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Sample records for biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

  1. Biological activity of lactoferrin-functionalized biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocerino, Nunzia; Fulgione, Andrea; Iannaccone, Marco; Tomasetta, Laura; Ianniello, Flora; Martora, Francesca; Lelli, Marco; Roveri, Norberto; Capuano, Federico; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics is a general public health problem. Progress in developing new molecules with antimicrobial properties has been made. In this study, we evaluated the biological activity of a hybrid nanocomposite composed of synthetic biomimetic hydroxyapatite surface-functionalized by lactoferrin (LF-HA). We evaluated the antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties of LF-HA and found that the composite was active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and that it modulated proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses and enhanced antioxidant properties as compared with LF alone. These results indicate the possibility of using LF-HA as an antimicrobial system and biomimetic hydroxyapatite as a candidate for innovative biomedical applications.

  2. Lactoferrin Adsorbed onto Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Controlling - In Vivo - the Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Fulgione

    Full Text Available The resistance of Helicobacter pylori to the antibiotic therapy poses the problem to discover new therapeutic approaches. Recently it has been stated that antibacterial, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties of lactoferrin are increased when this protein is surface-linked to biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals.Based on these knowledge, the aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an alternative therapy against Helicobacter pylori infection.Antibacterial and antinflammatory properties, humoral antibody induction, histopathological analysis and absence of side effects were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies.The tests carried out have been demonstrated better performance of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles combined with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei compared to both lactoferrin and probiotic alone or pooled.These findings indicate the effectiveness and safety of our proposed therapy as alternative treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

  3. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite

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    Norberto Roveri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Norberto Roveri, Michele IafiscoLaboratory of Environmental and Biological Structural Chemistry (LEBSC, Dipartimento di Chimica ‘G. Ciamician’, Alma Mater Studiorum, Università di Bologna, Bologna, ItalyAbstract: By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical–physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical–physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical–physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.Keywords: hydroxyapatite, nanocrystals, biomimetism, biomaterials, drug delivery, remineralization

  4. Evolving application of biomimetic nanostructured hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roveri, Norberto; Iafisco, Michele

    2010-11-09

    By mimicking Nature, we can design and synthesize inorganic smart materials that are reactive to biological tissues. These smart materials can be utilized to design innovative third-generation biomaterials, which are able to not only optimize their interaction with biological tissues and environment, but also mimic biogenic materials in their functionalities. The biomedical applications involve increasing the biomimetic levels from chemical composition, structural organization, morphology, mechanical behavior, nanostructure, and bulk and surface chemical-physical properties until the surface becomes bioreactive and stimulates cellular materials. The chemical-physical characteristics of biogenic hydroxyapatites from bone and tooth have been described, in order to point out the elective sides, which are important to reproduce the design of a new biomimetic synthetic hydroxyapatite. This review outlines the evolving applications of biomimetic synthetic calcium phosphates, details the main characteristics of bone and tooth, where the calcium phosphates are present, and discusses the chemical-physical characteristics of biomimetic calcium phosphates, methods of synthesizing them, and some of their biomedical applications.

  5. Incorporation of proteins into biomimetic hydroxyapatite coatings

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    Liu, Y.; Groot, K. de [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands). Biomaterials Research Group; IsoTis, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Layrolle, P. [IsoTis, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Blitterswijk, C.A. van [IsoTis, Bilthoven (Netherlands); Twente Univ., Enschede (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite coating was biomimetically deposited on titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V). Various concentrations (10 ng/ml - 1 {mu}g/ml) of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were added into a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution (CPS) at physiological temperature and pH of 7.4. Pre-treated Ti6Al4V plates were immersed into such solution for 48 hours at 37 C. BSA was co-precipitated with the crystals during the coating process. A white and thick (30 - 50 {mu}m) coating was uniformly deposited on titanium surfaces. The produced coatings were evaluated and protein release was measured. Results revealed: at higher BSA concentrations in the solution, the coating changed its microstructure; the crystal size of the coating and the coating thickness decreased indicating a crystal growth inhibition. Loading amounts of protein in the coating increased with higher concentration in the solution. Protein was incorporated into whole layer of coating and lead to a slow release. These results indicated that biomimetic hydroxyapatite coatings are suitable carriers for proteins. (orig.)

