutrient availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Reis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity has a strong genetic component, but few of the genes that predispose to obesity are known. Genetic screens in invertebrates have the potential to identify genes and pathways that regulate the levels of stored fat, many of which are likely to be conserved in humans. To facilitate such screens, we have developed a simple buoyancy-based screening method for identifying mutant Drosophila larvae with increased levels of stored fat. Using this approach, we have identified 66 genes that when mutated increase organismal fat levels. Among these was a sirtuin family member, Sir2. Sirtuins regulate the storage and metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids by deacetylating key regulatory proteins. However, since mammalian sirtuins function in many tissues in different ways, it has been difficult to define their role in energy homeostasis accurately under normal feeding conditions. We show that knockdown of Sir2 in the larval fat body results in increased fat levels. Moreover, using genetic mosaics, we demonstrate that Sir2 restricts fat accumulation in individual cells of the fat body in a cell-autonomous manner. Consistent with this function, changes in the expression of metabolic enzymes in Sir2 mutants point to a shift away from catabolism. Surprisingly, although Sir2 is typically upregulated under conditions of starvation, Sir2 mutant larvae survive better than wild type under conditions of amino-acid starvation as long as sugars are provided. Our findings point to a Sir2-mediated pathway that activates a catabolic response to amino-acid starvation irrespective of the sugar content of the diet.

  8. Metabolite profiling of two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Thomas; Meuleye, Bertrand Seumo; Miller, Andreas; Shu, Qing-Yao; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2007-12-26

    Two low phytic acid (lpa) rice mutant lines, Os-lpa-XS110-1 and Os-lpa-XS110-2, were grown together with their parent wild-type variety Xiushui 110 in four field trials. HPLC analysis of inositol phosphates in the seeds produced demonstrated that compared to the wild-type, the reduction in phytic acid content in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (-46%) was more pronounced than that in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (-23%). Lower inositol phosphates (InsP 3, InsP 4, InsP 5) were not detected in the mutants. The lpa mutants and the wild-type rice were subjected to comparative metabolite profiling by capillary gas chromatography. On average, 34% (Os-lpa-XS110-1) and 42% (Os-lpa-XS110-2) of the detected peaks were statistically significantly different between wild-type and mutants. However, only a few of these differences could be consistently observed for all field trials. Identification and quantification of the consistently different metabolites revealed that contents of myo-inositol and raffinose were increased in Os-lpa-XS110-1 but decreased in Os-lpa-XS110-2 compared to the wild-type. In addition, Os-lpa-XS110-1 exhibited increased levels of galactose and galactinol. Consideration of these metabolic changes in light of the routes involved in the biosynthesis of phytic acid indicated a disturbance in the early biosynthetic pathway of phytic acid in Os-lpa-XS110-2 (similar to the lpa-1 type mutation in maize) and a mutation event affecting phosphorylation of myo-inositol in Os-lpa-XS110-1 (similar to the lpa-3-type mutation).

  9. Transcriptome profiling reveals differential gene expression in proanthocyanidin biosynthesis associated with red/green skin color mutant of pear (Pyrus communis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan eYang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanin concentration is the key determinant for red skin color in pear fruit. However, the molecular basis for development of red skin is complicated and has not been well understood thus far. ‘Starkrimson’ (Pyrus communis L., an introduced red pear cultivated in the north of China and its green mutant provides a desirable red/green pair for identification of candidate genes involved in color variation. Here, we sequenced and annotated the transcriptome for the red /green color mutant at three stages of development using Illumina RNA-seq technology. The total number of mapped reads ranged from 26 to 46 million in six libraries. About 70.11-71.95% of clean reads could be mapped to the reference genome. Compared with green colored fruit, a total of 2,230 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in red fruit. Gene Ontology (GO terms were defined for 4,886 differential transcripts involved in 15 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. Three DEGs were identified as candidate genes in the flavonoid pathway, LAR, ANR and C3H. Tellingly, higher expression was found for genes encoding ANR and LAR in the green color mutant, promoting the proanthocyanidin (PA pathway and leading to lower anthocyanin. MYB-binding cis-motifs were identified in the promoter region of LAR and ANR. Based on these findings, we speculate that the regulation of PA biosynthesis might be a key factor for this red/green color mutant. Besides the known MYB and MADS transcription families, two new families, AP2 and WRKY, were identified as having high correlation with anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned pear. In addition, qRT-PCR was used to confirm the transcriptome results for 17 DEGs, high correlation of gene expression, further proved that AP2 and WARK regulated the anthocyanin biosynthesis in red skinned ‘Starkrimson’, and ANR and LAR promote PA biosynthesis and contribute to the green skinned variant. This study can serve as a valuable

  10. A triple-emission fluorescent probe reveals distinctive amyloid fibrillar polymorphism of wild-type alpha-synuclein and its familial Parkinson's disease mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celej, M Soledad; Caarls, Wouter; Demchenko, Alexander P; Jovin, Thomas M

    2009-08-11

    Intracytoplasmic neuronal deposits containing amyloid fibrils of the 140-amino acid presynaptic protein alpha-synuclein (AS) are the hallmark of Parkinson's (PD) disease and related neurodegenerative disorders. Three point mutations (A53T, A30P, and E46K) are linked to early onset PD. Compared to the wild-type (WT) protein, the mutants aggregate faster in vitro, but their fibrillar products are quite similar. Using the extrinsic multiple-emission probe 4'-(diethylamino)-3-hydroxyflavone (FE), we demonstrate unique and distinct spectroscopic signatures for the amyloid fibrils formed by the WT and mutant AS, presumably indicative of subtle differences in supramolecular structure. The two well-separated emission bands of the FE probe originate from a proton transfer reaction in the excited state. The ratiometric response constitutes a sensitive, tunable reporter of microenvironmental properties such as polarity and hydrogen bonding. The very distinctive fluorescence spectra of the FE probe bound to the four AS variants reflect different tautomeric equilibria in the excited state and the existence of at least two different binding sites in the fibrils for the dye. Deconvolution of the two-dimensional excitation-emission spectra leads to estimations of different local dielectric constants and extents of hydration characteristic of the proteins. The sensitivity of such a simple external probe to conformational alterations induced by point mutations is unprecedented and provides new insight into key phenomena related to amyloid fibrils: plasticity, polymorphism, propagation of structural features, and structure-function relationships underlying toxicity.

  11. Characterization of temperature-sensitive mutants reveals a role for receptor-like kinase SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG in coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation during Arabidopsis leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zhong, Si-Hui; Cui, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jianming; He, Zu-Hua

    2012-12-01

    The balance between cell proliferation and cell differentiation is essential for leaf patterning. However, identification of the factors coordinating leaf patterning and cell growth behavior is challenging. Here, we characterized a temperature-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant with leaf blade and venation defects. We mapped the mutation to the sub-2 allele of the SCRAMBLED/STRUBBELIG (SCM/SUB) receptor-like kinase gene whose functions in leaf development have not been demonstrated. The sub-2 mutant displayed impaired blade development, asymmetric leaf shape and altered venation patterning under high ambient temperature (30°C), but these defects were less pronounced at normal growth temperature (22°C). Loss of SCM/SUB function results in reduced cell proliferation and abnormal cell expansion, as well as altered auxin patterning. SCM/SUB is initially expressed throughout leaf primordia and becomes restricted to the vascular cells, coinciding with its roles in early leaf patterning and venation formation. Furthermore, constitutive expression of the SCM/SUB gene also restricts organ growth by inhibiting the transition from cell proliferation to expansion. We propose the existence of a SCM/SUB-mediated developmental stage-specific signal for leaf patterning, and highlight the importance of the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation for leaf morphogenesis.

  12. Genetic background impacts soluble and cell wall-bound aromatics in brown midrib mutants of sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the effects that genetic background has on two sorghum brown midrib (bmr) mutants, plant phenolics, lignin biosynthetic enzymes and stem anatomy were evaluated in wild-type (WT), bmr-6, bmr-12 and double-mutants (bmr-6 and bmr-12) in near isogenic , RTx430 and Wheatland backgrounds. The...

  13. Lifespan extension and paraquat resistance in a ubiquinone-deficient Escherichia coli mutant depend on transcription factors ArcA and TdcA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonidakis, Stavros; Finkel, Steven E; Longo, Valter D

    2011-03-01

    We recently reported a genome-wide screen for extended stationary phase survival in Escherichia coli. One of the mutants recovered is deleted for ubiG, which encodes a methyltransferase required for the biosynthesis of ubiquinone. The ubiG mutant exhibits longer lifespan, as well as enhanced resistance to thermal and oxidative stress compared to wt at extracellular pH9. The longevity of the mutant, as well as its resistance to the superoxide-generating agent paraquat, is partially dependent on the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ArcA. A microarray analysis revealed several genes whose expression is either suppressed or enhanced by ArcA in the ubiG mutant. TdcA is a transcription factor involved in the transport and metabolism of amino acids during anaerobic growth. Its enhanced expression in the ubiG mutant is dependent on ArcA. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that ArcA and TdcA function in the same genetic pathway to increase lifespan and enhance oxidative stress resistance in the ubiG mutant. Our results might be relevant for the elucidation of the mechanism of lifespan extension in mutant mice and worms bearing mutations in ubiquinone biosynthetic genes.

  14. Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, M.H.; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Cummings, Matthew; Biggins, J.B.; Blin, Kai; Bruijn, De Irene; Chooi, Yit Heng; Claesen, Jan; Coates, R.C.; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Duddela, Srikanth; Düsterhus, Stephanie; Edwards, Daniel J.; Fewer, David P.; Garg, Neha; Geiger, Christoph; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Greule, Anja; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Haines, Anthony S.; Helfrich, Eric J.N.; Hillwig, Matthew L.; Ishida, Keishi; Jones, Adam C.; Jones, Carla S.; Jungmann, Katrin; Kegler, Carsten; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kötter, Peter; Krug, Daniel; Masschelein, Joleen; Melnik, Alexey V.; Mantovani, Simone M.; Monroe, Emily A.; Moore, Marcus; Moss, Nathan; Nützmann, Hans Wilhelm; Pan, Guohui; Pati, Amrita; Petras, Daniel; Reen, F.J.; Rosconi, Federico; Rui, Zhe; Tian, Zhenhua; Tobias, Nicholas J.; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Wiemann, Philipp; Wyckoff, Elizabeth; Yan, Xiaohui; Yim, Grace; Yu, Fengan; Xie, Yunchang; Aigle, Bertrand; Apel, Alexander K.; Balibar, Carl J.; Balskus, Emily P.; Barona-Gómez, Francisco; Bechthold, Andreas; Bode, Helge B.; Borriss, Rainer; Brady, Sean F.; Brakhage, Axel A.; Caffrey, Patrick; Cheng, Yi Qiang; Clardy, Jon; Cox, Russell J.; Mot, De René; Donadio, Stefano; Donia, Mohamed S.; Donk, Van Der Wilfred A.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Doyle, Sean; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Entian, Karl Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.; Gross, Harald; Gust, Bertolt; Hertweck, Christian; Höfte, Monica; Jensen, Susan E.; Ju, Jianhua; Katz, Leonard; Kaysser, Leonard; Klassen, Jonathan L.; Keller, Nancy P.; Kormanec, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Kwon, Hyung Jin; Lautru, Sylvie; Lavigne, Rob; Lee, Chia Y.; Linquan, Bai; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Wen; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Mahmud, Taifo; Mast, Yvonne; Méndez, Carmen; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Micklefield, Jason; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Moore, Bradley S.; Moreira, Leonilde M.; Müller, Rolf; Neilan, Brett A.; Nett, Markus; Nielsen, Jens; O'Gara, Fergal; Oikawa, Hideaki; Osbourn, Anne; Osburne, Marcia S.; Ostash, Bohdan; Payne, Shelley M.; Pernodet, Jean Luc; Petricek, Miroslav; Piel, Jörn; Ploux, Olivier; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Salas, José A.; Schmitt, Esther K.; Scott, Barry; Seipke, Ryan F.; Shen, Ben; Sherman, David H.; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smanski, Michael J.; Sosio, Margherita; Stegmann, Evi; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Tahlan, Kapil; Thomas, Christopher M.; Tang, Yi; Truman, Andrew W.; Viaud, Muriel; Walton, Jonathan D.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Weber, Tilmann; Wezel, Van Gilles P.; Wilkinson, Barrie; Willey, Joanne M.; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerard D.; Ziemert, Nadine; Zhang, Changsheng; Zotchev, Sergey B.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploi

  15. Analysis of a naturally-occurring deletion mutant of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus reveals sf58 as a new per os infectivity factor of lepidopteran-infecting baculoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Oihane; Palma, Leopoldo; Williams, Trevor; López-Ferber, Miguel; Caballero, Primitivo

    2012-01-01

    The Nicaraguan population of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus, SfMNPV-NIC, is structured as a mixture of nine genotypes (A-I). Occlusion bodies (OBs) of SfMNPV-C, -D and -G pure genotypes are incapable of oral transmission; a phenotype which in SfMNPV-C and -D is due to the absence of pif1 and pif2 genes. The complete sequence of the SfMNPV-G genome was determined to identify possible factors involved in this phenotype. Deletions of 4860 bp (22,366-27,225) and 60 bp (119,759-119,818) were observed in SfMNPV-G genome compared with that of the predominant complete genotype SfMNPV-B (132,954 bp). However no genes homologous to previously described per os infectivity factors were located within the deleted sequences. Significant differences were detected in the nucleotide sequence in sf58 gene (unknown function) that produced changes in the amino acid sequence and the predicted secondary structure of the corresponding protein. This gene is conserved only in lepidopteran baculoviruses (alpha- and betabaculoviruses). To determine the role of sf58 in peroral infectivity a deletion mutant was constructed using bacmid technology. OBs of the deletion mutant (Sf58null) were not orally infectious for S. frugiperda larvae, whereas Sf58null rescue virus OBs recovered oral infectivity. Sf58null DNA and occlusion derived virions (ODVs) were as infective as SfMNPV bacmid DNA and ODVs in intrahemocelically infected larvae or cell culture, indicating that defects in ODV or OB morphogenesis were not involved in the loss of peroral infectivity. Addition of optical brightener or the presence of the orally infectious SfMNPV-B OBs in mixtures with SfMNPV-G OBs did not recover Sf58null OB infectivity. According to these results sf58 is a new per os infectivity factor present only in lepidopteran baculoviruses.

  16. The biosynthetic gene cluster for the beta-lactam carbapenem thienamycin in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Luz Elena; Méndez, Carmen; Braña, Alfredo F; Blanco, Gloria; Salas, José A

    2003-04-01

    beta-lactam ring formation in carbapenem and clavam biosynthesis proceeds through an alternative mechanism to the biosynthetic pathway of classic beta-lactam antibiotics. This involves the participation of a beta-lactam synthetase. Using available information from beta-lactam synthetases, we generated a probe for the isolation of the thienamycin cluster from Streptomyces cattleya. Genes homologous to carbapenem and clavulanic acid biosynthetic genes have been identified. They would participate in early steps of thienamycin biosynthesis leading to the formation of the beta-lactam ring. Other genes necessary for the biosynthesis of thienamycin have also been identified in the cluster (methyltransferases, cysteinyl transferases, oxidoreductases, hydroxylase, etc.) together with two regulatory genes, genes involved in exportation and/or resistance, and a quorum sensing system. Involvement of the cluster in thienamycin biosynthesis was demonstrated by insertional inactivation of several genes generating thienamycin nonproducing mutants.

  17. Characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of rebeccamycin from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaka, Hiroyasu; Taniguchi, Shin-ichi; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Furumai, Tamotsu

    2003-01-01

    The biosynthetic gene cluster for rebeccamycin, an indolocarbazole antibiotic, from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243 has 11 ORFs. To clarify their functions, mutants with rebG, rebD, rebC, rebP, rebM, rebR, rebH, rebT, or orfD2 disrupted were constructed, and the gene products were examined. rebP disruptants produced 11,11'-dichlorochromopyrrolic acid, found to be a biosynthetic intermediate by a bioconversion experiment. Other genes encoded N-glycosyltransferase (rebG), monooxygenase (rebC), methyltransferase (rebM), a transcriptional activator (rebR), and halogenase (rebH). rebT disruptants produced rebeccamycin as much as the wild strain, so rebT was probably not involved in rebeccamycin production. Biosynthetic genes of staurosporine, an another indolocarbazole antibiotic, were cloned from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274. staO, staD, and staP were similar to rebO, rebD, and rebP, respectively, all of which are responsible for indolocarbazole biosynthesis, But a rebC homolog, encoding a putative enzyme oxidizing the C-7 site of pyrrole rings, was not found in the staurosporine biosynthetic gene cluster. These results suggest that indolocarbazole is constructed by oxidative decarboxylation of chromopyrrolic acid (11,11'-dichlorochromopyrrolic acid in rebeccamycin) generated from two molecules of tryptophan by coupling and that the oxidation state at the C-7 position depends on the additional enzyme(s) encoded by the biosynthetic genes.

  18. Global Proteomic Profiling of the Secretome of Candida albicans ecm33 Cell Wall Mutant Reveals the Involvement of Ecm33 in Sap2 Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Bona, Ana; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-10-02

    Candida albicans secretes numerous proteins related to cell wall remodeling, adhesion, nutrient acquisition and host interactions. Also, extracellular vesicles containing cytoplasmic proteins are secreted into the medium. The C. albicans ecm33/ecm33 mutant (RML2U) presents an altered cell wall and is avirulent. The proteomic analysis of proteins secreted by RML2U cells identified a total of 170 proteins: 114 and 154 of which correspond to the vesicle-free secretome and extracellular vesicles, respectively. Notably, 98 proteins were common to both samples, and the groups most represented were metabolic and cell wall-related proteins. The results of this study showed that RML2U had an altered pattern of proteins secreted by the classical secretion pathway as well as the formation of extracellular vesicles, including their size, quantity, and protein composition. Specifically, the secretion of aspartic protease 2 (Sap2) was compromised but not its intracellular expression, with bovine serum albumin (BSA) degradation by RML2U being altered when BSA was used as the sole nitrogen source. Furthermore, as recent research links the expression of Sap2 to the TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) signaling pathway, the sensitivity of RML2U to rapamycin (the inhibitor of TOR kinase) was tested and found to be enhanced, connecting Ecm33 with this pathway.

  19. LC–MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1-Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-04-04

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity, and metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC–MS)-based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2);daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the upregulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complexes I, II, III, and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative of spatiotemporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. Finally, this restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves and possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways to sustain longevity.

  20. LC-MS Proteomics Analysis of the Insulin/IGF-1 Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans daf-2(e1370) Mutant Reveals Extensive Restructuring of Intermediary Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depuydt, Geert G.; Xie, Fang; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smolders, Arne; Brewer, Heather M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Braeckman, Bart P.

    2014-02-20

    The insulin/IGF-1 receptor is a major known determinant of dauer formation, stress resistance, longevity and metabolism in C. elegans. In the past, whole-genome transcript profiling was used extensively to study differential gene expression in response to reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling, including expression levels of metabolism-associated genes. Taking advantage of the recent developments in quantitative liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry (LC-MS) based proteomics, we profiled the proteomic changes that occur in response to activation of the DAF-16 transcription factor in the germline-less glp-4(bn2); daf-2(e1370) receptor mutant. Strikingly, the daf-2 profile suggests extensive reorganization of intermediary metabolism, characterized by the up-regulation of many core intermediary metabolic pathways. These include, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, glycogenesis, pentose phosphate cycle, citric acid cycle, glyoxylate shunt, fatty acid β-oxidation, one-carbon metabolism, propionate and tyrosine catabolism, and complex I, II, III and V of the electron transport chain. Interestingly, we found simultaneous activation of reciprocally regulated metabolic pathways, which is indicative for spatio-temporal coordination of energy metabolism and/or extensive post-translational regulation of these enzymes. This restructuring of daf-2 metabolism is reminiscent to that of hypometabolic dauers, allowing the efficient and economical utilization of internal nutrient reserves, possibly also shunting metabolites through alternative energy-generating pathways, in order to sustain longevity.

  1. Polyketide synthase chemistry does not direct biosynthetic divergence between 9- and 10-membered enediynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsman, Geoff P; Chen, Yihua; Thorson, Jon S; Shen, Ben

    2010-06-22

    Enediynes are potent antitumor antibiotics that are classified as 9- or 10-membered according to the size of the enediyne core structure. However, almost nothing is known about enediyne core biosynthesis, and the determinants of 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence remain elusive. Previous work identified enediyne-specific polyketide synthases (PKSEs) that can be phylogenetically distinguished as being involved in 9- versus 10-membered enediyne biosynthesis, suggesting that biosynthetic divergence might originate from differing PKSE chemistries. Recent in vitro studies have identified several compounds produced by the PKSE and associated thioesterase (TE), but condition-dependent product profiles make it difficult to ascertain a true catalytic difference between 9- and 10-membered PKSE-TE systems. Here we report that PKSE chemistry does not direct 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence as revealed by comparing the products from three 9-membered and two 10-membered PKSE-TE systems under identical conditions using robust in vivo assays. Three independent experiments support a common catalytic function for 9- and 10-membered PKSEs by the production of a heptaene metabolite from: (i) all five cognate PKSE-TE pairs in Escherichia coli; (ii) the C-1027 and calicheamicin cognate PKSE-TEs in Streptomyces lividans K4-114; and (iii) selected native producers of both 9- and 10-membered enediynes. Furthermore, PKSEs and TEs from different 9- and 10-membered enediyne biosynthetic machineries are freely interchangeable, revealing that 9- versus 10-membered enediyne core biosynthetic divergence occurs beyond the PKSE-TE level. These findings establish a starting point for determining the origins of this biosynthetic divergence.

  2. Biosynthetic multitasking facilitates thalassospiramide structural diversity in marine bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Ross, Avena C.

    2013-01-23

    Thalassospiramides A and B are immunosuppressant cyclic lipopeptides first reported from the marine α-proteobacterium Thalassospira sp. CNJ-328. We describe here the discovery and characterization of an extended family of 14 new analogues from four Tistrella and Thalassospira isolates. These potent calpain 1 protease inhibitors belong to six structure classes in which the length and composition of the acylpeptide side chain varies extensively. Genomic sequence analysis of the thalassospiramide-producing microbes revealed related, genus-specific biosynthetic loci encoding hybrid nonribosomal peptide synthetase/polyketide synthases consistent with thalassospiramide assembly. The bioinformatics analysis of the gene clusters suggests that structural diversity, which ranges from the 803.4 Da thalassospiramide C to the 1291.7 Da thalassospiramide F, results from a complex sequence of reactions involving amino acid substrate channeling and enzymatic multimodule skipping and iteration. Preliminary biochemical analysis of the N-terminal nonribosomal peptide synthetase module from the Thalassospira TtcA megasynthase supports a biosynthetic model in which in cis amino acid activation competes with in trans activation to increase the range of amino acid substrates incorporated at the N terminus. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Insights into fluorometabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces cattleya DSM46488 through genome sequence and knockout mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chunhua; Li, Peng; Deng, Zixin; Ou, Hong-Yu; McGlinchey, Ryan P; O'Hagan, David

    2012-10-01

    Streptomyces cattleya DSM 46488 is unusual in its ability to biosynthesise fluorine containing natural products, where it can produce fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine. The individual enzymes involved in fluorometabolite biosynthesis have already been demonstrated in in vitro investigations. Candidate genes for the individual biosynthetic steps were located from recent genome sequences. In vivo inactivation of individual genes including those encoding the S-adenosyl-l-methionine:fluoride adenosyltransferase (fluorinase, SCATT_41540), 5'-fluoro-5'-deoxyadenosine phosphorylase (SCATT_41550), fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase (SCATT_41470), 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose-1-phosphate isomerase (SCATT_20080) and a 4-fluorothreonine acetaldehyde transaldolase (SCATT_p11780) confirm that they are essential for fluorometabolite production. Notably gene disruption of the transaldolase (SCATT_p11780) resulted in a mutant which could produce fluoroacetate but was blocked in its ability to biosynthesise 4-fluorothreonine, revealing a branchpoint role for the PLP-transaldolase.

  4. Limiting Cholesterol Biosynthetic Flux Spontaneously Engages Type I IFN Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Autumn G; Williams, Kevin J; Argus, Joseph P; Zhou, Quan D; Brar, Gurpreet; Vergnes, Laurent; Gray, Elizabeth E; Zhen, Anjie; Wu, Nicholas C; Yamada, Douglas H; Cunningham, Cameron R; Tarling, Elizabeth J; Wilks, Moses Q; Casero, David; Gray, David H; Yu, Amy K; Wang, Eric S; Brooks, David G; Sun, Ren; Kitchen, Scott G; Wu, Ting-Ting; Reue, Karen; Stetson, Daniel B; Bensinger, Steven J

    2015-12-17

    Cellular lipid requirements are achieved through a combination of biosynthesis and import programs. Using isotope tracer analysis, we show that type I interferon (IFN) signaling shifts the balance of these programs by decreasing synthesis and increasing import of cholesterol and long chain fatty acids. Genetically enforcing this metabolic shift in macrophages is sufficient to render mice resistant to viral challenge, demonstrating the importance of reprogramming the balance of these two metabolic pathways in vivo. Unexpectedly, mechanistic studies reveal that limiting flux through the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway spontaneously engages a type I IFN response in a STING-dependent manner. The upregulation of type I IFNs was traced to a decrease in the pool size of synthesized cholesterol and could be inhibited by replenishing cells with free cholesterol. Taken together, these studies delineate a metabolic-inflammatory circuit that links perturbations in cholesterol biosynthesis with activation of innate immunity.

  5. Porphyrin Binding to Gun4 Protein, Facilitated by a Flexible Loop, Controls Metabolite Flow through the Chlorophyll Biosynthetic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopečná, Jana; Cabeza de Vaca, Israel; Adams, Nathan B P; Davison, Paul A; Brindley, Amanda A; Hunter, C Neil; Guallar, Victor; Sobotka, Roman

    2015-11-20

    In oxygenic phototrophs, chlorophylls, hemes, and bilins are synthesized by a common branched pathway. Given the phototoxic nature of tetrapyrroles, this pathway must be tightly regulated, and an important regulatory role is attributed to magnesium chelatase enzyme at the branching between the heme and chlorophyll pathway. Gun4 is a porphyrin-binding protein known to stimulate in vitro the magnesium chelatase activity, but how the Gun4-porphyrin complex acts in the cell was unknown. To address this issue, we first performed simulations to determine the porphyrin-docking mechanism to the cyanobacterial Gun4 structure. After correcting crystallographic loop contacts, we determined the binding site for magnesium protoporphyrin IX. Molecular modeling revealed that the orientation of α6/α7 loop is critical for the binding, and the magnesium ion held within the porphyrin is coordinated by Asn-211 residue. We also identified the basis for stronger binding in the Gun4-1 variant and for weaker binding in the W192A mutant. The W192A-Gun4 was further characterized in magnesium chelatase assay showing that tight porphyrin binding in Gun4 facilitates its interaction with the magnesium chelatase ChlH subunit. Finally, we introduced the W192A mutation into cells and show that the Gun4-porphyrin complex is important for the accumulation of ChlH and for channeling metabolites into the chlorophyll biosynthetic pathway.

  6. Metabolite profiling of two novel low phytic acid (lpa) soybean mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Thomas; Nörenberg, Svenja; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2009-07-22

    A GC-based approach was applied to compare the metabolite profiles of two low phytic acid (lpa) soybean mutants and their respective wild-types. The lpa mutants (Gm-lpa-TW75-1 and Gm-lpa-ZC-2) were grown together with the wild-types (Taiwan 75 and Zhechun no. 3) in three and four field trials, respectively. HPLC analysis revealed a phytic acid reduction of -53% for Gm-lpa-TW75-1 and of -46% for Gm-lpa-ZC-2. For Gm-lpa-TW75-1, no accumulation of lower inositol phosphates was observed, whereas Gm-lpa-ZC-2 exhibited significantly increased contents of the lower inositol phosphates InsP(3), InsP(4), and InsP(5) compared to the corresponding wild-type. The metabolite profiling revealed that compared to the wild-types, 40% (Gm-lpa-TW75-1) and 21% (Gm-lpa-ZC-2) of the detected peaks were statistically significantly different in the lpa mutants grown at one field trial. However, the majority of these differences were shown to be related to environmental impact and natural variability rather than to the mutation event. Identification of consistent metabolic changes in the lpa mutants revealed decreased contents of myo-inositol, galactinol, raffinose, stachyose, and the galactosyl cyclitols galactopinitol A, galactopinitol B, and fagopyritol B1 compared to the wild-type. These consistently pronounced changes in Gm-lpa-TW75-1 confirmed the suggested mutation target. Consideration of the metabolic changes observed for Gm-lpa-ZC-2 (accumulation of lower inositol phosphates and increased myo-inositol contents) indicated a mutation event affecting the latter biosynthetic steps leading to phytic acid. The study demonstrated the applicability of metabolite profiling for the detection of changes in the metabolite phenotype induced by mutation breeding and its power in assisting in the elucidation of mutation events.

  7. Emergent biosynthetic capacity in simple microbial communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Chao Chiu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Microbes have an astonishing capacity to transform their environments. Yet, the metabolic capacity of a single species is limited and the vast majority of microorganisms form complex communities and join forces to exhibit capabilities far exceeding those achieved by any single species. Such enhanced metabolic capacities represent a promising route to many medical, environmental, and industrial applications and call for the development of a predictive, systems-level understanding of synergistic microbial capacity. Here we present a comprehensive computational framework, integrating high-quality metabolic models of multiple species, temporal dynamics, and flux variability analysis, to study the metabolic capacity and dynamics of simple two-species microbial ecosystems. We specifically focus on detecting emergent biosynthetic capacity--instances in which a community growing on some medium produces and secretes metabolites that are not secreted by any member species when growing in isolation on that same medium. Using this framework to model a large collection of two-species communities on multiple media, we demonstrate that emergent biosynthetic capacity is highly prevalent. We identify commonly observed emergent metabolites and metabolic reprogramming patterns, characterizing typical mechanisms of emergent capacity. We further find that emergent secretion tends to occur in two waves, the first as soon as the two organisms are introduced, and the second when the medium is depleted and nutrients become limited. Finally, aiming to identify global community determinants of emergent capacity, we find a marked association between the level of emergent biosynthetic capacity and the functional/phylogenetic distance between community members. Specifically, we demonstrate a "Goldilocks" principle, where high levels of emergent capacity are observed when the species comprising the community are functionally neither too close, nor too distant. Taken together

  8. Characterization and Fine Mapping of a Necrotic Leaf Mutant in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lijing Wang; Shuai Han; Shiyi Zhong; Haizhong Wei; Yanjun Zhang; Yan Zhao; Baoshen Liu

    2013-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) is a commercially important crop.Its yield can be reduced by mutations in biosynthetic and degradative pathways that cause death.In this paper,we describe the necrotic leaf (nec-t) mutant,which was obtained from an inbred line,81647.The nec-t mutant plants had yellow leaves with necrotic spots,reduced chlorophyll content,and the etiolated seedlings died under normal growth conditions.Transmission electron microscopy revealed scattered thylakoids,and reduced numbers of grana lamellae and chloroplasts per cell.Histochemical staining suggested that spot formation of nec-t leaves might be due to cell death.Genetic analysis showed that necrosis was caused by the mutation of a recessive locus.Using simple sequence repeat markers,the Nec-t gene was mapped between mmc0111 and bnlg2277 on the short arm of chromosome 2.A total of 1287 individuals with the mutant phenotype from a F2 population were used for physical mapping.The Nec-t gene was located between markers T31 and H8 within a physical region of 131.7 kb.

  9. Characterization of algG encoding C5-epimerase in the alginate biosynthetic gene cluster of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, A; Mathee, K; Franklin, M J; Giacomini, A; O'Regan, M; Ohman, D E

    2001-10-31

    The organization of the alginate gene cluster in Pseudomonas fluorescens was characterized. A bank of genomic DNA from P. fluorescens was mobilized to a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a transposon insertion (algJ::Tn501) in the alginate biosynthetic operon that rendered it non-mucoid. Phenotypic complementation in this heterologous host was observed, and a complementing clone containing 32 kb of P. fluorescens DNA was obtained. Southern hybridization studies showed that genes involved in alginate biosynthesis (e.g. algD, algG, and algA) were approximately in the same order and position as in P. aeruginosa. When the clone was mobilized to a P. aeruginosa algG mutant that produced alginate as polymannuronate due to its C5-epimerase defect, complementation was observed and the alginate from the recombinant strain contained L-guluronate as determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A sequence analysis of the P. fluorescens DNA containing algG revealed sequences similar to P. aeruginosa algG that were also flanked by algE- and algX-like sequences. The predicted AlgG amino acid sequence of P. fluorescens was 67% identical (80% similar) to P. aeruginosa AlgG and 60% identical (76% similar) to Azotobacter vinelandii AlgG. As in P. aeruginosa, AlgG from P. fluorescens appeared to have a signal sequence that would localize it to the periplasm where AlgG presumably acts as a C5-epimerase at the polymer level. Non-polar algG knockout mutants of P. fluorescens were defective in alginate production, suggesting a potential role for this protein in polymer formation.

  10. Clonal analysis of kit ligand a functional expression reveals lineage-specific competence to promote melanocyte rescue in the mutant regenerating caudal fin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Tryon

    Full Text Available The study of regeneration in an in vivo vertebrate system has the potential to reveal targetable genes and pathways that could improve our ability to heal and repair damaged tissue. We have developed a system for clonal labeling of discrete cell lineages and independently inducing gene expression under control of the heat shock promoter in the zebrafish caudal fin. Consequently we are able to test the affects of overexpressing a single gene in the context of regeneration within each of the nine different cell lineage classes that comprise the caudal fin. This can test which lineage is necessary or sufficient to provide gene function. As a first example to demonstrate this approach, we explored which lineages were competent to functionally express the kit ligand a protein as assessed by the local complementation of the mutation in the sparse-like (kitlgatc244b background. We show that dermal fibroblast expression of kit ligand a robustly supports the rescue of melanocytes in the regenerating caudal fin. kit ligand a expression from skin and osteoblasts results in more modest and variable rescue of melanocytes, while lateral line expression was unable to complement the mutation.

  11. Analysis of Drosophila p8 and p52 mutants reveals distinct roles for the maintenance of TFIIH stability and male germ cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Becerra, Grisel; Juárez, Mandy; Valadez-Graham, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is activated by factors that interact within complex machinery to initiate transcription. An important component of this machinery is the DNA repair/transcription factor TFIIH. Mutations in TFIIH result in three human syndromes: xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Transcription and DNA repair defects have been linked to some clinical features of these syndromes. However, how mutations in TFIIH affect specific developmental programmes, allowing organisms to develop with particular phenotypes, is not well understood. Here, we show that mutations in the p52 and p8 subunits of TFIIH have a moderate effect on the gene expression programme in the Drosophila testis, causing germ cell differentiation arrest in meiosis, but no Polycomb enrichment at the promoter of the affected differentiation genes, supporting recent data that disagree with the current Polycomb-mediated repression model for regulating gene expression in the testis. Moreover, we found that TFIIH stability is not compromised in p8 subunit-depleted testes that show transcriptional defects, highlighting the role of p8 in transcription. Therefore, this study reveals how defects in TFIIH affect a specific cell differentiation programme and contributes to understanding the specific syndrome manifestations in TFIIH-afflicted patients.

  12. Sugars as the optimal biosynthetic carbon substrate of aqueous life throughout the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Our previous analysis of the energetics of metabolism showed that both the biosynthesis of amino acids and lipids from sugars, and the fermentation of organic substrates, were energetically driven by electron transfer reactions resulting in carbon redox disproportionation (Weber, 1997). Redox disproportionation--the spontaneous (energetically favorable) direction of carbon group transformation in biosynthesis--is brought about and driven by the energetically downhill transfer of electron pairs from more oxidized carbon groups (with lower half-cell reduction potentials) to more reduced carbon groups (with higher half-cell reduction potentials). In this report, we compare the redox and kinetic properties of carbon groups in order to evaluate the relative biosynthetic capability of organic substrates, and to identify the optimal biosubstrate. This analysis revealed that sugars (monocarbonyl alditols) are the optimal biosynthetic substrate because they contain the maximum number of biosynthetically useful high energy electrons/carbon atom while still containing a single carbonyl group needed to kinetically facilitate their conversion to useful biosynthetic intermediates. This conclusion applies to aqueous life throughout the Universe because it is based on invariant aqueous carbon chemistry--primarily, the universal reduction potentials of carbon groups.

  13. Metabolic engineering of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway in the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (Phaffia rhodozyma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdoes, Jan C; Sandmann, Gerhard; Visser, Hans; Diaz, Maria; van Mossel, Minca; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2003-07-01

    The crtYB locus was used as an integrative platform for the construction of specific carotenoid biosynthetic mutants in the astaxanthin-producing yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The crtYB gene of X. dendrorhous, encoding a chimeric carotenoid biosynthetic enzyme, could be inactivated by both single and double crossover events, resulting in non-carotenoid-producing transformants. In addition, the crtYB gene, linked to either its homologous or a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter, was overexpressed in the wild type and a beta-carotene-accumulating mutant of X. dendrorhous. In several transformants containing multiple copies of the crtYB gene, the total carotenoid content was higher than in the control strain. This increase was mainly due to an increase of the beta-carotene and echinone content, whereas the total content of astaxanthin was unaffected or even lower. Overexpression of the phytoene synthase-encoding gene (crtI) had a large impact on the ratio between mono- and bicyclic carotenoids. Furthermore, we showed that in metabolic engineered X. dendrorhous strains, the competition between the enzymes phytoene desaturase and lycopene cyclase for lycopene governs the metabolic flux either via beta-carotene to astaxanthin or via 3,4-didehydrolycopene to 3-hydroxy-3'-4'-didehydro-beta-psi-caroten-4-one (HDCO). The monocylic carotenoid torulene and HDCO, normally produced as minority carotenoids, were the main carotenoids produced in these strains.

  14. Characterization of a Salmonella typhimurium mutant defective in phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochimsen, Bjarne; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Garber, Bruce B.;

    1985-01-01

    This study describes the isolation and characterization of a mutant (strain GP122) of Salmonella typhimurium with a partial deficiency of phosphoribosylpyrophosphate (PRPP) synthetase activity. This strain was isolated in a purE deoD gpt purine auxotroph by a procedure designed to select guanosine......-utilizing mutants. Strain GP122 had roughly 15% of the PRPP synthetase activity and 25% of the PRPP pool of its parent strain. The mutant exhibited many of the predicted consequences of a decreased PRPP pool and a defective PRPP synthetase enzyme, including: poor growth on purine bases; decreased accumulation of 5...... phosphoribosyltransferase, enzymes involved in the pyrimidine de novo biosynthetic pathway; growth stimulation by PRPP-sparing compounds (e.g. guanosine, histidine); poor growth in low phosphate medium; and increased heat lability of the defective enzyme. This mutant strain also had increased levels of guanosine 5...

  15. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  16. Isolation and characterization of the Arabidopsis heat-intolerant 2 (hit2) mutant reveal the essential role of the nuclear export receptor EXPORTIN1A (XPO1A) in plant heat tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shin-Jye; Wang, Lian-Chin; Yeh, Ching-Hui; Lu, Chun-An; Wu, Shaw-Jye

    2010-06-01

    *The Arabidopsis heat-intolerant 2 (hit2) mutant was isolated on the basis of its impaired ability to withstand moderate heat stress (37 degrees C). Determination of the genetic mutation that underlies the hit2 thermosensitive phenotype allowed better understanding of the mechanisms by which plants cope with heat stress. *Genetic analysis revealed that hit2 is a single recessive mutation. Map-based cloning was used to identify the hit2 locus. The response of hit2 to other types of heat stress was also investigated to characterize the protective role of HIT2. *hit2 was defective in basal but not in acquired thermotolerance. hit2 was sensitive to methyl viologen-induced oxidative stress, and the survival of hit2 seedlings in response to heat stress was affected by light conditions. The mutated locus was located at the EXPORTIN1A (XPO1A) gene, which encodes a nuclear transport receptor. Two T-DNA insertion lines, xpo1a-1 and xpo1a-3, exhibited the same phenotypes as hit2. *The results provide evidence that Arabidopsis XPO1A is dispensable for normal plant growth and development but is essential for thermotolerance, in part by mediating the protection of plants against heat-induced oxidative stress.

  17. Genome mining of the hitachimycin biosynthetic gene cluster: involvement of a phenylalanine-2,3-aminomutase in biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Koichi; Uchino, Asuka; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Numakura, Mario; Takayanagi, Ryuichi; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2015-04-13

    Hitachimycin is a macrolactam antibiotic with (S)-β-phenylalanine (β-Phe) at the starter position of its polyketide skeleton. To understand the incorporation mechanism of β-Phe and the modification mechanism of the unique polyketide skeleton, the biosynthetic gene cluster for hitachimycin in Streptomyces scabrisporus was identified by genome mining. The identified gene cluster contains a putative phenylalanine-2,3-aminomutase (PAM), five polyketide synthases, four β-amino-acid-carrying enzymes, and a characteristic amidohydrolase. A hitA knockout mutant showed no hitachimycin production, but antibiotic production was restored by feeding with (S)-β-Phe. We also confirmed the enzymatic activity of the HitA PAM. The results suggest that the identified gene cluster is responsible for the biosynthesis of hitachimycin. A plausible biosynthetic pathway for hitachimycin, including a unique polyketide skeletal transformation mechanism, is proposed.

  18. Aspergillus nidulans as a platform for discovery and characterization of complex biosynthetic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anyaogu, Diana Chinyere

    andfeed. Secondary metabolites therefore both have a positive and deleterious impact on the human health.The increase in available genome sequences of fungi has revealed that there is a large number of putativesecondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters to be discovered and potentially exploited...... of secondary metabolites and 2) Developing A. nidulans as a model systemfor protein production with human-like glycan structure.  The first part of this study resulted in the development of a method for the transfer and expression ofintact biosynthetic gene clusters to A. nidulans to facilitate pathway...... and product discovery. As proof ofconcept the biosynthetic gene cluster for production of the polyketide geodin was identified andtransferred from A. terreus to A. nidulans. The cluster was integrated in a well characterized locus in A.nidulans. Reconstitution of the cluster resulted in the production...

