WorldWideScience

Sample records for bioprospecting metagenomes glycosyl

  1. Marine metagenomics as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-08-12

    This review summarizes usage of genome-editing technologies for metagenomic studies; these studies are used to retrieve and modify valuable microorganisms for production, particularly in marine metagenomics. Organisms may be cultivable or uncultivable. Metagenomics is providing especially valuable information for uncultivable samples. The novel genes, pathways and genomes can be deducted. Therefore, metagenomics, particularly genome engineering and system biology, allows for the enhancement of biological and chemical producers and the creation of novel bioresources. With natural resources rapidly depleting, genomics may be an effective way to efficiently produce quantities of known and novel foods, livestock feed, fuels, pharmaceuticals and fine or bulk chemicals.

  2. Improved cultivation and metagenomics as new tools for bioprospecting in cold environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester, Jan Kjølhede; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    into the laboratory or through metagenomic approaches where culture-independent DNA sequence information can be combined with functional screening. The coupling of these two approaches circumvents the need for pure, cultured isolates and can be used to generate targeted information on communities enriched...... be limited as few hosts are available for expression of genes with extremophilic properties. This review summarizes the methods developed for improved cultivation as well as the metagenomic approaches for bioprospecting with focus on the challenges faced by bioprospecting in cold environments....

  3. Bioprospecting metagenomics of a microbial community on cotton degradation: Mining for new glycoside hydrolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoxiu; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Lei; Wei, Wei; Wang, Xuedong; Wei, Dongzhi; Wang, Wei

    2016-09-20

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHases) of higher performance are immediately needed for efficient degradation of plant biomass into fermentable sugars in industrial processes. The current study represents functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire involved in crude cotton biomass degradation. Physical contact between cells and substrate is necessary for efficient hydrolysis of cellulose. Cytophagales, which plays a major role in cotton biomass decomposition, was identified as a prevalent community member by 16S rRNA analysis. From the metagenome data, 2058 GHase homologs were identified, of which sixteen were successfully expressed in E. coli. Four enzymes showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-xylopyranoside, four showed activities on p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside, two had activities against p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucuronide, one showed activity on laminarin, three had activities against p-nitrophenyl-N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminide, one had activity towards carboxymethyl cellulose, and one towards p-nitrophenyl-β-d-mannopyranoside. Metagenomics provides a good resource for mining novel biomass degrading enzymes. The sixteen GHases that were cloned may have potential application for biomass conversion and bioproduct production. Functional characterization of the enzymatic repertoire in cotton biomass degradation and analysis of the GHases provide insight into the composition and interaction of enzymes and pathways of plant biomass degradation. PMID:27460447

  4. Estimating the success of enzyme bioprospecting through metagenomics: current status and future trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Manuel; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Bargiela, Rafael; Streit, Wolfgang R; Golyshina, Olga V; Golyshin, Peter N

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have suggested that the establishment of industrially relevant enzyme collections from environmental genomes has become a routine procedure. Across the studies assessed, a mean number of approximately 44 active clones were obtained in an average size of approximately 53 000 clones tested using naïve screening protocols. This number could be significantly increased in shorter times when novel metagenome enzyme sequences obtained by direct sequencing are selected and subjected to high-throughput expression for subsequent production and characterization. The pre-screening of clone libraries by naïve screens followed by the pyrosequencing of the inserts allowed for a 106-fold increase in the success rate of identifying genes encoding enzymes of interest. However, a much longer time, usually on the order of years, is needed from the time of enzyme identification to the establishment of an industrial process. If the hit frequency for the identification of enzymes performing at high turnover rates under real application conditions could be increased while still covering a high natural diversity, the very expensive and time-consuming enzyme optimization phase would likely be significantly shortened. At this point, it is important to review the current knowledge about the success of fine-tuned naïve- and sequence-based screening protocols for enzyme selection and to describe the environments worldwide that have already been subjected to enzyme screen programmes through metagenomic tools. Here, we provide such estimations and suggest the current challenges and future actions needed before environmental enzymes can be successfully introduced into the market. PMID:26275154

  5. Bioprospecting and Functional Analysis of Neglected Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogt, Josef Korbinian

    of functional relationships in single organisms and environments. The sequencing data can also be mined for novel compounds and enzymes. The process of exploiting biological resources for commercial use is known as bioprospecting. This PhD thesis describes the concept of bioprospecting in the post genomic era...... of arctic marine metagenomes reveals bacterial strategies for deep sea persistence (Manuscript II). Furthermore, this extreme environment is a fertile ground to mine for novel proteolytic enzymes. Manuscript III presents a bioinformatics approach to identify sequences for potential commercialization......Advances in Next Generation Sequencing technologies made it possible to sequence DNA extracted from environments and organisms at a reasonable cost allowing research fields such as metagenomics and whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) to be established. These techniques allow the study...

  6. Backbone structures in human milk oligosaccharides: trans-glycosylation by metagenomic β-N-acetylhexosaminidases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyffenegger, Christian; Nordvang, Rune Thorbjørn; Zeuner, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    -encoding genes were identified by functional screening of a soil-derived metagenomic library. The β-N-acetylhexosaminidases were expressed in Escherichia coli with an N-terminal His6-tag and were purified by nickel affinity chromatography. The sequence similarities of the enzymes with their respective closest...

  7. Ecology and bioprospecting

    OpenAIRE

    Beattie, Andrew J.; HAY, MARK; MAGNUSSON, BILL; de Nys, Rocky; SMEATHERS, JAMES; VINCENT, JULIAN F. V.

    2010-01-01

    Bioprospecting is the exploration of biodiversity for new resources of social and commercial value. It is carried out by a wide range of established industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and agriculture as well as a wide range of comparatively new ones such as aquaculture, bioremediation, biomining, biomimetic engineering and nanotechnology. The benefits of bioprospecting have emerged from such a wide range of organisms and environments worldwide that it is not possible to predict...

  8. Cloning and molecular modelling of pectin degrading glycosyl hydrolase of family 28 from soil metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathya, T A; Jacob, Ani Methew; Khan, Mahejibin

    2014-01-01

    Western Ghats of India is recognized as one of the 12 mega diversity regions of the world and is the hot spot for unrevealed microbial diversity. To explore the diversity of polysaccharide degrading enzymes in that region, metagenomic library was constructed from forest soil of Southern Western Ghats region. Nine pectinolytic clones with the ability to degrade citrus pectin were isolated based on function based screening of the library. Sequence analysis of pg_4 clone containing revealed that it contained GH family 28 domain (pfam00295) belonging to polygalacturonase superfamily (PLN03003). Its amino acid sequence analysis showed 25-55 % identity to the other well-characterized polygalacturonases. Molecular modeling of pg_4 revealed that it comprised of three right handed-parallel β sheets, one anti-parallel β sheet and one α helix with three conserved catalytic residue D 2263, D 284-85 and H 312 at the C terminal end. The enzyme characterized was able to hydrolyze both apple and citrus pectin with K m values of 1.685 and 1.542 mg ml(-1) and retained more that 80 % of activity at pH 5-9 and temperature 20-60 °C. PMID:24452715

  9. Ecology and bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Andrew J; Hay, Mark; Magnusson, Bill; de Nys, Rocky; Smeathers, James; Vincent, Julian F V

    2011-05-01

    Bioprospecting is the exploration of biodiversity for new resources of social and commercial value. It is carried out by a wide range of established industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and agriculture as well as a wide range of comparatively new ones such as aquaculture, bioremediation, biomining, biomimetic engineering and nanotechnology. The benefits of bioprospecting have emerged from such a wide range of organisms and environments worldwide that it is not possible to predict what species or habitats will be critical to society, or industry, in the future. The benefits include an unexpected variety of products that include chemicals, genes, metabolic pathways, structures, materials and behaviours. These may provide physical blueprints or inspiration for new designs. Criticism aimed at bioprospecting has been addressed, in part, by international treaties and legal agreements aimed at stopping biopiracy and many activities are now funded by agencies that require capacity-building and economic benefits in host countries. Thus, much contemporary bioprospecting has multiple goals, including the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable management of natural resources and economic development. Ecologists are involved in three vital ways: first, applying ecological principles to the discovery of new resources. In this context, natural history becomes a vast economic database. Second, carrying out field studies, most of them demographic, to help regulate the harvest of wild species. Third, emphasizing the profound importance of millions of mostly microscopic species to the global economy. PMID:22737038

  10. Identification of novel glycosyl hydrolases with cellulolytic activity against crystalline cellulose from metagenomic libraries constructed from bacterial enrichment cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Toshio; Kamei, Ichiro; Hirai, Hirofumi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2014-01-01

    To obtain cellulases that are capable of degrading crystalline cellulose and cedar wood, metagenomic libraries were constructed from raw soil sample which was covered to pile of cedar wood sawdust or from its enrichment cultures. The efficiency of screening of metagenomic library was improved more than 3 times by repeating enrichment cultivation using crystalline cellulose as a carbon source, compared with the library constructed from raw soil. Four cellulase genes were obtained from the meta...

  11. Isolation and Characterization of a Glycosyl Hydrolase Family 16 β-Agarase from a Mangrove Soil Metagenomic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Zhimao; Su, Hongfei; Zhang, Si

    2016-01-01

    A mangrove soil metagenomic library was constructed and a β-agarase gene designated as AgaML was isolated by functional screening. The gene encoded for a 659-amino-acids polypeptide with an estimated molecular mass of 71.6 kDa. The deduced polypeptide sequences of AgaML showed the highest identity of 73% with the glycoside hydrolase family 16 β-agarase from Microbulbifer agarilyticus in the GenBank database. AgaML was cloned and highly expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The purified recombinant protein, AgaML, showed optimal activity at 50 °C and pH 7.0. The kinetic parameters of Km and Vmax values toward agarose were 4.6 mg·mL−1 and 967.5 μM·min−1·mg−1, respectively. AgaML hydrolyzed the β-1,4-glycosidic linkages of agar to generate neoagarotetraose (NA4) and neoagarohexaose (NA6) as the main products. These characteristics suggest that AgaML has potential application in cosmetic, pharmaceuticals and food industries. PMID:27548158

  12. Red Sea as a source for bioprospecting

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2015-12-12

    King-Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) is located on the shores of the Red Sea in Saudi Arabia. The Red Sea is well known for its unique environment, harboring various microbes capable of surviving in salty brines. We collected sediment samples from brine pool adjacent to the Thuwal cold seeps in the Red Sea. The taxonomic analysis showed the diversity and abundance of bacterial and archaeal operational taxonomic units (OUT). Recently we established in the laboratory a microdroplet technology to encapsulate single cells. This technology enables us to analyze single-cell genomes and perform the high-throughput screening. The genomes of both cultivable and uncultivable organisms can be analyzed. We envision the collection of complimentary data, obtained by various techniques, such as single-cell genomics, metagenomics, and transcriptomics. That will enable us not only to understand the environment and microorganism communities but also will allow to discover the previously unknown genes, pathways, and whole genomes. These data will facilitate the enhancement of biological and chemical producers, and pave the way for bioprospecting.

  13. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA main

  14. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest. PMID:26901403

  15. Bioprospecting thermophiles for cellulase production: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Somen Acharya; Anita Chaudhary

    2012-01-01

    Most of the potential bioprospecting is currently related to the study of the extremophiles and their potential use in industrial processes. Recently microbial cellulases find applications in various industries and constitute a major group of industrial enzymes. Considerable amount of work has been done on microbial cellulases, especially with resurgence of interest in biomass ethanol production employing cellulases and use of cellulases in textile and paper industry. Most efficient method of...

  16. BIO-PROSPECTING, IPR, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ITS TRADE SECRETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lad Meenal Deepak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bio-prospecting involves searching for collecting, and deriving genetic material from samples of bio-diversity that can be used in commercialized pharmaceutical, agricultural, industrial, or chemical processing end products. Salient features of Bio-prospecting are: Conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, Rights of traditional, indigenous knowledge holders; fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the research, indigenous knowledge, intellectual property, or application of biological resources. The meaningful participation in these processes by traditional, indigenous knowledge holders.As far as Bio-prospecting & final commercial manufacturing company is concerned certain larger pharmaceutical companies operate their own Bio-prospecting units. They can develop a commercial drug from an idea to Bio-prospecting for genetic material, clinical trial, manufacturing & marketing.Herbal medicines are not marketed as pharmaceuticals & are not regulated by FDA. These drugs lack in quality control & mostly sold as dietary supplements. Pharmaceutical industries ordinarily synthesize compounds from a limited amount of natural products & the Herbal medicine industries usually don’t attempt to do so because of high cost involved for the relatively low return. Pharmaceutical Bio-prospecting involves high returns & requires low volume harvesting.The convential biological diversities are an international protocol which gives expression to the novel idea that the Bio-prospecting process could yield conservation & develop benefits. The Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement under the World Trade Organization (WTO is the pre-eminent international agreement governing intellectual property rights. It covers a broad range of intellectual property rights, including copyright, trademarks, geographical indications, trade secrets, and patents. Along with TRIPS a focuses given to rights of traditional indigenous

  17. BIO-PROSPECTING, IPR, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ITS TRADE SECRETS

    OpenAIRE

    Lad Meenal Deepak; Kumar Naresh

    2012-01-01

    Bio-prospecting involves searching for collecting, and deriving genetic material from samples of bio-diversity that can be used in commercialized pharmaceutical, agricultural, industrial, or chemical processing end products. Salient features of Bio-prospecting are: Conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity, Rights of traditional, indigenous knowledge holders; fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the research, indigenous knowledge, intellectual property, or appli...

  18. Bioprospecting thermophiles for cellulase production: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somen Acharya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Most of the potential bioprospecting is currently related to the study of the extremophiles and their potential use in industrial processes. Recently microbial cellulases find applications in various industries and constitute a major group of industrial enzymes. Considerable amount of work has been done on microbial cellulases, especially with resurgence of interest in biomass ethanol production employing cellulases and use of cellulases in textile and paper industry. Most efficient method of lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysis is through enzymatic saccharification using cellulases. Significant information has also been gained about the physiology of thermophilic cellulases producers and process development for enzyme production and biomass saccharification. The review discusses the current knowledge on cellulase producing thermophilic microorganisms, their physiological adaptations and control of cellulase gene expression. It discusses the industrial applications of thermophilic cellulases, their cost of production and challenges in cellulase research especially in the area of improving process economics of enzyme production.

  19. Beyond the Thumbrule Approach: Regulatory Innovations for Bioprospecting in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Sanjay Bavikatte and Morten Walløe Tvedt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the wake of the Nagoya Protocol on Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS, there is unprecedented attention on good Green Governance, which implies the development of resource efficient, rights based and effective domestic frameworks to regulate bioprospecting. India has been pioneering in this regard due to its ABS legislation in 2002 that long preceded the Nagoya Protocol. However much has changed since 2002 and while India has learnt a great deal from its ‘learning by doing’ method, there are valuable lessons that can be learnt from innovations in the ABS frameworks of other countries. The innovations of these countries are a great resource for National Biodiversity Authority (NBA in India that is seeking to make the processing of the bioprospecting applications in India more optimal. The current paper highlights the challenges faced by the NBA in processing the high volumes of bioprospecting applications, analyses the reasons for such challenges and proposes solutions for the same.

  20. Phylogenies reveal predictive power of traditional medicine in bioprospecting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saslis-Lagoudakis, C Haris; Savolainen, Vincent; Williamson, Elizabeth M;

    2012-01-01

    There is controversy about whether traditional medicine can guide drug discovery, and investment in bioprospecting informed by ethnobotanical data has fluctuated. One view is that traditionally used medicinal plants are not necessarily efficacious and there are no robust methods for distinguishin...

  1. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase. PMID:26621459

  2. Metagenomic studies of the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Ibarra, Martin Augusto; Mineta, Katsuhiko; Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    the bio-prospecting potential of the Red Sea microbiota. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of the previous studies and the need for generating a large and representative metagenomic database of the Red Sea to help establish a dynamic model of the Red Sea microbiota. PMID:26526132

  3. Bioprospecting: from theory to practice (and back again)

    OpenAIRE

    N Castree

    2003-01-01

    This paper critically assesses the theory and practice of biodiversity prospecting in the developing world. Taking the case of perhaps the most famous bioprospecting broker – Costa Rica's National Institute of Biodiversity – rival theoretical discourses on the ‘selling nature to save it’ approach to environmental conservation are unpacked. This approach, currently de rigueur in mainstream global environmental organizations, is touted by its advocates in the academic and policy world a...

  4. Swine Fecal Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomic approaches are providing rapid and more robust means to investigate the composition and functional genetic potential of complex microbial communities. In this study, we utilized a metagenomic approach to further understand the functional diversity of the swine gut. To...

  5. Bioprospection Beyond Intellectual Property Rights: The Kani Model of Access and Benefit Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Pascual, Unai; Dedeurwaerdere, Tom; Krishna, Vijesh V.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the value of bioprospection for genetic resources (GR) and traditional knowledge (TK) from the South for industrial/research input. The focus is on a dynamic approach to contracting and property rights building upon insights from evolutionary institutional economics. Drawing on a unique 'access and benefit sharing' (ABS) bioprospecting contract from the Western Ghats, India, we show how the monetary value of plant genetic information from the traditional knowledge holders...

  6. Analyse of The Legal Framework in Colombia for implementation of Bioprospecting Practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The practice of bioprospecting is inherently linked with traditional knowledge and practices of local communities in the South as well as with the commercial activities of industries (e.g., pharmaceutics sector, agriculture) in the North. A series of actors operate at this interface, such as Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), Research Centers, Universities, Science and Technology sponsor institutions and the State. As these actors have divergent interests and powers of negotiation, an appropriate regulatory framework is necessary to regulate their interaction. This paper analyzes the existing legal framework in a mega-diverse country, like Colombia, for implementation of bioprospecting practices. The research consisted of two key components: (i) A review of the state of art of bioprospecting; (ii) A work in situ in Colombia, which consisted of analysis of information and genetic resources related to bioprospecting, participation in the implementation of a legal frame for bioprospecting practices and interviews with Colombian professionals in the field of biodiversity conservation. Our research determined that: (i) national authorities encounter a multitude of difficulties to implement a legal framework in Colombia, especially the Andean regional normativity; (ii) the execution of research projects related to bioprospecting in Colombia faces numerous challenges

  7. Bioprospecting and evolving alternative xylose and arabinose pathway enzymes for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Jellison, Taylor; Alper, Hal S

    2016-03-01

    Bioprospecting is an effective way to find novel enzymes from strains with desirable phenotypes. Such bioprospecting has enabled organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize nonnative pentose sugars. Yet, the efficiency of this pentose catabolism (especially for the case of arabinose) remains suboptimal. Thus, further pathway optimization or identification of novel, optimal pathways is needed. Previously, we identified a novel set of xylan catabolic pathway enzymes from a superior pentose-utilizing strain of Ustilago bevomyces. These enzymes were used to successfully engineer a xylan-utilizing S. cerevisiae through a blended approach of bioprospecting and evolutionary engineering. Here, we expanded this approach to xylose and arabinose catabolic pathway engineering and demonstrated that bioprospected xylose and arabinose catabolic pathways from U. bevomyces offer alternative choices for enabling efficient pentose catabolism in S. cerevisiae. By introducing a novel set of xylose catabolic genes from U. bevomyces, growth rates were improved up to 85 % over a set of traditional Scheffersomyces stipitis pathway genes. In addition, we suggested an alternative arabinose catabolic pathway which, after directed evolution and pathway engineering, enabled S. cerevisiae to grow on arabinose as a sole carbon source in minimal medium with growth rates upwards of 0.05 h(-1). This pathway represents the most efficient growth of yeast on pure arabinose minimal medium. These pathways provide great starting points for further strain development and demonstrate the utility of bioprospecting from U. bevomyces. PMID:26671616

  8. [Mini review] metagenomic studies of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, Hayedeh

    2015-10-23

    Red Sea, and the bio-prospecting potential of the Red Sea microbiota. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of the previous studies and the need for generating a large and representative metagenomic database of the Red Sea to help establish a dynamic model of the Red Sea microbiota.

  9. Glycosylation Engineering of Glycoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadamoto, Reiko; Nishimura, Shin-Ichiro

    Naturally occurring glycosylation of glycoproteins varies in glycosylation site and in the number and structure of glycans. The engineering of well-defined glycoproteins is an important technology for the preparation of pharmaceutically relevant glycoproteins and in the study of the relationship between glycans and proteins on a structure-function level. In pharmaceutical applications of glycoproteins, the presence of terminal sialic acids on glycans is particularly important for the in vivo circulatory half life, since sialic acid-terminated glycans are not recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors. Therefore, there have been a number of attempts to control or modify cellular metabolism toward the expression of glycoproteins with glycosylation profiles similar to that of human glycoproteins. In this chapter, recent methods for glycoprotein engineering in various cell culture systems (mammalian cells, plant, yeast, and E. coli) and advances in the chemical approach to glycoprotein formation are described.

  10. Solid-Phase Random Glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agoston, K.; Kröger, Lars; Dekany, Gyula;

    2009-01-01

    Two different approaches were employed to study solid phase random glycosylations to obtain oligosaccharide libraries. In approach I, Wang resin esters were attached to the acceptors structures. Following their glycosylation and resin cleavage, the peracetylated components of the oligosaccharide...

  11. Bioprospecting of Red Sea Sponges for Novel Antiviral Pharmacophores

    KAUST Repository

    O'Rourke, Aubrie

    2015-05-01

    Natural products offer many possibilities for the treatment of disease. More than 70% of the Earth’s surface is ocean, and recent exploration and access has allowed for new additions to this catalog of natural treasures. The Central Red Sea off the coast of Saudi Arabia serves as a newly accessible location, which provides the opportunity to bioprospect marine sponges with the purpose of identifying novel antiviral scaffolds. Antivirals are underrepresented in present day clinical trials, as well as in the academic screens of marine natural product libraries. Here a high-throughput pipeline was initiated by prefacing the antiviral screen with an Image-based High-Content Screening (HCS) technique in order to identify candidates with antiviral potential. Prospective candidates were tested in a biochemical or cell-based assay for the ability to inhibit the NS3 protease of the West Nile Virus (WNV NS protease) as well as replication and reverse transcription of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 (HIV-1). The analytical chemistry techniques of High-Performance Liquid Chromatograpy (HPLC), Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) where used in order to identify the compounds responsible for the characteristic antiviral activity of the selected sponge fractions. We have identified a 3-alkyl pyridinium from Amphimedon chloros as the causative agent of the observed WNV NS3 protease inhibition in vitro. Additionally, we identified debromohymenialdisine, hymenialdisine, and oroidin from Stylissa carteri as prospective scaffolds capable of HIV-1 inhibition.

  12. Surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes has been inspired by the structure of natural biomem-branes. It refers to that glycosyl groups are introduced onto the membrane surface by various strate-gies, which combine the separation function of the membrane with the biological function of the sac-charides in one system. In this review, progress in the surface glycosylation of polymeric membranes is highlighted in two aspects, i.e. the glycosylation methods and the potential applications of the sur-face-glycosylated membranes.

  13. Ocean microbial metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhof, Lee J.; Goodman, Robert M.

    2009-09-01

    Technology for accessing the genomic DNA of microorganisms, directly from environmental samples without prior cultivation, has opened new vistas to understanding microbial diversity and functions. Especially as applied to soils and the oceans, environments on Earth where microbial diversity is vast, metagenomics and its emergent approaches have the power to transform rapidly our understanding of environmental microbiology. Here we explore select recent applications of the metagenomic suite to ocean microbiology.

  14. Multispectral sorter for rapid, nondestructive optical bioprospecting for algae biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ryan W.; Wu, Hauwen; Singh, Seema

    2014-03-01

    Microalgal biotechnology is a nascent yet burgeoning field for developing the next generation of sustainable feeds, fuels, and specialty chemicals. Among the issues facing the algae bioproducts industry, the lack of efficient means of cultivar screening and phenotype selection represents a critical hurdle for rapid development and diversification. To address this challenge, we have developed a multi-modal and label-free optical tool which simultaneously assesses the photosynthetic productivity and biochemical composition of single microalgal cells, and provides a means for actively sorting attractive specimen (bioprospecting) based on the spectral readout. The device integrates laser-trapping micro-Raman spectroscopy and pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry of microalgal cells in a flow cell. Specifically, the instrument employs a dual-purpose epi-configured IR laser for single-cell trapping and Raman spectroscopy, and a high-intensity VISNIR trans-illumination LED bank for detection of variable photosystem II (PSII) fluorescence. Micro-Raman scatter of single algae cells revealed vibrational modes corresponding to the speciation and total lipid content, as well as other major biochemical pools, including total protein, carbohydrates, and carotenoids. PSII fluorescence dynamics provide a quantitative estimate of maximum photosynthetic efficiency and regulated and non-regulated non-photochemical quenching processes. The combined spectroscopic readouts provide a set of metrics for subsequent optical sorting of the cells by the laser trap for desirable biomass properties, e.g. the combination of high lipid productivity and high photosynthetic yield. Thus the device provides means for rapid evaluation and sorting of algae cultures and environmental samples for biofuels development.

  15. Metagenomic mining for microbiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O; Malandain, Cedric; Prestat, Emmanuel; Larose, Catherine; Monier, Jean-Michel; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M

    2011-12-01

    Microbial ecologists can now start digging into the accumulating mountains of metagenomic data to uncover the occurrence of functional genes and their correlations to microbial community members. Limitations and biases in DNA extraction and sequencing technologies impact sequence distributions, and therefore, have to be considered. However, when comparing metagenomes from widely differing environments, these fluctuations have a relatively minor role in microbial community discrimination. As a consequence, any functional gene or species distribution pattern can be compared among metagenomes originating from various environments and projects. In particular, global comparisons would help to define ecosystem specificities, such as involvement and response to climate change (for example, carbon and nitrogen cycle), human health risks (eg, presence of pathogen species, toxin genes and viruses) and biodegradation capacities. Although not all scientists have easy access to high-throughput sequencing technologies, they do have access to the sequences that have been deposited in databases, and therefore, can begin to intensively mine these metagenomic data to generate hypotheses that can be validated experimentally. Information about metabolic functions and microbial species compositions can already be compared among metagenomes from different ecosystems. These comparisons add to our understanding about microbial adaptation and the role of specific microbes in different ecosystems. Concurrent with the rapid growth of sequencing technologies, we have entered a new age of microbial ecology, which will enable researchers to experimentally confirm putative relationships between microbial functions and community structures. PMID:21593798

  16. Novel α-L-Fucosidases from a Soil Metagenome for Production of Fucosylated Human Milk Oligosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lezyk, Mateusz Jakub; Jers, Carsten; Kjaerulff, Louise;

    2016-01-01

    -derived metagenome library and expressed in E. coli as recombinant 6xHis-tagged proteins. All seven fucosidases belong to glycosyl hydrolase family 29 (GH 29). Six of the seven α-L-fucosidases were substrate-inhibited, moderately thermostable and most hydrolytically active in the pH range 6-7, when tested with para......-condensation) or to lactose. With the α-L-fucosidase from Thermotoga maritima and the metagenome-derived Mfuc5, different fucosyllactose variants including the principal fucosylated HMO 2'-fucosyllactose were synthesised in yields of up to ~6.4%. Mfuc5 was able to release fucose from xyloglucan and could also use...

  17. Recent progresses in metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metagenomics addresses the collective genetic structure and functional composition of a microbial community at its native habitat. This approach has emerged as a powerful tool to study the structure and function of the microbiota for the past few years and is revolutionizing studies of microbial ec...

  18. Bioprospecting of strains of Streptococcus thermophilus from Indian fermented milk products for folate production

    OpenAIRE

    Iyer, Ramya; Tomar, Sudhir Kumar; Mohanty, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Prashant; Singh, Rameshwar

    2011-01-01

    International audience This study deals with the bio-prospecting of folate producing strains of Streptococcus thermophilus isolated from milk and different fermented milk products of Indian origin. From a total of 500 randomly selected colonies isolated from 209 different samples, 117 isolates were identified as S. thermophilus by classical biochemical and molecular characterization. Frequency of incidence of S. thermophilus in the different samples of milk and milk products was variable w...

  19. Beyond biodiversity: fish metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ardura

    Full Text Available Biodiversity and intra-specific genetic diversity are interrelated and determine the potential of a community to survive and evolve. Both are considered together in Prokaryote communities treated as metagenomes or ensembles of functional variants beyond species limits.Many factors alter biodiversity in higher Eukaryote communities, and human exploitation can be one of the most important for some groups of plants and animals. For example, fisheries can modify both biodiversity and genetic diversity (intra specific. Intra-specific diversity can be drastically altered by overfishing. Intense fishing pressure on one stock may imply extinction of some genetic variants and subsequent loss of intra-specific diversity. The objective of this study was to apply a metagenome approach to fish communities and explore its value for rapid evaluation of biodiversity and genetic diversity at community level. Here we have applied the metagenome approach employing the barcoding target gene coi as a model sequence in catch from four very different fish assemblages exploited by fisheries: freshwater communities from the Amazon River and northern Spanish rivers, and marine communities from the Cantabric and Mediterranean seas.Treating all sequences obtained from each regional catch as a biological unit (exploited community we found that metagenomic diversity indices of the Amazonian catch sample here examined were lower than expected. Reduced diversity could be explained, at least partially, by overexploitation of the fish community that had been independently estimated by other methods.We propose using a metagenome approach for estimating diversity in Eukaryote communities and early evaluating genetic variation losses at multi-species level.

  20. Soil metagenomics and tropical soil productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Garrett, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    This presentation summarizes research in the soil metagenomics cross cutting research activity. Soil metagenomics studies soil microbial communities as contributors to soil health.C CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  1. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Summary: As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for the best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of the bioinformatic analysis step by step. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning ...

  2. A primer on metagenomics.

    OpenAIRE

    Wooley, John C.; Adam Godzik; Iddo Friedberg

    2010-01-01

    Metagenomics is a discipline that enables the genomic study of uncultured microorganisms. Faster, cheaper sequencing technologies and the ability to sequence uncultured microbes sampled directly from their habitats are expanding and transforming our view of the microbial world. Distilling meaningful information from the millions of new genomic sequences presents a serious challenge to bioinformaticians. In cultured microbes, the genomic data come from a single clone, making sequence assembly ...

  3. Methods for comparative metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Auch Alexander F; Mitra Suparna; Richter Daniel C; Huson Daniel H; Schuster Stephan C

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Metagenomics is a rapidly growing field of research that aims at studying uncultured organisms to understand the true diversity of microbes, their functions, cooperation and evolution, in environments such as soil, water, ancient remains of animals, or the digestive system of animals and humans. The recent development of ultra-high throughput sequencing technologies, which do not require cloning or PCR amplification, and can produce huge numbers of DNA reads at an affordab...

  4. The YNP metagenome project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inskeep, William P.; Jay, Zackary J.; Tringe, Susannah G.;

    2013-01-01

    The Yellowstone geothermal complex contains over 10,000 diverse geothermal features that host numerous phylogenetically deeply rooted and poorly understood archaea, bacteria, and viruses. Microbial communities in high-temperature environments are generally less diverse than soil, marine, sediment......, and environmental variables. Twenty geochemically distinct geothermal ecosystems representing a broad spectrum of Yellowstone hot-spring environments were used for metagenomic and geochemical analysis and included approximately equal numbers of: (1) phototrophic mats, (2) “filamentous streamer” communities, and (3...

  5. Databases of the marine metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-10-28

    The metagenomic data obtained from marine environments is significantly useful for understanding marine microbial communities. In comparison with the conventional amplicon-based approach of metagenomics, the recent shotgun sequencing-based approach has become a powerful tool that provides an efficient way of grasping a diversity of the entire microbial community at a sampling point in the sea. However, this approach accelerates accumulation of the metagenome data as well as increase of data complexity. Moreover, when metagenomic approach is used for monitoring a time change of marine environments at multiple locations of the seawater, accumulation of metagenomics data will become tremendous with an enormous speed. Because this kind of situation has started becoming of reality at many marine research institutions and stations all over the world, it looks obvious that the data management and analysis will be confronted by the so-called Big Data issues such as how the database can be constructed in an efficient way and how useful knowledge should be extracted from a vast amount of the data. In this review, we summarize the outline of all the major databases of marine metagenome that are currently publically available, noting that database exclusively on marine metagenome is none but the number of metagenome databases including marine metagenome data are six, unexpectedly still small. We also extend our explanation to the databases, as reference database we call, that will be useful for constructing a marine metagenome database as well as complementing important information with the database. Then, we would point out a number of challenges to be conquered in constructing the marine metagenome database.

  6. Microbial Metagenomics: Beyond the Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Dupont, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomics literally means “beyond the genome.” Marine microbial metagenomic databases presently comprise ˜400 billion base pairs of DNA, only ˜3% of that found in 1 ml of seawater. Very soon a trillion-base-pair sequence run will be feasible, so it is time to reflect on what we have learned from metagenomics. We review the impact of metagenomics on our understanding of marine microbial communities. We consider the studies facilitated by data generated through the Global Ocean Sampling expedition, as well as the revolution wrought at the individual laboratory level through next generation sequencing technologies. We review recent studies and discoveries since 2008, provide a discussion of bioinformatic analyses, including conceptual pipelines and sequence annotation and predict the future of metagenomics, with suggestions of collaborative community studies tailored toward answering some of the fundamental questions in marine microbial ecology.

  7. Current and future resources for functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Kathy Nguyen Lam; Jiujun eCheng; Katja eEngel; Josh David Neufeld; Trevor Carlos Charles

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomics is a powerful experimental approach for studying gene function, starting from the extracted DNA of mixed microbial populations. A functional approach relies on the construction and screening of metagenomic libraries – physical libraries that contain DNA cloned from environmental metagenomes. The information obtained from functional metagenomics can help in future annotations of gene function and serve as a complement to sequence-based metagenomics. In this Perspective,...

  8. Current and future resources for functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Kathy N.; Cheng, Jiujun; Engel, Katja; Neufeld, Josh D.; Charles, Trevor C.

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomics is a powerful experimental approach for studying gene function, starting from the extracted DNA of mixed microbial populations. A functional approach relies on the construction and screening of metagenomic libraries—physical libraries that contain DNA cloned from environmental metagenomes. The information obtained from functional metagenomics can help in future annotations of gene function and serve as a complement to sequence-based metagenomics. In this Perspective, w...

  9. Molecular biology, a tool for bioprospection of plants secondary metabolism in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Palacios Rojas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant secondary metabolites play an important role in plant-plant, plant-microorganisms and plant-insect interactions. They also protect the plants against stress environmental conditions. Plant secondary metabolites are also very important to humans due to their nutritional, pharmaceutical, medical and industrial properties. However, the secondary metabolism of tropical plant species still remains very poorly understood and characterised at the biochemical, molecular and genetic level. Within bioprospection programs to study the biodiversity of Colombian plants, the secondary metabolism is a very important target. Here we present an experimental methodology based on genomic DNA isolation from field collected plants, and the use of degenerate primers to PCR amplify genes that encodes pyridoxal-dependent enzymes which are involved in the alkaloids biosynthesis. Based on sequence homology we designed degenerate primers to amplify conserved gene sequences from 18 different plant families. Six putative tydc/tdc decarboxylases sequences were obtained from plants of the Piper genus. This report shows the usefulness of the DNA collection and PCR-based methodology e to increase the understanding and exploration of the secondary metabolism of Colombian plants. Key words: Bioprospection, secondary metabolism, degenerate primer, microarrays, PLP-dependent decarboxylases.

  10. Bioprospecting the African Renaissance: The new value of muthi in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihling Hanspeter CW

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article gives an overview of anthropological research on bioprospecting in general and of available literature related to bioprospecting particularly in South Africa. It points out how new insights on value regimes concerning plant-based medicines may be gained through further research and is meant to contribute to a critical discussion about the ethics of Access and Benefit Sharing (ABS. In South Africa, traditional healers, plant gatherers, petty traders, researchers and private investors are assembled around the issues of standardization and commercialization of knowledge about plants. This coincides with a nation-building project which promotes the revitalization of local knowledge within the so called African Renaissance. A social science analysis of the transformation of so called Traditional Medicine (TM may shed light onto this renaissance by tracing social arenas in which different regimes of value are brought into conflict. When medicinal plants turn into assets in a national and global economy, they seem to be manipulated and transformed in relation to their capacity to promote health, their market value, and their potential to construct new ethics of development. In this context, the translation of socially and culturally situated local knowledge about muthi into global pharmaceuticals creates new forms of agency as well as new power differentials between the different actors involved.

  11. Enzymatic glycosylation of multivalent scaffolds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bojarová, Pavla; Rosencrantz, R. R.; Elling, L.; Křen, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 11 (2013), s. 4774-4797. ISSN 0306-0012 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13042; GA ČR GAP207/10/0321 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINYLTRANSFERASE-III * MUCIN TANDEM REPEAT * NEIGHBORING RESIDUE GLYCOSYLATION Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 30.425, year: 2013

  12. Metagenomic small molecule discovery methods

    OpenAIRE

    Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Milshteyn, Aleksandr; Brady, Sean F

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches to natural product discovery provide the means of harvesting bioactive small molecules synthesized by environmental bacteria without the requirement of first culturing these organisms. Advances in sequencing technologies and general metagenomic methods are beginning to provide the tools necessary to unlock the unexplored biosynthetic potential encoded by the genomes of uncultured environmental bacteria. Here, we highlight recent advances in sequence- and functional- bas...

  13. Metagenomics: An Application Based Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Yasir Bashir; Salam Pradeep Singh; Bolin Kumar Konwar

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomics deals with the isolation of genetic material directly recovered from environmental samples. Metagenomics as an approach has emerged over the past two decades to elucidate a host of microbial communities inhabiting a specific niche with the goal of understanding their genetic diversity, population structure, and ecological role played by them. A number of new and novel molecules with significant functionalities and applications have been identified through this approach. In fact, ...

  14. Promiscuous enzymes from functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Colin, Pierre-Yves; Kintses, Balint; Gielen, Fabrice; Miton, Charlotte; Fischer, Gerhard; Mahomed, Mark; HYVONEN, Marko; Morgavi, Diego P.; Janssen, Dick B.; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Unculturable bacterial communities provide a rich source of biocatalysts, but their experimental discovery by functional metagenomics is difficult, because the odds are stacked against the experimentor. Here we demonstrate functional screening of a million-membered metagenomic library in microfluidic picolitre droplet compartments. Using bait substrates, new hydrolases for sulfate monoesters and phosphotriesters were identified, mostly based on promiscuous activities presumed not to be under ...

  15. Machine learning for metagenomics: methods and tools

    OpenAIRE

    Soueidan, Hayssam; Nikolski, Macha

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the complexity and variability of metagenomic studies, modern machine learning approaches have seen increased usage to answer a variety of question encompassing the full range of metagenomic NGS data analysis. We review here the contribution of machine learning techniques for the field of metagenomics, by presenting known successful approaches in a unified framework. This review focuses on five important metagenomic problems: OTU-clustering, binning, taxonomic profling and assignment...

  16. Neurology of inherited glycosylation disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Freeze, HH; Eklund, E A; Ng, BG; Patterson, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise most of the nearly 70 genetic disorders known to be caused by impaired synthesis of glycoconjugates. The effects are expressed in most organ systems, and most involve the nervous system. Typical manifestations include structural abnormalities, (eg, rapidly progressive cerebellar atrophy), myopathies (including congenital muscular dystrophies and limb-girdle dystrophies), strokes and stroke-like episodes, epileptic seizures, developmental delay, a...

  17. N-glycosylation in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Ivan G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-linked glycosylation of secretory and membrane proteins is the most complex posttranslational modification known to occur in eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to play critical roles in modulating protein function. Although this important biological process has been extensively studied in mammals, much less is known about this biosynthetic pathway in plants. The enzymes involved in plant N-glycan biosynthesis and processing are still not well defined and the mechanism of their genetic regulation is almost completely unknown. In this paper we describe our first attempt to understand the N-linked glycosylation mechanism in a plant species by using the data generated by the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST project. The SUCEST database was mined for sugarcane gene products potentially involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. This approach has led to the identification and functional assignment of 90 expressed sequence tag (EST clusters sharing significant sequence similarity with the enzymes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis and processing. The ESTs identified were also analyzed to establish their relative abundance.

  18. Web Resources for Metagenomics Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pravin Dudhagara; Sunil Bhavsar; Chintan Bhagat; Anjana Ghelani; Shreyas Bhatt; Rajesh Patel

    2015-01-01

    The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms spawned an enormous volume of data. This explosion in data has unearthed new scalability challenges for existing bioinformatics tools. The analysis of metagenomic sequences using bioinformatics pipelines is complicated by the substantial complexity of these data. In this article, we review several commonly-used online tools for metagenomics data analysis with respect to their quality and detail of analysis using simulated metagenomics data. There are at least a dozen such software tools presently available in the public domain. Among them, MGRAST, IMG/M, and METAVIR are the most well-known tools according to the number of citations by peer-reviewed scientific media up to mid-2015. Here, we describe 12 online tools with respect to their web link, annotation pipelines, clustering methods, online user support, and availability of data storage. We have also done the rating for each tool to screen more potential and preferential tools and evaluated five best tools using synthetic metagenome. The article comprehensively deals with the contemporary problems and the prospects of metagenomics from a bioinformatics viewpoint.

  19. Ethnodiagnostic skills of the Digo community for malaria: a lead to traditional bioprospecting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mwanzia Nguta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a major public health problem that is presently complicated by the development of resistance by Plasmodium falciparum to the mainstay drugs. Thus, new drugs with unique structures and mechanism of action are required to treat drug-resistant strains of malaria. Historically, compounds containing a novel structure from natural origin represent a major source for the discovery and development of new drugs for several diseases. This paper presents ethnophytotherapeutic remedies, ethnodiagnostic skills and related traditional knowledge utilized by the Digo community of the Kenyan Coast to diagnose malaria as a lead to traditional bioprospecting. The current study was carried out in three Digo villages of Diani sub-location between May 2009 and December 2009. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews, and open and close-ended questionnaires. A total of sixty (60 respondents (34 men and 26 women provided the targeted information. The results show that the indigenous knowledge of Digo community on malaria encompasses not only the symptoms of malaria but also the factors that are responsible for causing malaria, attributes favoring the breeding of mosquitoes and practices employed to guard against mosquito bites or to protect households against malaria. This knowledge is closely in harmony with scientific approaches to the treatment and control of the disease. The Digo community uses sixty (60 medicinal plants distributed in fifty two (52 genera and twenty seven(27 families to treat malaria. The most frequently mentioned symptoms were fever, joint pains and vomiting while the most frequently mentioned practices employed to guard against mosquito bites and/or to protect households against malaria was burning of herbal plants such as Ocimum suave and ingestion of herbal decoctions and concoctions. The Digo community has abundant ethnodiagnostic skills for malaria which forms the basis of their traditional bioprospecting techniques.

  20. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    glycosylation sites could be excluded as explanation for the differential reactivity. The latency transition of non-glycosylated, but not of glycosylated PAI-1, was strongly accelerated by a non-ionic detergent. The different biochemical properties of glycosylated and non-glycosylated PAI-1 depended...

  1. Study Bioprospecting of Medicinal Plant Extracts of the Semiarid Northeast: Contribution to the Control of Oral Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Suênia P. Silva; Deysiane O. Brandão; Chaves, Thiago P.; Formiga Filho, Amaro L. N.; Costa, Edja Maria M. de B.; Santos, Vanda L.; Medeiros, Ana Cláudia D.

    2012-01-01

    Dental pathologies can be caused by plaque-forming bacteria and yeast, which reside in the oral cavity. The bacteria growing in dental plaque, a naturally occurring biofilm, display increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. The objective was the evaluation of a preclinical assay of medicinal plants of the semiarid region from the northeast against oral pathogenic microorganism, aiming at bioprospecting a new product. The selection of plant material for this study was based on the ethnobot...

  2. A novel cold active esterase derived from Colombian high Andean forest soil metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Diego Javier; Montaña, José Salvador; Alvarez, Diana; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    In order to search new lipolytic enzymes and conduct bioprospecting of microbial communities from high Andean forest soil, a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clones was constructed in Escherichia coli using plasmid p-Bluescript II SK+. The library covered 80 Mb of the metagenomic DNA mainly from Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. Two clones with lipolytic activity in tributyrin as a substrate were recovered. Clone BAA3G2 (pSK-estGX1) was selected and the entire 4.6 Kb insert sequence was determined. The sequence had a GC content of 70.6% and could be derived from an undescribed Actinobacteria genome. One open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (gene estGX1) with a molecular mass of 22.4 kDa that contained the pentapeptide G-P-S-G-G near the N-terminus essential for lipase activity and the putative catalytic triad was identified, also a putative ribosomal binding site located 18 bp upstream the estGX1 ATG start codon was identified. The phylogenetic analysis suggested that the protein belonged to a new lipase family. The secreted enzyme showed a preference for short length fatty acids, with specific activity against p-nitrophenyl-butyrate (0.142 U/mg of total protein), it was cold active with relative activity of 30% at 10°C and moderately thermo active with relative activity of 80% at 50°C and had a pH optimum of 8.0 at 40°C. PMID:22806812

  3. Metagenomic analysis of microbial communities and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, Lars

    2014-01-01

    From small clone libraries to large next-generation sequencing datasets – the field of community genomics or metagenomics has developed tremendously within the last years. This chapter will summarize some of these developments and will also highlight pitfalls of current metagenomic analyses....... It will illustrate the general workflow of a metagenomic study and introduce the three different metagenomic approaches: (1) the random shotgun approach that focuses on the metagenome as a whole, (2) the targeted approach that focuses on metagenomic amplicon sequences, and (3) the function-driven approach that uses...... heterologous expression of metagenomic DNA fragments to discover novel metabolic functions. Lastly, the chapter will shortly discuss the meta-analysis of gene expression of microbial communities, more precisely metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics....

  4. Functional Intestinal Metagenomics (Chapter 18)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogert, van den B.; Leimena, M.M.; Vos, de W.M.; Zoetendal, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    The premiere two-volume reference on revelations from studying complex microbial communities in many distinct habitats Metagenomics is an emerging field that has changed the way microbiologists study microorganisms. It involves the genomic analysis of microorganisms by extraction and cloning of DNA

  5. Estimating richness from phage metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteriophages are important drivers of ecosystem functions, yet little is known about the vast majority of phages. Phage metagenomics, or the study of the collective genome of an assemblage of phages, enables the investigation of broad ecological questions in phage communities. One ecological cha...

  6. Synthesis of oligosaccharides using per-O-trimethylsilyl-glycosyl iodides as glycosyl donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Cui, Yanli; Zou, Rong; Cheng, Zhaodong; Yao, Weirong; Mao, Yangyi; Zhang, Yongmin

    2016-06-01

    Trimethylsilyl (TMS) protecting group has been found to be very useful for the simultaneous protection of both the glycosyl donor- and the acceptor-substrates in oligosaccharide synthesis. Thus, while the per-O-trimethylsilylated glycosyl iodides served as the glycosyl donor, those bearing selectively exposed primary hydroxyl groups were found suitable as the glycosyl acceptor for the reaction. The cheap and commercially available trialkylamine, triethylamine was found to be an effective promoter for the glycosylation. Importantly, the reaction was α-stereospecific and gave the products in 58%-78% yields. PMID:27077820

  7. Exploration of soil metagenome diversity for prospection of enzymes involved in lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, T.M.; Squina, F.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paixao, D.A.A.; Franco Cairo, J.P.L.; Buchli, F.; Ruller, R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Bioetanol (CTBE), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Prade, R. [Oklahoma State University, Sillwater, OK (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Metagenomics allows access to genetic information encoded in DNA of microorganisms recalcitrant to cultivation. They represent a reservoir of novel biocatalyst with potential application in environmental friendly techniques aiming to overcome the dependence on fossil fuels and also to diminish air and water pollution. The focus of our work is the generation of a tool kit of lignocellulolytic enzymes from soil metagenome, which could be used for second generation ethanol production. Environmental samples were collected at a sugarcane field after harvesting, where it is expected that the microbial population involved on lignocellulose degradation was enriched due to the presence of straws covering the soil. Sugarcane Bagasse-Degrading-Soil (SBDS) metagenome was massively-parallel-454-Roche-sequenced. We identified a full repertoire of genes with significant match to glycosyl hydrolases catalytic domain and carbohydrate-binding modules. Soil metagenomics libraries cloned into pUC19 were screened through functional assays. CMC-agar screening resulted in positive clones, revealing new cellulases coding genes. Through a CMC-zymogram it was possible to observe that one of these genes, nominated as E-1, corresponds to an enzyme that is secreted to the extracellular medium, suggesting that the cloned gene carried the original signal peptide. Enzymatic assays and analysis through capillary electrophoresis showed that E-1 was able to cleave internal glycosidic bonds of cellulose. New rounds of functional screenings through chromogenic substrates are being conducted aiming the generation of a library of lignocellulolytic enzymes derived from soil metagenome, which may become key component for development of second generation biofuels. (author)

  8. Exploration of soil metagenome diversity for prospection of enzymes involved in lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Metagenomics allows access to genetic information encoded in DNA of microorganisms recalcitrant to cultivation. They represent a reservoir of novel biocatalyst with potential application in environmental friendly techniques aiming to overcome the dependence on fossil fuels and also to diminish air and water pollution. The focus of our work is the generation of a tool kit of lignocellulolytic enzymes from soil metagenome, which could be used for second generation ethanol production. Environmental samples were collected at a sugarcane field after harvesting, where it is expected that the microbial population involved on lignocellulose degradation was enriched due to the presence of straws covering the soil. Sugarcane Bagasse-Degrading-Soil (SBDS) metagenome was massively-parallel-454-Roche-sequenced. We identified a full repertoire of genes with significant match to glycosyl hydrolases catalytic domain and carbohydrate-binding modules. Soil metagenomics libraries cloned into pUC19 were screened through functional assays. CMC-agar screening resulted in positive clones, revealing new cellulases coding genes. Through a CMC-zymogram it was possible to observe that one of these genes, nominated as E-1, corresponds to an enzyme that is secreted to the extracellular medium, suggesting that the cloned gene carried the original signal peptide. Enzymatic assays and analysis through capillary electrophoresis showed that E-1 was able to cleave internal glycosidic bonds of cellulose. New rounds of functional screenings through chromogenic substrates are being conducted aiming the generation of a library of lignocellulolytic enzymes derived from soil metagenome, which may become key component for development of second generation biofuels. (author)

  9. Subtractive assembly for comparative metagenomics, and its application to type 2 diabetes metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Mingjie; Doak, Thomas G.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Comparative metagenomics remains challenging due to the size and complexity of metagenomic datasets. Here we introduce subtractive assembly, a de novo assembly approach for comparative metagenomics that directly assembles only the differential reads that distinguish between two groups of metagenomes. Using simulated datasets, we show it improves both the efficiency of the assembly and the assembly quality of the differential genomes and genes. Further, its application to type 2 diabetes (T2D)...