  6. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystal coating on biodegradable microspheres

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    Okada, Masahiro [Department of Bioengineering, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan); Furuzono, Tsutomu, E-mail: furuzono@ri.ncvc.go.jp [Department of Bioengineering, Advanced Medical Engineering Center, National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, 5-7-1 Fujishirodai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Nano-sized single crystals of calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) were uniformly coated on poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) microspheres through the ionic interaction between calcium ions on the HAp nanocrystal and carboxyl groups on the PLLA microsphere. In order to coat the substrate with HAp nanocrystals through ionic interaction, the surfaces of the PLLA microspheres were hydrolyzed in an alkaline aqueous solution at pH 11.0 for 1 h at room temperature. The interaction between the HAp nanocrystals and the carboxyl groups originating from PLLA end groups was estimated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The alkali-treated PLLA microspheres were coated with HAp nanocrystals by immersing the microspheres in an ethanol dispersion of HAp nanocrystals followed by washing in an ultrasonic bath.

  7. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  8. Reusable hydroxyapatite nanocrystal sensors for protein adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Ikoma, Toshiyuki; Hanagata, Nobutaka [Biomaterials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Chakarov, Dinko; Kasemo, Bengt [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteberg S-41296 (Sweden); Tanaka, Junzo, E-mail: tikoma@ceram.titech.ac.j [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    The repeatability of the adsorption and removal of fibrinogen and fetal bovine serum on hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystal sensors was investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) monitoring technique. The HAp nanocrystals were coated on a gold-coated quartz sensor by electrophoretic deposition. Proteins adsorbed on the HAp sensors were removed by (i) ammonia/hydrogen peroxide mixture (APM), (ii) ultraviolet light (UV), (iii) UV/APM, (iv) APM/UV and (v) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) treatments. FTIR spectra of the reused surfaces revealed that the APM and SDS treatments left peptide fragments or the proteins adsorbed on the surfaces, whereas the other methods successfully removed the proteins. The QCM-D measurements indicated that in the removal treatments, fibrinogen was slowly adsorbed in the first cycle because of the change in surface wettability revealed by contact angle measurements. The SDS treatment was not effective in removing proteins. The APM or UV treatment decreased the frequency shifts for the reused HAp sensors. The UV/APM treatment did not induce the frequency shifts but decreased the dissipation shifts. Therefore, we conclude that the APM/UV treatment is the most useful method for reproducing protein adsorption behavior on HAp sensors.

  9. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend enhanced biomimetic hydroxyapatite mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ahmed; El-Sakhawy, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    The current article investigates the effect of bioactive cellulose/wool blend on calcium phosphate biomimetic mineralization. Regenerated cellulose/wool blend was prepared by dissolution-regeneration of neat cellulose and natural wool in 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride [Bmim][Cl], as a solvent for the two polymers. Crystalline hydroxyapatite nanofibers with a uniform size, shape and dimension were formed after immersing the bioactive blend in simulated body fluid. The cytotoxicity of cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite was studied using animal fibroblast baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) and the result displayed good cytocompatability. This research work presents a green processing method for the development of novel cellulose/wool/hydroxyapatite hybrid materials for tissue engineering applications.

  10. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals: Simple preparation, characterization and formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box. 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P. O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fathi, Mohammadhossein [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dental Materials Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fereshteh, Zeinab [Biomaterials Research Group, Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-01

    Crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles and nanorods have been successfully synthesized via a simple precipitation method. To control the shape and particle size of HAP nanocrystals, coordination ligands derived from 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde were first prepared, characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H-NMR) spectroscopies, and finally applied in the synthesis process of HAP. On the other hand, the HAP nanocrystals were also characterized by several techniques including powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). According to the FE-SEM and TEM micrographs, it was found that the morphology and crystallinity of the HAP powders depended on the coordination mode of the ligands. - Highlights: • HAP nanobundles and nanoparticles have been prepared by a precipitation method. • Morphologies of HAP nanocrystals were controlled by different coordination ligands. • The formation mechanism of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was also considered.