  19. Structures of Bacterial Biosynthetic Arginine Decarboxylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F Forouhar; S Lew; J Seetharaman; R Xiao; T Acton; G Montelione; L Tong

    2011-12-31

    Biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC; also known as SpeA) plays an important role in the biosynthesis of polyamines from arginine in bacteria and plants. SpeA is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme and shares weak sequence homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases. Here, the crystal structure of PLP-bound SpeA from Campylobacter jejuni is reported at 3.0 {angstrom} resolution and that of Escherichia coli SpeA in complex with a sulfate ion is reported at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of the SpeA monomer contains two large domains, an N-terminal TIM-barrel domain followed by a {beta}-sandwich domain, as well as two smaller helical domains. The TIM-barrel and {beta}-sandwich domains share structural homology with several other PLP-dependent decarboxylases, even though the sequence conservation among these enzymes is less than 25%. A similar tetramer is observed for both C. jejuni and E. coli SpeA, composed of two dimers of tightly associated monomers. The active site of SpeA is located at the interface of this dimer and is formed by residues from the TIM-barrel domain of one monomer and a highly conserved loop in the {beta}-sandwich domain of the other monomer. The PLP cofactor is recognized by hydrogen-bonding, {pi}-stacking and van der Waals interactions.

  20. Neurosteroid biosynthetic pathways changes in prefrontal cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Sabina; Bossers, Koen; Van de Bilt, Saskia; Agrapart, Vincent; Morales, Rafael Ramirez; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-11-01

    Expression of the genes for enzymes involved in neurosteroid biosynthesis was studied in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=49). Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that mRNA levels of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), which is involved in the first step of steroidogenesis and in GABAergic transmission, were increased, as were mRNA levels for several neurosteroid biosynthetic enzymes. Aromatase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD17B1) and aldo-keto reductase 1C2 (AKR1C2), were all increased in the late stages of AD. Several GABA-A subunits were significantly reduced in AD. Increased expression of aromatase in the PFC was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was found to be localized predominantly in astrocytes. These data suggest a role for estrogens and allopregnanolone produced by astrocytes in the PFC in AD, possibly as part of a rescue program. The reduced gene expression of some synaptic and extra-synaptic GABA-A subunits may indicate a deficit of modulation of GABA-A receptors by neuroactive steroids, which may contribute to the neuropsychiatric characteristics of this disease.

  1. The Arabidopsis thaliana mutant air1 implicates SOS3 in the regulation of anthocyanins under salt stress

    KAUST Repository

    Van Oosten, Michael James

    2013-08-08

    The accumulation of anthocyanins in plants exposed to salt stress has been largely documented. However, the functional link and regulatory components underlying the biosynthesis of these molecules during exposure to stress are largely unknown. In a screen of second site suppressors of the salt overly sensitive3-1 (sos3-1) mutant, we isolated the anthocyanin-impaired-response-1 (air1) mutant. air1 is unable to accumulate anthocyanins under salt stress, a key phenotype of sos3-1 under high NaCl levels (120 mM). The air1 mutant showed a defect in anthocyanin production in response to salt stress but not to other stresses such as high light, low phosphorous, high temperature or drought stress. This specificity indicated that air1 mutation did not affect anthocyanin biosynthesis but rather its regulation in response to salt stress. Analysis of this mutant revealed a T-DNA insertion at the first exon of an Arabidopsis thaliana gene encoding for a basic region-leucine zipper transcription factor. air1 mutants displayed higher survival rates compared to wild-type in oxidative stress conditions, and presented an altered expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes such as F3H, F3′H and LDOX in salt stress conditions. The results presented here indicate that AIR1 is involved in the regulation of various steps of the flavonoid and anthocyanin accumulation pathways and is itself regulated by the salt-stress response signalling machinery. The discovery and characterization of AIR1 opens avenues to dissect the connections between abiotic stress and accumulation of antioxidants in the form of flavonoids and anthocyanins. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

  2. Stimulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide biosynthetic pathways delays axonal degeneration after axotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yo; Araki, Toshiyuki; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2006-08-16

    Axonal degeneration occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases and after traumatic injury and is a self-destructive program independent from programmed cell death. Previous studies demonstrated that overexpression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (Nmnat1) or exogenous application of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) can protect axons of cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from degeneration caused by mechanical or neurotoxic injury. In mammalian cells, NAD can be synthesized from multiple precursors, including tryptophan, nicotinic acid, nicotinamide, and nicotinamide riboside (NmR), via multiple enzymatic steps. To determine whether other components of these NAD biosynthetic pathways are capable of delaying axonal degeneration, we overexpressed each of the enzymes involved in each pathway and/or exogenously administered their respective substrates in DRG cultures and assessed their capacity to protect axons after axotomy. Among the enzymes tested, Nmnat1 had the strongest protective effects, whereas nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase and nicotinic acid phosphoribosyl transferase showed moderate protective activity in the presence of their substrates. Strong axonal protection was also provided by Nmnat3, which is predominantly located in mitochondria, and an Nmnat1 mutant localized to the cytoplasm, indicating that the subcellular location of NAD production is not crucial for protective activity. In addition, we showed that exogenous application of the NAD precursors that are the substrates of these enzymes, including nicotinic acid mononucleotide, nicotinamide mononucleotide, and NmR, can also delay axonal degeneration. These results indicate that stimulation of NAD biosynthetic pathways via a variety of interventions may be useful in preventing or delaying axonal degeneration.

  3. A genomics based discovery of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borui Pi

    Full Text Available Secondary metabolites (SMs produced by Aspergillus have been extensively studied for their crucial roles in human health, medicine and industrial production. However, the resulting information is almost exclusively derived from a few model organisms, including A. nidulans and A. fumigatus, but little is known about rare pathogens. In this study, we performed a genomics based discovery of SM biosynthetic gene clusters in Aspergillus ustus, a rare human pathogen. A total of 52 gene clusters were identified in the draft genome of A. ustus 3.3904, such as the sterigmatocystin biosynthesis pathway that was commonly found in Aspergillus species. In addition, several SM biosynthetic gene clusters were firstly identified in Aspergillus that were possibly acquired by horizontal gene transfer, including the vrt cluster that is responsible for viridicatumtoxin production. Comparative genomics revealed that A. ustus shared the largest number of SM biosynthetic gene clusters with A. nidulans, but much fewer with other Aspergilli like A. niger and A. oryzae. These findings would help to understand the diversity and evolution of SM biosynthesis pathways in genus Aspergillus, and we hope they will also promote the development of fungal identification methodology in clinic.

  4. Biochemical and histological characterization of tomato mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina C. Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical responses inherent to antioxidant systems as well morphological and anatomical properties of photomorphogenic, hormonal and developmental tomato mutants were investigated. Compared to the non-mutant Micro-Tom (MT, we observed that the malondialdehyde (MDA content was enhanced in the diageotropica (dgt and lutescent (l mutants, whilst the highest levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were observed in high pigment 1 (hp1 and aurea (au mutants. The analyses of antioxidant enzymes revealed that all mutants exhibited reduced catalase (CAT activity when compared to MT. Guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX was enhanced in both sitiens (sit and notabilis (not mutants, whereas in not mutant there was an increase in ascorbate peroxidase (APX. Based on PAGE analysis, the activities of glutathione reductase (GR isoforms III, IV, V and VI were increased in l leaves, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD isoform III was reduced in leaves of sit, epi, Never ripe (Nr and green flesh (gf mutants. Microscopic analyses revealed that hp1 and au showed an increase in leaf intercellular spaces, whereas sit exhibited a decrease. The au and hp1 mutants also exhibited a decreased in the number of leaf trichomes. The characterization of these mutants is essential for their future use in plant development and ecophysiology studies, such as abiotic and biotic stresses on the oxidative metabolism.Neste trabalho, analisamos as respostas bioquímicas inerentes ao sistema antioxidante, assim como propriedades morfológicas e anatômicas de mutantes fotomorfogenéticos e hormonais de tomateiro. Comparados ao não mutante Micro-Tom (MT, observamos que o conteúdo de malondialdeído (MDA aumentou nos mutantes diageotropica (dgt e lutescent (l, enquanto os maiores níveis de H2O2 foram encontrados nos mutantes high pigment 1 (hp1 e aurea (au. Análises de enzimas antioxidantes mostraram que todos os mutantes reduziram a atividade de catalase (CAT quando comparado a MT. A

  5. Role of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, E D; Weigert, C

    2000-09-01

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway has been hypothesized to be involved in the development of insulin resistance and diabetic vascular complications. In particular, it was demonstrated that hyperglycemia-induced production of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1), a prosclerotic cytokine causally involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. Several lines of evidence indicate that TGF-beta1 induction is mediated by the hexosamine pathway. In cultured mesangial cells, high glucose levels induce TGF-beta1 production. This effect is eliminated by inhibition of glutamine: fructose-6-phosphate-amidotransferase (GFAT), the rate-limiting enzyme of this pathway. Furthermore, stable overexpression of GFAT increased levels of TGF-beta1 protein, mRNA, and promoter activity. Inasmuch as stimulation or inhibition of GFAT increased or decreased high glucose-stimulated activity of protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, the observed effects appear to be transduced by PKC. In similar experiments, involvement of the hexosamine pathway in hyperglycemia-induced production of cytokines (TGF-alpha and basic fibroblast growth factor [bFGF]) was demonstrated in vascular smooth muscle cells. These studies also revealed a rapid increase in GFAT activity by treatment with agents that elevated levels of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP), thus indicating that GFAT activity is tightly regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, high expression of GFAT was found in human adipocytes, skeletal muscle, vascular smooth muscle cells, and renal tubular epithelial cells. whereas glomerular cells remained essentially unstained. However, significant staining occurred in glomerular cells of patients with diabetic nephropathy. Current data indicate that the flux through the hexosamine pathway, regulated by GFAT, may be causally involved in the development of diabetic vascular disease, particularly diabetic nephropathy.

  6. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27007394

  7. Natural Product Biosynthetic Diversity and Comparative Genomics of the Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Elke; Gugger, Muriel; Sivonen, Kaarina; Fewer, David P

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria are an ancient lineage of slow-growing photosynthetic bacteria and a prolific source of natural products with intricate chemical structures and potent biological activities. The bulk of these natural products are known from just a handful of genera. Recent efforts have elucidated the mechanisms underpinning the biosynthesis of a diverse array of natural products from cyanobacteria. Many of the biosynthetic mechanisms are unique to cyanobacteria or rarely described from other organisms. Advances in genome sequence technology have precipitated a deluge of genome sequences for cyanobacteria. This makes it possible to link known natural products to biosynthetic gene clusters but also accelerates the discovery of new natural products through genome mining. These studies demonstrate that cyanobacteria encode a huge variety of cryptic gene clusters for the production of natural products, and the known chemical diversity is likely to be just a fraction of the true biosynthetic capabilities of this fascinating and ancient group of organisms.

  8. Ochratoxin A Producing Fungi, Biosynthetic Pathway and Regulatory Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Wang, Liuqing; Liu, Fei; Wang, Qi; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhao, Yueju; Liu, Yang

    2016-03-21

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), mainly produced by Aspergillus and Penicillum species, is one of the most important mycotoxin contaminants in agricultural products. It is detrimental to human health because of its nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and immunosuppression. OTA structurally consists of adihydrocoumarin moiety linked with l-phenylalanine via an amide bond. OTA biosynthesis has been putatively hypothesized, although several contradictions exist on some processes of the biosynthetic pathway. We discuss recent information on molecular studies of OTA biosynthesis despite insufficient genetic background in detail. Accordingly, genetic regulation has also been explored with regard to the interaction between the regulators and the environmental factors. In this review, we focus on three aspects of OTA: OTA-producing strains, OTA biosynthetic pathway and the regulation mechanisms of OTA production. This can pave the way to assist in protecting food and feed from OTA contamination by understanding OTA biosynthetic pathway and regulatory mechanisms.

  9. Evolutionary systems biology of amino acid biosynthetic cost in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Barton

    Full Text Available Every protein has a biosynthetic cost to the cell based on the synthesis of its constituent amino acids. In order to optimise growth and reproduction, natural selection is expected, where possible, to favour the use of proteins whose constituents are cheaper to produce, as reduced biosynthetic cost may confer a fitness advantage to the organism. Quantifying the cost of amino acid biosynthesis presents challenges, since energetic requirements may change across different cellular and environmental conditions. We developed a systems biology approach to estimate the cost of amino acid synthesis based on genome-scale metabolic models and investigated the effects of the cost of amino acid synthesis on Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression and protein evolution. First, we used our two new and six previously reported measures of amino acid cost in conjunction with codon usage bias, tRNA gene number and atomic composition to identify which of these factors best predict transcript and protein levels. Second, we compared amino acid cost with rates of amino acid substitution across four species in the genus Saccharomyces. Regardless of which cost measure is used, amino acid biosynthetic cost is weakly associated with transcript and protein levels. In contrast, we find that biosynthetic cost and amino acid substitution rates show a negative correlation, but for only a subset of cost measures. In the economy of the yeast cell, we find that the cost of amino acid synthesis plays a limited role in shaping transcript and protein expression levels compared to that of translational optimisation. Biosynthetic cost does, however, appear to affect rates of amino acid evolution in Saccharomyces, suggesting that expensive amino acids may only be used when they have specific structural or functional roles in protein sequences. However, as there appears to be no single currency to compute the cost of amino acid synthesis across all cellular and environmental

  10. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids

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    Shinji Kishimoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid, saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid, ergotamine (ergot alkaloid and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid. This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details.

  11. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.; Manzano, D.; Tanic, N.; Pesic, M.; Bankovic, J.; Pateraki, I.; Ricard, L.; Ferrer, A.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Krol, van der A.R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew that a

  12. Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster : commentary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H; Kottmann, Renzo; Yilmaz, Pelin; Cummings, Matthew; Biggins, John B; Blin, Kai; de Bruijn, Irene; Chooi, Yit Heng; Claesen, Jan; Coates, R Cameron; Cruz-Morales, Pablo; Duddela, Srikanth; Dusterhus, Stephanie; Edwards, Daniel J; Fewer, David P; Garg, Neha; Geiger, Christoph; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Greule, Anja; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Haines, Anthony S; Helfrich, Eric J N; Hillwig, Matthew L; Ishida, Keishi; Jones, Adam C; Jones, Carla S; Jungmann, Katrin; Kegler, Carsten; Kim, Hyun Uk; Kotter, Peter; Krug, Daniel; Masschelein, Joleen; Melnik, Alexey V; Mantovani, Simone M; Monroe, Emily A; Moore, Marcus; Moss, Nathan; Nutzmann, Hans-Wilhelm; Pan, Guohui; Pati, Amrita; Petras, Daniel; Reen, F Jerry; Rosconi, Federico; Rui, Zhe; Tian, Zhenhua; Tobias, Nicholas J; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Wiemann, Philipp; Wyckoff, Elizabeth; Yan, Xiaohui; Yim, Grace; Yu, Fengan; Xie, Yunchang; Aigle, Bertrand; Apel, Alexander K; Balibar, Carl J; Balskus, Emily P; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Bechthold, Andreas; Bode, Helge B; Borriss, Rainer; Brady, Sean F; Brakhage, Axel A; Caffrey, Patrick; Cheng, Yi-Qiang; Clardy, Jon; Cox, Russell J; De Mot, Rene; Donadio, Stefano; Donia, Mohamed S; van der Donk, Wilfred A; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Doyle, Sean; Driessen, Arnold J M; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H; Gross, Harald; Gust, Bertolt; Hertweck, Christian; Hofte, Monica; Jensen, Susan E; Ju, Jianhua; Katz, Leonard; Kaysser, Leonard; Klassen, Jonathan L; Keller, Nancy P; Kormanec, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Kwon, Hyung-Jin; Lautru, Sylvie; Lavigne, Rob; Lee, Chia Y; Linquan, Bai; Liu, Xinyu; Liu, Wen; Luzhetskyy, Andriy; Mahmud, Taifo; Mast, Yvonne; Mendez, Carmen; Metsa-Ketela, Mikko; Micklefield, Jason; Mitchell, Douglas A; Moore, Bradley S; Moreira, Leonilde M; Muller, Rolf; Neilan, Brett A; Nett, Markus; Nielsen, Jens; O'Gara, Fergal; Oikawa, Hideaki; Osbourn, Anne; Osburne, Marcia S; Ostash, Bohdan; Payne, Shelley M; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Petricek, Miroslav; Piel, Jorn; Ploux, Olivier; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Salas, Jose A; Schmitt, Esther K; Scott, Barry; Seipke, Ryan F; Shen, Ben; Sherman, David H; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smanski, Michael J; Sosio, Margherita; Stegmann, Evi; Sussmuth, Roderich D; Tahlan, Kapil; Thomas, Christopher M; Tang, Yi; Truman, Andrew W; Viaud, Muriel; Walton, Jonathan D; Walsh, Christopher T; Weber, Tilmann; van Wezel, Gilles P; Wilkinson, Barrie; Willey, Joanne M; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Wright, Gerard D; Ziemert, Nadine; Zhang, Changsheng; Zotchev, Sergey B; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko; Glockner, Frank Oliver

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploit.

  13. Proteomic analyses reveal the key roles of BrlA and AbaA in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang-Soo, E-mail: shinks@dju.kr [Division of Life Science, Daejeon University, Daejeon, 300-716 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Biomedical Omics Team, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI), Ohcang, 368-883 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Analytical Science and Technology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bio-Analytical Science, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae-Hyuk, E-mail: jyu1@wisc.edu [Departments of Bacteriology and Genetics, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI, 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-31

    The opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus primarily reproduces by forming a large number of asexual spores (conidia). Sequential activation of the central regulators BrlA, AbaA and WetA is necessary for the fungus to undergo asexual development. In this study, to address the presumed roles of these key developmental regulators during proliferation of the fungus, we analyzed and compared the proteomes of vegetative cells of wild type (WT) and individual mutant strains. Approximately 1300 protein spots were detectable from 2-D electrophoresis gels. Among these, 13 proteins exhibiting significantly altered accumulation levels were further identified by ESI-MS/MS. Markedly, we found that the GliM and GliT proteins associated with gliotoxin (GT) biosynthesis and self-protection of the fungus from GT were significantly down-regulated in the ΔabaA and ΔbrlA mutants. Moreover, mRNA levels of other GT biosynthetic genes including gliM, gliP, gliT, and gliZ were significantly reduced in both mutant strains, and no and low levels of GT were detectable in the ΔbrlA and ΔabaA mutant strains, respectively. As GliT is required for the protection of the fungus from GT, growth of the ΔbrlA mutant with reduced levels of GliT was severely impaired by exogenous GT. Our studies demonstrate that AbaA and BrlA positively regulate expression of the GT biosynthetic gene cluster in actively growing vegetative cells, and likely bridge morphological and chemical development during the life-cycle of A. fumigatus. - Highlights: • Proteome analyses of WT and mutants reveal 13 differentially expressed proteins. • The GliT and GliM proteins are significantly down-regulated by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Expression of other gliotoxin biosynthetic genes is lowered by ΔabaA and ΔbrlA. • Growth of ΔbrlA strain lacking GliT is completely inhibited by exogenous gliotoxin. • BrlA and AbaA play key roles in biogenesis of gliotoxin in Aspergillus fumigatus.

  14. Molecular Breeding of a Fungus Producing a Precursor Diterpene Suitable for Semi-Synthesis by Dissection of the Biosynthetic Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noike, Motoyoshi; Ono, Yusuke; Araki, Yuji; Tanio, Ryo; Higuchi, Yusuke; Nitta, Hajime; Hamano, Yoshimitsu; Toyomasu, Tomonobu; Sassa, Takeshi; Kato, Nobuo; Dairi, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    Many clinically useful pharmaceuticals are semi-synthesized from natural products produced by actinobacteria and fungi. The synthetic protocols usually contain many complicated reaction steps and thereby result in low yields and high costs. It is therefore important to breed microorganisms that produce a compound most suitable for chemical synthesis. For a long time, desirable mutants have been obtained by random mutagenesis and mass screening. However, these mutants sometimes show unfavorable phenotypes such as low viability and low productivity of the desired compound. Fusicoccin (FC) A is a diterpene glucoside produced by the fungus Phomopsis amygdali. Both FC and the structurally-related cotylenin A (CN) have phytohormone-like activity. However, only CN exhibits anti-cancer activity. Since the CN producer lost its ability to proliferate during preservation, a study on the relationship between structure and activity was carried out, and elimination of the hydroxyl group at position 12 of FC was essential to mimic the CN-like activity. Based on detailed dissection of the biosynthetic machinery, we constructed a mutant producing a compound without a hydroxyl group at position 12 by gene-disruption. The mutant produced this compound as a sole metabolite, which can be easily and efficiently converted into an anti-cancer drug, and its productivity was equivalent to the sum of FC-related compounds produced by the parental strain. Our strategy would be applicable to development of pharmaceuticals that are semi-synthesized from fungal metabolites. PMID:22870285

  15. Molecular breeding of a fungus producing a precursor diterpene suitable for semi-synthesis by dissection of the biosynthetic machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoyoshi Noike

    Full Text Available Many clinically useful pharmaceuticals are semi-synthesized from natural products produced by actinobacteria and fungi. The synthetic protocols usually contain many complicated reaction steps and thereby result in low yields and high costs. It is therefore important to breed microorganisms that produce a compound most suitable for chemical synthesis. For a long time, desirable mutants have been obtained by random mutagenesis and mass screening. However, these mutants sometimes show unfavorable phenotypes such as low viability and low productivity of the desired compound. Fusicoccin (FC A is a diterpene glucoside produced by the fungus Phomopsis amygdali. Both FC and the structurally-related cotylenin A (CN have phytohormone-like activity. However, only CN exhibits anti-cancer activity. Since the CN producer lost its ability to proliferate during preservation, a study on the relationship between structure and activity was carried out, and elimination of the hydroxyl group at position 12 of FC was essential to mimic the CN-like activity. Based on detailed dissection of the biosynthetic machinery, we constructed a mutant producing a compound without a hydroxyl group at position 12 by gene-disruption. The mutant produced this compound as a sole metabolite, which can be easily and efficiently converted into an anti-cancer drug, and its productivity was equivalent to the sum of FC-related compounds produced by the parental strain. Our strategy would be applicable to development of pharmaceuticals that are semi-synthesized from fungal metabolites.

  16. Functional characterization of the vitamin K2 biosynthetic enzyme UBIAD1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Hirota

    Full Text Available UbiA prenyltransferase domain-containing protein 1 (UBIAD1 plays a significant role in vitamin K2 (MK-4 synthesis. We investigated the enzymological properties of UBIAD1 using microsomal fractions from Sf9 cells expressing UBIAD1 by analysing MK-4 biosynthetic activity. With regard to UBIAD1 enzyme reaction conditions, highest MK-4 synthetic activity was demonstrated under basic conditions at a pH between 8.5 and 9.0, with a DTT ≥0.1 mM. In addition, we found that geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate were also recognized as a side-chain source and served as a substrate for prenylation. Furthermore, lipophilic statins were found to directly inhibit the enzymatic activity of UBIAD1. We analysed the aminoacid sequences homologies across the menA and UbiA families to identify conserved structural features of UBIAD1 proteins and focused on four highly conserved domains. We prepared protein mutants deficient in the four conserved domains to evaluate enzyme activity. Because no enzyme activity was detected in the mutants deficient in the UBIAD1 conserved domains, these four domains were considered to play an essential role in enzymatic activity. We also measured enzyme activities using point mutants of the highly conserved aminoacids in these domains to elucidate their respective functions. We found that the conserved domain I is a substrate recognition site that undergoes a structural change after substrate binding. The conserved domain II is a redox domain site containing a CxxC motif. The conserved domain III is a hinge region important as a catalytic site for the UBIAD1 enzyme. The conserved domain IV is a binding site for Mg2+/isoprenyl side-chain. In this study, we provide a molecular mapping of the enzymological properties of UBIAD1.

  17. Differential hexosamine biosynthetic pathway gene expression with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Coomer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP culminates in the attachment of O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc onto serine/threonine residues of target proteins. The HBP is regulated by several modulators, i.e. O-linked β-N-acetylglucosaminyl transferase (OGT and β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (OGA catalyze the addition and removal of O-GlcNAc moieties, respectively; while flux is controlled by the rate-limiting enzyme glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFPT, transcribed by two genes, GFPT1 and GFPT2. Since increased HBP flux is glucose-responsive and linked to insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes onset, we hypothesized that diabetic individuals exhibit differential expression of HBP regulatory genes. Volunteers (n = 60; n = 20 Mixed Ancestry, n = 40 Caucasian were recruited from Stellenbosch and Paarl (Western Cape, South Africa and classified as control, pre- or diabetic according to fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c levels, respectively. RNA was purified from leukocytes isolated from collected blood samples and OGT, OGA, GFPT1 and GFPT2 expressions determined by quantitative real-time PCR. The data reveal lower OGA expression in diabetic individuals (P < 0.01, while pre- and diabetic subjects displayed attenuated OGT expression vs. controls (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively. Moreover, GFPT2 expression decreased in pre- and diabetic Caucasians vs. controls (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively. We also found ethnic differences, i.e. Mixed Ancestry individuals exhibited a 2.4-fold increase in GFPT2 expression vs. Caucasians, despite diagnosis (P < 0.01. Gene expression of HBP regulators differs between diabetic and non-diabetic individuals, together with distinct ethnic-specific gene profiles. Thus differential HBP gene regulation may offer diagnostic utility and provide candidate susceptibility genes for different ethnic groupings.

  18. Expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in developing endosperm of Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Keyu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temporal and spatial expression of fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes are associated with the accumulation of storage lipids in the seeds of oil plants. In jatropha (Jatropha curcas L., a potential biofuel plant, the storage lipids are mainly synthesized and accumulated in the endosperm of seeds. Although the fatty acid and lipid biosynthetic genes in jatropha have been identified, the expression of these genes at different developing stages of endosperm has not been systemically investigated. Results Transmission electron microscopy study revealed that the oil body formation in developing endosperm of jatropha seeds initially appeared at 28 days after fertilization (DAF, was actively developed at 42 DAF and reached to the maximum number and size at 56 DAF. Sixty-eight genes that encode enzymes, proteins or their subunits involved in fatty acid and lipid biosynthesis were identified from a normalized cDNA library of jatropha developing endosperm. Gene expression with quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that the 68 genes could be collectively grouped into five categories based on the patterns of relative expression of the genes during endosperm development. Category I has 47 genes and they displayed a bell-shaped expression pattern with the peak expression at 28 or 42 DAF, but low expression at 14 and 56 DAF. Category II contains 8 genes and expression of the 8 genes was constantly increased from 14 to 56 DAF. Category III comprises of 2 genes and both genes were constitutively expressed throughout endosperm development. Category IV has 9 genes and they showed a high expression at 14 and 28 DAF, but a decreased expression from 42 to 56 DAF. Category V consists of 2 genes and both genes showed a medium expression at 14 DAF, the lowest expression at 28 or 42 DAF, and the highest expression at 56 DAF. In addition, genes encoding enzymes or proteins with similar function were

  19. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kiyohito; Hashimoto, Mikako; Hori, Ryuji; Adachi, Takumi; Okuyama, Hidetoshi; Orikasa, Yoshitake; Nagamine, Tadashi; Shimizu, Satoru; Ueno, Akio; Morita, Naoki

    2016-05-12

    The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase), the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs) such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed.

  20. Bacterial Long-Chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Their Biosynthetic Genes, Functions, and Practical Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyohito Yoshida

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional and pharmaceutical values of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs such as arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids have been well recognized. These LC-PUFAs are physiologically important compounds in bacteria and eukaryotes. Although little is known about the biosynthetic mechanisms and functions of LC-PUFAs in bacteria compared to those in higher organisms, a combination of genetic, bioinformatic, and molecular biological approaches to LC-PUFA-producing bacteria and some eukaryotes have revealed the notably diverse organization of the pfa genes encoding a polyunsaturated fatty acid synthase complex (PUFA synthase, the LC-PUFA biosynthetic processes, and tertiary structures of the domains of this enzyme. In bacteria, LC-PUFAs appear to take part in specific functions facilitating individual membrane proteins rather than in the adjustment of the physical fluidity of the whole cell membrane. Very long chain polyunsaturated hydrocarbons (LC-HCs such as hentriacontanonaene are considered to be closely related to LC-PUFAs in their biosynthesis and function. The possible role of LC-HCs in strictly anaerobic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic environments and the evolutionary relationships of anaerobic and aerobic bacteria carrying pfa-like genes are also discussed.

  1. Identification of a plastidial phenylalanine exporter that influences flux distribution through the phenylalanine biosynthetic network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widhalm, Joshua R; Gutensohn, Michael; Yoo, Heejin; Adebesin, Funmilayo; Qian, Yichun; Guo, Longyun; Jaini, Rohit; Lynch, Joseph H; McCoy, Rachel M; Shreve, Jacob T; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Rhodes, David; Morgan, John A; Dudareva, Natalia

    2015-09-10

    In addition to proteins, L-phenylalanine is a versatile precursor for thousands of plant metabolites. Production of phenylalanine-derived compounds is a complex multi-compartmental process using phenylalanine synthesized predominantly in plastids as precursor. The transporter(s) exporting phenylalanine from plastids, however, remains unknown. Here, a gene encoding a Petunia hybrida plastidial cationic amino-acid transporter (PhpCAT) functioning in plastidial phenylalanine export is identified based on homology to an Escherichia coli phenylalanine transporter and co-expression with phenylalanine metabolic genes. Radiolabel transport assays show that PhpCAT exports all three aromatic amino acids. PhpCAT downregulation and overexpression result in decreased and increased levels, respectively, of phenylalanine-derived volatiles, as well as phenylalanine, tyrosine and their biosynthetic intermediates. Metabolic flux analysis reveals that flux through the plastidial phenylalanine biosynthetic pathway is reduced in PhpCAT RNAi lines, suggesting that the rate of phenylalanine export from plastids contributes to regulating flux through the aromatic amino-acid network.

  2. Expression of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes and changes in carotenoids during ripening in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namitha, Kanakapura Krishnamurthy; Archana, Surya Narayana; Negi, Pradeep Singh

    2011-04-01

    To study the expression pattern of carotenoid biosynthetic pathway genes, changes in their expression at different stages of maturity in tomato fruit (cv. Arka Ahuti) were investigated. The genes regulating carotenoid production were quantified by a dot blot method using a DIG (dioxigenin) labelling and detection kit. The results revealed that there was an increase in the levels of upstream genes of the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway such as 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), 4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl diphosphate reductase (Lyt B), phytoene synthase (PSY), phytoene desaturase (PDS) and ζ-carotene desaturase (ZDS) by 2-4 fold at the breaker stage as compared to leaf. The lycopene and β-carotene content was analyzed by HPLC at different stages of maturity. The lycopene (15.33 ± 0.24 mg per 100 g) and β-carotene (10.37 ± 0.46 mg per 100 g) content were found to be highest at 5 days post-breaker and 10 days post-breaker stage, respectively. The lycopene accumulation pattern also coincided with the color values at different stages of maturity. These studies may provide insight into devising gene-based strategies for enhancing carotenoid accumulation in tomato fruits.

  3. Identification of the Scopularide Biosynthetic Gene Cluster in Scopulariopsis brevicaulis

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    Mie Bech Lukassen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scopularide A is a promising potent anticancer lipopeptide isolated from a marine derived Scopulariopsis brevicaulis strain. The compound consists of a reduced carbon chain (3-hydroxy-methyldecanoyl attached to five amino acids (glycine, l-valine, d-leucine, l-alanine, and l-phenylalanine. Using the newly sequenced S. brevicaulis genome we were able to identify the putative biosynthetic gene cluster using genetic information from the structurally related emericellamide A from Aspergillus nidulans and W493-B from Fusarium pseudograminearum. The scopularide A gene cluster includes a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS2, a CoA ligase, an acyltransferase, and a transcription factor. Homologous recombination was low in S. brevicaulis so the local transcription factor was integrated randomly under a constitutive promoter, which led to a three to four-fold increase in scopularide A production. This indirectly verifies the identity of the proposed biosynthetic gene cluster.

  4. Elucidation and in planta reconstitution of the parthenolide biosynthetic pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qing; Manzano, David; Tanić, Nikola

    2014-01-01

    Parthenolide, the main bioactive compound of the medicinal plant feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium), is a promising anti-cancer drug. However, the biosynthetic pathway of parthenolide has not been elucidated yet. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of all the genes from feverfew...... that are required for the biosynthesis of parthenolide, using a combination of 454 sequencing of a feverfew glandular trichome cDNA library, co-expression analysis and metabolomics. When parthenolide biosynthesis was reconstituted by transient co-expression of all pathway genes in Nicotiana benthamiana, up to 1.......4μgg-1 parthenolide was produced, mostly present as cysteine and glutathione conjugates. These relatively polar conjugates were highly active against colon cancer cells, with only slightly lower activity than free parthenolide. In addition to these biosynthetic genes, another gene encoding...

  5. Genetic and Phenotypic Analyses of a Papaver somniferum T-DNA Insertional Mutant with Altered Alkaloid Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Yoshimatsu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro shoot culture of a T-DNA insertional mutant of Papaver somniferum L. established by the infection of Agrobacterium rhizogenes MAFF03-01724 accumulated thebaine instead of morphine as a major opium alkaloid. To develop a non-narcotic opium poppy and to gain insight into its genetic background, we have transplanted this mutant to soil, and analyzed its alkaloid content along with the manner of inheritance of T-DNA insertion loci among its selfed progenies. In the transplanted T0 primary mutant, the opium (latex was found to be rich in thebaine (16.3% of dried opium by HPLC analysis. The analyses on T-DNA insertion loci by inverse PCR, adaptor-ligation PCR, and quantitative real-time PCR revealed that as many as 18 copies of T-DNAs were integrated into a poppy genome in a highly complicated manner. The number of copies of T-DNAs was decreased to seven in the selected T3 progenies, in which the average thebaine content was 2.4-fold that of the wild type plant. This may indicate that the high thebaine phenotype was increasingly stabilized as the number of T-DNA copies was decreased. In addition, by reverse transcription PCR analysis on selected morphine biosynthetic genes, the expression of codeine 6-O-demethylase was clearly shown to be diminished in the T0 in vitro shoot culture, which can be considered as one of the key factors of altered alkaloid composition.

  6. Stationary phase expression of the arginine biosynthetic operon argCBH in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yuan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arginine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli is elevated in response to nutrient limitation, stress or arginine restriction. Though control of the pathway in response to arginine limitation is largely modulated by the ArgR repressor, other factors may be involved in increased stationary phase and stress expression. Results In this study, we report that expression of the argCBH operon is induced in stationary phase cultures and is reduced in strains possessing a mutation in rpoS, which encodes an alternative sigma factor. Using strains carrying defined argR, and rpoS mutations, we evaluated the relative contributions of these two regulators to the expression of argH using operon-lacZ fusions. While ArgR was the main factor responsible for modulating expression of argCBH, RpoS was also required for full expression of this biosynthetic operon at low arginine concentrations (below 60 μM L-arginine, a level at which growth of an arginine auxotroph was limited by arginine. When the argCBH operon was fully de-repressed (arginine limited, levels of expression were only one third of those observed in ΔargR mutants, indicating that the argCBH operon is partially repressed by ArgR even in the absence of arginine. In addition, argCBH expression was 30-fold higher in ΔargR mutants relative to levels found in wild type, fully-repressed strains, and this expression was independent of RpoS. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that both derepression and positive control by RpoS are required for full control of arginine biosynthesis in stationary phase cultures of E. coli.

  7. Metabolic engineering of the astaxanthin-biosynthetic pathway of Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Hans; van Ooyen, Albert J J; Verdoes, Jan C

    2003-12-01

    This review describes the different approaches that have been used to manipulate and improve carotenoid production in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous. The red yeast X. dendrorhous (formerly known as Phaffia rhodozyma) is one of the microbiological production systems for natural astaxanthin. Astaxanthin is applied in food and feed industry and can be used as a nutraceutical because of its strong antioxidant properties. However, the production levels of astaxanthin in wild-type isolates are rather low. To increase the astaxanthin content in X. dendrorhous, cultivation protocols have been optimized and astaxanthin-hyperproducing mutants have been obtained by screening of classically mutagenized X. dendrorhous strains. The knowledge about the regulation of carotenogenesis in X. dendrorhous is still limited in comparison to that in other carotenogenic fungi. The X. dendrorhous carotenogenic genes have been cloned and a X. dendrorhous transformation system has been developed. These tools allowed the directed genetic modification of the astaxanthin pathway in X. dendrorhous. The crtYB gene, encoding the bifunctional enzyme phytoene synthase/lycopene cyclase, was inactivated by insertion of a vector by single and double cross-over events, indicating that it is possible to generate specific carotenoid-biosynthetic mutants. Additionally, overexpression of crtYB resulted in the accumulation of beta-carotene and echinone, which indicates that the oxygenation reactions are rate-limiting in these recombinant strains. Furthermore, overexpression of the phytoene desaturase-encoding gene (crtI) showed an increase in monocyclic carotenoids such as torulene and HDCO (3-hydroxy-3',4'-didehydro-beta,-psi-carotene-4-one) and a decrease in bicyclic carotenoids such as echinone, beta-carotene and astaxanthin.

  8. Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA Mutants Implicate GAUT Genes in the Biosynthesis of Pectin and Xylan in Cell Walls and Seed Testa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerry H. Caffall; Sivakumar Pattathil; Sarah E. Phillips; Michael G. Hahn; Debra Mohnen

    2009-01-01

    Galacturonosyltransferase 1 (GAUT1) is an α1,4-D-galacturonosyltransferase that transfers galacturonic acid from uridine 5'-diphosphogalacturonic acid onto the pectic polysaccharide homogalacturonan (Sterling et al., 2006). The 25-member Arabidopsis thaliana GAUT1-related gene family encodes 15 GAUT and 10 GAUT-like (GATL) proteins with, respectively, 56-84 and 42-53% amino acid sequence similarity to GAUT1. Previous phylogenetic analyses of AtGAUTs indicated three clades: A through C. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of the Arabidopsis, poplar and rice GAUT families has sub-classified the GAUTs into seven clades: clade A-1 (GAUTs 1 to 3); A-2 (GAUT4); A-3 (GAUTs 5 and 6); A-4 (GAUT7); B-1(GAUTs 8 and 9); B-2 (GAUTs 10 and 11); and clade C (GAUTs 12 to 15). The Arabidopsis GAUTs have a distribution com-parable to the poplar orthologs, with the exception of GAUT2, which is absent in poplar. Rice, however, has no orthologs of GAUTs 2 and 12 and has multiple apparent orthologs of GAUTs 1, 4, and 7 compared with eitherArabidopsis or poplar. The cell wall glycosyl residue compositions of 26 homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for 13 of 15 Arabidopsis GAUTgenes reveal significantly and reproducibly different cell walls in specific tissues of gaut mutants 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14 from that of wild-type Arabidopsis walls. Pectin and xylan polysaccharides are affected by the loss of GAUT function, as dem-onstrated by the altered galacturonic acid, xylose, rhamnose, galactose, and arabinose composition of distinct gaut mu-tant walls. The wall glycosyl residue compositional phenotypes observed among the gaut mutants suggest that at least six different biosynthetic linkages in pectins and/or xylans are affected by the lesions in these GAUTgenes. Evidence is also presented to support a role for GAUT11 in seed mucilage expansion and in seed wall and mucilage composition.

  9. Metagenomic approaches for exploiting uncultivated bacteria as a resource for novel biosynthetic enzymology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Micheal C; Piel, Jörn

    2013-05-23

    Most biologically active microbial natural products are known from strains that can be isolated and cultivated in the laboratory. However, the genomics era has revealed that cultured bacteria represent a mere fraction of total estimated bacterial biodiversity. With the development of community genomics, termed metagenomics, the uncultivated majority became accessible for functional analysis. Through metagenomic studies, novel biocatalysts and biosynthetic pathways are being discovered at a pace previously not possible using traditional molecular biology techniques. Additionally, the study of uncultivated bacteria has provided valuable insights into previously overlooked biocatalysts from cultured strains. This perspective highlights recent discoveries from metagenomics of uncultivated bacteria and discusses the impact of those findings on the field of natural products.

  10. Generation of the natamycin analogs by gene engineering of natamycin biosynthetic genes in Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shui-Ping; Yuan, Peng-Hui; Wang, Yue-Yue; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Zhou, Zhen-Xing; Bu, Qing-ting; Yu, Pin; Jiang, Hui; Li, Yong-Quan

    2015-04-01

    The polyene antibiotic natamycin is widely used as an antifungal agent in both human therapy and the food industry. Here we obtained four natamycin analogs with high titers, including two new compounds, by engineering of six post-polyketide synthase (PKS) tailoring enzyme encoding genes in a natamycin industrial producing strain, Streptomyces chattanoogensis L10. Precise analysis of S. chattanoogensis L10 culture identified natamycin and two natamycin analogs, 4,5-deepoxy-natamycin and 4,5-deepoxy-natamycinolide. The scnD deletion mutant of S. chattanoogensis L10 did not produce natamycin but increased the titer of 4,5-deepoxy-natamycin. Inactivation of each of scnK, scnC, and scnJ in S. chattanoogensis L10 abolished natamycin production and accumulated 4,5-deepoxy-natamycinolide. Deletion of scnG in S. chattanoogensis L10 resulted in production of two new compounds, 4,5-deepoxy-12-decarboxyl-12-methyl-natamycin and its dehydration product without natamycin production. Inactivation of the ScnG-associated ferredoxin ScnF resulted in impaired production of natamycin. Bioassay of these natamycin analogs showed that three natamycin analogs remained antifungal activities. We found that homologous glycosyltransferases genes including amphDI and nysDI can partly complement the ΔscnK mutant. Our results here also support that ScnG, ScnK, and ScnD catalyze carboxylation, glycosylation, and epoxidation in turn in the natamycin biosynthetic pathway. Thus this paper provided a method to generate natamycin analogs and shed light on the natamycin biosynthetic pathway.