  10. An application of statistics to comparative metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohwer Forest

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics, sequence analyses of genomic DNA isolated directly from the environments, can be used to identify organisms and model community dynamics of a particular ecosystem. Metagenomics also has the potential to identify significantly different metabolic potential in different environments. Results Here we use a statistical method to compare curated subsystems, to predict the physiology, metabolism, and ecology from metagenomes. This approach can be used to identify those subsystems that are significantly different between metagenome sequences. Subsystems that were overrepresented in the Sargasso Sea and Acid Mine Drainage metagenome when compared to non-redundant databases were identified. Conclusion The methodology described herein applies statistics to the comparisons of metabolic potential in metagenomes. This analysis reveals those subsystems that are more, or less, represented in the different environments that are compared. These differences in metabolic potential lead to several testable hypotheses about physiology and metabolism of microbes from these ecosystems.

  11. An application of statistics to comparative metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rohwer Forest; Rodriguez-Brito Beltran; Edwards Robert A

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Metagenomics, sequence analyses of genomic DNA isolated directly from the environments, can be used to identify organisms and model community dynamics of a particular ecosystem. Metagenomics also has the potential to identify significantly different metabolic potential in different environments. Results Here we use a statistical method to compare curated subsystems, to predict the physiology, metabolism, and ecology from metagenomes. This approach can be used to identify t...

  12. Metagenomic Detection Methods in Biopreparedness Outbreak Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Oskar Erik; Hansen, Trine; Knutsson, Rickard;

    2013-01-01

    of a clinical sample, creating a metagenome, in a single week of laboratory work. As new technologies emerge, their dissemination and capacity building must be facilitated, and criteria for use, as well as guidelines on how to report results, must be established. This article focuses on the use of metagenomics......, gaps in research, and future directions. Examples of metagenomic detection, as well as possible applications of the methods, are described in various biopreparedness outbreak scenarios....

  13. Exploration of noncoding sequences in metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Tobar-Tosse

    Full Text Available Environment-dependent genomic features have been defined for different metagenomes, whose genes and their associated processes are related to specific environments. Identification of ORFs and their functional categories are the most common methods for association between functional and environmental features. However, this analysis based on finding ORFs misses noncoding sequences and, therefore, some metagenome regulatory or structural information could be discarded. In this work we analyzed 23 whole metagenomes, including coding and noncoding sequences using the following sequence patterns: (G+C content, Codon Usage (Cd, Trinucleotide Usage (Tn, and functional assignments for ORF prediction. Herein, we present evidence of a high proportion of noncoding sequences discarded in common similarity-based methods in metagenomics, and the kind of relevant information present in those. We found a high density of trinucleotide repeat sequences (TRS in noncoding sequences, with a regulatory and adaptive function for metagenome communities. We present associations between trinucleotide values and gene function, where metagenome clustering correlate with microorganism adaptations and kinds of metagenomes. We propose here that noncoding sequences have relevant information to describe metagenomes that could be considered in a whole metagenome analysis in order to improve their organization, classification protocols, and their relation with the environment.

  14. Role of marine bioprospecting contracts in developing access and benefit sharing mechanism for marine traditional knowledge holders in the pharmaceutical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Bhatia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable growth of bio-based industry has led to a rapid increase in the bioprospecting activities. The marine biomes are a rich reservoir of unique life systems making them an attractive target for bioprospecting for identification and development of potential drug molecules for human therapeutics. Many of the drug molecules such as ara-c, trabecetidin and eribulin have been discovered from marine organisms. It is noteworthy that indigenous communities have developed, preserved as well as evolved the marine traditional knowledge from one generation to next. Pharmaceutical companies utilize marine life based traditional knowledge developed by the communities at various stages of drug development, unfortunately, many a times without having a mechanism of access and benefit sharing in place. One such example is the marine bioprospecting Fiji contract that illustrates the role played by Fijian community and the lacuna in access and benefit sharing mechanisms. The present study is an attempt to explore the mechanism of fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising from use of marine bioresources with the local communities as marine traditional knowledge holders in marine areas. It briefly describes the various international conventions and protocols that emphasize on the development of fair and equitable benefit sharing mechanisms. The study proposes marine bioprospecting contracts that are based on mutually agreed terms among the key stakeholders (the State with the genetic resources, traditional knowledge holders and marine bioprospectors. Marine bioprospecting contracts eventually will need to be customized as per the legislation of a country because of territorial nature of law. Also, the marine bioprospecting contracts will differ from other bioprospecting contracts due to various unique parameters associated with the activity such as economics of deep sea explorations (expensive processes of exploration and sample extraction

  15. Bioprospecting of Marine Invertebrates for New Natural Products — A Chemical and Zoogeographical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Calado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Bioprospecting for new marine natural products (NPs has increased significantly over the last decades, leading to an unprecedented discovery of new molecules. Marine invertebrates have been the most important source of these NPs, with researchers commonly targeting particular taxonomic groups, marine regions and/or molecules from specific chemical groups. The present review focuses on new NPs identified from marine invertebrates between 2000 and 2009, and performs a detailed analysis on: (1 the chemical groups of these NPs; (2 the association of particular chemical groups to specific marine invertebrate taxa; and (3 the yielding of molecules from the same chemical group from organisms occurring in a particular geographic region. Our survey revealed an increasing number of new terpenoids being discovered between 2000 and 2009, contrasting with the decreasing trend in the discovery of new alkaloids and aliphatic molecules. Overall, no particular association was identified between marine invertebrate taxa and chemical groups of new NPs. Nonetheless, it is worth noting that most NPs recorded from cnidarians and mollusks were terpenoids, while most NPs identified in echinoderms were aliphatic compounds or carbohydrates. The geographical trends observed in our study do not support the idea of particular chemical groups of new NPs being associated with marine invertebrates from any specific geographical region, as NPs from different chemical groups were commonly distributed worldwide.

  16. Bioprospecting for hyper-lipid producing microalgal strains for sustainable biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanda, T; Ramesh, D; Karthikeyan, S; Kumari, S; Anandraj, A; Bux, F

    2011-01-01

    Global petroleum reserves are shrinking at a fast pace, increasing the demand for alternate fuels. Microalgae have the ability to grow rapidly, and synthesize and accumulate large amounts (approximately 20-50% of dry weight) of neutral lipid stored in cytosolic lipid bodies. A successful and economically viable algae based biofuel industry mainly depends on the selection of appropriate algal strains. The main focus of bioprospecting for microalgae is to identify unique high lipid producing microalgae from different habitats. Indigenous species of microalgae with high lipid yields are especially valuable in the biofuel industry. Isolation, purification and identification of natural microalgal assemblages using conventional techniques is generally time consuming. However, the recent use of micromanipulation as a rapid isolating tool allows for a higher screening throughput. The appropriate media and growth conditions are also important for successful microalgal proliferation. Environmental parameters recorded at the sampling site are necessary to optimize in vitro growth. Identification of species generally requires a combination of morphological and genetic characterization. The selected microalgal strains are grown in upscale systems such as raceway ponds or photobireactors for biomass and lipid production. This paper reviews the recent methodologies adopted for site selection, sampling, strain selection and identification, optimization of cultural conditions for superior lipid yield for biofuel production. Energy generation routes of microalgal lipids and biomass are discussed in detail. PMID:20624676

  17. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni; Thøgersen, Ida; Andreasen, Peter; Enghild, Jan Johannes

    sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627......-636). In contrast, PAI-1, containing a total of 26 Ser and 26 Thr residues, which are potential targets for O-linked glycosylation, was found to be devoid of N-acetyl-galactosamine, demonstrating the absence of O-linked glycosylation. Analysis of PAI-1 variants with mutational inactivation of each of the...

  18. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni; Thøgersen, Ida; Andreasen, Peter; Enghild, Jan J.

    2002-01-01

    sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627......-636). In contrast, PAI-1, containing a total of 26 Ser and 26 Thr residues, which are potential targets for O-linked glycosylation, was found to be devoid of N-acetyl-galactosamine, demonstrating the absence of O-linked glycosylation. Analysis of PAI-1 variants with mutational inactivation of each of the...

  19. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni; Thøgersen, Ida; Andreasen, Peter; Enghild, Jan Johannes

    sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627...... sequences utilized for N-linked glycosylation by Fluorophore Assisted Carbohydrate Electrophoresis (FACE), showed a different N-linked glycosylation profile of the glycans at each of the 2 sites. The exact structure of the carbohydrate chains at each of these 2 sequences are being determined using MALDI...

  20. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  1. Construction and screening of marine metagenomic libraries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, Nancy; Löscher, Carolin; Metzger, Rebekka;

    2010-01-01

    microbial consortia on marine tissues of multicellular organisms are rich sources for isolating novel bioactive compounds and genes. Here we describe the sampling, construction of large-insert metagenomic libraries from marine habitats and exemplarily one function based screen of metagenomic clones....

  2. Stable isotope probing: uses in metagenomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, O.; Musilová, L.; Demnerová, K.; Macek, Tomáš; Macková, M.

    Wymondham: Caister Academic Press, 2011 - (Marco, D.), s. 89-97 ISBN 978-1-904455-87-5 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Metagenomics * stable isotope probing * high-throughput sequencing * microbial ecology Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics http://www.horizonpress.com/ metagenomics -advances

  3. Undergraduate Urban Metagenomics Research Module †

    OpenAIRE

    Muth, Theodore R.; McEntee, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    The undergraduate urban metagenomics research module is an adaptable and tractable project that can be incorporated into exisiting microbiology, ecology, bioinformatics, introductory biology or other courses.  The module takes advantage of recent advances in metagenomics and next generation sequencing, giving students an opportunity to apply these current technologies to novel questions regarding microbial community diversity and dynamics.

  4. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Piacente; Matteo Gaglianone; Maria Elena Laugieri; Tonetti, Michela G.

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observ...

  5. Altered tumor cell glycosylation promotes metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    LuborBorsig

    2014-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells is associated with aberrant glycosylation presented on the cell-surface. Commonly observed changes in glycan structures during malignancy encompasses aberrant expression and glycosylation of mucins; abnormal branching of N-glycans; and increased presence of sialic acid on proteins and glycolipids. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the presence of certain glycan structures correlates with cancer progression by affecting tumor cell invasiveness, ab...

  6. Congenital disorders of glycosylation with neonatal presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Resende, Catarina; Carvalho, Carmen; Alegria, Artur; Oliveira, Dulce; Quelhas, Dulce; Bandeira, Anabela; Proença, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of hereditary diseases characterised by deficiency of enzymes involved in proteins glycosylation. We describe the clinical case of a neonate with CDG type 1a, nowadays designated phosphomannomutase 2 (PMM2)-CDG. Physical examination showed an abnormal facies, axial hypotonia, abnormal fat distribution, inverted nipples, non-palpable testicles and arachnodactyly. Progressive multiple system organ involvement and worsening of hypertrophic ...

  7. Diversity in protein glycosylation among insect species

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenborre, Gianni; Smagghe, Guy; Ghesquière, Bart; Menschaert, Gerben; Rao, Nagender; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Els

    2011-01-01

    Background: A very common protein modification in multicellular organisms is protein glycosylation or the addition of carbohydrate structures to the peptide backbone. Although the Class of the Insecta is the largest animal taxon on Earth, almost all information concerning glycosylation in insects is derived from studies with only one species, namely the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this report, the differences in glycoproteomes between insects belon...

  8. Lymphatic Edema in Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Verstegen, Ruud HJ.; Theodore, Miranda; Klerk, Hans; Morava, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of metabolic disorders caused by deficient protein glycosylation. PMM2-CDG, the most common CDG, is caused by phosphomannomutase (PMM) deficiency. Clinical symptoms often include neurological involvement in addition to dysmorphic features, failure to thrive, cardiac failure, renal, and endocrine abnormalities. To our knowledge, lymphatic edema in CDG has not been reported. We present two cases of lymphatic edema in PMM2-CDG patients. The...

  9. A retrospective metagenomics approach to studying Blastocystis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lee O'Brien; Bonde, Ida; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2015-01-01

    Blastocystis is a common single-celled intestinal parasitic genus, comprising several subtypes. Here, we screened data obtained by metagenomic analysis of faecal DNA for Blastocystis by searching for subtype-specific genes in coabundance gene groups, which are groups of genes that covary across......- and Prevotella-driven enterotypes. This is the first study to investigate the relationship between Blastocystis and communities of gut bacteria using a metagenomics approach. The study serves as an example of how it is possible to retrospectively investigate microbial eukaryotic communities in the gut using...... metagenomic datasets targeting the bacterial component of the intestinal microbiome and the interplay between these microbial communities....

  10. Bioprospecting finds the toughest biological material: extraordinary silk from a giant riverine orb spider.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingi Agnarsson

    into the river. This hypothesis predicts that rapid change in material properties of silk co-occurred with ecological shifts within the genus, and can thus be tested by combining material science, behavioral observations, and phylogenetics. Our findings highlight the potential benefits of natural history-informed bioprospecting to discover silks, as well as other materials, with novel and exceptional properties to serve as models in biomimicry.

  11. Comparative metagenomics of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-26

    Metagenome produces a tremendous amount of data that comes from the organisms living in the environments. This big data enables us to examine not only microbial genes but also the community structure, interaction and adaptation mechanisms at the specific location and condition. The Red Sea has several unique characteristics such as high salinity, high temperature and low nutrition. These features must contribute to form the unique microbial community during the evolutionary process. Since 2014, we started monthly samplings of the metagenomes in the Red Sea under KAUST-CCF project. In collaboration with Kitasato University, we also collected the metagenome data from the ocean in Japan, which shows contrasting features to the Red Sea. Therefore, the comparative metagenomics of those data provides a comprehensive view of the Red Sea microbes, leading to identify key microbes, genes and networks related to those environmental differences.

  12. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha;

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laborato......We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing...... laboratories and fed either a low-fat or high-fat diet. Similar to the human gut microbiome, >99% of the cataloged genes are bacterial. We identified 541 metagenomic species and defined a core set of 26 metagenomic species found in 95% of the mice. The mouse gut microbiome is functionally similar to its human...

  13. Toward Accurate and Quantitative Comparative Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayfach, Stephen; Pollard, Katherine S

    2016-08-25

    Shotgun metagenomics and computational analysis are used to compare the taxonomic and functional profiles of microbial communities. Leveraging this approach to understand roles of microbes in human biology and other environments requires quantitative data summaries whose values are comparable across samples and studies. Comparability is currently hampered by the use of abundance statistics that do not estimate a meaningful parameter of the microbial community and biases introduced by experimental protocols and data-cleaning approaches. Addressing these challenges, along with improving study design, data access, metadata standardization, and analysis tools, will enable accurate comparative metagenomics. We envision a future in which microbiome studies are replicable and new metagenomes are easily and rapidly integrated with existing data. Only then can the potential of metagenomics for predictive ecological modeling, well-powered association studies, and effective microbiome medicine be fully realized. PMID:27565341

  14. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Behzad, Hayedeh; Gojobori, Takashi; Mineta, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events su...

  15. Metagenomics: Facts and Artifacts, and Computational Challenges*

    OpenAIRE

    Wooley, John C.; Ye, Yuzhen

    2009-01-01

    Metagenomics is the study of microbial communities sampled directly from their natural environment, without prior culturing. By enabling an analysis of populations including many (so-far) unculturable and often unknown microbes, metagenomics is revolutionizing the field of microbiology, and has excited researchers in many disciplines that could benefit from the study of environmental microbes, including those in ecology, environmental sciences, and biomedicine. Specific computational and stat...

  16. Metagenomics: Application of Genomics to Uncultured Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Handelsman, Jo

    2004-01-01

    Metagenomics (also referred to as environmental and community genomics) is the genomic analysis of microorganisms by direct extraction and cloning of DNA from an assemblage of microorganisms. The development of metagenomics stemmed from the ineluctable evidence that as-yet-uncultured microorganisms represent the vast majority of organisms in most environments on earth. This evidence was derived from analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences amplified directly from the environment, an approach that ...

  17. Metagenomics: A new horizon in cancer research

    OpenAIRE

    Joyita Banerjee; Neetu Mishra; Yogita Dhas

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics has broadened the scope of targeting microbes responsible for inducing various types of cancers. About 16.1% of cancers are associated with microbial infection. Metagenomics is an equitable way of identifying and studying micro-organisms within their habitat. In cancer research, this approach has revolutionized the way of identifying, analyzing and targeting the microbial diversity present in the tissue specimens of cancer patients. The genomic analyses of these micro-organisms t...

  18. Large-Scale Screens of Metagenomic Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Vinh D.; Palden, Tsultrim; DeLong, Edward F.

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomic libraries archive large fragments of contiguous genomic sequences from microorganisms without requiring prior cultivation. Generating a streamlined procedure for creating and screening metagenomic libraries is therefore useful for efficient high-throughput investigations into the genetic and metabolic properties of uncultured microbial assemblages. Here, key protocols are presented on video, which we propose is the most useful format for accurately describing a long process that...

  19. Bacterial Protein N-Glycosylation: New Perspectives and Applications*

    OpenAIRE

    Nothaft, Harald; Szymanski, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein glycosylation is widespread throughout all three domains of life. Bacterial protein N-glycosylation and its application to engineering recombinant glycoproteins continue to be actively studied. Here, we focus on advances made in the last 2 years, including the characterization of novel bacterial N-glycosylation pathways, examination of pathway enzymes and evolution, biological roles of protein modification in the native host, and exploitation of the N-glycosylation pathways to create ...

  20. Challenges and Opportunities of Airborne Metagenomics

    KAUST Repository

    Behzad, H.

    2015-05-06

    Recent metagenomic studies of environments, such as marine and soil, have significantly enhanced our understanding of the diverse microbial communities living in these habitats and their essential roles in sustaining vast ecosystems. The increase in the number of publications related to soil and marine metagenomics is in sharp contrast to those of air, yet airborne microbes are thought to have significant impacts on many aspects of our lives from their potential roles in atmospheric events such as cloud formation, precipitation, and atmospheric chemistry to their major impact on human health. In this review, we will discuss the current progress in airborne metagenomics, with a special focus on exploring the challenges and opportunities of undertaking such studies. The main challenges of conducting metagenomic studies of airborne microbes are as follows: 1) Low density of microorganisms in the air, 2) efficient retrieval of microorganisms from the air, 3) variability in airborne microbial community composition, 4) the lack of standardized protocols and methodologies, and 5) DNA sequencing and bioinformatics-related challenges. Overcoming these challenges could provide the groundwork for comprehensive analysis of airborne microbes and their potential impact on the atmosphere, global climate, and our health. Metagenomic studies offer a unique opportunity to examine viral and bacterial diversity in the air and monitor their spread locally or across the globe, including threats from pathogenic microorganisms. Airborne metagenomic studies could also lead to discoveries of novel genes and metabolic pathways relevant to meteorological and industrial applications, environmental bioremediation, and biogeochemical cycles.

  1. Control of mucin-type O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Gerken, Thomas A; Fritz, Timothy A; Tabak, Lawrence A

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins is an essential process in all eukaryotes and a great diversity in types of protein glycosylation exists in animals, plants and microorganisms. Mucin-type O-glycosylation, consisting of glycans attached via O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) to serine and threonine ...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7470 - Glycosylated hemoglobin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. 864.7470 Section 864.7470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Glycosylated hemoglobin assay. (a) Identification. A glycosylated hemoglobin assay is a device used to...

  3. Is glycosylated haemoglobin a marker of fertility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjollund, N H; Jensen, Tina Kold; Bonde, Jens Peter;

    1999-01-01

    We performed a follow-up study of time to pregnancy in a population of first-time pregnancy planners without previous reproductive experience. The objective of this paper is to report and discuss a finding of a strong relationship between glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1C) and fertility. A total of...

  4. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Piacente

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production.

  5. The Autonomous Glycosylation of Large DNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacente, Francesco; Gaglianone, Matteo; Laugieri, Maria Elena; Tonetti, Michela G

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of surface molecules is a key feature of several eukaryotic viruses, which use the host endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi apparatus to add carbohydrates to their nascent glycoproteins. In recent years, a newly discovered group of eukaryotic viruses, belonging to the Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Virus (NCLDV) group, was shown to have several features that are typical of cellular organisms, including the presence of components of the glycosylation machinery. Starting from initial observations with the chlorovirus PBCV-1, enzymes for glycan biosynthesis have been later identified in other viruses; in particular in members of the Mimiviridae family. They include both the glycosyltransferases and other carbohydrate-modifying enzymes and the pathways for the biosynthesis of the rare monosaccharides that are found in the viral glycan structures. These findings, together with genome analysis of the newly-identified giant DNA viruses, indicate that the presence of glycogenes is widespread in several NCLDV families. The identification of autonomous viral glycosylation machinery leads to many questions about the origin of these pathways, the mechanisms of glycan production, and eventually their function in the viral replication cycle. The scope of this review is to highlight some of the recent results that have been obtained on the glycosylation systems of the large DNA viruses, with a special focus on the enzymes involved in nucleotide-sugar production. PMID:26690138

  6. Detection of cytoplasmic glycosylation associated with hydroxyproline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Christopher M; van der Wel, Hanke; Blader, Ira J

    2006-01-01

    A special class of glycosylation occurs on a proline residue of the cytoplasmic/nuclear protein Skp1 in the social amoeba Dictyostelium. For this glycosylation to occur, the proline must first be hydroxylated by the action of a soluble prolyl 4-hydroxylase acting on the protein. Cytoplasmic prolyl 4-hydroxylases are dioxygen-dependent enzymes that have low affinity for their O2 substrate and, therefore, have been implicated in O2-sensing in Dictyostelium, as well as in vertebrates and invertebrates. The sugar-hydroxyproline linkage has low abundance, is resistant to alkali cleavage and known glycosidases, and does not bind known lectins. However, initial screens for this modification can be made by assessing changes in electrophoretic mobility of candidate proteins after treatment of cells with prolyl hydroxylase inhibitors, and/or by metabolic labeling with [3H]sugar precursors. In addition, cytoplasmic hydroxylation/glycosylation can be assessed by assaying for cytoplasmic glycosyltransferases. Here we describe these methods and examples of their use in analyzing Skp1 glycosylation in Dictyostelium and the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis in humans. PMID:17132515

  7. The Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Christensen, Anni; Thøgersen, Ida; Andreasen, Peter; Enghild, Jan Johannes

    sequences. Analyses of these mutants for the content of N-acetyl glucosamine showed that Asn209 and Asn265, but not Asn329, are glycosylated, in agreement with previous suggestions made on the basis of X-ray crystal structure analysis of PAI-1 expressed in CHO cells (Xue et al. (1998) Structure 6, 627...

  8. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  9. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-10-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malformations (Walker Warburg syndrome; muscle-eye-brain disease; Fukuyama muscular dystrophy; congenital muscular dystrophy type 1D) to a relatively milder congenital variant with no brain involvement (congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C), and to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) type 2 variants with onset in childhood or adult life (LGMD2I, LGMD2L, and LGMD2N). ADG is a peripheral membrane protein that undergoes multiple and complex glycosylation steps to regulate its ability to effectively interact with extracellular matrix proteins, such as laminin, agrin, and perlecan. Although the precise composition of the glycans present on ADG are not known, it has been demonstrated that the forced overexpression of LARGE, or its paralog LARGE2, is capable of increasing the glycosylation of ADG in normal cells. In addition, its overexpression is capable of restoring dystroglycan glycosylation and laminin binding properties in primary cell cultures of patients affected by different genetically defined dystroglycanopathy variants. These observations suggest that there could be a role for therapeutic strategies to overcome the glycosylation defect in these conditions via the overexpression of LARGE. PMID:19019316

  10. Metagenomics of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Metagenomics approach was used to identify unknown organisms which live in association with the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Metagenomics combines molecular biology and genetics to identify, and characterize genetic material from unique biological ...

  11. Interactive metagenomic visualization in a Web browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillippy Adam M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A critical output of metagenomic studies is the estimation of abundances of taxonomical or functional groups. The inherent uncertainty in assignments to these groups makes it important to consider both their hierarchical contexts and their prediction confidence. The current tools for visualizing metagenomic data, however, omit or distort quantitative hierarchical relationships and lack the facility for displaying secondary variables. Results Here we present Krona, a new visualization tool that allows intuitive exploration of relative abundances and confidences within the complex hierarchies of metagenomic classifications. Krona combines a variant of radial, space-filling displays with parametric coloring and interactive polar-coordinate zooming. The HTML5 and JavaScript implementation enables fully interactive charts that can be explored with any modern Web browser, without the need for installed software or plug-ins. This Web-based architecture also allows each chart to be an independent document, making them easy to share via e-mail or post to a standard Web server. To illustrate Krona's utility, we describe its application to various metagenomic data sets and its compatibility with popular metagenomic analysis tools. Conclusions Krona is both a powerful metagenomic visualization tool and a demonstration of the potential of HTML5 for highly accessible bioinformatic visualizations. Its rich and interactive displays facilitate more informed interpretations of metagenomic analyses, while its implementation as a browser-based application makes it extremely portable and easily adopted into existing analysis packages. Both the Krona rendering code and conversion tools are freely available under a BSD open-source license, and available from: http://krona.sourceforge.net.

  12. metaSPAdes: a new versatile de novo metagenomics assembler

    OpenAIRE

    Nurk, Sergey; Meleshko, Dmitry; Korobeynikov, Anton; Pevzner, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    While metagenomics has emerged as a technology of choice for analyzing bacterial populations, assembly of metagenomic data remains difficult thus stifling biological discoveries. metaSPAdes is a new assembler that addresses the challenge of metagenome analysis and capitalizes on computational ideas that proved to be useful in assemblies of single cells and highly polymorphic diploid genomes. We benchmark metaSPAdes against other state-of-the-art metagenome assemblers across diverse da-tasets ...

  13. Glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase retrieved from the metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku eUchiyama

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available β-glucosidases (BGLs hydrolyze cellooligosaccharides to glucose and play a crucial role in the enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Despite their significance for the production of glucose, most identified BGLs are commonly inhibited by low (~mM concentrations of glucose. Therefore, BGLs that are insensitive to glucose inhibition have great biotechnological merit. We applied a metagenomic approach to screen for such rare glucose-tolerant BGLs. A metagenomic library was created in Escherichia coli (approximately 10,000 colonies and grown on LB agar plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-glucoside, yielding 828 positive (blue colonies. These were then arrayed in 96-well plates, grown in LB, and secondarily screened for activity in the presence of 10% (w/v glucose. Seven glucose-tolerant clones were identified, each of which contained a single bgl gene. The genes were classified into two groups, differing by two nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes were identical (452 aa and found to belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 1. The recombinant protein (Ks5A7 was overproduced in E. coli as a C-terminal 6 × His-tagged protein and purified to apparent homogeneity. The molecular mass of the purified Ks5A7 was determined to be 54 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and 160 kDa by gel filtration analysis. The enzyme was optimally active at 45°C and pH 5.0–6.5 and retained full or 1.5–2-fold enhanced activity in the presence of 0.1–0.5 M glucose. It had a low KM (78 µM with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 0.36 mM with cellobiose and high Vmax (91 µmol min-1 mg-1 with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 155 µmol min-1 mg-1 with cellobiose among known glucose-tolerant BGLs and was free from substrate (0.1 M cellobiose inhibition. The efficient use of Ks5A7 in conjunction with Trichoderma reesei cellulases in enzymatic saccharification of alkaline-treated rice straw was demonstrated by increased production of glucose.

  14. Scalable metagenomic taxonomy classification using a reference genome database

    OpenAIRE

    Ames, Sasha K.; Hysom, David A.; Shea N. Gardner; Lloyd, G. Scott; Gokhale, Maya B.; Allen, Jonathan E.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Deep metagenomic sequencing of biological samples has the potential to recover otherwise difficult-to-detect microorganisms and accurately characterize biological samples with limited prior knowledge of sample contents. Existing metagenomic taxonomic classification algorithms, however, do not scale well to analyze large metagenomic datasets, and balancing classification accuracy with computational efficiency presents a fundamental challenge. Results: A method is presented to shift...

  15. Soil Metagenomes from Different Pristine Environments of Northwest Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Colman, Déborah I.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first study to use a high-throughput metagenomic shotgun approach to explore the biosynthetic potential of soil metagenomes from different pristine environments of northwest Argentina. Our data sets characterize these metagenomes and provide information on the possible effect these ecosystems have on their diversity and biosynthetic potential.

  16. Efficient synthesis of glycosylated phenazine natural products and analogs with DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jane B.; Petersen, Lars; Jensen, K.J.;

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by the occurrence and function of phenazines in natural products, new glycosylated analogs were designed and synthesized. DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate) glycosyl donors were used in an efficient and easily-handled glycosylation protocol compatible with combinatorial chemistry....... Benzoylated D-glucose, D-galactose and L-quinovose DISAL glycosyl donors were synthesized in high yields and used under mild conditions to glycosylate methyl saphenate and 2-hydroxyphenazine. The glycosides were screened for biological activity and one compound showed inhibitory activity towards topoisomerase...

  17. Shotgun metagenomic data streams: surfing without fear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berendzen, Joel R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-06

    Timely information about bio-threat prevalence, consequence, propagation, attribution, and mitigation is needed to support decision-making, both routinely and in a crisis. One DNA sequencer can stream 25 Gbp of information per day, but sampling strategies and analysis techniques are needed to turn raw sequencing power into actionable knowledge. Shotgun metagenomics can enable biosurveillance at the level of a single city, hospital, or airplane. Metagenomics characterizes viruses and bacteria from complex environments such as soil, air filters, or sewage. Unlike targeted-primer-based sequencing, shotgun methods are not blind to sequences that are truly novel, and they can measure absolute prevalence. Shotgun metagenomic sampling can be non-invasive, efficient, and inexpensive while being informative. We have developed analysis techniques for shotgun metagenomic sequencing that rely upon phylogenetic signature patterns. They work by indexing local sequence patterns in a manner similar to web search engines. Our methods are laptop-fast and favorable scaling properties ensure they will be sustainable as sequencing methods grow. We show examples of application to soil metagenomic samples.

  18. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  19. Viral metagenomics and blood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvage, V; Eloit, M

    2016-02-01

    The characterization of the human blood-associated viral community (also called blood virome) is essential for epidemiological surveillance and to anticipate new potential threats for blood transfusion safety. Currently, the risk of blood-borne agent transmission of well-known viruses (HBV, HCV, HIV and HTLV) can be considered as under control in high-resource countries. However, other viruses unknown or unsuspected may be transmitted to recipients by blood-derived products. This is particularly relevant considering that a significant proportion of transfused patients are immunocompromised and more frequently subjected to fatal outcomes. Several measures to prevent transfusion transmission of unknown viruses have been implemented including the exclusion of at-risk donors, leukocyte reduction of donor blood, and physicochemical treatment of the different blood components. However, up to now there is no universal method for pathogen inactivation, which would be applicable for all types of blood components and, equally effective for all viral families. In addition, among available inactivation procedures of viral genomes, some of them are recognized to be less effective on non-enveloped viruses, and inadequate to inactivate higher viral titers in plasma pools or derivatives. Given this, there is the need to implement new methodologies for the discovery of unknown viruses that may affect blood transfusion. Viral metagenomics combined with High Throughput Sequencing appears as a promising approach for the identification and global surveillance of new and/or unexpected viruses that could impair blood transfusion safety. PMID:26778104

  20. Involvement of Aberrant Glycosylation in Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Miyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is one of the most common posttranslational modification reactions and nearly half of all known proteins in eukaryotes are glycosylated. In fact, changes in oligosaccharides structures are associated with many physiological and pathological events, including cell growth, migration and differentiation, and tumor invasion. Therefore, functional glycomics, which is a comprehensive study of the structures and functions of glycans, is attracting the increasing attention of scientists in various fields of life science. In cases of thyroid cancer, the biological characters and prognosis are completely different in each type of histopathology, and their oligosaccharide structures as well as the expression of glycosyltransferases are also different. In this review, we summarized our previous papers on oligosaccharides and thyroid cancers and discussed a possible function of oligosaccharides in the carcinogenesis in thyroid cancer.

  1. Metagenomic exploration of antibiotic resistance in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Jean-Michel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Delmont, Tom O; Mathieu, Alban; Vogel, Timothy M; Simonet, Pascal

    2011-06-01

    The ongoing development of metagenomic approaches is providing the means to explore antibiotic resistance in nature and address questions that could not be answered previously with conventional culture-based strategies. The number of available environmental metagenomic sequence datasets is rapidly expanding and henceforth offer the ability to gain a more comprehensive understanding of antibiotic resistance at the global scale. Although there is now evidence that the environment constitutes a vast reservoir of antibiotic resistance gene determinants (ARGDs) and that the majority of ARGDs acquired by human pathogens may have an environmental origin, a better understanding of their diversity, prevalence and ecological significance may help predict the emergence and spreading of newly acquired resistances. Recent applications of metagenomic approaches to the study of ARGDs in natural environments such as soil should help overcome challenges concerning expanding antibiotic resistances. PMID:21601510

  2. Viral metagenomics: are we missing the giants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halary, S; Temmam, S; Raoult, D; Desnues, C

    2016-06-01

    Amoeba-infecting giant viruses are recently discovered viruses that have been isolated from diverse environments all around the world. In parallel to isolation efforts, metagenomics confirmed their worldwide distribution from a broad range of environmental and host-associated samples, including humans, depicting them as a major component of eukaryotic viruses in nature and a possible resident of the human/animal virome whose role is still unclear. Nevertheless, metagenomics data about amoeba-infecting giant viruses still remain scarce, mainly because of methodological limitations. Efforts should be pursued both at the metagenomic sample preparation level and on in silico analyses to better understand their roles in the environment and in human/animal health and disease. PMID:26851442

  3. Metagenomics: A new horizon in cancer research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyita Banerjee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomics has broadened the scope of targeting microbes responsible for inducing various types of cancers. About 16.1% of cancers are associated with microbial infection. Metagenomics is an equitable way of identifying and studying micro-organisms within their habitat. In cancer research, this approach has revolutionized the way of identifying, analyzing and targeting the microbial diversity present in the tissue specimens of cancer patients. The genomic analyses of these micro-organisms through next generation sequencing techniques invariably facilitate in recognizing the microbial population in biopsies and their evolutionary relationships with each other. In this review an attempt has been made to generate current metagenomic view on cancer microbiota. Different types of micro-organisms have been found to be linked to various types of cancers, thus, contributing significantly in understanding the disease at molecular level.

  4. Metagenomic Systems Biology of the Human Microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ida

    to the advances in next generation sequencing, which has allowed for large-scale metagenomics studies of different niches of the human microbiota. Especially the gut microbiota has been studied intensively. However, most studies have been purely descriptive, thus there is still a lot to learn regarding...... the interplay between species in the microbiota and also between the host and the inhabiting microorganisms. Additionally, the non-bacterial part of the microbiota, which includes bacteriophages, plasmids and micro-eukaryotes, is not very well described. In this thesis, metagenomics data from the human gut......, nose and oral cavity has been analyzed. The central method has been a co-abundance clustering method, which separates genes from metagenomics data under the assumption that genes originating from the same DNA (e.g. a bacterial genome, a phage or a plasmid) will co-vary across samples. Thus, co...

  5. Pathway-Based Functional Analysis of Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, Sivan; Sharon, Itai; Pinter, Ron Y.; Shlomi, Tomer

    Metagenomic data enables the study of microbes and viruses through their DNA as retrieved directly from the environment in which they live. Functional analysis of metagenomes explores the abundance of gene families, pathways, and systems, rather than their taxonomy. Through such analysis researchers are able to identify those functional capabilities most important to organisms in the examined environment. Recently, a statistical framework for the functional analysis of metagenomes was described that focuses on gene families. Here we describe two pathway level computational models for functional analysis that take into account important, yet unaddressed issues such as pathway size, gene length and overlap in gene content among pathways. We test our models over carefully designed simulated data and propose novel approaches for performance evaluation. Our models significantly improve over current approach with respect to pathway ranking and the computations of relative abundance of pathways in environments.

  6. FANTOM: Functional and taxonomic analysis of metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanli Kemal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of quantitative metagenomics data is important for our understanding of ecosystem functioning and assessing differences between various environmental samples. There is a need for an easy to use tool to explore the often complex metagenomics data in taxonomic and functional context. Results Here we introduce FANTOM, a tool that allows for exploratory and comparative analysis of metagenomics abundance data integrated with metadata information and biological databases. Importantly, FANTOM can make use of any hierarchical database and it comes supplied with NCBI taxonomic hierarchies as well as KEGG Orthology, COG, PFAM and TIGRFAM databases. Conclusions The software is implemented in Python, is platform independent, and is available at http://www.sysbio.se/Fantom.

  7. Muscular dystrophies due to glycosylation defects

    OpenAIRE

    Muntoni, Francesco; Torelli, Silvia; Brockington, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In the last few years, muscular dystrophies due to reduced glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (ADG) have emerged as a common group of conditions, now referred to as dystroglycanopathies. Mutations in six genes (POMT1, POMT2, POMGnT1, Fukutin, FKRP and LARGE) have so far been identified in patients with a dystroglycanopathy. Allelic mutations in each of these genes can result in a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from severe congenital onset with associated structural brain malfo...

  8. Comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Bai

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence signatures, as defined by the frequencies of k-tuples (or k-mers, k-grams, have been used extensively to compare genomic sequences of individual organisms, to identify cis-regulatory modules, and to study the evolution of regulatory sequences. Recently many next-generation sequencing (NGS read data sets of metagenomic samples from a variety of different environments have been generated. The assembly of these reads can be difficult and analysis methods based on mapping reads to genes or pathways are also restricted by the availability and completeness of existing databases. Sequence-signature-based methods, however, do not need the complete genomes or existing databases and thus, can potentially be very useful for the comparison of metagenomic samples using NGS read data. Still, the applications of sequence signature methods for the comparison of metagenomic samples have not been well studied. Results We studied several dissimilarity measures, including d2, d2* and d2S recently developed from our group, a measure (hereinafter noted as Hao used in CVTree developed from Hao’s group (Qi et al., 2004, measures based on relative di-, tri-, and tetra-nucleotide frequencies as in Willner et al. (2009, as well as standard lp measures between the frequency vectors, for the comparison of metagenomic samples using sequence signatures. We compared their performance using a series of extensive simulations and three real next-generation sequencing (NGS metagenomic datasets: 39 fecal samples from 33 mammalian host species, 56 marine samples across the world, and 13 fecal samples from human individuals. Results showed that the dissimilarity measure d2S can achieve superior performance when comparing metagenomic samples by clustering them into different groups as well as recovering environmental gradients affecting microbial samples. New insights into the environmental factors affecting microbial compositions in metagenomic samples

  9. Competition between folding and glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, B; Bruun, A W; Kielland-Brandt, Morten; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    Using carboxypeptidase Y in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, the in vivo relationship between protein folding and N-glycosylation was studied. Seven new sites for N-glycosylation were introduced at positions buried in the folded protein structure. The level of glycosylation of such new...... acceptor sites. In some cases, all the newly synthesized mutant protein was modified at the novel site while in others no modification took place. In the most interesting category of mutants, the level of glycosylation was dependent on the conditions for folding. This shows that folding and glycosylation...... reactions can compete in vivo and that glycosylation does not necessarily precede folding. The approach described may be generally applicable for the analysis of protein folding in vivo....

  10. Glycosylation in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein and its biological implications

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Yung Shwen

    2013-08-01

    Glycosylation of HIV-1 envelope proteins (Env gp120/gp41) plays a vital role in viral evasion from the host immune response, which occurs through the masking of key neutralization epitopes and the presentation of the Env glycosylation as \\'self\\' to the host immune system. Env glycosylation is generally conserved, yet its continual evolution plays an important role in modulating viral infectivity and Env immunogenicity. Thus, it is believed that Env glycosylation, which is a vital part of the HIV-1 architecture, also controls intra- and inter-clade genetic variations. Discerning intra- and inter-clade glycosylation variations could therefore yield important information for understanding the molecular and biological differences between HIV clades and may assist in effectively designing Env-based immunogens and in clearly understanding HIV vaccines. This review provides an in-depth perspective of various aspects of Env glycosylation in the context of HIV-1 pathogenesis. © 2013 Future Medicine Ltd.

  11. Glycosylation site prediction using ensembles of Support Vector Machine classifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Silvescu Adrian; Sinapov Jivko; Caragea Cornelia; Dobbs Drena; Honavar Vasant

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Glycosylation is one of the most complex post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Glycosylation plays an important role in biological processes ranging from protein folding and subcellular localization, to ligand recognition and cell-cell interactions. Experimental identification of glycosylation sites is expensive and laborious. Hence, there is significant interest in the development of computational methods for reliable prediction of glyco...

  12. Vanadate-resistant yeast mutants are defective in protein glycosylation.

    OpenAIRE

    Ballou, L; Hitzeman, R A; Lewis, M. S.; Ballou, C E

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous recessive orthovanadate-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were obtained in five complementation groups, and all show defects in protein glycosylation that mimic the previously isolated mnn mutants. Three of the groups are allelic to the known mnn8, mnn9, and mnn10 mutants, whereas the other two groups show other glycosylation defects. The vanadate-resistant phenotype was associated with enhanced hygromycin B sensitivity. The glycosylation phenotypes of the mutants are ...

  13. Glycosylation site prediction using ensembles of Support Vector Machine classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvescu Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycosylation is one of the most complex post-translational modifications (PTMs of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Glycosylation plays an important role in biological processes ranging from protein folding and subcellular localization, to ligand recognition and cell-cell interactions. Experimental identification of glycosylation sites is expensive and laborious. Hence, there is significant interest in the development of computational methods for reliable prediction of glycosylation sites from amino acid sequences. Results We explore machine learning methods for training classifiers to predict the amino acid residues that are likely to be glycosylated using information derived from the target amino acid residue and its sequence neighbors. We compare the performance of Support Vector Machine classifiers and ensembles of Support Vector Machine classifiers trained on a dataset of experimentally determined N-linked, O-linked, and C-linked glycosylation sites extracted from O-GlycBase version 6.00, a database of 242 proteins from several different species. The results of our experiments show that the ensembles of Support Vector Machine classifiers outperform single Support Vector Machine classifiers on the problem of predicting glycosylation sites in terms of a range of standard measures for comparing the performance of classifiers. The resulting methods have been implemented in EnsembleGly, a web server for glycosylation site prediction. Conclusion Ensembles of Support Vector Machine classifiers offer an accurate and reliable approach to automated identification of putative glycosylation sites in glycoprotein sequences.

  14. Applications of metagenomics for industrial bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent progress in mining the rich genetic resource of non-culturable microbes has led to the discovery of new genes, enzymes, and natural products. The impact of metagenomics is witnessed in the development of commodity and fine chemicals, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals where the benefit of enz...

  15. Towards a more complete metagenomics toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerging scientific discipline of metagenomics has not only created a myriad of opportunities for biologists to reveal new insights into the microbial underpinnings of our environment, but has also presented a number of interesting challenges for bioinformatics algorithms and software developers...

  16. Building on basic metagenomics with complementary technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Warnecke, Falk; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Metagenomics, the application of random shotgun sequencing to environmental samples, is a powerful approach for characterizing microbial communities. However, this method only represents the cornerstone of what can be achieved using a range of complementary technologies such as transcriptomics, proteomics, cell sorting and microfluidics. Together, these approaches hold great promise for the study of microbial ecology and evolution.

  17. Study Bioprospecting of Medicinal Plant Extracts of the Semiarid Northeast: Contribution to the Control of Oral Microorganisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Suênia P. Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental pathologies can be caused by plaque-forming bacteria and yeast, which reside in the oral cavity. The bacteria growing in dental plaque, a naturally occurring biofilm, display increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. The objective was the evaluation of a preclinical assay of medicinal plants of the semiarid region from the northeast against oral pathogenic microorganism, aiming at bioprospecting a new product. The selection of plant material for this study was based on the ethnobotanical data on the traditional use of plants from the semiarid region. The thirty extracts were subjected to the determination of antibiofilm activity against gram-positive, gram-negative bacteria and yeast. The hydroalcoholic extract which showed positive antibiofilm activity against most of the microorganisms tested in agar diffusion assay was further tested for the determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and Bioassay with Artemia salina. Plant samples tested in this study exhibited good antibiofilm activity for the treatment of oral problems. The Schinopsis brasiliensis showed greater activity for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, but toxicity against Artemia salina.

  18. Bioprospecting the Curculigoside-Cinnamic Acid-Rich Fraction from Molineria latifolia Rhizome as a Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Der Jiun; Chan, Kim Wei; Sarega, Nadarajan; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu; Ithnin, Hairuszah; Ismail, Maznah

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence from both experimental and clinical studies depicts the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Specifically, disruption of homeostatic redox balance in accumulated body fat mass leads to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Strategies for the restoration of redox balance, potentially by exploring potent plant bioactives, have thus become the focus of therapeutic intervention. The present study aimed to bioprospect the potential use of the curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction from Molineria latifolia rhizome as an antioxidant therapeutic agent. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) isolated from M. latifolia rhizome methanolic extract (RME) contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds, particularly curculigoside and cinnamic acid. EAF demonstrated glycation inhibitory activities in both glucose- and fructose-mediated glycation models. In addition, in vitro chemical-based and cellular-based antioxidant assays showed that EAF exhibited high antioxidant activities and a protective effect against oxidative damage in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although the efficacies of individual phenolics differed depending on the structure and concentration, a correlational study revealed strong correlations between total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities. The results concluded that enriched phenolic contents in EAF (curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction) contributed to the overall better reactivity. Our data suggest that this bioactive-rich fraction warrants therapeutic potential against oxidative stress-related disorders. PMID:27322226

  19. Preparation of glycosyl donors from D-glucosamine and their reactivity for glycosylation reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, J.; Trnka, T.; Ledvina, Miroslav

    Praha : Czech Chemical Society, 2003. s. 11. [CUKRBLIK 2003. Current Chemistry and Biochemistry of Saccharides. 16.04.2003, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA303/01/0690 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : glycosylation reactions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry

  20. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Abeylath, Sampath C.; Turos, Edward

    2007-01-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-α-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3...

  1. Regulation of Notch Signaling by Glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Stanley, Pamela

    2007-01-01

    Notch receptors are ~300 kd cell surface glycoproteins whose activation by Notch ligands regulates cell fate decisions in the metazoa. The extracellular domain of Notch receptors has many epidermal growth factor-like repeats that are glycosylated with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans as well as N-glycans. Disruption of O-fucose glycan synthesis leads to severe Notch signaling defects in Drosophila and mammals. Removal or addition of O-fucose glycan consensus sites on Notch receptors also leads ...

  2. Altered tumor cell glycosylation promotes metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LuborBorsig

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant transformation of cells is associated with aberrant glycosylation presented on the cell-surface. Commonly observed changes in glycan structures during malignancy encompasses aberrant expression and glycosylation of mucins; abnormal branching of N-glycans; and increased presence of sialic acid on proteins and glycolipids. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the presence of certain glycan structures correlates with cancer progression by affecting tumor cell invasiveness, ability to disseminate through the blood circulation and to metastasize in distant organs. During metastasis tumor cell-derived glycans enable binding to cells in their microenvironment including endothelium and blood constituents through glycan-binding receptors - lectins. In this review we will discuss current concepts how tumor cell-derived glycans contribute to metastasis with the focus on three types of lectins: siglecs, galectins and selectins. Siglecs are present on virtually all hematopoetic cells and usually negatively regulate immune responses. Galectins are mostly expressed by tumor cells and support tumor cell survival. Selectins are vascular adhesion receptors that promote tumor cell dissemination. All lectins facilitate interactions within the tumor microenvironment and thereby promote cancer progression. The identification of mechanisms how tumor glycans contribute to metastasis may help to improve diagnosis, prognosis and aid to develop clinical strategies to prevent metastasis.

  3. IgG glycosylation changes and MBL2 polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Lone N; Jacobsen, Søren; Abrahams, Jodie L;

    2012-01-01

    To examine whether IgG glycosylation changes and MBL2 genotypes are associated with systemic inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA).......To examine whether IgG glycosylation changes and MBL2 genotypes are associated with systemic inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA)....

  4. Is metagenomics resolving identification of functions in microbial communities?

    OpenAIRE

    Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2013-01-01

    We are coming up on the tenth anniversary of the broad use of the method involving whole metagenome shotgun sequencing, referred to as metagenomics. The application of this approach has definitely revolutionized microbiology and the related fields, including the realization of the importance of the human microbiome. As such, metagenomics has already provided a novel outlook on the complexity and dynamics of microbial communities that are an important part of the biosphere of the planet. Accum...

  5. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Kumar; Kishore Kumar Krishnani; Bharat Bhushan; Manoj Pandit Brahmane

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metage...

  6. Current and future trends in metagenomics : Development of knowledge bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takuji; Kurokawa, Ken

    Microbes are essential for every part of life on Earth. Numerous microbes inhabit the biosphere, many of which are uncharacterized or uncultivable. They form a complex microbial community that deeply affects against surrounding environments. Metagenome analysis provides a radically new way of examining such complex microbial community without isolation or cultivation of individual bacterial community members. In this article, we present a brief discussion about a metagenomics and the development of knowledge bases, and also discuss about the future trends in metagenomics.