  11. A Novel Nanocomposite Particle of Hydroxyapatite and Silk Fibroin: Biomimetic Synthesis and Its Biocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Niu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel bone-like biomaterial of hydroxyapatite (HAP and silk fibroin (SF composite was developed by biomimetic synthesis. The composite was precipitated from drops of Ca(OH2 suspension and H3PO4 solution with SF. With this method, the HAP nanocrystals were obtained by self-assembling on a SF surface whose c-axis was aligned with the long-axis direction of SF in microstructures; this shares the same misconstrues of collagen and HAP with that in the natural bone. The HAP/SF composite then demonstrated that it could promote osteoblast proliferation in vitro and new bone formation in vivo. The novel biomaterial is a promising material for bone replacement and regeneration.

  12. The precursors effects on biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar; Aydınoğlu, Aysu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, effects of the starting material on chemical, physical, and biological properties of biomimetic hydroxyapatite ceramic powders (BHA) were investigated. Characterization and chemical analysis of BHA powders were performed by using XRD, FT-IR, and ICP-AES. Microstructural features such as size and morphology of the resulting BHA powders were characterized by using BET, nano particle sizer, pycnometer, and SEM. Additionally, biological properties of the BHA ceramic powders were also investigated by using water-soluble tetrazolium salts test (WST-1). According to the chemical analysis of BHA ceramic powders, chemical structures of ceramics which are prepared under different conditions and by using different starting materials show differences. Ceramic powders which are produced at 80°C are mainly composed of hydroxyapatite, dental hydroxyapatite (contain Na and Mg elements in addition to Ca), and calcium phosphate sulfide. However, these structures are altered at high temperatures such as 900°C depending on the features of starting materials and form various calcium phosphate ceramics and/or their mixtures such as Na-Mg-hydroxyapatite, hydroxyapatite, Mg-Whitlockit, and chloroapatite. In vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that amorphous ceramics produced at 80°C and ceramics containing chloroapatite structure as main or secondary phases were found to be extremely cytotoxic. Furthermore, cell culture studies showed that highly crystalline pure hydroxyapatite structures were extremely cytotoxic due to their high crystallinity values. Consequently, the current study indicates that the selection of starting materials which can be used in the production of calcium phosphate ceramics is very important. It is possible to produce calcium phosphate ceramics which have sufficient biocompatibility at physiological pH values and by using appropriate starting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biomimetic Synthesis of Noble Metal Nanocrystals and the Mechanism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Lingyan

    Nanostructured materials with dimensions reaching the nanoscale possess novel properties different from their bulk counterparts. Engineering nanomaterials to exploit their improved functions show important applications in catalysis, electrocatalysis, electronics, optoelectronics, and energy devices. One of the challenges to date is to develop methods for producing nanomaterials in a controllable and predictable fashion. We seek to develop novel biomimetic synthetic protocols for programmable nanomaterial synthesis, i.e., using biomolecules with specific material recognition properties to manipulate nanomaterial morphologies and structures. Starting with three Pt binding peptides with distinct recognition properties, i.e., a Pt material specific peptide BP7A and two Pt facet specific peptides T7 (Pt {100} facet specific) and S7 (Pt {111} facet specific), we demonstrate a rational creation of Pt bipyramids, a new type of shape for Pt nanocrystals. The BP7A peptide is found to be able to introduce twinning during Pt nanocrystal growth. We use it to generate single twinned seeds for Pt nanocrystals. Together with targeted facet stabilization using T7/S7 peptides, Pt {100} bipyramid and {111} bipyramid are successfully synthesized for the first time. We further utilize the twin introducing property of the BP7A peptide to generate ultrathin Pt nanowire with high twin densities. We show that the Pt nanowire possesses higher electrocatalytic activity and durability in oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reactions due to its one-dimensional nanostructure and the presence of dense twin defects, demonstrating the concept of defect engineering in nanocrystals as a strategy in the design of novel electrocatalyst. The organic-inorganic interface is a key issue in many fields including colloidal syntheses and biomimetics, the understanding of which can enable the design of new material synthetic strategies. We aim to understand how the Pt binding peptides modulate the