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin eWu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5, deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation.

  12. Characterization of Arabidopsis 6-phosphogluconolactonase T-DNA insertion mutants reveals an essential role for the oxidative section of the plastidic pentose phosphate pathway in plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yuqing; DeFraia, Christopher; Williams, Donna; Zhang, Xudong; Mou, Zhonglin

    2009-07-01

    Arabidopsis PGL1, PGL2, PGL4 and PGL5 are predicted to encode cytosolic isoforms of 6-phosphogluconolactonase (6PGL), whereas PGL3 is predicted to encode a 6PGL that has been shown to localize in both plastids and peroxisomes. Therefore, 6PGL may exist in the cytosol, plastids and peroxisomes. However, the function of 6PGL in these three subcellular locations has not been well defined. Here we show that PGL3 is essential, whereas PGL1, PGL2 and PGL5 are individually dispensable for plant growth and development. Knockdown of PGL3 in the pgl3 mutant leads to a dramatic decrease in plant size, a significant increase in total glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and a marked decrease in cellular redox potential. Interestingly, the pgl3 plants exhibit constitutive pathogenesis-related gene expression and enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326 and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2. We found that although pgl3 does not spontaneously accumulate elevated levels of free salicylic acid (SA), the constitutive defense responses in pgl3 plants are almost completely suppressed by the npr1 and sid2/eds16/ics1 mutations, suggesting that the pgl3 mutation activates NPR1- and SID2/EDS16/ICS1-dependent defense responses. We demonstrate that plastidic (not peroxisomal) localization and 6PGL activity of the PGL3 protein are essential for complementing all pgl3 phenotypes, indicating that the oxidative section of the plastidic pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is required for plant normal growth and development. Thus, pgl3 provides a useful tool not only for defining the role of the PPP in different subcellular compartments, but also for dissecting the SA/NPR1-mediated signaling pathway.

  13. Production of the Bioactive Compounds Violacein and Indolmycin Is Conditional in a maeA Mutant of Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea S4054 Lacking the Malic Enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Thøgersen, Mariane; Delpin, Marina; Melchiorsen, Jette;

    2016-01-01

    It has previously been reported that some strains of the marine bacterium Pseudoalteromonas luteoviolacea produce the purple bioactive pigment violacein as well as the antibiotic compound indolmycin, hitherto only found in Streptomyces. The purpose of the present study was to determine the relati...... of violacein and indolmycin may be metabolically linked and that yet unidentified antibacterial compound(s) may be play a role in the antibacterial activity of P. luteoviolacea....... role of each of these two compounds as antibacterial compounds in P. luteoviolacea S4054. Using Tn10 transposon mutagenesis, a mutant strain that was significantly reduced in violacein production in mannose-containing substrates was created. Full genome analyses revealed that the vio-biosynthetic gene...... produced by the mutant strain was about 300% that of the wild type. Since inhibition of V. anguillarum and S. aureus by the mutant strain was similar to that of the wild type, it is concluded that violacein is not the major antibacterial compound in P. luteoviolacea. We furthermore propose that production...

  14. A kinetic model for the penicillin biosynthetic pathway in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Jørgensen, Henrik

    1996-01-01

    A kinetic model for the first two steps in the penicillin biosynthetic pathway, i.e. the ACV synthetase (ACVS) and the isopenicillin N synthetase (IPNS) is proposed. The model is based on Michaelis-Menten type kinetics with non-competitive inhibition of the ACVS by ACV, and competitive inhibition...... of the IPNS by glutathione. The model predicted flux through the pathway corresponds well with the measured rate of penicillin biosynthesis. From the kinetic model the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients are calculated throughout a fed-batch cultivation, and it is found...

  15. Carotenoid biosynthetic genes in Brassica rapa: comparative genomic analysis, phylogenetic analysis, and expression profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peirong; Zhang, Shujiang; Zhang, Shifan; Li, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Cheng, Feng; Wu, Jian; Wang, Xiaowu; Sun, Rifei

    2015-01-01

    Background Carotenoids are isoprenoid compounds synthesized by all photosynthetic organisms. Despite much research on carotenoid biosynthesis in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, there is a lack of information on the carotenoid pathway in Brassica rapa. To better understand its carotenoid biosynthetic pathway, we performed a systematic analysis of carotenoid biosynthetic genes at the genome level in B. rapa. Results We identified 67 carotenoid biosynthetic genes in B. rapa, which were ort...

  16. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Beyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  17. Cloning and characterization of the biosynthetic gene cluster of the bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitor tirandamycin from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xuhua; Wang, Zhongwen; Wang, Bo; Ma, Junying; Huang, Hongbo; Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si; Zhang, Changsheng; Ju, Jianhua

    2011-03-18

    Tirandamycins are bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitors holding great potential for antibacterial agent design. To elucidate the biosynthetic machinery and generate new derivatives, the tirandamycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned and sequenced from marine-derived Streptomyces sp. SCSIO1666. The biosynthetic gene cluster of tirandamycin spans a DNA region of ∼56kb and consists of 15 open reading frames (ORFs) which encode three type I polyketide synthases (TrdAI, AII, AIII), one non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (TrdD), one phosphopantetheinyl transferase (TrdM), one Type II thioesterase (TrdB), one FAD-dependent oxidoreductase (TrdL), one cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (TrdI), three proteins related to resistance and regulations (TrdHJK), and four proteins with unknown function (TrdCEFG). To investigate the roles of the genes played in the biosynthetic machinery, seven genes (trdAI and trdBDFHIK) were inactivated via in frame replacement with an apramycin gene cassette using λ-RED recombination technology. The ΔtrdAI and ΔtrdD mutants targeting the ketosynthase and adenylation domain of TrdAI and TrdD, respectively, abolished the production of tirandamycins, confirming their involvement in the tirandamycin biosynthesis. TrdH showed high homology to LuxR family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which abolished the production of tirandamycins, indicating that TrdH is a positive regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. On the other hand, TrdK showed high homology to TetR-family transcriptional regulatory proteins, disruption of which significantly increased the yields of tirandamycins almost one-fold, implicating that TrdK is a negative regulator for tirandamycin biosynthesis. Disruption of the gene trdI resulted in the accumulation of the intermediate tirandamycin C (3) and a trace amount of new product tirandamycin C2 (5). A model of tirandamycin biosynthesis was proposed based on bioinformatics analyses, gene inactivation experiments and

  18. Heterologous stable expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes using the moss Physcomitrella patens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Søren Spanner; King, Brian Christopher; Zhan, Xin

    2014-01-01

    characterization of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, engineered Physcomitrella can be a green biotechnological platform for production of terpenoids. Here, we describe two complementary and simple procedures for stable nuclear transformation of Physcomitrella with terpenoid biosynthetic genes, selection......Heterologous and stable expression of genes encoding terpenoid biosynthetic enzymes in planta is an important tool for functional characterization and is an attractive alternative to expression in microbial hosts for biotechnological production. Despite improvements to the procedure...... already been widely recognized as a viable alternative for industrial-scale production of biopharmaceuticals. For expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes, and reconstruction of heterologous pathways, Physcomitrella has unique attributes that makes it a very promising biotechnological host...

  19. Phenylpropanoids accumulation in eggplant fruit: characterization of biosynthetic genes and regulation by a MYB transcription factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa eDocimo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phenylpropanoids are major secondary metabolites in eggplant (Solanum melongena fruits. Chlorogenic acid (CGA accounts for 70 to 90% of total phenolics in flesh tissues, while anthocyanins are mainly present in the fruit skin. As a contribution to the understanding of the peculiar accumulation of these health-promoting metabolites in eggplant, we report on metabolite abundance, regulation of CGA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, and characterization of candidate CGA biosynthetic genes in S. melongena.Higher contents of CGA, Delphinidin 3-rutinoside and rutin were found in eggplant fruits compared to other tissues, associated to an elevated transcript abundance of structural genes such as PAL, HQT, DFR and ANS, suggesting that active in situ biosynthesis contributes to anthocyanin and CGA accumulation in fruit tissues. Putative orthologs of the two CGA biosynthetic genes PAL and HQT, as well as a variant of a MYB1 transcription factor showing identity with group 6 MYBs, were isolated from an Occidental S. melongena traditional variety and demonstrated to differ from published sequences from Asiatic varieties.In silico analysis of the isolated SmPAL1, SmHQT1, SmANS, and SmMyb1 promoters revealed the presence of several Myb regulatory elements for the biosynthetic genes and unique elements for the TF, suggesting its involvement in other physiological roles beside phenylpropanoid biosynthesis regulation.Transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves of SmMyb1 and of a C-terminal SmMyb1 truncated form (SmMyb1Δ9 resulted in anthocyanin accumulation only of SmMyb1 agro-infiltrated leaves. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed the interaction of both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 with an anthocyanin-related potato bHLH1 TF. Interestingly, a doubled amount of CGA was detected in both SmMyb1 and SmMyb1Δ9 agro-infiltrated leaves, thus suggesting that the N-terminal region of SmMyb1 is sufficient to activate its synthesis. These data suggest that a deletion of

  20. Effect of photoperiod on gibberellin biosynthetic enzymes in spinach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1986-04-01

    The photoperiodic control of stem elongation in spinach, a long day (LD) rosette plant, is mediated by gibberellins (GAs). The early 13-hydroxylated GA biosynthetic pathway from GA/sub 12/ to GA/sub 20/ operates in spinach: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two enzymes of this pathway, those converting GA/sub 53/ to GA/sub 44/ (GA/sub 53/ oxidase) and GA/sub 19/ to GA/sub 20/ (GA/sub 19/ oxidase), are regulated by light. The enzyme converting GA/sub 44/ to GA/sub 19/ (GA/sub 44/ oxidase) is not light-regulated. In the light GA/sub 53/ and GA/sub 18/ oxidase activities are increased, therefore causing the GA biosynthetic pathway to be turned on. This leads to the production of an active GA in LD, which causes an increase in stem elongation. Two the enzymes, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ oxidases, can be separated from one another by anion exchange HPLC. Estimates of the molecular weights of these two enzymes based on gel filtration HPLC will be reported.

  1. The biosynthetic pathway of vitamin C in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, G L; Jones, M A; Smirnoff, N

    1998-05-28

    Vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) has important antioxidant and metabolic functions in both plants and animals, but humans, and a few other animal species, have lost the capacity to synthesize it. Plant-derived ascorbate is thus the major source of vitamin C in the human diet. Although the biosynthetic pathway of L-ascorbic acid in animals is well understood, the plant pathway has remained unknown-one of the few primary plant metabolic pathways for which this is the case. L-ascorbate is abundant in plants (found at concentrations of 1-5 mM in leaves and 25 mM in chloroplasts) and may have roles in photosynthesis and transmembrane electron transport. We found that D-mannose and L-galactose are efficient precursors for ascorbate synthesis and are interconverted by GDP-D-mannose-3,5-epimerase. We have identified an enzyme in pea and Arabidopsis thaliana, L-galactose dehydrogenase, that catalyses oxidation of L-galactose to L-galactono-1,4-lactone. We propose an ascorbate biosynthesis pathway involving GDP-D-mannose, GDP-L-galactose, L-galactose and L-galactono-1,4-lactone, and have synthesized ascorbate from GDP-D-mannose by way of these intermediates in vitro. The definition of this biosynthetic pathway should allow engineering of plants for increased ascorbate production, thus increasing their nutritional value and stress tolerance.

  2. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  3. Tracing the biosynthetic source of essential amino acids in marine turtles using delta13C fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Karen E; Kelez, Shaleyla; Larsen, Thomas; Choy, C Anela; Popp, Brian N

    2014-05-01

    Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce essential amino acids (EAAs) with distinctive patterns of delta13C values that can be used as naturally occurring fingerprints of biosynthetic origin of EAAs in a food web. Because animals cannot synthesize EAAs and must obtain them from food, their tissues reflect delta13C(EAA) patterns found in diet, but it is not known how microbes responsible for hindgut fermentation in some herbivores influence the delta13C values of EAAs in their hosts' tissues. We examined whether distinctive delta13C fingerprints of hindgut flora are evident in the tissues of green turtles (Chelonia mydas), which are known to be facultative hindgut fermenters. We determined delta13C(EAA) values in tissues of green turtles foraging herbivorously in neritic habitats of Hawaii and compared them with those from green, olive ridley, and loggerhead turtles foraging carnivorously in oceanic environments of the central and southeast Pacific Ocean. Results of multivariate statistical analysis revealed two distinct groups that could be distinguished based on unique delta13C(EAA) patterns. A three-end-member predictive linear discriminant model indicated that delta13C(EAA) fingerprints existed in the tissues of carnivorous turtles that resembled patterns found in microalgae, which form the base of an oceanic food web, whereas herbivorous turtles derive EAAs from a bacterial or seagrass source. This study demonstrates the capacity for delta13C fingerprinting to establish the biosynthetic origin of EAAs in higher consumers, and that marine turtles foraging on macroalgal diets appear to receive nutritional supplementation from bacterial symbionts in their digestive system.

  4. Novel Key Metabolites Reveal Further Branching of the Roquefortine/Meleagrin Biosynthetic Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ries, Marco I.; Ali, Hazrat; Lankhorst, Peter P.; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Vreeken, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic profiling and structural elucidation of novel secondary metabolites obtained from derived deletion strains of the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum were used to reassign various previously ascribed synthetase genes of the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway to their corresponding produ

  5. Origins and spread of pfdhfr mutant alleles in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Toshihiro

    2010-06-01

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum parasite resistant to sulfadoxine and pyrimethamine (SP) poses a serious public health problem. Resistance is caused by point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps), the two key enzymes in the folate biosynthetic pathway. The use of microsatellite markers flanking pfdhfr has recently shown that the invasion of limited resistant lineages may explain the widespread SP resistance in many endemic regions. In Africa, however, multiple indigenous origins of pfdhfr triple mutants have been demonstrated. More new independent lineages and routes of geographical spread of resistance may be found by further molecular evolutionary analyses using samples from various endemic regions. Here, I review recent studies about the history of SP usage and the evolution and spread of resistant lineages while addressing the technical issue of microsatellite analysis.

  6. Characterization of Gibberellin Receptor Mutants of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter M.Chandler; Carol A.Harding; Anthony R.Ashton; Mark D.Mulcair; Nicholas E.Dixon; Lewis N.Mander

    2008-01-01

    The sequence of Gidl (a gene for a gibberellin (GA) receptor from rice) was used to identify a putative orthoIogue from barley.This was expressed in E.coil,and produced a protein that was able to bind GA in vitro with both structural specificity and saturability.Its potential role in GA responses was investigated using barley mutants with reduced GA sensitivity (gsel mutants).Sixteen different gsel mutants each carried a unique nucleotide substitution in this sequence.In all but one case,these changes resulted in single amino acid substitutions,and,for the remaining mutant,a substitution in the 5' untranslated region of the mRNA is proposed to interfere with translation initiation.There was perfect linkage in segregating populations between new mutant alleles and the gsel phenotype,leading to the conclusion that the putative GID1 GA receptor sequence in barley corresponds to the Gsel locus.Determination of endogenous GA contents in one of the mutants revealed enhanced accumulation of bioactive GA1,and a deficit of C20 GA precursors.All of the gsel mutants had reduced sensitivity to exogenous GA3,and to AC94377 (a GA analogue) at concentrations that are normally 'saturating',but,at much higher concentrations,there was often a considerable response.The comparison between barley and rice mutants reveals interesting differences between these two cereal species in GA hormonal physiology.

  7. Functional roles of three cutin biosynthetic acyltransferases in cytokinin responses and skotomorphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Zhou, Zhao-Yang; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Chai, Juan; Zhou, Qin; Wang, Li; Hirnerová, Eva; Mrvková, Michaela; Novák, Ondřej; Guo, Guang-Qin

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins (CKs) regulate plant development and growth via a two-component signaling pathway. By forward genetic screening, we isolated an Arabidopsis mutant named grow fast on cytokinins 1 (gfc1), whose seedlings grew larger aerial parts on MS medium with CK. gfc1 is allelic to a previously reported cutin mutant defective in cuticular ridges (dcr). GFC1/DCR encodes a soluble BAHD acyltransferase (a name based on the first four enzymes characterized in this family: Benzylalcohol O-acetyltransferase, Anthocyanin O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase, anthranilate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase and Deacetylvindoline 4-O-acetyltransferase) with diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) activity in vitro and is necessary for normal cuticle formation on epidermis in vivo. Here we show that gfc1 was a CK-insensitive mutant, as revealed by its low regeneration frequency in vitro and resistance to CK in adventitious root formation and dark-grown hypocotyl inhibition assays. In addition, gfc1 had de-etiolated phenotypes in darkness and was therefore defective in skotomorphogenesis. The background expression levels of most type-A Arabidopsis Response Regulator (ARR) genes were higher in the gfc1 mutant. The gfc1-associated phenotypes were also observed in the cutin-deficient glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4/8 (gpat4/8) double mutant [defective in glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) acyltransferase enzymes GPAT4 and GPAT8, which redundantly catalyze the acylation of G3P by hydroxyl fatty acid (OH-FA)], but not in the cutin-deficient mutant cytochrome p450, family 86, subfamily A, polypeptide 2/aberrant induction of type three 1 (cyp86A2/att1), which affects the biosynthesis of some OH-FAs. Our results indicate that some acyltransferases associated with cutin formation are involved in CK responses and skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  8. Functional roles of three cutin biosynthetic acyltransferases in cytokinin responses and skotomorphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wu

    Full Text Available Cytokinins (CKs regulate plant development and growth via a two-component signaling pathway. By forward genetic screening, we isolated an Arabidopsis mutant named grow fast on cytokinins 1 (gfc1, whose seedlings grew larger aerial parts on MS medium with CK. gfc1 is allelic to a previously reported cutin mutant defective in cuticular ridges (dcr. GFC1/DCR encodes a soluble BAHD acyltransferase (a name based on the first four enzymes characterized in this family: Benzylalcohol O-acetyltransferase, Anthocyanin O-hydroxycinnamoyltransferase, anthranilate N-hydroxycinnamoyl/benzoyltransferase and Deacetylvindoline 4-O-acetyltransferase with diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT activity in vitro and is necessary for normal cuticle formation on epidermis in vivo. Here we show that gfc1 was a CK-insensitive mutant, as revealed by its low regeneration frequency in vitro and resistance to CK in adventitious root formation and dark-grown hypocotyl inhibition assays. In addition, gfc1 had de-etiolated phenotypes in darkness and was therefore defective in skotomorphogenesis. The background expression levels of most type-A Arabidopsis Response Regulator (ARR genes were higher in the gfc1 mutant. The gfc1-associated phenotypes were also observed in the cutin-deficient glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase 4/8 (gpat4/8 double mutant [defective in glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P acyltransferase enzymes GPAT4 and GPAT8, which redundantly catalyze the acylation of G3P by hydroxyl fatty acid (OH-FA], but not in the cutin-deficient mutant cytochrome p450, family 86, subfamily A, polypeptide 2/aberrant induction of type three 1 (cyp86A2/att1, which affects the biosynthesis of some OH-FAs. Our results indicate that some acyltransferases associated with cutin formation are involved in CK responses and skotomorphogenesis in Arabidopsis.

  9. Detection of additional genes of the patulin biosynthetic pathway in Penicillium griseofulvum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genes in the patulin biosynthetic pathway are likely to be arranged in a cluster as has been found for biosynthetic pathways of other mycotoxins. The mycotoxin patulin, common in apples and apple juice, is most often associated with Penicillium expansum. However, of 15 fungal species capable of sy...

  10. Engineered Streptomyces avermitilis host for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene cluster for secondary metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Mamoru; Komatsu, Kyoko; Koiwai, Hanae; Yamada, Yuuki; Kozone, Ikuko; Izumikawa, Miho; Hashimoto, Junko; Takagi, Motoki; Omura, Satoshi; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Cane, David E; Ikeda, Haruo

    2013-07-19

    An industrial microorganism, Streptomyces avermitilis, which is a producer of anthelmintic macrocyclic lactones, avermectins, has been constructed as a versatile model host for heterologous expression of genes encoding secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Twenty of the entire biosynthetic gene clusters for secondary metabolites were successively cloned and introduced into a versatile model host S. avermitilis SUKA17 or 22. Almost all S. avermitilis transformants carrying the entire gene cluster produced metabolites as a result of the expression of biosynthetic gene clusters introduced. A few transformants were unable to produce metabolites, but their production was restored by the expression of biosynthetic genes using an alternative promoter or the expression of a regulatory gene in the gene cluster that controls the expression of biosynthetic genes in the cluster using an alternative promoter. Production of metabolites in some transformants of the versatile host was higher than that of the original producers, and cryptic biosynthetic gene clusters in the original producer were also expressed in a versatile host.

  11. Redox Impact on Starch Biosynthetic Enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna

    Summary The thesis provides new insight into the influence of the plant cell redox state on the transient starch metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana with a focus on starch biosynthetic enzymes. Two main hypotheses forms the basis of this thesis: 1) photosynthesis and starch metabolism...... are coordinated by the redox state of the cell via post-translational modification of the starch metabolic enzymes containing redox active cysteine residues and these cysteine residues became cross-linked upon oxidation providing a conformational change leading to activity loss; 2) cysteine residues...... of chloroplast enzymes can play a role not only in enzyme activity and redox sensitivity but also in protein folding and stability upon oxidation. Several redox sensitive enzymes identified in this study can serve as potential targets to control the carbon flux to and from starch during the day and night...

  12. Metabolic engineering of biosynthetic pathway for production of renewable biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijai; Mani, Indra; Chaudhary, Dharmendra Kumar; Dhar, Pawan Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic engineering is an important area of research that involves editing genetic networks to overproduce a certain substance by the cells. Using a combination of genetic, metabolic, and modeling methods, useful substances have been synthesized in the past at industrial scale and in a cost-effective manner. Currently, metabolic engineering is being used to produce sufficient, economical, and eco-friendly biofuels. In the recent past, a number of efforts have been made towards engineering biosynthetic pathways for large scale and efficient production of biofuels from biomass. Given the adoption of metabolic engineering approaches by the biofuel industry, this paper reviews various approaches towards the production and enhancement of renewable biofuels such as ethanol, butanol, isopropanol, hydrogen, and biodiesel. We have also identified specific areas where more work needs to be done in the future.

  13. Alkaloids from Pandanus amaryllifolius: Isolation and Their Plausible Biosynthetic Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Chi; Yu, Meng-Lun; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Beerhues, Ludger; Cheng, Yuan-Bin; Chen, Lei-Chin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Chen, Hui-Fen; Chung, Yu-Ming; Hou, Ming-Feng; Wu, Yang-Chang; Chang, Fang-Rong

    2015-10-23

    Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb. (Pandanaceae) is used as a flavor and in folk medicine in Southeast Asia. The ethanolic crude extract of the aerial parts of P. amaryllifolius exhibited antioxidant, antibiofilm, and anti-inflammatory activities in previous studies. In the current investigation, the purification of the ethanolic extract yielded nine new compounds, including N-acetylnorpandamarilactonines A (1) and B (2); pandalizines A (3) and B (4); pandanmenyamine (5); pandamarilactones 2 (6) and 3 (7), and 5(E)-pandamarilactonine-32 (8); and pandalactonine (9). The isolated alkaloids, with either a γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactone or γ-alkylidene-α,β-unsaturated-γ-lactam system, can be classified into five skeletons including norpandamarilactonine, indolizinone, pandanamine, pandamarilactone, and pandamarilactonine. A plausible biosynthetic route toward 1-5, 7, and 9 is proposed.

  14. Extending the biosynthetic repertoires of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Agnieszka Janina Zygadlo; Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplasts found in plants and algae, and photosynthetic microorganisms such as cyanobacteria, are emerging hosts for sustainable production of valuable biochemicals, using only inorganic nutrients, water, CO2 and light as inputs. In the past decade, many bioengineering efforts have focused...... on metabolic engineering and synthetic biology in the chloroplast or in cyanobacteria for the production of fuels, chemicals, as well as complex, high-value bioactive molecules. Biosynthesis of all these compounds can be performed in photosynthetic organelles/organisms by heterologous expression...... of chloroplasts and cyanobacteria as biosynthetic compartments and hosts, and we estimate the production levels to be expected from photosynthetic hosts in light of the fraction of electrons and carbon that can potentially be diverted from photosynthesis. The supply of reducing power, in the form of electrons...

  15. Metabolic profiling of alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in mouse tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Mori

    Full Text Available NAD plays essential redox and non-redox roles in cell biology. In mammals, its de novo and recycling biosynthetic pathways encompass two independent branches, the "amidated" and "deamidated" routes. Here we focused on the indispensable enzymes gating these two routes, i.e. nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase (NMNAT, which in mammals comprises three distinct isozymes, and NAD synthetase (NADS. First, we measured the in vitro activity of the enzymes, and the levels of all their substrates and products in a number of tissues from the C57BL/6 mouse. Second, from these data, we derived in vivo estimates of enzymes'rates and quantitative contributions to NAD homeostasis. The NMNAT activity, mainly represented by nuclear NMNAT1, appears to be high and nonrate-limiting in all examined tissues, except in blood. The NADS activity, however, appears rate-limiting in lung and skeletal muscle, where its undetectable levels parallel a relative accumulation of the enzyme's substrate NaAD (nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide. In all tissues, the amidated NAD route was predominant, displaying highest rates in liver and kidney, and lowest in blood. In contrast, the minor deamidated route showed higher relative proportions in blood and small intestine, and higher absolute values in liver and small intestine. Such results provide the first comprehensive picture of the balance of the two alternative NAD biosynthetic routes in different mammalian tissues under physiological conditions. This fills a gap in the current knowledge of NAD biosynthesis, and provides a crucial information for the study of NAD metabolism and its role in disease.

  16. Resorbable biosynthetic mesh for crural reinforcement during hiatal hernia repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicuben, Evan T; Worrell, Stephanie G; DeMeester, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    The use of mesh to reinforce crural closure during hiatal hernia repair is controversial. Although some studies suggest that using synthetic mesh can reduce recurrence, synthetic mesh can erode into the esophagus and in our opinion should be avoided. Studies with absorbable or biologic mesh have not proven to be of benefit for recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of hiatal hernia repair with modern resorbable biosynthetic mesh in combination with adjunct tension reduction techniques. We retrospectively analyzed all patients who had crural reinforcement during repair of a sliding or paraesophageal hiatal hernia with Gore BioA resorbable mesh. Objective follow-up was by videoesophagram and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. There were 114 patients. The majority of operations (72%) were laparoscopic primary repairs with all patients receiving a fundoplication. The crura were closed primarily in all patients and reinforced with a BioA mesh patch. Excessive tension prompted a crural relaxing incision in four per cent and a Collis gastroplasty in 39 per cent of patients. Perioperative morbidity was minor and unrelated to the mesh. Median objective follow-up was one year, but 18 patients have objective follow-up at two or more years. A recurrent hernia was found in one patient (0.9%) three years after repair. The use of crural relaxing incisions and Collis gastroplasty in combination with crural reinforcement with resorbable biosynthetic mesh is associated with a low early hernia recurrence rate and no mesh-related complications. Long-term follow-up will define the role of these techniques for hiatal hernia repair.

  17. Structural, stability, dynamic and binding properties of the ALS-causing T46I mutant of the hVAPB MSP domain as revealed by NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Lua

    Full Text Available T46I is the second mutation on the hVAPB MSP domain which was recently identified from non-Brazilian kindred to cause a familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here using CD, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we characterized the structure, stability, dynamics and binding capacity of the T46I-MSP domain. The results reveal: 1 unlike P56S which we previously showed to completely eliminate the native MSP structure, T46I leads to no significant disruption of the native secondary and tertiary structures, as evidenced from its far-UV CD spectrum, as well as Cα and Cβ NMR chemical shifts. 2 Nevertheless, T46I does result in a reduced thermodynamic stability and loss of the cooperative urea-unfolding transition. As such, the T46I-MSP domain is more prone to aggregation than WT at high protein concentrations and temperatures in vitro, which may become more severe in the crowded cellular environments. 3 T46I only causes a 3-fold affinity reduction to the Nir2 peptide, but a significant elimination of its binding to EphA4. 4 EphA4 and Nir2 peptide appear to have overlapped binding interfaces on the MSP domain, which strongly implies that two signaling networks may have a functional interplay in vivo. 5 As explored by both H/D exchange and MD simulations, the MSP domain is very dynamic, with most loop residues and many residues on secondary structures highly fluctuated or/and exposed to bulk solvent. Although T46I does not alter overall dynamics, it does trigger increased dynamics of several local regions of the MSP domain which are implicated in binding to EphA4 and Nir2 peptide. Our study provides the structural and dynamic understanding of the T46I-causing ALS; and strongly highlights the possibility that the interplay of two signaling networks mediated by the FFAT-containing proteins and Eph receptors may play a key role in ALS pathogenesis.

  18. Structural basis for acyl acceptor specificity in the achromobactin biosynthetic enzyme AcsD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Stefan; Botting, Catherine H; Song, Lijiang; Kadi, Nadia F; Challis, Gregory L; Naismith, James H

    2011-09-23

    Siderophores are known virulence factors, and their biosynthesis is a target for new antibacterial agents. A non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore biosynthetic pathway in Dickeya dadantii is responsible for production of the siderophore achromobactin. The D. dadantii achromobactin biosynthesis protein D (AcsD) enzyme has been shown to enantioselectively esterify citric acid with l-serine in the first committed step of achromobactin biosynthesis. The reaction occurs in two steps: stereospecific activation of citric acid by adenylation, followed by attack of the enzyme-bound citryl adenylate by l-serine to produce the homochiral ester. We now report a detailed characterization of the substrate profile and mechanism of the second (acyl transfer) step of AcsD enzyme. We demonstrate that the enzyme catalyzes formation of not only esters but also amides from the citryl-adenylate intermediate. We have rationalized the substrate utilization profile for the acylation reaction by determining the first X-ray crystal structure of a product complex for this enzyme class. We have identified the residues that are important for both recognition of l-serine and catalysis of ester formation. Our hypotheses were tested by biochemical analysis of various mutants, one of which shows a reversal of specificity from the wild type with respect to non-natural substrates. This change can be rationalized on the basis of our structural data. That this change in specificity is accompanied by no loss in activity suggests that AcsD and other members of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore superfamily may have biotransformation potential.

  19. Structural Basis for Acyl Acceptor Specificity in the Achromobactin Biosynthetic Enzyme AcsD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelz, Stefan; Botting, Catherine H.; Song, Lijiang; Kadi, Nadia F.; Challis, Gregory L.; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Siderophores are known virulence factors, and their biosynthesis is a target for new antibacterial agents. A non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore biosynthetic pathway in Dickeya dadantii is responsible for production of the siderophore achromobactin. The D. dadantii achromobactin biosynthesis protein D (AcsD) enzyme has been shown to enantioselectively esterify citric acid with l-serine in the first committed step of achromobactin biosynthesis. The reaction occurs in two steps: stereospecific activation of citric acid by adenylation, followed by attack of the enzyme-bound citryl adenylate by l-serine to produce the homochiral ester. We now report a detailed characterization of the substrate profile and mechanism of the second (acyl transfer) step of AcsD enzyme. We demonstrate that the enzyme catalyzes formation of not only esters but also amides from the citryl-adenylate intermediate. We have rationalized the substrate utilization profile for the acylation reaction by determining the first X-ray crystal structure of a product complex for this enzyme class. We have identified the residues that are important for both recognition of l-serine and catalysis of ester formation. Our hypotheses were tested by biochemical analysis of various mutants, one of which shows a reversal of specificity from the wild type with respect to non-natural substrates. This change can be rationalized on the basis of our structural data. That this change in specificity is accompanied by no loss in activity suggests that AcsD and other members of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-independent siderophore superfamily may have biotransformation potential. PMID:21835184

  20. The carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana shares similar features with the pathway of mammals and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippa, Sonia; Zhao, Yingjuan; Merlier, Franck; Charrier, Aurélie; Perrin, Yolande

    2012-11-01

    Carnitine is an essential quaternary ammonium amino acid that occurs in the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. The role and synthesis of this compound are very well documented in bacteria, fungi and mammals. On the contrary, although the presence of carnitine in plant tissue has been reported four decades ago and information about its biological implication are available, nothing is known about its synthesis in plants. We designed experiments to determine if the carnitine biosynthetic pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana is similar to the pathway in mammals and in the fungi Neurospora crassa and Candida albicans. We first checked for the presence of trimetyllysine (TML) and γ-butyrobetaine (γ-BB), two precursors of carnitine in fungi and in mammals, using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Both compounds were shown to be present in plant extracts at concentrations in the picomole range per mg of dry weight. We next synthesized deuterium-labeled TML and transferred A. thaliana seedlings on growth medium supplemented with 1 mM of the deuterated precursor. LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of plant extracts clearly highlighted the synthesis of deuterium labeled γ-BB and labeled carnitine in deuterated-TML fed plants. The similarities between plant, fungal and mammalian pathways provide very useful information to search homologies between genomes. As a matter of fact the analysis of A. thaliana protein database provides homology for several enzymes responsible for carnitine synthesis in fungi and mammals. The study of mutants affected in the corresponding genes would be very useful to elucidate the plant carnitine biosynthetic pathway and to investigate further the role of carnitine in plant physiology.

  1. Application of lectin microarray to crude samples: differential glycan profiling of lec mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebe, Youji; Kuno, Atsushi; Uchiyama, Noboru; Koseki-Kuno, Shiori; Yamada, Masao; Sato, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2006-03-01

    We recently developed a novel system for lectin microarray based on the evanescent-field fluorescence-detection principle, by which even weak lectin-oligosaccharide interactions are detectable without a washing procedure. For its practical application, cell glycan analysis was performed for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and their glycan profile was compared with those of their glycosylation-defective Lec mutants. Each of the cell surface extracts gave a significantly different profile from that of the parental CHO cells in a manner reflecting denoted biosynthetic features. Hence, the developed lectin microarray system is considered to be fully applicable for differential glycan profiling of crude samples.

  2. IDH1 mutant structures reveal a mechanism of dominant inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shimin Zhao; Kun-Liang Guan

    2010-01-01

    @@ Pioneered by a major cancer genome sequencing project [1] and followed by numerous cancer genomic sequencing studies [2-4], the cytosolic isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH1) gene and mitochondria isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2) gene are found to be frequently mutated in low grade gliomas and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and to a much lower frequency in other types of tumors.

  3. Microscale oxygraphy reveals OXPHOS impairment in MRC mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, F; D'Amato, I; Jensen, P B; Ravaglia, S; Zeviani, M; Tiranti, V

    2012-03-01

    Given the complexity of the respiratory chain structure, assembly and regulation, the diagnostic workout for the identification of defects of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a major challenge. Spectrophotometric assays, that measure the activity of individual respiratory complexes in tissue and cell homogenates or isolated mitochondria, are highly specific, but their utilization is limited by the availability of sufficient biological material and intrinsic sensitivity. A further limitation is tissue specificity, which usually determines attenuation, or disappearance, in cultured fibroblasts, of defects detected in muscle or liver. We used numerous fibroblast cell lines derived from patients with OXPHOS deficiencies to set up experimental protocols required for the direct readout of cellular respiration using the Seahorse XF96 apparatus, which measures oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and extra-cellular acidification rate (ECAR) in 96 well plates. Results demonstrate that first level screening based on microscale oxygraphy is more sensitive, cheaper and rapid than spectrophotometry for the biochemical evaluation of cells from patients with suspected mitochondrial disorders.

  4. Microscale oxygraphy reveals OXPHOS impairment in MRC mutant cells

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Given the complexity of the respiratory chain structure, assembly and regulation, the diagnostic workout for the identification of defects of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is a major challenge. Spectrophotometric assays, that measure the activity of individual respiratory complexes in tissue and cell homogenates or isolated mitochondria, are highly specific, but their utilization is limited by the availability of sufficient biological material and intrinsic sensitivity. A further limitat...

  5. Developmental and Genotypic Variation in Leaf Wax Content and Composition, and in Expression of Wax Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea var. capitata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laila, Rawnak; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Suh, Mi Chung; Kim, Juyoung; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2017-01-01

    Cuticular waxes act as a protective barrier against environmental stresses. In the present study, we investigated developmental and genotypic variation in wax formation of cabbage lines, with a view to understand the related morphology, genetics and biochemistry. Our studies revealed that the relative expression levels of wax biosynthetic genes in the first-formed leaf of the highest-wax line remained constantly higher but were decreased in other genotypes with leaf aging. Similarly, the expression of most of the tested genes exhibited decrease from the inner leaves to the outer leaves of 5-month-old cabbage heads in the low-wax lines in contrast to the highest-wax line. In 10-week-old plants, expression of wax biosynthetic genes followed a quadratic function and was generally increased in the early developing leaves but substantially decreased at the older leaves. The waxy compounds in all cabbage lines were predominately C29-alkane, -secondary alcohol, and -ketone. Its deposition was increased with leaf age in 5-month-old plants. The high-wax lines had dense, prominent and larger crystals on the leaf surface compared to low-wax lines under scanning electron microscopy. Principal component analysis revealed that the higher expression of LTP2 genes in the lowest-wax line and the higher expression of CER3 gene in the highest-wax line were probably associated with the comparatively lower and higher wax content in those two lines, respectively. This study furthers our understanding of the relationships between the expression of wax biosynthetic genes and the wax deposition in cabbage lines. Highlight: In cabbage, expression of wax-biosynthetic genes was generally decreased in older and senescing leaves, while wax deposition was increased with leaf aging, and C29-hydrocarbon was predominant in the wax crystals. PMID:28119701

  6. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1 is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established.

  7. A biosynthetic pathway for hexanoic acid production in Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Yuna; Kim, Jun-Seob; Park, Jun-Bum; Heo, Paul; Lim, Jae Hyung; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Seo, Jin-Ho; Park, Jin Hwan; Koo, Hyun Min; Cho, Kwang Myung; Park, Jin-Byung; Ha, Suk-Jin; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2014-07-20

    Hexanoic acid can be used for diverse industrial applications and is a precursor for fine chemistry. Although some natural microorganisms have been screened and evolved to produce hexanoic acid, the construction of an engineered biosynthetic pathway for producing hexanoic acid in yeast has not been reported. Here we constructed hexanoic acid pathways in Kluyveromyces marxianus by integrating 5 combinations of seven genes (AtoB, BktB, Crt, Hbd, MCT1, Ter, and TES1), by which random chromosomal sites of the strain are overwritten by the new genes from bacteria and yeast. One recombinant strain, H4A, which contained AtoB, BktB, Crt, Hbd, and Ter, produced 154mg/L of hexanoic acid from galactose as the sole substrate. However, the hexanoic acid produced by the H4A strain was re-assimilated during the fermentation due to the reverse activity of AtoB, which condenses two acetyl-CoAs into a single acetoacetyl-CoA. This product instability could be overcome by the replacement of AtoB with a malonyl CoA-acyl carrier protein transacylase (MCT1) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results suggest that Mct1 provides a slow but stable acetyl-CoA chain elongation pathway, whereas the AtoB-mediated route is fast but unstable. In conclusion, hexanoic acid was produced for the first time in yeast by the construction of chain elongation pathways comprising 5-7 genes in K. marxianus.

  8. Expanding the product profile of a microbial alkane biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harger, Matthew; Zheng, Lei; Moon, Austin; Ager, Casey; An, Ju Hye; Choe, Chris; Lai, Yi-Ling; Mo, Benjamin; Zong, David; Smith, Matthew D; Egbert, Robert G; Mills, Jeremy H; Baker, David; Pultz, Ingrid Swanson; Siegel, Justin B

    2013-01-18

    Microbially produced alkanes are a new class of biofuels that closely match the chemical composition of petroleum-based fuels. Alkanes can be generated from the fatty acid biosynthetic pathway by the reduction of acyl-ACPs followed by decarbonylation of the resulting aldehydes. A current limitation of this pathway is the restricted product profile, which consists of n-alkanes of 13, 15, and 17 carbons in length. To expand the product profile, we incorporated a new part, FabH2 from Bacillus subtilis , an enzyme known to have a broader specificity profile for fatty acid initiation than the native FabH of Escherichia coli . When provided with the appropriate substrate, the addition of FabH2 resulted in an altered alkane product profile in which significant levels of n-alkanes of 14 and 16 carbons in length are produced. The production of even chain length alkanes represents initial steps toward the expansion of this recently discovered microbial alkane production pathway to synthesize complex fuels. This work was conceived and performed as part of the 2011 University of Washington international Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) project.

  9. Isolation and Biosynthetic Analysis of Haliamide, a New PKS-NRPS Hybrid Metabolite from the Marine Myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxobacteria of marine origin are rare and hard-to-culture microorganisms, but they genetically harbor high potential to produce novel antibiotics. An extensive investigation on the secondary metabolome of the unique marine myxobacterium Haliangium ochraceum SMP-2 led to the isolation of a new polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrid product, haliamide (1. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including NMR and HR-MS. Haliamide (1 showed cytotoxicity against HeLa-S3 cells with IC50 of 12 μM. Feeding experiments were performed to identify the biosynthetic building blocks of 1, revealing one benzoate, one alanine, two propionates, one acetate and one acetate-derived terminal methylene. The biosynthetic gene cluster of haliamide (hla, 21.7 kbp was characterized through the genome mining of the producer, allowing us to establish a model for the haliamide biosynthesis. The sulfotransferase (ST-thioesterase (TE domains encoded in hlaB appears to be responsible for the terminal alkene formation via decarboxylation.

  10. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  11. Establishment of pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root cultures for genetic interrogation of the hydrolyzable tannin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Nadia N; Bandaranayake, Pradeepa C G; Tian, Li

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to the numerous reports on the human therapeutic applications of hydrolyzable tannins (HTs), genes involved in their biosynthesis have not been identified at the molecular level from any plant species. Although we have previously identified candidate HT biosynthetic genes in pomegranate using transcriptomic and bioinformatic analyses, characterization of in planta enzyme function remains a critical step in biochemical pathway elucidation. We here report the establishment of a pomegranate (Punica granatum) hairy root culture system that produces HTs. Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains transformed with a binary vector harboring a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) gene were used for hairy root induction, allowing visual, non-destructive, detection of transgene incorporation. It also demonstrated that the pomegranate hairy root culture system is suitable for expressing heterologous genes (YFP in this case). Expression of 26 putative UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) genes, obtained from a pomegranate fruit peel (a tissue highly abundant in HTs) RNA-Seq library, were verified in wild type and hairy roots. In addition, two candidate UGTs for HT biosynthesis were identified based on HPLC and differential gene expression analyses of various pomegranate tissues. Together with in vitro enzyme activity assays, the hairy root culture system holds great promise for revealing the undivulged HT biosynthetic pathway using pomegranate as a model system.