  7. Cracking the Glycome Encoder: Signaling, Trafficking, and Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Frederic; Chia, Joanne

    2016-05-01

    The glycoproteome, the ensemble of glycans and their carrier proteins, plays major roles in multicellular life by regulating cell interactions with their environment. How information is encoded into the glycome, in other words how glycosylation is modulated in response to signals, remains largely unclear. Glycosylation enzymes operate predominantly in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi, a highly compartmentalized membrane-bound environment. Recent work indicates that this compartmentalization is plastic and tightly regulated. For instance, specific signals can induce the relocation of O-glycosylation enzymes, GALNTs, from the Golgi to the ER, resulting in significant upregulation of O-glycosylation initiation. We have named this re-compartmentation process the 'GALA pathway'. GALA illustrates how membrane trafficking in the secretory pathway can regulate protein glycosylation and thus encode information in the glycome. PMID:26832820

  8. Trans-species Engineering of Glycosylated Therapeutic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang

    understood. Currently, mammalian cells are required for human O-glycosylation. Increasing efforts have been devoted to engineering non-mammalian cells for production of recombinant proteins with “human-like” glycosylation. Substantial success has been achieved with designed N-glycosylation in both lower......Recombinant expression of therapeutic proteins is one of the major tasks in modern biomedicine. One of the most important factors with respect to therapeutic use in human is posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the recombinant proteins, of which protein glycosylation is by far the most...... important to address. Whenever glycosylation has been found to be an important PTM for function or bioactivity, human therapeutics have generally been produced in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. Oglycosylation is one of the most complex regulated PTMs of proteins but also one of the least...

  9. SmashCommunity: A metagenomic annotation and analysis tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Harrington, Eoghan D; Foerstner, Konrad U;

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: SmashCommunity is a stand-alone metagenomic annotation and analysis pipeline suitable for data from Sanger and 454 sequencing technologies. It supports state-of-the-art software for essential metagenomic tasks such as assembly and gene prediction. It provides tools to estimate...... the quantitative phylogenetic and functional compositions of metagenomes, to compare compositions of multiple metagenomes and to produce intuitive visual representations of such analyses. AVAILABILITY: SmashCommunity is freely available at http://www.bork.embl.de/software/smash CONTACT: bork@embl.de....

  10. An Experimental Metagenome Data Management and AnalysisSystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Korzeniewski, Frank; Palaniappan, Krishna; Szeto, Ernest; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-03-01

    The application of shotgun sequencing to environmental samples has revealed a new universe of microbial community genomes (metagenomes) involving previously uncultured organisms. Metagenome analysis, which is expected to provide a comprehensive picture of the gene functions and metabolic capacity of microbial community, needs to be conducted in the context of a comprehensive data management and analysis system. We present in this paper IMG/M, an experimental metagenome data management and analysis system that is based on the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides tools and viewers for analyzing both metagenomes and isolate genomes individually or in a comparative context.

  11. The metagenomics RAST server – a public resource for the automatic phylogenetic and functional analysis of metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens R; Rodriguez A. (ed.); Paczian T; Kubal M; Glass EM; Olson R; D'Souza M; Paarmann D; Meyer F; Wilke A; Wilkening J; Edwards RA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Random community genomes (metagenomes) are now commonly used to study microbes in different environments. Over the past few years, the major challenge associated with metagenomics shifted from generating to analyzing sequences. High-throughput, low-cost next-generation sequencing has provided access to metagenomics to a wide range of researchers. Results A high-throughput pipeline has been constructed to provide high-performance computing to all researchers interested in u...

  12. Micropinocytic Ingestion of Glycosylated Albumin by Isolated Microvessels: Possible Role in Pathogenesis of Diabetic Microangiopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stuart K.; Devenny, James J.; Bitensky, Mark W.

    1981-04-01

    Microvessels isolated from rat epididymal fat exhibit differential vesicular ingestion rates for unmodified and nonenzymatically glycosylated rat albumin. While unmodified rat albumin is excluded from ingestion by endothelial micropinocytic vesicles, glycosylated albumin is avidly taken up by endocytosis. Interaction of albumin and glycosylated albumin with endothelium was studied with a double-label fluorescence assay of micropinocytosis. When glycosylated albumin was present at a concentration of 6% with respect to total albumin (the level found in ``non diabetic'' serum), only glycosylated albumin was ingested. At higher concentrations of glycosylated albumin (those found in diabetic serum), both albumin and glycosylated albumin are ingested. Glycosylation of endothelial membrane components results in stimulated ingestion of glycosylated albumin, persistent exclusion of unmodified albumin, and unaltered micropinocytic ingestion of native ferritin. These results indicate that nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum albumin may result in rapid vesicle-mediated extravasation of albumin. Chronic microvascular leakage of glycosylated albumin could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy.

  13. Metagenomic scaffolds enable combinatorial lignin transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Strachan, Cameron R.; Singh, Rahul; VanInsberghe, David; Ievdokymenko, Kateryna; Budwill, Karen; Mohn, William W.; Eltis, Lindsay D.; Steven J Hallam

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass conversion into biofuels and chemicals can reduce human reliance on petroleum and promote sustainable biorefining processes. The structural polymer lignin can comprise up to 40% of plant biomass, but resists decomposition into valuable monoaromatic compounds. In this study, we devised a previously unidentified biosensor responsive to lignin transformation products. We used this biosensor in a functional screen to recover metagenomic scaffolds sourced from coal bed bacterial comm...

  14. CAMERA: A Community Resource for Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rekha Seshadri; Kravitz, Saul A; Larry Smarr; Paul Gilna; Marvin Frazier

    2007-01-01

    Microbes are responsible for most of the chemical transformations that are crucial to sustaining life on Earth. Their ability to inhabit almost any environmental niche suggests that they possess an incredible diversity of physiological capabilities. However, we have little to no information on a majority of the millions of microbial species that are predicted to exist, mainly because of our inability to culture them in the laboratory. A growing discipline called metagenomics allows u...

  15. Metagenomics for pathogen detection in public health

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Ruth R.; Montoya, Vincent; Gardy, Jennifer L; Patrick, David M.; Tang, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Traditional pathogen detection methods in public health infectious disease surveillance rely upon the identification of agents that are already known to be associated with a particular clinical syndrome. The emerging field of metagenomics has the potential to revolutionize pathogen detection in public health laboratories by allowing the simultaneous detection of all microorganisms in a clinical sample, without a priori knowledge of their identities, through the use of next-generation DNA sequ...

  16. Metagenomic analysis of soil microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Đokić Lidija; Savić M.; Narančić Tanja; Vasiljević Branka

    2010-01-01

    Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae, rare resurrection plants growing in the Balkan Peninsula, produce a high amount of phenolic compounds as a response to stress. The composition and size of bacterial communities in two rhizosphere soil samples of these plants were analyzed using a metagenomic approach. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) experiments together with DAPI staining showed that the metabolically active bacteria represent only a small fraction, approximately 5%, of total so...

  17. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weynberg, Karen D; Wood-Charlson, Elisha M; Suttle, Curtis A; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2014-01-01

    Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available) the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis. PMID:24847321

  18. New Extremophilic Lipases and Esterases from Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, Olalla; Cerdán, Maria E; González Siso, Maria I

    2014-01-01

    Lipolytic enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of ester bonds in the presence of water. In media with low water content or in organic solvents, they can catalyze synthetic reactions such as esterification and transesterification. Lipases and esterases, in particular those from extremophilic origin, are robust enzymes, functional under the harsh conditions of industrial processes owing to their inherent thermostability and resistance towards organic solvents, which combined with their high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivity make them very attractive biocatalysts for a variety of industrial applications. Likewise, enzymes from extremophile sources can provide additional features such as activity at extreme temperatures, extreme pH values or high salinity levels, which could be interesting for certain purposes. New lipases and esterases have traditionally been discovered by the isolation of microbial strains producing lipolytic activity. The Genome Projects Era allowed genome mining, exploiting homology with known lipases and esterases, to be used in the search for new enzymes. The Metagenomic Era meant a step forward in this field with the study of the metagenome, the pool of genomes in an environmental microbial community. Current molecular biology techniques make it possible to construct total environmental DNA libraries, including the genomes of unculturable organisms, opening a new window to a vast field of unknown enzymes with new and unique properties. Here, we review the latest advances and findings from research into new extremophilic lipases and esterases, using metagenomic approaches, and their potential industrial and biotechnological applications. PMID:24588890

  19. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  20. Metagenomic analysis of soil microbial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đokić Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramonda serbica and Ramonda nathaliae, rare resurrection plants growing in the Balkan Peninsula, produce a high amount of phenolic compounds as a response to stress. The composition and size of bacterial communities in two rhizosphere soil samples of these plants were analyzed using a metagenomic approach. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH experiments together with DAPI staining showed that the metabolically active bacteria represent only a small fraction, approximately 5%, of total soil bacteria. Using universal bacteria - specific primers 16S rDNA genes were amplified directly from metagenomic DNAs and two libraries were constructed. The Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RLFP method was used in library screening. Amongst 192 clones, 35 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs were determined from the rhizosphere of R. nathaliae, and 13 OTUs out of 80 clones in total from the library of R. serbica. Representative clones from each OTU were sequenced. The majority of sequences from metagenomes showed very little similarity to any cultured bacteria. In conclusion, the bacterial communities in the studied soil samples showed quite poor diversity. .

  1. Glycosyl Dithiocarbamates: β-Selective Couplings without Auxiliary Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the ...

  2. Glycosylation and secretion of human α-amylases

    OpenAIRE

    Junko Amano; Shou Takashima

    2012-01-01

    Three human α-amylases exist: Amy1 (salivary amylase), Amy2A (pancreatic amylase), and Amy2B (expressed in various tissues). These amylases share a 97% - 99% amino acid sequence identity, and two potential N-glycosylation sites (N427 and N476) are commonly found in the C-terminal region. In general, salivary amylase is more frequently glycosylated than pancreatic amylase, and it is still uncertain why differences in the glycosylation pattern among human amylase iso-zymes occur. In this study,...

  3. MetaSim: a sequencing simulator for genomics and metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Richter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The new research field of metagenomics is providing exciting insights into various, previously unclassified ecological systems. Next-generation sequencing technologies are producing a rapid increase of environmental data in public databases. There is great need for specialized software solutions and statistical methods for dealing with complex metagenome data sets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To facilitate the development and improvement of metagenomic tools and the planning of metagenomic projects, we introduce a sequencing simulator called MetaSim. Our software can be used to generate collections of synthetic reads that reflect the diverse taxonomical composition of typical metagenome data sets. Based on a database of given genomes, the program allows the user to design a metagenome by specifying the number of genomes present at different levels of the NCBI taxonomy, and then to collect reads from the metagenome using a simulation of a number of different sequencing technologies. A population sampler optionally produces evolved sequences based on source genomes and a given evolutionary tree. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MetaSim allows the user to simulate individual read datasets that can be used as standardized test scenarios for planning sequencing projects or for benchmarking metagenomic software.

  4. Cross-cutting activities: Soil quality and soil metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Motavalli, Peter P.; Garrett, Karen A.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation reports on the work of the SANREM CRSP cross-cutting activities "Assessing and Managing Soil Quality for Sustainable Agricultural Systems" and "Soil Metagenomics to Construct Indicators of Soil Degradation." The introduction gives an overview of the extensiveness of soil degradation globally and defines soil quality. The objectives of the soil quality cross cutting activity are: CCRA-4 (Soil Metagenomics)

  5. Which Microbial Communities Are Present? Sequence-Based Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Sean M.

    The use of metagenomic methods that directly sequence environmental samples has revealed the extraordinary microbial diversity missed by traditional culture-based methodologies. Therefore, to develop a complete and representative model of an environment's microbial community and activities, metagenomic analysis is an essential tool.

  6. Antibiotic Resistome: Improving Detection and Quantification Accuracy for Comparative Metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbehery, Ali H A; Aziz, Ramy K; Siam, Rania

    2016-04-01

    The unprecedented rise of life-threatening antibiotic resistance (AR), combined with the unparalleled advances in DNA sequencing of genomes and metagenomes, has pushed the need for in silico detection of the resistance potential of clinical and environmental metagenomic samples through the quantification of AR genes (i.e., genes conferring antibiotic resistance). Therefore, determining an optimal methodology to quantitatively and accurately assess AR genes in a given environment is pivotal. Here, we optimized and improved existing AR detection methodologies from metagenomic datasets to properly consider AR-generating mutations in antibiotic target genes. Through comparative metagenomic analysis of previously published AR gene abundance in three publicly available metagenomes, we illustrate how mutation-generated resistance genes are either falsely assigned or neglected, which alters the detection and quantitation of the antibiotic resistome. In addition, we inspected factors influencing the outcome of AR gene quantification using metagenome simulation experiments, and identified that genome size, AR gene length, total number of metagenomics reads and selected sequencing platforms had pronounced effects on the level of detected AR. In conclusion, our proposed improvements in the current methodologies for accurate AR detection and resistome assessment show reliable results when tested on real and simulated metagenomic datasets. PMID:27031878

  7. Metagenomics: Retrospect and Prospects in High Throughput Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, metagenomics has emerged as a powerful tool for mining of hidden microbial treasure in a culture independent manner. In the last two decades, metagenomics has been applied extensively to exploit concealed potential of microbial communities from almost all sorts of habitats. A brief historic progress made over the period is discussed in terms of origin of metagenomics to its current state and also the discovery of novel biological functions of commercial importance from metagenomes of diverse habitats. The present review also highlights the paradigm shift of metagenomics from basic study of community composition to insight into the microbial community dynamics for harnessing the full potential of uncultured microbes with more emphasis on the implication of breakthrough developments, namely, Next Generation Sequencing, advanced bioinformatics tools, and systems biology.

  8. Metagenomics and Bioinformatics in Microbial Ecology: Current Status and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Satoshi; Yang, Ching-chia; Iwasaki, Wataru

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches are now commonly used in microbial ecology to study microbial communities in more detail, including many strains that cannot be cultivated in the laboratory. Bioinformatic analyses make it possible to mine huge metagenomic datasets and discover general patterns that govern microbial ecosystems. However, the findings of typical metagenomic and bioinformatic analyses still do not completely describe the ecology and evolution of microbes in their environments. Most analyses still depend on straightforward sequence similarity searches against reference databases. We herein review the current state of metagenomics and bioinformatics in microbial ecology and discuss future directions for the field. New techniques will allow us to go beyond routine analyses and broaden our knowledge of microbial ecosystems. We need to enrich reference databases, promote platforms that enable meta- or comprehensive analyses of diverse metagenomic datasets, devise methods that utilize long-read sequence information, and develop more powerful bioinformatic methods to analyze data from diverse perspectives. PMID:27383682

  9. Assessment of metagenomic assembly using simulated next generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mende, Daniel R; Waller, Alison S; Sunagawa, Shinichi;

    2012-01-01

    Due to the complexity of the protocols and a limited knowledge of the nature of microbial communities, simulating metagenomic sequences plays an important role in testing the performance of existing tools and data analysis methods with metagenomic data. We developed metagenomic read simulators...... with platform-specific (Sanger, pyrosequencing, Illumina) base-error models, and simulated metagenomes of differing community complexities. We first evaluated the effect of rigorous quality control on Illumina data. Although quality filtering removed a large proportion of the data, it greatly improved....... Although the increase in contig length was accompanied by increased chimericity, it resulted in more complete genes and a better characterization of the functional repertoire. The metagenomic simulators developed for this research are freely available....

  10. Stability-increasing effects of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang-Ling; Yu, Yu-Qi; Chen, Zhong-Jian; Wen, Guo-Song; Wei, Fu-Gang; Zheng, Quan; Wang, Chong-De; Xiao, Xing-Lei

    2017-01-01

    This review comprehensively summarizes the existing knowledge regarding the chemical implications of anthocyanin glycosyl acylation, the effects of acylation on the stability of acylated anthocyanins and the corresponding mechanisms. Anthocyanin glycosyl acylation commonly refers to the phenomenon in which the hydroxyl groups of anthocyanin glycosyls are esterified by aliphatic or aromatic acids, which is synthetically represented by the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups. Generally, glycosyl acylation increases the in vitro and in vivo chemical stability of acylated anthocyanins, and the mechanisms primarily involve physicochemical, stereochemical, photochemical, biochemical or environmental aspects under specific conditions. Additionally, the acylation sites as well as the types and numbers of acyl groups influence the stability of acylated anthocyanins to different degrees. This review could provide insight into the optimization of the stability of anthocyanins as well as the application of suitable anthocyanins in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. PMID:27507456

  11. Glycosyl dithiocarbamates: β-selective couplings without auxiliary groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2014-03-21

    In this article, we evaluate glycosyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) with unprotected C2 hydroxyls as donors in β-linked oligosaccharide synthesis. We report a mild, one-pot conversion of glycals into β-glycosyl DTCs via DMDO oxidation with subsequent ring opening by DTC salts, which can be generated in situ from secondary amines and CS2. Glycosyl DTCs are readily activated with Cu(I) or Cu(II) triflate at low temperatures and are amenable to reiterative synthesis strategies, as demonstrated by the efficient construction of a tri-β-1,6-linked tetrasaccharide. Glycosyl DTC couplings are highly β-selective despite the absence of a preexisting C2 auxiliary group. We provide evidence that the directing effect is mediated by the C2 hydroxyl itself via the putative formation of a cis-fused bicyclic intermediate. PMID:24548247

  12. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  13. Enhanced Aromatic Sequons Increase Oligosaccharyltransferase Glycosylation Efficiency and Glycan Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amber N; Chen, Wentao; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Hanson, Sarah R; Wiseman, R Luke; Dell, Anne; Haslam, Stuart M; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2015-08-20

    N-Glycosylation plays an important role in protein folding and function. Previous studies demonstrate that a phenylalanine residue introduced at the n-2 position relative to an Asn-Xxx-Thr/Ser N-glycosylation sequon increases the glycan occupancy of the sequon in insect cells. Here, we show that any aromatic residue at n-2 increases glycan occupancy in human cells and that this effect is dependent upon oligosaccharyltransferase substrate preferences rather than differences in other cellular processing events such as degradation or trafficking. Moreover, aromatic residues at n-2 alter glycan processing in the Golgi, producing proteins with less complex N-glycan structures. These results demonstrate that manipulating the sequence space surrounding N-glycosylation sequons is useful both for controlling glycosylation efficiency, thus enhancing glycan occupancy, and for influencing the N-glycan structures produced. PMID:26190824

  14. A glycogene mutation map for discovery of diseases of glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Joshi, Hiren J;

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids involves over 200 known glycosyltransferases, and deleterious defects in many of the genes encoding these enzymes cause disorders collectively classified as Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDGs). Most known CDGs are caused by defects in glycogenes that...... effects glycosylation globally. Many glycosyltransferases are members of homologous isoenzyme families and deficiencies in individual isoenzymes may not affect glycosylation globally. In line with this there appears to be an underrepresentation of disease-causing glycogenes among these larger isoenzyme...... populations, which can be used to predict and/or analyze functional deleterious mutations. Here, we constructed a draft of a Functional Mutational Map of glycogenes, GlyMAP, from WES of a rather homogenous population of 2,000 Danes. We catalogued all missense mutations and used prediction algorithms, manual...

  15. Deciphering the Glycosylation of Sap9 and Sap10 Proteases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novák, Petr; Man, Petr; Dostál, Jiří; Pichová, Iva

    San Antonio, 2005, WP15. [ASMS Conference /53./. San Antonio (US), 05.06.2005-09.06.2005] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : glycosylation * virulence factor Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  16. Enzymatic Glycosylation of Small Molecules: Challenging Substrates Require Tailored Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Desmet, T.; Soetaert, W.; Bojarová, Pavla; Křen, Vladimír; Dijkhuizen, L.; Eastwick-Field, V.; Schiller, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 35 (2012), s. 10786-10801. ISSN 0947-6539 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : acceptor specificity * enzyme engineering * glycosylation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.831, year: 2012

  17. Multiple proteins with essential mitochondrial functions have glycosylated isoforms

    OpenAIRE

    Burnham-Marusich, Amanda R.; Berninsone, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Nucleocytosolic and secreted proteins are commonly glycosylated. However, reports of glycosylated mitochondrial proteins are rare. Using lectin chromatography on bovine heart, we detected low-abundance glycoforms of nuclear-encoded proteins with well-established mitochondrial function: pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α, NADH dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur protein 3, ADP/ATP translocase, ATP synthase d and oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein. Notably, the latter two have been previously...

  18. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Mahan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  .

  19. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Alison E; Jennewein, Madeleine F; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H; Alter, Galit

    2016-03-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a specific set of instructions to the innate immune system to direct the elimination of antibody-bound antigens. While it is clear that subclass selection is actively regulated during the course of natural infection, it is unclear whether antibody glycosylation can be tuned, in a signal-specific or pathogen-specific manner. Here, we show that antibody glycosylation is determined in an antigen- and pathogen-specific manner during HIV infection. Moreover, while dramatic differences exist in bulk IgG glycosylation among individuals in distinct geographical locations, immunization is able to overcome these differences and elicit antigen-specific antibodies with similar antibody glycosylation patterns. Additionally, distinct vaccine regimens induced different antigen-specific IgG glycosylation profiles, suggesting that antibody glycosylation is not only programmable but can be manipulated via the delivery of distinct inflammatory signals during B cell priming. These data strongly suggest that the immune system naturally drives antibody glycosylation in an antigen-specific manner and highlights a promising means by which next-generation therapeutics and vaccines can harness the antiviral activity of the innate immune system via directed alterations in antibody glycosylation in vivo.  . PMID:26982805

  20. Synthesis of new glycosylated zinc phthalocyanines and naphthalocyanines

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Zafar

    2010-01-01

    Glycosylated phthalocyanines (Pc’s) despite their great potential for the generation of reactive oxygen species (singlet oxygen), are less common in literature. Reactive oxygen species are potent oxidant and are used for the destruction of cancer cells in a therapeutic technique called as photodynamic therapy (PDT). Objective of this work was to synthesize a structural variety of glycosylated zinc(II) phthalocyanines for PDT applications. We chose to prepare phthalocyanines, tetra- and octagl...

  1. Glycoengineering of yeasts from the perspective of glycosylation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piirainen, Mari A; de Ruijter, Jorg C; Koskela, Essi V; Frey, Alexander D

    2014-12-25

    N-linked glycosylation of proteins is one of the most common posttranslational modifications. N-glycan structures and N-glycosylation efficiency are crucial parameters in the production of N-glycosylated proteins. Yeast cells can be seen as an attractive production host for therapeutic glycoproteins and pioneering work of glycoengineering was performed in Pichia pastoris, realizing yeast strains capable of producing defined, human-type N-glycans. Most strategies used for glycoengineering rely on the modification of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis for the generation of the substrate for Golgi-localized glycosyltransferases. However, modifications in the lipid-linked oligosaccharide biosynthesis often result in the accumulation of intermediate structures and cause hypoglycosylation of client proteins. In order to ensure complete N-glycosylation, the flow of lipid-linked oligosaccharide through the biosynthetic pathway and the transfer of the oligosaccharide from the donor lipid onto the protein have to be optimized. A promising tool to improve site occupancy is the expression of protozoan oligosaccharyltransferases, which possess altered specificities for the oligosaccharide and also for the protein acceptor site. Furthermore, flipping of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide into the ER lumen can be improved by overexpression of an artificial flippase. Improving the glycosylation efficiency ensures that not only homogeneous N-glycan structures are generated, but also client proteins are fully glycosylated. PMID:24632452

  2. Engineering Mammalian Mucin-type O-Glycosylation in Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Drew, Damian P; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2012-01-01

    -glycans are attached to proteins, and which structures are formed, difficult. Because plants are devoid of GalNAc-type O-glycosylation, we have assessed requirements for establishing human GalNAc O-glycosylation de novo in plants with the aim of developing cell systems with custom-designed O...... of MUC1 was glycosylated with up to three and five GalNAc residues when co-expressed with GalNAc-T2 and a combination of GalNAc-T2 and GalNAc-T4, respectively, as determined by mass spectrometry. O-Glycosylation was furthermore demonstrated on a tandem repeat of MUC16 and interferon a2b. In plants......, prolines in certain classes of proteins are hydroxylated and further substituted with plant-specific O-glycosylation; unsubstituted hydroxyprolines were identified in our MUC1 construct. In summary, this study demonstrates that mammalian type O-glycosylation can be established in plants and that plants may...

  3. Metagenomic approaches to identifying infectious agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höper, D; Mettenleiter, T C; Beer, M

    2016-04-01

    Since the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies, the untargeted screening of samples from outbreaks for pathogen identification using metagenomics has become technically and economically feasible. However, various aspects need to be considered in order to exploit the full potential of NGS for virus discovery. Here, the authors summarise those aspects of the main steps that have a significant impact, from sample selection through sample handling and processing, as well as sequencing and finally data analysis, with a special emphasis on existing pitfalls. PMID:27217170

  4. Disulfide bonds and glycosylation in fungal peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongi, P; Kjalke, M; Vind, J; Tams, J W; Johansson, T; Welinder, K G

    1995-01-15

    Four conserved disulfide bonds and N-linked and O-linked glycans of extracellular fungal peroxidases have been identified from studies of a lignin and a manganese peroxidase from Trametes versicolor, and from Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) and recombinant C. cinereus peroxidase (rCIP) expressed in Aspergillus oryzae. The eight cysteine residues are linked 1-3, 2-7, 4-5 and 6-8, and are located differently from the four conserved disulfide bridges present in the homologous plant peroxidases. CIP and rCIP were identical in their glycosylation pattern, although the extent of glycan chain heterogeneity depended on the fermentation batch. CIP and rCIP have one N-linked glycan composed only of GlcNAc and Man at residue Asn142, and two O-linked glycans near the C-terminus. The major glycoform consists of single Man residues at Thr331 and at Ser338. T. versicolor lignin isoperoxidase TvLP10 contains a single N-linked glycan composed of (GlcNAc)2Man5 bound to Asn103, whereas (GlcNAc)2Man3 was found in T. versicolor manganese isoperoxidase TvMP2 at the same position. In addition, mass spectrometry of the C-terminal peptide of TvMP2 indicated the presence of five Man residues in O-linked glycans. No phosphate was found in these fungal peroxidases. PMID:7851395

  5. Glycosylated hemoglobin and hyperbaric oxygen coverage denials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, A D; Worth, E R; Weaver, L K

    2015-01-01

    Some Medicaid and Medicare fiscal intermediaries are denying hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) patients if the glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) > 7.0%. We performed multiple PubMed searches for any diabetic wound healing clinical trial that documented HbA1c and had a wound healing endpoint. We scrutinized 30 peer-reviewed clinical trials, representing more than 4,400 patients. The average HbA1c from the intervention side of the studies was 8.6% (7.2% - 9.9%) and the control/sham side was 8.3% (6.0% - 10.6%). Twelve studies made a direct attempt to link HbA1c and wound healing. Four retrospective studies and one prospective cohort study assert that lower HbA1c favors wound healing, but review of the studies reveal design flaws that invalidate these conclusions. In total, 25 studies showed no direct correlation between HbA1c levels and wound healing. There was no randomized controlled trial (RCT) data demonstrating that HbA1c controlled by the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Frequently, patients lack optimal blood glucose control when they have a limb-threatening DFU. The evidence supports that denying hyperbaric oxygen to those with HbA1c > 7.0% is unfounded. PMID:26152104

  6. Identifying personal microbiomes using metagenomic codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzosa, Eric A; Huang, Katherine; Meadow, James F; Gevers, Dirk; Lemon, Katherine P; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Huttenhower, Curtis

    2015-06-01

    Community composition within the human microbiome varies across individuals, but it remains unknown if this variation is sufficient to uniquely identify individuals within large populations or stable enough to identify them over time. We investigated this by developing a hitting set-based coding algorithm and applying it to the Human Microbiome Project population. Our approach defined body site-specific metagenomic codes: sets of microbial taxa or genes prioritized to uniquely and stably identify individuals. Codes capturing strain variation in clade-specific marker genes were able to distinguish among 100s of individuals at an initial sampling time point. In comparisons with follow-up samples collected 30-300 d later, ∼30% of individuals could still be uniquely pinpointed using metagenomic codes from a typical body site; coincidental (false positive) matches were rare. Codes based on the gut microbiome were exceptionally stable and pinpointed >80% of individuals. The failure of a code to match its owner at a later time point was largely explained by the loss of specific microbial strains (at current limits of detection) and was only weakly associated with the length of the sampling interval. In addition to highlighting patterns of temporal variation in the ecology of the human microbiome, this work demonstrates the feasibility of microbiome-based identifiability-a result with important ethical implications for microbiome study design. The datasets and code used in this work are available for download from huttenhower.sph.harvard.edu/idability. PMID:25964341

  7. Genovo: De Novo Assembly for Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laserson, Jonathan; Jojic, Vladimir; Koller, Daphne

    Next-generation sequencing technologies produce a large number of noisy reads from the DNA in a sample. Metagenomics and population sequencing aim to recover the genomic sequences of the species in the sample, which could be of high diversity. Methods geared towards single sequence reconstruction are not sensitive enough when applied in this setting. We introduce a generative probabilistic model of read generation from environmental samples and present Genovo, a novel de novo sequence assembler that discovers likely sequence reconstructions under the model. A Chinese restaurant process prior accounts for the unknown number of genomes in the sample. Inference is made by applying a series of hill-climbing steps iteratively until convergence. We compare the performance of Genovo to three other short read assembly programs across one synthetic dataset and eight metagenomic datasets created using the 454 platform, the largest of which has 311k reads. Genovo's reconstructions cover more bases and recover more genes than the other methods, and yield a higher assembly score.

  8. Metagenome Fragment Classification Using -Mer Frequency Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Rosen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of microbial sequencing data is being generated through large-scale projects in ecology, agriculture, and human health. Efficient high-throughput methods are needed to analyze the mass amounts of metagenomic data, all DNA present in an environmental sample. A major obstacle in metagenomics is the inability to obtain accuracy using technology that yields short reads. We construct the unique -mer frequency profiles of 635 microbial genomes publicly available as of February 2008. These profiles are used to train a naive Bayes classifier (NBC that can be used to identify the genome of any fragment. We show that our method is comparable to BLAST for small 25 bp fragments but does not have the ambiguity of BLAST's tied top scores. We demonstrate that this approach is scalable to identify any fragment from hundreds of genomes. It also performs quite well at the strain, species, and genera levels and achieves strain resolution despite classifying ubiquitous genomic fragments (gene and nongene regions. Cross-validation analysis demonstrates that species-accuracy achieves 90% for highly-represented species containing an average of 8 strains. We demonstrate that such a tool can be used on the Sargasso Sea dataset, and our analysis shows that NBC can be further enhanced.

  9. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper;

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomic selections represent a powerful technique that is widely applied for identification of novel genes from complex metagenomic sources. However, whereas hundreds to thousands of clones can be easily generated and sequenced over a few days of experiments, analyzing the data...... is time consuming and constitutes a major bottleneck for experimental researchers in the field. Here we present the deFUME web server, an easy-to-use web-based interface for processing, annotation and visualization of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non...

  10. Protein glycosylation in Helicobacter pylori: beyond the flagellins?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S Hopf

    Full Text Available Glycosylation of flagellins by pseudaminic acid is required for virulence in Helicobacter pylori. We demonstrate that, in H. pylori, glycosylation extends to proteins other than flagellins and to sugars other than pseudaminic acid. Several candidate glycoproteins distinct from the flagellins were detected via ProQ-emerald staining and DIG- or biotin- hydrazide labeling of the soluble and outer membrane fractions of wild-type H. pylori, suggesting that protein glycosylation is not limited to the flagellins. DIG-hydrazide labeling of proteins from pseudaminic acid biosynthesis pathway mutants showed that the glycosylation of some glycoproteins is not dependent on the pseudaminic acid glycosylation pathway, indicating the existence of a novel glycosylation pathway. Fractions enriched in glycoprotein candidates by ion exchange chromatography were used to extract the sugars by acid hydrolysis. High performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection revealed characteristic monosaccharide peaks in these extracts. The monosaccharides were then identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. The spectra are consistent with sugars such as 5,7-diacetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Ac7Ac previously described on flagellins, 5-acetamidino-7-acetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-L-manno-nonulosonic acid (Pse5Am7Ac, bacillosamine derivatives and a potential legionaminic acid derivative (Leg5AmNMe7Ac which were not previously identified in H. pylori. These data open the way to the study of the mechanism and role of protein glycosylation on protein function and virulence in H. pylori.

  11. Prion propagation in cells expressing PrP glycosylation mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamat, Muhammad K; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jérôme; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-04-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrP(C)) to a disease-related isoform (PrP(Sc)). PrP(C) carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrP(C) glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both attachment sites. We examined their subcellular trafficking and ability to convert into PrP(Sc) and to sustain stable prion propagation in the absence of wild-type PrP. The susceptibility to infection of mutants monoglycosylated at either site differed dramatically depending on the amino acid substitution. Aglycosylated double mutants showed overaccumulation in the Golgi compartment and failed to be infected. Introduction of an ectopic glycosylation site near the N terminus fully restored cell surface expression of PrP but not convertibility into PrP(Sc), while PrP(C) with three glycosylation sites conferred cell permissiveness to infection similarly to the wild type. In contrast, predominantly aglycosylated molecules with nonmutated N-glycosylation sequons, produced in cells expressing glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchorless PrP(C), were able to form infectious PrP(Sc). Together our findings suggest that glycosylation is important for efficient trafficking of anchored PrP to the cell surface and sustained prion propagation. However, properly trafficked glycosylation mutants were not necessarily prone to conversion, thus making it difficult in such studies to discern whether the amino acid changes or glycan chain removal most influences the permissiveness to prion infection. PMID:21248032

  12. A cost-effective strategy for the bio-prospecting of mixed microalgae with high carbohydrate content: diversity fluctuations in different growth media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cea-Barcia, Glenda; Buitrón, Germán; Moreno, Gloria; Kumar, Gopalakrishnan

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, widespread efforts have been directed towards decreasing the costs associated with microalgae culture systems for the production of biofuels. In this study, a simple and inexpensive strategy to bio-prospect and cultivate mixed indigenous chlorophytes with a high carbohydrate content for biomethane and biohydrogen production was developed. Mixed microalgae were collected from four different water-bodies in Queretaro, Mexico, and were grown in Bold's basal mineral medium and secondary effluent from a wastewater treatment plant using inexpensive photo-bioreactors. The results showed large fluctuations in microalgal genera diversity based on different culture media and nitrogen sources. In secondary effluent, Golenkinia sp. and Scenedesmus sp. proliferated. The carbohydrate content, for secondary effluent, varied between 12% and 57%, and the highest volumetric and areal productivity were 61 mg L(-1)d(-1) and 4.6 g m(-2)d(-1), respectively. These results indicate that mixed microalgae are a good feedstock for biomethane and biohydrogen production. PMID:24857418

  13. Cnidarians as a Source of New Marine Bioactive Compounds—An Overview of the Last Decade and Future Steps for Bioprospecting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Rocha

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine invertebrates are rich sources of bioactive compounds and their biotechnological potential attracts scientific and economic interest worldwide. Although sponges are the foremost providers of marine bioactive compounds, cnidarians are also being studied with promising results. This diverse group of marine invertebrates includes over 11,000 species, 7500 of them belonging to the class Anthozoa. We present an overview of some of the most promising marine bioactive compounds from a therapeutic point of view isolated from cnidarians in the first decade of the 21st century. Anthozoan orders Alcyonacea and Gorgonacea exhibit by far the highest number of species yielding promising compounds. Antitumor activity has been the major area of interest in the screening of cnidarian compounds, the most promising ones being terpenoids (monoterpenoids, diterpenoids, sesquiterpenoids. We also discuss the future of bioprospecting for new marine bioactive compounds produced by cnidarians.

  14. Glycosylated Nanoparticles as Efficient Antimicrobial Delivery Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Ahmed M; Abdulkarim, Ali; Sharples, Gary J; Cameron, Neil R

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic polymer nanoparticles that can be tailored through multivalent ligand display on the surface, while at the same time allowing encapsulation of desired bioactive molecules, are especially useful in providing a versatile and robust platform in the design of specific delivery vehicles for various purposes. Glycosylated nanoparticles (glyco-NPs) of a poly(n-butyl acrylate) (pBA) core and poly(N-2-(β-d-glucosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGlcEAM)) or poly(N-2-(β-D-galactosyloxy)ethyl acrylamide) (p(NβGalEAM)) corona were prepared via nanoprecipitation in aqueous solutions of preformed amphiphilic glycopolymers. Well-defined block copolymers of (poly(pentafluorophenyl acrylate) (pPFPA) and pBA were first prepared by RAFT polymerization followed by postpolymerization functionalization with aminoethyl glycosides to yield p(NβGlcEAM-b-BA) and p(NβGalEAM-b-BA), which were then used to form glyco-NPs (glucosylated and galactosylated NPs, Glc-NPs and Gal-NPs, respectively). The glyco-NPs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and TEM. Encapsulation and release of ampicillin, leading to nanoparticles that we have termed "glyconanobiotics", were studied. The ampicillin-loaded glyco-NPs were found to induce aggregation of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and resulted in antibacterial activity approaching that of ampicillin itself. This glyconanobiotics strategy represents a potential new approach for the delivery of antibiotics close to the surface of bacteria by promoting bacterial aggregation. Defined release in the proximity of the bacterial envelope may thus enhance antibacterial efficiency and potentially reduce the quantities of agent required for potency. PMID:27434596

  15. Glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles by emulsion polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeylath, Sampath C; Turos, Edward

    2007-08-01

    A selection of glycosylated polyacrylate nanoparticles has been prepared by radical-initiated emulsion polymerization in aqueous media. Using ethyl acrylate as a co-monomer, carbohydrate acrylates were incorporated into the poly(ethyl acrylate) framework to give stable emulsions of glyconanoparticles with an average particle size of around 40 nm. Using this technique a variety of glyconanoparticles were prepared from 3-O-acryloyl-1,2:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-glucofuranose, 1-O-acryloyl-2,3:5,6-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-mannofuranose, 6-O-acryloyl-1,2:3,4-di-O-isopropylidene-alpha-D-galactopyranose, 2-N-acryloyl-1,3,4,6-tetra-O-acetyl-beta-D-glucosamine, 5-O-acryloyl-2,3-isopropylidene-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose and 4-N-acetyl-5'-O-acryloyl-2',3'-O-isopropylidene cytidine. Scanning electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and proton NMR analysis of the emulsions indicated essentially 100% incorporation of the carbohydrate acrylate monomer into the polymer with the exception of O-benzyl- and O-benzoyl-protected carbohydrate acrylates, which gave incomplete incorporation. Formation of larger glyconanoparticles of ~80nm with (unprotected) 3-O-acryloyl-D-glucose and 5-O-acryloyl-1-methoxy-beta-D-ribofuranose revealed the influence of free hydroxyl groups in the monomer on the particle size during polymerization, a feature which is also apparently dependent on the amount of carbohydrate in the matrix. This methodology allows for a new, simple route to the synthesis of polymeric glyconanoparticles with potential applications in targeted drug delivery and materials development. PMID:18677404

  16. Bioprospecting of microalgae: Proper extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatographic-high resolution mass spectrometric fingerprinting as key tools for successful metabolom characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranska-Zachariasova, Milena; Kastanek, Petr; Dzuman, Zbynek; Rubert, Josep; Godula, Michal; Hajslova, Jana

    2016-03-15

    Currently, the interest in microalgae as a source of biologically active components exploitable as supplementary ingredients to food/feed or in cosmetics continues to increase. Existing research mainly aims to focus on revealing and recovering the rare, cost competitive components of the algae metabolom. Because these components could be of very different physicochemical character, a universal approach for their isolation and characterization should be developed. This study demonstrates the systematic development of the extraction strategy that represents one of the key challenges in effective algae bioprospecting, which predefines their further industrial application. By using of Trachydiscus minutus as a model microalgae biomass, following procedures were tested and critically evaluated in order to develop the generic procedure for microalgae bioprospecting: (i) various ways of mechanical disintegration of algae cells enabling maximum extraction efficiency, (ii) the use of a wide range of extraction solvents/solvent mixtures suitable for optimal extraction yields of polar, medium-polar, and non-polar compounds, (iii) the use of consecutive extractions as a fractionation approach. Within the study, targeted screening of selected compounds representing broad range of polarities was realized by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution tandem mass spectrometric detection (UHPLC-HRMS/MS), to assess the effectiveness of undertaken isolation steps. As a result, simple and high-throughput extraction-fractionation strategy based on consecutive extraction with water-aqueous methanol-hexane/isopropanol was developed. Moreover, to demonstrate the potential of the UHPLC-HRMS/MS for the retrospective non-target screening and compounds identification, the collected mass spectra have been evaluated to characterize the pattern of extracted metabolites. Attention was focused on medium-/non-polar extracts and characterization of lipid species

  17. Analysis and comparison of very large metagenomes with fast clustering and functional annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The remarkable advance of metagenomics presents significant new challenges in data analysis. Metagenomic datasets (metagenomes are large collections of sequencing reads from anonymous species within particular environments. Computational analyses for very large metagenomes are extremely time-consuming, and there are often many novel sequences in these metagenomes that are not fully utilized. The number of available metagenomes is rapidly increasing, so fast and efficient metagenome comparison methods are in great demand. Results The new metagenomic data analysis method Rapid Analysis of Multiple Metagenomes with a Clustering and Annotation Pipeline (RAMMCAP was developed using an ultra-fast sequence clustering algorithm, fast protein family annotation tools, and a novel statistical metagenome comparison method that employs a unique graphic interface. RAMMCAP processes extremely large datasets with only moderate computational effort. It identifies raw read clusters and protein clusters that may include novel gene families, and compares metagenomes using clusters or functional annotations calculated by RAMMCAP. In this study, RAMMCAP was applied to the two largest available metagenomic collections, the "Global Ocean Sampling" and the "Metagenomic Profiling of Nine Biomes". Conclusion RAMMCAP is a very fast method that can cluster and annotate one million metagenomic reads in only hundreds of CPU hours. It is available from http://tools.camera.calit2.net/camera/rammcap/.

  18. Defectively N-glycosylated and non-O-glycosylated aminopeptidase N (CD13) is normally expressed at the cell surface and has full enzymatic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norén, K; Hansen, Gert Helge; Clausen, H;

    1997-01-01

    the glycoprotein aminopeptidase N can be synthesized and the effects of altered glycosylation can be studied. It is demonstrated that aminopeptidase N carries "mucin-type" O-glycans and that this is predominantly located in the stalk, which connects the catalytic headgroup to the membrane anchor...... changes in N-glycosylation as the various glycosylated forms of aminopeptidase N are normally converted from the high-mannose form to the complex glycosylated form. Enzymatic activity is not influenced by the changes in glycosylation....

  19. Quantifying environmental adaptation of metabolic pathways in metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gianoulis, Tara A; Raes, Jeroen; Patel, Prianka V;

    2009-01-01

    Recently, approaches have been developed to sample the genetic content of heterogeneous environments (metagenomics). However, by what means these sequences link distinct environmental conditions with specific biological processes is not well understood. Thus, a major challenge is how the usage...

  20. Functional Metagenomic Investigations of the Human Intestinal Microbiota

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Aimee M.; Munck, Christian; Sommer, Morten Otto Alexander;

    2011-01-01

    of this microbial community, its recalcitrance to standard cultivation, and the immense diversity of its encoded genes has necessitated the development of novel molecular, microbiological, and genomic tools. Functional metagenomics is one such culture-independent technique, used for decades to study environmental...... microorganisms, but relatively recently applied to the study of the human commensal microbiota. Metagenomic functional screens characterize the functional capacity of a microbial community, independent of identity to known genes, by subjecting the metagenome to functional assays in a genetically tractable host....... Here we highlight recent work applying this technique to study the functional diversity of the intestinal microbiota, and discuss how an approach combining high-throughput sequencing, cultivation, and metagenomic functional screens can improve our understanding of interactions between this complex...

  1. Quantitative metagenomic analyses based on average genome size normalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Jeremy Alexander; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Over the past quarter-century, microbiologists have used DNA sequence information to aid in the characterization of microbial communities. During the last decade, this has expanded from single genes to microbial community genomics, or metagenomics, in which the gene content of an environment can...... provide not just a census of the community members but direct information on metabolic capabilities and potential interactions among community members. Here we introduce a method for the quantitative characterization and comparison of microbial communities based on the normalization of metagenomic data...... by estimating average genome sizes. This normalization can relieve comparative biases introduced by differences in community structure, number of sequencing reads, and sequencing read lengths between different metagenomes. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by comparing metagenomes from two different...

  2. Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

    Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

  3. Metagenomics of Glassy-winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three new insect-infecting viruses, three endosymbiotic bacteria, a fungus, and a bacterial phage were discovered using a metagenomics approach to identify unknown organisms that live in association with the sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). The genetic composition of ...

  4. Comparative Metagenomics of Freshwater Microbial Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous analyses of a microbial metagenome from uranium and nitric-acid contaminated groundwater (FW106) showed significant environmental effects resulting from the rapid introduction of multiple contaminants. Effects include a massive loss of species and strain biodiversity, accumulation of toxin resistant genes in the metagenome and lateral transfer of toxin resistance genes between community members. To better understand these results in an ecological context, a second metagenome from a pristine groundwater system located along the same geological strike was sequenced and analyzed (FW301). It is hypothesized that FW301 approximates the ancestral FW106 community based on phylogenetic profiles and common geological parameters; however, even if is not the case, the datasets still permit comparisons between healthy and stressed groundwater ecosystems. Complex carbohydrate metabolism has been almost entirely lost in the stressed ecosystem. In contrast, the pristine system encodes a wide diversity of complex carbohydrate metabolism systems, suggesting that carbon turnover is very rapid and less leaky in the healthy groundwater system. FW301 encodes many (∼160+) carbon monoxide dehydrogenase genes while FW106 encodes none. This result suggests that the community is frequently exposed to oxygen from aerated rainwater percolating into the subsurface, with a resulting high rate of carbon metabolism and CO production. When oxygen levels fall, the CO then serves as a major carbon source for the community. FW301 appears to be capable of CO2 fixation via the reductive carboxylase (reverse TCA) cycle and possibly acetogenesis, activities; these activities are lacking in the heterotrophic FW106 system which relies exclusively on respiration of nitrate and/or oxygen for energy production. FW301 encodes a complete set of B12 biosynthesis pathway at high abundance suggesting the use of sodium gradients for energy production in the healthy groundwater community. Overall

  5. Meta-IDBA: A de Novo assembler for metagenomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Yu; Leung, Henry C. M.; S. M. YIU; Chin, Francis Y.L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing techniques allow us to generate reads from a microbial environment in order to analyze the microbial community. However, assembling of a set of mixed reads from different species to form contigs is a bottleneck of metagenomic research. Although there are many assemblers for assembling reads from a single genome, there are no assemblers for assembling reads in metagenomic data without reference genome sequences. Moreover, the performances of these assembl...

  6. MetaPar: Metagenomic Sequence Assembly via Iterative Reclassification

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, MinJi; Ligo, Jonathan G.; Emad, Amin; Farnoud, Farzad; Milenkovic, Olgica; Veeravalli, Venugopal V.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a parallel algorithmic architecture for metagenomic sequence assembly, termed MetaPar, which allows for significant reductions in assembly time and consequently enables the processing of large genomic datasets on computers with low memory usage. The gist of the approach is to iteratively perform read (re)classification based on phylogenetic marker genes and assembler outputs generated from random subsets of metagenomic reads. Once a sufficiently accurate classification within gen...

  7. mmnet: An R Package for Metagenomics Systems Biology Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Cao; Xiaofei Zheng; Fei Li; Xiaochen Bo

    2015-01-01

    The human microbiome plays important roles in human health and disease. Previous microbiome studies focused mainly on single pure species function and overlooked the interactions in the complex communities on system-level. A metagenomic approach introduced recently integrates metagenomic data with community-level metabolic network modeling, but no comprehensive tool was available for such kind of approaches. To facilitate these kinds of studies, we developed an R package, mmnet, to implement ...

  8. MOCAT: A Metagenomics Assembly and Gene Prediction Toolkit

    OpenAIRE

    Kultima, Jens Roat; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Li, Junhua; Chen, Weineng; Chen, Hua; Mende, Daniel R; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Pan, Qi; Liu, Binghang; Qin, Junjie; Wang, Jun; Bork, Peer

    2012-01-01

    MOCAT is a highly configurable, modular pipeline for fast, standardized processing of single or paired-end sequencing data generated by the Illumina platform. The pipeline uses state-of-the-art programs to quality control, map, and assemble reads from metagenomic samples sequenced at a depth of several billion base pairs, and predict protein-coding genes on assembled metagenomes. Mapping against reference databases allows for read extraction or removal, as well as abundance calculations. Rele...

  9. Metagenomics - a guide from sampling to data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics applies a suite of genomic technologies and bioinformatics tools to directly access the genetic content of entire communities of organisms. The field of metagenomics has been responsible for substantial advances in microbial ecology, evolution, and diversity over the past 5 to 10 years, and many research laboratories are actively engaged in it now. With the growing numbers of activities also comes a plethora of methodological knowledge and expertise that should guide future devel...

  10. Diagnostic metagenomics: potential applications to bacterial, viral and parasitic infections

    OpenAIRE

    Pallen, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The term ‘shotgun metagenomics’ is applied to the direct sequencing of DNA extracted from a sample without culture or target-specific amplification or capture. In diagnostic metagenomics, this approach is applied to clinical samples in the hope of detecting and characterizing pathogens. Here, I provide a conceptual overview, before reviewing several recent promising proof-of-principle applications of metagenomics in virus discovery, analysis of outbreaks and detection of pathogens in ...

  11. Metagenomics for studying unculturable microorganisms: cutting the Gordian knot

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick D Schloss; Handelsman, Jo

    2005-01-01

    More than 99% of prokaryotes in the environment cannot be cultured in the laboratory, a phenomenon that limits our understanding of microbial physiology, genetics, and community ecology. One way around this problem is metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning and analysis of microbial DNA extracted directly from an environmental sample. Recent advances in shotgun sequencing and computational methods for genome assembly have advanced the field of metagenomics to provide glimpses into the l...

  12. Comparative Viral Metagenomics of Environmental Samples from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Soo; Whon, Tae Woong; Bae, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of metagenomics into the field of virology has facilitated the exploration of viral communities in various natural habitats. Understanding the viral ecology of a variety of sample types throughout the biosphere is important per se, but it also has potential applications in clinical and diagnostic virology. However, the procedures used by viral metagenomics may produce technical errors, such as amplification bias, while public viral databases are very limited, which may hamper...