  14. Removal of formaldehyde by hydroxyapatite layer biomimetically deposited on polyamide film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Takahiro; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Tanihara, Masao; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Sakaguchi, Yoshimitsu; Konagaya, Shigeji

    2006-07-01

    Some harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as formaldehyde, are regulated atmospheric pollutants. Therefore, development of a material to remove these VOCs is required. We focused on hydroxyapatite, which had been biomimetically coated on a polyamide film, as an adsorbent and found that formaldehyde was successfully removed by this adsorbent. The amount of formaldehyde adsorbed increased with the area of the polyamide film occupied by hydroxyapatite. The amount of adsorbed formaldehyde and its rate of adsorption were larger for hydroxyapatite deposited on polyamide film than for the commercially available calcined hydroxyapatite powder. This high adsorption ability is achieved by the use of nanosized particles of hydroxyapatite with low crystallinity and containing a large number of active surface sites. Therefore, hydroxyapatite biomimetically coated on organic substrates can become a candidate material for removing harmful VOCs such as formaldehyde.

  15. Recombinant human-like collagen directed growth of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Y.; Cui, F. Z.

    2006-05-01

    Bones are biocomposites with hierarchical structure that require controlled mineral deposition during their self-assembly to form tissues with unique mechanical properties. Type I collagen proteins, acidic extracellular matrix proteins, play a critical role in mineral formation and many researches on artificial bones have been made inspired by nature using type I collagen derived from animal tissues. Here we report that recombinant human-like type I collagen, an acidic protein, can direct growth of hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals in vitro in the form of self-assembly of nano-fibrils of mineralized collagen resembling extracellular matrix. The mineralized collagen fibrils aligned parallel to each other to form mineralized collagen fibers. HA nanocrystals grew on the surface of these collagen fibrils with the c-axis of nanocrystals of HA orienting along the longitudinal axis of the fibrils. These artificial analogs of bone have a potential clinical application in bone repair.

  16. Assessment of bone ingrowth potential of biomimetic hydroxyapatite and brushite coated porous E-beam structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Eufrasio, T.S.; Hannink, G.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Buma, P.

    2011-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of biomimetic hydroxyapatite and brushite coatings applied on porous E-beam structure was examined in goats and compared to a similar uncoated porous structure and a conventional titanium plasma spray coating. Specimens were implanted in the iliac crest of goats for a per

  17. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela, E-mail: gciobanu03@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Rd., no. 63, zip: 700050, Iasi (Romania); Ciobanu, Octavian [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Universitatii Str., no. 16, zip: 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D{sub 3}, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm.

  18. Induction of bone formation by smart biphasic hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate biomimetic matrices in the non-human primate Papio ursinus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ripamonti, U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term studies in the non-human primate Chacma baboon Papio ursinus were set to investigate the induction of bone formation by biphasic hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (HA/β-TCP) biomimetic matrices. HA/β-TCP biomimetic matrices in a pre...

  19. Development of Biomimetic Needle-like Apatite Nanocrystals by a Simple New Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie WEI; Yubao LI; Yi ZUO; Xueling PENG; Li ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    A new method of calcium nitrate and sodium phosphate as reactants was employed to prepare biomimetic apatite nanocrystals by a simple heating treatment in water. The structure and properties of the apatite crystals were investigated by TEM, XRD, IR, ICP and TG. It is found that the apatite nanocrystals contain OH-, CO32-, Na+ and HPO~- ions in their crystal structure. The crystal water is removed during heating from 200℃ to 400℃. CO32-and HPO~- are decomposed at 600℃ to 800℃, also there is lattice water lost at this temperature stage. The morphology of the apatite nanocrystals is needle-like with a length less than 80 nm. The size and crystallinity of the apatite nanocrystals increase with water treatment temperature and time. Compared to the apatite crystals sintered at 800℃, water treated apatite nanocrystals are poorly crystallized apatite. The results indicate that the apatite nanocrystals have similarity in composition, structure, morphology and crystallinity to that of bone apatite crystals. It can be used to make apatite crystals/polymer biomimetic bone repair materials or for other biomedical applications.