  12. Nanolipoprotein particles comprising a natural rubber biosynthetic enzyme complex and related products, methods and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeprich, Paul D.; Whalen, Maureen

    2016-04-05

    Provided herein are nanolipoprotein particles that comprise a biosynthetic enzyme more particularly an enzyme capable of catalyzing rubber or other rubbers polymerization, and related assemblies, devices, methods and systems.

  13. Reconstitution of Biosynthetic Machinery for the Synthesis of the Highly Elaborated Indole Diterpene Penitrem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chengwei; Tagami, Koichi; Minami, Atsushi;

    2015-01-01

    KULNJ). Importantly, without conventional gene disruption, reconstitution of the biosynthetic machinery provided sufficient data to determine the pathway. It was thus demonstrated that the Aspergillus oryzae reconstitution system is a powerful method for studying the biosynthesis of complex natural products....

  14. Location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in the gliding bacteria Cytophaga hutchinsonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Johnson

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the recently published genome sequence of Cytophagahutchinsonii revealed an unusual collection of genes for an organism that can attackcrystalline cellulose. Consequently, questions were being raised by cellulase scientists, as towhat mechanism this organism uses to degrade its insoluble substrates. Cellulose, being ahighly polymeric compound and insoluble in water, cannot enter the cell walls ofmicroorganisms. Cellulose-degrading enzymes have therefore to be located on the surface ofthe cell wall or released extracellularly. The location of most cellulase enzymes has beenstudied. However, basic information on C. hutchinsonii cellulases is almost non-existent. Inthe present study, the location, formation and biosynthetic regulation of cellulases in C.hutchinsonii were demonstrated on different substrates. Various fractions isolated from C.hutchinsonii after cell rupture were assayed for carboxymethyl-cellulase activity (CMC.The cellulases were found to be predominantly cell-free during active growth on solka-flok,although 30% of activity was recorded on cell-bound enzymes. Relatively little CM-cellulase was formed when cells were grown on glucose and cellobiose. Apparently glucoseor labile substrates such as cellobiose seem to repress the formation of CM-cellulase. Thesefindings should provide some insight into possible hydrolysis mechanisms by C.hutchinsonii.

  15. BmPAH catalyzes the initial melanin biosynthetic step in Bombyx mori.

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    Ping Chen

    Full Text Available Pigmentation during insect development is a primal adaptive requirement. In the silkworm, melanin is the primary component of larval pigments. The rate limiting substrate in melanin synthesis is tyrosine, which is converted from phenylalanine by the rate-limiting enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH. While the role of tyrosine, derived from phenylalanine, in the synthesis of fiber proteins has long been known, the role of PAH in melanin synthesis is still unknown in silkworm. To define the importance of PAH, we cloned the cDNA sequence of BmPAH and expressed its complete coding sequence using the Bac-to-Bac baculovirus expression system. Purified recombinant protein had high PAH activity, some tryptophan hydroxylase activity, but no tyrosine hydroxylase activity, which are typical properties of PAH in invertebrates. Because melanin synthesis is most robust during the embryonic stage and larval integument recoloring stage, we injected BmPAH dsRNA into silkworm eggs and observed that decreasing BmPAH mRNA reduced neonatal larval tyrosine and caused insect coloration to fail. In vitro cultures and injection of 4(th instar larval integuments with PAH inhibitor revealed that PAH activity was essential for larval marking coloration. These data show that BmPAH is necessary for melanin synthesis and we propose that conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine by PAH is the first step in the melanin biosynthetic pathway in the silkworm.

  16. Insulin Biosynthetic Interaction Network Component, TMEM24, Facilitates Insulin Reserve Pool Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pottekat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin homeostasis in pancreatic β cells is now recognized as a critical element in the progression of obesity and type II diabetes (T2D. Proteins that interact with insulin to direct its sequential synthesis, folding, trafficking, and packaging into reserve granules in order to manage release in response to elevated glucose remain largely unknown. Using a conformation-based approach combined with mass spectrometry, we have generated the insulin biosynthetic interaction network (insulin BIN, a proteomic roadmap in the β cell that describes the sequential interacting partners of insulin along the secretory axis. The insulin BIN revealed an abundant C2 domain-containing transmembrane protein 24 (TMEM24 that manages glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from a reserve pool of granules, a critical event impaired in patients with T2D. The identification of TMEM24 in the context of a comprehensive set of sequential insulin-binding partners provides a molecular description of the insulin secretory pathway in β cells.

  17. Spliced X-box binding protein 1 couples the unfolded protein response to hexosamine biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao V; Deng, Yingfeng; Gao, Ningguo; Pedrozo, Zully; Li, Dan L; Morales, Cyndi R; Criollo, Alfredo; Luo, Xiang; Tan, Wei; Jiang, Nan; Lehrman, Mark A; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lee, Ann-Hwee; Lavandero, Sergio; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Ferdous, Anwarul; Gillette, Thomas G; Scherer, Philipp E; Hill, Joseph A

    2014-03-13

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) generates uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) for glycan synthesis and O-linked GlcNAc (O-GlcNAc) protein modifications. Despite the established role of the HBP in metabolism and multiple diseases, regulation of the HBP remains largely undefined. Here, we show that spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), the most conserved signal transducer of the unfolded protein response (UPR), is a direct transcriptional activator of the HBP. We demonstrate that the UPR triggers HBP activation via Xbp1s-dependent transcription of genes coding for key, rate-limiting enzymes. We further establish that this previously unrecognized UPR-HBP axis is triggered in a variety of stress conditions. Finally, we demonstrate a physiologic role for the UPR-HBP axis by showing that acute stimulation of Xbp1s in heart by ischemia/reperfusion confers robust cardioprotection in part through induction of the HBP. Collectively, these studies reveal that Xbp1s couples the UPR to the HBP to protect cells under stress.

  18. Cloning and expression analyses of the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in mulberry plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiwu; Shuai, Qin; Chen, Hu; Fan, Li; Zeng, Qiwei; He, Ningjia

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins are natural food colorants produced by plants that play important roles in their growth and development. Mulberry fruits are rich in anthocyanins, which are the most important active components of mulberry and have many potentially beneficial effects on human health. The study of anthocyanin biosynthesis will bring benefits for quality improvement and industrial exploration of mulberry fruits. In the present study, nine putative genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis in mulberry plants were identified and cloned. Sequence analysis revealed that the mulberry anthocyanin biosynthetic genes were conserved and had counterparts in other plants. Spatial transcriptional analysis showed detectable expression of eight of these genes in different tissues. The results of expression and UPLC analyses in two mulberry cultivars with differently colored fruit indicated that anthocyanin concentrations correlated with the expression levels of genes associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis including CHS1, CHI, F3H1, F3'H1, and ANS during the fruit ripening process. The present studies provide insight into anthocyanin biosynthesis in mulberry plants and may facilitate genetic engineering for improvement of the anthocyanin content in mulberry fruit.

  19. Marine Actinobacteria from the Gulf of California: diversity, abundance and secondary metabolite biosynthetic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril-Espinosa, Amayaly; Freel, Kelle C.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf of California is a coastal marine ecosystem characterized as having abundant biological resources and a high level of endemism. In this work we report the isolation and characterization of Actinobacteria from different sites in the western Gulf of California. We collected 126 sediment samples and isolated on average 3.1–38.3 Actinobacterial strains from each sample. Phylogenetic analysis of 136 strains identified them as members of the genera Actinomadura, Micromonospora, Nocardiopsis, Nonomuraea, Saccharomonospora, Salinispora, Streptomyces and Verrucosispora. These strains were grouped into 26–56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) based on 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98–100 %. At 98 % sequence identity, three OTUs appear to represent new taxa while nine (35 %) have only been reported from marine environments. Sixty-three strains required seawater for growth. These fell into two OTUs at the 98 % identity level and include one that failed to produce aerial hyphae and was only distantly related (≤95.5 % 16S identity) to any previously cultured Streptomyces sp. Phylogenetic analyses of ketosynthase domains associated with polyketide synthase genes revealed sequences that ranged from 55 to 99 % nucleotide identity to experimentally characterized biosynthetic pathways suggesting that some may be associated with the production of new secondary metabolites. These results indicate that marine sediments from the Gulf of California harbor diverse Actinobacterial taxa with the potential to produce new secondary metabolites. PMID:23229438

  20. Minimization of biosynthetic costs in adaptive gene expression responses of yeast to environmental changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Vilaprinyo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Yeast successfully adapts to an environmental stress by altering physiology and fine-tuning metabolism. This fine-tuning is achieved through regulation of both gene expression and protein activity, and it is shaped by various physiological requirements. Such requirements impose a sustained evolutionary pressure that ultimately selects a specific gene expression profile, generating a suitable adaptive response to each environmental change. Although some of the requirements are stress specific, it is likely that others are common to various situations. We hypothesize that an evolutionary pressure for minimizing biosynthetic costs might have left signatures in the physicochemical properties of proteins whose gene expression is fine-tuned during adaptive responses. To test this hypothesis we analyze existing yeast transcriptomic data for such responses and investigate how several properties of proteins correlate to changes in gene expression. Our results reveal signatures that are consistent with a selective pressure for economy in protein synthesis during adaptive response of yeast to various types of stress. These signatures differentiate two groups of adaptive responses with respect to how cells manage expenditure in protein biosynthesis. In one group, significant trends towards downregulation of large proteins and upregulation of small ones are observed. In the other group we find no such trends. These results are consistent with resource limitation being important in the evolution of the first group of stress responses.

  1. Accumulation of Kaempferitrin and Expression of Phenyl-Propanoid Biosynthetic Genes in Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shicheng Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus is cultivated worldwide for its fiber; however, the medicinal properties of this plant are currently attracting increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the expression levels of genes involved in the biosynthesis of kaempferitrin, a compound with many biological functions, in different kenaf organs. We found that phenylalanine ammonia lyase (HcPAL was more highly expressed in stems than in other organs. Expression levels of cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (HcC4H and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (Hc4CL were highest in mature leaves, followed by stems and young leaves, and lowest in roots and mature flowers. The expression of chalcone synthase (HcCHS, chalcone isomerase (HcCHI, and flavone 3-hydroxylase (HcF3H was highest in young flowers, whereas that of flavone synthase (HcFLS was highest in leaves. An analysis of kaempferitrin accumulation in the different organs of kenaf revealed that the accumulation of this compound was considerably higher (>10-fold in leaves than in other organs. On the basis of a comparison of kaempferitrin contents with the expression levels of different genes in different organs, we speculate that HcFLS plays an important regulatory role in the kaempferitrin biosynthetic pathway in kenaf.

  2. Genome mining unveils widespread natural product biosynthetic capacity in human oral microbe Streptococcus mutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Hao, Tingting; Xie, Zhoujie; Horsman, Geoff P.; Chen, Yihua

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a major pathogen causing human dental caries. As a Gram-positive bacterium with a small genome (about 2 Mb) it is considered a poor source of natural products. Due to a recent explosion in genomic data available for S. mutans strains, we were motivated to explore the natural product production potential of this organism. Bioinformatic characterization of 169 publically available genomes of S. mutans from human dental caries revealed a surprisingly rich source of natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. Anti-SMASH analysis identified one nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster, seven polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters and 136 hybrid PKS/NRPS gene clusters. In addition, 211 ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) clusters and 615 bacteriocin precursors were identified by a combined analysis using BAGEL and anti-SMASH. S. mutans harbors a rich and diverse natural product genetic capacity, which underscores the importance of probing the human microbiome and revisiting species that have traditionally been overlooked as “poor” sources of natural products. PMID:27869143

  3. Single cell genome amplification accelerates identification of the apratoxin biosynthetic pathway from a complex microbial assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashel V Grindberg

    Full Text Available Filamentous marine cyanobacteria are extraordinarily rich sources of structurally novel, biomedically relevant natural products. To understand their biosynthetic origins as well as produce increased supplies and analog molecules, access to the clustered biosynthetic genes that encode for the assembly enzymes is necessary. Complicating these efforts is the universal presence of heterotrophic bacteria in the cell wall and sheath material of cyanobacteria obtained from the environment and those grown in uni-cyanobacterial culture. Moreover, the high similarity in genetic elements across disparate secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways renders imprecise current gene cluster targeting strategies and contributes sequence complexity resulting in partial genome coverage. Thus, it was necessary to use a dual-method approach of single-cell genomic sequencing based on multiple displacement amplification (MDA and metagenomic library screening. Here, we report the identification of the putative apratoxin. A biosynthetic gene cluster, a potent cancer cell cytotoxin with promise for medicinal applications. The roughly 58 kb biosynthetic gene cluster is composed of 12 open reading frames and has a type I modular mixed polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS organization and features loading and off-loading domain architecture never previously described. Moreover, this work represents the first successful isolation of a complete biosynthetic gene cluster from Lyngbya bouillonii, a tropical marine cyanobacterium renowned for its production of diverse bioactive secondary metabolites.

  4. Effect of different immunosuppressive drugs on calcineurin and its mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Several mutants in Loop7 region and near Loop7 region of calcineurin A (CN A) subunit have been constructed and purified using site-directed mutagenesis.Their phosphatase activity and the corresponding solution conformation were examined.Their phosphatase activities between wild-type CN and mutants were compared to identify the interaction of different immunosuppressive drugs with CN.The results showed that the phosphatase activities of the mutants at Loop7 were much higher than the one of wild-type CN.Furthermore,circular dichroism spectra of the mutants revealed that their solution conformations gave rise in changes in native structure of the protein.Cyclophilin-CyclosporinA (CyP-CsA) significantly inhibited the phosphatase activity of wild-type CN,and had no effects on the phosphatase activity of mutants in Loop7 region,which indicates that the site-directed mutagenesis at Loop7 region made a significant change in the interaction between CyP-CsA and CN.Examination of the activities of these mutants resulted in the presence of immunosuppressive component from traditional Chinese drugs.The component of Chinese drug,ZIP1,could directly inhibit both CN and CN mutants without drug binding protein.These results suggest that the Loop7 region is an important structural area involved in the inhibition by CyP-CsA.It is valuable to further study the inhibition by ZIP1.

  5. Transcriptomics analyses reveal global roles of the regulator AveI in Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Chen, Jun; Jiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Weiwen; Jiang, Weihong; Lu, Yinhua

    2009-09-01

    In our previous studies, AveI was identified as a negative regulator for avermectin biosynthesis in Streptomyces avermitilis NRRL8165, and the aveI-null mutant of NRRL8165 could produce at least 10-fold more avermectin B1a than its wild-type strain. In order to explore the regulatory mechanism by which aveI affects avermectin biosynthesis, in this study, we performed a global comparative gene expression analysis between aveI deletion mutant 8165DeltaI and its wild-type strain using NimbleGen microarrays in combination with real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR. The results showed the aveI deletion has caused global changes beyond the avermectin biosynthetic gene cluster. The aveI gene not only negatively affected expression of the avermectin biosynthetic gene cluster but also affected expression of oligomycin and filipin biosynthetic clusters. In addition, the genes involved in precursor biosyntheses for avermectin or other antibiotics, such as crotonyl-CoA reductase and methylmalonyl-CoA decarboxylase, were also upregulated in aveI mutant. Furthermore, genes in several key primary metabolic pathways, such as protein synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, were found downregulated in the mutant. These results suggested that the aveI gene may be functioning as a global regulator involved in directing carbon flux from primary to secondary metabolism.

  6. Genome mining of the Streptomyces avermitilis genome and development of genome-minimized hosts for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Haruo; Kazuo, Shin-ya; Omura, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    To date, several actinomycete genomes have been completed and annotated. Among them, Streptomyces microorganisms are of major pharmaceutical interest because they are a rich source of numerous secondary metabolites. S. avermitilis is an industrial microorganism used for the production of an anthelmintic agent, avermectin, which is a commercially important antiparasitic agent in human and veterinary medicine, and agricultural pesticides. Genome analysis of S. avermitilis provides significant information for not only industrial applications but also understanding the features of this genus. On genome mining of S. avermitilis, the microorganism has been found to harbor at least 38 secondary metabolic gene clusters and 46 insertion sequence (IS)-like sequences on the genome, which have not been searched so far. A significant use of the genome data of Streptomyces microorganisms is the construction of a versatile host for heterologous expression of exogenous biosynthetic gene clusters by genetic engineering. Since S. avermitilis is used as an industrial microorganism, the microorganism is already optimized for the efficient supply of primary metabolic precursors and biochemical energy to support multistep biosynthesis. The feasibility of large-deletion mutants of S. avermitilis has been confirmed by heterologous expression of more than 20 exogenous biosynthetic gene clusters.

  7. Hydroxycinnamic acids and UV-B depletion: Profiling and biosynthetic gene expression in flesh and peel of wild-type and hp-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvenzani, Valentina; Castagna, Antonella; Ranieri, Annamaria; Tonelli, Chiara; Petroni, Katia

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids (HCAs) are phenolic compounds widely found in most plant families. Aim of the present work was to investigate their accumulation and biosynthetic gene expression in presence or absence of UV-B radiation in tomato fruits of wild-type and hp-1, a mutant characterized by exaggerated photoresponsiveness and increased fruit pigmentation. Gene expression and HCAs content were higher in hp-1 than in wild type peel and UV-B depletion determined a decrease in HCAs accumulation in wild-type and an increase in hp-1 fruits, generally in accordance with biosynthetic gene expression. In flesh, despite a similar transcript level of most genes between the two genotypes, HCAs content was generally higher in wild type than in hp-1, although remaining at a lower level with respect to wild type peel. Under UV-B depletion, a general reduction of HCAs content was observed in wild-type flesh, whereas an increase in the content of p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid was observed in hp-1 flesh.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Streptomyces coelicolor TetR-Like Protein ActR Alone and in Complex with Actinorhodin or the Actinorhodin Biosynthetic Precursor (S)-DNPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willems,A.; Tahlan, K.; Taguchi, T.; Zhang, K.; Lee, Z.; Ichinose, K.; Junop, M.; Nodwell, J.

    2008-01-01

    Actinorhodin, an antibiotic produced by Streptomyces coelicolor, is exported from the cell by the ActA efflux pump. actA is divergently transcribed from actR, which encodes a TetR-like transcriptional repressor. We showed previously that ActR represses transcription by binding to an operator from the actA/actR intergenic region. Importantly, actinorhodin itself or various actinorhodin biosynthetic intermediates can cause ActR to dissociate from its operator, leading to derepression. This suggests that ActR may mediate timely self-resistance to an endogenously produced antibiotic by responding to one of its biosynthetic precursors. Here, we report the structural basis for this precursor-mediated derepression with crystal structures of homodimeric ActR by itself and in complex with either actinorhodin or the actinorhodin biosynthetic intermediate (S)-DNPA [4-dihydro-9-hydroxy-1-methyl-10-oxo-3-H-naphtho-[2, 3-c]-pyran-3-(S)-acetic acid]. The ligand-binding tunnel in each ActR monomer has a striking hydrophilic/hydrophobic/hydrophilic arrangement of surface residues that accommodate either one hexacyclic actinorhodin molecule or two back-to-back tricyclic (S)-DNPA molecules. Moreover, our work also reveals the strongest structural evidence to date that TetR-mediated antibiotic resistance may have been acquired from an antibiotic-producer organism.

  9. The sub-cellular localisation of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes, CrtRb2 and PSY2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasare, Stefania; Wright, Kathryn; Campbell, Raymond; Morris, Wayne; Ducreux, Laurence; Chapman, Sean; Bramley, Peter; Fraser, Paul; Roberts, Alison; Taylor, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Carotenoids are isoprenoids with important biological roles both for plants and animals. The yellow flesh colour of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers is a quality trait dependent on the types and levels of carotenoids that accumulate. The carotenoid biosynthetic pathway is well characterised, facilitating the successful engineering of carotenoid content in numerous crops including potato. However, a clear understanding concerning the factors regulating carotenoid accumulation and localisation in plant storage organs, such as tubers, is lacking. In the present study, the localisation of key carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes was investigated, as one of the unexplored factors that could influence the accumulation of carotenoids in potato tubers. Stable transgenic potato plants were generated by over-expressing β-CAROTENE HYDROXYLASE 2 (CrtRb2) and PHYTOENE SYNTHASE 2 (PSY2) genes, fused to red fluorescent protein (RFP). Gene expression and carotenoid levels were both significantly increased, confirming functionality of the fluorescently tagged proteins. Confocal microscopy studies revealed different sub-organellar localisations of CrtRb2-RFP and PSY2-RFP within amyloplasts. CrtRb2 was detected in small vesicular structures, inside amyloplasts, whereas PSY2 was localised in the stroma of amyloplasts. We conclude that it is important to consider the location of biosynthetic enzymes when engineering the carotenoid metabolic pathway in storage organs such as tubers.

  10. Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase of Escherichia coli, Identification of a mutant enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove-Jensen, Bjarne; Nygaard, Per

    1982-01-01

    , stimulated the mutant enzyme. The activity of PRib-PP synthetase in crude extract was higher in the mutant than in the parent. When starved for purines an accumulation of PRib-PP was observed in the parent strain, while the pool decreased in the mutant. During pyrimidine starvation derepression of PRib....... Kinetic analysis of the mutant PRib-PP synthetase revealed an apparent Km for ATP and ribose 5-phosphate of 1.0 mM and 240 μM respectively, compared to 60 μM and 45 μM respectively for the wild-type enzyme. ADP, which inhibits the wild-type enzyme at a concentration of 0.5 mM ribose 5-phosphate...

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1, a Gramicidin S- and d-Phenylalanyl-l-Propyl Diketopiperazine-Deficient Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Faizah N.; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Woodward, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1 mutant deficient in gramicidin S (GS) and d-phenylalanyl-l-propyl diketopiperazine (DKP) formation. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (6,301,904 bp, 43.20% G+C content) without any plasmid. The complete genome sequence enables further investigation of the biosynthetic mechanism and the biological function of gramicidin S. PMID:26679577

  12. Targeted Gene Disruption of the Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptomyces sp. US24 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiha Sioud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have previously isolated a new actinomycete strain from Tunisian soil called Streptomyces sp. US24, and have shown that it produces two bioactive molecules including a Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro diketopiperazine (DKP. To identify the structural genes responsible for the synthesis of this DKP derivative, a PCR amplification (696 bp was carried out using the Streptomyces sp. US24 genomic DNA as template and two degenerate oligonucleotides designed by analogy with genes encoding peptide synthetases (NRPS. The detection of DKP derivative biosynthetic pathway of the Streptomyces sp. US24 strain was then achieved by gene disruption via homologous recombination using a suicide vector derived from the conjugative plasmid pSET152 and containing the PCR product. Chromatography analysis, biological tests and spectroscopic studies of supernatant cultures of the wild-type Streptomyces sp. US24 strain and three mutants obtained by this gene targeting disruption approach showed that the amplified DNA fragment is required for Cyclo (L-Phe, L-Pro biosynthesis in Streptomyces sp. US24 strain. This DKP derivative seems to be produced either directly via a nonribosomal pathway or as a side product in the course of nonribosomal synthesis of a longer peptide.

  13. Fructan Biosynthetic and Breakdown Enzymes in Dicots Evolved From Different Invertases. Expression of Fructan Genes Throughout Chicory Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Van den Ende

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructans are fructose-based oligo- and polymers that serve as reserve carbohydrates in many plant species. The biochemistry of fructan biosynthesis in dicots has been resolved, and the respective cDNAs have been cloned. Recent progress has now succeeded in elucidating the biochemistry and molecular biology of fructan biodegradation in chicory, an economically important species used for commercial inulin extraction. Unlike fructan biosynthetic genes that originated from vacuolar-type invertase, fructan exohydrolases (FEHs seem to have evolved from a cell-wall invertase ancestor gene that later obtained a low iso-electric point and a vacuolar targeting signal. Expression analysis reveals that fructan enzymes are controlled mainly at the transcriptional level. Using chicory as a model system, northern analysis was consistent with enzymatic activity measurements and observed carbohydrate changes throughout its development.

  14. Exploitation of the Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) genome sequence for discovery of new natural products and biosynthetic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challis, Gregory L

    2014-02-01

    Streptomyces, and related genera of Actinobacteria, are renowned for their ability to produce antibiotics and other bioactive natural products with a wide range of applications in medicine and agriculture. Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) is a model organism that has been used for more than five decades to study the genetic and biochemical basis for the production of bioactive metabolites. In 2002, the complete genome sequence of S. coelicolor was published. This greatly accelerated progress in understanding the biosynthesis of metabolites known or suspected to be produced by S. coelicolor and revealed that streptomycetes have far greater potential to produce bioactive natural products than suggested by classical bioassay-guided isolation studies. In this article, efforts to exploit the S. coelicolor genome sequence for the discovery of novel natural products and biosynthetic pathways are summarized.

  15. New Role of Rosea1 in Regulating Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Hairy Root of Snapdragon (Antirrhinum majus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the transcriptional regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in hairy roots system by ectopically expressing Rosea1 and Delila and we found something different from previous research. The RT-PCR results revealed that Rosea1 could activate early and late biosynthetic genes tested, including CHS, DFR and ANS. Delila enhanced the expression of CHS weakly, but did not influence DFR or ANS. The two regulators, Rosea1 and Delila, failed to interplay each other. It was speculated that Delila would be ineffective in the absence of Rosea1, another MYB factor specifically controlling CHS may exist. This investigation provided a new way to increase anthocyanin content by over expressing a MYB factor, potentially to be used in the field of agriculture and food

  16. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein...... metabolisms predicted for S. collinus Tü 365 includes PKS, NRPS, PKS-NRPS hybrids, a lanthipeptide, terpenes and siderophores. While some of these gene clusters were found to contain genes related to known secondary metabolites, which also could be detected in HPLC–MS analyses, most of the uncharacterized...... biosynthesis interacting with elongation factor EF-Tu. Genome Mining revealed 32 gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of diverse secondary metabolites in the genome of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, indicating an enormous biosynthetic potential of this strain. The structural diversity of secondary...

  17. Epilepsy-Related Slack Channel Mutants Lead to Channel Over-Activity by Two Different Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong-Yao Tang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve sodium-activated potassium channel (KCNT1, Slack genetic mutants have been identified from severe early-onset epilepsy patients. The changes in biophysical properties of these mutants and the underlying mechanisms causing disease remain elusive. Here, we report that seven of the 12 mutations increase, whereas one mutation decreases, the channel’s sodium sensitivity. Two of the mutants exhibit channel over-activity only when the intracellular Na+ ([Na+]i concentration is ∼80 mM. In contrast, single-channel data reveal that all 12 mutants increase the maximal open probability (Po. We conclude that these mutant channels lead to channel over-activity predominantly by increasing the ability of sodium binding to activate the channel, which is indicated by its maximal Po. The sodium sensitivity of these epilepsy causing mutants probably determines the [Na+]i concentration at which these mutants exert their pathological effects.

  18. Biosynthetic mechanism for sunscreens of the biocontrol agent Lysobacter enzymogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Lysobacter are ubiquitous environmental bacteria emerging as novel biocontrol agents and new sources of anti-infectives. So far, very little effort has been invested in the study of the biology of these Gram-negative gliding bacteria. Many Lysobacter species are characterized by their yellow-orange appearance. Using transposon mutagenesis, we identified a stand-alone polyketide synthase (PKS gene cluster required for the pigment production in L. enzymogenes OH11. The yellow pigments were abolished in the "white" mutants generated by target-specific deletions of ketosynthase (KS, acyl carrier protein, or ketoreductase. Spectroscopic data suggested that the pigments belong to xanthomonadin-like aryl polyenes. Polyene-type polyketides are known to be biosynthesized by modular PKS (Type I, not by stand-alone PKS (Type II which always contain the heterodimer KS-CLF (chain-length factor as the key catalytic component. Remarkably, this aryl polyene PKS complex only contains the KS (ORF17, but not the CLF. Instead, a hypothetical protein (ORF16 is located immediately next to ORF17. ORF16-17 homologs are widespread in numerous uncharacterized microbial genomes, in which an ORF17 homolog is always accompanied by an ORF16 homolog. The deletion of ORF16 eliminated pigment production, and homology modeling suggested that ORF16 shares a structural similarity to the N-terminal half of CLF. A point-mutation of glutamine (Q166A that is the conserved active site of known CLF abolished pigment production. The "white" mutants are significantly more sensitive to UV/visible light radiation or H2O2 treatment than the wild type. These results unveil the first example of Type II PKS-synthesized polyene pigments and show that the metabolites serve as Lysobacter "sunscreens" that are important for the survival of these ubiquitous environmental organisms.

  19. Nonlinear biosynthetic gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production by Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijland, Jeroen G; Ebbendorf, Bjorg; Woszczynska, Marta; Boer, Rémon; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2010-11-01

    Industrial penicillin production levels by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum increased dramatically by classical strain improvement. High-yielding strains contain multiple copies of the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster that encodes three key enzymes of the β-lactam biosynthetic pathway. We have analyzed the gene cluster dose effect on penicillin production using the high-yielding P. chrysogenum strain DS17690 that was cured from its native clusters. The amount of penicillin V produced increased with the penicillin biosynthetic gene cluster number but was saturated at high copy numbers. Likewise, transcript levels of the biosynthetic genes pcbAB [δ-(l-α-aminoadipyl)-l-cysteinyl-d-valine synthetase], pcbC (isopenicillin N synthase), and penDE (acyltransferase) correlated with the cluster copy number. Remarkably, the protein level of acyltransferase, which localizes to peroxisomes, was saturated already at low cluster copy numbers. At higher copy numbers, intracellular levels of isopenicillin N increased, suggesting that the acyltransferase reaction presents a limiting step at a high gene dose. Since the number and appearance of the peroxisomes did not change significantly with the gene cluster copy number, we conclude that the acyltransferase activity is limiting for penicillin biosynthesis at high biosynthetic gene cluster copy numbers. These results suggest that at a high penicillin production level, productivity is limited by the peroxisomal acyltransferase import activity and/or the availability of coenzyme A (CoA)-activated side chains.

  20. Isolation of New Gravitropic Mutants under Hypergravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Akiko; Toyota, Masatsugu; Shimada, Masayoshi; Mekata, Mika; Kurata, Tetsuya; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo T.

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetics is a powerful approach used to link genotypes and phenotypes, and mutant screening/analysis has provided deep insights into many aspects of plant physiology. Gravitropism is a tropistic response in plants, in which hypocotyls and stems sense the direction of gravity and grow upward. Previous studies of gravitropic mutants have suggested that shoot endodermal cells in Arabidopsis stems and hypocotyls are capable of sensing gravity (i.e., statocytes). In the present study, we report a new screening system using hypergravity conditions to isolate enhancers of gravitropism mutants, and we also describe a rapid and efficient genome mapping method, using next-generation sequencing (NGS) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based markers. Using the endodermal-amyloplast less 1 (eal1) mutant, which exhibits defective development of endodermal cells and gravitropism, we found that hypergravity (10 g) restored the reduced gravity responsiveness in eal1 hypocotyls and could, therefore, be used to obtain mutants with further reduction in gravitropism in the eal1 background. Using the new screening system, we successfully isolated six ene (enhancer of eal1) mutants that exhibited little or no gravitropism under hypergravity conditions, and using NGS and map-based cloning with SNP markers, we narrowed down the potential causative genes, which revealed a new genetic network for shoot gravitropism in Arabidopsis.

  1. Correction of defective protein kinesis of human P-glycoprotein mutants by substrates and modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, T W; Clarke, D M

    1997-01-10

    There is growing evidence that abnormal protein folding or trafficking (protein kinesis) leads to diseases. We have used P-glycoprotein as a model protein to develop strategies to overcome defects in protein kinesis. Misprocessed mutants of the human P-glycoprotein are retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as core-glycosylated biosynthetic intermediates and rapidly degraded. Synthesis of the mutant proteins in the presence of drug substrates or modulators such as capsaicin, cyclosporin, vinblastine, or verapamil, however, resulted in the appearance of a fully glycosylated and functional protein at the cell surface. These effects were dose-dependent and occurred within a few hours after the addition of substrate. The ability to facilitate processing of the misfolded mutants appeared to be independent of the cell lines used and location of the mutation. P-glycoproteins with mutations in transmembrane segments, extracellular or cytoplasmic loops, the nucleotide-binding domains, or the linker region were processed to the fully mature form in the presence of these substrates. These drug substrates or modulators acted as specific chemical chaperones for P-glycoprotein because they were ineffective on the deltaF508 mutant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. Therefore, one possible strategy to prevent protein misfolding is to carry out synthesis in the presence of specific substrates or modulators of the protein.

  2. The aba mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana is impaired in epoxy-carotenoid biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rock, C.D.; Zeevaart, J.A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-09-01

    The three mutant alleles of the ABA locus of Arabidopsis thaliana result in plants that are deficient in the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA). The authors have used {sup 18}O{sub 2} to label ABA in water-stressed leaves of mutant and wild-type Arabidopsis. Analysis by selected ion monitoring and tandem mass spectrometry of ({sup 18}O)ABA and its catabolites, phaseic acid and ABA-glucose ester ({beta}-D-glucopyranosyl abscisate), indicates that the aba genotypes are impaired in ABA biosynthesis and have a small ABA precursor pool of compounds that contain oxygens on the rings, presumably oxygenated carotenoids (xanthophylls). Quantitation of the carotenoids form mutant and wild-type leaves establishes that the aba alleles cause a deficiency of the epoxy-carotenoids violaxanthin and neoxanthin and an accumulation of their biosynthetic precursor, zeaxanthin. These results provide evidence that ABA is synthesized by oxidative cleavage of epoxy-carotenoids (the indirect pathway). Furthermore the carotenoid mutant they describe undergoes normal greening. Thus the aba alleles provide an opportunity to study the physiological roles of epoxy-carotenoids in photosynthesis in a higher plants.

  3. Mutants of Streptomyces cattleya defective in the synthesis of a factor required for thienamycin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, T; Roach, C; Ruby, C; Taylor, D; Preisig, C; Reeves, C

    1994-09-01

    Thienamycin non-producing mutants of Streptomydes cattleya were identified that displayed a cross-feeding relationship. A diffusible product from one of these mutants (RK-11) resulted in restoration of thienamycin production when fed to cultures of another mutant (RK-4). In vivo radiolabeling experiments were conducted to test whether the RK-11 mutant produced a late biosynthetic intermediate which contained a carbapenem ring and a cysteaminyl and/or a hydroxyethyl side chain. Both [35S]cystine and [methyl-3H]methionine were used to label the RK-11 product which was then fed to RK-4 cultures. None of the thienamycin subsequently produced by RK-4 converter cells was labeled, implying the lack of either side chain of the thienamycin molecule in the RK-11 product. Further stability studies suggested that the RK-11 product does not contain a carbapenem ring. Additional feeding experiments with RK-4 cells also ruled out the possibility that the RK-11 product is a co-factor necessary for thienamycin production. It is concluded that the RK-11 product may regulate expression of the thienamycin gene cluster.

  4. Effective Antibiofilm Polyketides against Staphylococcus aureus from the Pyranonaphthoquinone Biosynthetic Pathways of Streptomyces Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Terhi; San Martin Galindo, Paola; Taguchi, Takaaki; Manner, Suvi; Vuorela, Pia M; Ichinose, Koji; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko; Fallarero, Adyary

    2015-10-01

    Streptomyces bacteria are renowned for their ability to produce bioactive secondary metabolites. Recently, synthetic biology has enabled the production of intermediates and shunt products, which may have altered biological activities compared to the end products of the pathways. Here, we have evaluated the potential of recently isolated alnumycins and other closely related pyranonaphthoquinone (PNQ) polyketides against Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. The antimicrobial potency of the compounds against planktonic cells and biofilms was determined by redox dye-based viability staining, and the antibiofilm efficacy of the compounds was confirmed by viable counting. A novel antistaphylococcal polyketide, alnumycin D, was identified. Unexpectedly, the C-ribosylated pathway shunt product alnumycin D was more active against planktonic and biofilm cells than the pathway end product alnumycin A, where a ribose unit has been converted into a dioxane moiety. The evaluation of the antibiofilm potential of other alnumycins revealed that the presence of the ribose moiety in pyranose form is essential for high activity against preformed biofilms. Furthermore, the antibiofilm potential of other closely related PNQ polyketides was examined. Based on their previously reported activity against planktonic S. aureus cells, granaticin B, kalafungin, and medermycin were also selected for testing, and among them, granaticin B was found to be the most potent against preformed biofilms. The most active antibiofilm PNQs, alnumycin D and granaticin B, share several structural features that may be important for their antibiofilm activity. They are uncharged, glycosylated, and also contain a similar oxygenation pattern of the lateral naphthoquinone ring. These findings highlight the potential of antibiotic biosynthetic pathways as a source of effective antibiofilm compounds.

  5. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlhut, Steen G; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh; Harrison, Scott J; Maury, Jérôme; Neves, Ana Rute; Forster, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer's disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin pathway in Escherichia coli. We propose a novel biosynthetic pathway from the amino acid, tyrosine, utilizing nine heterologous enzymes. The pathway proceeds via the synthesis of two flavanones never produced in microorganisms before--garbanzol and resokaempferol. We show for the first time a functional biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols.

  6. Discovery of Unclustered Fungal Indole Diterpene Biosynthetic Pathways through Combinatorial Pathway Reassembly in Engineered Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Man-Cheng; Lin, Hsiao-Ching; Li, Dehai; Zou, Yi; Li, Jian; Xu, Wei; Cacho, Ralph A; Hillenmeyer, Maureen E; Garg, Neil K; Tang, Yi

    2015-11-01

    The structural diversity and biological activities of fungal indole diterpenes (IDTs) are generated in large part by the IDT cyclases (IDTCs). Identifying different IDTCs from IDT biosynthetic pathways is therefore important toward understanding how these enzymes introduce chemical diversity from a common linear precursor. However, IDTCs involved in the cyclization of the well-known aflavinine subgroup of IDTs have not been discovered. Here, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a heterologous host and a phylogenetically guided enzyme mining approach, we combinatorially assembled IDT biosynthetic pathways using IDTCs homologues identified from different fungal hosts. We identified the genetically standalone IDTCs involved in the cyclization of aflavinine and anominine and produced new IDTs not previously isolated. The cyclization mechanisms of the new IDTCs were proposed based on the yeast reconstitution results. Our studies demonstrate heterologous pathway assembly is a useful tool in the reconstitution of unclustered biosynthetic pathways.

  7. Volatile terpenes from actinomycetes: a biosynthetic study correlating chemical analyses to genome data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Patrick; Citron, Christian A; Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2013-11-25

    The volatile terpenes of 24 actinomycetes whose genomes have been sequenced (or are currently being sequenced) were collected by use of a closed-loop stripping apparatus and identified by GC/MS. The analytical data were compared against a phylogenetic analysis of all 192 currently available sequences of bacterial terpene cyclases (excluding geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases). In addition to the several groups of terpenes with known biosynthetic origin, selinadienes were identified as a large group of biosynthetically related sesquiterpenes that are produced by several streptomycetes. The detection of a large number of previously unrecognised side products of known terpene cyclases proved to be particularly important for an in depth understanding of biosynthetic pathways to known terpenes in actinomycetes. Interpretation of the chemical analytical data in the context of the phylogenetic tree of bacterial terpene cyclases pointed to the function of three new enzymes: (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase, selina-3,7(11)-diene synthase and aristolochene synthase.

  8. Wild Accessions and Mutant Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Sandal, Niels Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    Lotus japonicus, Lotus burttii, and Lotus filicaulis are species of Lotus genus that are utilized for molecular genetic analysis such as the construction of a linkage map and QTL analysis. Among them, a number of mutants have been isolated from two wild accessions: L. japonicus Gifu B-129...

  9. An Integrated Metabolomic and Genomic Mining Workflow to Uncover the Biosynthetic Potential of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Vynne, Nikolaj Grønnegaard; Klitgaard, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    considerable diversity: only 2% of the chemical features and 7% of the biosynthetic genes were common to all strains, while 30% of all features and 24% of the genes were unique to single strains. The list of chemical features was reduced to 50 discriminating features using a genetic algorithm and support...... vector machines. Features were dereplicated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) networking to identify molecular families of the same biosynthetic origin, and the associated pathways were probed using comparative genomics. Most of the discriminating features were related to antibacterial compounds...

  10. Assembly of a novel biosynthetic pathway for production of the plant flavonoid fisetin in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahlhut, Steen Gustav; Siedler, Solvej; Malla, Sailesh;

    2015-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites are an underutilized pool of bioactive molecules for applications in the food, pharma and nutritional industries. One such molecule is fisetin, which is present in many fruits and vegetables and has several potential health benefits, including anti-cancer, anti......-viral and anti-aging activity. Moreover, fisetin has recently been shown to prevent Alzheimer׳s disease in mice and to prevent complications associated with diabetes type I. Thus far the biosynthetic pathway of fisetin in plants remains elusive. Here, we present the heterologous assembly of a novel fisetin...... biosynthetic pathway and establish E. coli as a microbial platform strain for the production of fisetin and related flavonols....