  13. Metagenomic-derived Insights of Microbial Communities Between Soil Biomes

    OpenAIRE

    Antonopoulos, Dionysios

    2012-01-01

    The astounding complexity of soil microbial communities poses challenges for mechanistically describing the myriad roles that soil microbes perform in ecosystem processes. Combining the increasingly lower cost of “now”-generation DNA sequencing technologies with high-volume data analysis platforms (like the MG-RAST metagenomics anlaysis server) provides a new level of observational resolution for environmental metagenomics. By combining the increased volume of data produced with these DNA seq...

  14. Metagenome Skimming of Insect Specimen Pools: Potential for Comparative Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Gillett, Conrad P. D. T.; Timmermans, Martijn J. T. N.; Vogler, Alfried P.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic analyses are challenging in metazoans, but high-copy number and repeat regions can be assembled from low-coverage sequencing by “genome skimming,” which is applied here as a new way of characterizing metagenomes obtained in an ecological or taxonomic context. Illumina shotgun sequencing on two pools of Coleoptera (beetles) of approximately 200 species each were assembled into tens of thousands of scaffolds. Repeated low-coverage sequencing recovered similar scaffold sets consisten...

  15. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  16. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    microbes isolated from human atherosclerotic vessels. However, high-resolution investigation of microbial infectious agents from human vessels that may contribute to atherosclerosis is very limited. In spite of the progress in recent sequencing technologies, analyzing host-associated metagenomes remain...... a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  17. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  18. A human gut microbial gene catalogue established by metagenomic sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Marcelo Bertalan Quintanilha; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn;

    2010-01-01

    To understand the impact of gut microbes on human health and well-being it is crucial to assess their genetic potential. Here we describe the Illumina-based metagenomic sequencing, assembly and characterization of 3.3 million non-redundant microbial genes, derived from 576.7 gigabases of sequence...... minimal gut metagenome and the minimal gut bacterial genome in terms of functions present in all individuals and most bacteria, respectively....

  19. Metagenomic sequencing of an in vitro-simulated microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Morgan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microbial life dominates the earth, but many species are difficult or even impossible to study under laboratory conditions. Sequencing DNA directly from the environment, a technique commonly referred to as metagenomics, is an important tool for cataloging microbial life. This culture-independent approach involves collecting samples that include microbes in them, extracting DNA from the samples, and sequencing the DNA. A sample may contain many different microorganisms, macroorganisms, and even free-floating environmental DNA. A fundamental challenge in metagenomics has been estimating the abundance of organisms in a sample based on the frequency with which the organism's DNA was observed in reads generated via DNA sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We created mixtures of ten microbial species for which genome sequences are known. Each mixture contained an equal number of cells of each species. We then extracted DNA from the mixtures, sequenced the DNA, and measured the frequency with which genomic regions from each organism was observed in the sequenced DNA. We found that the observed frequency of reads mapping to each organism did not reflect the equal numbers of cells that were known to be included in each mixture. The relative organism abundances varied significantly depending on the DNA extraction and sequencing protocol utilized. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We describe a new data resource for measuring the accuracy of metagenomic binning methods, created by in vitro-simulation of a metagenomic community. Our in vitro simulation can be used to complement previous in silico benchmark studies. In constructing a synthetic community and sequencing its metagenome, we encountered several sources of observation bias that likely affect most metagenomic experiments to date and present challenges for comparative metagenomic studies. DNA preparation methods have a particularly profound effect in our study, implying that samples

  20. Metagenomic Sequencing of an In Vitro-Simulated Microbial Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Jenna L.; Darling, Aaron E.; Eisen, Jonathan A.

    2009-12-01

    Background: Microbial life dominates the earth, but many species are difficult or even impossible to study under laboratory conditions. Sequencing DNA directly from the environment, a technique commonly referred to as metagenomics, is an important tool for cataloging microbial life. This culture-independent approach involves collecting samples that include microbes in them, extracting DNA from the samples, and sequencing the DNA. A sample may contain many different microorganisms, macroorganisms, and even free-floating environmental DNA. A fundamental challenge in metagenomics has been estimating the abundance of organisms in a sample based on the frequency with which the organism's DNA was observed in reads generated via DNA sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings: We created mixtures of ten microbial species for which genome sequences are known. Each mixture contained an equal number of cells of each species. We then extracted DNA from the mixtures, sequenced the DNA, and measured the frequency with which genomic regions from each organism was observed in the sequenced DNA. We found that the observed frequency of reads mapping to each organism did not reflect the equal numbers of cells that were known to be included in each mixture. The relative organism abundances varied significantly depending on the DNA extraction and sequencing protocol utilized. Conclusions/Significance: We describe a new data resource for measuring the accuracy of metagenomic binning methods, created by in vitro-simulation of a metagenomic community. Our in vitro simulation can be used to complement previous in silico benchmark studies. In constructing a synthetic community and sequencing its metagenome, we encountered several sources of observation bias that likely affect most metagenomic experiments to date and present challenges for comparative metagenomic studies. DNA preparation methods have a particularly profound effect in our study, implying that samples prepared with

  1. Uncovering oral Neisseria tropism and persistence using metagenomic sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donati, Claudio; Zolfo, Moreno; Albanese, Davide; Tin Truong, Duy; Asnicar, Francesco; Iebba, Valerio; Cavalieri, Duccio; Jousson, Olivier; De Filippo, Carlotta; Huttenhower, Curtis; Segata, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Microbial epidemiology and population genomics have previously been carried out near-exclusively for organisms grown in vitro. Metagenomics helps to overcome this limitation, but it is still challenging to achieve strain-level characterization of microorganisms from culture-independent data with sufficient resolution for epidemiological modelling. Here, we have developed multiple complementary approaches that can be combined to profile and track individual microbial strains. To specifically profile highly recombinant neisseriae from oral metagenomes, we integrated four metagenomic analysis techniques: single nucleotide polymorphisms in the clade's core genome, DNA uptake sequence signatures, metagenomic multilocus sequence typing and strain-specific marker genes. We applied these tools to 520 oral metagenomes from the Human Microbiome Project, finding evidence of site tropism and temporal intra-subject strain retention. Although the opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis is enriched for colonization in the throat, N. flavescens and N. subflava populate the tongue dorsum, and N. sicca, N. mucosa and N. elongata the gingival plaque. The buccal mucosa appeared as an intermediate ecological niche between the plaque and the tongue. The resulting approaches to metagenomic strain profiling are generalizable and can be extended to other organisms and microbiomes across environments. PMID:27572971

  2. A Bioinformatician's Guide to Metagenomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2008-08-01

    As random shotgun metagenomic projects proliferate and become the dominant source of publicly available sequence data, procedures for best practices in their execution and analysis become increasingly important. Based on our experience at the Joint Genome Institute, we describe step-by-step the chain of decisions accompanying a metagenomic project from the viewpoint of a bioinformatician. We guide the reader through a standard workflow for a metagenomic project beginning with pre-sequencing considerations such as community composition and sequence data type that will greatly influence downstream analyses. We proceed with recommendations for sampling and data generation including sample and metadata collection, community profiling, construction of shotgun libraries and sequencing strategies. We then discuss the application of generic sequence processing steps (read preprocessing, assembly, and gene prediction and annotation) to metagenomic datasets by contrast to genome projects. Different types of data analyses particular to metagenomes are then presented including binning, dominant population analysis and gene-centric analysis. Finally data management systems and issues are presented and discussed. We hope that this review will assist bioinformaticians and biologists in making better-informed decisions on their journey during a metagenomic project.

  3. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    Although glycosyl iodides have been known for more than 100 years, it was not until the 21st century that their full potential began to be harnessed for complex glycoconjugate synthesis. Mechanistic studies in the late 1990s probed glycosyl iodide formation by NMR spectroscopy and revealed important reactivity features embedded in protecting-group stereoelectronics. Differentially protected sugars having an anomeric acetate were reacted with trimethylsilyl iodide (TMSI) to generate the glycosyl iodides. In the absence of C-2 participation, generation of the glycosyl iodide proceeded by inversion of the starting anomeric acetate stereochemistry. Once formed, the glycosyl iodide readily underwent in situ anomerization, and in the presence of excess iodide, equilibrium concentrations of α- and β-iodides were established. Reactivity profiles depended upon the identity of the sugar and the protecting groups adorning it. Consistent with the modern idea of disarmed versus armed sugars, ester protecting groups diminished the reactivity of glycosyl iodides and ether protecting groups enhanced the reactivity. Thus, acetylated sugars were slower to form the iodide and anomerize than their benzylated analogues, and these disarmed glycosyl iodides could be isolated and purified, whereas armed ether-protected iodides could only be generated and reacted in situ. All other things being equal, the β-iodide was orders of magnitude more reactive than the thermodynamically more stable α-iodide, consistent with the idea of in situ anomerization introduced by Lemieux in the mid-20th century. Glycosyl iodides are far more reactive than the corresponding bromides, and with the increased reactivity comes increased stereocontrol, particularly when forming α-linked linear and branched oligosaccharides. Reactions with per-O-silylated glycosyl iodides are especially useful for the synthesis of α-linked glycoconjugates. Silyl ether protecting groups make the glycosyl iodide so reactive

  4. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique O. Duarte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients’ response to therapy.

  5. Mucin-Type O-Glycosylation in Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Henrique O; Freitas, Daniela; Gomes, Catarina; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation plays a crucial role in several physiological and pathological processes of the gastric tissue. Modifications in enzymes responsible for key glycosylation steps and the consequent abnormal biosynthesis and expression of their glycan products constitute well-established molecular hallmarks of disease state. This review addresses the major role played by mucins and associated O-glycan structures in Helicobacter pylori adhesion to the gastric mucosa and the subsequent establishment of a chronic infection, with concomitant drastic alterations of the gastric epithelium glycophenotype. Furthermore, alterations of mucin expression pattern and glycan signatures occurring in preneoplastic lesions and in gastric carcinoma are also described, as well as their impact throughout the gastric carcinogenesis cascade and in cancer progression. Altogether, mucin-type O-glycosylation alterations may represent promising biomarkers with potential screening and prognostic applications, as well as predictors of cancer patients' response to therapy. PMID:27409642

  6. Polar Glycosylated and Lateral Non-Glycosylated Flagella from Aeromonas hydrophila Strain AH-1 (Serotype O11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M. Fulton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Polar and but not lateral flagellin proteins from Aeromonas hydrophila strain AH-1 (serotype O11 were found to be glycosylated. Top-down mass spectrometry studies of purified polar flagellins suggested the presence of a 403 Da glycan of mass. Bottom-up mass spectrometry studies showed the polar flagellin peptides to be modified with 403 Da glycans in O-linkage. The MS fragmentation pattern of this putative glycan was similar to that of pseudaminic acid derivative. Mutants lacking the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid (pseB and pseI homologues were unable to produce polar flagella but no changes were observed in lateral flagella by post-transcriptional regulation of the flagellin. Complementation was achieved by reintroduction of the wild-type pseB and pseI. We compared two pathogenic features (adhesion to eukaryotic cells and biofilm production between the wild-type strain and two kinds of mutants: mutants lacking polar flagella glycosylation and lacking the O11-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS but with unaltered polar flagella glycosylation. Results suggest that polar flagella glycosylation is extremely important for A. hydrophila AH-1 adhesion to Hep-2 cells and biofilm formation. In addition, we show the importance of the polar flagella glycosylation for immune stimulation of IL-8 production via toll-“like” receptor 5 (TLR5.

  7. Expanding the marine virosphere using metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Megumi Mizuno

    Full Text Available Viruses infecting prokaryotic cells (phages are the most abundant entities of the biosphere and contain a largely uncharted wealth of genomic diversity. They play a critical role in the biology of their hosts and in ecosystem functioning at large. The classical approaches studying phages require isolation from a pure culture of the host. Direct sequencing approaches have been hampered by the small amounts of phage DNA present in most natural habitats and the difficulty in applying meta-omic approaches, such as annotation of small reads and assembly. Serendipitously, it has been discovered that cellular metagenomes of highly productive ocean waters (the deep chlorophyll maximum contain significant amounts of viral DNA derived from cells undergoing the lytic cycle. We have taken advantage of this phenomenon to retrieve metagenomic fosmids containing viral DNA from a Mediterranean deep chlorophyll maximum sample. This method allowed description of complete genomes of 208 new marine phages. The diversity of these genomes was remarkable, contributing 21 genomic groups of tailed bacteriophages of which 10 are completely new. Sequence based methods have allowed host assignment to many of them. These predicted hosts represent a wide variety of important marine prokaryotic microbes like members of SAR11 and SAR116 clades, Cyanobacteria and also the newly described low GC Actinobacteria. A metavirome constructed from the same habitat showed that many of the new phage genomes were abundantly represented. Furthermore, other available metaviromes also indicated that some of the new phages are globally distributed in low to medium latitude ocean waters. The availability of many genomes from the same sample allows a direct approach to viral population genomics confirming the remarkable mosaicism of phage genomes.

  8. Aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meany Danni L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the new roles for enzymes in personalized medicine builds on a rational approach to cancer biomarker discovery using enzyme-associated aberrant glycosylation. A hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation is associated with differential expressions of enzymes such as glycosyltransferase and glycosidases. The aberrant expressions of the enzymes in turn cause cancer cells to produce glycoproteins with specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures. Content In this review we provide examples of cancer biomarker discovery using aberrant glycosylation in three areas. First, changes in glycosylation machinery such as glycosyltransferases/glycosidases could be used as cancer biomarkers. Second, most of the clinically useful cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins. Discovery of specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures of these existing biomarkers could improve their cancer specificity, such as the discovery of AFP-L3, fucosylated glycoforms of AFP. Third, cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures provide a compelling rationale for discovering new biomarkers using glycomic and glycoproteomic technologies. Summary As a hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation allows for the rational design of biomarker discovery efforts. But more important, we need to translate these biomarkers from discovery to clinical diagnostics using good strategies, such as the lessons learned from translating the biomarkers discovered using proteomic technologies to OVA 1, the first FDA-cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multivariate Index Assay (IVDMIA. These lessons, providing important guidance in current efforts in biomarker discovery and translation, are applicable to the discovery of aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers as well.

  9. Engineering controlled mammalian type O-Glycosylation in plant cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Drew, Damian Paul; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2011-01-01

    Human mucins are large heavily O-glycosylated glycoproteins (>200 kDa), which account for the majority of proteins in mucus layers that e.g. hydrate, lubricate and protect cells from proteases as well as from pathogens. O-linked mucin glycans are truncated in many cancers, yielding truncated cancer...... specific glyco-peptide epitopes, such as the Tn epitope (GalNAc sugar attached to either Serine or Threonine), which are antigenic to the immune system. In the present study, we have identified plant cells as the only eukaryotic cells without mammalian type O-glycosylation or competing (for sites) O...

  10. INTERACTION BETWEEN THE SURFACE GLYCOSYLATED POLYPROPYLENE MEMBRANE AND LECTIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yang; Ling-shu Wan; Zhi-kang Xu

    2008-01-01

    A glycopolymer bearing glucose residues was tethered onto the surface of polypropylene microporous membrane by UV-induced graft polymerization of α-allyl glucoside. Concanavalin A (Con A), a glucose recognizing lectin, could be specifically adsorbed to the membrane surface. On the other hand, the membrane surface showed no recognition ability to another lectin peanut agglutinin. Moreover, the recognition complex between the glycosylated membrane surface and Con Acould be inhibited by glucose and mannose solution. This surface glycosylated membrane could be used as affinity membrane for protein separation and purification.

  11. Prion Propagation in Cells Expressing PrP Glycosylation Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Salamat, Muhammad Khalid; Dron, Michel; Chapuis, Jerome; Langevin, Christelle; Laude, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Infection by prions involves conversion of a host-encoded cell surface protein (PrPC) to a disease-related isoform (PrPSc). PrPC carries two glycosylation sites variably occupied by complex N-glycans, which have been suggested by previous studies to influence the susceptibility to these diseases and to determine characteristics of prion strains. We used the Rov cell system, which is susceptible to sheep prions, to generate a series of PrPC glycosylation mutants with mutations at one or both a...

  12. Estimating the extent of horizontal gene transfer in metagenomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moya Andrés

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in complete genomes has been widely studied, its influence in the evolution of natural communities of prokaryotes remains unknown. The availability of metagenomic sequences allows us to address the study of global patterns of prokaryotic evolution in samples from natural communities. However, the methods that have been commonly used for the study of HGT are not suitable for metagenomic samples. Therefore it is important to develop new methods or to adapt existing ones to be used with metagenomic sequences. Results We have created two different methods that are suitable for the study of HGT in metagenomic samples. The methods are based on phylogenetic and DNA compositional approaches, and have allowed us to assess the extent of possible HGT events in metagenomes for the first time. The methods are shown to be compatible and quite precise, although they probably underestimate the number of possible events. Our results show that the phylogenetic method detects HGT in between 0.8% and 1.5% of the sequences, while DNA compositional methods identify putative HGT in between 2% and 8% of the sequences. These ranges are very similar to these found in complete genomes by related approaches. Both methods act with a different sensitivity since they probably target HGT events of different ages: the compositional method mostly identifies recent transfers, while the phylogenetic is more suitable for the detections of older events. Nevertheless, the study of the number of HGT events in metagenomic sequences from different communities shows a consistent trend for both methods: the lower amount is found for the sequences of the Sargasso Sea metagenome, while the higher quantity is found in the whale fall metagenome from the bottom of the ocean. The significance of these observations is discussed. Conclusion The computational approaches that are used to find possible HGT events in complete

  13. Micropinocytic ingestion of glycosylated albumin by isolated microvessels: possible role in pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S K; Devenny, J J; Bitensky, M W

    1981-01-01

    Microvessels isolated from rat epididymal fat exhibit differential vesicular ingestion rates for unmodified and non-enzymatically glycosylated rat albumin. While unmodified rat albumin is excluded from ingestion by endothelial micropinocytic vesicles, glycosylated albumin is avidly taken up by endocytosis. Interaction of albumin and glycosylated albumin with endothelium was studied with a double-label fluorescence assay of micropinocytosis. When glycosylated albumin was present at a concentra...

  14. Comparison of pectin-degrading fungal communities in temperate forests using glycosyl hydrolase family 28 pectinase primers targeting Ascomycete fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacura, Matthew D; Sprockett, Daniel D; Heidenreich, Bess; Blackwood, Christopher B

    2016-04-01

    Fungi have developed a wide assortment of enzymes to break down pectin, a prevalent polymer in plant cell walls that is important in plant defense and structure. One enzyme family used to degrade pectin is the glycosyl hydrolase family 28 (GH28). In this study we developed primers for the amplification of GH28 coding genes from a database of 293 GH28 sequences from 40 fungal genomes. The primers were used to successfully amplify GH28 pectinases from all Ascomycota cultures tested, but only three out of seven Basidiomycota cultures. In addition, we further tested the primers in PCRs on metagenomic DNA extracted from senesced tree leaves from different forest ecosystems, followed by cloning and sequencing. Taxonomic specificity for Ascomycota GH28 genes was tested by comparing GH28 composition in leaves to internal transcribed spacer (ITS) amplicon composition using pyrosequencing. All sequences obtained from GH28 primers were classified as Ascomycota; in contrast, ITS sequences indicated that fungal communities were up to 39% Basidiomycetes. Analysis of leaf samples indicated that both forest stand and ecosystem type were important in structuring fungal communities. However, site played the prominent role in explaining GH28 composition, whereas ecosystem type was more important for ITS composition, indicating possible genetic drift between populations of fungi. Overall, these primers will have utility in understanding relationships between fungal community composition and ecosystem processes, as well as detection of potentially pathogenic Ascomycetes. PMID:26899925

  15. Bioprospecting marine plankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abida, Heni; Ruchaud, Sandrine; Rios, Laurent; Humeau, Anne; Probert, Ian; De Vargas, Colomban; Bach, Stéphane; Bowler, Chris

    2013-11-01

    The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics. PMID:24240981

  16. Bioprospecting Marine Plankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Bowler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ocean dominates the surface of our planet and plays a major role in regulating the biosphere. For example, the microscopic photosynthetic organisms living within provide 50% of the oxygen we breathe, and much of our food and mineral resources are extracted from the ocean. In a time of ecological crisis and major changes in our society, it is essential to turn our attention towards the sea to find additional solutions for a sustainable future. Remarkably, while we are overexploiting many marine resources, particularly the fisheries, the planktonic compartment composed of zooplankton, phytoplankton, bacteria and viruses, represents 95% of marine biomass and yet the extent of its diversity remains largely unknown and underexploited. Consequently, the potential of plankton as a bioresource for humanity is largely untapped. Due to their diverse evolutionary backgrounds, planktonic organisms offer immense opportunities: new resources for medicine, cosmetics and food, renewable energy, and long-term solutions to mitigate climate change. Research programs aiming to exploit culture collections of marine micro-organisms as well as to prospect the huge resources of marine planktonic biodiversity in the oceans are now underway, and several bioactive extracts and purified compounds have already been identified. This review will survey and assess the current state-of-the-art and will propose methodologies to better exploit the potential of marine plankton for drug discovery and for dermocosmetics.

  17. Environmental Metagenomics: The Data Assembly and Data Analysis Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinay; Maitra, S. S.; Shukla, Rohit Nandan

    2015-01-01

    Novel gene finding is one of the emerging fields in the environmental research. In the past decades the research was focused mainly on the discovery of microorganisms which were capable of degrading a particular compound. A lot of methods are available in literature about the cultivation and screening of these novel microorganisms. All of these methods are efficient for screening of microbes which can be cultivated in the laboratory. Microorganisms which live in extreme conditions like hot springs, frozen glaciers, acid mine drainage, etc. cannot be cultivated in the laboratory, this is because of incomplete knowledge about their growth requirements like temperature, nutrients and their mutual dependence on each other. The microbes that can be cultivated correspond only to less than 1 % of the total microbes which are present in the earth. Rest of the 99 % of uncultivated majority remains inaccessible. Metagenomics transcends the culture requirements of microbes. In metagenomics DNA is directly extracted from the environmental samples such as soil, seawater, acid mine drainage etc., followed by construction and screening of metagenomic library. With the ongoing research, a huge amount of metagenomic data is accumulating. Understanding this data is an essential step to extract novel genes of industrial importance. Various bioinformatics tools have been designed to analyze and annotate the data produced from the metagenome. The Bio-informatic requirements of metagenomics data analysis are different in theory and practice. This paper reviews the tools that are available for metagenomic data analysis and the capability such tools—what they can do and their web availability.

  18. MetaBinG: Using GPUs to Accelerate Metagenomic Sequence Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Peng; Xuan, Liming; Liu, Lei; Wei, Chaochun

    2011-01-01

    Metagenomic sequence classification is a procedure to assign sequences to their source genomes. It is one of the important steps for metagenomic sequence data analysis. Although many methods exist, classification of high-throughput metagenomic sequence data in a limited time is still a challenge. We present here an ultra-fast metagenomic sequence classification system (MetaBinG) using graphic processing units (GPUs). The accuracy of MetaBinG is comparable to the best existing systems and it c...

  19. Current opportunities and challenges in microbial metagenome analysis—a bioinformatic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Teeling, Hanno; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Metagenomics has become an indispensable tool for studying the diversity and metabolic potential of environmental microbes, whose bulk is as yet non-cultivable. Continual progress in next-generation sequencing allows for generating increasingly large metagenomes and studying multiple metagenomes over time or space. Recently, a new type of holistic ecosystem study has emerged that seeks to combine metagenomics with biodiversity, meta-expression and contextual data. Such ‘ecosystems biology’ ap...

  20. Glucosamine derived DISAL donors for stereoselective glycosylations under neutral conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathe, S.; Thygesen, M.B.; Larsen, K.; Petersen, L.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    DISAL (methyl 3,5-dinitrosa/icylate) D-glcosyl, D-galactosyl, D-mannosyl, and L-quinovosyl donors have previously provided the efficient glycosylation of a range of substrates under either strictly neutral, mildly basic, or very mildly Lewis acidic (LiClO4) conditions. Herein we report the synthe...

  1. Glycoproteins and Glycosylation Site Assignments in Cereal seed Proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol

    The study of plant proteomes is important to further the understanding of biological processes and enhance the agronomical and nutritional value of crops and food products. To gain deeper understanding on the proteome level, it is important to characterize posttranslational modifications. Glycosy......The study of plant proteomes is important to further the understanding of biological processes and enhance the agronomical and nutritional value of crops and food products. To gain deeper understanding on the proteome level, it is important to characterize posttranslational modifications...... supplementing cotton wool with ZIC-HILIC in a microcolumn (called ZIC-cotton). This approach reduced co-enrichment of non-glycosylated peptides and allowed glycoppeptide identification from large protein mixtures. It was applied for glycoprotein identification and glycosylation site assignment in wheat albumin...... and barley aleurone layer proteins. By sitespecific glycosylation labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis, 76 different glycosylation sites within 65 wheat albumin proteins were identified using a combination of ZIC-cotton and cotton wool. In addition, ZIC-cotton has been also applied to proteins produced from...

  2. Recent developments in the enzymatic O-glycosylation of flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    The glycosylation of bioactive compounds, such as flavonoids, is of particular relevance, as it modulates many of their pharmacokinetic parameters. This article reviews the literature between 2010 and the end of 2015 that deals with the enzymatic O-glycosylation of this class of compounds. Enzymes of glycosyltransferase family 1 remain the biocatalysts of choice for glycodiversification of flavonoids, in spite of relatively low yields. Transfers of 14 different sugars, in addition to glucose, were reported. Several Escherichia coli strains were metabolically engineered to enable a (more efficient) synthesis of the required donor during in vivo glycosylations. For the transfer of glucose, enzymes of glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 70 were successfully assayed with several flavonoids. The number of acceptor substrates and of regiospecificities characterized so far is smaller than for glycosyltransferases. However, their glycosyl donors are much cheaper and yields are considerably higher. A few success stories of enzyme engineering were reported. These improved the catalytic efficiency as well as donor, acceptor, or product ranges. Currently, the development of appropriate high-throughput screening systems appears to be the major bottleneck for this powerful technology. PMID:27029191

  3. A new colorimetric method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, S S; Pattabiraman, T N

    1981-02-01

    A new colorimetric method, based on the phenol sulphuric acid reaction of carbohydrates, is described for the determination of glycosylated hemoglobin. Hemolyzates were treated with 1 mol/l oxalic acid in 2 mol/l Hcl for 4 h at 100 degrees C, the protein was precipitated with trichloroacetic acid, and the free sugars and hydroxymethyl furfural in the protein free supernatant were treated with phenol and sulphuric acid to form the color. The new method is compared to the thiobarbituric acid method and the ion-exchange chromatographic method for the estimation of glycosylated hemoglobin in normals and diabetics. The increase in glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients as estimated by the phenol-sulphuric acid method was more significant (P less than 0.001) than the increase observed by the thiobarbituric acid method (P less than 0.01). The correlation between the phenol-sulphuric acid method and the column method was better (r = 0.91) than the correlation between the thiobarbituric acid method and the column method (r = 0.84). No significant correlation between fasting and postprandial blood sugar level and glycosylated hemoglobin level as determined by the two colorimetric methods was observed in diabetic patients. PMID:7226519

  4. Glucosamine derived DISAL donors for stereoselective glycosylations under neutral conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grathe, S.; Thygesen, M.B.; Larsen, K.;

    2005-01-01

    the synthesis of new glucosamine DISAL donors, carrying N-TCP, -Troc, or -TFAc protecting groups, and their use in beta-(1,2-trans) selective glycosylations, primarily in NMP in the absence of any added Lewis acids, or in CH3NO2 with LiClO4. Finally, precise microwave heating proved effective in promoting...

  5. Orphan protein function and its relation to glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Ramneek; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Brunak, Søren

    2002-01-01

    orphan proteins since they do not belong to a functionally characterised protein family. Many sequences must, therefore, be compared using their features rather than by direct comparison in the conventional sequence space. Here we focus on one such feature — glycosylation — that is common in eukaryotic...

  6. Biochemical Importance of Glycosylation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gils, Ann; Pedersen, Katrine Egelund; Skottrup, Peter; Christensen, Anni; Naessens, Dominik; Deinum, Johanna; Enghild, Jan Johannes; Declerck, Paul; Andreasen, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The serpin plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a potential target for anti-thrombotic and anti-cancer therapy. PAI-1 has 3 potential sites for N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate here that PAI-1 expressed recombinantly or naturally by human cell lines display a heterogeneous......-inactivating compounds of potential clinical importance....

  7. Glucose-tolerant β-glucosidase retrieved from a Kusaya gravy metagenome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Taku; Yaoi, Katusro; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    β-glucosidases (BGLs) hydrolyze cello-oligosaccharides to glucose and play a crucial role in the enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass. Despite their significance for the production of glucose, most identified BGLs are commonly inhibited by low (∼mM) concentrations of glucose. Therefore, BGLs that are insensitive to glucose inhibition have great biotechnological merit. We applied a metagenomic approach to screen for such rare glucose-tolerant BGLs. A metagenomic library was created in Escherichia coli (∼10,000 colonies) and grown on LB agar plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-glucoside, yielding 828 positive (blue) colonies. These were then arrayed in 96-well plates, grown in LB, and secondarily screened for activity in the presence of 10% (w/v) glucose. Seven glucose-tolerant clones were identified, each of which contained a single bgl gene. The genes were classified into two groups, differing by two nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of these genes were identical (452 aa) and found to belong to the glycosyl hydrolase family 1. The recombinant protein (Ks5A7) was overproduced in E. coli as a C-terminal 6 × His-tagged protein and purified to apparent homogeneity. The molecular mass of the purified Ks5A7 was determined to be 54 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and 160 kDa by gel filtration analysis. The enzyme was optimally active at 45°C and pH 5.0-6.5 and retained full or 1.5-2-fold enhanced activity in the presence of 0.1-0.5 M glucose. It had a low KM (78 μM with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 0.36 mM with cellobiose) and high V max (91 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucoside; 155 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) with cellobiose) among known glucose-tolerant BGLs and was free from substrate (0.1 M cellobiose) inhibition. The efficient use of Ks5A7 in conjunction with Trichoderma reesei cellulases in enzymatic saccharification of alkaline-treated rice straw was demonstrated by increased production of glucose. PMID:26136726

  8. Cloning and functional characterization of endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene from metagenomic library of vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Haji; Azam, Syed Sikander; Telke, Amar; Kim, Seon Won; Chung, Young Ryun

    2013-06-01

    In the vermicomposting of paper mill sludge, the activity of earthworms is very dependent on dietetic polysaccharides including cellulose as energy sources. Most of these polymers are degraded by the host microbiota and considered potentially important source for cellulolytic enzymes. In the present study, a metagenomic library was constructed from vermicompost (VC) prepared with paper mill sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS) and functionally screened for cellulolytic activities. Eighteen cellulase expressing clones were isolated from about 89,000 fosmid clones libraries. A short fragment library was constructed from the most active positive clone (cMGL504) and one open reading frame (ORF) of 1,092 bp encoding an endo-β-1,4-glucanase was indentified which showed 88% similarity with Cellvibrio mixtus cellulase A gene. The endo-β-1,4-glucanase cmgl504 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant cmgl504 cellulase displayed activities at a broad range of temperature (25-55°C) and pH (5.5-8.5). The enzyme degraded carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with 15.4 U, while having low activity against avicel. No detectable activity was found for xylan and laminarin. The enzyme activity was stimulated by potassium chloride. The deduced protein and three-dimensional structure of metagenome-derived cellulase cmgl504 possessed all features, including general architecture, signature motifs, and N-terminal signal peptide, followed by the catalytic domain of cellulase belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5). The cellulases cloned in this work may play important roles in the degradation of celluloses in vermicomposting process and could be exploited for industrial application in future. PMID:23812813

  9. The great screen anomaly-a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2012-01-01

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been hera

  10. The magic and menace of metagenomics: prospects for the study of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leveau, J.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    This article aims to be a pragmatic primer into the field of metagenomics with special emphasis on the prospective contributions of metagenomics to the study of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). After an introduction into the concepts and methodologies of metagenomics and a discussion of

  11. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A.; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M.; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype. PMID:26840264

  12. Identification of novel plasma glycosylation-associated markers of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catera, Mariangela; Borelli, Vincenzo; Malagolini, Nadia; Chiricolo, Mariella; Venturi, Giulia; Reis, Celso A; Osorio, Hugo; Abruzzo, Provvidenza M; Capri, Miriam; Monti, Daniela; Ostan, Rita; Franceschi, Claudio; Dall'Olio, Fabio

    2016-02-16

    The pro- or anti-inflammatory activities of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) are controlled by the structure of the glycan N-linked to Asn297 of their heavy chain. The age-associated low grade inflammation (inflammaging) is associated with increased plasmatic levels of agalactosylated IgGs terminating with N-acetylglucosamine (IgG-G0) whose biogenesis has not been fully explained. Although the biosynthesis of glycans is in general mediated by glycosyltransferases associated with internal cell membranes, the extracellular glycosylation of circulating glycoproteins mediated by plasmatic glycosyltransferases has been recently demonstrated. In this study we have investigated the relationship between plasmatic glycosyltransferases, IgG glycosylation and inflammatory and aging markers. In cohorts of individuals ranging from infancy to centenarians we determined the activity of plasmatic β4 galactosyltransferase(s) (B4GALTs) and of α2,6-sialyltransferase ST6GAL1, the glycosylation of IgG, the GlycoAge test (a glycosylation-based marker of aging) and the plasma level of inflammatory and liver damage markers. Our results show that: 1) plasmatic B4GALTs activity is a new marker of aging, showing a linear increase throughout the whole age range. 2) plasmatic ST6GAL1 was high only in children and in people above 80, showing a quadratic relationship with age. 3) Neither plasmatic glycosyltransferase correlated with markers of liver damage. 4) plasmatic ST6GAL1 showed a positive association with acute phase proteins in offspring of short lived parents, but not in centenarians or in their offspring. 5) Although the glycosylation of IgGs was not correlated with the level of the two plasmatic glycosyltransferases, it showed progressive age-associated changes consistent with a shift toward a pro-inflammatory glycotype. PMID:26840264

  13. Longitudinal Metagenomic Analysis of Hospital Air Identifies Clinically Relevant Microbes

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paula; Pham, Long K.; Waltz, Shannon; Sphar, Dan; Yamamoto, Robert T.; Conrad, Douglas; Taplitz, Randy; Torriani, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    We describe the sampling of sixty-three uncultured hospital air samples collected over a six-month period and analysis using shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Our primary goals were to determine the longitudinal metagenomic variability of this environment, identify and characterize genomes of potential pathogens and determine whether they are atypical to the hospital airborne metagenome. Air samples were collected from eight locations which included patient wards, the main lobby and outside. The resulting DNA libraries produced 972 million sequences representing 51 gigabases. Hierarchical clustering of samples by the most abundant 50 microbial orders generated three major nodes which primarily clustered by type of location. Because the indoor locations were longitudinally consistent, episodic relative increases in microbial genomic signatures related to the opportunistic pathogens Aspergillus, Penicillium and Stenotrophomonas were identified as outliers at specific locations. Further analysis of microbial reads specific for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia indicated homology to a sequenced multi-drug resistant clinical strain and we observed broad sequence coverage of resistance genes. We demonstrate that a shotgun metagenomic sequencing approach can be used to characterize the resistance determinants of pathogen genomes that are uncharacteristic for an otherwise consistent hospital air microbial metagenomic profile. PMID:27482891

  14. Random whole metagenomic sequencing for forensic discrimination of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakova, Anastasia S; Smith, Renee J; Burgoyne, Leigh; Abarno, Damien; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Here we assess the ability of random whole metagenomic sequencing approaches to discriminate between similar soils from two geographically distinct urban sites for application in forensic science. Repeat samples from two parklands in residential areas separated by approximately 3 km were collected and the DNA was extracted. Shotgun, whole genome amplification (WGA) and single arbitrarily primed DNA amplification (AP-PCR) based sequencing techniques were then used to generate soil metagenomic profiles. Full and subsampled metagenomic datasets were then annotated against M5NR/M5RNA (taxonomic classification) and SEED Subsystems (metabolic classification) databases. Further comparative analyses were performed using a number of statistical tools including: hierarchical agglomerative clustering (CLUSTER); similarity profile analysis (SIMPROF); non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS); and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) at all major levels of taxonomic and metabolic classification. Our data showed that shotgun and WGA-based approaches generated highly similar metagenomic profiles for the soil samples such that the soil samples could not be distinguished accurately. An AP-PCR based approach was shown to be successful at obtaining reproducible site-specific metagenomic DNA profiles, which in turn were employed for successful discrimination of visually similar soil samples collected from two different locations. PMID:25111003

  15. Metagenomic Insights into Transferable Antibiotic Resistance in Oral Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumar, S; Roberts, A P; Martin, F E; Adler, C J

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is considered one of the greatest threats to global public health. Resistance is often conferred by the presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), which are readily found in the oral microbiome. In-depth genetic analyses of the oral microbiome through metagenomic techniques reveal a broad distribution of ARGs (including novel ARGs) in individuals not recently exposed to antibiotics, including humans in isolated indigenous populations. This has resulted in a paradigm shift from focusing on the carriage of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria to a broader concept of an oral resistome, which includes all resistance genes in the microbiome. Metagenomics is beginning to demonstrate the role of the oral resistome and horizontal gene transfer within and between commensals in the absence of selective pressure, such as an antibiotic. At the chairside, metagenomic data reinforce our need to adhere to current antibiotic guidelines to minimize the spread of resistance, as such data reveal the extent of ARGs without exposure to antimicrobials and the ecologic changes created in the oral microbiome by even a single dose of antibiotics. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metagenomics in the investigation of the oral resistome, including the transmission of antibiotic resistance in the oral microbiome. Future perspectives, including clinical implications of the findings from metagenomic investigations of oral ARGs, are also considered. PMID:27183895

  16. Selection in coastal Synechococcus (cyanobacteria populations evaluated from environmental metagenomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Tai

    Full Text Available Environmental metagenomics provides snippets of genomic sequences from all organisms in an environmental sample and are an unprecedented resource of information for investigating microbial population genetics. Current analytical methods, however, are poorly equipped to handle metagenomic data, particularly of short, unlinked sequences. A custom analytical pipeline was developed to calculate dN/dS ratios, a common metric to evaluate the role of selection in the evolution of a gene, from environmental metagenomes sequenced using 454 technology of flow-sorted populations of marine Synechococcus, the dominant cyanobacteria in coastal environments. The large majority of genes (98% have evolved under purifying selection (dN/dS1, 77 out of 83 (93% were hypothetical. Notable among annotated genes, ribosomal protein L35 appears to be under positive selection in one Synechococcus population. Other annotated genes, in particular a possible porin, a large-conductance mechanosensitive channel, an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter, and a homologue of a pilus retraction protein had regions of the gene with elevated dN/dS. With the increasing use of next-generation sequencing in metagenomic investigations of microbial diversity and ecology, analytical methods need to accommodate the peculiarities of these data streams. By developing a means to analyze population diversity data from these environmental metagenomes, we have provided the first insight into the role of selection in the evolution of Synechococcus, a globally significant primary producer.

  17. Metagenomic analysis of permafrost microbial community response to thaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackelprang, R.; Waldrop, M.P.; DeAngelis, K.M.; David, M.M.; Chavarria, K.L.; Blazewicz, S.J.; Rubin, E.M.; Jansson, J.K.

    2011-07-01

    We employed deep metagenomic sequencing to determine the impact of thaw on microbial phylogenetic and functional genes and related this data to measurements of methane emissions. Metagenomics, the direct sequencing of DNA from the environment, allows for the examination of whole biochemical pathways and associated processes, as opposed to individual pieces of the metabolic puzzle. Our metagenome analyses revealed that during transition from a frozen to a thawed state there were rapid shifts in many microbial, phylogenetic and functional gene abundances and pathways. After one week of incubation at 5°C, permafrost metagenomes converged to be more similar to each other than while they were frozen. We found that multiple genes involved in cycling of C and nitrogen shifted rapidly during thaw. We also constructed the first draft genome from a complex soil metagenome, which corresponded to a novel methanogen. Methane previously accumulated in permafrost was released during thaw and subsequently consumed by methanotrophic bacteria. Together these data point towards the importance of rapid cycling of methane and nitrogen in thawing permafrost.

  18. Reconstruction of Bacterial and Viral Genomes from Multiple Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kumar, Sanjiv; Prasoodanan, Vishnu P. K.; Harish, K.; Sharma, Ashok K.; Sharma, Vineet K.

    2016-01-01

    Several metagenomic projects have been accomplished or are in progress. However, in most cases, it is not feasible to generate complete genomic assemblies of species from the metagenomic sequencing of a complex environment. Only a few studies have reported the reconstruction of bacterial genomes from complex metagenomes. In this work, Binning-Assembly approach has been proposed and demonstrated for the reconstruction of bacterial and viral genomes from 72 human gut metagenomic datasets. A total 1156 bacterial genomes belonging to 219 bacterial families and, 279 viral genomes belonging to 84 viral families could be identified. More than 80% complete draft genome sequences could be reconstructed for a total of 126 bacterial and 11 viral genomes. Selected draft assembled genomes could be validated with 99.8% accuracy using their ORFs. The study provides useful information on the assembly expected for a species given its number of reads and abundance. This approach along with spiking was also demonstrated to be useful in improving the draft assembly of a bacterial genome. The Binning-Assembly approach can be successfully used to reconstruct bacterial and viral genomes from multiple metagenomic datasets obtained from similar environments. PMID:27148174

  19. Metagenomic Analysis of Bacterial Communities of Antarctic Surface Snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lopatina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of bacteria present in surface snow around four Russian stations in Eastern Antarctica was studied by high throughput sequencing of amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments and shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Considerable class- and genus-level variation between the samples was revealed indicating a presence of inter-site diversity of bacteria in Antarctic snow. Flavobacterium was a major genus in one sampling site and was also detected in other sites. The diversity of flavobacterial type II-C CRISPR spacers in the samples was investigated by metagenome sequencing. Thousands of unique spacers were revealed with less than 35% overlap between the sampling sites, indicating an enormous natural variety of flavobacterial CRISPR spacers and, by extension, high level of adaptive activity of the corresponding CRISPR-Cas system. None of the spacers matched known spacers of flavobacterial isolates from the Northern hemisphere. Moreover, the percentage of spacers with matches with Antarctic metagenomic sequences obtained in this work was significantly higher than with sequences from much larger publically available environmental metagenomic database. The results indicate that despite the overall very high level of diversity, Antarctic Flavobacteria comprise a separate pool that experiences pressures from mobile genetic elements different from those present in other parts of the world. The results also establish analysis of metagenomic CRISPR spacer content as a powerful tool to study bacterial populations diversity.

  20. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics emerged as an important field of research not only in microbial ecology but also for human health and disease, and metagenomic studies are performed on increasingly larger scales. While recent taxonomic classification programs achieve high speed by comparing genomic k-mers, they often lack sensitivity for overcoming evolutionary divergence, so that large fractions of the metagenomic reads remain unclassified. Here we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju, which finds maximum (in-)exact matches on the protein-level using the Burrows-Wheeler transform. We show in a genome exclusion benchmark that Kaiju classifies reads with higher sensitivity and similar precision compared with current k-mer-based classifiers, especially in genera that are underrepresented in reference databases. We also demonstrate that Kaiju classifies up to 10 times more reads in real metagenomes. Kaiju can process millions of reads per minute and can run on a standard PC. Source code and web server are available at http://kaiju.binf.ku.dk. PMID:27071849

  1. Unsupervised Two-Way Clustering of Metagenomic Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruthi Prabhakara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge facing metagenomics is the development of tools for the characterization of functional and taxonomic content of vast amounts of short metagenome reads. The efficacy of clustering methods depends on the number of reads in the dataset, the read length and relative abundances of source genomes in the microbial community. In this paper, we formulate an unsupervised naive Bayes multispecies, multidimensional mixture model for reads from a metagenome. We use the proposed model to cluster metagenomic reads by their species of origin and to characterize the abundance of each species. We model the distribution of word counts along a genome as a Gaussian for shorter, frequent words and as a Poisson for longer words that are rare. We employ either a mixture of Gaussians or mixture of Poissons to model reads within each bin. Further, we handle the high-dimensionality and sparsity associated with the data, by grouping the set of words comprising the reads, resulting in a two-way mixture model. Finally, we demonstrate the accuracy and applicability of this method on simulated and real metagenomes. Our method can accurately cluster reads as short as 100 bps and is robust to varying abundances, divergences and read lengths.

  2. Metagenomic-Based Study of the Phylogenetic and Functional Gene Diversity in Galápagos Land and Marine Iguanas

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Pei-Ying

    2014-12-19

    In this study, a metagenome-based analysis of the fecal samples from the macrophytic algae-consuming marine iguana (MI; Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and terrestrial biomass-consuming land iguanas (LI; Conolophus spp.) was conducted. Phylogenetic affiliations of the fecal microbiome were more similar between both iguanas than to other mammalian herbivorous hosts. However, functional gene diversities in both MI and LI iguana hosts differed in relation to the diet, where the MI fecal microbiota had a functional diversity that clustered apart from the other terrestrial-biomass consuming reptilian and mammalian hosts. A further examination of the carbohydrate-degrading genes revealed that several of the prevalent glycosyl hydrolases (GH), glycosyl transferases (GT), carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), and carbohydrate esterases (CE) gene classes were conserved among all examined herbivorous hosts, reiterating the important roles these genes play in the breakdown and metabolism of herbivorous diets. Genes encoding some classes of carbohydrate-degrading families, including GH2, GH13, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM48, CE4, and CE11, as well as genes associated with sulfur metabolism and dehalogenation, were highly enriched or unique to the MI. In contrast, gene sequences that relate to archaeal methanogenesis were detected only in LI fecal microbiome, and genes coding for GH13, GH66, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM13, CE4, and CE8 carbohydrate active enzymes were highly abundant in the LI. Bacterial populations were enriched on various carbohydrates substrates (e.g., glucose, arabinose, xylose). The majority of the enriched bacterial populations belong to genera Clostridium spp. and Enterococcus spp. that likely accounted for the high prevalence of GH13 and GH2, as well as the GT families (e.g., GT2, GT4, GT28, GT35, and GT51) that were ubiquitously present in the fecal microbiota of all herbivorous hosts.

  3. Metagenomic-based study of the phylogenetic and functional gene diversity in Galápagos land and marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Mao, Yuejian; Ortiz-Kofoed, Shannon; Shah, Rushabh; Cann, Isaac; Mackie, Roderick I

    2015-02-01

    In this study, a metagenome-based analysis of the fecal samples from the macrophytic algae-consuming marine iguana (MI; Amblyrhynchus cristatus) and terrestrial biomass-consuming land iguanas (LI; Conolophus spp.) was conducted. Phylogenetic affiliations of the fecal microbiome were more similar between both iguanas than to other mammalian herbivorous hosts. However, functional gene diversities in both MI and LI iguana hosts differed in relation to the diet, where the MI fecal microbiota had a functional diversity that clustered apart from the other terrestrial-biomass consuming reptilian and mammalian hosts. A further examination of the carbohydrate-degrading genes revealed that several of the prevalent glycosyl hydrolases (GH), glycosyl transferases (GT), carbohydrate binding modules (CBM), and carbohydrate esterases (CE) gene classes were conserved among all examined herbivorous hosts, reiterating the important roles these genes play in the breakdown and metabolism of herbivorous diets. Genes encoding some classes of carbohydrate-degrading families, including GH2, GH13, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM48, CE4, and CE11, as well as genes associated with sulfur metabolism and dehalogenation, were highly enriched or unique to the MI. In contrast, gene sequences that relate to archaeal methanogenesis were detected only in LI fecal microbiome, and genes coding for GH13, GH66, GT2, GT4, CBM50, CBM13, CE4, and CE8 carbohydrate active enzymes were highly abundant in the LI. Bacterial populations were enriched on various carbohydrates substrates (e.g., glucose, arabinose, xylose). The majority of the enriched bacterial populations belong to genera Clostridium spp. and Enterococcus spp. that likely accounted for the high prevalence of GH13 and GH2, as well as the GT families (e.g., GT2, GT4, GT28, GT35, and GT51) that were ubiquitously present in the fecal microbiota of all herbivorous hosts. PMID:25524569

  4. Absolute Quantitation of Glycosylation Site Occupancy Using Isotopically Labeled Standards and LC-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Go, Eden P.; Desaire, Heather

    2014-06-01

    N-linked glycans are required to maintain appropriate biological functions on proteins. Underglycosylation leads to many diseases in plants and animals; therefore, characterizing the extent of glycosylation on proteins is an important step in understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases. To determine the glycosylation site occupancy, protein N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) is typically used to detach the glycan from the protein, during which the formerly glycosylated asparagine undergoes deamidation to become an aspartic acid. By comparing the abundance of the resulting peptide containing aspartic acid against the one containing non-glycosylated asparagine, the glycosylation site occupancy can be evaluated. However, this approach can give inaccurate results when spontaneous chemical deamidation of the non-glycosylated asparagine occurs. To overcome this limitation, we developed a new method to measure the glycosylation site occupancy that does not rely on converting glycosylated peptides to their deglycosylated forms. Specifically, the overall protein concentration and the non-glycosylated portion of the protein are quantified simultaneously by using heavy isotope-labeled internal standards coupled with LC-MS analysis, and the extent of site occupancy is accurately determined. The efficacy of the method was demonstrated by quantifying the occupancy of a glycosylation site on bovine fetuin. The developed method is the first work that measures the glycosylation site occupancy without using PNGase F, and it can be done in parallel with glycopeptide analysis because the glycan remains intact throughout the workflow.

  5. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on the Complexation of Antidiabetic Drugs with Glycosylated Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedher, N.; Kanojia, M.