  20. Biomimetic properties of an injectable chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Zhi [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu Bo; Li Songjian [Department of Orthopedics, Zhujiang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China)

    2011-04-08

    To meet the challenges of designing an injectable scaffold and regenerating bone with complex three-dimensional (3D) structures, a biomimetic and injectable hydrogel scaffold based on nano-hydroxyapatite (HA), collagen (Col) and chitosan (Chi) is synthesized. The chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (Chi/HA/Col) solution rapidly forms a stable gel at body temperature. It shows some features of natural bone both in main composition and microstructure. The Chi/HA/Col system can be expected as a candidate for workable systemic minimally invasive scaffolds with surface properties similar to physiological bone based on scanning electron microscopic (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) results.

  1. Biomimetic deposition of hydroxyapatite on a synthetic polypeptide with beta sheet structure in a solution mimicking body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Akari; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ogata, Shin-ichi; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Tanihara, Masao

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of a hydroxyapatite layer with similar structure to bone mineral is an attractive approach to the fabrication of bioactive coating layers to achieve direct bonding to living bone. To get successful coating of a hydroxyapatite layer on an organic polymer using a biomimetic solution, it is essential to find organic substrates that can effectively induce heterogeneous nucleation of hydroxyapatite after exposure to the body environment. Our previous study showed that sericin, a type of silk protein, has the ability to induce hydroxyapatite nucleation in a biomimetic solution when the sericin has a beta sheet structure. To confirm the effectiveness of the beta sheet structure in hydroxyapatite nucleation, we focused on investigating hydroxyapatite deposition on a synthetic polypeptide with a beta sheet structure in a biomimetic solution. The beta sheet forming polypeptides with and without carboxyl groups, poly(FE)(3)FG, poly(FQ)(3)FG, poly(LE)(3)LG and poly(LQ)(3)LG, were synthesized in this study. All the polypeptides had mainly beta sheet structure. After soaking the polypeptide films in 1.5SBF, which has 1.5 times the inorganic ion concentrations of human blood plasma, hydroxyapatite formed on the surfaces of the polypeptides with carboxyl groups, poly(FE)(3)FG and poly(LE)(3)LG, within 2 days, but not on those without carboxyl groups, poly(FQ)(3)FG and poly(LQ)(3)LG. We confirmed that the beta sheet structure was effective for hydroxyapatite nucleation even in the synthetic polypeptide. This finding is useful for the future design of organic polymers that can effectively induce nucleation of hydroxyapatite.

  2. On the synthesis of tailored biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoplates through a bioinspired approach in the presence of collagen or chitosan and L-arginine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsetsekou, A., E-mail: athtse@metal.ntua.gr; Brasinika, D.; Vaou, V.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.

    2014-10-01

    Controlling the structure of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals is vital for acquiring a consistent product. In an effort to synthesize crystals mimicking the morphology of natural bone's apatite, a bioinspired process was developed based on the use of a natural biomacromolecule, collagen or chitosan, in conjunction with L-arginine to direct the formation of hydroxyapatite from H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Ca(OH){sub 2}. Different cases were investigated by employing various concentrations of the precursors and two molar ratios of Ca/P 1/1 and 10/6. The reaction was carried out at basic pH conditions and at biomimetic temperature (40 °C). The resulting aqueous suspensions were characterized in terms of their rheological behavior, whereas the derived powders were fully evaluated by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and Raman spectroscopy. The analysis showed that in all cases, the only phase detected was hydroxyapatite of a plate-like morphology very similar to that of natural apatite. The homogeneity of the morphology and the crystal size distribution depend on the precursors' final concentration with the mean size ranging from 5 nm up to 20 nm. The powder that demonstrated the best characteristics in terms of homogeneity was that produced in the presence of collagen for molar ratio of Ca/P 1/1. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite nanoplates similar to those of bone's apatite were developed. • A novel approach simulating the biomineralization environment was developed. • L-Arginine was combined with collagen or chitosan to direct HAp nucleation. • Depending on reaction conditions a very homogeneous nanostructure is attained.