  11. A human vitamin D receptor mutant activated by cholecalciferol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, Amanda M; Castillo, Hilda S; Duraj-Thatte, Anna; Doyle, Donald F; Azizi, Bahareh

    2011-07-01

    The human vitamin D receptor (hVDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, involved in calcium and phosphate homeostasis; hence implicated in a number of diseases, such as Rickets and Osteoporosis. This receptor binds 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (also referred to as 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) and other known ligands, such as lithocholic acid. Specific interactions between the receptor and ligand are crucial for the function and activation of this receptor, as implied by the single point mutation, H305Q, causing symptoms of Type II Rickets. In this work, further understanding of the significant and essential interactions between the ligand and the receptor was deciphered, through a combination of rational and random mutagenesis. A hVDR mutant, H305F, was engineered with increased sensitivity towards lithocholic acid, with an EC(50) value of 10 μM and 40±14 fold activation in mammalian cell assays, while maintaining wild-type activity with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). Furthermore, via random mutagenesis, a hVDR mutant, H305F/H397Y, was discovered to bind a novel small molecule, cholecalciferol, a precursor in the 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) biosynthetic pathway, which does not activate wild-type hVDR. This variant, H305F/H397Y, binds and activates in response to cholecalciferol concentrations as low as 100 nM, with an EC(50) value of 300 nM and 70±11 fold activation in mammalian cell assays. In silico docking analysis of the variant displays a dramatic conformational shift of cholecalciferol in the ligand binding pocket in comparison to the docked analysis of cholecalciferol with wild-type hVDR. This shift is hypothesized to be due to the introduction of two bulkier residues, suggesting that the addition of these bulkier residues introduces molecular interactions between the ligand and receptor, leading to activation with cholecalciferol.

  12. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A.; Atanasova, V; Robinson, H; Eisenstein, E; Coleman, J; Pesci, E; Parsons, J

    2009-01-01

    Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical 170-residue ????? domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad of PqsD. The C112A mutant is inactive, although it still reversibly binds anthraniloyl-CoA. The covalent complex between anthranilate and Cys112 clearly illuminates the orientation of key elements of the PqsD catalytic machinery and represents a snapshot of a key point in the catalytic cycle.

  13. Effects of overexpressing individual lignin biosynthetic enzymes on feeding and growth of corn earworms and fall armyworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin is an important insect resistance component of plants. Enhancing or disrupting the lignin biosynthetic pathway for different bioenergy uses may alter pest resistance. The lignin biosynthetic pathway is complex, and a number of pathway compounds are also involved in the biosynthesis of simpler...

  14. Accumulation of Rutin and Betulinic Acid and Expression of Phenylpropanoid and Triterpenoid Biosynthetic Genes in Mulberry (Morus alba L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shicheng; Park, Chang Ha; Li, Xiaohua; Kim, Yeon Bok; Yang, Jingli; Sung, Gyoo Byung; Park, Nam Il; Kim, Soonok; Park, Sang Un

    2015-09-30

    Mulberry (Morus alba L.) is used in traditional Chinese medicine and is the sole food source of the silkworm. Here, 21 cDNAs encoding phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and 21 cDNAs encoding triterpene biosynthetic genes were isolated from mulberry. The expression levels of genes involved in these biosynthetic pathways and the accumulation of rutin, betulin, and betulinic acid, important secondary metabolites, were investigated in different plant organs. Most phenylpropanoid and triterpene biosynthetic genes were highly expressed in leaves and/or fruit, and most genes were downregulated during fruit ripening. The accumulation of rutin was more than fivefold higher in leaves than in other organs, and higher levels of betulin and betulinic acid were found in roots and leaves than in fruit. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression levels, we speculate that MaUGT78D1 and MaLUS play important regulatory roles in the rutin and betulin biosynthetic pathways.

  15. Fusion genetic analysis of jasmonate-signalling mutants in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Bøgh; Raventos, D.; Mundy, John Williams

    2002-01-01

    Jasmonates induce plant-defence responses and act to regulate defence-related genes including positive feedback of the lipoxygenase 2 (LOX2) gene involved in jasmonate synthesis. To identify jasmonate-signalling mutants, we used a fusion genetic strategy in which the firefly luciferase (FLUC......) and Escherichia coliß-glucuronidase (GUS) reporters were expressed under control of the jasmonate-responsive LOX2 promoter. Spatial and temporal patterns of reporter expression were determined initially, and revealed that JA-responsive expression from the LOX2 promoter required de novo protein synthesis. Reporter...... as two recessive mutants, designated joe1 and 2, that overexpress the reporter. Genetic analysis indicated that reporter overexpression in the joe mutants requires COI. joe1 responded to MeJA with increased anthocyanin accumulation, while joe2 responded with decreased root growth inhibition. In addition...

  16. Spontaneous chlorophyll mutants of Pennisetum americanum: Genetics and chlorophyll quantities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduru, P R; Rao, M K

    1980-05-01

    plastids were also observed. In 'patchy white' secondary destruction of chlorophylls and the presence of defective plastids were found to be associated with reduced chlorophyll quantity at maturity.Paper chromatographic studies of leaf flavonoids revealed some variation between the inbreds, but there were three common spots, 7, 8 and 9, except for PDP in which the spot 8 was absent. Chlorophyll deficient mutants differed from their respective controls in the absence of one or more of the spots present in the controls and in the presence of new spots in some of the mutants.Most of the chlorophyll mutants showed higher survival rate in the Kharif season than in Rabi season which was attributed to the higher mean day temperature and longer day light period in the Kharif season than in Rabi season.

  17. Lactococcus lactis as expression host for the biosynthetic incorporation of tryptophan analogues into recombinant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Khattabi, Mohamed; van Roosmalen, Maarten L.; Jager, Dennis; Metselaar, Heidi; Permentier, Hjalmar; Leenhouts, Kees; Broos, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Incorporation of Trp (tryptophan) analogues into a protein may facilitate its structural analysis by spectroscopic techniques. Development of a biological system for the biosynthetic incorporation of such analogues into proteins is of considerable importance. The Gram-negative Escherichia coli is th

  18. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF BIOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTS BY PERTRACTION - CHALLENGE FOR THE “WHITE BIOTECHNOLOGY”

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Cascaval; Anca-Irina Galaction

    2010-01-01

    This review presents our original results on selective separation of some biosynthetic products (antibiotics, carboxylic acids, amino acids) by free or facilitated pertraction (extraction and transport through liquid membranes). Selecting the optimum conditions, for all studied cases these pertraction technique simplify the technologies applied at industrial scale for separation and purification, allows to reaching high selectivity and reducing the overall cost of the products.

  19. Phytochemical and Biosynthetic Studies of Lignans, with a Focus on Indonesian Medicinal Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfahmi, [No Value

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis phytochemical and biosynthetic studies of lignans are described. The focus is on the Indonesian medicinal plants Phyllanthus niruri and Piper cubeba and on two Linum species, Linum flavum and L. leonii, native to European countries. Both Indonesian plants are used in jamu. Jamu is the

  20. Characterization of the fumonisin B2 biosynthetic gene cluster in Aspergillus niger and A. awamori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspergillus niger and A. awamori strains isolated from grapes cultivated in Mediterranean basin were examined for fumonisin B2 (FB2) production and presence/absence of sequences within the fumonisin biosynthetic gene (fum) cluster. Presence of 13 regions in the fum cluster was evaluated by PCR assay...

  1. HPLC-SPE-NMR for combinatorial biosynthetic investigations – Expanding the landscape of diterpene structural diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Hamberger, Björn Robert;

    In this work, the analytical technique, HPLC-HRMS-SPE-NMR was used for the first time in combination with combinatorial biosynthetic investigations in N. benthamiana. This efficient setup allowed for identification of several diterpene synthase (diTPS) combinations responsible for stereospecific...

  2. Design-based re-engineering of biosynthetic gene clusters : plug-and-play in practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frasch, Hans-Jörg; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gago, Federico; Parayil, Ajikumar

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology is revolutionizing the way in which the biosphere is explored for natural products. Through computational genome mining, thousands of biosynthetic gene clusters are being identified in microbial genomes, which constitute a rich source of potential novel pharmaceuticals. New methods

  3. C. elegans and mutants with chronic nicotine exposure as a novel model of cancer phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanteti, Rajani; Dhanasingh, Immanuel; El-Hashani, Essam; Riehm, Jacob J; Stricker, Thomas; Nagy, Stanislav; Zaborin, Alexander; Zaborina, Olga; Biron, David; Alverdy, John C; Im, Hae Kyung; Siddiqui, Shahid; Padilla, Pamela A; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    We previously investigated MET and its oncogenic mutants relevant to lung cancer in C. elegans. The inactive orthlogues of the receptor tyrosine kinase Eph and MET, namely vab-1 and RB2088 respectively, the temperature sensitive constitutively active form of KRAS, SD551 (let-60; GA89) and the inactive c-CBL equivalent mutants in sli-1 (PS2728, PS1258, and MT13032) when subjected to chronic exposure of nicotine resulted in a significant loss in egg-laying capacity and fertility. While the vab-1 mutant revealed increased circular motion in response to nicotine, the other mutant strains failed to show any effect. Overall locomotion speed increased with increasing nicotine concentration in all tested mutant strains except in the vab-1 mutants. Moreover, chronic nicotine exposure, in general, upregulated kinases and phosphatases. Taken together, these studies provide evidence in support of C. elegans as initial in vivo model to study nicotine and its effects on oncogenic mutations identified in humans.

  4. Mutant alpha-synuclein and autophagy in PC12 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kangyong Liu; Chunfeng Liu; Chuancheng Ren; Yaping Yang; Liwei Shen; Xuezhong Li; Fen Wang; Zhenghong Qin

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that overexpression of mutant α-synuclein in PC12 cells is related to occurrence of autophagy.The present study established mutant a-synuclein (A30P)-transfected PC12 cells and treated them with the autophagy inducer rapamycin and autophagy inhibitor wortmannin, respectively.Results demonstrated that mutant o-synuclein resulted in cell death via autophagy and involved α-synuclein accumulation, membrane lipid oxidation, and loss of plasma membrane integrity.Mutant α-synuclein (A30P) also mediated toxicity of1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion.Moreover, rapamycin inhibited a-synuclein aggregation, while wortmannin promoted o-synuclein aggregation and cell death.To further determine the role of autophagy due to mutant a-synuclein, the present study measured expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3.Results revealed that wortmannin and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion inhibited expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3,while rapamycin promoted its expression.These findings suggested that abnormal aggregation of a-synuclein induced autophagic programmed cell death in PC12 cells.

  5. Effect of different immunosuppressive drugs on calcineurin and its mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阎力君; 于翠娟; 张丽芳; 魏群

    2000-01-01

    Several mutants in Loop7 region and near Loop7 region of calcineurin A (CN A) subunit have been constructed and purified using site-directed mutagenesis. Their phosphatase activity and the corresponding solution conformation were examined. Their phosphatase activities between wild-type CN and mutants were compared to identify the interaction of different immuno-suppressive drugs with CN. The results showed that the phosphatase activities of the mutants at Loop7 were much higher than the one of wild-type CN. Furthermore, circular dichroism spectra of the mutants revealed that their solution conformations gave rise in changes in native structure of the protein. Cyclophilin-CyclosporinA (CyP-CsA) significantly inhibited the phosphatase activity of wild-type CN, and had no effects on the phosphatase activity of mutants in Loop7 region, which indicates that the site-directed mutagenesis at Loop7 region made a significant change in the interaction between CyP-CsA and CN. Examination of the activities of these

  6. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  7. Stabilization of Nucleotide Binding Domain Dimers Rescues ABCC6 Mutants Associated with Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yanchao; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2017-02-03

    ABC transporters are polytopic membrane proteins that utilize ATP binding and hydrolysis to facilitate transport across biological membranes. Forty-eight human ABC transporters have been identified in the genome, and the majority of these are linked to heritable disease. Mutations in the ABCC6 (ATP binding cassette transporter C6) ABC transporter are associated with pseudoxanthoma elasticum, a disease of altered elastic properties in multiple tissues. Although ∼200 mutations have been identified in pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients, the underlying structural defects associated with the majority of these are poorly understood. To evaluate the structural consequences of these missense mutations, a combination of biophysical and cell biological approaches were applied to evaluate the local and global folding and assembly of the ABCC6 protein. Structural and bioinformatic analyses suggested that a cluster of mutations, representing roughly 20% of the patient population with identified missense mutations, are located in the interface between the transmembrane domain and the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain. Biochemical and cell biological analyses demonstrate these mutations influence multiple steps in the biosynthetic pathway, minimally altering local domain structure but adversely impacting ABCC6 assembly and trafficking. The differential impacts on local and global protein structure are consistent with hierarchical folding and assembly of ABCC6. Stabilization of specific domain-domain interactions via targeted amino acid substitution in the catalytic site of the C-terminal nucleotide binding domain restored proper protein trafficking and cell surface localization of multiple biosynthetic mutants. This rescue provides a specific mechanism by which chemical chaperones could be developed for the correction of ABCC6 biosynthetic defects.

  8. Bacterial mutants for enhanced succinate production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baart, G.J.E.; Beauprez, J.J.R.; Foulquie, M.M.R.; Heijnen, J.J.; Maertens, J.

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for obtaining enhanced metabolite production in micro-organisms, and to mutants and/or transformants obtained with said method. More particularly, it relates to bacterial mutants and/or transformants for enhanced succinate production, especially mutants and/

  9. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  10. Identification of anrF gene, a homology of admM of andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Ping Yu; Jun-Li Zhu; Xue-Ping Yao; Shi-Cheng He; Hai-Ning Huang; Wei-Liang Chen; Yong-Hao Hu; De-Bao Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the gene (s) related to the antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8 and to elucidate its antagonistic mechanism.METHODS: Transposon-mediated mutagenesis and tagging method and cassette PCR-based chromosomal walking method were adopted to isolate the mutant strain(s) of B8 that lost the antagonistic activity and to clone DNA fragments around Tn5 insertion site. Sequence compiling and open reading frame (ORF) finding were done with DNAStar program and homologous sequence and conserved domain searches were performed with BlastN or BlastP programs at www. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. To verify the gene involved in the antagonistic activity, complementation of a full-length clone of the anrFgene to the mutant B8F strain was used.RESULTS: A 3 321 bp contig around the Tn5 insertion site was obtained and an ORF of 2 634 bp in length designated as anrFgene encoding for a 877 aa polyketide synthase-like protein was identified. It had a homology of 83% at the nucleotide level and 79% ID/87% SIM at the protein level, to the admM gene of Pantoea agglornerans andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster (AY192157). The Tn5was inserted at 2 420 bp of the gene corresponding to the COG3319 (the thioesterase domain of type Ⅰ polyketide synthase) coding region on B8F. The antagonistic activity against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae was resumed with complementation of the full-length anrFgene to the mutant B8F.CONCLUSION: The anrFgene obtained is related to the antagonistic activity of B8, and the antagonistic substances produced by B8 are andrimid and/or its analogs.

  11. Effective use of heterologous hosts for characterization of biosynthetic enzymes allows production of natural products and promotes new natural product discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In the past few years, there has been impressive progress in elucidating the mechanism of biosynthesis of various natural products accomplished through the use of genetic, molecular biological and biochemical techniques. Here, we present a comprehensive overview of the current results from our studies on fungal natural product biosynthetic enzymes, including nonribosomal peptide synthetase and polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase hybrid synthetase, as well as auxiliary enzymes, such as methyltransferases and oxygenases. Specifically, biosynthesis of the following compounds is described in detail: (i) Sch210972, potentially involving a Diels-Alder reaction that may be catalyzed by CghA, a functionally unknown protein identified by targeted gene disruption in the wild type fungus; (ii) chaetoglobosin A, formed via multi-step oxidations catalyzed by three redox enzymes, one flavin-containing monooxygenase and two cytochrome P450 oxygenases as characterized by in vivo biotransformation of relevant intermediates in our engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (iii) (-)-ditryptophenaline, formed by a cytochrome P450, revealing the dimerization mechanism for the biosynthesis of diketopiperazine alkaloids; (iv) pseurotins, whose variations in the C- and O-methylations and the degree of oxidation are introduced combinatorially by multiple redox enzymes; and (v) spirotryprostatins, whose spiro-carbon moiety is formed by a flavin-containing monooxygenase or a cytochrome P450 as determined by heterologous de novo production of the biosynthetic intermediates and final products in Aspergillus niger. We close our discussion by summarizing some of the key techniques that have facilitated the discovery of new natural products, production of their analogs and identification of biosynthetic mechanisms in our study.

  12. A wilty mutant of rice has impaired hydraulic conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, Koji; Ookawa, Taiichiro; Satoh, Hikaru; Hirasawa, Tadashi

    2007-08-01

    The rice CM2088 mutant is the wilty phenotype and wilts markedly under well-watered sunny conditions. The leaf water potential and epidermal (mainly stomatal) conductance of CM2088 plants decreased significantly under conditions that induced intense transpiration, as compared with those of wild-type plants, revealing that the wilty phenotype was not the result of abnormal stomatal behavior but was due to an increase in resistance to water transport. The resistance to water transport was dramatically elevated in the node and the sheath and blade of a leaf of the mutant, but not in the root or stem. The diameter of xylem vessels in the large vascular bundles of the leaf sheath and the internode tended to be small, and the numbers of vessel elements with narrowed or scalariform perforation plates in the leaf blade and sheath were greater in the mutant than in the wild type. Most xylem vessels were occluded, with air bubbles in the leaf sheath of the mutant during the midday hours under intense transpiration conditions, while no bubbles were observed in plants that were barely transpiring, revealing that the significant increase in resistance to water transport was a result of the cavitation. The additive effects of cavitation in xylem vessels and the decreased diameter and deformed plates of vessel elements might be responsible for the wilty phenotype of CM2088.

  13. Phenotypic, genetic and molecular characterization of a maize low phytic acid mutant (lpa241).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilu, R; Panzeri, D; Gavazzi, G; Rasmussen, S K; Consonni, G; Nielsen, E

    2003-10-01

    Phytic acid, myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate, is the major storage compound of phosphorous (P) in plants, predominantly accumulating in seeds (up to 4-5% of dry weight) and pollen. In cereals, phytic acid is deposited in embryo and aleurone grain tissues as a mixed "phytate" salt of potassium and magnesium, although phytates contain other mineral cations such as iron and zinc. During germination, phytates are broken down by the action of phytases, releasing their P, minerals and myo-inositol which become available to the growing seedling. Phytic acid represents an anti-nutritional factor for animals, and isolation of maize low phytic acid ( lpa) mutants provides a novel approach to study its biochemical pathway and to tackle the nutritional problems associated with it. Following chemical mutagenesis of pollen, we have isolated a viable recessive mutant named lpa 241 showing about 90% reduction of phytic acid and about a tenfold increase in seed-free phosphate content. Although germination rate was decreased by about 30% compared to wild-type, developement of mutant plants was apparentely unaffected. The results of the genetic, biochemical and molecular characterization experiments carried out by SSR mapping, MDD-HPLC and RT-PCR are consistent with a mutation affecting the MIPS1S gene, coding for the first enzyme of the phytic acid biosynthetic pathway.

  14. Characterization of Sugar Insensitive (sis) Mutants of Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Susan I.

    2009-06-08

    . Characterization of mutant and wild-type plants has revealed that sugars inhibit breakdown of seed storage lipids. In addition, high concentrations of exogenous sugars largely eliminate the development of mature chloroplasts by developing seedlings. Affymetrix GeneChip experiments have revealed that expression of many plant genes is partially regulated by sugar levels, with approximately two percent of genes exhibiting alterations in steady-state mRNA levels in response to changing sugar concentrations. Ultimately, a better understanding of plant sugar responses may allow improvements in rates of carbon fixation and manipulation of carbon partitioning. These improvements will be needed to help make production of energy from biomass more economically attractive.

  15. Identification of a Long Rice Spikelet Mutant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xian-jun; WANG Bin; HAN Zan-ping; XIE Zhao-hui; MOU Chun-hong; WANG Xu-dong

    2004-01-01

    A spontaneously occurring rice (Oryza sativa L. ) mutant, characterized by homeotic conversion in glumes and stamens, was found in the progeny of a cross. The mutant showed long glumes and glumaceous lodicules and morphological transformation of stamens into pistils. Mutant florets consisted of 1 to 3 completely developed pistils, some pistilloid stamens with filaments, but tipped by bulged tissue and 0 to 3 stigmas. It seens that the mutant phenotype of the homeotic conversions in glumes and stamens is similar to that of the B loss-of-function mutants in Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum. The mutant is controlled by a single recessive gene as a segregation ratio of 3:1 (wild type to mutant plants) was observed in the F2 generation.

  16. Characterization of cyanobacterial hydrocarbon composition and distribution of biosynthetic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Cameron Coates

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to naturally produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids. Hydrocarbon compositions of thirty-two strains of cyanobacteria were characterized to reveal novel structural features and insights into hydrocarbon biosynthesis in cyanobacteria. This investigation revealed new double bond (2- and 3-heptadecene and methyl group positions (3-, 4- and 5-methylheptadecane for a variety of strains. Additionally, results from this study and literature reports indicate that hydrocarbon production is a universal phenomenon in cyanobacteria. All cyanobacteria possess the capacity to produce hydrocarbons from fatty acids yet not all accomplish this through the same metabolic pathway. One pathway comprises a two-step conversion of fatty acids first to fatty aldehydes and then alkanes that involves a fatty acyl ACP reductase (FAAR and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO. The second involves a polyketide synthase (PKS pathway that first elongates the acyl chain followed by decarboxylation to produce a terminal alkene (olefin synthase, OLS. Sixty-one strains possessing the FAAR/ADO pathway and twelve strains possessing the OLS pathway were newly identified through bioinformatic analyses. Strains possessing the OLS pathway formed a cohesive phylogenetic clade with the exception of three Moorea strains and Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 which may have acquired the OLS pathway via horizontal gene transfer. Hydrocarbon pathways were identified in one-hundred-forty-two strains of cyanobacteria over a broad phylogenetic range and there were no instances where both the FAAR/ADO and the OLS pathways were found together in the same genome, suggesting an unknown selective pressure maintains one or the other pathway, but not both.

  17. Characterization of virginiamycin S biosynthetic genes from Streptomyces virginiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namwat, Wises; Kamioka, Yuji; Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nihira, Takuya

    2002-03-20

    Streptomyces virginiae produces -butyrolactone autoregulators (virginiae butanolide, VB), which control the biosynthesis of virginiamycin M1 and S. A 6.3-kb region downstream of the virginiamycin S (VS)-resistance operon in S. virginiae was sequenced, and four plausible open reading frames (ORFs) (visA, 1,260 bp; visB, 1,656 bp; visC, 888 bp; visD, 1209 bp) were identified. Homology analysis revealed significant similarities with enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of cyclopeptolide antibiotics: VisA (53% identity, 65% similarity) to -lysine 2-aminotransferase (NikC) of nikkomycin D biosynthesis, VisB (66% identity, 72% similarity) to 3-hydroxypicolinic acid:AMP ligase of pristinamycin I biosynthesis, VisC (48% identity, 59% similarity) to lysine cyclodeaminase of ascomycin biosynthesis, and VisD (43% identity, 56% similarity) to erythromycin C-22 hydroxylase of erythromycin biosynthesis. Northern blotting as well as high-resolution S1 analysis of the ORFs revealed that they were transcribed as two bicistronic transcripts, namely 3.0-kb visB-visA and another 2.7-kb visC-visD transcript, with promoters locating upstream of visB and visC, respectively. Transcription of the two operons was observed only 1 h after the VB production, which was 2 h before the virginiamycin production. Furthermore, prompt induction of the transcription was observed as a result of external VB addition, suggesting that the expression of the two operons was under the control of VB.

  18. C-23 hydroxylation by Arabidopsis CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 reveals a novel shortcut in brassinosteroid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Szatmari, Anna-Maria; Watanabe, Bunta; Fujita, Satomi; Bancos, Simona; Koncz, Csaba; Lafos, Marcel; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Sakata, Kanzo; Szekeres, Miklos; Mizutani, Masaharu

    2006-11-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are biosynthesized from campesterol via several cytochrome P450 (P450)-catalyzed oxidative reactions. We report the functional characterization of two BR-biosynthetic P450s from Arabidopsis thaliana: CYP90C1/ROTUNDIFOLIA3 and CYP90D1. The cyp90c1 cyp90d1 double mutant exhibits the characteristic BR-deficient dwarf phenotype, although the individual mutants do not display this phenotype. These data suggest redundant roles for these P450s. In vitro biochemical assays using insect cell-expressed proteins revealed that both CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 catalyze C-23 hydroxylation of various 22-hydroxylated BRs with markedly different catalytic efficiencies. Both enzymes preferentially convert 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone, (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5alpha-ergostan-3-one, and (22S,24R)-22-hydroxyergost-4-en-3-one to 23-hydroxylated products, whereas they are less active on 6-deoxocathasterone. Likewise, cyp90c1 cyp90d1 plants were deficient in 23-hydroxylated BRs, and in feeding experiments using exogenously supplied intermediates, only 23-hydroxylated BRs rescued the growth deficiency of the cyp90c1 cyp90d1 mutant. Thus, CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 are redundant BR C-23 hydroxylases. Moreover, their preferential substrates are present in the endogenous Arabidopsis BR pool. Based on these results, we propose C-23 hydroxylation shortcuts that bypass campestanol, 6-deoxocathasterone, and 6-deoxoteasterone and lead directly from (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5alpha-ergostan-3-one and 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone to 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol.

  19. C-23 Hydroxylation by Arabidopsis CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 Reveals a Novel Shortcut in Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Szatmari, Anna-Maria; Watanabe, Bunta; Fujita, Satomi; Bancos, Simona; Koncz, Csaba; Lafos, Marcel; Shibata, Kyomi; Yokota, Takao; Sakata, Kanzo; Szekeres, Miklos; Mizutani, Masaharu

    2006-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are biosynthesized from campesterol via several cytochrome P450 (P450)–catalyzed oxidative reactions. We report the functional characterization of two BR-biosynthetic P450s from Arabidopsis thaliana: CYP90C1/ROTUNDIFOLIA3 and CYP90D1. The cyp90c1 cyp90d1 double mutant exhibits the characteristic BR-deficient dwarf phenotype, although the individual mutants do not display this phenotype. These data suggest redundant roles for these P450s. In vitro biochemical assays using insect cell-expressed proteins revealed that both CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 catalyze C-23 hydroxylation of various 22-hydroxylated BRs with markedly different catalytic efficiencies. Both enzymes preferentially convert 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone, (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one, and (22S,24R)-22-hydroxyergost-4-en-3-one to 23-hydroxylated products, whereas they are less active on 6-deoxocathasterone. Likewise, cyp90c1 cyp90d1 plants were deficient in 23-hydroxylated BRs, and in feeding experiments using exogenously supplied intermediates, only 23-hydroxylated BRs rescued the growth deficiency of the cyp90c1 cyp90d1 mutant. Thus, CYP90C1 and CYP90D1 are redundant BR C-23 hydroxylases. Moreover, their preferential substrates are present in the endogenous Arabidopsis BR pool. Based on these results, we propose C-23 hydroxylation shortcuts that bypass campestanol, 6-deoxocathasterone, and 6-deoxoteasterone and lead directly from (22S,24R)-22-hydroxy-5α-ergostan-3-one and 3-epi-6-deoxocathasterone to 3-dehydro-6-deoxoteasterone and 6-deoxotyphasterol. PMID:17138693

  20. Isolation and characterization of rice lesion mimic mutants from a T-DNA tagged population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shutian; PEI Zhongyou; LUO Lijuan; TIAN Yingchuan; HE Chaozu

    2005-01-01

    A rice ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Nipponbare) T-DNA tagged population consisting of about 7000 individual lines was generated and screened for rice lesion mimic mutants in the T1 generation. Ten lines were found to develop spontaneous lesions in the absence of pathogen infection and displayed distinct lesion phenotypes. These mutants were tentatively designated as lm1 -lm10 (for lesion mimic), respectively. Lesion formation of lm mutants was developmentally regulated, and all the mutants showed stunted growth and reduced fertility. Genetic analysis demonstrated that all the mutations were recessive, and five partially fertile mutants (lm4-lm8) were derived from different loci. Mimic lesions occurring on the leaves of lm mutants resulted from cell death as revealed by trypan blue staining. Six of them ( lm3 -lm8 ) exhibited enhanced resistance to five bacterial blight isolates, indicating their wide-spectrum resistance to this pathogen. These results imply that some lesion mimic mutations of rice might be involved in disease resistance signaling pathways,and that isolation of these mutated genes may be useful for elucidating molecular mechanisms of plant disease resistance. Among the mutants, only one mutant, lm6, was preliminarily shown to cosegregate with the inserted T-DNA in its T1 generation, making it feasible to isolate the gene responsible for the phenotype of this mutant.

  1. Biosynthetic consequences of multiple sequential post-transition-state bifurcations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Joo; Tantillo, Dean J.

    2014-02-01

    Selectivity in chemical reactions that form complex molecular architectures from simpler precursors is usually rationalized by comparing competing transition-state structures that lead to different possible products. Herein we describe a system for which a single transition-state structure leads to the formation of many isomeric products via pathways that feature multiple sequential bifurcations. The reaction network described connects the pimar-15-en-8-yl cation to miltiradiene, a tricyclic diterpene natural product, and isomers via cyclizations and/or rearrangements. The results suggest that the selectivity of the reaction is controlled by (post-transition-state) dynamic effects, that is, how the carbocation structure changes in response to the distribution of energy in its vibrational modes. The inherent dynamical effects revealed herein (characterized through quasiclassical direct dynamics calculations using density functional theory) have implications not only for the general principles of selectivity prediction in systems with complex potential energy surfaces, but also for the mechanisms of terpene synthase enzymes and their evolution. These findings redefine the challenges faced by nature in controlling the biosynthesis of complex natural products.

  2. Biosynthetic origin of geosmin in red beets (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guiping; Edwards, Charles G; Fellman, John K; Mattinson, D Scott; Navazio, John

    2003-02-12

    Geosmin provides the characteristic but sometimes undesirable "earthy" flavor to red table beets. To date, it is not known whether geosmin is a byproduct of beet metabolism or synthesized by soil-borne microorganisms and taken up by the beets during maturation. Analysis of mature beet roots revealed that peels contained 6 times the amount of geosmin compared to the bodies and cores. Sterilized beet seeds were aseptically grown in a basal medium prior to analysis for the presence of geosmin. Using a headspace solid-phase microextraction (HSPME) method, the relative recovery of geosmin from beet seedling extracts was 72.0 +/- 4.2% with (-)-menthone as the internal standard. The presence of geosmin in aseptically grown beet seedlings was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using authentic geosmin as the standard. During aseptic growth, the concentration of geosmin in seedlings remained constant for up to 5 months but increased at 6 months. Geosmin added to the growth medium was not absorbed by the seedlings. These studies support the conclusion that red beets are capable of endogenous synthesis of geosmin.

  3. Structural basis for biosynthetic programming of fungal aromatic polyketide cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jason M; Korman, Tyler P; Labonte, Jason W; Vagstad, Anna L; Hill, Eric A; Kamari-Bidkorpeh, Oliver; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Townsend, Craig A

    2009-10-22

    Polyketides are a class of natural products with diverse structures and biological activities. The structural variability of aromatic products of fungal nonreducing, multidomain iterative polyketide synthases (NR-PKS group of IPKSs) results from regiospecific cyclizations of reactive poly-beta-keto intermediates. How poly-beta-keto species are synthesized and stabilized, how their chain lengths are determined, and, in particular, how specific cyclization patterns are controlled have been largely inaccessible and functionally unknown until recently. A product template (PT) domain is responsible for controlling specific aldol cyclization and aromatization of these mature polyketide precursors, but the mechanistic basis is unknown. Here we present the 1.8 A crystal structure and mutational studies of a dissected PT monodomain from PksA, the NR-PKS that initiates the biosynthesis of the potent hepatocarcinogen aflatoxin B(1) in Aspergillus parasiticus. Despite having minimal sequence similarity to known enzymes, the structure displays a distinct 'double hot dog' (DHD) fold. Co-crystal structures with palmitate or a bicyclic substrate mimic illustrate that PT can bind both linear and bicyclic polyketides. Docking and mutagenesis studies reveal residues important for substrate binding and catalysis, and identify a phosphopantetheine localization channel and a deep two-part interior binding pocket and reaction chamber. Sequence similarity and extensive conservation of active site residues in PT domains suggest that the mechanistic insights gleaned from these studies will prove general for this class of IPKSs, and lay a foundation for defining the molecular rules controlling NR-PKS cyclization specificity.

  4. Producing the Ethylene Signal: Regulation and Diversification of Ethylene Biosynthetic Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Matthew A; DeLong, Alison

    2015-09-01

    Strictly controlled production of ethylene gas lies upstream of the signaling activities of this crucial regulator throughout the plant life cycle. Although the biosynthetic pathway is enzymatically simple, the regulatory circuits that modulate signal production are fine tuned to allow integration of responses to environmental and intrinsic cues. Recently identified posttranslational mechanisms that control ethylene production converge on one family of biosynthetic enzymes and overlay several independent reversible phosphorylation events and distinct mediators of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Although the core pathway is conserved throughout seed plants, these posttranslational regulatory mechanisms may represent evolutionarily recent innovations. The evolutionary origins of the pathway and its regulators are not yet clear; outside the seed plants, numerous biochemical and phylogenetic questions remain to be addressed.

  5. Designing universal primers for the isolation of DNA sequences encoding Proanthocyanidins biosynthetic enzymes in Crataegus aronia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuiter Afnan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hawthorn is the common name of all plant species in the genus Crataegus, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Crataegus are considered useful medicinal plants because of their high content of proanthocyanidins (PAs and other related compounds. To improve PAs production in Crataegus tissues, the sequences of genes encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes are required. Findings Different bioinformatics tools, including BLAST, multiple sequence alignment and alignment PCR analysis were used to design primers suitable for the amplification of DNA fragments from 10 candidate genes encoding enzymes involved in PAs biosynthesis in C. aronia. DNA sequencing results proved the utility of the designed primers. The primers were used successfully to amplify DNA fragments of different PAs biosynthesis genes in different Rosaceae plants. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first use of the alignment PCR approach to isolate DNA sequences encoding PAs biosynthetic enzymes in Rosaceae plants.

  6. Gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors make human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum cells swell and rupture to death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Toyama

    Full Text Available Malaria remains as one of the most devastating infectious disease, and continues to exact an enormous toll in medical cost and days of labor lost especially in the tropics. Effective malaria control and eventual eradication remain a huge challenge, with efficacious antimalarials as important intervention/management tool. Clearly new alternative drugs that are more affordable and with fewer side effects are desirable. After preliminary in vitro assays with plant growth regulators and inhibitors, here, we focus on biosynthetic inhibitors of gibberellin, a plant hormone with many important roles in plant growth, and show their inhibitory effect on the growth of both apicomplexa, Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment of P. falciparum cultures with the gibberellin biosynthetic inhibitors resulted in marked morphological changes that can be reversed to a certain degree under hyperosmotic environment. These unique observations suggest that changes in the parasite membrane permeability may explain the pleiotropic effects observed within the intracellular parasites.

  7. Recent advances in Cannabis sativa research: biosynthetic studies and its potential in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikantaramas, Supaart; Taura, Futoshi; Morimoto, Satoshi; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2007-08-01

    Cannabinoids, consisting of alkylresorcinol and monoterpene groups, are the unique secondary metabolites that are found only in Cannabis sativa. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabichromene (CBC) are well known cannabinoids and their pharmacological properties have been extensively studied. Recently, biosynthetic pathways of these cannabinoids have been successfully established. Several biosynthetic enzymes including geranylpyrophosphate:olivetolate geranyltransferase, tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) synthase, cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) synthase and cannabichromenic acid (CBCA) synthase have been purified from young rapidly expanding leaves of C. sativa. In addition, molecular cloning, characterization and localization of THCA synthase have been recently reported. THCA and cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), its substrate, were shown to be apoptosis-inducing agents that might play a role in plant defense. Transgenic tobacco hairy roots expressing THCA synthase can produce THCA upon feeding of CBGA. These results open the way for biotechnological production of cannabinoids in the future.

  8. Biosynthetic Relationship between Acutumine and Dechloroacutumine in Menispermum dauricum Root Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, H A; Sugimoto, Y; Saisho, T; Inanaga, S; Hashimoto, M; Isogai, A

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthetic relationship between acutumine 1 and dechloroacutumine 2 was studied using (13)C-labeled tyrosine and (3)H-labeled 2 as tracers. (13)C-NMR spectra of (13)C-labeled 1 and 2 showed that the alkaloids, each composed of two molecules of tyrosine, are derived from the same biosynthetic pathway. Feeding Menispermum dauricum (Menispermaceae) roots, cultured in a chloride-enriched medium, with (3)H-labeled 2 demonstrated that 1 is the only alkaloid metabolite of 2. Conversion (5%) of the exogenously applied 2, taken up by the roots, into 1 showed that 2 is the precursor of 1. Incomplete conversion of 2 into 1 suggests accumulation of the exogenously applied 2 in cell organelles and/or compartmentation of the enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of 1.

  9. Biosynthetic Machinery Involved in Aberrant Glycosylation: Promising Targets for Development Drugs Against Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia eVasconcelos-dos-Santos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on altered metabolism and nutrient uptake to generate and keep the malignant phenotype. The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP is a branch of glucose metabolism that produces UDP-GlcNAc, and its derivatives, UDP-GalNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac, donor substrates used in the production of glycoproteins and glycolipids. Growing evidence demonstrates that alteration of the pool of activated substrates might lead to different glycosylation and cell signaling. It is already well established that aberrant glycosylation can modulate tumor growth and malignant transformation in different cancer types. Therefore, biosynthetic machinery involved in the assembly of aberrant glycans are becoming prominent targets for anti-tumor drugs. This review describes three classes of glycosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, N-linked and mucin type O-linked glycosylation, involved in tumor progression, their biosynthesis and highlights the available inhibitors as potential anti-tumor drugs.

  10. Improved herbivore resistance in cultivated tomato with the sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway from a wild relative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleeker, Petra M; Mirabella, Rossana; Diergaarde, Paul J; VanDoorn, Arjen; Tissier, Alain; Kant, Merijn R; Prins, Marcel; de Vos, Martin; Haring, Michel A; Schuurink, Robert C

    2012-12-04

    Tomato breeding has been tremendously efficient in increasing fruit quality and quantity but did not focus on improving herbivore resistance. The biosynthetic pathway for the production of 7-epizingiberene in a wild tomato was introduced into a cultivated greenhouse variety with the aim to obtain herbivore resistance. 7-Epizingiberene is a specific sesquiterpene with toxic and repellent properties that is produced and stored in glandular trichomes. We identified 7-epizingiberene synthase (ShZIS) that belongs to a new class of sesquiterpene synthases, exclusively using Z-Z-farnesyl-diphosphate (zFPP) in plastids, probably arisen through neo-functionalization of a common ancestor. Expression of the ShZIS and zFPP synthases in the glandular trichomes of cultivated tomato resulted in the production of 7-epizingiberene. These tomatoes gained resistance to several herbivores that are pests of tomato. Hence, introduction of this sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathway into cultivated tomatoes resulted in improved herbivore resistance.

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases in opisthokonts reveals unexpected ancestral complexity and novel modern biosynthetic components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather C Smart

    Full Text Available Glycerolipid synthesis represents a central metabolic process of all forms of life. In the last decade multiple genes coding for enzymes responsible for the first step of the pathway, catalyzed by glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT, have been described, and characterized primarily in model organisms like Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mice. Notoriously, the fungal enzymes share low sequence identity with their known animal counterparts, and the nature of their homology is unclear. Furthermore, two mitochondrial GPAT isoforms have been described in animal cells, while no such enzymes have been identified in Fungi. In order to determine if the yeast and mammalian GPATs are representative of the set of enzymes present in their respective groups, and to test the hypothesis that metazoan orthologues are indeed absent from the fungal clade, a comparative genomic and phylogenetic analysis was performed including organisms spanning the breadth of the Opisthokonta supergroup. Surprisingly, our study unveiled the presence of 'fungal' orthologs in the basal taxa of the holozoa and 'animal' orthologues in the basal holomycetes. This includes a novel clade of fungal homologues, with putative peroxisomal targeting signals, of the mitochondrial/peroxisomal acyltransferases in Metazoa, thus potentially representing an undescribed metabolic capacity in the Fungi. The overall distribution of GPAT homologues is suggestive of high relative complexity in the ancestors of the opisthokont clade, followed by loss and sculpting of the complement in the descendent lineages. Divergence from a general versatile metabolic model, present in ancestrally deduced GPAT complements, points to distinctive contributions of each GPAT isoform to lipid metabolism and homeostasis in contemporary organisms like humans and their fungal pathogens.

  12. Global regulation of nucleotide biosynthetic genes by c-Myc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chun Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The c-Myc transcription factor is a master regulator and integrates cell proliferation, cell growth and metabolism through activating thousands of target genes. Our identification of direct c-Myc target genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP coupled with pair-end ditag sequencing analysis (ChIP-PET revealed that nucleotide metabolic genes are enriched among c-Myc targets, but the role of Myc in regulating nucleotide metabolic genes has not been comprehensively delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report that the majority of genes in human purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway were induced and directly bound by c-Myc in the P493-6 human Burkitt's lymphoma model cell line. The majority of these genes were also responsive to the ligand-activated Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein, Myc-ER, in a Myc null rat fibroblast cell line, HO.15 MYC-ER. Furthermore, these targets are also responsive to Myc activation in transgenic mouse livers in vivo. To determine the functional significance of c-Myc regulation of nucleotide metabolism, we sought to determine the effect of loss of function of direct Myc targets inosine monophosphate dehydrogenases (IMPDH1 and IMPDH2 on c-Myc-induced cell growth and proliferation. In this regard, we used a specific IMPDH inhibitor mycophenolic acid (MPA and found that MPA dramatically inhibits c-Myc-induced P493-6 cell proliferation through S-phase arrest and apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results demonstrate the direct induction of nucleotide metabolic genes by c-Myc in multiple systems. Our finding of an S-phase arrest in cells with diminished IMPDH activity suggests that nucleotide pool balance is essential for c-Myc's orchestration of DNA replication, such that uncoupling of these two processes create DNA replication stress and apoptosis.

  13. Preparation and characteri-zation of some surface nega-tively charged residue mu-tants of cytochrome b5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis was used to obtain seven variants of tryptic fragment of bovine liver cytochrome b5 (cyt b5), in which the negatively charged residues around the heme exposed edge of cyt b5 were replaced by hydrophobic amino acid alanine. Double-site mutants, triple-site mutants and even quadruple-site mutants were obtained. DNA sequencing and molecular weight measurements of the mutant proteins both confirmed that these site-directed muta- genesises were successfully performed. Spectroelectrochemistry of these mutant proteins revealed that the apparent redox potentials of these mutant proteins caused a positive shift of 2-10 mV. The global structure of these mutant proteins did not show much difference from that of the wild type cyt b5, providing a solid base for the further study on the roles of the proteins' surface charges.