    2013-11-01

    Glycosylation decreases the association constant values and hence the binding affinity of human serum albumin (HSA) for the antidiabetic drugs under study. The percentage of HAS-bound drug at physiological temperature was only about 21-38 % as compared to 46-74 % for non-glycosylated HSA. Thus the percentage of free drug available for an antihyperglycemic effect was about double (62-79 %) compared to the values for non-glycosylated HSA. Much higher free drug concentrations available for pharmacological effect can lead to the risk of hypoglycemia. Hydrophobic interactions were predominantly involved in the binding. In the binding of gliclazide, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions were involved. Site specificity for glycosylated HSA was the same as that for non-glycosylated HSA; gliclazide and repaglinide bind only at site II whereas glimepiride and glipizide bind at both sites I and II. Glycosylation, however, caused conformational changes in albumin, and the binding region within site II was different for glycosylated and non-glycosylated albumin. Stern-Volmer analysis also indicated the conformational changes in albumin as a result of glycosylation and showed that the dynamic quenching mechanism was valid for fluorescence of both glycosylated and non-glycosylated HSA.

  6. Effect of O-Linked Glycosylation on the Equilibrium Structural Ensemble of Intrinsically Disordered Polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-12-24

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), which provides a large proteome diversity. Previous work on glycosylation of globular proteins has revealed remarkable effects of glycosylation on protein function, altering the folding stability and structure and/or altering the protein surface which affects their binding characteristics. Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) or intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of large proteins are also frequently glycosylated, yet how glycosylation affects their function remains to be elucidated. An important open question is, does glycosylation affect IDP structure or binding characteristics or both? In this work, we particularly address the structural effects of O-linked glycosylation by investigating glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of two different IDPs, tau174-183 and human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), by all-atom explicit solvent simulations. We simulate these IDPs in aqueous solution for O-linked glycosylated and unglycosylated forms by employing two modern all-atom force fields for which glycan parameters are also available. We find that O-linked glycosylation only has a modest effect on equilibrium structural ensembles of IDPs, for the cases studied here, which suggests that the functional role of glycosylation may be primarily exerted by modulation of the protein binding characteristics rather than structure. PMID:26618856

  7. Ab initio gene identification in metagenomic sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhan; Lomsadze, Alexandre; Borodovsky, Mark

    2010-07-01

    We describe an algorithm for gene identification in DNA sequences derived from shotgun sequencing of microbial communities. Accurate ab initio gene prediction in a short nucleotide sequence of anonymous origin is hampered by uncertainty in model parameters. While several machine learning approaches could be proposed to bypass this difficulty, one effective method is to estimate parameters from dependencies, formed in evolution, between frequencies of oligonucleotides in protein-coding regions and genome nucleotide composition. Original version of the method was proposed in 1999 and has been used since for (i) reconstructing codon frequency vector needed for gene finding in viral genomes and (ii) initializing parameters of self-training gene finding algorithms. With advent of new prokaryotic genomes en masse it became possible to enhance the original approach by using direct polynomial and logistic approximations of oligonucleotide frequencies, as well as by separating models for bacteria and archaea. These advances have increased the accuracy of model reconstruction and, subsequently, gene prediction. We describe the refined method and assess its accuracy on known prokaryotic genomes split into short sequences. Also, we show that as a result of application of the new method, several thousands of new genes could be added to existing annotations of several human and mouse gut metagenomes. PMID:20403810

  8. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  9. Unlocking short read sequencing for metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rodrigue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different high-throughput nucleic acid sequencing platforms are currently available but a trade-off currently exists between the cost and number of reads that can be generated versus the read length that can be achieved. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe an experimental and computational pipeline yielding millions of reads that can exceed 200 bp with quality scores approaching that of traditional Sanger sequencing. The method combines an automatable gel-less library construction step with paired-end sequencing on a short-read instrument. With appropriately sized library inserts, mate-pair sequences can overlap, and we describe the SHERA software package that joins them to form a longer composite read. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This strategy is broadly applicable to sequencing applications that benefit from low-cost high-throughput sequencing, but require longer read lengths. We demonstrate that our approach enables metagenomic analyses using the Illumina Genome Analyzer, with low error rates, and at a fraction of the cost of pyrosequencing.

  10. Genomics, metagenomics and proteomics in biomining microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Lissette; Chi, An; Beard, Simon; Orell, Alvaro; Guiliani, Nicolas; Shabanowitz, Jeff; Hunt, Donald F; Jerez, Carlos A

    2006-01-01

    The use of acidophilic, chemolithotrophic microorganisms capable of oxidizing iron and sulfur in industrial processes to recover metals from minerals containing copper, gold and uranium is a well established biotechnology with distinctive advantages over traditional mining. A consortium of different microorganisms participates in the oxidative reactions resulting in the extraction of dissolved metal values from ores. Considerable effort has been spent in the last years to understand the biochemistry of iron and sulfur compounds oxidation, bacteria-mineral interactions (chemotaxis, quorum sensing, adhesion, biofilm formation) and several adaptive responses allowing the microorganisms to survive in a bioleaching environment. All of these are considered key phenomena for understanding the process of biomining. The use of genomics, metagenomics and high throughput proteomics to study the global regulatory responses that the biomining community uses to adapt to their changing environment is just beginning to emerge in the last years. These powerful approaches are reviewed here since they offer the possibility of exciting new findings that will allow analyzing the community as a microbial system, determining the extent to which each of the individual participants contributes to the process, how they evolve in time to keep the conglomerate healthy and therefore efficient during the entire process of bioleaching. PMID:16288845

  11. OTU analysis using metagenomic shotgun sequencing data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Hao

    Full Text Available Because of technological limitations, the primer and amplification biases in targeted sequencing of 16S rRNA genes have veiled the true microbial diversity underlying environmental samples. However, the protocol of metagenomic shotgun sequencing provides 16S rRNA gene fragment data with natural immunity against the biases raised during priming and thus the potential of uncovering the true structure of microbial community by giving more accurate predictions of operational taxonomic units (OTUs. Nonetheless, the lack of statistically rigorous comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragments and other data types makes it difficult to interpret previously reported results using 16S rRNA gene fragments. Therefore, in the present work, we established a standard analysis pipeline that would help confirm if the differences in the data are true or are just due to potential technical bias. This pipeline is built by using simulated data to find optimal mapping and OTU prediction methods. The comparison between simulated datasets revealed a relationship between 16S rRNA gene fragments and full-length 16S rRNA sequences that a 16S rRNA gene fragment having a length >150 bp provides the same accuracy as a full-length 16S rRNA sequence using our proposed pipeline, which could serve as a good starting point for experimental design and making the comparison between 16S rRNA gene fragment-based and targeted 16S rRNA sequencing-based surveys possible.

  12. DISAL glycosyl donors for the synthesis of a linear hexasaccharide under mild conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars; Laursen, Jane B.; Larsen, K.;

    2003-01-01

    The new class of glycosyl donors with a methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate (DISAL) anomeric leaving group has proved efficient for glycosylation under strictly neutral, mildly basic, or mildly acidic conditions. Here, we report the synthesis of novel DISAL disaccharide glycosyl donors prepared by easy ...... nucleophilic aromatic substitution. These DISAL donors proved efficient in the synthesis of a starch-related hexasaccharide under very mild conditions. Glycosylations proceeded with alpha-selectivity and were compatible with Trt protecting groups.......The new class of glycosyl donors with a methyl 3,5-dinitrosalicylate (DISAL) anomeric leaving group has proved efficient for glycosylation under strictly neutral, mildly basic, or mildly acidic conditions. Here, we report the synthesis of novel DISAL disaccharide glycosyl donors prepared by easy...

  13. Natural Product Discovery through Improved Functional Metagenomics in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Hala A; Low-Beinart, Lila; Obiajulu, Joseph U; Brady, Sean F

    2016-08-01

    Because the majority of environmental bacteria are not easily culturable, access to many bacterially encoded secondary metabolites will be dependent on the development of improved functional metagenomic screening methods. In this study, we examined a collection of diverse Streptomyces species for the best innate ability to heterologously express biosynthetic gene clusters. We then optimized methods for constructing high quality metagenomic cosmid libraries in the best Streptomyces host. An initial screen of a 1.5 million-membered metagenomic library constructed in Streptomyces albus, the species that exhibited the highest propensity for heterologous expression of gene clusters, led to the identification of the novel natural product metatricycloene (1). Metatricycloene is a tricyclic polyene encoded by a reductive, iterative polyketide-like gene cluster. Related gene clusters found in sequenced genomes appear to encode a largely unexplored collection of structurally diverse, polyene-based metabolites. PMID:27447056

  14. Kaiju: Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Lee Ng, Kim; Krogh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The constantly decreasing cost and increasing output of current sequencing technologies enable large scale metagenomic studies of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Therefore, fast and accurate methods for taxonomic classification are needed, which can operate on increasingly larger...... datasets and reference databases. Recently, several fast metagenomic classifiers have been developed, which are based on comparison of genomic k-mers. However, nucleotide comparison using a fixed k-mer length often lacks the sensitivity to overcome the evolutionary distance between sampled species and...... genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy...

  15. Fast and sensitive taxonomic classification for metagenomics with Kaiju

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Ng, Kim Lee; Krogh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The constantly decreasing cost and increasing output of current sequencing technologies enable large scale metagenomic studies of microbial communities from diverse habitats. Therefore, fast and accurate methods for taxonomic classification are needed, which can operate on increasingly larger...... datasets and reference databases. Recently, several fast metagenomic classifiers have been developed, which are based on comparison of genomic k-mers. However, nucleotide comparison using a fixed k-mer length often lacks the sensitivity to overcome the evolutionary distance between sampled species...... and genomes in the reference database. Here, we present the novel metagenome classifier Kaiju for fast assignment of reads to taxa. Kaiju finds maximum exact matches on the protein-level using the Borrows-Wheeler transform, and can optionally allow amino acid substitutions in the search using a greedy...

  16. Metagenomes provide valuable comparative information on soil microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Stenbæk, Jonas; Santos, Susana;

    2016-01-01

    Despite the critical ecological roles of microeukaryotes in terrestrial ecosystems, most descriptive studies of soil microbes published so far focused only on specific groups. Meanwhile, the fast development of metagenome sequencing leads to considerable data accumulation in public repositories......, providing microbiologists with substantial amounts of accessible information. We took advantage of public metagenomes in order to investigate microeukaryote communities in a well characterized grassland soil. The data gathered allowed the evaluation of several factors impacting the community structure...... on metagenomic microeukaryote DNA. Choosing the correct annotation procedure and reference database has proven to be crucial, as it considerably limits the risk of wrong assignments. In addition, a significant and pronounced effect of the DNA extraction method on the taxonomical structure of soil microeukaryotes...

  17. Mining anaerobic digester consortia metagenomes for secreted carbohydrate active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo;

    . To gain insight into both the degradation of the carbohydrates and the various roles of the microbes in the ADs we have mined metagenomes from both types of ADs for glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, auxiliary activities, and carbohydrate binding modules. The mining...... thermophilic and mesophilic ADs a wide variety of carbohydrate active enzyme functions were discovered in the metagenomic sequencing of the microbial consortia. The most dominating type of glycoside hydrolases were β-glucosidases (up to 27%), α-amylases (up to 10%), α-glucosidases (up to 8%), α......-galactosidases (up to 9%) and β-galactosidases (up to 7%). For carbohydrate esterases the by far most dominating type was acetylxylan esterases (up to 59%) followed by feruloyl esterases (up to 16%). Less than 15 polysaccharide lyases were identified in the different metagenomes and not surprisingly...

  18. Recovering full-length viral genomes from metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia eSmits

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease metagenomics is driven by the question: what is causing the disease? in contrast to classical metagenome studies which are guided by what is out there?. In case of a novel virus, a first step to eventually establishing etiology can be to recover a full-length viral genome from a metagenomic sample. However retrieval of a full-length genome of a divergent virus is technically challenging and can be time-consuming and costly. Here we discuss different assembly and fragment linkage strategies such as iterative assembly, motif searches, k-mer frequency profiling, coverage profile binning and other strategies used to recover genomes of potential viral pathogens in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  19. Multi-Layer and Recursive Neural Networks for Metagenomic Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzler, Gregory; Polikar, Robi; Rosen, Gail

    2015-09-01

    Recent advances in machine learning, specifically in deep learning with neural networks, has made a profound impact on fields such as natural language processing, image classification, and language modeling; however, feasibility and potential benefits of the approaches to metagenomic data analysis has been largely under-explored. Deep learning exploits many layers of learning nonlinear feature representations, typically in an unsupervised fashion, and recent results have shown outstanding generalization performance on previously unseen data. Furthermore, some deep learning methods can also represent the structure in a data set. Consequently, deep learning and neural networks may prove to be an appropriate approach for metagenomic data. To determine whether such approaches are indeed appropriate for metagenomics, we experiment with two deep learning methods: i) a deep belief network, and ii) a recursive neural network, the latter of which provides a tree representing the structure of the data. We compare these approaches to the standard multi-layer perceptron, which has been well-established in the machine learning community as a powerful prediction algorithm, though its presence is largely missing in metagenomics literature. We find that traditional neural networks can be quite powerful classifiers on metagenomic data compared to baseline methods, such as random forests. On the other hand, while the deep learning approaches did not result in improvements to the classification accuracy, they do provide the ability to learn hierarchical representations of a data set that standard classification methods do not allow. Our goal in this effort is not to determine the best algorithm in terms accuracy-as that depends on the specific application-but rather to highlight the benefits and drawbacks of each of the approach we discuss and provide insight on how they can be improved for predictive metagenomic analysis. PMID:26316190

  20. Toward a Standards-Compliant Genomic and Metagenomic Publication Record

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garrity, GM; Field, D; Kyrpides, N;

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, we are aware as a community of the growing need to manage the avalanche of genomic and metagenomic data, in addition to related data types like ribosomal RNA and barcode sequences, in a way that tightly integrates contextual data with traditional literature in a machine-readable way...... is in the midst of a publishing revolution. This revolution is marked by a growing shift away from a traditional dichotomy between "journal articles" and "database entries" and an increasing adoption of hybrid models of collecting and disseminating scientific information. With respect to genomes and metagenomes...

  1. Whither or wither geomicrobiology in the era of 'community metagenomics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Capone, D.G.; Stolz, J.F.; Fuhrman, J.

    2005-01-01

    Molecular techniques are valuable tools that can improve our understanding of the structure of microbial communities. They provide the ability to probe for life in all niches of the biosphere, perhaps even supplanting the need to cultivate microorganisms or to conduct ecophysiological investigations. However, an overemphasis and strict dependence on such large information-driven endeavours as environmental metagenomics could overwhelm the field, to the detriment of microbial ecology. We now call for more balanced, hypothesis-driven research efforts that couple metagenomics with classic approaches.

  2. Metagenomic Screening of Urban Rattus Norvegicus for Virus and Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Arn

    Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus) are ubiquitous around areas populated by human and are known vectors of pathogens to humans. Therefore the surveillance of R. norvegicus is important if we want to understand which pathogens they spread. Metagenomics and second-generation sequencing are paving...... the way for increasing rates of pathogen discovery and identification, thereby enabling faster containment of wildlife vectors. In this thesis, I have used metagenomics to assess the virome and resistome of the wild urban R. norvegicus. Many new potential viruses are discovered through virome analyses...

  3. Evaluating the Quantitative Capabilities of Metagenomic Analysis Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequencing technologies are applied widely and frequently today to describe metagenomes, i.e., microbial communities in environmental or clinical samples, without the need for culturing them. These technologies usually return short (100-300 base-pairs long) DNA reads, and these reads are processed by metagenomic analysis software that assign phylogenetic composition-information to the dataset. Here we evaluate three metagenomic analysis software (AmphoraNet-a webserver implementation of AMPHORA2-, MG-RAST, and MEGAN5) for their capabilities of assigning quantitative phylogenetic information for the data, describing the frequency of appearance of the microorganisms of the same taxa in the sample. The difficulties of the task arise from the fact that longer genomes produce more reads from the same organism than shorter genomes, and some software assign higher frequencies to species with longer genomes than to those with shorter ones. This phenomenon is called the "genome length bias." Dozens of complex artificial metagenome benchmarks can be found in the literature. Because of the complexity of those benchmarks, it is usually difficult to judge the resistance of a metagenomic software to this "genome length bias." Therefore, we have made a simple benchmark for the evaluation of the "taxon-counting" in a metagenomic sample: we have taken the same number of copies of three full bacterial genomes of different lengths, break them up randomly to short reads of average length of 150 bp, and mixed the reads, creating our simple benchmark. Because of its simplicity, the benchmark is not supposed to serve as a mock metagenome, but if a software fails on that simple task, it will surely fail on most real metagenomes. We applied three software for the benchmark. The ideal quantitative solution would assign the same proportion to the three bacterial taxa. We have found that AMPHORA2/AmphoraNet gave the most accurate results and the other two software were under

  4. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet.

    OpenAIRE

    Oliva, Laia; Baron, Cristian; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Remesar, Xavier; Alemany, Marià

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since ...

  5. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Douglas S; Nelson, Randall W; Borges, Chad R

    2009-10-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, colorectal, pancreatic, and prostate cancer patients. Results obtained by electrospray ionization-based mass spectrometric immunoassay showed that there was no significant depletion of DBP trisaccharide glycosylation in the 56 cancer patients examined relative to healthy controls. These results suggest that alternative hypotheses regarding the molecular and/or structural origins of GcMAF must be considered to explain the relative inability of cancer patient serum to activate macrophages. PMID:19642159

  6. High throughput whole rumen metagenome profiling using untargeted massively parallel sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Elizabeth M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variation of microorganism communities in the rumen of cattle (Bos taurus is of great interest because of possible links to economically or environmentally important traits, such as feed conversion efficiency or methane emission levels. The resolution of studies investigating this variation may be improved by utilizing untargeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS, that is, sequencing without targeted amplification of genes. The objective of this study was to develop a method which used MPS to generate “rumen metagenome profiles”, and to investigate if these profiles were repeatable among samples taken from the same cow. Given faecal samples are much easier to obtain than rumen fluid samples; we also investigated whether rumen metagenome profiles were predictive of faecal metagenome profiles. Results Rather than focusing on individual organisms within the rumen, our method used MPS data to generate quantitative rumen micro-biome profiles, regardless of taxonomic classifications. The method requires a previously assembled reference metagenome. A number of such reference metagenomes were considered, including two rumen derived metagenomes, a human faecal microflora metagenome and a reference metagenome made up of publically available prokaryote sequences. Sequence reads from each test sample were aligned to these references. The “rumen metagenome profile” was generated from the number of the reads that aligned to each contig in the database. We used this method to test the hypothesis that rumen fluid microbial community profiles vary more between cows than within multiple samples from the same cow. Rumen fluid samples were taken from three cows, at three locations within the rumen. DNA from the samples was sequenced on the Illumina GAIIx. When the reads were aligned to a rumen metagenome reference, the rumen metagenome profiles were repeatable (P  Conclusions We have presented a simple and high throughput method of

  7. Glycosylation of plasma IgG in colorectal cancer prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Evropi Theodoratou; Kujtim Thaçi; Felix Agakov; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Jerko Štambuk; Maja Pučić-Baković; Frano Vučković; Peter Orchard; Anna Agakova; DIN, FARHAT V. N.; Ewan Brown; Rudd, Pauline M; Susan M. Farrington; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Harry Campbell

    2016-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the potential value of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation as a novel prognostic biomarker of colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed plasma IgG glycans in 1229 CRC patients and correlated with survival outcomes. We assessed the predictive value of clinical algorithms and compared this to algorithms that also included glycan predictors. Decreased galactosylation, decreased sialylation (of fucosylated IgG glycan structures) and increased bisecting GlcNAc in IgG glyca...

  8. Glycosylation status of vitamin D binding protein in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rehder, Douglas S.; Nelson, Randall W.; Borges, Chad R.

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of the results of activity studies, previous reports have suggested that vitamin D binding protein (DBP) is significantly or even completely deglycosylated in cancer patients, eliminating the molecular precursor of the immunologically important Gc macrophage activating factor (GcMAF), a glycosidase-derived product of DBP. The purpose of this investigation was to directly determine the relative degree of O-linked trisaccharide glycosylation of serum-derived DBP in human breast, co...

  9. GlyProt: in silico glycosylation of proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bohne-Lang, Andreas; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm

    2005-01-01

    GlyProt () is a web-based tool that enables meaningful N-glycan conformations to be attached to all the spatially accessible potential N-glycosylation sites of a known three-dimensional (3D) protein structure. The probabilities of physicochemical properties such as mass, accessible surface and radius of gyration are calculated. The purpose of this service is to provide rapid access to reliable 3D models of glycoproteins, which can subsequently be refined by using more elaborate simulations an...

  10. The role of N-glycosylation in kiwi allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Garrido-Arandia, María; Murua-García, Amaya; Palacin, Aranzazu; Tordesillas, Leticia; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Ramos, Tania; Canto, Gabriela; Blanco, Carlos; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Pacios, Luis F.; Díaz Perales, Araceli

    2014-01-01

    The physical, biochemical, and immunological characteristics of plant allergens have been widely studied, but no definite conclusion has been reached about what actually makes a protein an allergen. In this sense, N-glycosylation is an exclusive characteristic of plant allergens not present in mammals and it could be implied in allergenic sensitization. With this aim, we evaluated and compared the allergenic activity of the protein fraction and the N-glycan fraction of the thaumatin-like prot...

  11. Reduced apolipoprotein glycosylation in patients with the metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Savinova

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the apolipoprotein composition of the three major lipoprotein classes in patients with metabolic syndrome to healthy controls.Very low density (VLDL, intermediate/low density (IDL/LDL, hereafter LDL, and high density lipoproteins (HDL fractions were isolated from plasma of 56 metabolic syndrome subjects and from 14 age-sex matched healthy volunteers. The apolipoprotein content of fractions was analyzed by one-dimensional (1D gel electrophoresis with confirmation by a combination of mass spectrometry and biochemical assays.Metabolic syndrome patients differed from healthy controls in the following ways: (1 total plasma--apoA1 was lower, whereas apoB, apoC2, apoC3, and apoE were higher; (2 VLDL--apoB, apoC3, and apoE were increased; (3 LDL--apoC3 was increased, (4 HDL--associated constitutive serum amyloid A protein (SAA4 was reduced (p<0.05 vs. controls for all. In patients with metabolic syndrome, the most extensively glycosylated (di-sialylated isoform of apoC3 was reduced in VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions by 17%, 30%, and 25%, respectively (p<0.01 vs. controls for all. Similarly, the glycosylated isoform of apoE was reduced in VLDL, LDL, and HDL fractions by 15%, 26%, and 37% (p<0.01 vs. controls for all. Finally, glycosylated isoform of SAA4 in HDL fraction was 42% lower in patients with metabolic syndrome compared with controls (p<0.001.Patients with metabolic syndrome displayed several changes in plasma apolipoprotein composition consistent with hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL cholesterol levels. Reduced glycosylation of apoC3, apoE and SAA4 are novel findings, the pathophysiological consequences of which remain to be determined.

  12. Experimental nonenzymatic glycosylation of vitreous collagens occurs by two pathways.

    OpenAIRE

    Pulido, J S

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the process of nonenzymatic glycosolation of vitreous collagen in vitro to determine the contributions of the classic Maillard pathway and the oxidative pathway, as well as to evaluate possible inhibitors of both pathways. METHODS: Bovine vitreous collagen was extracted and then incubated with hexoses in vitro. The amount of advanced glycosylation end (AGE) products was measured by fluorometry under varying conditions in the presence and absence of glycosolation inhibitors. ...

  13. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Highly Reactive Glycosyl Halides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Kovács

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Highly reactive glycosyl chlorides and bromides have been analysed by a routine mass spectrometric method using electrospray ionization and lithium salt adduct-forming agents in anhydrous acetonitrile solution, providing salient lithiated molecular ions [M+Li]+, [2M+Li]+ etc. The role of other adduct-forming salts has also been evaluated. The lithium salt method is useful for accurate mass determination of these highly sensitive compounds.

  14. Ethanol Perturbs Glycosylation and Inhibits Hypersecretion in Trichoderma reesei

    OpenAIRE

    Merivuori, Hannele; Montenecourt, Bland S.; Sands, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of ethanol and phenylethanol on the growth of and glycoprotein secretion by Trichoderma reesei were studied. Low levels (1.5%, vol/vol) of ethanol perturbed the glycosylation process, as shown by alterations in the isoelectric profile of the secreted proteins and a reduction in the rate of incorporation of mannose into oligosaccharides. In addition to these effects on posttranslational modification, ethanol drastically lowered the protein secretion level of a hypersecretory strain.

  15. Similarities and Differences in the Glycosylation Mechanisms in Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Dell

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have witnessed a rapid growth in the number and diversity of prokaryotic proteins shown to carry N- and/or O-glycans, with protein glycosylation now considered as fundamental to the biology of these organisms as it is in eukaryotic systems. This article overviews the major glycosylation pathways that are known to exist in eukarya, bacteria and archaea. These are (i oligosaccharyltransferase (OST-mediated N-glycosylation which is abundant in eukarya and archaea, but is restricted to a limited range of bacteria; (ii stepwise cytoplasmic N-glycosylation that has so far only been confirmed in the bacterial domain; (iii OST-mediated O-glycosylation which appears to be characteristic of bacteria; and (iv stepwise O-glycosylation which is common in eukarya and bacteria. A key aim of the review is to integrate information from the three domains of life in order to highlight commonalities in glycosylation processes. We show how the OST-mediated N- and O-glycosylation pathways share cytoplasmic assembly of lipid-linked oligosaccharides, flipping across the ER/periplasmic/cytoplasmic membranes, and transferring “en bloc” to the protein acceptor. Moreover these hallmarks are mirrored in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. Like in eukaryotes, stepwise O-glycosylation occurs on diverse bacterial proteins including flagellins, adhesins, autotransporters and lipoproteins, with O-glycosylation chain extension often coupled with secretory mechanisms.

  16. ANÁLISIS DEL MARCO LEGAL EN COLOMBIA PARA LA IMPLEMENTACIÓN DE PRÁCTICAS DE BIOPROSPECCIÓN Analyse Of The Legal Framework In Colombia For Implementation Of Bioprospecting Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OSCAR DUARTE

    Full Text Available La práctica de bioprospección tiene características que involucran la interacción entre conocimiento tradicional, poseído por comunidades locales e indígenas de los países del Sur y las actividades comerciales propias de industrias como la farmacéutica y la de agroinsumos de los países del Norte; en esta interacción, emergen otra serie de actores como las Organizaciones No Gubernamentales, los Centros de Investigación, las Universidades, las instituciones financiadoras de actividades de ciencia y tecnología y el Estado, entre otros. Esta confluencia se caracteriza por motivaciones e intereses divergentes entre actores con poderes muy disímiles, lo cual ocasiona la necesidad de poseer marcos normativos que contribuyan a regular dicha interacción. Se analiza el marco legal en la implementación de la práctica bioprospectiva en un país megadiverso como Colombia, para lo cual se hizo la revisión de literatura correspondiente y se realizó un trabajo de campo en Colombia, mediante el cual se accedió a información de la autoridad nacional competente en materia de diversidad biológica y acceso a recursos genéticos, se participó en una serie de reuniones en las cuales se analizó la implementación del marco legal en bioprospección y se hicieron entrevistas con actores involucrados en dicha práctica. Se concluye que hay dificultades de la autoridad nacional competente para implementar la normatividad de carácter regional andino y se evidencian las enormes limitantes para que los investigadores colombianos adelanten proyectos de investigación en esta temática.The practice of bioprospecting is inherently linked with traditional knowledge and practices of local communities in the South as well as with the commercial activities of industries (e.g., pharmaceutic sector, agriculture in the North. A series of actors operate at this interface, such as Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs, Research Centers, Universities, Science and

  17. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alma’abadi, Amani D.

    2015-11-10

    More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  18. Comparing actinomycete and bacterial soil and sediment communities for metagenomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hill, P.; Krištůfek, Václav; Feijoo, A. M.; Caballero, S.; van Elsas, D.

    Praha: Výzkumný ústav rostlinné výroby, Praha, 2005. s. 10. [Život v pode /6./. 01.02.2005-02.02.2005, Praha] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : actinomycete * bacterial soil and sediment communities * metagenomics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  19. Metagenom - bohatý zdroj nových biomolekul

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotrba, P.; Uhlík, Ondřej; Ječná, K.; Macková, M.; Macek, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 102, č. 11 (2008), s. 960-968. ISSN 0009-2770 Grant ostatní: GA MŠk(CZ) 2B08031 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : metagenomics * non-cultivable microorganisms * enzymes * antibiotics Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.593, year: 2008

  20. Metagenomes provide valuable comparative information on soil microeukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquiod, Samuel; Stenbæk, Jonas; Santos, Susana S; Winding, Anne; Sørensen, Søren J; Priemé, Anders

    2016-06-01

    Despite the critical ecological roles of microeukaryotes in terrestrial ecosystems, most descriptive studies of soil microbes published so far focused only on specific groups. Meanwhile, the fast development of metagenome sequencing leads to considerable data accumulation in public repositories, providing microbiologists with substantial amounts of accessible information. We took advantage of public metagenomes in order to investigate microeukaryote communities in a well characterized grassland soil. The data gathered allowed the evaluation of several factors impacting the community structure, including the DNA extraction method, the database choice and also the annotation procedure. While most studies on soil microeukaryotes are based on sequencing of PCR-amplified taxonomic markers (18S rRNA genes, ITS regions), this work represents, to our knowledge, the first report based solely on metagenomic microeukaryote DNA. Choosing the correct annotation procedure and reference database has proven to be crucial, as it considerably limits the risk of wrong assignments. In addition, a significant and pronounced effect of the DNA extraction method on the taxonomical structure of soil microeukaryotes has been identified. Our analyses suggest that publicly available metagenome data can provide valuable information on soil microeukaryotes for comparative purposes when handled appropriately, complementing the current view provided by ribosomal amplicon sequencing methods. PMID:27020245

  1. Metagenomics of the Mucosal Microbiota of European Eels

    OpenAIRE

    Carda Diéguez, Miguel; Ghai, Rohit; Rodriguez Valera, Francisco; Amaro González, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    European eels are an economically important and threatened species that are prone to rapid collapse in farm conditions. Using metagenomics, we show that the eel mucosal microbiota has specific features distinguishing it from the surrounding aquatic community. This is a first step in dissecting the resident microbiota of this critical barrier that may have implications for maintenance of healthy eel populations.

  2. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani D. Alma’abadi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available More than 99% of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel biocatalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to a great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metagenomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we discuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  3. Marine Metagenome as A Resource for Novel Enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amani D. Alma’abadi; Takashi Gojobori; Katsuhiko Mineta

    2015-01-01

    More than 99%of identified prokaryotes, including many from the marine environment, cannot be cultured in the laboratory. This lack of capability restricts our knowledge of microbial genetics and community ecology. Metagenomics, the culture-independent cloning of environmental DNAs that are isolated directly from an environmental sample, has already provided a wealth of information about the uncultured microbial world. It has also facilitated the discovery of novel bio-catalysts by allowing researchers to probe directly into a huge diversity of enzymes within natural microbial communities. Recent advances in these studies have led to a great interest in recruiting microbial enzymes for the development of environmentally-friendly industry. Although the metage-nomics approach has many limitations, it is expected to provide not only scientific insights but also economic benefits, especially in industry. This review highlights the importance of metagenomics in mining microbial lipases, as an example, by using high-throughput techniques. In addition, we dis-cuss challenges in the metagenomics as an important part of bioinformatics analysis in big data.

  4. Metagenomic species profiling using universal phylogenetic marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunagawa, Shinichi; Mende, Daniel R; Zeller, Georg;

    2013-01-01

    To quantify known and unknown microorganisms at species-level resolution using shotgun sequencing data, we developed a method that establishes metagenomic operational taxonomic units (mOTUs) based on single-copy phylogenetic marker genes. Applied to 252 human fecal samples, the method revealed...

  5. Metagenomics and other Methods for Measuring Antibiotic Resistance in Agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is broad concern regarding antibiotic resistance on farms and in fields, however there is no standard method for defining or measuring antibiotic resistance in environmental samples. Methods: We used metagenomic, culture-based, and molecular methods to characterize the amount, t...

  6. Metagenomic Analyses of Drinking Water Receiving Different Disinfection Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    A metagenome-based approach was utilized for assessing the taxonomic affiliation and function potential of microbial populations in free chlorine (CHL) and monochloramine (CHM) treated drinking water (DW). A total of 1,024, 242 (averaging 544 bp) and 849, 349 (averaging 554 bp) ...

  7. Metagenomics and development of the gut microbiota in infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallès, Y.; Gosalbes, M. J.; de Vries, Lisbeth Elvira;

    2012-01-01

    , the gastrointestinal tract microbiota is often exposed to antibiotics, and may be an important reservoir of resistant strains and of transferable resistance genes from early infancy. We are investigating by means of diverse metagenomic approaches several areas of microbiota development in infants, including...

  8. Comparative metagenomics of eight geographically remote terrestrial hot springs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menzel, Peter; Islin, Sóley Ruth; Rike, Anne Gunn;

    2015-01-01

    Hot springs are natural habitats for thermophilic Archaea and Bacteria. In this paper, we present the metagenomic analysis of eight globally distributed terrestrial hot springs from China, Iceland, Italy, Russia, and the USA with a temperature range between 61 and 92 (∘)C and pH between 1.8 and 7...

  9. Evaluating techniques for metagenome annotation using simulated sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randle-Boggis, Richard J; Helgason, Thorunn; Sapp, Melanie; Ashton, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing has allowed huge amounts of DNA sequence data to be produced, advancing the capabilities of microbial ecosystem studies. The current challenge is to identify from which microorganisms and genes the DNA originated. Several tools and databases are available for annotating DNA sequences. The tools, databases and parameters used can have a significant impact on the results: naïve choice of these factors can result in a false representation of community composition and function. We use a simulated metagenome to show how different parameters affect annotation accuracy by evaluating the sequence annotation performances of MEGAN, MG-RAST, One Codex and Megablast. This simulated metagenome allowed the recovery of known organism and function abundances to be quantitatively evaluated, which is not possible for environmental metagenomes. The performance of each program and database varied, e.g. One Codex correctly annotated many sequences at the genus level, whereas MG-RAST RefSeq produced many false positive annotations. This effect decreased as the taxonomic level investigated increased. Selecting more stringent parameters decreases the annotation sensitivity, but increases precision. Ultimately, there is a trade-off between taxonomic resolution and annotation accuracy. These results should be considered when annotating metagenomes and interpreting results from previous studies. PMID:27162180

  10. Assessment of quality control approaches for metagenomic data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Su, Xiaoquan; Ning, Kang

    2014-11-01

    Currently there is an explosive increase of the next-generation sequencing (NGS) projects and related datasets, which have to be processed by Quality Control (QC) procedures before they could be utilized for omics analysis. QC procedure usually includes identification and filtration of sequencing artifacts such as low-quality reads and contaminating reads, which would significantly affect and sometimes mislead downstream analysis. Quality control of NGS data for microbial communities is especially challenging. In this work, we have evaluated and compared the performance and effects of various QC pipelines on different types of metagenomic NGS data and from different angles, based on which general principles of using QC pipelines were proposed. Results based on both simulated and real metagenomic datasets have shown that: firstly, QC-Chain is superior in its ability for contamination identification for metagenomic NGS datasets with different complexities with high sensitivity and specificity. Secondly, the high performance computing engine enabled QC-Chain to achieve a significant reduction in processing time compared to other pipelines based on serial computing. Thirdly, QC-Chain could outperform other tools in benefiting downstream metagenomic data analysis.

  11. Toward stable genetic engineering of human o-glycosylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhang; Bennett, Eric Paul; Jørgensen, Bodil;

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation is the most abundant and complex posttranslational modification to be considered for recombinant production of therapeutic proteins. Mucin-type (N-acetylgalactosamine [GalNAc]-type) O-glycosylation is found in eumetazoan cells but absent in plants and yeast, making these cell types an...... obvious choice for de novo engineering of this O-glycosylation pathway. We previously showed that transient implementation of O-glycosylation capacity in plants requires introduction of the synthesis of the donor substrate UDP-GalNAc and one or more polypeptide GalNAc-transferases for incorporating Gal......NAc residues into proteins. Here, we have stably engineered O-glycosylation capacity in two plant cell systems, soil-grown Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) Bright Yellow-2 suspension culture cells. Efficient GalNAc O-glycosylation of two stably coexpressed substrate O...

  12. Functional metagenomics to decipher food-microbe-host crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraufie, Pierre; de Wouters, Tomas; Potocki-Veronese, Gabrielle; Blottière, Hervé M; Doré, Joël

    2015-02-01

    The recent developments of metagenomics permit an extremely high-resolution molecular scan of the intestinal microbiota giving new insights and opening perspectives for clinical applications. Beyond the unprecedented vision of the intestinal microbiota given by large-scale quantitative metagenomics studies, such as the EU MetaHIT project, functional metagenomics tools allow the exploration of fine interactions between food constituents, microbiota and host, leading to the identification of signals and intimate mechanisms of crosstalk, especially between bacteria and human cells. Cloning of large genome fragments, either from complex intestinal communities or from selected bacteria, allows the screening of these biological resources for bioactivity towards complex plant polymers or functional food such as prebiotics. This permitted identification of novel carbohydrate-active enzyme families involved in dietary fibre and host glycan breakdown, and highlighted unsuspected bacterial players at the top of the intestinal microbial food chain. Similarly, exposure of fractions from genomic and metagenomic clones onto human cells engineered with reporter systems to track modulation of immune response, cell proliferation or cell metabolism has allowed the identification of bioactive clones modulating key cell signalling pathways or the induction of specific genes. This opens the possibility to decipher mechanisms by which commensal bacteria or candidate probiotics can modulate the activity of cells in the intestinal epithelium or even in distal organs such as the liver, adipose tissue or the brain. Hence, in spite of our inability to culture many of the dominant microbes of the human intestine, functional metagenomics open a new window for the exploration of food-microbe-host crosstalk. PMID:25417646

  13. Metagenome Skimming of Insect Specimen Pools: Potential for Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linard, Benjamin; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Gillett, Conrad P D T; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-06-01

    Metagenomic analyses are challenging in metazoans, but high-copy number and repeat regions can be assembled from low-coverage sequencing by "genome skimming," which is applied here as a new way of characterizing metagenomes obtained in an ecological or taxonomic context. Illumina shotgun sequencing on two pools of Coleoptera (beetles) of approximately 200 species each were assembled into tens of thousands of scaffolds. Repeated low-coverage sequencing recovered similar scaffold sets consistently, although approximately 70% of scaffolds could not be identified against existing genome databases. Identifiable scaffolds included mitochondrial DNA, conserved sequences with hits to expressed sequence tag and protein databases, and known repeat elements of high and low complexity, including numerous copies of rRNA and histone genes. Assemblies of histones captured a diversity of gene order and primary sequence in Coleoptera. Scaffolds with similarity to multiple sites in available coleopteran genome sequences for Dendroctonus and Tribolium revealed high specificity of scaffolds to either of these genomes, in particular for high-copy number repeats. Numerous "clusters" of scaffolds mapped to the same genomic site revealed intra- and/or intergenomic variation within a metagenome pool. In addition to effect of taxonomic composition of the metagenomes, the number of mapped scaffolds also revealed structural differences between the two reference genomes, although the significance of this striking finding remains unclear. Finally, apparently exogenous sequences were recovered, including potential food plants, fungal pathogens, and bacterial symbionts. The "metagenome skimming" approach is useful for capturing the genomic diversity of poorly studied, species-rich lineages and opens new prospects in environmental genomics. PMID:25979752

  14. Artificial and natural duplicates in pyrosequencing reads of metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weizhong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial duplicates from pyrosequencing reads may lead to incorrect interpretation of the abundance of species and genes in metagenomic studies. Duplicated reads were filtered out in many metagenomic projects. However, since the duplicated reads observed in a pyrosequencing run also include natural (non-artificial duplicates, simply removing all duplicates may also cause underestimation of abundance associated with natural duplicates. Results We implemented a method for identification of exact and nearly identical duplicates from pyrosequencing reads. This method performs an all-against-all sequence comparison and clusters the duplicates into groups using an algorithm modified from our previous sequence clustering method cd-hit. This method can process a typical dataset in ~10 minutes; it also provides a consensus sequence for each group of duplicates. We applied this method to the underlying raw reads of 39 genomic projects and 10 metagenomic projects that utilized pyrosequencing technique. We compared the occurrences of the duplicates identified by our method and the natural duplicates made by independent simulations. We observed that the duplicates, including both artificial and natural duplicates, make up 4-44% of reads. The number of natural duplicates highly correlates with the samples' read density (number of reads divided by genome size. For high-complexity metagenomic samples lacking dominant species, natural duplicates only make up Conclusions Our method is available from http://cd-hit.org as a downloadable program and a web server. It is important not only to identify the duplicates from metagenomic datasets but also to distinguish whether they are artificial or natural duplicates. We provide a tool to estimate the number of natural duplicates according to user-defined sample types, so users can decide whether to retain or remove duplicates in their projects.

  15. Metagenomic Analysis of Koumiss in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samat Kozhakhmetov

    2014-12-01

    : Lactobacillus diolivorans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, L. casei, L. curvatus  yeast genus Torula (62.4% and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (37.6%.Conclusion. Thus, the first metagenomic research of koumiss, which was conducted in Kazakhstan, showed significant variations in microbial composition.

  16. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Albu, Roxana I.; Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation, and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, b...

  17. Extracellular Domain N-Glycosylation Controls Human Thrombopoietin Receptor Cell Surface Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Stefan N. Constantinescu

    2011-01-01

    The thrombopoietin receptor (TpoR) is a type I transmembrane protein that mediates the signaling functions of thrombopoietin (Tpo) in regulating megakaryocyte differentiation, platelet formation and hematopoietic stem cell renewal. We probed the role of each of the four extracellular domain putative N-glycosylation sites for cell surface localization and function of the receptor. Single N-glycosylation mutants at any of the four sites were able to acquire the mature N-glycosylated pattern, bu...

  18. Synthesis of glycosyl-amino acids of biological interest; Sintese de glicoaminoacidos de interesse biologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, Vanessa Leiria; Carvalho, Ivone [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas]. E-mail: carronal@usp.br

    2008-07-01

    This work describes the synthesis of the glycosylated amino acids {alpha}GlcNAc-Thr, {beta}GlcNAc-Thr and {alpha}LacNAc-Thr by the glycosylation reaction of the amino acid threonine with the corresponding glycosyl donors {alpha}GlcNAcCl and {alpha}LacN3Cl. The glycosylated amino acids containing the sugar units {alpha}-D-GlcNAc and {alpha}-D-LacNAc O-linked to threonine amino acids are related to O-glycans found in mucins of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, while the corresponding {beta}-D-GlcNAc isomer is involved in cellular signaling events. (author)

  19. N-Glycosylation of Carnosinase Influences Protein Secretion and Enzyme Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Riedl, Eva; Koeppel, Hannes; Pfister, Frederick; Peters, Verena; Sauerhoefer, Sibylle; Sternik, Paula; Brinkkoetter, Paul; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Navis, Gerjan; Henning, Robert H.; van den Born, Jacob; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Janssen, Bart; van der Woude, Fokko J.; Yard, Benito A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The (CTG)n polymorphism in the serum carnosinase (CN-1) gene affects CN-1 secretion. Since CN-1 is heavily glycosylated and glycosylation might influence protein secretion as well, we tested the role of N-glycosylation for CN-1 secretion and enzyme activity. We also tested whether CN-1 secretion is changed under hyperglycemic conditions. RESULTS N-glycosylation of CN-1 was either inhibited by tunicamycin in pCSII-CN-1–transfected Cos-7 cells or by stepwise deletion of its three puta...

  20. The glycosyltransferase involved in thurandacin biosynthesis catalyzes both O- and S-glycosylation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huan; Oman, Trent J.; Zhang, Ran; Garcia De Gonzalo, Chantal V.; Zhang, Qi; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2013-01-01

    The S-glycosyltransferase SunS is a recently discovered enzyme that selectively catalyzes the conjugation of carbohydrates to the cysteine thiol of proteins. This study reports the discovery of a second S-glycosyltransferase, ThuS, and shows that ThuS catalyzes both S-glycosylation of the thiol of cysteine and O-glycosylation of the hydroxyl group of serine in peptide substrates. ThuS-catalyzed S-glycosylation is more efficient than O-glycosylation and the enzyme demonstrates high tolerance w...

  1. Glycosylation Is a Major Regulator of Phenylpropanoid Availability and Biological Activity in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roy, Julien; Huss, Brigitte; Creach, Anne; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2016-01-01

    The phenylpropanoid pathway in plants is responsible for the biosynthesis of a huge amount of secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and tyrosine. Both flavonoids and lignins are synthesized at the end of this very diverse metabolic pathway, as well as many intermediate molecules whose precise biological functions remain largely unknown. The diversity of these molecules can be further increased under the action of UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) leading to the production of glycosylated hydroxycinnamates and related aldehydes, alcohols and esters. Glycosylation can change phenylpropanoid solubility, stability and toxic potential, as well as influencing compartmentalization and biological activity. (De)-glycosylation therefore represents an extremely important regulation point in phenylpropanoid homeostasis. In this article we review recent knowledge on the enzymes involved in regulating phenylpropanoid glycosylation status and availability in different subcellular compartments. We also examine the potential link between monolignol glycosylation and lignification by exploring co-expression of lignin biosynthesis genes and phenolic (de)glycosylation genes. Of the different biological roles linked with their particular chemical properties, phenylpropanoids are often correlated with the plant's stress management strategies that are also regulated by glycosylation. UGTs can for instance influence the resistance of plants during infection by microorganisms and be involved in the mechanisms related to environmental changes. The impact of flavonoid glycosylation on the color of flowers, leaves, seeds and fruits will also be discussed. Altogether this paper underlies the fact that glycosylation and deglycosylation are powerful mechanisms allowing plants to regulate phenylpropanoid localisation, availability and biological activity. PMID:27303427

  2. Insights on N-glycosylation of human haptoglobin and its association with cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu; Shang, Shuxin; Li, Wei; Qin, Xue; Liu, Yinkun

    2016-07-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most significant post-translation modifications and plays a critical role in various biological functions. Haptoglobin (Hp) is one of the acute-phase response proteins secreted by liver. Its glycosylation could be analyzed by many analytical techniques qualitatively and quantitatively. The glycosylation alterations of Hp are reported to be associated with different kinds of diseases. The main glycosylation alterations of Hp in cancer appear to be the presence of aberrantly fucosylated and sialylated structures as well as increased branching. In this mini review, we provided a brief overview of Hp structure and biological function, discussed its glycosylation alterations in different cancers, and described the existing technologies for analyzing glycosylation site and glycan of Hp. Given the importance of Hp glycosylation, its unknown and unclear biological complexity and significances, Hp glycosylation has become a major target in cancer research. Development of sensitive and specific detection of Hp glycosylation including large-scale validation may be significant steps forward to its clinical application. PMID:26873173

  3. Bioprospecting the thermal waters of the Roman baths: isolation of oleaginous species and analysis of the FAME profile for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Bädorf, Holly D; Chuck, Christopher J; Mokebo, Kirsty R; Macdonald, Heather; Davidson, Matthew G; Scott, Rod J

    2013-01-01

    The extensive diversity of microalgae provides an opportunity to undertake bioprospecting for species possessing features suited to commercial scale cultivation. The outdoor cultivation of microalgae is subject to extreme temperature fluctuations; temperature tolerant microalgae would help mitigate this problem. The waters of the Roman Baths, which have a temperature range between 39°C and 46°C, were sampled for microalgae. A total of 3 green algae, 1 diatom and 4 cyanobacterial species were successfully isolated into 'unialgal' culture. Four isolates were filamentous, which could prove advantageous for low energy dewatering of cultures using filtration.Lipid content, profiles and growth rates of the isolates were examined at temperatures of 20, 30, 40°C, with and without nitrogen starvation and compared against the oil producing green algal species, Chlorella emersonii. Some isolates synthesized high levels of lipids, however, all were most productive at temperatures lower than those of the Roman Baths. The eukaryotic algae accumulated a range of saturated and polyunsaturated FAMEs and all isolates generally showed higher lipid accumulation under nitrogen deficient conditions (Klebsormidium sp. increasing from 1.9% to 16.0% and Hantzschia sp. from 31.9 to 40.5%). The cyanobacteria typically accumulated a narrower range of FAMEs that were mostly saturated, but were capable of accumulating a larger quantity of lipid as a proportion of dry weight (M. laminosus, 37.8% fully saturated FAMEs). The maximum productivity of all the isolates was not determined in the current work and will require further effort to optimise key variables such as light intensity and media composition. PMID:23369619

  4. High throughtput comparisons and profiling of metagenomes for industrially relevant enzymes

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Intikhab

    2016-01-26

    More and more genomes and metagenomes are being sequenced since the advent of Next Generation Sequencing Technologies (NGS). Many metagenomic samples are collected from a variety of environments, each exhibiting a different environmental profile, e.g. temperature, environmental chemistry, etc… These metagenomes can be profiled to unearth enzymes relevant to several industries based on specific enzyme properties such as ability to work on extreme conditions, such as extreme temperatures, salinity, anaerobically, etc.. In this work, we present the DMAP platform comprising of a high-throughput metagenomic annotation pipeline and a data-warehouse for comparisons and profiling across large number of metagenomes. We developed two reference databases for profiling of important genes, one containing enzymes related to different industries and the other containing genes with potential bioactivity roles. In this presentation we describe an example analysis of a large number of publicly available metagenomic sample from TARA oceans study (Science 2015) that covers significant part of world oceans.

  5. GIPC: Glycosyl Inositol Phospho Ceramides, the major sphingolipids on earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronnier, Julien; Germain, Véronique; Gouguet, Paul; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2016-04-01

    What are the most abundant sphingolipids on earth? The answer is Glycosyl Inositol Phosphoryl Ceramides (GIPCs) present in fungi and the green lineage. In this review, we discuss the putative role of plant GIPCs in the lipid bilayer asymmetry, in the lateral organization of membrane rafts and in the very long chain fatty acid inter-leaflet coupling of lipids in the plant plasma membrane (PM). A special focus on the structural similarities -and putative functions- of GIPCs is discussed by comparison with animal gangliosides, structural homologs of plant GIPCs. PMID:27074617

  6. Effect of the glycosylation of flavonoids on interaction with protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hui; Wu, Donghui; Wang, Hongxian; Xu, Ming

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, two flavonoid aglycones (baicalein, quercetin) and their glycosides (baicalin, quercitrin) were studied for their ability to bind protein by quenching the protein intrinsic fluorescence. From the spectra obtained, the bimolecular quenching constants, the apparent static binding constants, and binding sites values were calculated. The glycosylation of flavonoids decreases the binding affinity with protein. For quercetin and quercitrin, the binding constants for BSA were 3.65 × 10 7 and 6.47 × 10 3 L mol -1, respectively. For baicalein and baicalin, the binding constants were 4.54 × 10 8 and 1.63 × 10 6 L mol -1, respectively.