  3. Cell adhesion and tissue response to hydroxyapatite nanocrystal-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fabric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Hiroshi; Okada, Masahiro; Masuda, Miwa; Ueki, Mitsuki; Narama, Isao; Kitao, Satoshi; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Furuzono, Tsutomu; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2009-09-01

    Cell adhesion and tissue response to poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) fabric coated with nanosized hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals were studied. The HAp nanocrystals were prepared by the wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an anti-sintering agent to prevent calcination-induced sintering. After the PLLA fabric was hydrolyzed with an alkaline aqueous solution, the HAp nanocrystals were coated via ionic interaction between the calcium ions on the HAp and the carboxyl groups on the alkali-treated PLLA. The PLLA surface uniformly coated with the HAp nanocrystals was observed by scanning electron microscope. The ionic interaction between the HAp and the PLLA was estimated by FT-IR. Improved cell adhesion to the HAp nanocrystal-coated surface was demonstrated by in vitro testing using a mouse fibroblast cell line L929. Furthermore, reduced inflammatory response to the HAp nanocrystal-coated PLLA fabric (as compared with a non-treated one) was confirmed by a subcutaneous implantation test with rats. Thus the HAp nanocrystal-coated PLLA developed has possible efficacy as an implant material in the fields of general and orthopedic surgery, and as a cell scaffold in tissue engineering.

  4. Hydroxyapatite coating by biomimetic method on titanium alloy using concentrated SBF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bharati; M K Sinha; D Basu

    2005-10-01

    This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite on titanium alloy at ambient temperature. In the present study, coating was obtained by soaking the substrate in a 5 times concentrated simulated body fluid (5XSBF) solution for different periods of time with and without the use of CaO–SiO2 based glass as a possible source of nucleating agent of apatite formation. Optical microscopic and SEM observations revealed the deposition of Ca–P layer on the titanium alloy by both the methods. Thickness of coating was found to increase with the increase in immersion time. The use of glass did not help the formation of apatite nuclei on the substrate and the coating obtained by this method was also not uniform. EDX analysis indicated that the coating consisted of Ca–P based apatite globules, mostly in agglomerated form, and its crystallinity was poor as revealed by XRD.

  5. Development of Microspheres Covered with Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Cell Scaffold for Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Terada, Takahiro; Kogai, Yasumichi; Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-06-01

    We prepared poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) cell scaffolds coated with hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals with 50-100 nm in diameter via the Pickering emulsion method. Our cell scaffolds were composed of biodegradable polymers and HAp nanocrystals as a core and shell, respectively. The scaffolds were spherical but displayed uneven shapes when altering a shear speed of homogenization during syntheses. The surface coverage of HAp nanocrystals was examined because the HAp-coating ratio for the scaffolds was an important factor as cell scaffolds in order to enhance cell adhesion. On the basis of scanning electron microscopy observations and thermogravimetric analyses, it was found that the cell scaffolds showed distorted morphologies, and the HAp-coating ratio decreased with increasing the shear speed in the synthesis because shear stress influenced shapes of the scaffolds.