  14. Dothistroma pini, a Forest Pathogen, Contains Homologs of Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Pathway Genes

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Homologs of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes have been identified in the pine needle pathogen Dothistroma pini. D. pini produces dothistromin, a difuranoanthraquinone toxin with structural similarity to the aflatoxin precursor versicolorin B. Previous studies with purified dothistromin suggest a possible role for this toxin in pathogenicity. By using an aflatoxin gene as a hybridization probe, a genomic D. pini clone was identified that contained four dot genes with similarity to genes in aflatox...

  15. Diversity in biosynthetic pathways of galactolipids in the light of endosymbiotic origin of chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eSato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria and chloroplasts perform oxygenic photosynthesis, and share a common origin. Galactolipids are present in the photosynthetic membranes of both cyanobacteria and chloroplasts, but the biosynthetic pathways of the galactolipids are significantly different in the two systems. In this minireview, we explain the history of the discovery of the cyanobacterial pathway, and present a probable scenario of the evolution of the two pathways.

  16. Biosynthetic preparation of selectively deuterated phosphatidylcholine in genetically modified Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Selma; Thygesen, Mikkel Boas; Schiller, Jürgen;

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a major component of eukaryotic cell membranes and one of the most commonly used phospholipids for reconstitution of membrane proteins into carrier systems such as lipid vesicles, micelles and nanodiscs. Selectively deuterated versions of this lipid have many applicati...... tail. This biosynthetic approach paves the way for the synthesis of specifically deuterated, physiologically relevant phospholipid species which remain difficult to obtain through standard chemical synthesis....

  17. Structure of Nampt/PBEF/visfatin, a mammalian NAD[superscript +]biosynthetic enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xiangbin; Bheda, Poonam; Revollo, Javier R.; Imai, Shin-ichiro; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-22

    Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt) synthesizes nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) from nicotinamide in a mammalian NAD{sup +} biosynthetic pathway and is required for SirT1 activity in vivo. Nampt has also been presumed to be a cytokine (PBEF) or a hormone (visfatin). The crystal structure of Nampt in the presence and absence of NMN shows that Nampt is a dimeric type II phosphoribosyltransferase and provides insights into the enzymatic mechanism.

  18. SELECTIVE SEPARATION OF BIOSYNTHETIC PRODUCTS BY PERTRACTION - CHALLENGE FOR THE “WHITE BIOTECHNOLOGY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Cascaval

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This review presents our original results on selective separation of some biosynthetic products (antibiotics, carboxylic acids, amino acids by free or facilitated pertraction (extraction and transport through liquid membranes. Selecting the optimum conditions, for all studied cases these pertraction technique simplify the technologies applied at industrial scale for separation and purification, allows to reaching high selectivity and reducing the overall cost of the products.

  19. Biosynthetic Studies on Water-Soluble Derivative 5c (DTX5c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J. Fernández

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The dinoflagellate Prorocentrum belizeanum is responsible for the production of several toxins involved in the red tide phenomenon known as Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP. In this paper we report on the biosynthetic origin of an okadaic acid water-soluble ester derivative, DTX5c, on the basis of the spectroscopical analysis of 13C enriched samples obtained by addition of labelled sodium [l-13C], [2-13C] acetate to artificial cultures of this dinoflagellate.

  20. Enhancement of cordyceps polysaccharide production via biosynthetic pathway analysis in Hirsutella sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Baker, Peter James; Yi, Ming; Wu, Hui; Xu, Feng; Teng, Yi; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-11-01

    The addition of various sulfates for enhanced cordyceps polysaccharide (CP) production in submerged cultivation of H. sinensis was investigated, and manganese sulfate was found the most effective. 2mM of manganese sulfate on 0day (d) was investigated as the optimal adding condition, and the CP production reached optimum with 5.33%, increasing by 93.3% compared with the control. Furthermore, the consumption of three main precursors of CP was studied over cultivation under two conditions. Intracellular mannose content decreased by 43.1% throughout 6days cultivation, which corresponded to CP accumulation rate sharply increased from 0 d to 6 d, and mannose was considered as the most preferred precursor for generating CP. Subsequently, mannose biosynthetic pathway was constructed and verified for the first time in H. sinensis, which constituted the important part of CP biosynthesis, and transcriptional levels of the biosynthetic genes were studied. Transcriptional level of gene cpsA was significantly up-regulated 5.35-fold and it was a key gene involved both in mannose and CP biosynthesis. This study demonstrated that manganese sulfate addition is an efficient and simple way to improve CP production. Transcriptional analysis based on biosynthetic pathway was helpful to find key genes and better understand CP biosynthesis.

  1. A simple biosynthetic pathway for large product generation from small substrate amounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, Marko; Djordjevic, Magdalena

    2012-10-01

    A recently emerging discipline of synthetic biology has the aim of constructing new biosynthetic pathways with useful biological functions. A major application of these pathways is generating a large amount of the desired product. However, toxicity due to the possible presence of toxic precursors is one of the main problems for such production. We consider here the problem of generating a large amount of product from a potentially toxic substrate. To address this, we propose a simple biosynthetic pathway, which can be induced in order to produce a large number of the product molecules, by keeping the substrate amount at low levels. Surprisingly, we show that the large product generation crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of the substrate molecules. We derive an optimal induction strategy, which allows as much as three orders of magnitude increase in the product amount through biologically realistic parameter values. We point to a recently discovered bacterial immune system (CRISPR/Cas in E. coli) as a putative example of the pathway analysed here. We also argue that the scheme proposed here can be used not only as a stand-alone pathway, but also as a strategy to produce a large amount of the desired molecules with small perturbations of endogenous biosynthetic pathways.

  2. Identification and analysis of the paulomycin biosynthetic gene cluster and titer improvement of the paulomycins in Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jine Li

    Full Text Available The paulomycins are a group of glycosylated compounds featuring a unique paulic acid moiety. To locate their biosynthetic gene clusters, the genomes of two paulomycin producers, Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115 and Streptomyces sp. YN86, were sequenced. The paulomycin biosynthetic gene clusters were defined by comparative analyses of the two genomes together with the genome of the third paulomycin producer Streptomyces albus J1074. Subsequently, the identity of the paulomycin biosynthetic gene cluster was confirmed by inactivation of two genes involved in biosynthesis of the paulomycose branched chain (pau11 and the ring A moiety (pau18 in Streptomyces paulus NRRL 8115. After determining the gene cluster boundaries, a convergent biosynthetic model was proposed for paulomycin based on the deduced functions of the pau genes. Finally, a paulomycin high-producing strain was constructed by expressing an activator-encoding gene (pau13 in S. paulus, setting the stage for future investigations.

  3. Mutants of GABA transaminase (POP2 suppress the severe phenotype of succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (ssadh mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ludewig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The gamma-aminubutyrate (GABA shunt bypasses two steps of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and is present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In plants, the pathway is composed of the calcium/calmodulin-regulated cytosolic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, the mitochondrial enzymes GABA transaminase (GABA-T; POP2 and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH. We have previously shown that compromising the function of the GABA-shunt, by disrupting the SSADH gene of Arabidopsis, causes enhanced accumulation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs and cell death in response to light and heat stress. However, to date, genetic investigations of the relationships between enzymes of the GABA shunt have not been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the role of succinic semialdehyde (SSA, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and GABA in the accumulation of ROIs, we combined two genetic approaches to suppress the severe phenotype of ssadh mutants. Analysis of double pop2 ssadh mutants revealed that pop2 is epistatic to ssadh. Moreover, we isolated EMS-generated mutants suppressing the phenotype of ssadh revealing two new pop2 alleles. By measuring thermoluminescence at high temperature, the peroxide contents of ssadh and pop2 mutants were evaluated, showing that only ssadh plants accumulate peroxides. In addition, pop2 ssadh seedlings are more sensitive to exogenous SSA or GHB relative to wild type, because GHB and/or SSA accumulate in these plants. SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the lack of supply of succinate and NADH to the TCA cycle is not responsible for the oxidative stress and growth retardations of ssadh mutants. Rather, we suggest that the accumulation of SSA, GHB, or both, produced downstream of the GABA-T transamination step, is toxic to the plants, resulting in high ROI levels and impaired development.

  4. Inhibitory Effect of Cinnamaldehyde, Citral, and Eugenol on Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Gene Expression and Aflatoxin B1 Biosynthesis in Aspergillus flavus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dandan; Xing, Fuguo; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Limin; Hua, Huijuan; Zhou, Lu; Zhao, Yueju; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the inhibitory effects of cinnamaldehyde, citral, and eugenol on aflatoxin biosynthesis, the expression levels of 5 key aflatoxin biosynthetic genes were evaluated by real-time PCR. Aspergillus flavus growth and AFB1 production were completely inhibited by 0.80 mmol/L of cinnamaldehyde and 2.80 mmol/L of citral. However, at lower concentration, cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L) significantly reduced AFB1 production with inhibition rate of 68.9%, 95.4%, and 41.8%, respectively, while no effect on fungal growth. Real-time PCR showed that the expressions of aflR, aflT, aflD, aflM, and aflP were down-regulated by cinnamaldehyde (0.40 mmol/L), eugenol (0.80 mmol/L), and citral (0.56 mmol/L). In the presence of cinnamaldehyde, AflM was highly down-regulated (average of 5963 folds), followed by aflP, aflR, aflD, and aflT with the average folds of 55, 18, 6.5, and 5.8, respectively. With 0.80 mmol/L of eugenol, aflP was highly down-regulated (average of 2061-folds), followed by aflM, aflR, aflD, and aflT with average of 138-, 15-, 5.2-, and 4.8-folds reduction, respectively. With 0.56 mmol/L of citral, aflT was completely inhibited, followed by aflM, aflP, aflR, and aflD with average of 257-, 29-, 3.5-, and 2.5-folds reduction, respectively. These results suggest that the reduction in AFB1 production by cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, and citral at low concentration may be due to the down-regulations of the transcription level of aflatoxin biosynthetic genes. Cinnamaldehyde and eugenol may be employed successfully as a good candidate in controlling of toxigenic fungi and subsequently contamination with aflatoxins in practice.

  5. Biosynthetic pathway of aliphatic formates via a Baeyer–Villiger oxidation in mechanism present in astigmatid mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuhiro; Sakata, Daisuke; Schmelz, Eric A.; Mori, Naoki; Kuwahara, Yasumasa

    2017-01-01

    Astigmatid mites depend on bioactive glandular secretions, pheromones, and defensive agents to mediate intra- and interspecies interactions. Aliphatic formates, such as (Z,Z)-8,11-heptadecadienyl formate (8,11-F17) and (Z)-8-heptadecenyl formate (8-F17), are rarely encountered natural products that are abundant in Sancassania sp. Sasagawa (Acari: Acaridae) mite secretions. Linoleic acid and oleic acid are predicted as key intermediates in the synthesis of the closely related aliphatic formates. To gain insight in this biosynthetic pathway, acarid mite feeding experiments were conducted using 13C-labeled precursors to precisely track incorporation. Analyses using 13C NMR spectroscopy demonstrated that the 13C-labeling pattern of the precursors was detectable on formates in exocrine secretions and likewise on fatty acids in total lipid pools. Curiously, the results demonstrated that the formates were biosynthesized without the dehomologation of corresponding fatty acids. Careful examination of the mass spectra from labeling experiments revealed that the carbonyl carbon of the formates is originally derived from the C-1 position of the fatty acids. Consistent with a Baeyer–Villiger oxidation reaction, labeling studies support the insertion of an oxygen atom between the carbonyl group and carbon chain. Empirical data support the existence of a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase responsible for the catalyzation of the Baeyer–Villiger oxidation. The predicted existence of a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase capable of converting aliphatic aldehydes to formates represents an exciting opportunity to expand the enzymatic toolbox available for controlled biochemical synthesis. PMID:28223501

  6. Identification and Functional Characterization of Genes Encoding Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthetic Activities from Unicellular Microalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Royah Vaezi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify novel genes encoding enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of nutritionally important omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, a database search was carried out in the genomes of the unicellular photoautotrophic green alga Ostreococcus RCC809 and cold-water diatom Fragilariopsis cylindrus. The search led to the identification of two putative “front-end” desaturases (Δ6 and Δ4 from Ostreococcus RCC809 and one Δ6-elongase from F. cylindrus. Heterologous expression of putative open reading frames (ORFs in yeast revealed that the encoded enzyme activities efficiently convert their respective substrates: 54.1% conversion of α-linolenic acid for Δ6-desaturase, 15.1% conversion of 22:5n-3 for Δ4-desaturase and 38.1% conversion of γ-linolenic acid for Δ6-elongase. The Δ6-desaturase from Ostreococcus RCC809 displays a very strong substrate preference resulting in the predominant synthesis of stearidonic acid (C18:4Δ6,9,12,15. These data confirm the functional characterization of omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthetic genes from these two species which have until now not been investigated for such activities. The identification of these new genes will also serve to expand the repertoire of activities available for metabolically engineering the omega-3 trait in heterologous hosts as well as providing better insights into the synthesis of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA in marine microalgae.

  7. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas; Rohrer, Sabrina; Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein biosynthesis interacting with elongation factor EF-Tu. Genome Mining revealed 32 gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of diverse secondary metabolites in the genome of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, indicating an enormous biosynthetic potential of this strain. The structural diversity of secondary metabolisms predicted for S. collinus Tü 365 includes PKS, NRPS, PKS-NRPS hybrids, a lanthipeptide, terpenes and siderophores. While some of these gene clusters were found to contain genes related to known secondary metabolites, which also could be detected in HPLC-MS analyses, most of the uncharacterized gene clusters are not expressed under standard laboratory conditions. With this study we aimed to characterize the genome information of S. collinus Tü 365 to make use of gene clusters, which previously have not been described for this strain. We were able to connect the gene clusters of a lanthipeptide, a carotenoid, five terpenoid compounds, an ectoine, a siderophore and a spore pigment-associated gene cluster to their respective biosynthesis products.

  8. Modeling dynamics of mutants in heterogeneous stem cell niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriyari, L.; Mahdipour-Shirayeh, A.

    2017-02-01

    Studying the stem cell (SC) niche architecture is a crucial step for investigating the process of oncogenesis and obtaining an effective stem cell therapy for various cancers. Recently, it has been observed that there are two groups of SCs in the SC niche collaborating with each other to maintain tissue homeostasis: border stem cells (BSCs), which are responsible in controlling the number of non-stem cells as well as stem cells, and central stem cells (CeSCs), which regulate the SC niche. Here, we develop a bi-compartmental stochastic model for the SC niche to study the spread of mutants within the niche. The analytic calculations and numeric simulations, which are in perfect agreement, reveal that in order to delay the spread of mutants in the SC niche, a small but non-zero number of SC proliferations must occur in the CeSC compartment. Moreover, the migration of BSCs to CeSCs delays the spread of mutants. Furthermore, the fixation probability of mutants in the SC niche is independent of types of SC division as long as all SCs do not divide fully asymmetrically. Additionally, the progeny of CeSCs have a much higher chance than the progeny of BSCs to take over the entire niche.

  9. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest.

  10. Demarcation of mutant-carrying regions in barley plants after ethylmethane-sulfonate seed treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, P.

    1966-01-01

    The branching pattern of the barley plant is analyzed and the anatomical structure of the resting barley embryo studied in longitudinal and cross-sections as well as by dissection techniques. The frequency and distribution of ethylmethane-sulfonate induced chloroplast and morphological seedling...... was obtained.The absence of cluster sharing allows the recognition in the barley plant of 8 mutually exclusive mutant sectors which never had a mutant cluster in common. The anatomical analysis proves that the barley embryo contains at least 6 separate shoot meristems or prospective shoot meristems, which...... will constitute mutually exclusive mutant sectors in the plant. The combined genetical and anatomical analysis reveals that in large seeds there are always 9 meristems leading to 9 mutually exclusive mutant sectors. Up to 7 additional meristems leading to mutually exclusive mutant sectors can be present...

  11. The isolation of Staphylococcus aureus tea tree oil-reduced susceptibility mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuaron, Jesus A; Dulal, Santosh; Cooke, Peter H; Torres, Nathanial J; Gustafson, John E

    2014-08-01

    Tea tree oil (TTO)-reduced susceptibility (TTORS) mutants of two Staphylococcus aureus laboratory strains were isolated utilizing TTO gradient plates. Attempts to isolate TTORS mutants employing agar plates containing single TTO concentrations failed. All TTORS mutants demonstrated a small colony variant (SCV) phenotype and produced cells with a smaller diameter, as determined by scanning electron microscopy. The addition of SCV auxotrophic supplements to media did not lead to an increase in TTORS mutant colony size. Revertants were also isolated from the TTORS mutants following growth in drug-free media, and all revertant strains demonstrated phenotypes similar to their respective parent strains. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that an SH1000 TTORS mutant demonstrated a thinner cell wall and novel septal invaginations compared with parent strain SH1000. In addition, comparative genomic sequencing did not reveal any mutations in an SH1000 TTORS mutant previously linked to well-characterized SCV genotypes. This study demonstrates that TTO can select for a unique SCV phenotype.

  12. Study and reengineering of the binding sites and allosteric regulation of biosynthetic threonine deaminase by isoleucine and valine in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Zhen; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Zeng, An-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Biosynthetic threonine deaminase (TD) is a key enzyme for the synthesis of isoleucine which is allosterically inhibited and activated by Ile and Val, respectively. The binding sites of Ile and Val and the mechanism of their regulations in TD are not clear, but essential for a rational design of efficient productive strain(s) for Ile and related amino acids. In this study, structure-based computational approach and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to identify the potential binding sites of Ile and Val in Escherichia coli TD. Our results demonstrated that each regulatory domain of the TD monomer possesses two nonequivalent effector-binding sites. The residues R362, E442, G445, A446, Y369, I460, and S461 only interact with Ile while E347, G350, and F352 are involved not only in the Ile binding but also in the Val binding. By further considering enzyme kinetic data, we propose a concentration-dependent mechanism of the allosteric regulation of TD by Ile and Val. For the construction of Ile overproducing strain, a novel TD mutant with double mutation of F352A/R362F was also created, which showed both higher activity and much stronger resistance to Ile inhibition comparing to those of wild-type enzyme. Overexpression of this mutant TD in E. coli JW3591 significantly increased the production of ketobutyrate and Ile in comparison to the reference strains overexpressing wild-type TD or the catabolic threonine deaminase (TdcB). This work builds a solid basis for the reengineering of TD and related microorganisms for Ile production.

  13. Metabolic reprogramming in mutant IDH1 glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Izquierdo-Garcia

    Full Text Available Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH 1 have been reported in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas. IDH1 is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate while mutant IDH1 catalyzes the conversion of α-ketoglutarate into 2-hydroxyglutarate. These mutations are associated with the accumulation of 2-hydroxyglutarate within the tumor and are believed to be one of the earliest events in the development of low-grade gliomas. The goal of this work was to determine whether the IDH1 mutation leads to additional magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS-detectable changes in the cellular metabolome.Two genetically engineered cell models were investigated, a U87-based model and an E6/E7/hTERT immortalized normal human astrocyte (NHA-based model. For both models, wild-type IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the wild-type IDH1 gene while mutant IDH1 cells were generated by transduction with a lentiviral vector coding for the R132H IDH1 mutant gene. Metabolites were extracted from the cells using the dual-phase extraction method and analyzed by 1H-MRS. Principal Component Analysis was used to analyze the MRS data.Principal Component Analysis clearly discriminated between wild-type and mutant IDH1 cells. Analysis of the loading plots revealed significant metabolic changes associated with the IDH1 mutation. Specifically, a significant drop in the concentration of glutamate, lactate and phosphocholine as well as the expected elevation in 2-hydroxyglutarate were observed in mutant IDH1 cells when compared to their wild-type counterparts.The IDH1 mutation leads to several, potentially translatable MRS-detectable metabolic changes beyond the production of 2-hydroxyglutarate.

  14. Two genes, rif15 and rif16, of the rifamycin biosynthetic gene cluster in Amycolatopsis mediterranei likely encode a transketolase and a P450 monooxygenase,respectively, both essential for the conversion of rifamycin SV into B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Yuan; Wei Zhao; Yi Zhong; Jin Wang; Zhongiun Qin; Xiaoming Ding; Guo-Ping Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Amycolatopsis mediterranei produces an important antibiotic rifamycin,the biosynthesis of which involves many unusual modifications.Previous work suggested a putative P450 enzyme encoded by rif16 within the rifamycin biosynthetic gene cluster (rif) was required for the conversion of the intermediate rifamycin SV into the end product rifamycin B.In this study,we genetically proved that a putative transketolase encoded by rif15 is another essential enzyme for this conversion.Expression of merely rif15 and rif16 in a rif cluster null mutant ofA.mediterranei U32 was able to convert rifamycin SV into B.However,this Rifl5- and Rifl6-mediated conversion was only detected in intact cells of A.meidterranei,but not in Streptomyce coelicolor or Mycobacterium smegmatis,suggesting that yet-characterized gene(s) in A.mediterranei other than those encoded by the rif cluster should be involved in this process.

  15. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  16. Study on culturing Trichodema mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-ai; WANG Wei-ming

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichodema mutants strains T5, T0803, T1010, T1003were cultured in different conditions and media, also in the presence of fungicides at 40 mg/kg (CK or procymidone + chlorothalonil, or maneb or phosethyl-Al) . The pH values of media were 5, 6, 7 and 8 and hyphae were grown at temperatures of 15, 20, 25 and 30 ℃. After being cultured for 3, 4, 5, or 6 days, the strains were transferred at a lower temperature to sporulate (20℃) Obtained data were analyzed statistically, with the orthogonal array and ranges (R) differing dependes on the treatments (R = 40.0,42.4, 48.0, 62.8,107.0). The results indicated that the most important factor was the nature of the strain (R =107.0), while the change in temperature and time of cultivation produced the lowest effect (R =40.0). Each factor variance was significant and A3B4C2D1E3 was the optimum combined condition, in which strain T1010 grew more quickly and sporulated most.

  17. Integrated Transcriptome and Metabolic Analyses Reveals Novel Insights into Free Amino Acid Metabolism in Huangjinya Tea Cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qunfeng; Liu, Meiya; Ruan, Jianyun

    2017-01-01

    The chlorotic tea variety Huangjinya, a natural mutant, contains enhanced levels of free amino acids in its leaves, which improves the drinking quality of its brewed tea. Consequently, this chlorotic mutant has a higher economic value than the non-chlorotic varieties. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the increased levels of free amino acids in this mutant are mostly unknown, as are the possible effects of this mutation on the overall metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in tea leaves. To gain further insight into the effects of chlorosis on the global metabolome and biosynthetic pathways in this mutant, Huangjinya plants were grown under normal and reduced sunlight, resulting in chlorotic and non-chlorotic leaves, respectively; their leaves were analyzed using transcriptomics as well as targeted and untargeted metabolomics. Approximately 5,000 genes (8.5% of the total analyzed) and ca. 300 metabolites (14.5% of the total detected) were significantly differentially regulated, thus indicating the occurrence of marked effects of light on the biosynthetic pathways in this mutant plant. Considering primary metabolism, including that of sugars, amino acids, and organic acids, significant changes were observed in the expression of genes involved in both nitrogen (N) and carbon metabolism. The suite of changes not only generated an increase in amino acids, including glutamic acid, glutamine, and theanine, but it also elevated the levels of free ammonium, citrate, and α-ketoglutarate, and lowered the levels of mono- and di-saccharides and of caffeine as compared with the non-chlorotic leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that the increased levels of amino acids in the chlorotic vs. non-chlorotic leaves are likely due to increased protein catabolism and/or decreased glycolysis and diminished biosynthesis of nitrogen-containing compounds other than amino acids, including chlorophyll, purines, nucleotides, and alkaloids.

  18. Biosynthetic origin of gibberellins A sub 3 and A sub 7 in cell-free preparations from seeds of Marah macrocarpus and Malus domestica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albone, K.S.; Gaskin, P.; MacMillan, J.; Willis, C.L. (Univ. of Bristol (England)); Phinney, B.O. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Cell-free preparations from seeds of Marah macrocarpus L. and Malus domestica L. catalyzed the conversion of gibberellin A{sub 9} (GA{sub 9}) and 2,3-dehydroGA{sub 9} to GA{sub 7}; GA{sub 9} was also metabolized to GA{sub 4} in a branch pathway. The preparation from Marah seeds also metabolized GA{sub 5} to GA{sub 3} in high yield; GA{sub 6} was a minor product and was not metabolized to GA{sub 3}. Using substrates stereospecifically labeled with deuterium, it was shown that the metabolism of GA{sub 5} to GA{sub 3} and of 2,3-dehydroGA{sub 9} to GA{sub 7} occurs with the loss of the 1{beta}-hydrogen. In cultures of Gibberella fujikuroi, mutant B1-41a, (1{beta},2{beta}-{sup 2}H{sub 2})GA{sub 4}, was metabolized to (1,2-{sup 2}H{sub 2})GA{sub 3} with the loss of the 1{alpha}- and 2{alpha}-hydrogens. These results provide further evidence that the biosynthetic origin of GA{sub 3} and GA{sub 7} in higher plants is different from that in the fungus Gibberella fujikuroi.

  19. Carotenoid profiling and biosynthetic gene expression in flesh and peel of wild-type and hp-1 tomato fruit under UV-B depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, Valerio; Calvenzani, Valentina; Petroni, Katia; Tonelli, Chiara; Castagna, Antonella; Ranieri, Annamaria

    2012-05-16

    Although light is recognized as one of the main factors influencing fruit carotenogenesis, the specific role of UV-B radiation has been poorly investigated. The present work is addressed to assess the molecular events underlying carotenoid accumulation in presence or absence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) light in tomato fruits of wild-type and high pigment-1 (hp-1), a mutant characterized by exaggerated photoresponsiveness and increased fruit pigmentation. Gene expression analyses indicated that in wild-type fruits UV-B radiation mainly negatively affects the carotenoid biosynthetic genes encoding enzymes downstream of lycopene both in flesh and peel, suggesting that the down-regulation of genes CrtL-b and CrtL-e and the subsequent accumulation of lycopene during tomato ripening are determined at least in part by UV-B light. In contrast to wild-type, UV-B depletion did not greatly affect carotenoid accumulation in hp-1 and generally determined minor differences in gene expression between control and UV-B-depleted conditions.

  20. Metagenome mining reveals polytheonamides as posttranslationally modified ribosomal peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Michael F; Gurgui, Cristian; Helf, Maximilian J; Morinaka, Brandon I; Uria, Agustinus R; Oldham, Neil J; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Piel, Jörn

    2012-10-19

    It is held as a paradigm that ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins contain only l-amino acids. We demonstrate a ribosomal origin of the marine sponge-derived polytheonamides, exceptionally potent, giant natural-product toxins. Isolation of the biosynthetic genes from the sponge metagenome revealed a bacterial gene architecture. Only six candidate enzymes were identified for 48 posttranslational modifications, including 18 epimerizations and 17 methylations of nonactivated carbon centers. Three enzymes were functionally validated, which showed that a radical S-adenosylmethionine enzyme is responsible for the unidirectional epimerization of multiple and different amino acids. Collectively, these complex alterations create toxins that function as unimolecular minimalistic ion channels with near-femtomolar activity. This study broadens the biosynthetic scope of ribosomal systems and creates new opportunities for peptide and protein bioengineering.

  1. Ambiguity Revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Subir Bose; Matthew Polisson; Ludovic Renou

    2012-01-01

    We derive necessary and suffcient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under ambiguity: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for the maxmin expected utility and subjective expected utility models are characterized as special cases.

  2. Ambiguity revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Ralph-C; Bose, Subir; Polisson, Matthew; Renou, Ludovic

    2013-01-01

    We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for data sets composed of state-contingent prices and consumption to be consistent with two prominent models of decision making under uncertainty: variational preferences and smooth ambiguity. The revealed preference conditions for subjective expected utility, maxmin expected utility, and multiplier preferences are characterised as special cases. We implement our tests on data from a portfolio choice experiment.

  3. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Margarita; Pons-Ferrer, Teresa; Mrázova, Anna; Pal'ove-Balang, Peter; Vilková, Mária; Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; Vega, José M; Eliášová, Adriana; Repčák, Miroslav; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2) in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L. japonicus plants in response to stress.

  4. Modulation of phenolic metabolism under stress conditions in a Lotus japonicus mutant lacking plastidic glutamine synthetase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGarcía-Calderón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper was aimed to investigate the possible implications of the lack of plastidic glutamine synthetase (GS2 in phenolic metabolism during stress responses in the model legume Lotus japonicus. Important changes in the transcriptome were detected in a GS2 mutant called Ljgln2-2, compared to the wild type, in response to two separate stress conditions, such as drought or the result of the impairment of the photorespiratory cycle. Detailed transcriptomic analysis showed that the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds was affected in the mutant plants in these two different types of stress situations. For this reason, the genes and metabolites related to this metabolic route were further investigated using a combined approach of gene expression analysis and metabolite profiling. A high induction of the expression of several genes for the biosynthesis of different branches of the phenolic biosynthetic pathway was detected by qRT-PCR. The extent of induction was always higher in Ljgln2-2, probably reflecting the higher stress levels present in this genotype. This was paralleled by accumulation of several kaempferol and quercetine glycosides, some of them described for the first time in L. japonicus, and of high levels of the isoflavonoid vestitol. The results obtained indicate that the absence of GS2 affects different aspects of phenolic metabolism in L .japonicus plants in response to stress.

  5. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  6. Spook and Spookier code for stage-specific components of the ecdysone biosynthetic pathway in Diptera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ono, Hajime; Rewitz, Kim; Shinoda, Tetsu

    2006-01-01

    that catalyze the terminal hydroxylation steps in the conversion of cholesterol to the molting hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. These P450s are conserved in other insects and each is thought to function throughout development as the sole mediator of a particular biosynthetic step since, where analyzed, each...... larval stages within the prothoracic gland cells of the ring gland. RNAi mediated reduction in the expression of this heterochromatin localized gene leads to arrest at the first instar stage which can be rescued by feeding the larva 20E, E or ketodiol but not 7dC. In addition, spok expression...

  7. Impact of lead ions on biosynthetic capacity of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2p-15 strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Т. P. Kilochok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of different concentrations of Pb ions on biosynthetical ability of Streptomyces recifensis var. lyticus 2P-15, which is the producer of compound complex of extracellular enzymes and growth stimulators, was studied. It has been showed, that Pb ions introduced in agar medium have had a stimulative effect on production of surface and depth mycelia. The Pb ions, which have been inoculated into liquid fermentative medium in concentration of 1,0–2,0 mg/l realized directed synthesis of bacterio- and proteolytic enzymes, had an influence on qualitative and quantitative composition of produced enzymes.

  8. Unlabeled milk from cows treated with biosynthetic growth hormones: a case of regulatory abdication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, S S

    1996-01-01

    Levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are substantially elevated and more bioactive in the milk of cows hyperstimulated with the biosynthetic bovine growth hormones rBGH, and are further increased by pasteurization. IGF-1 is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, as evidenced by marked growth-promoting effects even in short-term tests in mature rats, and absorption is likely to be still higher in infants. Converging lines of evidence incriminate IGF-1 in rBGH milk as a potential risk factor for both breast and gastrointestinal cancers.

  9. ATAF1 transcription factor directly regulates abscisic acid biosynthetic gene NCED3 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Krogh; Lindemose, Søren; De Masi, Federico

    2013-01-01

    ATAF1, an Arabidopsis thaliana NAC transcription factor, plays important roles in plant adaptation to environmental stress and development. To search for ATAF1 target genes, we used protein binding microarrays and chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP). This identified T[A,C,G]CGT[A,G] and TT[A,C,G...... abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone biosynthetic gene NCED3. ChIP-qPCR and expression analysis showed that ATAF1 binding to the NCED3 promoter correlated with increased NCED3 expression and ABA hormone levels. These results indicate that ATAF1 regulates ABA biosynthesis....

  10. Genetic Analysis of a Biomass Mutant in Oryza sativa%一个水稻生物产量突变体的遗传分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖子荣; 黄东益; 牛杰; 李俏; 吴安迪

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to reveal the genetic model of a biomass mutant in Oryza sativa. [Method] ln the process of seresning and iden-tification of Bar-transgenic rice, a biomass mutant was found in 10 lines of TI progenies. The mutant was investigated for genetic analysis and agronomic traits by herbicide spraying and PCR amplification. [Result] The segregation ratio is consistent with mendelian law(3:1). The mutant assumed not only higher plant height, wider straw and earlier florescence, but also more tillers, bigger spikes and resuhantly higher biomass. PCR detections indicated that no co-segregation was observed between mutant traits and target gene(Bar) in the T-DNA inserted, proving that the mutant is not caused by the insertion of T-DNA containing target gene (Bar). [Conclusion] Our study may avail to understand the cloning of mutant gene and the mechanism of the mutant gene on biomass.

  11. A fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based strategy for rapid isolation of high-lipid Chlamydomonas mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Mia; Freeman, Elizabeth S; Jinkerson, Robert E; Jonikas, Martin C

    2015-01-01

    There is significant interest in farming algae for the direct production of biofuels and valuable lipids. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is the leading model system for studying lipid metabolism in green algae, but current methods for isolating mutants of this organism with a perturbed lipid content are slow and tedious. Here, we present the Chlamydomonas high-lipid sorting (CHiLiS) strategy, which enables enrichment of high-lipid mutants by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of pooled mutants stained with the lipid-sensitive dye Nile Red. This method only takes 5 weeks from mutagenesis to mutant isolation. We developed a staining protocol that allows quantification of lipid content while preserving cell viability. We improved separation of high-lipid mutants from the wild type by using each cell's chlorophyll fluorescence as an internal control. We initially demonstrated 20-fold enrichment of the known high-lipid mutant sta1 from a mixture of sta1 and wild-type cells. We then applied CHiLiS to sort thousands of high-lipid cells from a pool of about 60,000 mutants. Flow cytometry analysis of 24 individual mutants isolated by this approach revealed that about 50% showed a reproducible high-lipid phenotype. We further characterized nine of the mutants with the highest lipid content by flame ionization detection and mass spectrometry lipidomics. All mutants analyzed had a higher triacylglycerol content and perturbed whole-cell fatty acid composition. One arbitrarily chosen mutant was evaluated by microscopy, revealing larger lipid droplets than the wild type. The unprecedented throughput of CHiLiS opens the door to a systems-level understanding of green algal lipid biology by enabling genome-saturating isolation of mutants in key genes.

  12. Identification of auxotrophic mutants of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus by non-homologous end joining-mediated integrative transformation with genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarimizu, Tohru; Nonklang, Sanom; Nakamura, Junpei; Tokuda, Shuya; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Lorreungsil, Sasithorn; Sutthikhumpha, Surasit; Pukahuta, Charida; Kitagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Mikiko; Cha-Aim, Kamonchai; Limtong, Savitree; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji

    2013-12-01

    The isolation and application of auxotrophic mutants for gene manipulations, such as genetic transformation, mating selection and tetrad analysis, form the basis of yeast genetics. For the development of these genetic methods in the thermotolerant fermentative yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus, we isolated a series of auxotrophic mutants with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism. To identify the mutated genes, linear DNA fragments of nutrient biosynthetic pathway genes were amplified from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA and used to directly transform the K. marxianus auxotrophic mutants by random integration into chromosomes through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The appearance of transformant colonies indicated that the specific S. cerevisiae gene complemented the K. marxianus mutant. Using this interspecific complementation approach with linear PCR-amplified DNA, we identified auxotrophic mutations of ADE2, ADE5,7, ADE6, HIS2, HIS3, HIS4, HIS5, HIS6, HIS7, LYS1, LYS2, LYS4, LYS9, LEU1, LEU2, MET2, MET6, MET17, TRP3, TRP4 and TRP5 without the labour-intensive requirement of plasmid construction. Mating, sporulation and tetrad analysis techniques for K. marxianus were also established. With the identified auxotrophic mutant strains and S. cerevisiae genes as selective markers, NHEJ-mediated integrative transformation with PCR-amplified DNA is an attractive system for facilitating genetic analyses in the yeast K. marxianus.

  13. Expression of Terpenoid Biosynthetic Genes and Accumulation of Chemical Constituents in Valeriana fauriei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ji Park

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Valeriana fauriei (V. fauriei, which emits a characteristic and unpleasant odor, is important in traditional medicine. In this study, the expression of terpenoid biosynthetic genes was investigated in different organs that were also screened for volatile compounds including valerenic acid and its derivatives. Specific expression patterns from different parts of V. fauriei were observed using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. The highest transcript levels of biosynthetic genes involved in mevalonic acid (MVA and methylerythritol phosphate (MEP production were found in the stem. Although the amounts of volatile compounds were varied by organ, most of the volatile terpenoids were accumulated in the root. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis identified 128 volatile compounds, which represented 65.33% to 95.66% of total volatiles. Certain compounds were only found in specific organs. For example, isovalerenic acid and valerenic acid and its derivatives were restricted to the root. Organs with high transcript levels did not necessarily have high levels of the corresponding chemical constituents. According to these results, we hypothesize that translocation may occur between different organs in V. fauriei.

  14. Variation in oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis: intramolecular and biosynthetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Leonel; Pinzon, Maria Camila; Anderson, William T; Jahren, A Hope

    2006-10-01

    The oxygen isotopic composition of plant cellulose is commonly used for the interpretations of climate, ecophysiology and dendrochronology in both modern and palaeoenvironments. Further applications of this analytical tool depends on our in-depth knowledge of the isotopic fractionations associated with the biochemical pathways leading to cellulose. Here, we test two important assumptions regarding isotopic effects resulting from the location of oxygen in the carbohydrate moiety and the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose synthesis. We show that the oxygen isotopic fractionation of the oxygen attached to carbon 2 of the glucose moieties differs from the average fractionation of the oxygens attached to carbons 3-6 from cellulose by at least 9%, for cellulose synthesized within seedlings of two different species (Triticum aestivum L. and Ricinus communis L.). The fractionation for a given oxygen in cellulose synthesized by the Triticum seedlings, which have starch as their primary carbon source, is different than the corresponding fractionation in Ricinus seedlings, within which lipids are the primary carbon source. This observation shows that the biosynthetic pathway towards cellulose affects oxygen isotope partitioning, a fact heretofore undemonstrated. Our findings may explain the species-dependent variability in the overall oxygen isotope fractionation during cellulose synthesis, and may provide much-needed insight for palaeoclimate reconstruction using fossil cellulose.

  15. The pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway modulates production of biofilm determinants in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Garavaglia

    Full Text Available Bacteria are often found in multicellular communities known as biofilms, which constitute a resistance form against environmental stresses. Extracellular adhesion and cell aggregation factors, responsible for bacterial biofilm formation and maintenance, are tightly regulated in response to physiological and environmental cues. We show that, in Escherichia coli, inactivation of genes belonging to the de novo uridine monophosphate (UMP biosynthetic pathway impairs production of curli fibers and cellulose, important components of the bacterial biofilm matrix, by inhibiting transcription of the csgDEFG operon, thus preventing production of the biofilm master regulator CsgD protein. Supplementing growth media with exogenous uracil, which can be converted to UMP through the pyrimidine nucleotide salvage pathway, restores csgDEFG transcription and curli production. In addition, however, exogenous uracil triggers cellulose production, particularly in strains defective in either carB or pyrB genes, which encode enzymes catalyzing the first steps of de novo UMP biosynthesis. Our results indicate the existence of tight and complex links between pyrimidine metabolism and curli/cellulose production: transcription of the csgDEFG operon responds to pyrimidine nucleotide availability, while cellulose production is triggered by exogenous uracil in the absence of active de novo UMP biosynthesis. We speculate that perturbations in the UMP biosynthetic pathways allow the bacterial cell to sense signals such as starvation, nucleic acids degradation, and availability of exogenous pyrimidines, and to adapt the production of the extracellular matrix to the changing environmental conditions.

  16. Identification and developmental expression profiling of putative alkaloid biosynthetic genes in Corydalis yanhusuo bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Dengqun; Wang, Pengfei; Jia, Chan; Sun, Peng; Qi, Jianjun; Zhou, Lili; Li, Xian'en

    2016-01-18

    Alkaloids in bulbs of Corydalis (C.) yanhusuo are the major pharmacologically active compounds in treatment of blood vessel diseases, tumors and various pains. However, due to the absence of gene sequences in C. yanhusuo, the genes involved in alkaloid biosynthesis and their expression during bulb development remain unknown. We therefore established the first transcriptome database of C. yanhusuo via Illumina mRNA-Sequencing of a RNA composite sample collected at Bulb initiation (Day 0), early enlargement (Day 10) and maturation (Day 30). 25,013,630 clean 90 bp paired-end reads were de novo assembled into 47,081 unigenes with an average length of 489 bp, among which 30,868 unigenes (65.56%) were annotated in four protein databases. Of 526 putative unigenes involved in biosynthesis o f various alkaloids, 187 were identified as the candidate genes involved in the biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), the only alkaloid type reported in C. yanhusuo untill now. BIAs biosynthetic genes were highly upregulated in the overall pathway during bulb development. Identification of alkaloid biosynthetic genes in C. yanhusuo provide insights on pathways and molecular regulation of alkaloid biosynthesis, to initiate metabolic engineering in order to improve the yield of interesting alkaloids and to identify potentially new alkaloids predicted from the transcriptomic information.