  7. Glycal assembly by the in situ generation of glycosyl dithiocarbamates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padungros, Panuwat; Alberch, Laura; Wei, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Glycal assembly offers an expedient entry into β-linked oligosaccharides, but epoxyglycal donors can be capricious in their reactivities. Treatment with Et(2)NH and CS(2) enables their in situ conversion into glycosyl dithiocarbamates, which can be activated by copper triflate for coupling with complex or sterically congested acceptors. The coupling efficiency can be further enhanced by in situ benzoylation, as illustrated in an 11-step synthesis of a branched hexasaccharide from glucals in 28% isolated yield and just four chromatographic purifications. PMID:22686424

  8. Glycosylation of the major human Pneumocystis carinii surface antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Koch, C; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt; Nielsen, Jens Ole; Hansen, J E

    1993-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the major rat P. carinii surface antigen is important for initial host-organism attachment, possibly through binding to fibronectin, mannose-binding protein, or surfactant protein A. Since a carbohydrate/lectin interaction may be involved in adhesion, we undertook...... this study to characterize the glycosylation of the major human P. carinii surface glycoprotein (gp95). We have used purified gp95 as a source of antigen, and in lectin binding and deglycosylation studies it was found that approximately 9% of gp95 consists of N-linked carbohydrates of mainly high...

  9. Glycosylation-mediated phenylpropanoid partitioning in Populus tremuloides cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babst Benjamin A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phenylpropanoid-derived phenolic glycosides (PGs and condensed tannins (CTs comprise large, multi-purpose non-structural carbon sinks in Populus. A negative correlation between PG and CT concentrations has been observed in several studies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship is not known. Results Populus cell cultures produce CTs but not PGs under normal conditions. Feeding salicyl alcohol resulted in accumulation of salicins, the simplest PG, in the cells, but not higher-order PGs. Salicin accrual reflected the stimulation of a glycosylation response which altered a number of metabolic activities. We utilized this suspension cell feeding system as a model for analyzing the possible role of glycosylation in regulating the metabolic competition between PG formation, CT synthesis and growth. Cells accumulated salicins in a dose-dependent manner following salicyl alcohol feeding. Higher feeding levels led to a decrease in cellular CT concentrations (at 5 or 10 mM, and a negative effect on cell growth (at 10 mM. The competition between salicin and CT formation was reciprocal, and depended on the metabolic status of the cells. We analyzed gene expression changes between controls and cells fed with 5 mM salicyl alcohol for 48 hr, a time point when salicin accumulation was near maximum and CT synthesis was reduced, with no effect on growth. Several stress-responsive genes were up-regulated, suggestive of a general stress response in the fed cells. Salicyl alcohol feeding also induced expression of genes associated with sucrose catabolism, glycolysis and the Krebs cycle. Transcript levels of phenylalanine ammonia lyase and most of the flavonoid pathway genes were reduced, consistent with down-regulated CT synthesis. Conclusions Exogenous salicyl alcohol was readily glycosylated in Populus cell cultures, a process that altered sugar utilization and phenolic partitioning in the cells. Using this system, we

  10. Evaluating the Fidelity of De Novo Short Read Metagenomic Assembly Using Simulated Data

    OpenAIRE

    Pignatelli, Miguel; Moya, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    A frequent step in metagenomic data analysis comprises the assembly of the sequenced reads. Many assembly tools have been published in the last years targeting data coming from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies but these assemblers have not been designed for or tested in multi-genome scenarios that characterize metagenomic studies. Here we provide a critical assessment of current de novo short reads assembly tools in multi-genome scenarios using complex simulated metagenomic data....

  11. InteMAP: Integrated metagenomic assembly pipeline for NGS short reads

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Binbin; Wang, Fumeng; Wang, Xiaoqi; Duan, Liping; Zhu, Huaiqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has greatly facilitated metagenomic analysis but also raised new challenges for metagenomic DNA sequence assembly, owing to its high-throughput nature and extremely short reads generated by sequencers such as Illumina. To date, how to generate a high-quality draft assembly for metagenomic sequencing projects has not been fully addressed. Results We conducted a comprehensive assessment on state-of-the-art de novo assemblers and revealed that the perf...

  12. Evaluation of viral genome assembly and diversity estimation in deep metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre de Cárcer, Daniel; Angly, Florent E.; Alcamí, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background Viruses have unique properties, small genome and regions of high similarity, whose effects on metagenomic assemblies have not been characterized so far. This study uses diverse in silico simulated viromes to evaluate how extensively genomes can be assembled using different sequencing platforms and assemblers. Further, it investigates the suitability of different methods to estimate viral diversity in metagenomes. Results We created in silico metagenomes mimicking various platforms ...

  13. INDUS - a composition-based approach for rapid and accurate taxonomic classification of metagenomic sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Monzoorul Haque; Ghosh, Tarini Shankar; Reddy, Rachamalla Maheedhar; Reddy, Chennareddy Venkata Siva Kumar; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Sharmila S Mande

    2011-01-01

    Background Taxonomic classification of metagenomic sequences is the first step in metagenomic analysis. Existing taxonomic classification approaches are of two types, similarity-based and composition-based. Similarity-based approaches, though accurate and specific, are extremely slow. Since, metagenomic projects generate millions of sequences, adopting similarity-based approaches becomes virtually infeasible for research groups having modest computational resources. In this study, we present ...

  14. CoMet—a web server for comparative functional profiling of metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lingner, T.; Asshauer, K. P.; Schreiber, F.; Meinicke, P.

    2011-01-01

    Analyzing the functional potential of newly sequenced genomes and metagenomes has become a common task in biomedical and biological research. With the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies comparative metagenomics opens the way to elucidate the genetically determined similarities and differences of complex microbial communities. We developed the web server ‘CoMet’ (http://comet.gobics.de), which provides an easy-to-use comparative metagenomics platfor...

  15. WebMGA: a Customizable Web Server for Fast Metagenomic Sequence Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Niu Beifang; Fu Liming; Zhu Zhengwei; Wu Sitao; Li Weizhong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The new field of metagenomics studies microorganism communities by culture-independent sequencing. With the advances in next-generation sequencing techniques, researchers are facing tremendous challenges in metagenomic data analysis due to huge quantity and high complexity of sequence data. Analyzing large datasets is extremely time-consuming; also metagenomic annotation involves a wide range of computational tools, which are difficult to be installed and maintained by com...

  16. EBI metagenomics—a new resource for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Sarah; Corbett, Matthew; Denise, Hubert; Fraser, Matthew; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Hunter, Christopher; Jones, Philip; Leinonen, Rasko; McAnulla, Craig; Maguire, Eamonn; Maslen, John; Mitchell, Alex; Nuka, Gift; Oisel, Arnaud; Pesseat, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    Metagenomics is a relatively recently established but rapidly expanding field that uses high-throughput next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize the microbial communities inhabiting different ecosystems (including oceans, lakes, soil, tundra, plants and body sites). Metagenomics brings with it a number of challenges, including the management, analysis, storage and sharing of data. In response to these challenges, we have developed a new metagenomics resource (http://www.ebi.ac....

  17. The great screen anomaly—a new frontier in product discovery through functional metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Ekkers, David Matthias; Cretoiu, Mariana Silvia; Kielak, Anna Maria; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Functional metagenomics, the study of the collective genome of a microbial community by expressing it in a foreign host, is an emerging field in biotechnology. Over the past years, the possibility of novel product discovery through metagenomics has developed rapidly. Thus, metagenomics has been heralded as a promising mining strategy of resources for the biotechnological and pharmaceutical industry. However, in spite of innovative work in the field of functional genomics in recent years, yiel...

  18. MGAviewer: a desktop visualization tool for analysis of metagenomics alignment data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Zhengwei; Niu, Beifang; Chen, Jing; Wu, Sitao; Sun, Shulei; Li, Weizhong

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Numerous metagenomics projects have produced tremendous amounts of sequencing data. Aligning these sequences to reference genomes is an essential analysis in metagenomics studies. Large-scale alignment data call for intuitive and efficient visualization tool. However, current tools such as various genome browsers are highly specialized to handle intraspecies mapping results. They are not suitable for alignment data in metagenomics, which are often interspecies alignments. We have dev...

  19. Genome signature-based dissection of human gut metagenomes to extract subliminal viral sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, Lesley A.; Bowler, Lucas D.; Caplin, Jonathan; Dedi, Cinzia; Diston, David; Cheek, Elizabeth; Taylor, Huw; Ebdon, James E.; Jones, Brian V.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) have a key role in shaping the development and functional outputs of host microbiomes. Although metagenomic approaches have greatly expanded our understanding of the prokaryotic virosphere, additional tools are required for the phage-oriented dissection of metagenomic data sets, and host-range affiliation of recovered sequences. Here we demonstrate the application of a genome signature-based approach to interrogate conventional whole-community metagenomes an...

  20. A metagenomic β-glucuronidase uncovers a core adaptive function of the human intestinal microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Gloux, Karine; Berteau, Olivier; El oumami, Hanane; Béguet, Fabienne; Leclerc, Marion; Doré, Joël

    2010-01-01

    In the human gastrointestinal tract, bacterial β-D-glucuronidases (BG; E.C. 3.2.1.31) are involved both in xenobiotic metabolism and in some of the beneficial effects of dietary compounds. Despite their biological significance, investigations are hampered by the fact that only a few BGs have so far been studied. A functional metagenomic approach was therefore performed on intestinal metagenomic libraries using chromogenic glucuronides as probes. Using this strategy, 19 positive metagenomic cl...

  1. Improved metagenome assemblies and taxonomic binning using long-read circular consensus sequence data.

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, J A; Pan, Y.; A. Tooming-Klunderud; Eijsink, V. G. H.; McHardy, A. C.; Nederbragt, A. J.; Pope, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    DNA assembly is a core methodological step in metagenomic pipelines used to study the structure and function within microbial communities. Here we investigate the utility of Pacific Biosciences long and high accuracy circular consensus sequencing (CCS) reads for metagenomic projects. We compared the application and performance of both PacBio CCS and Illumina HiSeq data with assembly and taxonomic binning algorithms using metagenomic samples representing a complex microbial community. Eight SM...

  2. Improved metagenome assemblies and taxonomic binning using long-read circular consensus sequence data

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, J A; Pan, Y.; A. Tooming-Klunderud; Eijsink, V. G. H.; McHardy, A.C.; Nederbragt, A. J.; Pope, P.B.

    2016-01-01

    DNA assembly is a core methodological step in metagenomic pipelines used to study the structure and function within microbial communities. Here we investigate the utility of Pacific Biosciences long and high accuracy circular consensus sequencing (CCS) reads for metagenomic projects. We compared the application and performance of both PacBio CCS and Illumina HiSeq data with assembly and taxonomic binning algorithms using metagenomic samples representing a complex microbial community. Eight SM...

  3. Screening for novel enzymes from metagenome and SIGEX, as a way to improve it

    OpenAIRE

    Ryu Sangryeol; Yun Jiae

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Metagenomics has been successfully applied to isolate novel biocatalysts from the uncultured microbiota in the environment. Two types of screening have been used to identify clones carrying desired traits from metagenomic libraries: function-based screening, and sequence-based screening. Both function- and sequence- based screening have individual advantages and disadvantages, and they have been applied successfully to discover biocatalysts from metagenome. However, both strategies a...

  4. Genome signature analysis of thermal virus metagenomes reveals Archaea and thermophilic signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pride David T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomic analysis provides a rich source of biological information for otherwise intractable viral communities. However, study of viral metagenomes has been hampered by its nearly complete reliance on BLAST algorithms for identification of DNA sequences. We sought to develop algorithms for examination of viral metagenomes to identify the origin of sequences independent of BLAST algorithms. We chose viral metagenomes obtained from two hot springs, Bear Paw and Octopus, in Yellowstone National Park, as they represent simple microbial populations where comparatively large contigs were obtained. Thermal spring metagenomes have high proportions of sequences without significant Genbank homology, which has hampered identification of viruses and their linkage with hosts. To analyze each metagenome, we developed a method to classify DNA fragments using genome signature-based phylogenetic classification (GSPC, where metagenomic fragments are compared to a database of oligonucleotide signatures for all previously sequenced Bacteria, Archaea, and viruses. Results From both Bear Paw and Octopus hot springs, each assembled contig had more similarity to other metagenome contigs than to any sequenced microbial genome based on GSPC analysis, suggesting a genome signature common to each of these extreme environments. While viral metagenomes from Bear Paw and Octopus share some similarity, the genome signatures from each locale are largely unique. GSPC using a microbial database predicts most of the Octopus metagenome has archaeal signatures, while bacterial signatures predominate in Bear Paw; a finding consistent with those of Genbank BLAST. When using a viral database, the majority of the Octopus metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal virus Families Globuloviridae and Fuselloviridae, while none of the Bear Paw metagenome is predicted to belong to archaeal viruses. As expected, when microbial and viral databases are combined, each of

  5. MetLab: An In Silico Experimental Design, Simulation and Analysis Tool for Viral Metagenomics Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlé, Hadrien; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Hayer, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics, the sequence characterization of all genomes within a sample, is widely used as a virus discovery tool as well as a tool to study viral diversity of animals. Metagenomics can be considered to have three main steps; sample collection and preparation, sequencing and finally bioinformatics. Bioinformatic analysis of metagenomic datasets is in itself a complex process, involving few standardized methodologies, thereby hampering comparison of metagenomics studies between research groups. In this publication the new bioinformatics framework MetLab is presented, aimed at providing scientists with an integrated tool for experimental design and analysis of viral metagenomes. MetLab provides support in designing the metagenomics experiment by estimating the sequencing depth needed for the complete coverage of a species. This is achieved by applying a methodology to calculate the probability of coverage using an adaptation of Stevens’ theorem. It also provides scientists with several pipelines aimed at simplifying the analysis of viral metagenomes, including; quality control, assembly and taxonomic binning. We also implement a tool for simulating metagenomics datasets from several sequencing platforms. The overall aim is to provide virologists with an easy to use tool for designing, simulating and analyzing viral metagenomes. The results presented here include a benchmark towards other existing software, with emphasis on detection of viruses as well as speed of applications. This is packaged, as comprehensive software, readily available for Linux and OSX users at https://github.com/norling/metlab. PMID:27479078

  6. MetLab: An In Silico Experimental Design, Simulation and Analysis Tool for Viral Metagenomics Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, Martin; Karlsson-Lindsjö, Oskar E; Gourlé, Hadrien; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Hayer, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics, the sequence characterization of all genomes within a sample, is widely used as a virus discovery tool as well as a tool to study viral diversity of animals. Metagenomics can be considered to have three main steps; sample collection and preparation, sequencing and finally bioinformatics. Bioinformatic analysis of metagenomic datasets is in itself a complex process, involving few standardized methodologies, thereby hampering comparison of metagenomics studies between research groups. In this publication the new bioinformatics framework MetLab is presented, aimed at providing scientists with an integrated tool for experimental design and analysis of viral metagenomes. MetLab provides support in designing the metagenomics experiment by estimating the sequencing depth needed for the complete coverage of a species. This is achieved by applying a methodology to calculate the probability of coverage using an adaptation of Stevens' theorem. It also provides scientists with several pipelines aimed at simplifying the analysis of viral metagenomes, including; quality control, assembly and taxonomic binning. We also implement a tool for simulating metagenomics datasets from several sequencing platforms. The overall aim is to provide virologists with an easy to use tool for designing, simulating and analyzing viral metagenomes. The results presented here include a benchmark towards other existing software, with emphasis on detection of viruses as well as speed of applications. This is packaged, as comprehensive software, readily available for Linux and OSX users at https://github.com/norling/metlab. PMID:27479078

  7. MOCAT2: a metagenomic assembly, annotation and profiling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kultima, Jens Roat; Coelho, Luis Pedro; Forslund, Kristoffer; Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Li, Simone S.; Driessen, Marja; Voigt, Anita Yvonne; Zeller, Georg; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    Summary: MOCAT2 is a software pipeline for metagenomic sequence assembly and gene prediction with novel features for taxonomic and functional abundance profiling. The automated generation and efficient annotation of non-redundant reference catalogs by propagating pre-computed assignments from 18 databases covering various functional categories allows for fast and comprehensive functional characterization of metagenomes. Availability and Implementation: MOCAT2 is implemented in Perl 5 and Python 2.7, designed for 64-bit UNIX systems and offers support for high-performance computer usage via LSF, PBS or SGE queuing systems; source code is freely available under the GPL3 license at http://mocat.embl.de. Contact: bork@embl.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153620

  8. The MG-RAST metagenomics database and portal in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Andreas; Bischof, Jared; Gerlach, Wolfgang; Glass, Elizabeth; Harrison, Travis; Keegan, Kevin P; Paczian, Tobias; Trimble, William L; Bagchi, Saurabh; Grama, Ananth; Chaterji, Somali; Meyer, Folker

    2016-01-01

    MG-RAST (http://metagenomics.anl.gov) is an open-submission data portal for processing, analyzing, sharing and disseminating metagenomic datasets. The system currently hosts over 200,000 datasets and is continuously updated. The volume of submissions has increased 4-fold over the past 24 months, now averaging 4 terabasepairs per month. In addition to several new features, we report changes to the analysis workflow and the technologies used to scale the pipeline up to the required throughput levels. To show possible uses for the data from MG-RAST, we present several examples integrating data and analyses from MG-RAST into popular third-party analysis tools or sequence alignment tools. PMID:26656948

  9. Genomics and Metagenomics of Extreme Acidophiles in Biomining Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Over 160 draft or complete genomes of extreme acidophiles (pH metagenomic studies of such environments. This provides a rich source of latent data that can be exploited for understanding the biology of biomining environments and for advancing biotechnological applications. Genomic and metagenomic data are already yielding valuable insights into cellular processes, including carbon and nitrogen management, heavy metal and acid resistance, iron and sulfur oxido-reduction, linking biogeochemical processes to organismal physiology. The data also allow the construction of useful models of the ecophysiology of biomining environments and provide insight into the gene and genome evolution of extreme acidophiles. Additionally, since most of these acidophiles are also chemoautolithotrophs that use minerals as energy sources or electron sinks, their genomes can be plundered for clues about the evolution of cellular metabolism and bioenergetic pathways during the Archaean abiotic/biotic transition on early Earth. Acknowledgements: Fondecyt 1130683.

  10. Metagenomic insights into the dynamics of microbial communities in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergourlay, Gilles; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Champomier Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-11-20

    Metagenomics has proven to be a powerful tool in exploring a large diversity of natural environments such as air, soil, water, and plants, as well as various human microbiota (e.g. digestive tract, lungs, skin). DNA sequencing techniques are becoming increasingly popular and less and less expensive. Given that high-throughput DNA sequencing approaches have only recently started to be used to decipher food microbial ecosystems, there is a significant growth potential for such technologies in the field of food microbiology. The aim of this review is to present a survey of recent food investigations via metagenomics and to illustrate how this approach can be a valuable tool in the better characterization of foods and their transformation, storage and safety. Traditional food in particular has been thoroughly explored by global approaches in order to provide information on multi-species and multi-organism communities. PMID:26414193

  11. Functional metagenomic screen reveals new and diverse microbial rhodopsins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded

    2016-01-01

    Ion-translocating retinylidene rhodopsins are widely distributed among marine and freshwater microbes. The translocation is light-driven, contributing to the production of biochemical energy in diverse microbes. Until today, most microbial rhodopsins had been detected using bioinformatics based on homology to other rhodopsins. In the past decade, there has been increased interest in microbial rhodopsins in the field of optogenetics since microbial rhodopsins were found to be most useful in vertebrate neuronal systems. Here we report on a functional metagenomic assay for detecting microbial rhodopsins. Using an array of narrow pH electrodes and light-emitting diode illumination, we were able to screen a metagenomic fosmid library to detect diverse marine proteorhodopsins and an actinorhodopsin based solely on proton-pumping activity. Our assay therefore provides a rather simple phenotypic means to enrich our understanding of microbial rhodopsins without any prior knowledge of the genomic content of the environmental entities screened. PMID:26894445

  12. A Statistical Framework for the Functional Analysis of Metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharon, Itai; Pati, Amrita; Markowitz, Victor; Pinter, Ron Y.

    2008-10-01

    Metagenomic studies consider the genetic makeup of microbial communities as a whole, rather than their individual member organisms. The functional and metabolic potential of microbial communities can be analyzed by comparing the relative abundance of gene families in their collective genomic sequences (metagenome) under different conditions. Such comparisons require accurate estimation of gene family frequencies. They present a statistical framework for assessing these frequencies based on the Lander-Waterman theory developed originally for Whole Genome Shotgun (WGS) sequencing projects. They also provide a novel method for assessing the reliability of the estimations which can be used for removing seemingly unreliable measurements. They tested their method on a wide range of datasets, including simulated genomes and real WGS data from sequencing projects of whole genomes. Results suggest that their framework corrects inherent biases in accepted methods and provides a good approximation to the true statistics of gene families in WGS projects.

  13. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  14. (Meta)genomic insights into the pathogenome of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anukriti; Gilbert, Jack A; Lal, Rup

    2016-01-01

    Despite having serious clinical manifestations, Cellulosimicrobium cellulans remain under-reported with only three genome sequences available at the time of writing. Genome sequences of C. cellulans LMG16121, C. cellulans J36 and Cellulosimicrobium sp. strain MM were used to determine distribution of pathogenicity islands (PAIs) across C. cellulans, which revealed 49 potential marker genes with known association to human infections, e.g. Fic and VbhA toxin-antitoxin system. Oligonucleotide composition-based analysis of orthologous proteins (n = 791) across three genomes revealed significant negative correlation (P metagenomic islands using strain MM's genome with environmental data from the site of isolation (hot-spring biofilm) revealed (an)aerobic respiration as population segregation factor across the in situ cohorts. Using reference genomes and metagenomic data, our results highlight the emergence and evolution of PAIs in the genus Cellulosimicrobium. PMID:27151933

  15. A kit for the investigation of live Escherichia coli cell adhesion to glycosylated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, M.; Horst, A. K.; Klemm, Per; Lindhorst, T. K.

    2010-01-01

    A combination of microtiter plate functionalization techniques and two facile bacterial adhesion inhibition assays form a flexible toolbox for the investigation of bacterial adhesion mechanisms on glycosylated surfaces.......A combination of microtiter plate functionalization techniques and two facile bacterial adhesion inhibition assays form a flexible toolbox for the investigation of bacterial adhesion mechanisms on glycosylated surfaces....

  16. Glycosylation of Twisted gastrulation is required for BMP binding and activity during craniofacial development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CharlesJ.Billington

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Twisted Gastrulation (TWSG1 is a conserved, secreted glycoprotein that modulates signaling of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs in the extracellular space. Deletion of exon 4 of mouse Twsg1 (mTwsg1 is associated with significant craniofacial defects. However, little is understood about the biochemical properties of the corresponding region of the protein. We have uncovered a significant role for exon 4 sequences as encoding the only two glycosylation sites of the mTWSG1 protein. Deletion of the entire exon 4 or mutation of both glycosylation sites within exon 4 abolishes glycosylation of mTWSG1. Importantly, we find that constructs with mutated glycosylation sites have significantly reduced BMP binding activity. We further show that glycosylation and activity of TWSG1 recombinant proteins vary markedly by cellular source. Non-glycosylated mTWSG1 made in E. coli has both reduced affinity for BMPs, as shown by surface plasmon resonance analysis, and reduced BMP inhibitory activity in a mandibular explant culture system compared to glycosylated proteins made in insect cells or murine myeloma cells. This study highlights an essential role for glycosylation in Twisted gastrulation action.

  17. Effects of glycosylation on antigenicity and immunogenicity of classical swine fever virus envelope proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) harbors three envelope glycoproteins (E(rns), E1 and E2). Previous studies have demonstrated that removal of specific glycosylation sites within these proteins yielded attenuated and immunogenic CSFV mutants. Here we analyzed the effects of lack of glycosylation of...

  18. Stannylene‐Mediated Regioselective 6‐O‐Glycosylation of Unprotected Phenyl 1‐Thioglycopyranosides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggi, Agnese; Madsen, Robert

    2013-01-01

    acetal, and then subjected to selective glycosylation at the 6‐position with the Koenigs–Knorr protocol. Peracylated glycosyl bromides of D‐glucose, D‐galactose, D‐mannose and D‐glucosamine were employed as the donors to give the corresponding (1→6)‐linked disaccharides in moderate to good yields. The...

  19. Metagenomic analysis of the medicinal leech gut microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    Maltz, Michele A.; Bomar, Lindsey; Lapierre, Pascal; Morrison, Hilary G; McClure, Emily Ann; Sogin, Mitchell L.; Graf, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by 10-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host's digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes, and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of these microbial interactions within this...

  20. Metagenomic Analysis of the Medicinal Leech Gut Microbiota

    OpenAIRE

    MicheleAMaltz; HilaryGMorrison

    2014-01-01

    There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by ten-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host’s digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of theses microbial interactions within th...

  1. DIME: a novel framework for de novo metagenomic sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Yu, Ning; Ding, Xiaojun; Wang, Jianxin; Pan, Yi

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed next generation sequencing platforms not only decrease the cost for metagenomics data analysis, but also greatly enlarge the size of metagenomic sequence datasets. A common bottleneck of available assemblers is that the trade-off between the noise of the resulting contigs and the gain in sequence length for better annotation has not been attended enough for large-scale sequencing projects, especially for the datasets with low coverage and a large number of nonoverlapping contigs. To address this limitation and promote both accuracy and efficiency, we develop a novel metagenomic sequence assembly framework, DIME, by taking the DIvide, conquer, and MErge strategies. In addition, we give two MapReduce implementations of DIME, DIME-cap3 and DIME-genovo, on Apache Hadoop platform. For a systematic comparison of the performance of the assembly tasks, we tested DIME and five other popular short read assembly programs, Cap3, Genovo, MetaVelvet, SOAPdenovo, and SPAdes on four synthetic and three real metagenomic sequence datasets with various reads from fifty thousand to a couple million in size. The experimental results demonstrate that our method not only partitions the sequence reads with an extremely high accuracy, but also reconstructs more bases, generates higher quality assembled consensus, and yields higher assembly scores, including corrected N50 and BLAST-score-per-base, than other tools with a nearly theoretical speed-up. Results indicate that DIME offers great improvement in assembly across a range of sequence abundances and thus is robust to decreasing coverage. PMID:25684202

  2. Four novel algal virus genomes discovered from Yellowstone Lake metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Weijia Zhang; Jinglie Zhou; Taigang Liu; Yongxin Yu; Yingjie Pan; Shuling Yan; Yongjie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are algae-infecting large dsDNA viruses that are widely distributed in aquatic environments. Here, partial genomic sequences of four novel algal viruses were assembled from a Yellowstone Lake metagenomic data set. Genomic analyses revealed that three Yellowstone Lake phycodnaviruses (YSLPVs) had genome lengths of 178,262 bp, 171,045 bp, and 171,454 bp, respectively, and were phylogenetically closely related to prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae). The fourth (YSLGV), with a genome...

  3. Three Novel Virophage Genomes Discovered from Yellowstone Lake Metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jinglie; Sun, Dawei; Childers, Alyson; McDermott, Timothy R.; Wang, Yongjie; Mark R Liles

    2014-01-01

    Virophages are a unique group of circular double-stranded DNA viruses that are considered parasites of giant DNA viruses, which in turn are known to infect eukaryotic hosts. In this study, the genomes of three novel Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs)—YSLV5, YSLV6, and YSLV7—were identified from Yellowstone Lake through metagenomic analyses. The relative abundance of these three novel virophages and previously identified Yellowstone Lake virophages YSLV1 to -4 were determined in different loc...

  4. CoMeta: Classification of Metagenomes Using k-mers

    OpenAIRE

    Kawulok, Jolanta; Deorowicz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, the study of environmental samples has been developing rapidly. Characterization of the environment composition broadens the knowledge about the relationship between species composition and environmental conditions. An important element of extracting the knowledge of the sample composition is to compare the extracted fragments of DNA with sequences derived from known organisms. In the presented paper, we introduce an algorithm called CoMeta (Classification of metagenomes), which ass...

  5. Investigation of a metagenomic library for aerobic toluene degradation genes

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhajja, Emna; George, Isabelle; Liles, Marc; Agathos, Spiros N.; 14th International Symposium on Microbial Ecology (ISME14)

    2012-01-01

    A metagenomic study on sediment from a former gasworks site located in Düsseldorf- Flingern was conducted to assess the tar oil hydrocarbon degradation potential at that site. A sediment sample was collected from 6.70 m to 7.10 m below surface in the anoxic contaminant plume. This plume consisted mainly of benzene, toluene, ethylene, xylene and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The first step was to extract enough high quality, high molecular weight DNA despite low cell density within the sediment. ...

  6. Marine Microbial Metagenomics: From Individual to the Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Ching-Hung Tseng; Sen-Lin Tang

    2014-01-01

    Microbes are the most abundant biological entities on earth, therefore, studying them is important for understanding their roles in global ecology. The science of metagenomics is a relatively young field of research that has enjoyed significant effort since its inception in 1998. Studies using next-generation sequencing techniques on single genomes and collections of genomes have not only led to novel insights into microbial genomics, but also revealed a close association between environmenta...

  7. Metagenomics of the deep Mediterranean, a warm bathypelagic habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Belen Martín-Cuadrado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metagenomics is emerging as a powerful method to study the function and physiology of the unexplored microbial biosphere, and is causing us to re-evaluate basic precepts of microbial ecology and evolution. Most marine metagenomic analyses have been nearly exclusively devoted to photic waters. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We constructed a metagenomic fosmid library from 3,000 m-deep Mediterranean plankton, which is much warmer (approximately 14 degrees C than waters of similar depth in open oceans (approximately 2 degrees C. We analyzed the library both by phylogenetic screening based on 16S rRNA gene amplification from clone pools and by sequencing both insert extremities of ca. 5,000 fosmids. Genome recruitment strategies showed that the majority of high scoring pairs corresponded to genomes from Rhizobiales within the Alphaproteobacteria, Cenarchaeum symbiosum, Planctomycetes, Acidobacteria, Chloroflexi and Gammaproteobacteria. We have found a community structure similar to that found in the aphotic zone of the Pacific. However, the similarities were significantly higher to the mesopelagic (500-700 m deep in the Pacific than to the single 4000 m deep sample studied at this location. Metabolic genes were mostly related to catabolism, transport and degradation of complex organic molecules, in agreement with a prevalent heterotrophic lifestyle for deep-sea microbes. However, we observed a high percentage of genes encoding dehydrogenases and, among them, cox genes, suggesting that aerobic carbon monoxide oxidation may be important in the deep ocean as an additional energy source. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The comparison of metagenomic libraries from the deep Mediterranean and the Pacific ALOHA water column showed that bathypelagic Mediterranean communities resemble more mesopelagic communities in the Pacific, and suggests that, in the absence of light, temperature is a major stratifying factor in the oceanic water column, overriding

  8. Application of metagenomics in the human gut microbiome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Lin; Xu, Shao-Yan; Ren, Zhi-Gang; Tao, Liang; Jiang, Jian-Wen; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2015-01-01

    There are more than 1000 microbial species living in the complex human intestine. The gut microbial community plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogenic microbes, modulating immunity, regulating metabolic processes, and is even regarded as an endocrine organ. However, traditional culture methods are very limited for identifying microbes. With the application of molecular biologic technology in the field of the intestinal microbiome, especially metagenomic sequencing of ...

  9. Enhancing Metagenomics Investigations of Microbial Interactions with Biofilm Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Kakirde, Kavita S.; McLean, Robert J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of microbial ecology and diversity have been greatly enhanced by the application of culture-independent techniques. One such approach, metagenomics, involves sample collections from soil, water, and other environments. Extracted nucleic acids from bulk environmental samples are sequenced and analyzed, which allows microbial interactions to be inferred on the basis of bioinformatics calculations. In most environments, microbial interactions occur predominately in surface-adheren...

  10. Metagenomics, Metatranscriptomics, and Metabolomics Approaches for Microbiome Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Aguiar-Pulido; Wenrui Huang; Victoria Suarez-Ulloa; Trevor Cickovski; Kalai Mathee; Giri Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    Microbiomes are ubiquitous and are found in the ocean, the soil, and in/on other living organisms. Changes in the microbiome can impact the health of the environmental niche in which they reside. In order to learn more about these communities, different approaches based on data from multiple omics have been pursued. Metagenomics produces a taxonomical profile of the sample, metatranscriptomics helps us to obtain a functional profile, and metabolomics completes the picture by determining which...

  11. Metagenomic insights into the dynamics of microbial communities in food

    OpenAIRE

    Kergourlay, Gilles; Taminiau, Bernard; Daube, Georges; Champomier Vergès, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics has proven to be a powerful tool in exploring a large diversity of natural environments such as air, soil, water, and plants, as well as various human microbiota (e.g. digestive tract, lungs, skin). DNA sequencing techniques are becoming increasingly popular and less and less expensive. Given that high-throughput DNA sequencing approaches have only recently started to be used to decipher food microbial ecosystems, there is a significant growth potential for such technologies in t...

  12. Bioinformatic Approaches Reveal Metagenomic Characterization of Soil Microbial Community

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhuofei; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars H.; Jacquiod, Samuel Jehan Auguste; Sørensen, Søren Johannes

    2014-01-01

    As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic s...

  13. Functional screening of a metagenomic library from algal biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Marjolaine,

    2013-01-01

    Macroalgae, and particularly their lignin-free polysaccharides, are increasingly used for their gelling and therapeutic properties and for the production of biofuels and renewable chemical compounds. To extract, hydrolyze and purify this biomass, algae hydrolyzing enzymes are needed. Our work aims to identify and characterize algal biomass hydrolyzing enzymes expressed by microorganisms living on the surface of algae, by functional metagenomics. Therefore, a microbial DNA extraction me...

  14. Metagenome analysis of a soil and marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    De Tender, C.; Debode, J.; Devriese, L.; Haegeman, A.; Ruttink, T.; Baeyen, S.; Cremelie, P.; Maes, S; Dawyndt, P; Maes, M.; Robbens, J.

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic research of microplastics and the rhizosphere of lettuce gives information about the microbial composition and functions of the species present in their environment. Knowledge about the microbial load on microplastics and the functions these bacteria perform could help in the detection of marine plastic degrading bacteria.Understanding the influence of biochar on the rhizosphere microbiome and the effect on soil-borne pathogens, could lead to the development of novel ways to resto...

  15. The Microbiome of Brazilian Mangrove Sediments as Revealed by Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Dini Andreote; Diego Javier Jiménez; Diego Chaves; Armando Cavalcante Franco Dias; Danice Mazzer Luvizotto; Francisco Dini-Andreote; Cristiane Cipola Fasanella; Maryeimy Varon Lopez; Sandra Baena; Rodrigo Gouvêa Taketani; Itamar Soares de Melo

    2012-01-01

    Here we embark in a deep metagenomic survey that revealed the taxonomic and potential metabolic pathways aspects of mangrove sediment microbiology. The extraction of DNA from sediment samples and the direct application of pyrosequencing resulted in approximately 215 Mb of data from four distinct mangrove areas (BrMgv01 to 04) in Brazil. The taxonomic approaches applied revealed the dominance of Deltaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria in the samples. Paired statistical analysis showed high...

  16. Crass: identification and reconstruction of CRISPR from unassembled metagenomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Skennerton, Connor T.; Imelfort, Michael; Tyson, Gene W

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) constitute a bacterial and archaeal adaptive immune system that protect against bacteriophage (phage). Analysis of CRISPR loci reveals the history of phage infections and provides a direct link between phage and their hosts. All current tools for CRISPR identification have been developed to analyse completed genomes and are not well suited to the analysis of metagenomic data sets, where CRISPR loci are difficult to assemble ow...

  17. Sequencing platform and library preparation choices impact viral metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Solonenko, Sergei A; Ignacio-Espinoza, J César; Alberti, Adriana; Cruaud, Corinne; Hallam, Steven; Konstantinidis, Kostas; Tyson, Gene; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Microbes drive the biogeochemistry that fuels the planet. Microbial viruses modulate their hosts directly through mortality and horizontal gene transfer, and indirectly by re-programming host metabolisms during infection. However, our ability to study these virus-host interactions is limited by methods that are low-throughput and heavily reliant upon the subset of organisms that are in culture. One way forward are culture-independent metagenomic approaches, but t...

  18. Computational Approaches for Analyzing Ancient Genomes and Modern Metagenomes

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Nico

    2013-01-01

    Modern genomics entered a new era with the invention of next-generation sequencing techniques. Technical progress, high throughput and reasonably cheap costs of the systems enable us to look into the genomic sequences of whole communities or even extinct species. In the first part of this work we present and discuss state-of-the-art methods for analyzing metagenomes efficiently. As the assignment of sequencing reads to known species or functions is one key element in the analysis we discuss c...

  19. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Rui; Wang, Bochu; Zhub, Liancai, E-mail: wangbc2000@126.com [Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, (China); Wang, Manyuan [School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Abe, Ikuro, E-mail: abei@mol.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  20. PhyloSift: phylogenetic analysis of genomes and metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Darling

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Like all organisms on the planet, environmental microbes are subject to the forces of molecular evolution. Metagenomic sequencing provides a means to access the DNA sequence of uncultured microbes. By combining DNA sequencing of microbial communities with evolutionary modeling and phylogenetic analysis we might obtain new insights into microbiology and also provide a basis for practical tools such as forensic pathogen detection. In this work we present an approach to leverage phylogenetic analysis of metagenomic sequence data to conduct several types of analysis. First, we present a method to conduct phylogeny-driven Bayesian hypothesis tests for the presence of an organism in a sample. Second, we present a means to compare community structure across a collection of many samples and develop direct associations between the abundance of certain organisms and sample metadata. Third, we apply new tools to analyze the phylogenetic diversity of microbial communities and again demonstrate how this can be associated to sample metadata. These analyses are implemented in an open source software pipeline called PhyloSift. As a pipeline, PhyloSift incorporates several other programs including LAST, HMMER, and pplacer to automate phylogenetic analysis of protein coding and RNA sequences in metagenomic datasets generated by modern sequencing platforms (e.g., Illumina, 454.

  1. Bioinformatic approaches reveal metagenomic characterization of soil microbial community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuofei Xu

    Full Text Available As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic soil, and mangrove sediment and integrated some state-of-the-art computational tools to explore the phylogenetic and functional characterizations of the microbial communities in soil. Microbial composition and metabolic potential in soils were comprehensively illustrated at the metagenomic level. A spectrum of metagenomic biomarkers containing 46 taxa and 33 metabolic modules were detected to be significantly differential that could be used as indicators to distinguish at least one of five soil communities. The co-occurrence associations between complex microbial compositions and functions were inferred by network-based approaches. Our results together with the established bioinformatic pipelines should provide a foundation for future research into the relation between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function.

  2. Bioinformatic approaches reveal metagenomic characterization of soil microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhuofei; Hansen, Martin Asser; Hansen, Lars H; Jacquiod, Samuel; Sørensen, Søren J

    2014-01-01

    As is well known, soil is a complex ecosystem harboring the most prokaryotic biodiversity on the Earth. In recent years, the advent of high-throughput sequencing techniques has greatly facilitated the progress of soil ecological studies. However, how to effectively understand the underlying biological features of large-scale sequencing data is a new challenge. In the present study, we used 33 publicly available metagenomes from diverse soil sites (i.e. grassland, forest soil, desert, Arctic soil, and mangrove sediment) and integrated some state-of-the-art computational tools to explore the phylogenetic and functional characterizations of the microbial communities in soil. Microbial composition and metabolic potential in soils were comprehensively illustrated at the metagenomic level. A spectrum of metagenomic biomarkers containing 46 taxa and 33 metabolic modules were detected to be significantly differential that could be used as indicators to distinguish at least one of five soil communities. The co-occurrence associations between complex microbial compositions and functions were inferred by network-based approaches. Our results together with the established bioinformatic pipelines should provide a foundation for future research into the relation between soil biodiversity and ecosystem function. PMID:24691166

  3. Reconstruction of ribosomal RNA genes from metagenomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fan

    Full Text Available Direct sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics has a great potential for describing the 16S rRNA gene diversity of microbial communities. However current approaches using this 16S rRNA gene information to describe community diversity suffer from low taxonomic resolution or chimera problems. Here we describe a new strategy that involves stringent assembly and data filtering to reconstruct full-length 16S rRNA genes from metagenomicpyrosequencing data. Simulations showed that reconstructed 16S rRNA genes provided a true picture of the community diversity, had minimal rates of chimera formation and gave taxonomic resolution down to genus level. The strategy was furthermore compared to PCR-based methods to determine the microbial diversity in two marine sponges. This showed that about 30% of the abundant phylotypes reconstructed from metagenomic data failed to be amplified by PCR. Our approach is readily applicable to existing metagenomic datasets and is expected to lead to the discovery of new microbial phylotypes.

  4. Challenges of the Unknown: Clinical Application of Microbial Metagenomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Rose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast, high throughput and low cost whole genome sequencing holds great promise within public health microbiology, with applications ranging from outbreak detection and tracking transmission events to understanding the role played by microbial communities in health and disease. Within clinical metagenomics, identifying microorganisms from a complex and host enriched background remains a central computational challenge. As proof of principle, we sequenced two metagenomic samples, a known viral mixture of 25 human pathogens and an unknown complex biological model using benchtop technology. The datasets were then analysed using a bioinformatic pipeline developed around recent fast classification methods. A targeted approach was able to detect 20 of the viruses against a background of host contamination from multiple sources and bacterial contamination. An alternative untargeted identification method was highly correlated with these classifications, and over 1,600 species were identified when applied to the complex biological model, including several species captured at over 50% genome coverage. In summary, this study demonstrates the great potential of applying metagenomics within the clinical laboratory setting and that this can be achieved using infrastructure available to nondedicated sequencing centres.

  5. ExoMeg1: a new exonuclease from metagenomic library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Portela, Rita C. B.; Carvalho, Fabíola M.; Pereira, Carolina P. M.; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C.; Modesti, Mauro; Fuchs, Robert P.; Agnez-Lima, Lucymara F.

    2016-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are responsible for maintaining the integrity of DNA and are essential to life. However, our knowledge of DNA repair mechanisms is based on model organisms such as Escherichia coli, and little is known about free living and uncultured microorganisms. In this study, a functional screening was applied in a metagenomic library with the goal of discovering new genes involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity. One clone was identified and the sequence analysis showed an open reading frame homolog to a hypothetical protein annotated as a member of the Exo_Endo_Phos superfamily. This novel enzyme shows 3′-5′ exonuclease activity on single and double strand DNA substrates and it is divalent metal-dependent, EDTA-sensitive and salt resistant. The clone carrying the hypothetical ORF was able to complement strains deficient in recombination or base excision repair, suggesting that the new enzyme may be acting on the repair of single strand breaks with 3′ blockers, which are substrates for these repair pathways. Because this is the first report of an enzyme obtained from a metagenomic approach showing exonuclease activity, it was named ExoMeg1. The metagenomic approach has proved to be a useful tool for identifying new genes of uncultured microorganisms. PMID:26815639

  6. New viruses in veterinary medicine, detected by metagenomic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belák, Sándor; Karlsson, Oskar E; Blomström, Anne-Lie; Berg, Mikael; Granberg, Fredrik

    2013-07-26

    In our world, which is faced today with exceptional environmental changes and dramatically intensifying globalisation, we are encountering challenges due to many new factors, including the emergence or re-emergence of novel, so far "unknown" infectious diseases. Although a broad arsenal of diagnostic methods is at our disposal, the majority of the conventional diagnostic tests is highly virus-specific or is targeted entirely towards a limited group of infectious agents. This specificity complicates or even hinders the detection of new or unexpected pathogens, such as new, emerging or re-emerging viruses or novel viral variants. The recently developed approaches of viral metagenomics provide an effective novel way to screen samples and detect viruses without previous knowledge of the infectious agent, thereby enabling a better diagnosis and disease control, in line with the "One World, One Health" principles (www.oneworldonehealth.org). Using metagenomic approaches, we have recently identified a broad variety of new viruses, such as novel bocaviruses, Torque Teno viruses, astroviruses, rotaviruses and kobuviruses in porcine disease syndromes, new virus variants in honeybee populations, as well as a range of other infectious agents in further host species. These findings indicate that the metagenomic detection of viral pathogens is becoming now a powerful, cultivation-independent, and useful novel diagnostic tool in veterinary diagnostic virology. PMID:23428379

  7. Cyclodipeptides from metagenomic library of a japanese marine sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture-independent metagenomics is an attractive and promising approach to explore unique bioactive small molecules from marine sponges harboring uncultured symbiotic microbes. Therefore, we conducted functional screening of the metagenomic library constructed from the Japanese marine sponge Discodermia calyx. Bioassay-guided fractionation of plate culture extract of antibacterial clone pDC113 afforded eleven cyclodipeptides: Cyclo(l-Thr-l-Leu) (1), Cyclo(l-Val-d-Pro) (2), Cyclo(l-Ile-d-Pro) (3), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Pro) (4), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Leu) (5), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Ile) (6), Cyclo(l-Leu-l-Leu) (7), Cyclo(l-Phe-l-Tyr) (8), Cyclo(l-Trp-l-Pro) (9), Cyclo(l-Val-l-Trp) (10) and Cyclo(l-Ile-l-Trp) (11). To the best of our knowledge, these are first cyclodepeptides isolated from metagenomic library. Sequence analysis suggested that isolated cyclodipeptides were not synthesized by nonribosomal peptide synthetases and there was no significant indication of cyclodipeptide synthetases. (author)

  8. Culture-independent discovery of natural products from soil metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Micah; Hover, Bradley M; Brady, Sean F

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial natural products have proven to be invaluable starting points in the development of many currently used therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, traditional culture-based methods for natural product discovery have been deemphasized by pharmaceutical companies due in large part to high rediscovery rates. Culture-independent, or "metagenomic," methods, which rely on the heterologous expression of DNA extracted directly from environmental samples (eDNA), have the potential to provide access to metabolites encoded by a large fraction of the earth's microbial biosynthetic diversity. As soil is both ubiquitous and rich in bacterial diversity, it is an appealing starting point for culture-independent natural product discovery efforts. This review provides an overview of the history of soil metagenome-driven natural product discovery studies and elaborates on the recent development of new tools for sequence-based, high-throughput profiling of environmental samples used in discovering novel natural product biosynthetic gene clusters. We conclude with several examples of these new tools being employed to facilitate the recovery of novel secondary metabolite encoding gene clusters from soil metagenomes and the subsequent heterologous expression of these clusters to produce bioactive small molecules. PMID:26586404

  9. Functional metagenomic selection of RubisCOs from uncultivated bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varaljay, Vanessa A; Satagopan, Sriram; North, Justin A.; Witteveen, Briana; Dourado, Manuella N.; Anantharaman, Karthik; Arbing, Mark A.; McCann, Shelley; Oremland, Ronald S.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Tabita, F. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO) is a critical yet severely inefficient enzyme that catalyses the fixation of virtually all of the carbon found on Earth. Here, we report a functional metagenomic selection that recovers physiologically active RubisCO molecules directly from uncultivated and largely unknown members of natural microbial communities. Selection is based on CO2-dependent growth in a host strain capable of expressing environmental deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), precluding the need for pure cultures or screening of recombinant clones for enzymatic activity. Seventeen functional RubisCO-encoded sequences were selected using DNA extracted from soil and river autotrophic enrichments, a photosynthetic biofilm and a subsurface groundwater aquifer. Notably, three related form II RubisCOs were recovered which share high sequence similarity with metagenomic scaffolds from uncultivated members of theGallionellaceae family. One of the Gallionellaceae RubisCOs was purified and shown to possessCO2/O2 specificity typical of form II enzymes. X-ray crystallography determined that this enzyme is a hexamer, only the second form II multimer ever solved and the first RubisCO structure obtained from an uncultivated bacterium. Functional metagenomic selection leverages natural biological diversity and billions of years of evolution inherent in environmental communities, providing a new window into the discovery of CO2-fixing enzymes not previously characterized.