  17. Identification of a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery involved in astellolide biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Yasutomo; Takahashi, Shunji; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koyama, Yasuji

    2016-01-01

    Esterified drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones such as astellolides display various biological activities and are widely produced by plants and fungi. Given their low homology to known sesquiterpene cyclases, the genes responsible for their biosynthesis have not been uncovered yet. Here, we identified the astellolide gene cluster from Aspergillus oryzae and discovered a novel sesquiterpene biosynthetic machinery consisting of AstC, AstI, and AstK. All these enzymes are annotated as haloacid dehalogenase-like hydrolases, whereas AstC also contains a DxDTT motif conserved in class II diterpene cyclases. Based on enzyme reaction analyses, we found that AstC catalysed the protonation-initiated cyclisation of farnesyl pyrophosphate into drimanyl pyrophosphate. This was successively dephosphorylated by AstI and AstK to produce drim-8-ene-11-ol. Moreover, we also identified and characterised a unique non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, AstA, responsible for esterifying aryl acids to drimane-type sesquiterpene lactones. In this study, we highlight a new biosynthetic route for producing sesquiterpene and its esterified derivative. Our findings shed light on the identification of novel sesquiterpenes via genome mining. PMID:27628599

  18. Expression of phenazine biosynthetic genes during the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis of Glomus intraradices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionicia Gloria León-Martínez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To explore the molecular mechanisms that prevail during the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis involving the genus Glomus, we transcriptionally analysed spores of Glomus intraradices BE3 during early hyphal growth. Among 458 transcripts initially identified as being expressed at presymbiotic stages, 20% of sequences had homology to previously characterized eukaryotic genes, 30% were homologous to fungal coding sequences, and 9% showed homology to previously characterized bacterial genes. Among them, GintPbr1a encodes a homolog to Phenazine Biosynthesis Regulator (Pbr of Burkholderia cenocepacia, an pleiotropic regulatory protein that activates phenazine production through transcriptional activation of the protein D isochorismatase biosynthetic enzyme phzD (Ramos et al., 2010. Whereas GintPbr1a is expressed during the presymbiotic phase, the G. intraradices BE3 homolog of phzD (BGintphzD is transcriptionally active at the time of the establishment of the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis. DNA from isolated bacterial cultures found in spores of G. intraradices BE3 confirmed that both BGintPbr1a and BGintphzD are present in the genome of its potential endosymbionts. Taken together, our results indicate that spores of G. intraradices BE3 express bacterial phenazine biosynthetic genes at the onset of the fungal-plant symbiotic interaction.

  19. Blockage of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway affects riboflavin production in Ashbya gossypii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rui; Aguiar, Tatiana Q; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-01-10

    The Ashbya gossypii riboflavin biosynthetic pathway and its connection with the purine pathway have been well studied. However, the outcome of genetic alterations in the pyrimidine pathway on riboflavin production by A. gossypii had not yet been assessed. Here, we report that the blockage of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway in the recently generated A. gossypii Agura3 uridine/uracil auxotrophic strain led to improved riboflavin production on standard agar-solidified complex medium. When extra uridine/uracil was supplied, the production of riboflavin by this auxotroph was repressed. High concentrations of uracil hampered this (and the parent) strain growth, whereas excess uridine favored the A. gossypii Agura3 growth. Considering that the riboflavin and the pyrimidine pathways share the same precursors and that riboflavin overproduction may be triggered by nutritional stress, we suggest that overproduction of riboflavin by the A. gossypii Agura3 may occur as an outcome of a nutritional stress response and/or of an increased availability in precursors for riboflavin biosynthesis, due to their reduced consumption by the pyrimidine pathway.

  20. Treadmill exercise does not change gene expression of adrenal catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in chronically stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJUBICA GAVRILOVIC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic isolation of adult animals represents a form of psychological stress that produces sympatho-adrenomedullar activation. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenomedullary system. This study aimed to investigate physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-ß-hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB in the adrenal medulla, concentrations of catecholamines and corticosterone (CORT in the plasma and the weight of adrenal glands of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20 min treadmill running for 12 weeks. Also, we examined how additional acute immobilization stress changes the mentioned parameters. Treadmill running did not result in modulation of gene expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzymes and it decreased the level of CREB mRNA in the adrenal medulla of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats. The potentially negative physiological adaptations after treadmill running were recorded as increased concentrations of catecholamines and decreased morning CORT concentration in the plasma, as well as the adrenal gland hypertrophy of chronically psychosocially stressed rats. The additional acute immobilization stress increases gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla, as well as catecholamines and CORT levels in the plasma. Treadmill exercise does not change the activity of sympatho-adrenomedullary system of chronically psychosocially stressed rats.

  1. Genetic analysis of the capsular biosynthetic locus from all 90 pneumococcal serotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Bentley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Several major invasive bacterial pathogens are encapsulated. Expression of a polysaccharide capsule is essential for survival in the blood, and thus for virulence, but also is a target for host antibodies and the basis for effective vaccines. Encapsulated species typically exhibit antigenic variation and express one of a number of immunochemically distinct capsular polysaccharides that define serotypes. We provide the sequences of the capsular biosynthetic genes of all 90 serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae and relate these to the known polysaccharide structures and patterns of immunological reactivity of typing sera, thereby providing the most complete understanding of the genetics and origins of bacterial polysaccharide diversity, laying the foundations for molecular serotyping. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that a complete repertoire of capsular biosynthetic genes has been available, enabling a holistic analysis of a bacterial polysaccharide biosynthesis system. Remarkably, the total size of alternative coding DNA at this one locus exceeds 1.8 Mbp, almost equivalent to the entire S. pneumoniae chromosomal complement.

  2. Divergent evolutionary pattern of starch biosynthetic pathway genes in grasses and dicots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun; Li, Qi-Gang; Dunwell, Jim M; Zhang, Yuan-Ming

    2012-10-01

    Starch is the most widespread and abundant storage carbohydrate in crops and its production is critical to both crop yield and quality. In regard to the starch content in the seeds of crop plants, there is a distinct difference between grasses (Poaceae) and dicots. However, few studies have described the evolutionary pattern of genes in the starch biosynthetic pathway in these two groups of plants. In this study, therefore, an attempt was made to compare evolutionary rate, gene duplication, and selective pattern of the key genes involved in this pathway between the two groups, using five grasses and five dicots as materials. The results showed 1) distinct differences in patterns of gene duplication and loss between grasses and dicots; duplication in grasses mainly occurred before the divergence of grasses, whereas duplication mostly occurred in individual species within the dicots; there is less gene loss in grasses than in dicots, 2) a considerably higher evolutionary rate in grasses than in dicots in most gene families analyzed, and 3) evidence of a different selective pattern between grasses and dicots; positive selection may have occurred asymmetrically in grasses in some gene families, for example, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit. Therefore, we deduced that gene duplication contributes to, and a higher evolutionary rate is associated with, the higher starch content in grasses. In addition, two novel aspects of the evolution of the starch biosynthetic pathway were observed.

  3. A branched biosynthetic pathway is involved in production of roquefortine and related compounds in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazrat Ali

    Full Text Available Profiling and structural elucidation of secondary metabolites produced by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and derived deletion strains were used to identify the various metabolites and enzymatic steps belonging to the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway. Major abundant metabolites of this pathway were identified as histidyltryptophanyldiketopiperazine (HTD, dehydrohistidyltryptophanyldi-ketopiperazine (DHTD, roquefortine D, roquefortine C, glandicoline A, glandicoline B and meleagrin. Specific genes could be assigned to each enzymatic reaction step. The nonribosomal peptide synthetase RoqA accepts L-histidine and L-tryptophan as substrates leading to the production of the diketopiperazine HTD. DHTD, previously suggested to be a degradation product of roquefortine C, was found to be derived from HTD involving the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase RoqR. The dimethylallyltryptophan synthetase RoqD prenylates both HTD and DHTD yielding directly the products roquefortine D and roquefortine C without the synthesis of a previously suggested intermediate and the involvement of RoqM. This leads to a branch in the otherwise linear pathway. Roquefortine C is subsequently converted into glandicoline B with glandicoline A as intermediates, involving two monooxygenases (RoqM and RoqO which were mixed up in an earlier attempt to elucidate the biosynthetic pathway. Eventually, meleagrin is produced from glandicoline B involving a methyltransferase (RoqN. It is concluded that roquefortine C and meleagrin are derived from a branched biosynthetic pathway.

  4. A branched biosynthetic pathway is involved in production of roquefortine and related compounds in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hazrat; Ries, Marco I; Nijland, Jeroen G; Lankhorst, Peter P; Hankemeier, Thomas; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Vreeken, Rob J; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2013-01-01

    Profiling and structural elucidation of secondary metabolites produced by the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum and derived deletion strains were used to identify the various metabolites and enzymatic steps belonging to the roquefortine/meleagrin pathway. Major abundant metabolites of this pathway were identified as histidyltryptophanyldiketopiperazine (HTD), dehydrohistidyltryptophanyldi-ketopiperazine (DHTD), roquefortine D, roquefortine C, glandicoline A, glandicoline B and meleagrin. Specific genes could be assigned to each enzymatic reaction step. The nonribosomal peptide synthetase RoqA accepts L-histidine and L-tryptophan as substrates leading to the production of the diketopiperazine HTD. DHTD, previously suggested to be a degradation product of roquefortine C, was found to be derived from HTD involving the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase RoqR. The dimethylallyltryptophan synthetase RoqD prenylates both HTD and DHTD yielding directly the products roquefortine D and roquefortine C without the synthesis of a previously suggested intermediate and the involvement of RoqM. This leads to a branch in the otherwise linear pathway. Roquefortine C is subsequently converted into glandicoline B with glandicoline A as intermediates, involving two monooxygenases (RoqM and RoqO) which were mixed up in an earlier attempt to elucidate the biosynthetic pathway. Eventually, meleagrin is produced from glandicoline B involving a methyltransferase (RoqN). It is concluded that roquefortine C and meleagrin are derived from a branched biosynthetic pathway.

  5. iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis reveals potential factors associated with the enhancement of phenazine-1-carboxamide production in Pseudomonas chlororaphis P3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xue-Jie; Peng, Hua-Song; Hu, Hong-Bo; Huang, Xian-Qing; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2016-06-07

    Phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), a phenazine derivative, is strongly antagonistic to fungal phytopathogens. Pseudomonas chlororaphis HT66 is a PCN-producing, non-pathogenic biocontrol strain, and we obtained the mutant P. chlororaphis P3, which produces 4.7 times more PCN than the wild-type HT66 strain. To reveal the cause of PCN production enhancement in P3 and find potential factors related to PCN biosynthesis, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis was used to study the expression changes between the two strains. Of the 452 differentially expressed proteins, most were functionally mapped into PCN biosynthesis pathway or other related metabolisms. The upregulation of proteins, including PhzA/B, PhzD, PhzF, PhzG, and PhzH, involved in PCN biosynthesis was in agreement with the efficient production of PCN in P3. A number of proteins that function primarily in energy production, amino acid metabolism, and secondary metabolism played important roles in PCN biosynthesis. Notably, proteins involved in the uptake and conversion of phosphate, inorganic nitrogen sources, and iron improved the PCN production. Furthermore, the type VI secretion system may participate in the secretion or/and indirect biosynthetic regulation of PCN in P. chlororaphis. This study provides valuable clues to better understand the biosynthesis, excretion and regulation of PCN in Pseudomonas and also provides potential gene targets for further engineering high-yield strains.

  6. Characterization and Fine Mapping of the ibf Mutant in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiajun Cui; Shengci Fan; Tian Shao; Zejun Huang; Dali Zheng; Ding Tang; Ming Li; Qian Qian; Zhukuan Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The pigment is an important character in plant development. In the present study, we characterized and fine mapped one inhibitor for brown furrows gene (ibf) in rice (Oryza sativa L.). in the Ibf mutant, brown pigments specifically accumulate in the furrows of hulls as seeds mature and reach a maximum level in dry seeds. Genetic analysis showed that the mutant phenotype is controlled by one recessive nuclear gene, which was finally mapped in a 90-kb reglon on the long arm of chromosome 9. Polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting analysis revealed that there was a 26 kb deletion in the 90-kb region in the mutant. Since all the open reading frames outside the gap in the delimited reglon had no detectable difference in DNA sequence with the wild-type, we postulated that the Ibf locus should be located in the gap. Through gene annotation and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis, we selected OsKF1 encoding a kelch repeat-containing F-box family protein as the candidate gene of ibf.

  7. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  8. Transcriptional Regulation of Cytosolic Sulfotransferase 1C2 by Intermediates of the Cholesterol Biosynthetic Pathway in Primary Cultured Rat Hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondini, Elizabeth A; Pant, Asmita; Kocarek, Thomas A

    2015-12-01

    Cytosolic sulfotransferase 1C2 (SULT1C2) is expressed in the kidney, stomach, and liver of rats; however, the mechanisms regulating expression of this enzyme are not known. We evaluated transcriptional regulation of SULT1C2 by mevalonate (MVA)-derived intermediates in primary cultured rat hepatocytes using several cholesterol synthesis inhibitors. Blocking production of mevalonate with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin (30 μM), reduced SULT1C2 mRNA content by ∼40% whereas the squalene synthase inhibitor squalestatin (SQ1, 0.1 μM), which causes accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids, increased mRNA content by 4-fold. Treatment with MVA (10 mM) strongly induced SULT1C2 mRNA by 12-fold, and this effect was blocked by inhibiting squalene epoxidase but not by more distal cholesterol inhibitors, indicating the effects of MVA are mediated by postsqualene metabolites. Using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), we characterized the 5' end of SULT1C2 mRNA and used this information to generate constructs for promoter analysis. SQ1 and MVA increased reporter activity by ∼1.6- and 3-fold, respectively, from a construct beginning 49 base pairs (bp) upstream from the longest 5'-RACE product (-3140:-49). Sequence deletions from this construct revealed a hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1) element (-2558), and mutation of this element reduced basal (75%) and MVA-induced (30%) reporter activity and attenuated promoter activation following overexpression of HNF1α or 1β. However, the effects of SQ1 were localized to a more proximal promoter region (-281:-49). Collectively, our findings demonstrate that cholesterol biosynthetic intermediates influence SULT1C2 expression in rat primary hepatocytes. Further, HNF1 appears to play an important role in mediating basal and MVA-induced SULT1C2 transcription.

  9. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Cynthia A; Buenrostro, Jason; Butler, Timothy; Carlson, Matthew L; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Whittall, Justen B

    2011-04-07

    Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s) of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP), suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS) at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  10. Arctic mustard flower color polymorphism controlled by petal-specific downregulation at the threshold of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A Dick

    Full Text Available Intra- and interspecific variation in flower color is a hallmark of angiosperm diversity. The evolutionary forces underlying the variety of flower colors can be nearly as diverse as the colors themselves. In addition to pollinator preferences, non-pollinator agents of selection can have a major influence on the evolution of flower color polymorphisms, especially when the pigments in question are also expressed in vegetative tissues. In such cases, identifying the target(s of selection starts with determining the biochemical and molecular basis for the flower color variation and examining any pleiotropic effects manifested in vegetative tissues. Herein, we describe a widespread purple-white flower color polymorphism in the mustard Parrya nudicaulis spanning Alaska. The frequency of white-flowered individuals increases with increasing growing-season temperature, consistent with the role of anthocyanin pigments in stress tolerance. White petals fail to produce the stress responsive flavonoid intermediates in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway (ABP, suggesting an early pathway blockage. Petal cDNA sequences did not reveal blockages in any of the eight enzyme-coding genes in white-flowered individuals, nor any color differentiating SNPs. A qRT-PCR analysis of white petals identified a 24-fold reduction in chalcone synthase (CHS at the threshold of the ABP, but no change in CHS expression in leaves and sepals. This arctic species has avoided the deleterious effects associated with the loss of flavonoid intermediates in vegetative tissues by decoupling CHS expression in petals and leaves, yet the correlation of flower color and climate suggests that the loss of flavonoids in the petals alone may affect the tolerance of white-flowered individuals to colder environments.

  11. Engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in hairy root cultures of Rhodiola crenulata based on metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhong Lan

    Full Text Available Tyrosine decarboxylase initializes salidroside biosynthesis. Metabolic characterization of tyrosine decarboxylase gene from Rhodiola crenulata (RcTYDC revealed that it played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis. Recombinant 53 kDa RcTYDC converted tyrosine into tyramine. RcTYDC gene expression was induced coordinately with the expression of RcUDPGT (the last gene involved in salidroside biosynthesis in SA/MeJA treatment; the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was dramatically upregulated by SA, respectively 49 folds and 36 folds compared with control. MeJA also significantly increased the expression of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT in hairy root cultures. The tissue profile of RcTYDC and RcUDPGT was highly similar: highest expression levels found in stems, higher expression levels in leaves than in flowers and roots. The gene expressing levels were consistent with the salidroside accumulation levels. This strongly suggested that RcTYDC played an important role in salidroside biosynthesis in R. crenulata. Finally, RcTYDC was used to engineering salidroside biosynthetic pathway in R. crenulata hairy roots via metabolic engineering strategy of overexpression. All the transgenic lines showed much higher expression levels of RcTYDC than non-transgenic one. The transgenic lines produced tyramine, tyrosol and salidroside at higher levels, which were respectively 3.21-6.84, 1.50-2.19 and 1.27-3.47 folds compared with the corresponding compound in non-transgenic lines. In conclusion, RcTYDC overexpression promoted tyramine biosynthesis that facilitated more metabolic flux flowing toward the downstream pathway and as a result, the intermediate tyrosol was accumulated more that led to the increased production of the end-product salidroside.

  12. An Indexed, Mapped Mutant Library Enables Reverse Genetics Studies of Biological Processes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobo; Zhang, Ru; Patena, Weronika; Gang, Spencer S; Blum, Sean R; Ivanova, Nina; Yue, Rebecca; Robertson, Jacob M; Lefebvre, Paul A; Fitz-Gibbon, Sorel T; Grossman, Arthur R; Jonikas, Martin C

    2016-02-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a leading unicellular model for dissecting biological processes in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, its usefulness has been limited by difficulties in obtaining mutants in specific genes of interest. To allow generation of large numbers of mapped mutants, we developed high-throughput methods that (1) enable easy maintenance of tens of thousands of Chlamydomonas strains by propagation on agar media and by cryogenic storage, (2) identify mutagenic insertion sites and physical coordinates in these collections, and (3) validate the insertion sites in pools of mutants by obtaining >500 bp of flanking genomic sequences. We used these approaches to construct a stably maintained library of 1935 mapped mutants, representing disruptions in 1562 genes. We further characterized randomly selected mutants and found that 33 out of 44 insertion sites (75%) could be confirmed by PCR, and 17 out of 23 mutants (74%) contained a single insertion. To demonstrate the power of this library for elucidating biological processes, we analyzed the lipid content of mutants disrupted in genes encoding proteins of the algal lipid droplet proteome. This study revealed a central role of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase LCS2 in the production of triacylglycerol from de novo-synthesized fatty acids.

  13. Morphological Characterization of a New and Easily Recognizable Nuclear Male Sterile Mutant of Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Zhanguo; Huang, Jian; Smith, Ashley R.; Chen, Junping; Burke, John; Sattler, Scott E.

    2017-01-01

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) is one of the most important grain crops in the world. The nuclear male sterility (NMS) trait, which is caused by mutations on the nuclear gene, is valuable for hybrid breeding and genetic studies. Several NMS mutants have been reported previously, but none of them were well characterized. Here, we present our detailed morphological characterization of a new and easily recognizable NMS sorghum mutant male sterile 8 (ms8) isolated from an elite inbred BTx623 mutagenized by ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). Our results show that the ms8 mutant phenotype was caused by a mutation on a single recessive nuclear gene that is different from all available NMS loci reported in sorghum. In fertile sorghum plants, yellow anthers appeared first during anthesis, while in the ms8 mutant, white hairy stigma emerged first and only small white anthers were observed, making ms8 plants easily recognizable when flowering. The ovary development and seed production after manual pollination are normal in the ms8 mutant, indicating it is female fertile and male sterile only. We found that ms8 anthers did not produce pollen grains. Further analysis revealed that ms8 anthers were defective in tapetum development, which led to the arrest of pollen formation. As a stable male sterile mutant across different environments, greenhouses, and fields in different locations, the ms8 mutant could be a useful breeding tool. Moreover, ms8 might be an important for elucidating male gametophyte development in sorghum and other plants. PMID:28052078

  14. Diversity and Stability Study on Rice Mutants Induced in Space Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hong Lu; Xin-Zhu Wang; Qi Zheng; Shuang-Hong Guan; Ping Xin; Ye-Qing Sun

    2008-01-01

    To further study the characteristics of changes on the molecular level of rice mutants induced in space environment, we analyzed proteins in leaves and seeds of four rice mutants (two high-tillering and two low-tillering) in the 8th and 9th generations after a 15-day spaceflight, and compared with their ground controls by two-dimentional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and reverse phase liquid chromatography (RPLC). In addition, the albumin, globulin, prolamine, glutelin, and amylose of the mutant seeds were analyzed by RPLC and ultra-violet spectrometry. The results showed that the low-abundance proteins of leaves in the peak tillering stage are more likely to be induced compared with their corresponding controls. The albumin, globulin, and prolamine of the mutant seeds revealed changes when compared with their controls, and the characteristics of changes in different mutants were stably inherited in the 8th and 9th generations, suggesting that they can be used as biomarkers to identity the mutants induced by spaceflight. Moreover, two proteins (SSP9111 and SSP6302) were found to be expressed with high intensity (two-fold change) in different mutants, which were both correlated with photosystem according to mass spectrometry and database searching.

  15. Genes encoding chimeras of Neurospora crassa erg-3 and human TM7SF2 proteins fail to complement Neurospora and yeast sterol C-14 reductase mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Prakash; Durgadas P Kasbekar

    2002-03-01

    The human gene TM7SF2 encodes a polypeptide (SR-1) with high sequence similarity to sterol C-14 reductase, a key sterol biosynthetic enzyme in fungi, plants and mammals. In Neurospora and yeast this enzyme is encoded by the erg-3 and erg24 genes respectively. In an effort to demonstrate sterol C-14 reductase activity for SR-1 we constructed six recombinant genes coding for chimeras of the Neurospora erg-3 and SR-1 protein sequences and tested them for complementation of the Neurospora erg-3 mutant. To our surprise, all the chimeras failed to complement erg-3. A few of the chimeric proteins were also tested against the yeast erg24 mutant, but again there was no complementation. We discuss some reasons that might account for these unexpected findings.

  16. Effects of Cerium on Accumulation of Anthocyanins and Expression of Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Genes in Potato Cell Tissue Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The effects of Ce (Ⅳ) on callus growth, anthocyanin content, and expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes in callus suspension cultures of Solanum tuberosum cv. Chieftain were studied by the measurement of fresh weight, spectrophotometric assays, and semiquantitative RT-PCR. The results indicate that 0.1 mmol·L-1 Ce (Ⅳ) can promote callus growth, increase the accumulation of anthocyanins, and enhance the expression of five anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (CHS, F3H, F3′5′H, DFR, and 3GT) most efficiently. At high concentrations of 1 mmol·L-1, Ce (Ⅳ) partially inhibits callus growth and at 2 mmol·L-1 eventually lends to cell death. The results show that Ce(Ⅳ) can induce the expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes to produce and accumulate anthocyanins and increase the yield of anthocyanins.

  17. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0359 TITLE: Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Sarat Chandarlapaty CONTRACTING...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0359 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...mutations found in breast cancer using both structural and cell based assays. We have now have evidence for the effects of the most recurrent

  18. Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Introduction Approximately 70% of ER+ breast cancers harbor expression of the estrogen receptor and are dependent upon its activity for various aspects of the...resistance to current FDA approved ER antagonists, but that more potent and selective estrogen receptor antagonists will be sufficiently active to...antagonists and their potency against ER mutants both in vitro and in vivo . Targeting ESR1-Mutant Breast Cancer W81XWH-14-1-0359 9 4. Impact A) Impact

  19. Developmental genes during placentation: insights from mouse mutants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhu a LU; Qiang WANG; Bingyan WANG; Fengchao WANG; Haibin WANG

    2011-01-01

    Placenta,a temporary organ first formed during the development of a new life is essential for the survival and growth of the fetus in eutherian mammals.It serves as an interface for the exchange of nutrients,gases and wastes between the maternal and fetal compartments.During the past decades,studies employing gene-engineered mouse mutants have revealed a wide range of signaling molecules governing the trophoblast development and function during placentation under various pathophysiological conditions.Here,we summarize the recent progress with particular respect to the involvement of developmental genes during placentation.

  20. Design of an ectoine-responsive AraC mutant and its application in metabolic engineering of ectoine biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shan; Jiang, Peixia; Yao, Jun; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Gui, Xiwu; Dong, Zhiyang; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-07-01

    Advanced high-throughput screening methods for small molecules may have important applications in the metabolic engineering of the biosynthetic pathways of these molecules. Ectoine is an excellent osmoprotectant that has been widely used in cosmetics. In this study, the Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC was engineered to recognize ectoine as its non-natural effector and to activate transcription upon ectoine binding. As an endogenous reporter of ectoine, the mutated AraC protein was successfully incorporated into high-throughput screening of ectoine hyper-producing strains. The ectoine biosynthetic cluster from Halomonas elongata was cloned into E. coli. By engineering the rate-limiting enzyme L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), ectoine production and the specific activity of the EctB mutant were increased. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering regulatory proteins into sensitive and rapid screening tools for small molecules and highlighted the importance and efficacy of directed evolution strategies applied to the engineering of genetic components for yield improvement in the biosynthesis of small molecules.

  1. Estrogens Suppress a Behavioral Phenotype in Zebrafish Mutants of the Autism Risk Gene, CNTNAP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ellen J; Turner, Katherine J; Fernandez, Joseph M; Cifuentes, Daniel; Ghosh, Marcus; Ijaz, Sundas; Jain, Roshan A; Kubo, Fumi; Bill, Brent R; Baier, Herwig; Granato, Michael; Barresi, Michael J F; Wilson, Stephen W; Rihel, Jason; State, Matthew W; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-02-17

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of devastating neurodevelopmental syndromes that affect up to 1 in 68 children. Despite advances in the identification of ASD risk genes, the mechanisms underlying ASDs remain unknown. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in Contactin Associated Protein-like 2 (CNTNAP2) are strongly linked to ASDs. Here we investigate the function of Cntnap2 and undertake pharmacological screens to identify phenotypic suppressors. We find that zebrafish cntnap2 mutants display GABAergic deficits, particularly in the forebrain, and sensitivity to drug-induced seizures. High-throughput behavioral profiling identifies nighttime hyperactivity in cntnap2 mutants, while pharmacological testing reveals dysregulation of GABAergic and glutamatergic systems. Finally, we find that estrogen receptor agonists elicit a behavioral fingerprint anti-correlative to that of cntnap2 mutants and show that the phytoestrogen biochanin A specifically reverses the mutant behavioral phenotype. These results identify estrogenic compounds as phenotypic suppressors and illuminate novel pharmacological pathways with relevance to autism.

  2. A novel mechanism of sulfur transfer catalyzed by O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase in the methionine-biosynthetic pathway of Wolinella succinogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Timothy H. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States); Krishnamoorthy, Kalyanaraman; Begley, Tadhg P., E-mail: begley@tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77842 (United States); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: begley@tamu.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853-1301 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    MetY is the first reported structure of an O-acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase that utilizes a protein thiocarboxylate intermediate as the sulfur source in a novel methionine-biosynthetic pathway instead of catalyzing a direct sulfhydrylation reaction. O-Acetylhomoserine sulfhydrylase (OAHS) is a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent sulfide-utilizing enzyme in the l-cysteine and l-methionine biosynthetic pathways of various enteric bacteria and fungi. OAHS catalyzes the conversion of O-acetylhomoserine to homocysteine using sulfide in a process known as direct sulfhydrylation. However, the source of the sulfur has not been identified and no structures of OAHS have been reported in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of Wolinella succinogenes OAHS (MetY) determined at 2.2 Å resolution is reported. MetY crystallized in space group C2 with two monomers in the asymmetric unit. Size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering and crystal packing indicate that the biological unit is a tetramer in solution. This is further supported by the crystal structure, in which a tetramer is formed using a combination of noncrystallographic and crystallographic twofold axes. A search for structurally homologous proteins revealed that MetY has the same fold as cystathionine γ-lyase and methionine γ-lyase. The active sites of these enzymes, which are also PLP-dependent, share a high degree of structural similarity, suggesting that MetY belongs to the γ-elimination subclass of the Cys/Met metabolism PLP-dependent family of enzymes. The structure of MetY, together with biochemical data, provides insight into the mechanism of sulfur transfer to a small molecule via a protein thiocarboxylate intermediate.

  3. Enrichment of provitamin A content in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by introduction of the bacterial carotenoid biosynthetic genes CrtB and CrtI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Zeng, Jian; Li, Yin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Ling; Miao, Yingjie; Deng, Pengyi; Yuan, Cuihong; Ma, Cheng; Chen, Xi; Zang, Mingli; Wang, Qiong; Li, Kexiu; Chang, Junli; Wang, Yuesheng; Yang, Guangxiao; He, Guangyuan

    2014-06-01

    Carotenoid content is a primary determinant of wheat nutritional value and affects its end-use quality. Wheat grains contain very low carotenoid levels and trace amounts of provitamin A content. In order to enrich the carotenoid content in wheat grains, the bacterial phytoene synthase gene (CrtB) and carotene desaturase gene (CrtI) were transformed into the common wheat cultivar Bobwhite. Expression of CrtB or CrtI alone slightly increased the carotenoid content in the grains of transgenic wheat, while co-expression of both genes resulted in a darker red/yellow grain phenotype, accompanied by a total carotenoid content increase of approximately 8-fold achieving 4.76 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, a β-carotene increase of 65-fold to 3.21 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight, and a provitamin A content (sum of α-carotene, β-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) increase of 76-fold to 3.82 μg g(-1) of seed dry weight. The high provitamin A content in the transgenic wheat was stably inherited over four generations. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that enhancement of provitamin A content in transgenic wheat was also a result of the highly coordinated regulation of endogenous carotenoid biosynthetic genes, suggesting a metabolic feedback regulation in the wheat carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. These transgenic wheat lines are not only valuable for breeding wheat varieties with nutritional benefits for human health but also for understanding the mechanism regulating carotenoid biosynthesis in wheat endosperm.

  4. Variation in Fumonisin and Ochratoxin Production Associated with Differences in Biosynthetic Gene Content in Aspergillus niger and A. welwitschiae Isolates from Multiple Crop and Geographic Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, Antonia; Proctor, Robert H.; Morelli, Massimiliano; Haidukowski, Miriam; Gallo, Antonia; Logrieco, Antonio F.; Moretti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The fungi Aspergillus niger and A. welwitschiae are morphologically indistinguishable species used for industrial fermentation and for food and beverage production. The fungi also occur widely on food crops. Concerns about their safety have arisen with the discovery that some isolates of both species produce fumonisin (FB) and ochratoxin A (OTA) mycotoxins. Here, we examined FB and OTA production as well as the presence of genes responsible for synthesis of the mycotoxins in a collection of 92 A. niger/A. welwitschiae isolates from multiple crop and geographic origins. The results indicate that (i) isolates of both species differed in ability to produce the mycotoxins; (ii) FB-nonproducing isolates of A. niger had an intact fumonisin biosynthetic gene (fum) cluster; (iii) FB-nonproducing isolates of A. welwitschiae exhibited multiple patterns of fum gene deletion; and (iv) OTA-nonproducing isolates of both species lacked the ochratoxin A biosynthetic gene (ota) cluster. Analysis of genome sequence data revealed a single pattern of ota gene deletion in the two species. Phylogenetic analysis suggest that the simplest explanation for this is that ota cluster deletion occurred in a common ancestor of A. niger and A. welwitschiae, and subsequently both the intact and deleted cluster were retained as alternate alleles during divergence of the ancestor into descendent species. Finally, comparison of results from this and previous studies indicate that a majority of A. niger isolates and a minority of A. welwitschiae isolates can produce FBs, whereas, a minority of isolates of both species produce OTA. The comparison also suggested that the relative abundance of each species and frequency of FB/OTA-producing isolates can vary with crop and/or geographic origin. PMID:27667988

  5. Identification of Francisella novicida mutants that fail to induce prostaglandin E2 synthesis by infected macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Dale Woolard

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. We have previously shown that infection with F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS induces macrophages to synthesize prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Synthesis of PGE2 by F. tularensis infected macrophages results in decreased T cell proliferation in vitro and increased bacterial survival in vivo. Although we understand some of the biological consequences of F. tularensis induced PGE2 synthesis by macrophages, we do not understand the cellular pathways (neither host nor bacterial that result in up-regulation of the PGE2 biosynthetic pathway in F. tularensis infected macrophages. We took a genetic approach to begin to understand the molecular mechanisms of bacterial induction of PGE2 synthesis from infected macrophages. To identify F. tularensis genes necessary for the induction of PGE2 in primary macrophages, we infected cells with individual mutants from the closely related strain Francisella tularensis subspecies novicida U112 (U112 two allele mutant library. Twenty genes were identified that when disrupted resulted in U112 mutant strains unable to induce the synthesis of PGE2 by infected macrophages. Fourteen of the genes identified are located within the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI. Genes in the FPI are required for F. tularensis to escape from the phagosome and replicate in the cytosol, which might account for the failure of U112 with transposon insertions within the FPI to induce PGE2. This implies that U112 mutant strains that do not grow intracellularly would also not induce PGE2. We found that U112 clpB::Tn grows within macrophages yet fails to induce PGE2, while U112 pdpA::Tn does not grow yet does induce PGE2. We also found that U112 iglC::Tn neither grows nor induces PGE2. These findings indicate that there is dissociation between intracellular growth and the ability of F. tularensis to induce PGE2 synthesis. These mutants provide a critical entrée into the pathways used

  6. Morphological Structure and Genetic Mapping of New Leaf-Color Mutant Gene in Rice (Oryza sativa)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-hong; WANG Bao-he; DAI Zheng-yuan; LI Ai-hong; LIU Guang-qing; ZUO Shi-min; ZHANG Hong-xi; PAN Xue-biao

    2012-01-01

    Leaf-color mutations are a widely-observed class of mutations,playing an important role in the study of chlorophyll biosynthesis and plant chloroplast structure,function,genetics and development.A naturally-occurring leaf-color rice mutant,Baihuaidao 7,was analyzed.Mutant plants typically exhibited a green-white-green leaf-color progression,but this phenotype was only expressed in the presence of a stress signal induced by mechanical scarification such as transplantation.Prior to the appearance of white leaves,mutant plant growth,leaf color,chlorophyll content,and chloroplast ultrastructure appeared to be identical to those of the wild type.After the changeover to white leaf color,an examination of the mutated leaves revealed a decrease in total chlorophyll,chlorophyll a,chlorophyll b,and carotenoid content,a reduction in the number of chloroplast grana lamella and grana,and a gradual degradation of the thylakoid lamellas.At maturity,the mutant plant was etiolated and dwarfed compared with wild-type plants.Genetic analysis indicated that the leaf mutant character is controlled by a recessive nuclear gene.Genetic mapping of the mutant gene was performed using an F2 population derived from a Baihuaidao 7 ×Jiangxi 1587 cross.The mutant gene was mapped to rice chromosome 11,positioned between InDel markers L59.2-7 and L64.8-11,which are separated by approximately 740.5 kb.The mutant gene is believed to be a new leaf-color mutant gene in rice,and is tentatively designated as gwgl.

  7. Photoinhibition of photosystem I in a pea mutant with altered LHCII organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A G; Morgan-Kiss, R M; Krol, M; Allakhverdiev, S I; Zanev, Yu; Sane, P V; Huner, N P A

    2015-11-01

    Comparative analysis of in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that photosystem II (PSII) photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) of leaves of the Costata 2/133 pea mutant with altered pigment composition and decreased level of oligomerization of the light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-protein complexes (LHCII) of PSII (Dobrikova et al., 2000; Ivanov et al., 2005) did not differ from that of WT. In contrast, photosystem I (PSI) activity of the Costata 2/133 mutant measured by the far-red (FR) light inducible P700 (P700(+)) signal exhibited 39% lower steady state level of P700(+), a 2.2-fold higher intersystem electron pool size (e(-)/P700) and higher rate of P700(+) re-reduction, which indicate an increased capacity for PSI cyclic electron transfer (CET) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than WT. The mutant also exhibited a limited capacity for state transitions. The lower level of oxidizable P700 (P700(+)) is consistent with a lower amount of PSI related chlorophyll protein complexes and lower abundance of the PsaA/PsaB heterodimer, PsaD and Lhca1 polypeptides in Costata 2/133 mutant. Exposure of WT and the Costata 2/133 mutant to high light stress resulted in a comparable photoinhibition of PSII measured in vivo, although the decrease of Fv/Fm was modestly higher in the mutant plants. However, under the same photoinhibitory conditions PSI photochemistry (P700(+)) measured as ΔA820-860 was inhibited to a greater extent (50%) in the Costata 2/133 mutant than in the WT (22%). This was accompanied by a 50% faster re-reduction rate of P700(+) in the dark indicating a higher capacity for CET around PSI in high light treated mutant leaves. The role of chloroplast thylakoid organization on the stability of the PSI complex and its susceptibility to high light stress is discussed.

  8. Far-red light-insensitive, phytochrome A-deficient mutants of tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tuinen, A; Kerckhoffs, L H; Nagatani, A; Kendrick, R E; Koornneef, M

    1995-01-20

    We have selected two recessive mutants of tomato with slightly longer hypocotyls than the wild type, one under low fluence rate (3 mumol/m2/s) red light (R) and the other under low fluence rate blue light. These two mutants were shown to be allelic and further analysis revealed that hypocotyl growth was totally insensitive to far-red light (FR). We propose the gene symbol fri (far-red light insensitive) for this locus and have mapped it on chromosome 10. Immunochemically detectable phytochrome A polypeptide is essentially absent in the fri mutants as is the bulk spectrophotometrically detectable labile phytochrome pool in etiolated seedlings. A phytochrome B-like polypeptide is present in normal amounts and a small stable phytochrome pool can be readily detected by spectrophotometry in the fri mutants. Inhibition of hypocotyl growth by a R pulse given every 4 h is quantitatively similar in the fri mutants and wild type and the effect is to a large extent reversible if R pulses are followed immediately by a FR pulse. After 7 days in darkness, both fri mutants and the wild type become green on transfer to white light, but after 7 days in FR, the wild-type seedlings that have expanded their cotyledons lose their capacity to green in white light, while the fri mutants de-etiolate. Adult plants of the fri mutants show retarded growth and are prone to wilting, but exhibit a normal elongation response to FR given at the end of the daily photoperiod. The inhibition of seed germination by continuous FR exhibited by the wild type is normal in the fri mutants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Identification of transcriptional activators for thienamycin and cephamycin C biosynthetic genes within the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Miriam; Núñez, Luz Elena; Braña, Alfredo F; Méndez, Carmen; Salas, José A; Blanco, Gloria

    2008-08-01

    Two regulatory genes, thnI and thnU, were identified in the thienamycin (thn) gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya. ThnI resembles LysR-type transcriptional activators and ThnU belongs to the SARP family of transcriptional activators. Their functional role was established after independent inactivation by gene replacement together with transcriptional analysis involving reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Deletion of thnI abolished thienamycin production showing its involvement in thienamycin biosynthesis. Gene expression analysis applied to the thn gene cluster demonstrated that ThnI is a transcriptional activator essential for thienamycin biosynthesis that regulates the expression of nine genes involved in thienamycin assembly and export (thnH, thnJ, thnK, thnL, thnM, thnN, thnO, thnP and thnQ). Unexpectedly, the thnU disrupted mutant was not affected in thienamycin production but turned out to be essential for cephamycin C biosynthesis. Transcript analysis applied to early and late structural genes for cephamycin C biosynthesis (pcbAB and cmcI), revealed that ThnU is the transcriptional activator of these cephamycin C genes although they are not physically linked to the thn cluster. In addition, it was shown that deletion of thnI has an upregulatory effect on pcbAB and cmcI transcription consistent with a significant increase in cephamycin C biosynthesis in this mutant.

  10. Revealing Rembrandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Parker

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The power and significance of artwork in shaping human cognition is self-evident. The starting point for our empirical investigations is the view that the task of neuroscience is to integrate itself with other forms of knowledge, rather than to seek to supplant them. In our recent work, we examined a particular aspect of the appreciation of artwork using present-day functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Our results emphasised the continuity between viewing artwork and other human cognitive activities. We also showed that appreciation of a particular aspect of artwork, namely authenticity, depends upon the co-ordinated activity between the brain regions involved in multiple decision making and those responsible for processing visual information. The findings about brain function probably have no specific consequences for understanding how people respond to the art of Rembrandt in comparison with their response to other artworks. However, the use of images of Rembrandt’s portraits, his most intimate and personal works, clearly had a significant impact upon our viewers, even though they have been spatially confined to the interior of an MRI scanner at the time of viewing. Neuroscientific studies of humans viewing artwork have the capacity to reveal the diversity of human cognitive responses that may be induced by external advice or context as people view artwork in a variety of frameworks and settings.

  11. Isolation and characterisation of a dwarf rice mutant exhibiting defective gibberellins biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, S H; Gururani, M A; Lee, J W; Ahn, B-O; Chun, S-C

    2014-03-01

    We have isolated a severe dwarf mutant derived from a Ds (Dissociation) insertion mutant rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica c.v. Dongjin). This severe dwarf phenotype, has short and dark green leaves, reduced shoot growth early in the seedling stage, and later severe dwarfism with failure to initiate flowering. When treated with bioactive GA3 , mutants are restored to the normal wild-type phenotype. Reverse transcription PCR analyses of 22 candidate genes related to the gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis pathway revealed that among 22 candidate genes tested, a dwarf mutant transcript was not expressed only in one OsKS2 gene. Genetic analysis revealed that the severe dwarf phenotype was controlled by recessive mutation of a single nuclear gene. The putative OsKS2 gene was a chromosome 4-located ent-kaurene synthase (KS), encoding the enzyme that catalyses an early step of the GA biosynthesis pathway. Sequence analysis revealed that osks2 carried a 1-bp deletion in the ORF region of OsKS2, which led to a loss-of-function mutation. The expression pattern of OsKS2 in wild-type cv Dongjin, showed that it is expressed in all organs, most prominently in the stem and floral organs. Morphological characteristics of the dwarf mutant showed dramatic modifications in internal structure and external morphology. We propose that dwarfism in this mutant is caused by a point mutation in OsKS2, which plays a significant role in growth and development of higher plants. Further investigation on OsKS2 and other OsKS-like proteins is underway and may yield better understanding of the putative role of OsKS in severe dwarf mutants.