  10. Metagenomic abundance estimation and diagnostic testing on species level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Martin S.; Renard, Bernhard Y.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of sequencing-based metagenomic community analysis is the quantitative taxonomic assessment of microbial community compositions. In particular, relative quantification of taxons is of high relevance for metagenomic diagnostics or microbial community comparison. However, the majority of existing approaches quantify at low resolution (e.g. at phylum level), rely on the existence of special genes (e.g. 16S), or have severe problems discerning species with highly similar genome sequences. Yet, problems as metagenomic diagnostics require accurate quantification on species level. We developed Genome Abundance Similarity Correction (GASiC), a method to estimate true genome abundances via read alignment by considering reference genome similarities in a non-negative LASSO approach. We demonstrate GASiC’s superior performance over existing methods on simulated benchmark data as well as on real data. In addition, we present applications to datasets of both bacterial DNA and viral RNA source. We further discuss our approach as an alternative to PCR-based DNA quantification. PMID:22941661

  11. IMG/M: A data management and analysis system for metagenomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chu, Ken; Dalevi, Daniel; Chen, I-Min A.; Grechkin,Yuri; Dubchak,Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis,Konstantinos; Hug enholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-08-01

    IMG/M is a data management and analysis system for microbial community genomes (metagenomes) hosted at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). IMG/M consists of metagenome data integrated with isolate microbial genomes from the Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system. IMG/M provides IMG's comparative data analysis tools extended to handle metagenome data, together with metagenome-specific analysis tools. IMG/M is available at http://img.jgi.doe.gov/m. Studies of the collective genomes (also known as metagenomes) of environmental microbial communities (also known as microbiomes) are expected to lead to advances in environmental cleanup, agriculture, industrial processes, alternative energy production, and human health (1). Metagenomes of specific microbiome samples are sequenced by organizations worldwide, such as the Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), the Venter Institute and the Washington University in St. Louis using different sequencing strategies, technology platforms, and annotation procedures. According to the Genomes OnLine Database, about 28 metagenome studies have been published to date, with over 60 other projects ongoing and more in the process of being launched (2). The Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is one of the major contributors of metagenome sequence data, currently sequencing more than 50% of the reported metagenome projects worldwide. Due to the higher complexity, inherent incompleteness, and lower quality of metagenome sequence data, traditional assembly, gene prediction, and annotation methods do not perform on these datasets as well as they do on isolate microbial genome sequences (3, 4). In spite of these limitations, metagenome data are amenable to a variety of analyses, as illustrated by several recent studies (5-10). Metagenome data analysis is usually set up in the context of reference isolate genomes and considers the questions of composition and functional or metabolic

  12. NeSSM: a Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Jia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metagenomics can reveal the vast majority of microbes that have been missed by traditional cultivation-based methods. Due to its extremely wide range of application areas, fast metagenome sequencing simulation systems with high fidelity are in great demand to facilitate the development and comparison of metagenomics analysis tools. RESULTS: We present here a customizable metagenome simulation system: NeSSM (Next-generation Sequencing Simulator for Metagenomics. Combining complete genomes currently available, a community composition table, and sequencing parameters, it can simulate metagenome sequencing better than existing systems. Sequencing error models based on the explicit distribution of errors at each base and sequencing coverage bias are incorporated in the simulation. In order to improve the fidelity of simulation, tools are provided by NeSSM to estimate the sequencing error models, sequencing coverage bias and the community composition directly from existing metagenome sequencing data. Currently, NeSSM supports single-end and pair-end sequencing for both 454 and Illumina platforms. In addition, a GPU (graphics processing units version of NeSSM is also developed to accelerate the simulation. By comparing the simulated sequencing data from NeSSM with experimental metagenome sequencing data, we have demonstrated that NeSSM performs better in many aspects than existing popular metagenome simulators, such as MetaSim, GemSIM and Grinder. The GPU version of NeSSM is more than one-order of magnitude faster than MetaSim. CONCLUSIONS: NeSSM is a fast simulation system for high-throughput metagenome sequencing. It can be helpful to develop tools and evaluate strategies for metagenomics analysis and it's freely available for academic users at http://cbb.sjtu.edu.cn/~ccwei/pub/software/NeSSM.php.

  13. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-04-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  14. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Recombinant Pentameric and Hexameric Human IgM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moh, Edward S. X.; Lin, Chi-Hung; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Packer, Nicolle H.

    2016-07-01

    Glycosylation is known to play an important role in IgG antibody structure and function. Polymeric IgM, the largest known antibody in humans, displays five potential N-glycosylation sites on each heavy chain monomer. IgM can exist as a pentamer with a connecting singly N-glycosylated J-chain (with a total of 51 glycosylation sites) or as a hexamer (60 glycosylation sites). In this study, the N-glycosylation of recombinant pentameric and hexameric IgM produced by the same human cell type and culture conditions was site-specifically profiled by RP-LC-CID/ETD-MS/MS using HILIC-enriched tryptic and GluC glycopeptides. The occupancy of all putative N-glycosylation sites on the pentameric and hexameric IgM were able to be determined. Distinct glycosylation differences were observed between each of the five N-linked sites on the IgM heavy chains. While Asn171, Asn332, and Asn395 all had predominantly complex type glycans, differences in glycan branching and sialylation were observed between the sites. Asn563, a high mannose-rich glycosylation site that locates in the center of the IgM polymer, was only approximately 60% occupied in both the pentameric and hexameric IgM forms, with a difference in relative abundance of the glycan structures between the pentamer and hexamer. This study highlights the information obtained by characterization of the site-heterogeneity of a highly glycosylated protein of high molecular mass with quaternary structure, revealing differences that would not be seen by global glycan or deglycosylated peptide profiling.

  15. Diagnostic serum glycosylation profile in patients with intellectual disability as a result of MAN1B1 deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Timal, Sharita; Rymen, Daisy;

    2014-01-01

    Congenital disorders of glycosylation comprise a group of genetic defects with a high frequency of intellectual disability, caused by deficient glycosylation of proteins and lipids. The molecular basis of the majority of the congenital disorders of glycosylation type I subtypes, localized in the ...

  16. Identification of Diverse Antimicrobial Resistance Determinants Carried on Bacterial, Plasmid, or Viral Metagenomes from an Activated Sludge Microbial Assemblage▿

    OpenAIRE

    Parsley, Larissa C.; Consuegra, Erin J.; Kakirde, Kavita S.; Land, Andrew M.; Harper, Willie F.; Liles, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Using both sequence- and function-based metagenomic approaches, multiple antibiotic resistance determinants were identified within metagenomic libraries constructed from DNA extracted from bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, or viruses within an activated sludge microbial assemblage. Metagenomic clones and a plasmid that in Escherichia coli expressed resistance to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, or kanamycin were isolated, with many cloned DNA sequences lacking any significant homology to known ant...

  17. A metagenomic snapshot of taxonomic and functional diversity in an alpine glacier cryoconite ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cryoconite is a microbe–mineral aggregate which darkens the ice surface of glaciers. Microbial process and marker gene PCR-dependent measurements reveal active and diverse cryoconite microbial communities on polar glaciers. Here, we provide the first report of a cryoconite metagenome and culture-independent study of alpine cryoconite microbial diversity. We assembled 1.2 Gbp of metagenomic DNA sequenced using an Illumina HiScanSQ from cryoconite holes across the ablation zone of Rotmoosferner in the Austrian Alps. The metagenome revealed a bacterially-dominated community, with Proteobacteria (62% of bacterial-assigned contigs) and Bacteroidetes (14%) considerably more abundant than Cyanobacteria (2.5%). Streptophyte DNA dominated the eukaryotic metagenome. Functional genes linked to N, Fe, S and P cycling illustrated an acquisitive trend and a nitrogen cycle based upon efficient ammonia recycling. A comparison of 32 metagenome datasets revealed a similarity in functional profiles between the cryoconite and metagenomes characterized from other cold microbe–mineral aggregates. Overall, the metagenomic snapshot reveals the cryoconite ecosystem of this alpine glacier as dependent on scavenging carbon and nutrients from allochthonous sources, in particular mosses transported by wind from ice-marginal habitats, consistent with net heterotrophy indicated by productivity measurements. A transition from singular snapshots of cryoconite metagenomes to comparative analyses is advocated. (letter)

  18. Taxonomic and functional assignment of cloned sequences from high Andean forest soil metagenome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montaña, José Salvador; Jiménez Avella, Diego; Angel, Tatiana; Hernández, Mónica; Baena, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Total metagenomic DNA was isolated from high Andean forest soil and subjected to taxonomical and functional composition analyses by means of clone library generation and sequencing. The obtained yield of 1.7 μg of DNA/g of soil was used to construct a metagenomic library of approximately 20,000 clon

  19. Improved metagenome screening efficiency by random insertion of T7 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Jung; Kim, Haseong; Kim, Seo Hyeon; Rha, Eugene; Choi, Su-Lim; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hak-Sung; Lee, Seung-Goo

    2016-07-20

    Metagenomes constitute a major source for the identification of novel enzymes for industrial applications. However, current functional screening methods are hindered by the limited transcription efficiency of foreign metagenomic genes. To overcome this constraint, we introduced the 'Enforced Transcription' technique, which involves the random insertion of the bi-directional T7 promoter into a metagenomic fosmid library. Then the effect of enforced transcription was quantitatively assessed by screening for metagenomic lipolytic genes encoding enzymes whose catalytic activity forms halos on tributyrin agar plates. The metagenomic library containing the enforced transcription system yielded a significantly increased number of screening hits with lipolytic activity compared to the library without random T7 promoter insertions. Additional sequence analysis revealed that the hits from the enforced transcription library had greater genetic diversity than those from the original metagenome library. Enhancing heterologous expression using the T7 promoter should enable the identification of greater numbers of diverse novel biocatalysts from the metagenome than possible using conventional metagenome screening approaches. PMID:27239964

  20. Beyond research: a primer for considerations on using viral metagenomics in the field and clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, Richard J; Draper, Jenny L; Nielsen, Fiona G G; Dutilh, Bas E

    2015-01-01

    Powered by recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, metagenomics has already unveiled vast microbial biodiversity in a range of environments, and is increasingly being applied in clinics for difficult-to-diagnose cases. It can be tempting to suggest that metagenomics could be used

  1. Characterization of denitrification gene clusters of soil bacteria via a metagenomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Demanèche, Sandrine; Philippot, Laurent; David, Maude M.; Navarro, Elisabeth; Vogel, Timothy,; Simonet, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    We characterized operons encoding enzymes involved in denitrification, a nitrogen-cycling process involved in nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emission, using a metagenomic approach which combines molecular screening and pyrosequencing. Screening of 77,000 clones from a soil metagenomic library led to the identification and the subsequent characterization of nine denitrification gene clusters.

  2. A metagenomic snapshot of taxonomic and functional diversity in an alpine glacier cryoconite ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Arwyn; Pachebat, Justin A.; Swain, Martin; Hegarty, Matt; Hodson, Andrew J.; Irvine-Fynn, Tristram D. L.; Rassner, Sara M. E.; Sattler, Birgit

    2013-09-01

    Cryoconite is a microbe-mineral aggregate which darkens the ice surface of glaciers. Microbial process and marker gene PCR-dependent measurements reveal active and diverse cryoconite microbial communities on polar glaciers. Here, we provide the first report of a cryoconite metagenome and culture-independent study of alpine cryoconite microbial diversity. We assembled 1.2 Gbp of metagenomic DNA sequenced using an Illumina HiScanSQ from cryoconite holes across the ablation zone of Rotmoosferner in the Austrian Alps. The metagenome revealed a bacterially-dominated community, with Proteobacteria (62% of bacterial-assigned contigs) and Bacteroidetes (14%) considerably more abundant than Cyanobacteria (2.5%). Streptophyte DNA dominated the eukaryotic metagenome. Functional genes linked to N, Fe, S and P cycling illustrated an acquisitive trend and a nitrogen cycle based upon efficient ammonia recycling. A comparison of 32 metagenome datasets revealed a similarity in functional profiles between the cryoconite and metagenomes characterized from other cold microbe-mineral aggregates. Overall, the metagenomic snapshot reveals the cryoconite ecosystem of this alpine glacier as dependent on scavenging carbon and nutrients from allochthonous sources, in particular mosses transported by wind from ice-marginal habitats, consistent with net heterotrophy indicated by productivity measurements. A transition from singular snapshots of cryoconite metagenomes to comparative analyses is advocated.

  3. Identification and characterization of N-glycosylated proteins using proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selby, David S; Larsen, Martin R; Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2008-01-01

    complex task and is currently achieved by mass spectrometry-based methods that enable identification of glycoproteins and localization, classification, and analysis of individual glycan structures on proteins. In this chapter we briefly introduce a range of analytical technologies for recovery and...... analysis of glycoproteins and glycopeptides. Combinations of affinity-enrichment techniques, chemical and biochemical protocols, and advanced mass spectrometry facilitate detailed glycoprotein analysis in proteomics, from fundamental biological studies to biomarker discovery in biomedicine.......Glycoproteins constitute a large fraction of the proteome. The fundamental role of protein glycosylation in cellular development, growth, and differentiation, tissue development, and in host-pathogen interactions is by now widely accepted. Proteome-wide characterization of glycoproteins is a...

  4. Analysis of expression and glycosylation of avian metapneumovirus attachment glycoprotein from recombinant baculoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lizhong; Nishi, Krista; MacLeod, Erin; Sabara, Marta I; Li, Yan

    2010-11-01

    Recently, we reported the expression and glycosylation of avian metapneumovirus attachment glycoprotein (AMPV/C G protein) in eukaryotic cell lines by a transient-expression method. In the present study, we investigated the biosynthesis and O-linked glycosylation of the AMPV/C G protein in a baculovirus expression system. The results showed that the insect cell-produced G protein migrated more rapidly in SDS-PAGE as compared to LLC-MK2 cell-derived G proteins owing to glycosylation differences. The fully processed, mature form of G protein migrated between 78 and 86 kDa, which is smaller than the 110 kDa mature form of G expressed in LLC-MK2 cells. In addition, several immature G gene products migrating at 40-48 and 60-70 kDa were also detected by SDS-PAGE and represented glycosylated intermediates. The addition of the antibiotic tunicamycin, which blocks early steps of glycosylation, to insect cell culture resulted in the disappearance of two glycosylated forms of the G protein and identified a 38 kDa unglycosylated precursor. The maturation of the G protein was completely blocked by monensin, suggesting that the O-linked glycosylation of G initiated in the trans-Golgi compartment. The presence of O-linked sugars on the mature protein was further confirmed by lectin Arachis hypogaea binding assay. Furthermore, antigenic features of the G protein expressed in insect cells were evaluated by ELISA. PMID:20713098

  5. MG-Digger: an automated pipeline to search for giant virus-related sequences in metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eVerneau

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a ‘dark matter’. We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase pairs were collected, processed and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and five virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate hundreds of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are

  6. MG-Digger: An Automated Pipeline to Search for Giant Virus-Related Sequences in Metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verneau, Jonathan; Levasseur, Anthony; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a 'dark matter.' We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase) were collected, processed, and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and 5 virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate 100s of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are effective in improving knowledge about the

  7. MG-Digger: An Automated Pipeline to Search for Giant Virus-Related Sequences in Metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verneau, Jonathan; Levasseur, Anthony; Raoult, Didier; La Scola, Bernard; Colson, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The number of metagenomic studies conducted each year is growing dramatically. Storage and analysis of such big data is difficult and time-consuming. Interestingly, analysis shows that environmental and human metagenomes include a significant amount of non-annotated sequences, representing a ‘dark matter.’ We established a bioinformatics pipeline that automatically detects metagenome reads matching query sequences from a given set and applied this tool to the detection of sequences matching large and giant DNA viral members of the proposed order Megavirales or virophages. A total of 1,045 environmental and human metagenomes (≈ 1 Terabase) were collected, processed, and stored on our bioinformatics server. In addition, nucleotide and protein sequences from 93 Megavirales representatives, including 19 giant viruses of amoeba, and 5 virophages, were collected. The pipeline was generated by scripts written in Python language and entitled MG-Digger. Metagenomes previously found to contain megavirus-like sequences were tested as controls. MG-Digger was able to annotate 100s of metagenome sequences as best matching those of giant viruses. These sequences were most often found to be similar to phycodnavirus or mimivirus sequences, but included reads related to recently available pandoraviruses, Pithovirus sibericum, and faustoviruses. Compared to other tools, MG-Digger combined stand-alone use on Linux or Windows operating systems through a user-friendly interface, implementation of ready-to-use customized metagenome databases and query sequence databases, adjustable parameters for BLAST searches, and creation of output files containing selected reads with best match identification. Compared to Metavir 2, a reference tool in viral metagenome analysis, MG-Digger detected 8% more true positive Megavirales-related reads in a control metagenome. The present work shows that massive, automated and recurrent analyses of metagenomes are effective in improving knowledge about

  8. Antiproliferative and cancer-chemopreventive properties of sulfated glycosylated extract derived from Leucaena leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal-Eldeen Amira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to prove that simple chemical modification could provide new cancer chemopreventive and/or anticancer properties to the inactive extracted polysaccharide derived from Leucaena leucocephala . Polysaccharides were extracted from Leucaena leucocephala seeds and its 2,4-pentanedione-treated derivative (glycosylated form was prepared, which is further sulphated to give sulphated glycosylated form. Estimation of their anti-initiation activity, modulation of carcinogen metabolism, was indicated by the inhibition cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A and the induction of glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs. Anti-proliferation activity was investigated by MTT assay against human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2, breast carcinoma (MCF-7 and lymphoblastic leukemia (1301. Apoptosis/necrosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry. The results revealed that glycosylated form inhibited both CYP1A and GSTs, while sulphated glycosylated form not only inhibited CYP1A, but also induced the GSTs. Unlike GE, sulphated glycosylated form possessed a significant anti-proliferative activity against different cell lines. Analysis of HepG2 cell cycle phases demonstrated that glycosylated form led to a delay of G2/M-phase, while sulphated glycosylated form led to a concomitant arrest in S- and G2/M-phases. Investigation of apoptosis/necrosis ratio demonstrated that both of glycosylated form and sulphated glycosylated form induced HepG2 cell death by necrosis, but not apoptosis. Unmodified crude extract was neither active as cancer chemopreventive nor as anti-proliferative. In conclusion, chemical modification of Leucaena gum induced its cancer chemopreventive and anti-proliferative activities.

  9. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  10. Screening and characterization of a novel cellulase gene from the gut microflora of Hermetia illucens using metagenomic library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Muk; Lee, Young-Seok; Seo, So-Hyeon; Yoon, Sang-Hong; Kim, Soo-Jin; Hahn, Bum-Soo; Sim, Joon-Soo; Koo, Bon-Sung

    2014-09-01

    A metagenomic fosmid library was constructed using genomic DNA isolated from the gut microflora of Hermetia illucens, a black soldier fly. A cellulase-positive clone, with the CS10 gene, was identified by extensive Congo-red overlay screenings for cellulase activity from the fosmid library of 92,000 clones. The CS10 gene was composed of a 996 bp DNA sequence encoding the mature protein of 331 amino acids. The deduced amino acids of CS10 showed 72% sequence identity with the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 gene of Dysgonomonas mossii, displaying no significant sequence homology to already known cellulases. The purified CS10 protein presented a single band of cellulase activity with a molecular mass of approximately 40 kDa on the SDS-PAGE gel and zymogram. The purified CS10 protein exhibited optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and the thermostability and pH stability of CS10 were preserved at the ranges of 20~50°C and pH 4.0~10.0. CS10 exhibited little loss of cellulase activity against various chemical reagents such as 10% polar organic solvents, 1% non-ionic detergents, and 0.5 M denaturing agents. Moreover, the substrate specificity and the product patterns by thinlayer chromatography suggested that CS10 is an endo-β-1,4-glucanase. From these biochemical properties of CS10, it is expected that the enzyme has the potential for application in industrial processes. PMID:25022521

  11. Screening and characterization of a novel ruminal cellulase gene (Umcel-1) from a metagenomic library of gayal (Bos frontalis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bi-feng; MAO Hua-ming; YANG Shu-Li; ZHU Ya-xin; GU Zhao-bing; CHEN Yuan; LENG Jing; GOU Xiao; FENG Li; LI Qing; XI Dong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Gayal is a rare semi-wild bovine species found in the Indo-China. They can graze grasses, including bamboo leaves, as wel as reeds and other plant species, and grow to higher mature live weights than Yunnan Yelow cattle maintained in similar harsh environments. The aim of this study was to identify speciifc celulase in the gayal rumen. A metagenomic fosmid library was constructed using genomic DNA isolated from the ruminal contents of four adult gayals. This library contained 38400 clones with an average insert size of 35.5 kb. TheUmcel-1 gene was isolated from this library. Investigation of the celulase activity of 24 random clones led to the identiifcation of theUmcel-1 gene, which exhibited the most potent celulase activity. Sequencing theUmcel-1 gene revealed that it contained an open reading frame of 942 base pairs that encoded a product of 313 amino acids. The putativegene Umcel-1 product belonged to the glycosyl hydrolase family 5 and showed the highest homology to the celulase (GenBank accession no. YP_004310852.1) fromClostridium lentocelum DSM 5427, with 44% identity and 62% similarity. TheUmcel-1 gene was heterologously expressed inEscherichia coli BL21, and recombinant Umcel-1 was puriifed. The activity of puriifed recombinant Umcel-1 was assessed, and the results revealed that it hydrolyzed carboxymethyl celulose with optimal activity at pH 5.5 and 45°C. To our knowledge, this study provides the ifrst evidence for a celulase produced by bacteria in gayal rumen.

  12. Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Class A Repeats Are O-Glycosylated in Linker Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Wang, Shengjun; Narimatsu, Yoshiki;

    2014-01-01

    The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is crucial for cholesterol homeostasis and deficiency in LDLR functions cause hypercholesterolemia. LDLR is a type I transmembrane protein that requires O-glycosylation for stable expression at the cell surface. It has previously been suggested that LDLR......, which in wild-type CHO cells is glycosylated with the typical sialylated core 1 structure. The glycosites in linker regions of LDLR class A repeats are conserved in LDLR from man to Xenopus and found in other homologous receptors. O-Glycosylation is controlled by a large family of polypeptide Gal...

  13. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M; Petri, T; Løber, D; Nielsen, L S; Schleuning, W D; Blasi, F; Appella, E; Danø, K

    1990-01-01

    -PA. The purified protein shows a single 55-60 kDa band after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. It is a heavily glycosylated protein, the deglycosylated polypeptide chain comprising only 35 kDa. The glycosylated protein contains N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and sialic...... acid, but no N-acetyl-D-galactosamine. Glycosylation is responsible for substantial heterogeneity in the receptor on phorbol ester-stimulated U937 cells, and also for molecular weight variations among various cell lines. The amino acid composition and the NH2-terminal amino acid sequence are reported...

  14. Cancer associated aberrant protein o-glycosylation can modify antigen processing and immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Caroline B; Petersen, Cecilie; Lavrsen, Kirstine;

    2012-01-01

    response to a cancer related tumor antigen, Balb/c or B6.Cg(CB)-Tg(HLA-A/H2-D)2Enge/J (HLA-A2 transgenic) mice were immunized with a non-glycosylated or GalNAc-glycosylated MUC1 derived peptide followed by comparison of T cell proliferation, IFN-¿ release, and antibody induction. Gal...... abolished MUC1 specific CD8+ T cell responses in HLA-A2 transgenic mice. GalNAc glycosylation of MUC1 antigen therefore facilitates uptake, MHC class II presentation, and antibody response but might block the antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells....

  15. Diel Metagenomics and Metatranscriptomics of Elkhorn Slough Hypersaline Microbial Mat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Detweiler, A. M.; Everroad, R. C.; Bebout, L. E.; Weber, P. K.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Bebout, B.

    2014-12-01

    To understand the variation in gene expression associated with the daytime oxygenic phototrophic and nighttime fermentation regimes seen in hypersaline microbial mats, a contiguous mat piece was subjected to sampling at regular intervals over a 24-hour diel period. Additionally, to understand the impact of sulfate reduction on biohydrogen consumption, molybdate was added to a parallel experiment in the same run. 4 metagenome and 12 metatranscriptome Illumina HiSeq lanes were completed over day / night, and control / molybdate experiments. Preliminary comparative examination of noon and midnight metatranscriptomic samples mapped using bowtie2 to reference genomes has revealed several notable results about the dominant mat-building cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC 7420. Dominant cyanobacterium M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression in several pathways for nitrogen scavenging, including nitrogen fixation. Reads mapped to M. chthonoplastes PCC 7420 shows expression of two starch storage and utilization pathways, one as a starch-trehalose-maltose-glucose pathway, another through UDP-glucose-cellulose-β-1,4 glucan-glucose pathway. The overall trend of gene expression was primarily light driven up-regulation followed by down-regulation in dark, while much of the remaining expression profile appears to be constitutive. Co-assembly of quality-controlled reads from 4 metagenomes was performed using Ray Meta with progressively smaller K-mer sizes, with bins identified and filtered using principal component analysis of coverages from all libraries and a %GC filter, followed by reassembly of the remaining co-assembly reads and binned reads. Despite having relatively similar abundance profiles in each metagenome, this binning approach was able to distinctly resolve bins from dominant taxa, but also sulfate reducing bacteria that are desired for understanding molybdate inhibition. Bins generated from this iterative assembly process will be used for downstream

  16. Metagenomic reconstructions of bacterial CRISPR loci constrain population histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christine L; Thomas, Brian C; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Banfield, Jillian F

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial CRISPR-Cas systems provide insight into recent population history because they rapidly incorporate, in a unidirectional manner, short fragments (spacers) from coexisting infective virus populations into host chromosomes. Immunity is achieved by sequence identity between transcripts of spacers and their targets. Here, we used metagenomics to study the stability and dynamics of the type I-E CRISPR-Cas locus of Leptospirillum group II bacteria in biofilms sampled over 5 years from an acid mine drainage (AMD) system. Despite recovery of 452,686 spacers from CRISPR amplicons and metagenomic data, rarefaction curves of spacers show no saturation. The vast repertoire of spacers is attributed to phage/plasmid population diversity and retention of old spacers, despite rapid evolution of the targeted phage/plasmid genome regions (proto-spacers). The oldest spacers (spacers found at the trailer end) are conserved for at least 5 years, and 12% of these retain perfect or near-perfect matches to proto-spacer targets. The majority of proto-spacer regions contain an AAG proto-spacer adjacent motif (PAM). Spacers throughout the locus target the same phage population (AMDV1), but there are blocks of consecutive spacers without AMDV1 target sequences. Results suggest long-term coexistence of Leptospirillum with AMDV1 and periods when AMDV1 was less dominant. Metagenomics can be applied to millions of cells in a single sample to provide an extremely large spacer inventory, allow identification of phage/plasmids and enable analysis of previous phage/plasmid exposure. Thus, this approach can provide insights into prior bacterial environment and genetic interplay between hosts and their viruses. PMID:26394009

  17. Assembling the marine metagenome, one cell at a time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    Full Text Available The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  18. Assembling The Marine Metagenome, One Cell At A Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Han, Shunsheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Saw, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Senin, Pavel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Woyke, Tanja [DOE JOINT GENOME INAT.; Copeland, Alex [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Gonzalez, Jose [UNIV OF LAGUNA, SPAIN; Chatterji, Sourav [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Cheng, Jan - Fang [DOE JOINT GENSOME INST.; Eisen, Jonathan A [DOE JOINT GENOME INST.; Sieracki, Michael E [UNIV OF CA-DAVIS; Stepanauskas, Ramunas [BIGELOW LAB

    2008-01-01

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91% and 78%, respectively. Only 0.24% of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured taxa from a complex

  19. Assembling the Marine Metagenome, One Cell at a Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Xie, Gary; Copeland, Alex; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Han, Cliff; Kiss, Hajnalka; Saw, Jimmy H.; Senin, Pavel; Yang, Chi; Chatterji, Sourav; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Sieracki, Michael E.; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2010-06-24

    The difficulty associated with the cultivation of most microorganisms and the complexity of natural microbial assemblages, such as marine plankton or human microbiome, hinder genome reconstruction of representative taxa using cultivation or metagenomic approaches. Here we used an alternative, single cell sequencing approach to obtain high-quality genome assemblies of two uncultured, numerically significant marine microorganisms. We employed fluorescence-activated cell sorting and multiple displacement amplification to obtain hundreds of micrograms of genomic DNA from individual, uncultured cells of two marine flavobacteria from the Gulf of Maine that were phylogenetically distant from existing cultured strains. Shotgun sequencing and genome finishing yielded 1.9 Mbp in 17 contigs and 1.5 Mbp in 21 contigs for the two flavobacteria, with estimated genome recoveries of about 91percent and 78percent, respectively. Only 0.24percent of the assembling sequences were contaminants and were removed from further analysis using rigorous quality control. In contrast to all cultured strains of marine flavobacteria, the two single cell genomes were excellent Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) metagenome fragment recruiters, demonstrating their numerical significance in the ocean. The geographic distribution of GOS recruits along the Northwest Atlantic coast coincided with ocean surface currents. Metabolic reconstruction indicated diverse potential energy sources, including biopolymer degradation, proteorhodopsin photometabolism, and hydrogen oxidation. Compared to cultured relatives, the two uncultured flavobacteria have small genome sizes, few non-coding nucleotides, and few paralogous genes, suggesting adaptations to narrow ecological niches. These features may have contributed to the abundance of the two taxa in specific regions of the ocean, and may have hindered their cultivation. We demonstrate the power of single cell DNA sequencing to generate reference genomes of uncultured

  20. Metagenomics and the Human Virome in Asymptomatic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascovan, Nicolás; Duraisamy, Raja; Desnues, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have revolutionized how we think about viruses. Investigators can now go beyond pathogenic viruses and have access to the thousands of viruses that inhabit our bodies without causing clinical symptoms. By studying their interactions with each other, with other microbes, and with host genetics and immune systems, we can learn how they affect health and disease. This article reviews current knowledge of the composition and diversity of the human virome in physiologically healthy individuals. It focuses on recent results from metagenomics studies and discusses the contribution of bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses to human health. PMID:27607550

  1. Metagenomic Analysis of the Medicinal Leech Gut Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele A Maltz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There are trillions of microbes found throughout the human body and they exceed the number of eukaryotic cells by ten-fold. Metagenomic studies have revealed that the majority of these microbes are found within the gut, playing an important role in the host’s digestion and nutrition. The complexity of the animal digestive tract, unculturable microbes and the lack of genetic tools for most culturable microbes make it challenging to explore the nature of theses microbial interactions within this niche. The medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, has been shown to be a useful tool in overcoming these challenges, due to the simplicity of the microbiome and the availability of genetic tools for one of the two dominant gut symbionts, Aeromonas veronii. In this study, we utilize 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to further explore the microbial composition of the leech digestive tract, confirming the dominance of two taxa, the Rikenella-like bacterium and A. veronii. The deep sequencing approach revealed the presence of additional members of the microbial community that suggests the presence of a moderately complex microbial community with a richness of 36 taxa. The presence of a Proteus strain as a newly identified resident in the leech crop was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The metagenome of this community was also pyrosequenced and the contigs were binned into the following taxonomic groups: Rikenella-like (3.1 MB, Aeromonas (4.5 MB, Proteus (2.9 MB, Clostridium (1.8 MB, Eryspelothrix (0.96 MB, Desulfovibrio (0.14 MB and Fusobacterium (0.27 MB. Functional analyses on the leech gut symbionts were explored using the metagenomic data and MG-RAST. A comparison of the COG and KEGG categories of the leech gut metagenome to that of other animal digestive-tract microbiomes revealed that the leech digestive-tract had a similar metabolic potential to the human digestive-tract, supporting the usefulness of this system as a model for studying

  2. Binning sequences using very sparse labels within a metagenome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halgamuge Saman K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In metagenomic studies, a process called binning is necessary to assign contigs that belong to multiple species to their respective phylogenetic groups. Most of the current methods of binning, such as BLAST, k-mer and PhyloPythia, involve assigning sequence fragments by comparing sequence similarity or sequence composition with already-sequenced genomes that are still far from comprehensive. We propose a semi-supervised seeding method for binning that does not depend on knowledge of completed genomes. Instead, it extracts the flanking sequences of highly conserved 16S rRNA from the metagenome and uses them as seeds (labels to assign other reads based on their compositional similarity. Results The proposed seeding method is implemented on an unsupervised Growing Self-Organising Map (GSOM, and called Seeded GSOM (S-GSOM. We compared it with four well-known semi-supervised learning methods in a preliminary test, separating random-length prokaryotic sequence fragments sampled from the NCBI genome database. We identified the flanking sequences of the highly conserved 16S rRNA as suitable seeds that could be used to group the sequence fragments according to their species. S-GSOM showed superior performance compared to the semi-supervised methods tested. Additionally, S-GSOM may also be used to visually identify some species that do not have seeds. The proposed method was then applied to simulated metagenomic datasets using two different confidence threshold settings and compared with PhyloPythia, k-mer and BLAST. At the reference taxonomic level Order, S-GSOM outperformed all k-mer and BLAST results and showed comparable results with PhyloPythia for each of the corresponding confidence settings, where S-GSOM performed better than PhyloPythia in the ≥ 10 reads datasets and comparable in the ≥ 8 kb benchmark tests. Conclusion In the task of binning using semi-supervised learning methods, results indicate S-GSOM to be the best of

  3. Separating metagenomic short reads into genomes via clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaseichuk Olga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metagenomics approach allows the simultaneous sequencing of all genomes in an environmental sample. This results in high complexity datasets, where in addition to repeats and sequencing errors, the number of genomes and their abundance ratios are unknown. Recently developed next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies significantly improve the sequencing efficiency and cost. On the other hand, they result in shorter reads, which makes the separation of reads from different species harder. Among the existing computational tools for metagenomic analysis, there are similarity-based methods that use reference databases to align reads and composition-based methods that use composition patterns (i.e., frequencies of short words or l-mers to cluster reads. Similarity-based methods are unable to classify reads from unknown species without close references (which constitute the majority of reads. Since composition patterns are preserved only in significantly large fragments, composition-based tools cannot be used for very short reads, which becomes a significant limitation with the development of NGS. A recently proposed algorithm, AbundanceBin, introduced another method that bins reads based on predicted abundances of the genomes sequenced. However, it does not separate reads from genomes of similar abundance levels. Results In this work, we present a two-phase heuristic algorithm for separating short paired-end reads from different genomes in a metagenomic dataset. We use the observation that most of the l-mers belong to unique genomes when l is sufficiently large. The first phase of the algorithm results in clusters of l-mers each of which belongs to one genome. During the second phase, clusters are merged based on l-mer repeat information. These final clusters are used to assign reads. The algorithm could handle very short reads and sequencing errors. It is initially designed for genomes with similar abundance levels and then

  4. COMPARISON OF FRUCTOSAMINE AND GLYCOSYLATED HEMOGLOBIN IN A NON-INSULIN DEPENDENT DIABETIC POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amini

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to determine the clinical value of frnctosamine assay for monitoring type II diabetic patients, correlation of frnctosamine with glycosylated hemoglobin was studied. 100 patients with type II diabetes mcllitus were compared with 100 normal subjects. Fasting blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, albumin and frnctosamine were measured in alt subjects. In the diabetic patients, a significant correlation was observed between fasting blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin (r = 0.64, p < 0.01 and scrum frnctosamine (r = 0.7, P < 0.01. Tlicrc was also a significant correlation between glycosylated hemoglobin and scrum frtictosmine (r = .94, I'<0.01. Frnctosamine, assay can be used as an index of diabetes control.

  5. Analysis and glycosyl composition of the exopolysaccharide isolated from submerged fermentation of Ganoderma lucidum CG144

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosália Rubel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of glycosyl composition is an essential step to guide future research designs applied in bioactivity. In the same way, the unexplored potential bioactivity of exopolysaccharide from Ganoderma lucidum is huge. Therefore, this study investigated the glycosyl composition of the exopolysaccharide isolated from submerged fermentation of G. lucidum to serve as guide for future studies on bioactivity. Glycosyl content and composition were evaluated by combined GC/MS of the TMS derivatives of the monosaccharide methyl glycosides produced from the sample by acidic methanolysis. Glycosyl composition analysis showed that the dominant carbohydrate component in all samples of exopolysaccharide isolated from submerged fermentation of G. lucidum CG 144 was glucose (58.1%, mannose (26.6% and galactose (12.5% which can be referred to as heteroglycan. These results suggest that this Ganoderma exopolysaccharide may be a new immunomodulatory agent.

  6. Enzymatic activity of "high-mannose" glycosylated forms of intestinal microvillar hydrolases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöström, H; Norén, Ove; Danielsen, E M

    1985-01-01

    glycosylated form, whereas no difference was observed for the two other enzymes. The change in glycosylation from high-mannose to complex form thus seems to be of importance for the enzymatic activity of sucrase-isomaltase either by direct structural involvement or by a general stabilization effect on the......The "high-mannose" glycosylated forms of aminopeptidase N (EC 3.4.11.2), maltase-glucoamylase (EC 3.2.1.20), and sucrase-isomaltase (EC 3.2.1.48, EC 3.2.1.10) have been purified. The high-mannose glycosylated form of sucrase-isomaltase was found to have a lower specific activity than the complex...

  7. Prediction, conservation analysis, and structural characterization of mammalian mucin-type O-glycosylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julenius, Karin; Mølgaard, Anne; Gupta, Ramneek;

    2005-01-01

    experimentally investigated with regard to glycosylation status. From O-GLYCBASE a total of 86 mammalian proteins experimentally investigated for in vivo O-GalNAc sites were extracted. Mammalian protein homolog comparisons showed that a glycosylated serine or threonine is less likely to be precisely conserved...... than a nonglycosylated one. The Protein Data Bank was analyzed for structural information, and 12 glycosylated structures were obtained. All positive sites were found in coil or turn regions. A method for predicting the location for mucin-type glycosylation sites was trained using a neural network...... approach. The best overall network used as input amino acid composition, averaged surface accessibility predictions together with substitution matrix profile encoding of the sequence. To improve prediction on isolated (single) sites, networks were trained on isolated sites only. The final method combines...

  8. Prediction, conservation analysis, and structural characterization of mammalian mucin-type O-glycosylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julenius, Karin; Mølgaard, Anne; Gupta, Ramneek;

    2004-01-01

    experimentally investigated with regard to glycosylation status. From O-GLYCBASE a total of 86 mammalian proteins experimentally investigated for in vivo O-GalNAc sites were extracted. Mammalian protein homolog comparisons showed that a glycosylated serine or threonine is less likely to be precisely conserved...... than a nonglycosylated one. The Protein Data Bank was analyzed for structural information, and 12 glycosylated structures were obtained. All positive sites were found in coil or turn regions. A method for predicting the location for mucin-type glycosylation sites was trained using a neural network...... approach. The best overall network used as input amino acid composition, averaged surface accessibility predictions together with substitution matrix profile encoding of the sequence. To improve prediction on isolated (single) sites, networks were trained on isolated sites only. The final method combines...

  9. In silico determination of intracellular glycosylation and phosphorylation sites in human selectins: Implications for biological function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, I.; Hoessli, D.C.; Gupta, Ramneek;

    2007-01-01

    of other interacting proteins. Bioinformatics tools are therefore helpful to predict protein multifunctionality through the identification of serine and threonine residues wherein the hydroxyl group is likely to become modified by phosphorylation or glycosylation. Moreover, serines and threonines...

  10. Catching elusive glycosyl cations in a condensed phase with HF/SbF5 superacid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.; Arda, A.; Désiré, J.; Martin-Mingot, A.; Probst, N.; Sinaÿ, P.; Jiménez-Barbero, J.; Thibaudeau, S.; Blériot, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Glycosyl cations are universally accepted key ionic intermediates in the mechanism of glycosylation, the reaction that covalently links carbohydrates to other molecules. These ions have remained hypothetical species so far because of their extremely short life in organic media as a consequence of their very high reactivity. Here, we report the use of liquid hydrofluoric acid-antimony pentafluoride (HF/SbF5) superacid to generate and stabilize the glycosyl cations derived from peracetylated 2-deoxy and 2-bromoglucopyranose in a condensed phase. Their persistence in this superacid medium allows their three-dimensional structure to be studied by NMR, aided by complementary computations. Their deuteration further confirms the impact of the structure of the glycosyl cation on the stereochemical outcome of its trapping.

  11. SIKLODEKSTRIN GLIKOSIL TRANSFERASE DAN PEMANFAATANNYA DALAM INDUSTRI [Cyclodextrin Glycosyl Transferase and its application in industries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiasih Wahyuntari

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase (CGT-ase is mainly produced by Bacilli. Systematical name of the enzyme is E.C. 2.4.1.19 a-1,4 glucan-4-glycosyl transferase. The enzyme catalyzes hydrolysis of starch intramolecular, and intermolecular transglycosylation of a-1,4, glucan chains. Cyclodextrins are a-1,4 linked cyclic oligosaccharides resulting from enzymatic degradation of starch by cyclodextrin glycosyl transferase through untramolecular transglycosylation. The major cyclodextrins are made up of 6, 7 and 8 glucopyranose units which are known as a-, b-, and y-cyclodextrin. All CGT-ase catalyze three kinds of cyclodextrins, the proportion of the cyclodextrins depends on the enzyme source and reaction conditions. The intermolecular transglycosylation ability of the enzyme has been applied in transfering glycosyl residues into suitable acceptor. Transglycosylation by the enzymes have been tested to improve solubility of some flavonoids and to favor precipitation ci some glycosides.

  12. Prepubertal growth in congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (CDG-Ia)

    OpenAIRE

    Kjaergaard, S.; Muller, J; Skovby, F

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To delineate the pattern of growth in prepubertal children with congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia (CDG-Ia) in order to identify critical period(s) and possible cause(s) of growth failure.

  13. Methods for Improving Enzymatic Trans-glycosylation for Synthesis of Human Milk Oligosaccharide Biomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Jers, Carsten; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard;

    2014-01-01

    synthesis is a novel field of research in advanced food ingredient chemistry, involving the use of rare enzymes, which have until now mainly been studied for their biochemical significance, not for targeted biosynthesis applications. For the enzymatic synthesis of biofunctional glycans reaction parameter...... optimization to promote “reverse” catalysis with glycosidases is currently preferred over the use of glycosyl transferases. Numerous methods exist for minimizing the undesirable glycosidase-catalyzed hydrolysis and for improving the trans-glycosylation yields. This review provides an overview of the approaches......, enzyme recycling, and/or the use of cosolvents may significantly improve trans-glycosylation and biocatalytic productivity of the enzymatic reactions. Protein engineering is also a promising technique for obtaining high trans-glycosylation yields, and proof-of-concept for reversing sialidase activity...

  14. FY08 LDRD Final Report Probabilistic Inference of Metabolic Pathways from Metagenomic Sequence Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' haeseleer, P

    2009-03-01

    Metagenomic 'shotgun' sequencing of environmental microbial communities has the potential to revolutionize microbial ecology, allowing a cultivation-independent, yet sequence-based analysis of the metabolic capabilities and functions present in an environmental sample. Although its intensive sequencing requirements are a good match for the continuously increasing bandwidth at sequencing centers, the complexity, seemingly inexhaustible novelty, and 'scrambled' nature of metagenomic data is also proving a tremendous challenge for analysis. In fact, many metagenomics projects do not go much further than providing a list of novel gene variants and over- or under-represented functional gene categories. In this project, we proposed to develop a set of novel metagenomic sequence analysis tools, including a binning method to group sequences by species, inference of phenotypes and metabolic pathways from these reconstructed species, and extraction of coarse-grained flux models. We proposed to closely collaborate with the DOE Joint Genome Institute to align these tools with their metagenomics analysis needs and the developing IMG/M metagenomics pipeline. Results would be cross-validated with simulated metagenomic data using a testing platform developed at the JGI.

  15. WebMGA: a customizable web server for fast metagenomic sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Beifang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The new field of metagenomics studies microorganism communities by culture-independent sequencing. With the advances in next-generation sequencing techniques, researchers are facing tremendous challenges in metagenomic data analysis due to huge quantity and high complexity of sequence data. Analyzing large datasets is extremely time-consuming; also metagenomic annotation involves a wide range of computational tools, which are difficult to be installed and maintained by common users. The tools provided by the few available web servers are also limited and have various constraints such as login requirement, long waiting time, inability to configure pipelines etc. Results We developed WebMGA, a customizable web server for fast metagenomic analysis. WebMGA includes over 20 commonly used tools such as ORF calling, sequence clustering, quality control of raw reads, removal of sequencing artifacts and contaminations, taxonomic analysis, functional annotation etc. WebMGA provides users with rapid metagenomic data analysis using fast and effective tools, which have been implemented to run in parallel on our local computer cluster. Users can access WebMGA through web browsers or programming scripts to perform individual analysis or to configure and run customized pipelines. WebMGA is freely available at http://weizhongli-lab.org/metagenomic-analysis. Conclusions WebMGA offers to researchers many fast and unique tools and great flexibility for complex metagenomic data analysis.

  16. Comparative Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Mechanisms for Stress Response in Hypoliths from Extreme Hyperarid Deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Phuong Thi; Makhalanyane, Thulani P; Guerrero, Leandro D; Vikram, Surendra; Van de Peer, Yves; Cowan, Don A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding microbial adaptation to environmental stressors is crucial for interpreting broader ecological patterns. In the most extreme hot and cold deserts, cryptic niche communities are thought to play key roles in ecosystem processes and represent excellent model systems for investigating microbial responses to environmental stressors. However, relatively little is known about the genetic diversity underlying such functional processes in climatically extreme desert systems. This study presents the first comparative metagenome analysis of cyanobacteria-dominated hypolithic communities in hot (Namib Desert, Namibia) and cold (Miers Valley, Antarctica) hyperarid deserts. The most abundant phyla in both hypolith metagenomes were Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes with Cyanobacteria dominating in Antarctic hypoliths. However, no significant differences between the two metagenomes were identified. The Antarctic hypolithic metagenome displayed a high number of sequences assigned to sigma factors, replication, recombination and repair, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. In contrast, the Namib Desert metagenome showed a high abundance of sequences assigned to carbohydrate transport and metabolism. Metagenome data analysis also revealed significant divergence in the genetic determinants of amino acid and nucleotide metabolism between these two metagenomes and those of soil from other polar deserts, hot deserts, and non-desert soils. Our results suggest extensive niche differentiation in hypolithic microbial communities from these two extreme environments and a high genetic capacity for survival under environmental extremes. PMID:27503299

  17. Evidence-Based Clustering of Reads and Taxonomic Analysis of Metagenomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folino, Gianluigi; Gori, Fabio; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Marchiori, Elena

    The rapidly emerging field of metagenomics seeks to examine the genomic content of communities of organisms to understand their roles and interactions in an ecosystem. In this paper we focus on clustering methods and their application to taxonomic analysis of metagenomic data. Clustering analysis for metagenomics amounts to group similar partial sequences, such as raw sequence reads, into clusters in order to discover information about the internal structure of the considered dataset, or the relative abundance of protein families. Different methods for clustering analysis of metagenomic datasets have been proposed. Here we focus on evidence-based methods for clustering that employ knowledge extracted from proteins identified by a BLASTx search (proxygenes). We consider two clustering algorithms introduced in previous works and a new one. We discuss advantages and drawbacks of the algorithms, and use them to perform taxonomic analysis of metagenomic data. To this aim, three real-life benchmark datasets used in previous work on metagenomic data analysis are used. Comparison of the results indicates satisfactory coherence of the taxonomies output by the three algorithms, with respect to phylogenetic content at the class level and taxonomic distribution at phylum level. In general, the experimental comparative analysis substantiates the effectiveness of evidence-based clustering methods for taxonomic analysis of metagenomic data.

  18. Sialylation and glycosylation modulate cell adhesion and invasion to extracellular matrix in human malignant lymphoma: Dependency on integrin and the Rho GTPase family

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi; HASHIMOTO, YUKO

    2015-01-01

    To determine the biological roles of cell surface glycosylation, we modified the surface glycosylation of human malignant lymphoma cell lines using glycosylation inhibitors. The O-glycosylation inhibitor, benzyl-α-GalNAc (BZ) enhanced the fibronectin adhesion of HBL-8 cells, a human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, and of H-ALCL cells, a human anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line, both of which were established in our laboratory. The N-glycosylation inhibitor, tunicamycin (TM) inhibited the ...

  19. Engineering of human-type O-glycosylation in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic properties of recombinant proteins are very often affected by the composition and heterogeneity of their glycans. Conventional expression systems for recombinant pharmaceutical proteins typically do not address this problem and produce a mixture of glycoforms that are neither identical to human glycans nor optimized for enhanced efficacy. In terms of glycosylation, plants offer certain advantages over mammalian cells as the N-glycosylation pathway of plants is comparably simple an...

  20. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  1. SEM visualization of glycosylated surface molecules using lectin-coated microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, J.; Janer, L.; Campbell, M.

    1985-01-01

    There are several techniques currently used to localize glycosylated surface molecules by scanning electron microscopy (Grinnell, 1980; Molday, 1976; Linthicum and Sell, 1975; Nicolson, 1974; Lo Buglio, et al, 1972). A simple and rapid method, using a modification of Grinnell's technique is reported here. Essentially, microspheres coated with Concavalin A are used to bind to glycosylated regions of the palatal shelf epithelium and are visualized in the scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  2. Lipid-mediated glycosylation of endogenous proteins in isolated plasma membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Welten-Verstegen, G W; Boer, P; Steyn-Parvé, E P

    1980-01-01

    A highly purified plasma membrane fraction from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was obtained by centrifugation on discontinuous sucrose and Urografin gradients. This plasma membrane fraction was capable of glycosylating endogenous proteins. It is shown that glycolipids play an intermediate role in these glycosylation reactions; with uridine 5'-diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine as sugar donor the intermediate lipids possessed stability towards alkali and chromatographic mobilities similar to polyprenyl...

  3. Reaction of Phosphorylated and O-Glycosylated Peptides by Chemically Targeted Identification at Ambient Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Rusnak, Felicia; Zhou, Jie; Hathaway, Gary M.

    2004-01-01

    Conditions for carrying out chemically targeted identification of peptides containing phosphorylated or glycosylated serine residues have been investigated. Ba(OH)2 was used at ambient temperature to catalyze the β-elimination reaction at 25°C. Nucleophilic addition of 2-aminoethanethiol was performed in both parallel and tandem experiments. The method was demonstrated by the reaction of β-casein tryptic digest phosphopeptides and an O-glycosylated peptide. Contrary to an earlier report by ot...

  4. Flagellin and outer surface proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi are not glycosylated

    OpenAIRE

    ŠTĚRBA, Ján

    2012-01-01

    Glycosylation of four proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi s.s. was investigated ? flagellins FlaA, FlaB, and outer surface proteins OspA and OspB. Glycosylation of these four proteins was not proved by any of the used techniques. However, other glycan-staining positive proteins were present in the borrelia samples. These proteins were suggested to originate in the culture medium.

  5. Flow Injection Analysis for Simultaneous Quantification of Prolactin Concentration and Glycosylation Macroheterogeneity in Cell Culture Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Reinecke, Martin; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2000-01-01

    A flow injection analysis (FIA) system is presented for a twostep immunoassay-based determination of the total humanprolactin (hPRL) concentration along with its degree ofglycosylation. Separate measurement of total hPRL and nonglysosylated human prolactin (nG-hPRL) were made using twoflow-through cartridges each containing immobilized antibodiesof different specificity. The antibodies are immobilized on thesurface of a carrier. Glycosylated hPRL (G-hPRL) and, thus, thedegree of glycosylation...

  6. Glycoproteins in probiotic bacteria - Exploring the glycosylation potential of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG by genomics and glycoproteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Tytgat, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of glycoconjugates covers the cell wall of prokaryotes, forming a unique species-specific barcode. These glycoconjugates are important to establish specific interactions with the environment. Most studies of bacterial glycobiology focus on pathogens. Here, the importance of glycosylation in the microbiota isolate and model probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG is investigated, with a focus on glycoproteins. To shed light on how and why L. rhamnosus GG glycosylates part of...

  7. Aberrant Glycosylation in the Left Ventricle and Plasma of Rats with Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai-Okatani, Chiaki; Minamino, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Targeted proteomics focusing on post-translational modifications, including glycosylation, is a useful strategy for discovering novel biomarkers. To apply this strategy effectively to cardiac hypertrophy and resultant heart failure, we aimed to characterize glycosylation profiles in the left ventricle and plasma of rats with cardiac hypertrophy. Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats, a model of hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy, were fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet starting at 6 weeks. As a result, they exhibited cardiac hypertrophy at 12 weeks and partially impaired cardiac function at 16 weeks compared with control rats fed a low-salt (0.3% NaCl) diet. Gene expression analysis revealed significant changes in the expression of genes encoding glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. Glycoproteome profiling using lectin microarrays indicated upregulation of mucin-type O-glycosylation, especially disialyl-T, and downregulation of core fucosylation on N-glycans, detected by specific interactions with Amaranthus caudatus and Aspergillus oryzae lectins, respectively. Upregulation of plasma α-l-fucosidase activity was identified as a biomarker candidate for cardiac hypertrophy, which is expected to support the existing marker, atrial natriuretic peptide and its related peptides. Proteomic analysis identified cysteine and glycine-rich protein 3, a master regulator of cardiac muscle function, as an O-glycosylated protein with altered glycosylation in the rats with cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that alternations in O-glycosylation affect its oligomerization and function. In conclusion, our data provide evidence of significant changes in glycosylation pattern, specifically mucin-type O-glycosylation and core defucosylation, in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting that they are potential biomarkers for these diseases. PMID:27281159

  8. Gene prediction in metagenomic fragments: A large scale machine learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenstern Burkhard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metagenomics is an approach to the characterization of microbial genomes via the direct isolation of genomic sequences from the environment without prior cultivation. The amount of metagenomic sequence data is growing fast while computational methods for metagenome analysis are still in their infancy. In contrast to genomic sequences of single species, which can usually be assembled and analyzed by many available methods, a large proportion of metagenome data remains as unassembled anonymous sequencing reads. One of the aims of all metagenomic sequencing projects is the identification of novel genes. Short length, for example, Sanger sequencing yields on average 700 bp fragments, and unknown phylogenetic origin of most fragments require approaches to gene prediction that are different from the currently available methods for genomes of single species. In particular, the large size of metagenomic samples requires fast and accurate methods with small numbers of false positive predictions. Results We introduce a novel gene prediction algorithm for metagenomic fragments based on a two-stage machine learning approach. In the first stage, we use linear discriminants for monocodon usage, dicodon usage and translation initiation sites to extract features from DNA sequences. In the second stage, an artificial neural network combines these features with open reading frame length and fragment GC-content to compute the probability that this open reading frame encodes a protein. This probability is used for the classification and scoring of gene candidates. With large scale training, our method provides fast single fragment predictions with good sensitivity and specificity on artificially fragmented genomic DNA. Additionally, this method is able to predict translation initiation sites accurately and distinguishes complete from incomplete genes with high reliability. Conclusion Large scale machine learning methods are well-suited for gene

  9. Applying functional metagenomics to search for novel lignocellulosic enzymes in a microbial consortium derived from a thermophilic composting phase of sugarcane bagasse and cow manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lívia Tavares; de Oliveira, Marcelo Nagem Valério; Carneiro, Deisy Guimarães; de Souza, Robson Assis; Alvim, Mariana Caroline Tocantins; Dos Santos, Josenilda Carlos; da Silva, Cynthia Canêdo; Vidigal, Pedro Marcus Pereira; da Silveira, Wendel Batista; Passos, Flávia Maria Lopes

    2016-09-01

    Environments where lignocellulosic biomass is naturally decomposed are sources for discovery of new hydrolytic enzymes that can reduce the high cost of enzymatic cocktails for second-generation ethanol production. Metagenomic analysis was applied to discover genes coding carbohydrate-depleting enzymes from a microbial laboratory subculture using a mix of sugarcane bagasse and cow manure in the thermophilic composting phase. From a fosmid library, 182 clones had the ability to hydrolyse carbohydrate. Sequencing of 30 fosmids resulted in 12 contigs encoding 34 putative carbohydrate-active enzymes belonging to 17 glycosyl hydrolase (GH) families. One third of the putative proteins belong to the GH3 family, which includes β-glucosidase enzymes known to be important in the cellulose-deconstruction process but present with low activity in commercial enzyme preparations. Phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of seven selected proteins, including three β-glucosidases, showed low relatedness with protein sequences deposited in databases. These findings highlight microbial consortia obtained from a mixture of decomposing biomass residues, such as sugar cane bagasse and cow manure, as a rich resource of novel enzymes potentially useful in biotechnology for saccharification of lignocellulosic substrate. PMID:27350392

  10. Tracking Strains in the Microbiome: Insights from Metagenomics and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Ilana L.; Alm, Eric J.

    2016-01-01

    Transmission usually refers to the movement of pathogenic organisms. Yet, commensal microbes that inhabit the human body also move between individuals and environments. Surprisingly little is known about the transmission of these endogenous microbes, despite increasing realizations of their importance for human health. The health impacts arising from the transmission of commensal bacteria range widely, from the prevention of autoimmune disorders to the spread of antibiotic resistance genes. Despite this importance, there are outstanding basic questions: what is the fraction of the microbiome that is transmissible? What are the primary mechanisms of transmission? Which organisms are the most highly transmissible? Higher resolution genomic data is required to accurately link microbial sources (such as environmental reservoirs or other individuals) with sinks (such as a single person's microbiome). New computational advances enable strain-level resolution of organisms from shotgun metagenomic data, allowing the transmission of strains to be followed over time and after discrete exposure events. Here, we highlight the latest techniques that reveal strain-level resolution from raw metagenomic reads and new studies that are tracking strains across people and environments. We also propose how models of pathogenic transmission may be applied to study the movement of commensals between microbial communities. PMID:27242733

  11. Metagenome fragment classification based on multiple motif-occurrence profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Matsushita

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A vast amount of metagenomic data has been obtained by extracting multiple genomes simultaneously from microbial communities, including genomes from uncultivable microbes. By analyzing these metagenomic data, novel microbes are discovered and new microbial functions are elucidated. The first step in analyzing these data is sequenced-read classification into reference genomes from which each read can be derived. The Naïve Bayes Classifier is a method for this classification. To identify the derivation of the reads, this method calculates a score based on the occurrence of a DNA sequence motif in each reference genome. However, large differences in the sizes of the reference genomes can bias the scoring of the reads. This bias might cause erroneous classification and decrease the classification accuracy. To address this issue, we have updated the Naïve Bayes Classifier method using multiple sets of occurrence profiles for each reference genome by normalizing the genome sizes, dividing each genome sequence into a set of subsequences of similar length and generating profiles for each subsequence. This multiple profile strategy improves the accuracy of the results generated by the Naïve Bayes Classifier method for simulated and Sargasso Sea datasets.

  12. Detection of Novel Integrons in the Metagenome of Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antepowicz, Agata; Mullany, Peter; Roberts, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Integrons are genetic elements capable of capturing and expressing open reading frames (ORFs) embedded within gene cassettes. They are involved in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in clinically important pathogens. Although the ARGs are common in the oral cavity the association of integrons and antibiotic resistance has not been reported there. In this work, a PCR-based approach was used to investigate the presence of integrons and associated gene cassettes in human oral metagenomic DNA obtained from both the UK and Bangladesh. We identified a diverse array of gene cassettes containing ORFs predicted to confer antimicrobial resistance and other adaptive traits. The predicted proteins include a putative streptogramin A O-acetyltransferase, a bleomycin binding protein, cof-like hydrolase, competence and motility related proteins. This is the first study detecting integron gene cassettes directly from oral metagenomic DNA samples. The predicted proteins are likely to carry out a multitude of functions; however, the function of the majority is yet unknown. PMID:27304457

  13. Metagenomic analysis of the turkey gut RNA virus community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheffler Brian E

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Viral enteric disease is an ongoing economic burden to poultry producers worldwide, and despite considerable research, no single virus has emerged as a likely causative agent and target for prevention and control efforts. Historically, electron microscopy has been used to identify suspect viruses, with many small, round viruses eluding classification based solely on morphology. National and regional surveys using molecular diagnostics have revealed that suspect viruses continuously circulate in United States poultry, with many viruses appearing concomitantly and in healthy birds. High-throughput nucleic acid pyrosequencing is a powerful diagnostic technology capable of determining the full genomic repertoire present in a complex environmental sample. We utilized the Roche/454 Life Sciences GS-FLX platform to compile an RNA virus metagenome from turkey flocks experiencing enteric disease. This approach yielded numerous sequences homologous to viruses in the BLAST nr protein database, many of which have not been described in turkeys. Our analysis of this turkey gut RNA metagenome focuses in particular on the turkey-origin members of the Picornavirales, the Caliciviridae, and the turkey Picobirnaviruses.

  14. Changes in Healthy Human IgG Fc-Glycosylation after Birth and during Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Noortje; Reiding, Karli R; Driessen, Gertjan; van der Burg, Mirjam; Wuhrer, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    Glycosylation on the fragment crystallizable (Fc) region of immunoglobulin G (IgG) has a large influence on the interaction of the antibody with Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). IgG consists of four subclasses that all have distinct affinities for the different FcγRs. Knowledge about the Fc-glycosylation in healthy human is valuable as reference for new biomarkers and in the design of biopharmaceuticals that rely on IgG Fc-glycosylation. Previously, subclass-specific characterization of IgG Fc-glycosylation was performed for healthy adults, pregnant women, and newborns. For young healthy children, however, the subclass-specific description of IgG Fc-glycosylation is still lacking. Therefore, we performed the IgG subclass-specific analysis of the Fc-glycosylation of 130 healthy humans between birth and 40 years of age, including 22 samples derived from the umbilical cords of newborns. The analysis was performed by a previously published matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-time-of-flight (TOF)-mass spectrometry (MS) workflow, including a derivatization step for the linkage-specific stabilization of sialic acids. The characterization revealed that when children start to produce their own IgG they have a decreased galactosylation, sialylation, and bisection and an increased fucosylation compared with newborns. During childhood, the fucosylation and sialylation decrease, whereas bisection increases and galactosylation stays constant. PMID:27161864

  15. Genome-scale metabolic model of Pichia pastoris with native and humanized glycosylation of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Zahra Azimzadeh; Kerkhoven, Eduard J; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-05-01

    Pichia pastoris is used for commercial production of human therapeutic proteins, and genome-scale models of P. pastoris metabolism have been generated in the past to study the metabolism and associated protein production by this yeast. A major challenge with clinical usage of recombinant proteins produced by P. pastoris is the difference in N-glycosylation of proteins produced by humans and this yeast. However, through metabolic engineering, a P. pastoris strain capable of producing humanized N-glycosylated proteins was constructed. The current genome-scale models of P. pastoris do not address native nor humanized N-glycosylation, and we therefore developed ihGlycopastoris, an extension to the iLC915 model with both native and humanized N-glycosylation for recombinant protein production, but also an estimation of N-glycosylation of P. pastoris native proteins. This new model gives a better prediction of protein yield, demonstrates the effect of the different types of N-glycosylation of protein yield, and can be used to predict potential targets for strain improvement. The model represents a step towards a more complete description of protein production in P. pastoris, which is required for using these models to understand and optimize protein production processes. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 961-969. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26480251

  16. The Occurrence, Fate and Biological Activities of C-glycosyl Flavonoids in the Human Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courts, Fraser L; Williamson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The human diet contains a wide variety of plant-derived flavonoids, many of which are glycosylated via an O- or less commonly a C-glycosidic linkage. The distribution, quantity, and biological effects of C-glycosyl flavonoids in the human diet have received little attention in the literature in comparison to their O-linked counterparts, however, despite being present in many common foodstuffs. The structural nature, nomenclature, and distribution of C-glycosyl flavonoids in the human diet are, therefore, reviewed. Forty-three dietary flavonoids are revealed to be C-glycosylated, arising from the dihydrochalcone, flavone, and flavan-3-ol backbones, and distributed among edible fruits, cereals, leaves, and stems. C-linked sugar groups are shown to include arabinose, galactose, glucose, rutinose, and xylose, often being present more than once on a single flavonoid backbone and occasionally in tandem with O-linked glucose or rutinose groups. The pharmacokinetic fate of these compounds is discussed with particular reference to their apparent lack of interaction with hydrolytic mechanisms known to influence the fate of O-glycosylated dietary flavonoids, explaining the unusual but potentially important appearance of intact C-glycosylated flavonoid metabolites in human urine following oral administration. Finally, the potential biological significance of these compounds is reviewed, describing mechanisms of antidiabetic, antiinflammatory, anxiolytic, antispasmodic, and hepatoprotective effects. PMID:24915338

  17. Toward molecular trait-based ecology through integration of biogeochemical, geographical and metagenomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raes, Jeroen; Letunic, Ivica; Yamada, Takuji;

    2011-01-01

    Using metagenomic 'parts lists' to infer global patterns on microbial ecology remains a significant challenge. To deduce important ecological indicators such as environmental adaptation, molecular trait dispersal, diversity variation and primary production from the gene pool of an ecosystem, we...... integrated 25 ocean metagenomes with geographical, meteorological and geophysicochemical data. We find that climatic factors (temperature, sunlight) are the major determinants of the biomolecular repertoire of each sample and the main limiting factor on functional trait dispersal (absence of biogeographic...... composition derived from metagenomes is an important quantitative readout for molecular trait-based biogeography and ecology....

  18. GroopM: an automated tool for the recovery of population genomes from related metagenomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Imelfort

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metagenomic binning methods that leverage differential population abundances in microbial communities (differential coverage are emerging as a complementary approach to conventional composition-based binning. Here we introduce GroopM, an automated binning tool that primarily uses differential coverage to obtain high fidelity population genomes from related metagenomes. We demonstrate the effectiveness of GroopM using synthetic and real-world metagenomes, and show that GroopM produces results comparable with more time consuming, labor-intensive methods.

  19. Construction of small-insert and large-insert metagenomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Carola; Daniel, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of the Earth's biological diversity is hidden in uncultured and yet uncharacterized microbial genomes. The construction of metagenomic libraries is a cultivation-independent molecular approach to assess this unexplored genetic reservoir. In the last few years, a high number of novel biocatalysts have been identified by function-based or sequence-based screening of metagenomic libraries. Here, we describe detailed protocols for the construction of metagenomic small-insert and large-insert libraries in plasmids and fosmids, respectively, from environmental DNA. PMID:20830554

  20. First co-expression of a lipase and its specific foldase obtained by metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Martini, Viviane Paula; Glogauer, Arnaldo; Müller-Santos, Marcelo; Iulek, Jorge; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Mitchell, David Alexander; Pedrosa, Fabio Oliveira; Krieger, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    Background Metagenomics is a useful tool in the search for new lipases that might have characteristics that make them suitable for application in biocatalysis. This paper reports the cloning, co-expression, purification and characterization of a new lipase, denominated LipG9, and its specific foldase, LifG9, from a metagenomic library derived from a fat-contaminated soil. Results Within the metagenomic library, the gene lipg9 was cloned jointly with the gene of the foldase, lifg9. LipG9 and L...

  1. Ethanol induced changes in glycosylation of mucins in rat intestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Grewal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial surface of intestinal tract is covered by a mucosal layer, which constitutes the first line of defense against exposure of a variety of exogenous or endogenous agents. This epithelial coat is rich in mucins, secreted by goblet cells. In the present study, we investigated the effect of feeding 1 ml of 30% ethanol daily for different durations on mucin glycosylation in rat intestine. Ethanol feeding for 15 days had no effect, but the mucin secretion from goblet cells was enhanced in rats exposed to ethanol for 25-56 days. Alkaline phosphatase and sucrase activities were augmented in luminal mucins of animals fed ethanol for 25-56 days compared to controls.Chemical analysis, revealed an increase in hexose and sialic acid contents but reduced levels of fucose of mucins, in rats treated with ethanol for 25-56 days compared to controls.These alterations may be of pathological significance, since mucins are involved in protection and adhesion of microorganisms in intestinal lumen.

  2. O-linked glycosylation of retroviral envelope gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of [3H]glucosamine-labeled Friend mink cell focus-forming virus (FrMCF) gp70 with excess peptide:N-glycanase F (PNGase F) resulted in removal of the expected seven N-linked oligosaccharide chains; however, approximately 10% of the glucosamine label was retained in the resulting 49,000-Mr (49K) product. For [3H]mannose-labeled gp70, similar treatment led to removal of all the carbohydrate label from the protein. Prior digestion of the PNGase F-treated gp70 with neuraminidase resulted in an addition size shift, and treatment with O-glycanase led to the removal of almost all of the PNGase F-resistant sugars. These results indicate that gp70 possesses sialic acid-containing O-linked oligosaccharides. Analysis of intracellular env precursors demonstrated that O-linked sugars were present in gPr90env, the polyprotein intermediate which contains complex sugars, but not in the primary translation product, gPr80env, and proteolytic digestion studies allowed localization of the O-linked carbohydrates to a 10K region near the center of the gp70 molecule. similar substituents were detected on the gp70s of ecotropic and xenotropic murine leukemia viruses and two subgroups of feline leukemia virus, indicting that O-linked glycosylation is a conserved feature of retroviral env proteins

  3. The role of N-glycosylation in kiwi allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Arandia, María; Murua-García, Amaya; Palacin, Aranzazu; Tordesillas, Leticia; Gómez-Casado, Cristina; Blanca-Lopez, Natalia; Ramos, Tania; Canto, Gabriela; Blanco, Carlos; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Sánchez-Monge, Rosa; Pacios, Luis F; Díaz Perales, Araceli

    2014-05-01

    The physical, biochemical, and immunological characteristics of plant allergens have been widely studied, but no definite conclusion has been reached about what actually makes a protein an allergen. In this sense, N-glycosylation is an exclusive characteristic of plant allergens not present in mammals and it could be implied in allergenic sensitization. With this aim, we evaluated and compared the allergenic activity of the protein fraction and the N-glycan fraction of the thaumatin-like protein and the main kiwi allergen, Act d 2. The natural allergen, Act d 2, was deglycosylated by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatment; the N-glycan fraction was obtained by extended treatment with proteinase K. N-glycan- and protein- fractions were recognized by specific IgE of kiwi-allergic patients. By contrast, the sugar moiety showed a reduced capacity to activate basophils and T cells, but not dendritic cells derived from patients' monocytes. Related to this, the production of cytokines such as IL6 and IL10 was increased by the incubation of dendritic cells with sugar moiety. Thus, the sugar moiety plays a significant role in sensitization, inducing the activation of antigen-presenting cells, but it is the protein fraction that is responsible for the allergic reactions. PMID:24936296

  4. Free and glycosylated simple phenol profiling in Apulian Italian wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaba, C; Dellacassa, E; Nicolini, G; Nardin, T; Malacarne, M; Larcher, R

    2016-09-01

    Free simple phenols have a significant role in defining the sensory and nutritional characteristics of wines, affecting the organoleptic profile and having positive effects on health, but glycosidically bound phenols can also be hydrolysed during the winemaking process, releasing the corresponding volatile compounds and making a possible contribution to the final sensory profile. In this work, application of on-line SPE liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry, operating in negative polarity with heated electrospray, allowed to detect over eighty free and glycosylated simple phenols in Primitivo di Manduria and Negroamaro wines. Sixty-one phenols, four of which phenolic glucosidic precursors, were quantified as having quantification limits ranging from 0.001 to 0.1μgmL(-1), calibration R(2) of 0.99 for over 92% of compounds, and precision (R.S.D.%) always lower than 12%. Twenty-four simple phenolic precursors were tentatively identified as hexoside, pentoside and hexoside-hexoside derivatives, on the basis of accurate mass, isotopic pattern and MS/MS fragmentation. PMID:27041324

  5. Function and glycosylation of plant-derived antiviral monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Kisung; Tekoah, Yoram; Rudd, Pauline M; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Spitsin, Sergei; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Rupprecht, Charles; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Golovkin, Maxim; Koprowski, Hilary

    2003-06-24

    Plant genetic engineering led to the production of plant-derived mAb (mAbP), which provides a safe and economically feasible alternative to the current methods of antibody production in animal systems. In this study, the heavy and light chains of human anti-rabies mAb were expressed and assembled in planta under the control of two strong constitutive promoters. An alfalfa mosaic virus untranslated leader sequence and Lys-Asp-Glu-Leu (KDEL) endoplasmic reticulum retention signal were linked at the N and C terminus of the heavy chain, respectively. mAbP was as effective at neutralizing the activity of the rabies virus as the mammalian-derived antibody (mAbM) or human rabies Ig (HRIG). The mAbP contained mainly oligomannose type N-glycans (90%) and had no potentially antigenic alpha(1,3)-linked fucose residues. mAbP had a shorter half-life than mAbM. The mAbP was as efficient as HRIG for post-exposure prophylaxis against rabies virus in hamsters, indicating that differences in N-glycosylation do not affect the efficacy of the antibody in this model. PMID:12799460

  6. Implications of cellobiohydrolase glycosylation for use in biomass conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decker Stephen R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cellulase producing ascomycete, Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina, is known to secrete a range of enzymes important for ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. It is also widely used for the commercial scale production of industrial enzymes because of its ability to produce high titers of heterologous proteins. During the secretion process, a number of post-translational events can occur, however, that impact protein function and stability. Another ascomycete, Aspergillus niger var. awamori, is also known to produce large quantities of heterologous proteins for industry. In this study, T. reesei Cel7A, a cellobiohydrolase, was expressed in A. niger var. awamori and subjected to detailed biophysical characterization. The purified recombinant enzyme contains six times the amount of N-linked glycan than the enzyme purified from a commercial T. reesei enzyme preparation. The activities of the two enzyme forms were compared using bacterial (microcrystalline and phosphoric acid swollen (amorphous cellulose as substrates. This comparison suggested that the increased level of N-glycosylation of the recombinant Cel7A (rCel7A resulted in reduced activity and increased non-productive binding on cellulose. When treated with the N-glycosidase PNGaseF, the molecular weight of the recombinant enzyme approached that of the commercial enzyme and the activity on cellulose was improved.

  7. Large-scale metagenomic sequence clustering on map-reduce clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Zola, Jaroslaw; Aluru, Srinivas

    2013-02-01

    Taxonomic clustering of species from millions of DNA fragments sequenced from their genomes is an important and frequently arising problem in metagenomics. In this paper, we present a parallel algorithm for taxonomic clustering of large metagenomic samples with support for overlapping clusters. We develop sketching techniques, akin to those created for web document clustering, to deduce significant similarities between pairs of sequences without resorting to expensive all vs. all comparison. We formulate the metagenomic classification problem as that of maximal quasi-clique enumeration in the resulting similarity graph, at multiple levels of the hierarchy as prescribed by different similarity thresholds. We cast execution of the underlying algorithmic steps as applications of the map-reduce framework to achieve a cloud ready implementation. We show that the resulting framework can produce high quality clustering of metagenomic samples consisting of millions of reads, in reasonable time limits, when executed on a modest size cluster. PMID:23427983

  8. Genome sequences of rare, uncultured bacteria obtained by differential coverage binning of multiple metagenomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Skarshewski, Adam;

    2013-01-01

    metagenomes. Multiple metagenomes of the same community, which differ in relative population abundances, were used to assemble 31 bacterial genomes, including rare (<1% relative abundance) species, from an activated sludge bioreactor. Twelve genomes were assembled into complete or near-complete chromosomes....... Four belong to the candidate bacterial phylum TM7 and represent the most complete genomes for this phylum to date (relative abundances, 0.06–1.58%). Reanalysis of published metagenomes reveals that differential coverage binning facilitates recovery of more complete and higher fidelity genome bins than...... other currently used methods, which are primarily based on sequence composition. This approach will be an important addition to the standard metagenome toolbox and greatly improve access to genomes of uncultured microorganisms....

  9. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng; Zhao, Yang; Wu, Zhengrong; Liu, Ronghui; Xu, Ruixiang; Yan, Lei; Li, Hongyu

    2016-03-01

    Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese), a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411. PMID:26981389

  10. Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer from serofluid dish, a traditional Chinese fermented food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Serofluid dish (or Jiangshui, in Chinese, a traditional food in the Chinese culture for thousands of years, is made from vegetables by fermentation. In this work, microorganism community of the fermented serofluid dish was investigated by the culture-independent method. The metagenomic data in this article contains the sequences of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS regions of rRNA genes from 12 different serofluid dish samples. The metagenome comprised of 50,865 average raw reads with an average of 8,958,220 bp and G + C content is 45.62%. This is the first report on metagenomic data of fungal ITS from serofluid dish employing Illumina platform to profile the fungal communities of this little known fermented food from Gansu Province, China. The Metagenomic data of fungal internal transcribed spacer can be accessed at NCBI, SRA database accession no. SRP067411.

  11. Big Data, Evolution, and Metagenomes: Predicting Disease from Gut Microbiota Codon Usage Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijanić, Maja; Vlahoviček, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Metagenomics projects use next-generation sequencing to unravel genetic potential in microbial communities from a wealth of environmental niches, including those associated with human body and relevant to human health. In order to understand large datasets collected in metagenomics surveys and interpret them in context of how a community metabolism as a whole adapts and interacts with the environment, it is necessary to extend beyond the conventional approaches of decomposing metagenomes into microbial species' constituents and performing analysis on separate components. By applying concepts of translational optimization through codon usage adaptation on entire metagenomic datasets, we demonstrate that a bias in codon usage present throughout the entire microbial community can be used as a powerful analytical tool to predict for community lifestyle-specific metabolism. Here we demonstrate this approach combined with machine learning, to classify human gut microbiome samples according to the pathological condition diagnosed in the human host. PMID:27115650

  12. ‘Candidatus Competibacter’-lineage genomes retrieved from metagenomes reveal functional metabolic diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Albertsen, Mads; Andresen, Eva Kammer;

    2014-01-01

    theoretically reduces the EBPR capacity. In this study, two complete genomes from Competibacter were obtained from laboratory-scale enrichment reactors through metagenomics. Phylogenetic analysis identified the two genomes, ‘Candidatus Competibacter denitrificans’ and ‘Candidatus Contendobacter odensis...

  13. Life in Oligotropic Desert Environments: Contrasting Taxonomic and Functional Diversity of Two Microbial Mats with Metagenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Rosso, G.; Peimbert, M.; Olmedo, G.; Alcaraz, L. D.; Eguiarte, L. E.; Souza, V.

    2010-04-01

    The metagenomic analysis of two microbial mats from the oligotrophic waters in the Cuatrociéngas basin reveals large differences both at taxonomic and functional level. These are explained in terms of environmental stability and nutrient availability.

  14. Metagenomic evidence for the presence of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria in diverse environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yonghui; Baumbach, Jan; Barbosa, Eudes Guilherme Vieira;

    2016-01-01

    the environmental distribution of phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria. To fill this gap, we took advantage of fast growing public metagenomic databases and performed an extensive survey of metagenomes deposited into the NCBI's WGS database, the JGI's IMG webserver, and the MG-RAST webserver. By employing Mg...... protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester oxidative cyclase (AcsF) as a marker gene, we identified 291 AcsF fragments (24∼361 amino acids long) that are closely related to G. phototrophica from 161 metagenomes originating from various habitats, including air, river waters/sediment, estuarine waters, lake waters...... photosynthesis gene cluster (PGC) with identical gene composition and arrangement to those in G. phototrophica was reconstructed from the Odense wastewater metagenome, only differing in a 7.2 kb long non-photosynthesis-gene insert. These data suggest that phototrophic Gemmatimonadetes bacteria are much more...

  15. Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Nielsen, Kåre Lehmann;

    Metagenomes obtained by "deep sequencing" - what do they tell about the EBPR communities? Mads Albertsen1, Aaron M. Saunders1, Kåre L. Nielsen1 and Per H. Nielsen1 1 Department of Biotechnology, Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark Presenting Author: Mads...... Albertsen Keywords: Metagenomics; Accumulibacter; Micro-diversity; Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Introduction Metagenomics, or environmental genomics, provides comprehensive information about the entire microbial community of a certain ecosystem, e.g. a wastewater treatment plant. So far......, metagenomic analyses have been hampered by high costs and high level of expertise needed to conduct the investigations, but it is changing now with development of new technologies allowing analyses of billions of DNA sequences (deep-sequencing) and user-friendly pipelines for analyses of the huge data sets...

  16. Metagenomics as a tool to obtain full genomes of process-critical bacteria in engineered systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W.;

    parameters with functions of specific bacteria within the ecosystems in order to decipher principles that might be used to control and predict ecosystem performance. The main bottleneck in obtaining genomes from the environment is that the vast majority of bacteria are not readily cultured. Metagenomics......, the sequencing of bulk genomic DNA from environmental samples, has the potential to provide genomes of this uncultured majority. However, so far only few bacterial genomes have been obtained from metagenomic data. In this study we present a new approach to obtain individual genomes from metagenomes. We deeply...... sequenced two metagenomes from the same environmental sample, but using two independent DNA extraction methods, which resulted in different population abundances. This allowed sequence-composition independent binning of numerous high quality draft genomes from both high and low abundant members...

  17. Coextraction of microbial metagenomic DNA and RNA from deep-sea sediment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A protocol to coextract the microbial metagenomic DNA and RNA from deep-sea sediment was developed for the microbiological study of environmental samples. The obtained pure metagenomic DNA with the size larger than 23 kb and stable RNA could be used directly for PCR and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) respectively. The direct lysis including the treatments of SDS, proteinase and lysozyme was applied to acquiring the metagenomic DNA and RNA furthest. Prior to the lysis treatment, the glass bead and denaturing solution were added to enhance the lysis efficiency and keep the integrity of RNA respectively. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was applied in accessing the microbial 16S rRNA diversity by PCR and RT-PCR amplification from a single extraction. The pattern obtained by this analysis revealed some differences between them, indicating the efficiency of the protocol in extracting the metagenomic DNA and total RNA from deep-sea sediment.

  18. Identification and assembly of genomes and genetic elements in complex metagenomic samples without using reference genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Almeida, Mathieu; Juncker, Agnieszka;

    2014-01-01

    Most current approaches for analyzing metagenomic data rely on comparisons to reference genomes, but the microbial diversity of many environments extends far beyond what is covered by reference databases. De novo segregation of complex metagenomic data into specific biological entities......, such as particular bacterial strains or viruses, remains a largely unsolved problem. Here we present a method, based on binning co-abundant genes across a series of metagenomic samples, that enables comprehensive discovery of new microbial organisms, viruses and co-inherited genetic entities and aids assembly...... of microbial genomes without the need for reference sequences. We demonstrate the method on data from 396 human gut microbiome samples and identify 7,381 co-abundance gene groups (CAGs), including 741 metagenomic species (MGS). We use these to assemble 238 high-quality microbial genomes and identify...

  19. Screening for novel enzymes from metagenome and SIGEX, as a way to improve it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Sangryeol

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metagenomics has been successfully applied to isolate novel biocatalysts from the uncultured microbiota in the environment. Two types of screening have been used to identify clones carrying desired traits from metagenomic libraries: function-based screening, and sequence-based screening. Both function- and sequence- based screening have individual advantages and disadvantages, and they have been applied successfully to discover biocatalysts from metagenome. However, both strategies are laborious and tedious because of the low frequency of screening hits. A recent paper introduced a high throughput screening strategy, termed substrate-induced gene-expression screening (SIGEX. SIGEX is designed to select the clones harboring catabolic genes induced by various substrates in concert with fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS. This method was applied successfully to isolate aromatic hydrocarbon-induced genes from a metagenomic library. Although SIGEX has many limitations, it is expected to provide economic advantages, especially to industry.

  20. Experimental Design and Bioinformatics Analysis for the Application of Metagenomics in Environmental Sciences and Biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Feng; Zhang, Tong

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies have prompted the widespread application of metagenomics for the investigation of novel bioresources (e.g., industrial enzymes and bioactive molecules) and unknown biohazards (e.g., pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes) in natural and engineered microbial systems across multiple disciplines. This review discusses the rigorous experimental design and sample preparation in the context of applying metagenomics in environmental sciences and biotechnology. Moreover, this review summarizes the principles, methodologies, and state-of-the-art bioinformatics procedures, tools and database resources for metagenomics applications and discusses two popular strategies (analysis of unassembled reads versus assembled contigs/draft genomes) for quantitative or qualitative insights of microbial community structure and functions. Overall, this review aims to facilitate more extensive application of metagenomics in the investigation of uncultured microorganisms, novel enzymes, microbe-environment interactions, and biohazards in biotechnological applications where microbial communities are engineered for bioenergy production, wastewater treatment, and bioremediation. PMID:26451629

  1. IDENTIFICATION OF AVIAN-SPECIFIC FECAL METAGENOMIC SEQUENCES USING GENOME FRAGMENT ENRICHMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequence analysis of microbial genomes has provided biologists the opportunity to compare genetic differences between closely related microorganisms. While random sequencing has also been used to study natural microbial communities, metagenomic comparisons via sequencing analysis...

  2. Comprehensive analysis of protein glycosylation by solid-phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Shisheng; Shah, Punit; Eshghi, Shadi Toghi; Yang, Weiming; Trikannad, Namita; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Lijun; Aiyetan, Paul; Höti, Naseruddin; Zhang, Zhen; Chan, Daniel W.; Hui ZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive characterization of protein glycosylation is critical for understanding the structure and function of glycoproteins. However, due to the complexity and heterogeneity of glycoprotein conformations, current glycoprotein analyses focus mainly on either the de-glycosylated glycosylation site (glycosite)-containing peptides or the released glycans. Here, we describe a chemoenzymatic method called solid phase extraction of N-linked glycans and glycosite-containing peptides (NGAG) for ...

  3. Identification and Functional Characterization of Glycosylation of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB in Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Dai

    Full Text Available Yeast Pichia pastoris is a widely used system for heterologous protein expression. However, post-translational modifications, especially glycosylation, usually impede pharmaceutical application of recombinant proteins because of unexpected alterations in protein structure and function. The aim of this study was to identify glycosylation sites on recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB secreted by P. pastoris, and investigate possible effects of O-linked glycans on PDGF-BB functional activity. PDGF-BB secreted by P. pastoris is very heterogeneous and contains multiple isoforms. We demonstrated that PDGF-BB was O-glycosylated during the secretion process and detected putative O-glycosylation sites using glycosylation staining and immunoblotting. By site-directed mutagenesis and high-resolution LC/MS analysis, we, for the first time, identified two threonine residues at the C-terminus as the major O-glycosylation sites on rhPDGF-BB produced in P. pastoris. Although O-glycosylation resulted in heterogeneous protein expression, the removal of glycosylation sites did not affect rhPDGF-BB mitogenic activity. In addition, the unglycosylated PDGF-BBΔGly mutant exhibited the immunogenicity comparable to that of the wild-type form. Furthermore, antiserum against PDGF-BBΔGly also recognized glycosylated PDGF-BB, indicating that protein immunogenicity was unaltered by glycosylation. These findings elucidate the effect of glycosylation on PDGF-BB structure and biological activity, and can potentially contribute to the design and production of homogeneously expressed unglycosylated or human-type glycosylated PDGF-BB in P. pastoris for pharmaceutical applications.

  4. Regioselective Glycosylation of Unprotected Phenyl 1‐Thioglycopyranosides with Phenylboronic Acid as a Transient Masking Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Thomas Hauch; Madsen, Robert

    2013-01-01

    A useful protocol is described for the regioselective glycosylation of the secondary alcohols in unprotected glycosyl acceptors. Phenyl 1‐thioglycopyranosides derived from D‐glucose, D‐galactose, D‐glucosamine, L‐rhamnose, and L‐fucose were treated with phenylboronic acid to install a temporary b...... consecutive glycosylations in one pot, where a free 2‐hydroxy group ensures neighboring group participation in the second coupling....

  5. Bioprospecting--fuels from fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Gary Allan

    2015-05-01

    The world has a continuing demand and utility for liquid fuels to power its societies. The utilization of crude oil based fuels is leading to a dramatic increase in the CO2 content of the atmosphere which is being related to a dangerously warming earth. Having liquid fuels that are derived from biological sources is one solution to this growing problem since the carbon being utilized is only from recycled sources. Presently, the microbes, having the greatest impact on the world's economies, producing liquid fuel are various yeasts producing ethanol. Other microbial sources need to be sought since ethanol is not the most desirable fuel and yeasts require simple sugars to carry out the fermentation processes. Recently, several endophytic fungi have been described that make hydrocarbons with fuel potential (Mycodiesel). Among others the compounds found in the volatile phases of these cultures include alkanes, branched alkanes, cyclohexanes, cyclopentanes, and alkyl alcohols/ketones, benzenes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. Most importantly, generally these organisms make hydrocarbons while utilizing complex carbohydrates found in all plant-based agricultural wastes. Also discussed in this review is a rationale for finding hydrocarbon producing endophytes as well as examples of other promising hydrocarbon producers-Nodulisporium spp. which make 1,8-cineole and families of other hydrocarbons. Extremely favorable results of engine and fuel testing experiments recently completed on cineole and other products of Nodulisporium sp. are also presented. Finally, there is a brief discussion on the main limiting steps in the domestication of these fungi. PMID:25650344

  6. Glycosylation of the enhanced aromatic sequon is similarly stabilizing in three distinct reverse turn contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Joshua L; Powers, David L; Powers, Evan T; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2011-08-23

    Cotranslational N-glycosylation can accelerate protein folding, slow protein unfolding, and increase protein stability, but the molecular basis for these energetic effects is incompletely understood. N-glycosylation of proteins at naïve sites could be a useful strategy for stabilizing proteins in therapeutic and research applications, but without engineering guidelines, often results in unpredictable changes to protein energetics. We recently introduced the enhanced aromatic sequon as a family of portable structural motifs that are stabilized upon glycosylation in specific reverse turn contexts: a five-residue type I β-turn harboring a G1 β-bulge (using a Phe-Yyy-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) and a type II β-turn within a six-residue loop (using a Phe-Yyy-Zzz-Asn-Xxx-Thr sequon) [Culyba EK, et al. (2011) Science 331:571-575]. Here we show that glycosylating a new enhanced aromatic sequon, Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr, in a type I' β-turn stabilizes the Pin 1 WW domain. Comparing the energetic effects of glycosylating these three enhanced aromatic sequons in the same host WW domain revealed that the glycosylation-mediated stabilization is greatest for the enhanced aromatic sequon complementary to the type I β-turn with a G1 β-bulge. However, the portion of the stabilization from the tripartite interaction between Phe, Asn(GlcNAc), and Thr is similar for each enhanced aromatic sequon in its respective reverse turn context. Adding the Phe-Asn-Xxx-Thr motif (in a type I' β-turn) to the enhanced aromatic sequon family doubles the number of proteins that can be stabilized by glycosylation without having to alter the native reverse turn type. PMID:21825145

  7. Clinical diagnostics and therapy monitoring in the congenital disorders of glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scherpenzeel, Monique; Willems, Esther; Lefeber, Dirk J

    2016-06-01

    Abnormal protein glycosylation is observed in many common disorders like cancer, inflammation, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes. However, the actual use of this information in clinical diagnostics is still very limited. Information is usually derived from analysis of total serum N-glycan profiling methods, whereas the current use of glycoprotein biomarkers in the clinical setting is commonly based on protein levels. It can be envisioned that combining protein levels and their glycan isoforms would increase specificity for early diagnosis and therapy monitoring. To establish diagnostic assays, based on the mass spectrometric analysis of protein-specific glycosylation abnormalities, still many technical improvements have to be made. In addition, clinical validation is equally important as well as an understanding of the genetic and environmental factors that determine the protein-specific glycosylation abnormalities. Important lessons can be learned from the group of monogenic disorders in the glycosylation pathway, the Congenital Disorders of Glycosylation (CDG). Now that more and more genetic defects are being unraveled, we start to learn how genetic factors influence glycomics profiles of individual and total serum proteins. Although only in its initial stages, such studies suggest the importance to establish diagnostic assays for protein-specific glycosylation profiling, and the need to look beyond the single glycoprotein diagnostic test. Here, we review progress in and lessons from genetic disease, and review the increasing opportunities of mass spectrometry to analyze protein glycosylation in the clinical diagnostic setting. Furthermore, we will discuss the possibilities to expand current CDG diagnostics and how this can be used to approach glycoprotein biomarkers for more common diseases. PMID:26739145

  8. Improved functional properties of glycosylated soy protein isolate using D-glucose and xanthan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruiqi; Hettiarachchy, Navam; Rayaprolu, Srinivas; Davis, Mike; Eswaranandam, Satchithanandam; Jha, Alok; Chen, Pengyin

    2015-09-01

    Functional properties of the soy protein need to improve to have better applications in food industry. Alkali extracted and acid precipitated soy protein isolate (SPI) was glycosylated using D-glucose (G) and Xanthan gum (X) via Maillard reaction to improve solubility. The effects of SPI to G and SPI to X ratios (SPI:G = 2:1, 1:1, and 1:2; SPI:X = 100:1 and 10:1) and incubation time (0, 6, 12, and 24 h) on the solubility and functional properties of glycosylated SPI were evaluated. The SPI:G ratio of 1:2 yielded a maximum degree of glycosylation of 71.1 %. The solubility of SPI after glycosylation significantly increased (P 4.0-8.0 compared to SPI alone. Although the emulsion stability of glycosylated SPIs has not significantly increased (P > 0.05), the emulsifying activity improved significantly (P < 0.05). Glycosylation with SPI-X at a ratio of 10: 1 showed maximum emulsifying activity of 191.6 m(2)/g (SPI alone: 66.3 m(2)/g). Moreover, the SPI:X (ratio of 100:1) showed the maximum foaming activity (205 mL) compared to SPI alone (155 mL). The foaming stability of SPI (2.6 %) increased to 5.5 and 8.2 % when using xanthan gum at the ratio of 100:1 and 10:1, respectively. Glycosylated SPI with enhanced emulsifying and foaming properties has potential to improve the functional quality of the food products. PMID:26345030

  9. A computational framework for the automated construction of glycosylation reaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Liu

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is among the most common and complex post-translational modifications identified to date. It proceeds through the catalytic action of multiple enzyme families that include the glycosyltransferases that add monosaccharides to growing glycans, and glycosidases which remove sugar residues to trim glycans. The expression level and specificity of these enzymes, in part, regulate the glycan distribution or glycome of specific cell/tissue systems. Currently, there is no systematic method to describe the enzymes and cellular reaction networks that catalyze glycosylation. To address this limitation, we present a streamlined machine-readable definition for the glycosylating enzymes and additional methodologies to construct and analyze glycosylation reaction networks. In this computational framework, the enzyme class is systematically designed to store detailed specificity data such as enzymatic functional group, linkage and substrate specificity. The new classes and their associated functions enable both single-reaction inference and automated full network reconstruction, when given a list of reactants and/or products along with the enzymes present in the system. In addition, graph theory is used to support functions that map the connectivity between two or more species in a network, and that generate subset models to identify rate-limiting steps regulating glycan biosynthesis. Finally, this framework allows the synthesis of biochemical reaction networks using mass spectrometry (MS data. The features described above are illustrated using three case studies that examine: i O-linked glycan biosynthesis during the construction of functional selectin-ligands; ii automated N-linked glycosylation pathway construction; and iii the handling and analysis of glycomics based MS data. Overall, the new computational framework enables automated glycosylation network model construction and analysis by integrating knowledge of glycan structure and enzyme

  10. Importance of glycosylation on function of a potassium channel in neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Hall

    Full Text Available The Kv3.1 glycoprotein, a voltage-gated potassium channel, is expressed throughout the central nervous system. The role of N-glycans attached to the Kv3.1 glycoprotein on conducting and non-conducting functions of the Kv3.1 channel are quite limiting. Glycosylated (wild type, partially glycosylated (N220Q and N229Q, and unglycosylated (N220Q/N229Q Kv3.1 proteins were expressed and characterized in a cultured neuronal-derived cell model, B35 neuroblastoma cells. Western blots, whole cell current recordings, and wound healing assays were employed to provide evidence that the conducting and non-conducting properties of the Kv3.1 channel were modified by N-glycans of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein. Electrophoretic migration of the various Kv3.1 proteins treated with PNGase F and neuraminidase verified that the glycosylation sites were occupied and that the N-glycans could be sialylated, respectively. The unglycosylated channel favored a different whole cell current pattern than the glycoform. Further the outward ionic currents of the unglycosylated channel had slower activation and deactivation rates than those of the glycosylated Kv3.1 channel. These kinetic parameters of the partially glycosylated Kv3.1 channels were also slowed. B35 cells expressing glycosylated Kv3.1 protein migrated faster than those expressing partially glycosylated and much faster than those expressing the unglycosylated Kv3.1 protein. These results have demonstrated that N-glycans of the Kv3.1 glycoprotein enhance outward ionic current kinetics, and neuronal migration. It is speculated that physiological changes which lead to a reduction in N-glycan attachment to proteins will alter the functions of the Kv3.1 channel.

  11. A statistical toolbox for metagenomics: assessing functional diversity in microbial communities

    OpenAIRE

    Handelsman Jo; Schloss Patrick D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The 99% of bacteria in the environment that are recalcitrant to culturing have spurred the development of metagenomics, a culture-independent approach to sample and characterize microbial genomes. Massive datasets of metagenomic sequences have been accumulated, but analysis of these sequences has focused primarily on the descriptive comparison of the relative abundance of proteins that belong to specific functional categories. More robust statistical methods are needed to ...

  12. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic

    OpenAIRE

    HISAKAWA, N.; Quistad, S.D.; Hester, E.R.; Martynova, D.; Maughan, H.; E. Sala; Gavrilo, M.V.; Rohwer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotrop...

  13. Characterization of ancient and modern genomes by SNP detection and phylogenomic and metagenomic analysis using PALEOMIX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Mikkel; Ermini, Luca; Der Sarkissian, Clio;

    2014-01-01

    -generation sequencing reads, PALEOMIX carries out adapter removal, mapping against reference genomes, PCR duplicate removal, characterization of and compensation for postmortem damage, SNP calling and maximum-likelihood phylogenomic inference, and it profiles the metagenomic contents of the samples. As such, PALEOMIX...... allows for a series of potential applications in paleogenomics, comparative genomics and metagenomics. Applying the PALEOMIX pipeline to the three ancient and seven modern Phytophthora infestans genomes as described here takes 5 d using a 16-core server....

  14. Microbial metagenomics in the Baltic Sea: Recent advancements and prospects for environmental monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Ininbergs, Karolina; Bergman, Birgitta; Larsson, John; Ekman, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomics refers to the analysis of DNA from a whole community. Metagenomic sequencing of environmental DNA has greatly improved our knowledge of the identity and function of microorganisms in aquatic, terrestrial, and human biomes. Although open oceans have been the primary focus of studies on aquatic microbes, coastal and brackish ecosystems are now being surveyed. Here, we review so far published studies on microbes in the Baltic Sea, one of the world’s largest brackish water bodies, us...

  15. Biological removal of phosphorus and nitrogen from wastewater : new insights from metagenomic and metatranscriptomic approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Yanping; 毛艷萍

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to reveal the insights of microbial diversity, functional profile and gene expression of microorganisms responsible for enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) and hydrogen-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification mainly by using metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analysis based on high-throughput sequencing. Two sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) were operated to remove phosphorus (15 mg/L) from synthetic wastewater. The integrated metagenomic and metatranscripto...

  16. Natural variation in SAR11 marine bacterioplankton genomes inferred from metagenomic data

    OpenAIRE

    Wilhelm Larry J; Tripp H James; Givan Scott A; Smith Daniel P; Giovannoni Stephen J

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background One objective of metagenomics is to reconstruct information about specific uncultured organisms from fragmentary environmental DNA sequences. We used the genome of an isolate of the marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11 ('Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'; strain HTCC1062), obtained from the cold, productive Oregon coast, as a query sequence to study variation in SAR11 metagenome sequence data from the Sargasso Sea, a warm, oligotrophic ocean gyre. Results The average amino acid...

  17. Summer Workshop in Metagenomics: One Week Plus Eight Students Equals Gigabases of Cloned DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rios-Velazquez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We designed a week-long laboratory workshop in metagenomics for a cohort of undergraduate student researchers. During this course, students learned and utilized molecular biology and microbiology techniques to construct a metagenomic library from Puerto Rican soil. Pre- and postworkshop assessments indicated student learning gains in technical knowledge, skills, and confidence in a research environment. Postworkshop construction of additional libraries demonstrated retention of research techniques by the students.

  18. Exploration of nifH gene through soil metagenomes of the western Indian Himalayas

    OpenAIRE

    Soni, Ravindra; Suyal, Deep Chandra; Sai, Santosh; Goel, Reeta

    2016-01-01

    This group has previously highlighted the prevalence of Csp genes from cold Himalayan environments. However, this study has explored the uncultured diazotrophs from metagenomes of western Indian Himalayas. The metagenomic nifH gene clone library was constructed from the Temperate, Subtropical and Tarai soils of Western Himalaya, India followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. After preliminary screening, selected clones were sequenced. In silico analysis of the clones was don...

  19. A Physicians' Wish List for the Clinical Application of Intestinal Metagenomics

    OpenAIRE

    Klymiuk, Ingeborg; Högenauer, Christoph; Halwachs, Bettina; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Fricke, W. Florian; Steininger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Christoph Steininger and colleagues explore how multiple infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and neoplastic diseases have been associated with changes in the intestinal microbiome, although a cause-effect relationship is often difficult to establish. Integration of metagenomics into clinical medicine is a challenge, and the authors highlight clinical approaches that are of high priority for the useful medical application of metagenomics. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  20. Quantitative field testing Rotylenchulus reniformis DNA from metagenomic samples isolated directly from soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Showmaker

    Full Text Available A quantitative PCR procedure targeting the β-tubulin gene determined the number of Rotylenchulus reniformis Linford & Oliveira 1940 in metagenomic DNA samples isolated from soil. Of note, this outcome was in the presence of other soil-dwelling plant parasitic nematodes including its sister genus Helicotylenchus Steiner, 1945. The methodology provides a framework for molecular diagnostics of nematodes from metagenomic DNA isolated directly from soil.