  12. The basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons in the Y-gene recessive Bombyx mori mutants: a defect in the cellular uptake of carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Kozo; Katagiri, Chihiro; Tanaka, Yoshiro; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Sato, Ryoichi; Maekawa, Hideaki; Takada, Naoko; Banno, Yutaka; Fujii, Hiroshi; Wells, Michael A; Jouni, Zeina E

    2004-10-01

    Bombyx mori is an excellent model for the study of carotenoid-binding proteins (CBP). In previous papers, we identified and molecularly characterized a CBP from the Y-gene dominant mutants. In the present study, we attempted to correlate and establish lipid metabolism and distribution in these mutants. When [3H]-triolein was fed to the mutants, typical patterns of uptake of labeled fatty acids from midgut to hemolymph and subsequent delivery to fat body and silk glands were obtained in all mutants. Further analysis of lipid and carotenoid profiles revealed that the yellow coloration in the hemolymph associated with lipophorin is not attributed to a difference in lipophorin concentrations among the mutants, nor to its lipid composition, but rather to its carotenoid content. Lipophorin of the Y+I mutant exhibited the highest concentration of total carotenoids of 55.8 microg/mg lipophorin compared to 3.1 microg/mg in the +Y+I mutant, 1.2 microg/mg in the YI mutant and 0.5 microg/mg in the +YI mutant. Characteristic retention time in HPLC of the different classes of carotenoids of lipophorin identified the presence of lutein as the major chromophore (62-77%), followed by beta-carotenes (22-38%). Although lutein and beta-carotene content of mutants' lipophorin differed significantly, the ratio of lutein to beta-carotene of 3:1 was not different among mutants. Similarly, lipid compositions of mutant silk glands were not significantly different, but carotenoid contents were. The significantly high concentration of lutein in the Y+I mutant silk gland represented more than 160-fold increase compared to +Y+I mutant (plipid metabolism in the mutants is not defected and that the molecular basis for colorless hemolymph and cocoons is a defect in the cellular uptake of lutein associated with the Y-gene recessive mutants.

  13. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  14. Environmental and biosynthetic influences on carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, F. A.; Freeman, K. H.; Polissar, P. J.; Feakins, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Both carbon and hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf-wax n-alkanes are influenced by the availability of water in a plant's growth environment. Carbon isotope ratios of bulk tissues in C3 plants demonstrate a strong inverse relationship with measures of available moisture (e.g. mean annual precipitation and precipitation/evaporation). Similarly, hydrogen isotope ratios of leaf wax n-alkanes (δDl) can be enriched relative to precipitation (δDw) by transpiration, which is related to relative humidity and the leaf-to-air vapor pressure deficit. Thus, D-enrichment of leaf-wax n-alkanes relative to precipitation, termed the apparent fractionation (2ɛl/w), becomes more positive with increasing aridity. In theory, more positive values of leaf-wax δ13C (δ13Cl) and 2ɛl/w of leaf-wax n-alkanes should both correspond to more arid conditions in C3 plants. Here we review published and unpublished data on over 100 plants to examine this relationship. Contrary to expectations, C3 dicots show no clear relationship between δ13Cl and 2ɛl/w. This global lack of correlation is surprising given our understanding of aridity related isotopic effects in C3 plants. One possibility is that the implicit assumption of constant fractionation between lipid and bulk tissue is flawed due to the effects of different biosynthetic carriers and reaction pathways. We explore this possibility by examining the offset of leaf-wax carbon isotopes from the bulk leaf tissue (13ɛl/bulk). Different offsets would indicate additional biosynthetic processes are affecting δ13Cl in addition to any direct effects from aridity. We find that 13ɛl/bulk is highly variable, ranging from -1 to -16‰, which could explain the lack of correlation between δ13Cl and 2ɛl/w. In addition, 13ɛl/bulk values for C3 and C4 monocots (averages of -10.6 and -11.4‰ respectively) represent significantly greater offset between leaf wax and bulk tissue than in C3 dicots (average of -4.3‰), which is consistent with previous

  15. Transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorova, Ksenia; Kayumov, Airat; Woyda, Kathrin; Ilinskaja, Olga; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-05-02

    The Bacillus subtilis glutamine synthetase (GS) plays a dual role in cell metabolism by functioning as catalyst and regulator. GS catalyses the ATP-dependent synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonium. Under nitrogen-rich conditions, GS becomes feedback-inhibited by high intracellular glutamine levels and then binds transcription factors GlnR and TnrA, which control the genes of nitrogen assimilation. While GS-bound TnrA is no longer able to interact with DNA, GlnR-DNA binding is shown to be stimulated by GS complex formation. In this paper we show a new physiological feature of the interaction between glutamine synthetase and TnrA. The transcription factor TnrA inhibits the biosynthetic activity of glutamine synthetase in vivo and in vitro, while the GlnR protein does not affect the activity of the enzyme.

  16. Biosynthetic labeling and two-color imaging of phospholipids in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Cindy Y; Roth, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Salic, Adrian

    2015-02-09

    Phospholipids with a choline head group are abundant components of all biological membranes, performing critical functions in cellular structure, metabolism, and signaling. In spite of their importance, our ability to visualize choline phospholipids in vivo remains very limited. We present a simple and robust chemical strategy to image choline phospholipids, based on the metabolic incorporation of azidocholine analogues, that accurately reflects the normal biosynthetic incorporation of choline into cellular phospholipids. Azidocholine-labeled phospholipids can be imaged in cells with high sensitivity and resolution, following derivatization with fluorophores, by bio-orthogonal chemical reactions compatible with live-cell imaging. We used this method to visualize the subcellular localization of choline phospholipids. We also demonstrate that double metabolic labeling with azidocholine and propargylcholine allows sensitive two-color imaging of choline phospholipids. Our method represents a powerful approach to directly image phospholipids, and to study their dynamics in cells and tissues.

  17. Nutrient shortage triggers the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway via the GCN2-ATF4 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaveroux, Cédric; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Barbet, Virginie; Belfeki, Sofiane; Barthelaix, Audrey; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Lebecque, Serge; Renno, Toufic; Bruhat, Alain; Fafournoux, Pierre; Manié, Serge N

    2016-06-03

    The hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP) is a nutrient-sensing metabolic pathway that produces the activated amino sugar UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, a critical substrate for protein glycosylation. Despite its biological significance, little is known about the regulation of HBP flux during nutrient limitation. Here, we report that amino acid or glucose shortage increase GFAT1 production, the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the HBP. GFAT1 is a transcriptional target of the activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) induced by the GCN2-eIF2α signalling pathway. The increased production of GFAT1 stimulates HBP flux and results in an increase in O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine protein modifications. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ATF4 provides a link between nutritional stress and the HBP for the regulation of the O-GlcNAcylation-dependent cellular signalling.

  18. Revision of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuda, Masayuki; Ohmori, Miho; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Fujimoto, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In the past, we have questioned the accuracy of the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene, a putative biosynthetic intermediate of pseudopterosins, in light of the configuration of elisabethatrienol isolated from Pseudopterogorgia elisabethae, which was represented as 1S,4R,9S,11S. We have reinvestigated the stereochemistry of elisabethatriene. Elisabethatriene with the reported 1S,4R,9R,11S configuration was synthesized starting from (-)-isopulegol in its enantiomeric form. The (1)H- and (13)C-NMR data of the synthesized compound differed from those reported for elisabethatriene. In addition to the fact that elisabethatriene is converted into pseudopterosins, this finding has allowed us to propose that elisabethatriene should have the 1S,4R,9S,11S stereochemistry, which is identical to that of elisabethatrienol.

  19. Identification of a new diterpene biosynthetic gene cluster that produces O-methylkolavelool in Herpetosiphon aurantiacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Chiaki; Oshima, Misaki; Kurashima, Nodoka; Hoshino, Tsutomu

    2015-03-23

    Diterpenoids are usually found in plants and fungi, but are rare in bacteria. We have previously reported new diterpenes, named tuberculosinol and isotuberculosinol, which are generated from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene products Rv3377c and Rv3378c. No homologous gene was found at that time, but we recently found highly homologous proteins in the Herpetosiphon aurantiacus ATCC 23779 genome. Haur_2145 was a class II diterpene cyclase responsible for the conversion of geranylgeranyl diphosphate into kolavenyl diphosphate. Haur_2146, homologous to Rv3378c, synthesized (+)-kolavelool through the nucleophilic addition of a water molecule to the incipient cation formed after the diphosphate moiety was released. Haur_2147 afforded (+)-O-methylkolavelool from (+)-kolavelool, so this enzyme was an O-methyltransferase. This new diterpene was indeed detected in H. aurantiacus cells. This is the first report of the identification of a (+)-O-methylkolavelool biosynthetic gene cluster.

  20. Reassembled Biosynthetic Pathway for a Large-scale Synthesis of CMP-Neu5Ac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xiao

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: CMP-Neu5Ac is an important sugar nucleotide for biosynthesis of sialic acid and its conjugates. In this paper, a large-scale production system of CMP-Neu5Ac by a single strain is reported. The co-expression of Neu5Ac aldolase (EC4.1.3.3 and CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase (EC 2.7.7.43 was achieved by constructing individual genes into one plasmid and having a single culture that has both NeuAc aldolase and CMP-Neu5Ac synthetase activities. Overall this system only employed N-acetylmannosamine, excess of pyruvate and CTP to produce CMP-Neu5Ac. This work has demonstrated that a large-scale synthesis of sialic acid-derived oligosaccharides could be achieved economically and efficiently through a single, biosynthetic pathway engineered microorganism.

  1. Subcellular Compartmentalization and Trafficking of the Biosynthetic Machinery for Fungal Melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Srijana; Xu, Xinping; Lowry, David; Jackson, Jennifer C; Roberson, Robert W; Lin, Xiaorong

    2016-03-22

    Protection by melanin depends on its subcellular location. Although most filamentous fungi synthesize melanin via a polyketide synthase pathway, where and how melanin biosynthesis occurs and how it is deposited as extracellular granules remain elusive. Using a forward genetic screen in the pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus, we find that mutations in an endosomal sorting nexin abolish melanin cell-wall deposition. We find that all enzymes involved in the early steps of melanin biosynthesis are recruited to endosomes through a non-conventional secretory pathway. In contrast, late melanin enzymes accumulate in the cell wall. Such subcellular compartmentalization of the melanin biosynthetic machinery occurs in both A. fumigatus and A. nidulans. Thus, fungal melanin biosynthesis appears to be initiated in endosomes with exocytosis leading to melanin extracellular deposition, much like the synthesis and trafficking of mammalian melanin in endosomally derived melanosomes.

  2. Elongating internodes of Zea mays (maize): Early steps in the GA biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Y.; Phinney, B.O. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA)); Gaskin, P.; MacMillan, J. (Univ. of Bristol (England))

    1989-04-01

    The early steps in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway have yet to be defined for tissues that show a growth response to GAs. To this end we have synthesized the ({sup 13}C,{sup 3}H)-ent-kaurenoids, ent-kaurenol, ent-kaurenal ent-kaukenoic acid. We also have double-labeled ent-kaurene and double-labeled GA{sub 12}-aldehyde. We feed 1 - 10{mu}g of each substrate, individually, to 1.0g diced internodes in the appropriate buffer plus cofactors. We have observed up to 80% metabolism. We have identified (full scan GC-MS) 7{beta}-hydroxy-ent-kaurenoic acid as the major metabolite from double-labeled ent-kaurenoic acid feeds, thus defining the step ent-kaurenoic acid to 7{beta}-hydroxy-ent-kaurenoic acid.

  3. A Unique TryptophanC-Prenyltransferase from the Kawaguchipeptin Biosynthetic Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Anirudra; Kwak, Daniel H.; Dalponte, Luca; Leikoski, Niina; Galica, Tomas; Umeobika, Ugochukwu; Trembleau, Laurent; Bent, Andrew; Sivonen, Kaarina; Wahlsten, Matti; Wang, Hao; Rizzi, Ermanno; De Bellis, Gianluca; Naismith, James; Jaspars, Marcel; Liu, Xinyu; Houssen, Wael; Fewer, David Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobactins are are rapidly growing family of linear and cyclic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Kawaguchipeptins A and B, two macrocyclic undecapeptides reported earlier from Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-88, are shown to be products of the cyanobactin biosynthetic pathway. The 9 kb kawaguchipeptin (kgp) gene cluster was identified in a 5.26 Mb draft genome of Microcystis aeruginosa NIES-88. We verified that this gene cluster is responsible for the production of the kawaguchipeptins through heterologous expression of the kgp gene cluster in Escherichia coli. The KgpF prenyltransferase was overexpressed and was shown to prenylate C-3 of Trp residues in both linear and cyclic peptides in vitro. Our findings serve to further enhance the structural diversity of cyanobactins to include tryptophan-prenylated cyclic peptides. PMID:26846478

  4. Sex pheromone biosynthetic pathways are conserved between moths and the butterfly Bicyclus anynana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Wang, Hong-Lei; Lassance, Jean-Marc; Löfstedt, Christer

    2014-05-27

    Although phylogenetically nested within the moths, butterflies have diverged extensively in a number of life history traits. Whereas moths rely greatly on chemical signals, visual advertisement is the hallmark of mate finding in butterflies. In the context of courtship, however, male chemical signals are widespread in both groups although they likely have multiple evolutionary origins. Here, we report that in males of the butterfly Bicyclus anynana, courtship scents are produced de novo via biosynthetic pathways shared with females of many moth species. We show that two of the pheromone components that play a major role in mate choice, namely the (Z)-9-tetradecenol and hexadecanal, are produced through the activity of a fatty acyl Δ11-desaturase and two specialized alcohol-forming fatty acyl reductases. Our study provides the first evidence of conservation and sharing of ancestral genetic modules for the production of FA-derived pheromones over a long evolutionary timeframe thereby reconciling mate communication in moths and butterflies.

  5. Biosynthetic pathway of the phytohormone auxin in insects and screening of its inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Yokokura, Junpei; Ito, Tsukasa; Arai, Ryoma; Yokoyama, Chiaki; Toshima, Hiroaki; Nagata, Shinji; Asami, Tadao; Suzuki, Yoshihito

    2014-10-01

    Insect galls are abnormal plant tissues induced by galling insects. The galls are used for food and habitation, and the phytohormone auxin, produced by the insects, may be involved in their formation. We found that the silkworm, a non-galling insect, also produces an active form of auxin, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), by de novo synthesis from tryptophan (Trp). A detailed metabolic analysis of IAA using IAA synthetic enzymes from silkworms indicated an IAA biosynthetic pathway composed of a three-step conversion: Trp → indole-3-acetaldoxime → indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) → IAA, of which the first step is limiting IAA production. This pathway was shown to also operate in gall-inducing sawfly. Screening of a chemical library identified two compounds that showed strong inhibitory activities on the conversion step IAAld → IAA. The inhibitors can be efficiently used to demonstrate the importance of insect-synthesized auxin in gall formation in the future.

  6. First Biosynthetic pathway of 1-hepten-3-one in Iporangaia pustulosa (Opiliones)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Daniele F. O.; Wouters, Felipe C.; Machado, Glauco; Marsaioli, Anita J.

    2013-11-01

    Arthropods produce a great variety of natural compounds, many of which have unexplored biosynthesis. Among the armored harvestmen (Arachnida: Opiliones) of the suborder Laniatores, the defensive gland exudates contain vinyl ketones and other constituents of supposed polyketide origin. We have studied the biosynthesis of 1-hepten-3-one in the Neotropical harvestman Iporangaia pustulosa by feeding individuals with 13C-labeled precursors, demonstrating its mixed acetate/propionate origin. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed an unusual labeling pattern suggesting different propionate sources for starting and extender units. Our analysis also indicates the presence of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase, converting acetate into propionyl-CoA via succinyl-CoA, together with other C3 unit routes. This is the first biosynthetic study of alkyl vinyl ketones in arthropods. Our results shed light on the origin and diversification of chemical compounds in a major arthropod group.

  7. Water splitting-biosynthetic system with CO₂ reduction efficiencies exceeding photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Colón, Brendan C; Ziesack, Marika; Silver, Pamela A; Nocera, Daniel G

    2016-06-03

    Artificial photosynthetic systems can store solar energy and chemically reduce CO2 We developed a hybrid water splitting-biosynthetic system based on a biocompatible Earth-abundant inorganic catalyst system to split water into molecular hydrogen and oxygen (H2 and O2) at low driving voltages. When grown in contact with these catalysts, Ralstonia eutropha consumed the produced H2 to synthesize biomass and fuels or chemical products from low CO2 concentration in the presence of O2 This scalable system has a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~50% when producing bacterial biomass and liquid fusel alcohols, scrubbing 180 grams of CO2 per kilowatt-hour of electricity. Coupling this hybrid device to existing photovoltaic systems would yield a CO2 reduction energy efficiency of ~10%, exceeding that of natural photosynthetic systems.

  8. Reconstruction of the biosynthetic pathway for the core fungal polyketide scaffold rubrofusarin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, Peter; Naesby, Michael; Mortensen, Uffe Hasbro

    2013-01-01

    production in easily fermentable and genetically engineerable organisms, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli are desirable. Rubrofusarin is an orange polyketide pigment that is a common intermediate in many different fungal biosynthetic pathways. RESULTS: In this study, we established......BACKGROUND: Fungal polyketides include commercially important pharmaceuticals and food additives, e.g. the cholesterol-lowering statins and the red and orange monascus pigments. Presently, production relies on isolation of the compounds from the natural producers, and systems for heterologous....... CONCLUSIONS: The reconstructed pathway for rubrofusarin in S. cerevisiae allows the production of a core scaffold molecule with a branch-point role in several fungal polyketide pathways, thus paving the way for production of further natural pigments and bioactive molecules. Furthermore, the reconstruction...

  9. A novel approach for the characterisation of proteoglycans and biosynthetic enzymes in a snail model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesteira, Tarsis F; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ogata, Fernando T; Farias, Eduardo H C; Cavalheiro, Renan P; de Lima, Marcelo A; Cunha, Gabriel L A; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Almeida, Igor C; Toma, Leny; Nader, Helena B

    2011-12-01

    Proteoglycans encompass a heterogeneous group of glycoconjugates where proteins are substituted with linear, highly negatively charged glycosaminoglycan chains. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans are ubiquitous to the animal kingdom of the Eukarya domain. Information on the distribution and characterisation of proteoglycans in invertebrate tissues is limited and restricted to a few species. By the use of multidimensional protein identification technology and immunohistochemistry, this study shows for the first time the presence and tissue localisation of different proteoglycans, such as perlecan, aggrecan, and heparan sulphate proteoglycan, amongst others, in organs of the gastropoda Achatina fulica. Through a proteomic analysis of Golgi proteins and immunohistochemistry of tissue sections, we detected the machinery involved in glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis, related to polymer formation (polymerases), as well as secondary modifications (sulphation and uronic acid epimerization). Therefore, this work not only identifies both the proteoglycan core proteins and glycosaminoglycan biosynthetic enzymes in invertebrates but also provides a novel method for the study of glycosaminoglycan and proteoglycan evolution.

  10. The biosynthetic pathway for myxol-2' fucoside (myxoxanthophyll) in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Joel E; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-05-01

    Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 produces a variety of carotenoids, which comprise predominantly dicylic beta-carotene and two dicyclic xanthophylls, zeaxanthin and synechoxanthin. However, this cyanobacterium also produces a monocyclic myxoxanthophyll, which was identified as myxol-2' fucoside. Compared to the carotenoid glycosides produced by diverse microorganisms, cyanobacterial myxoxanthophyll and closely related compounds are unusual because they are glycosylated on the 2'-OH rather than on the 1'-OH position of the psi end of the molecule. In this study, the genes encoding two enzymes that modify the psi end of myxoxanthophyll in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002 were identified. Mutational and biochemical studies showed that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2032, renamed cruF, encodes a 1',2'-hydroxylase [corrected] and that open reading frame SynPCC7002_A2031, renamed cruG, encodes a 2'-O-glycosyltransferase. The enzymatic activity of CruF was verified by chemical characterization of the carotenoid products synthesized when cruF was expressed in a lycopene-producing strain of Escherichia coli. Database searches showed that homologs of cruF and cruG occur in the genomes of all sequenced cyanobacterial strains that are known to produce myxol or the acylic xanthophyll oscillaxanthin. The genomes of many other bacteria that produce hydroxylated carotenoids but do not contain crtC homologs also contain cruF orthologs. Based upon observable intermediates, a complete biosynthetic pathway for myxoxanthophyll is proposed. This study expands the suite of enzymes available for metabolic engineering of carotenoid biosynthetic pathways for biotechnological applications.

  11. Ethylene biosynthetic genes are differentially expressed during carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flower senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Have, A; Woltering, E J

    1997-05-01

    Ethylene production and expression patterns of an 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase (CARAO1) and of two ACC synthase (EC 4.4.1.14) genes (CARACC3 and CARAS1) were studied in floral organs of cut carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) cv. White Sim. During the vase life and after treatment of fresh flowers with ethylene, production of ethylene and expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes first started in the ovary followed by the styles and the petals. ACC oxidase was expressed in all the floral organs whereas, during the vase life, tissue-specific expression of the two ACC synthase genes was observed. After treatment with a high ethylene concentration, tissue specificity of the two ACC synthase genes was lost and only a temporal difference in expression remained. In styles, poor correlation between ethylene production and ACC synthase (CARAS1) gene expression was observed suggesting that either activity is regulated at the translational level or that the CARAS1 gene product requires an additional factor for activity. Isolated petals showed no increase in ethylene production and expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes when excised from the flower before the increase in petal ethylene production (before day 7); showed rapid cessation of ethylene production and gene expression when excised during the early phase of petal ethylene production (day 7) and showed a pattern of ethylene production and gene expression similar to the pattern observed in the attached petals when isolated at day 8. The interorgan regulation of gene expression and ethylene as a signal molecule in flower senescence are discussed.

  12. Revisiting sesquiterpene biosynthetic pathways leading to santalene and its analogues: a comprehensive mechanistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Garima; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-10-21

    Santalene and bergamotene are the major olefinic sesquiterpenes responsible for the fragrance of sandalwood oil. Herein we report the details of density functional theory investigations on the biosynthetic pathway of this important class of terpenes. The mechanistic study has been found to be effective toward gaining significant new insight into different possibilities for the formation of the key intermediates involved in santalene and bergamotene biosynthesis. The stereoelectronic features of the transition states and intermediates for (i) ring closure of the initial bisabolyl cation, and (ii) skeletal rearrangements in the ensuing bicyclic carbocationic intermediates leading to (-)-epi-β-santalene, (-)-β-santalene, (-)-α-santalene, (+)-epi-β-santalene, exo-β-bergamotene, endo-β-bergamotene, exo-α-bergamotene, and endo-α-bergamotene are presented. Interesting structural features pertaining to certain new carbocationic intermediates (such as b) resulting from the ring closure of bisabolyl cation are discussed. Extensive conformational sampling of all key intermediates along the biosynthetic pathway offered new insight into the role of the isoprenyl side chain conformation in the formation of santalene and its analogues. Although the major bicyclic products in Santalum album appear to arise from the right or left handed helical form of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP), different alternatives for their formation are found to be energetically feasible. The interconversion of the exo and endo isomers of bisabolyl cation and a likely epimerization, both with interesting mechanistic implications, are presented. The exo to endo conversion is identified to be energetically more favorable than another pathway emanating from the left handed helical FPP. The role of pyrophosphate (OPP(-)) in the penultimate deprotonation step leading to olefinic sesquiterpenes is also examined.

  13. Analysis of occludin trafficking, demonstrating continuous endocytosis, degradation, recycling and biosynthetic secretory trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Fletcher

    Full Text Available Tight junctions (TJs link adjacent cells and are critical for maintenance of apical-basolateral polarity in epithelial monolayers. The TJ protein occludin functions in disparate processes, including wound healing and Hepatitis C Virus infection. Little is known about steady-state occludin trafficking into and out of the plasma membrane. Therefore, we determined the mechanisms responsible for occludin turnover in confluent Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial monolayers. Using various biotin-based trafficking assays we observed continuous and rapid endocytosis of plasma membrane localised occludin (the majority internalised within 30 minutes. By 120 minutes a significant reduction in internalised occludin was observed. Inhibition of lysosomal function attenuated the reduction in occludin signal post-endocytosis and promoted co-localisation with the late endocytic system. Using a similar method we demonstrated that ∼20% of internalised occludin was transported back to the cell surface. Consistent with these findings, significant co-localisation between internalised occludin and recycling endosomal compartments was observed. We then quantified the extent to which occludin synthesis and transport to the plasma membrane contributes to plasma membrane occludin homeostasis, identifying inhibition of protein synthesis led to decreased plasma membrane localised occludin. Significant co-localisation between occludin and the biosynthetic secretory pathway was demonstrated. Thus, under steady-state conditions occludin undergoes turnover via a continuous cycle of endocytosis, recycling and degradation, with degradation compensated for by biosynthetic exocytic trafficking. We developed a mathematical model to describe the endocytosis, recycling and degradation of occludin, utilising experimental data to provide quantitative estimates for the rates of these processes.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of Sinorhizobium meliloti nodule bacteria in nifA mutant background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Zhexian; WANG Yiping; ZOU Huasong; LI Jian; ZHANG Yuantao; LIU Ying; YU Guanqiao; ZHU Jiabi; R(U)BERG Silvia; BECKER Anke

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of a Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 nifA mutant and wild type nodule bacteria were compared using whole genome microarrays. The results revealed a large scale alteration of gene expression (601 genes) in the nifA minus background. The loss of NifA altered the expression of many functional groups of genes (macromolecular metabolism, TCA cycle and respiration,nodulation and nitrogen fixation) and may lead to quite different life stages of the nodule bacteria.Upregulation of fixK and its associated genes was observed in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria. Additional quantitative real-time PCR experiments revealed that the transcript levels of fixLJ were significantly upshifted in the nifA mutant nodule bacteria.Putative NifA binding sites were predicted by a statistical method in the upstream sequences of 13 differentially regulated genes from the nifA- transcriptome.

  15. Genomics of iron acquisition in the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora: insights in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore desferrioxamine E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Theo H M; Duffy, Brion

    2011-10-01

    Genomics has clarified the biosynthetic pathway for desferrioxamine E critical for iron acquisition in the enterobacterial fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. Evidence for each of the individual steps and the role of desferrioxamine E biosynthesis in pathogen virulence and cell protection from host defenses is presented. Using comparative genomics, it can be concluded that desferrioxamine biosynthesis is ancestral within the genera Erwinia and Pantoea.

  16. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor associated with regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway in Rosaceae (on linr)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Kui-Lin; Bolitho, Karen; Grafton, Karryn; Kortstee, A.J.; Karunairetnam, Sakuntala; McGhie, T.K.; Espley, R.V.; Hellens, R.P.; Allan, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The control of plant anthocyanin accumulation is via transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding the biosynthetic enzymes. A key activator appears to be an R2R3 MYB transcription factor. In apple fruit, skin anthocyanin levels are controlled by a gene called MYBA or MYB1, while the

  17. Multiplex PCR analysis of fumonisin biosynthetic genes in fumonisin-nonproducing Aspergillus niger and A. awamori strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to determine the genetic basis for loss of fumonisin B¬2 (FB2) biosynthesis in FB2 non-producing A. niger strains, we developed multiplex PCR primer sets to amplify fragments of eight fumonisin biosynthetic pathway (fum) genes. Fragments of all eight fum genes were amplified in FB2-produci...

  18. Hepatitis B surface gene 145 mutant as a minor population in hepatitis B virus carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komatsu Haruki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV can have mutations that include the a determinant, which causes breakthrough infection. In particular, a single mutation at amino acid 145 of the surface protein (G145 is frequently reported in the failure of prophylactic treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of the a determinant mutants, especially the G145 variant, in Japan, where universal vaccination has not been adopted. Methods The present study was a retrospective study. The study cohorts were defined as follows: group 1, children with failure to prevent mother-to-child transmission despite immunoprophylaxis (n = 18, male/female = 8/10, age 1-14 years; median 6 years; group 2, HBV carriers who had not received vaccination or hepatitis B immunoglobulin (n = 107, male/female = 107, age 1-52 years; median 16 years. To detect the G145R and G145A mutants in patients, we designed 3 probes for real-time PCR. We also performed direct sequencing and cloning of PCR products. Results By mutant-specific real-time PCR, one subject (5.6% was positive for the G145R mutant in group 1, while the G145 mutant was undetectable in group 2. The a determinant mutants were detected in one (5.6% of the group 1 subjects and 10 (9.3% of the group 2 subjects using direct sequencing, but direct sequencing did not reveal the G145 mutant as a predominant strain in the two groups. However, the subject who was positive according to the mutant-specific real-time PCR in group 1 had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. In group 2, 11 patients had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Cloning of PCR products allowed detection of the G145R mutant as a minor strain in 7 (group 1: 1 subject, group 2: 6 subjects of 12 subjects who had overlapped peaks at nt 587 in the electropherogram. Conclusions The frequency of the a determinant mutants was not high in Japan. However, the G145R mutant was often present as a minor population in

  19. Tannerella forsythia strains display different cell-surface nonulosonic acids: biosynthetic pathway characterization and first insight into biological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Valentin; Janesch, Bettina; Windwarder, Markus; Maresch, Daniel; Braun, Matthias L; Megson, Zoë A; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Goneau, Marie-France; Sharma, Ashu; Altmann, Friedrich; Messner, Paul; Schoenhofen, Ian C; Schäffer, Christina

    2016-12-16

    Tannerella forsythia is an anaerobic, Gram-negative periodontal pathogen. A unique O-linked oligosaccharide decorates the bacterium's cell surface proteins and was shown to modulate the host immune response. In our study, we investigated the biosynthesis of the nonulosonic acid (NulO) present at the terminal position of this glycan. A bioinformatic analysis of T. forsythia genomes revealed a gene locus for the synthesis of pseudaminic acid (Pse) in the type strain ATCC 43037 while strains FDC 92A2 and UB4 possess a locus for the synthesis of legionaminic acid (Leg) instead. In contrast to the NulO in ATCC 43037, which has been previously identified as a Pse derivative (5-N-acetimidoyl-7-N-glyceroyl-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-l-glycero-l-manno-NulO), glycan analysis of strain UB4 performed in this study indicated a 350-Da, possibly N-glycolyl Leg (3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-d-glycero-d-galacto-NulO) derivative with unknown C5,7 N-acyl moieties. We have expressed, purified and characterized enzymes of both NulO pathways to confirm these genes' functions. Using capillary electrophoresis (CE), CE-mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, our studies revealed that Pse biosynthesis in ATCC 43037 essentially follows the UDP-sugar route described in Helicobacter pylori, while the pathway in strain FDC 92A2 corresponds to Leg biosynthesis in Campylobacter jejuni involving GDP-sugar intermediates. To demonstrate that the NulO biosynthesis enzymes are functional in vivo, we created knockout mutants resulting in glycans lacking the respective NulO. Compared to the wild-type strains, the mutants exhibited significantly reduced biofilm formation on mucin-coated surfaces, suggestive of their involvement in host-pathogen interactions or host survival. This study contributes to understanding possible biological roles of bacterial NulOs.

  20. Enhanced cellulase production in mutants of Thermomonospora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fennington, G.; Lupo, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata, a thermophilic actinomycete, secretes multiple forms of endo-beta, 1-4-glucanase (EG) when grown on cellulose-mineral salts liquid medium. The EG activity (measured as carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis) was separated by ion exchange chromatography into three distinct components which differed in their kinetic properties. Exposure of T. curvata to ultraviolet light, N-nitrosoguanidine, or ethane methyl sulfonate produced mutants with enhanced EG production. Selection of colonies which cleared cellulose agar plants containing 2-deoxyglucose or glycerol yielded mutants having 1.5 to 2.6 times the extracellular EG and saccharifying activity (measured by filter-paper and cotton-fiber hydrolysis). The secretion of extracellular protein was increased proportionally in mutant cultures. (Refs. 40).

  1. Changes in Thermostability of Photosystem Ⅱ and Leaf Lipid Composition of Rice Mutant with Deficiency of Light-harvesting Chlorophyll Protein Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunlai Tang; Mei Chen; Yinong Xu; Tingyun Kuang

    2007-01-01

    We studied the difference in thermostability of photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) and leaf lipid composition between a T-DNA insertion mutant rice (Oryza sativa L.) VG28 and its wild type Zhonghua11. Native green gel and SDS-PAGE electrophoreses revealed that the mutant VG28 lacked all light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complexes. Both the mutant and wild type were sensitive to high temperatures, and the maximal efficiency of PSⅡ photochemistry (Fv/Fm) and oxygen-evolving activity of PSⅡ in leaves significantly decreased with increasing temperature. However, the PSⅡ activity of the mutant was markedly more sensitive to high temperatures than that of the wild type. Lipid composition analysis showed that the mutant had less phosphatidylglycerol and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol compared with the wild type. Fatty acid analysis revealed that the mutant had an obvious decrease in the content of unsaturation of membrane lipids on the thermostability of PSll are discussed.

  2. Aging Kit mutant mice develop cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ye

    Full Text Available Both bone marrow (BM and myocardium contain progenitor cells expressing the c-Kit tyrosine kinase. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of c-Kit mutations on: i. myocardial c-Kit(+ cells counts and ii. the stability of left ventricular (LV contractile function and structure during aging. LV structure and contractile function were evaluated (echocardiography in two groups of Kit mutant (W/Wv and W41/W42 and in wild type (WT mice at 4 and 12 months of age and the effects of the mutations on LV mass, vascular density and the numbers of proliferating cells were also determined. In 4 month old Kit mutant and WT mice, LV ejection fractions (EF and LV fractional shortening rates (FS were comparable. At 12 months of age EF and FS were significantly decreased and LV mass was significantly increased only in W41/W42 mice. Myocardial vascular densities and c-Kit(+ cell numbers were significantly reduced in both mutant groups when compared to WT hearts. Replacement of mutant BM with WT BM at 4 months of age did not prevent these abnormalities in either mutant group although they were somewhat attenuated in the W/Wv group. Notably BM transplantation did not prevent the development of cardiomyopathy in 12 month W41/W42 mice. The data suggest that decreased numbers and functional capacities of c-Kit(+ cardiac resident progenitor cells may be the basis of the cardiomyopathy in W41/W42 mice and although defects in mutant BM progenitor cells may prove to be contributory, they are not causal.

  3. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cystine and exports glutamate. Slc7a11 is expressed primarily in the brain, but its role there is not clear. We performed behavioral tests on two different strains of homozygous slc7a11 mutant mice ('sut' and 'xCT'), as well as heteroallelic offspring of these two strains ('xCT/sut') and their associated genetic backgrounds. Homozygous sut mutant males showed reduced spontaneous alternation in spontaneous alternation tasks as well as reduced movement in an open field maze, but xCT and xCT/sut strains did not show significant changes in these tasks compared to appropriate controls. Neither xCT nor sut mutants showed differences from controls in rotarod tests. Female behavioral phenotypes were independent of estrus cycle stage. To ensure that homozygous xCT, sut, and xCT/sut strains all represent protein null alleles, we measured whole brain xCT protein levels using immunoblots. xCT, sut and xCT/sut strains showed no detectable xCT protein expression, confirming them as null alleles. Previously published microdialysis experiments showed reduced striatal glutamate in xCT mutants. Using the same methods, we measured reduced interstitial glutamate levels in the striatum but not cerebellum of sut mutants. However, we detected no glutamate change in the striatum or cerebellum of sut/xCT mice. We detected no changes in whole brain EAAT-1, -2, or -3 expression. We conclude that the behavioral and chemical differences exist between slc7a11 mutant strains, but we were unable to definitively attribute any of these differences to loss of system xc-.

  4. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guocai Li

    Full Text Available Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  5. Antibodies with higher bactericidal activity induced by a Neisseria gonorrhoeae Rmp deletion mutant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guocai; Xie, Rushan; Zhu, Xiaoping; Mao, Yanli; Liu, Shuangxi; Jiao, Hongmei; Yan, Hua; Xiong, Kun; Ji, Mingchun

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (N. gonorrhoeae) outer membrane protein reduction modifiable protein (Rmp) has strong immunogenicity. However, anti-Rmp antibodies block rather than preserve the antibacterial effects of protective antibodies, which hampers the development of vaccines for gonococcal infections. We herein constructed an Rmp deletion mutant strain of N. gonorrhoeae by gene homologous recombination. The 261-460 nucleotide residues of Rmp gene amplified from N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain were replaced with a kanamycin-resistant Kan gene amplified from pET-28a. The resultant hybridized DNA was transformed into N. gonorrhoeae WHO-A strain. PCR was used to screen the colonies in which wild-type Rmp gene was replaced with a mutant gene fragment. Western blotting revealed that the Rmp deletion mutant strain did not express Rmp protein. Rmp deletion did not alter the morphological and Gram staining properties of the mutant strain that grew slightly more slowly than the wild-type one. Rmp gene mutated stably throughout 25 generations of passage. Antibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay indicated that the antibodies induced by the mutant strain had evidently higher bactericidal activities than those induced by the wild-type strain. Further modification of the Rmp deletion mutant strain is still required in the development of novel live attenuated vaccines for gonorrhea by Opa genes deletion or screening of phenotypic variant strains that do not express Opa proteins.

  6. Molecular flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ribosome recycling factor and its functional consequences: An exploration involving mutants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Selvaraj; A Govindan; A Seshadri; B Dubey; U Varshney; M Vijayan

    2013-12-01

    Internal mobility of the two domain molecule of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) is known to be important for its action. Mycobacterium tuberculosis RRF does not complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF (in the presence of E. coli EF-G alone). Crystal structure had revealed higher rigidity of the M. tuberculosis RRF due to the presence of additional salt bridges between domains. Two inter-domain salt bridges and one between the linker region and the domain containing C-terminal residues were disrupted by appropriate mutations. Except for a C-terminal deletion mutant, all mutants showed RRF activity in E. coli when M. tuberculosis EF-G was also co-expressed. The crystal structures of the point mutants, that of the C-terminal deletion mutant and that of the protein grown in the presence of a detergent, were determined. The increased mobility resulting from the disruption of the salt bridge involving the hinge region allows the appropriate mutant to weakly complement E. coli for its deficiency of RRF even in the absence of simultaneous expression of the mycobacterial EF-G. The loss of activity of the C-terminal deletion mutant appears to be partly due to the rigidification of the molecule consequent to changes in the hinge region.

  7. Phenotypical and structural characterization of the Arabidopsis mutant involved in shoot apical meristem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe HU; Ping LI; Jinfang MA; Yunlong WANG; Xinyu WANG; Chongying WANG

    2008-01-01

    An Arabidopsis mutant induced by T-DNA insertion was studied with respect to its phenotype, micro-structure of shoot apical meristem (SAM) and histo-chemical localization of the GUS gene in comparison with the wild type. Phenotypical observation found that the mutant exhibited a dwarf phenotype with smaller organs (such as smaller leaves, shorter petioles), and slower development and flowering time compared to the wild type. Optical microscopic analysis of the mutant showed that it had a smaller and more flattened SAM, with reduced cell layers and a shortened distance between two leaf primordia compared with the wild type. In addi-tion, analysis of the histo-chemical localization of the GUS gene revealed that it was specifically expressed in the SAM and the vascular tissue of the mutant, which suggests that the gene trapped by T-DNA may function in the SAM, and T-DNA insertion could influence the functional activity of the related gene in the mutant, lead-ing to alterations in the SAM and a series of phenotypes in the mutant.

  8. A rice mutant displaying a heterochronically elongated internode carries a 100 kb deletion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mika Hayashi-Tsugane; Masahiko Maekawa; Qian Qian; Hirokazu Kobayashi; Shigeru Iida; Kazuo Tsugane

    2011-01-01

    We have isolated a recessive rice mutant,designated as indeterminate growth(ing),which displays creeping and apparent heterochronic phenotypes in the vegetative period with lanky and winding culms.Rough mapping and subsequent molecular characterization revealed that the ing mutant carries a large deletion,which corresponds to a 103 kb region in the Nipponbare genome,containing nine annotated genes on chromosome 3.Of these annotated genes,the SLRI gene encoding a DELLA protein is the only one that is well characterized in its function,and its null mutation,which is caused by a single base deletion in the middle of the intronless SLR1 gene,confers a slender phenotype that bears close resemblance to the ing mutant phenotype.The primary cause of the ing mutant phenotype is the deletion of the SLR1 gene,and the ing mutant appears to be the first characterized mutant having the entire SLRI sequence deleted.Our results also suggest that the deleted region of 103 kb does not contain an indispensable gene,whose dysfunction must result in a lethal phenotype.

  9. Phenotypic Characterization of a Comprehensive Set of MAPK1/ERK2 Missense Mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Brenan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-specific genomic information has the potential to guide therapeutic strategies and revolutionize patient treatment. Currently, this approach is limited by an abundance of disease-associated mutants whose biological functions and impacts on therapeutic response are uncharacterized. To begin to address this limitation, we functionally characterized nearly all (99.84% missense mutants of MAPK1/ERK2, an essential effector of oncogenic RAS and RAF. Using this approach, we discovered rare gain- and loss-of-function ERK2 mutants found in human tumors, revealing that, in the context of this assay, mutational frequency alone cannot identify all functionally impactful mutants. Gain-of-function ERK2 mutants induced variable responses to RAF-, MEK-, and ERK-directed therapies, providing a reference for future treatment decisions. Tumor-associated mutations spatially clustered in two ERK2 effector-recruitment domains yet produced mutants with opposite phenotypes. This approach articulates an allele-characterization framework that can be scaled to meet the goals of genome-guided oncology.

  10. Comparative docking studies of CYP1b1 and its PCG-associated mutant forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malkaram Sridhar Achary; Hampapathalu Adimurthy Nagarajaram

    2008-12-01

    Molecular docking has been used to compare and contrast the binding modes of oestradiol with the wild-type and some disease-associated mutant forms of the human CYP1b1 protein. The receptor structures used for docking were derived from molecular dynamics simulations of homology-modelled structures. Earlier studies involving molecular dynamics and principal component analysis indicated that mutations could have a disruptive effect on function, by destabilizing the native properties of the functionally important regions, especially those of