  6. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C.M. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Faria, Amanda N. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia-Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Ramos, Ana P., E-mail: anapr@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CaCO{sub 3} continuous films were deposited on titanium discs using a biomimetic approach. • The coatings origin hydroxyapatite when immersed in simulated body fluid. • The wettability and the free energy of the surfaces were increased after the treatment. • The coated titanium discs are bioactive and non-toxic to osteoblasts. - Abstract: CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO{sub 3} deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO{sub 3} continuous films on Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca{sup 2+}, exposed to CO{sub 2} (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO{sub 3} film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γ{sub s}) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γ{sub s} of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO{sub 3} thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  7. Biomimetic helical rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium for improving orthopedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Zhang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lijie Zhang1, Yupeng Chen2, Jose Rodriguez3, Hicham Fenniri3, Thomas J Webster11Division of Engineering, 2Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Natural bone consists of hard nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA in a nanostructured protein-based soft hydrogel template (ie, mostly collagen. For this reason, nanostructured HA has been an intriguing coating material on traditionally used titanium for improving orthopedic applications. In addition, helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs, newly developed materials which form through the self-assembly process of DNA base pair building blocks in body solutions, are soft nanotubes with a helical architecture that mimics natural collagen. Thus, the objective of this in vitro study was for the first time to combine the promising attributes of HRNs and nanocrystalline HA on titanium and assess osteoblast (bone-forming cell functions. Different sizes of nanocrystalline HA were synthesized in this study through a wet chemical precipitation process following either hydrothermal treatment or sintering. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that HRNs aligned with nanocrystalline HA, which indicates a high affinity between both components. Some of the nanocrystalline HA formed dense coatings with HRNs on titanium. More importantly, results demonstrated enhanced osteoblast adhesion on the HRN/nanocrystalline HA-coated titanium compared with conventional uncoated titanium. Among all the HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings tested, osteoblast adhesion was the greatest when HA nanometer particle size was the smallest. In this manner, this study demonstrated for the first time that biomimetic HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings on titanium were cytocompatible for osteoblasts and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic implants.Keywords: helical rosette nanotubes

  8. Biomimetic Synthesis of Calcium-Deficient Hydroxyapatite in a Natural Hydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchens, Stacy A [ORNL; Benson, Roberto S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Evans, Barbara R [ORNL; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    A novel composite material consisting of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CdHAP) biomimetically deposited in a bacterial cellulose hydrogel was synthesized and characterized. Cellulose produced by Gluconacetobacter hansenii was purified and sequentially incubated in solutions of calcium chloride followed by sodium phosphate dibasic. A substantial amount of apatite (50-90% of total dry weight) was homogeneously incorporated throughout the hydrogel after this treatment. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) showed that CdHAP crystallites had formed in the cellulose. XRD further demonstrated that the CdHAP was comprised of 10-50nm anisotropic crystallites elongated in the c-axis, similar to natural bone apatite. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy demonstrated that hydroxyl IR bands of the cellulose shifted to lower wave numbers indicating that a coordinate bond had possibly formed between the CdHAP and the cellulose hydroxyl groups. FTIR also suggested that the CdHAP had formed from an octacalcium phosphate precursor similar to physiological bone. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images confirmed that uniform ?1 mm spherical CdHAP particles comprised of nanosized crystallites with a lamellar morphology had formed in the cellulose. The synthesis of the composite mimics the natural biomineralization of bone indicating that bacterial cellulose can be used as a template for biomimetic apatite formation. This composite may have potential use as an orthopedic biomaterial.

  9. Biomimetic design of a bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone healing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, Kristen A., E-mail: kazimmer@vt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); LeBlanc, Jill M.; Sheets, Kevin T.; Fox, Robert W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Gatenholm, Paul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the design and synthesis of bacterial cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites for bone healing applications using a biomimetic approach. Bacterial cellulose (BC) with various surface morphologies (pellicles and tubes) was negatively charged by the adsorption of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) to initiate nucleation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (cdHAp). The cdHAp was grown in vitro via dynamic simulated body fluid (SBF) treatments over a one week period. Characterization of the mineralized samples was done with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The amount of cdHAp observed varied among different samples. XPS demonstrated that the atomic presence of calcium and phosphorus ranged from 0.44 at.% to 7.71 at.% Ca and 0.27 at.% to 11.18 at.% P. The Ca/P overall ratio ranged from 1.22 to 1.92. FESEM images showed that the cdHAp crystal size increased with increasing nanocellulose fibril density. To determine the viability of the scaffolds in vitro, the morphology and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells was analyzed using fluorescence microscopy and alkaline phosphatase gene expression. The presence of cdHAp crystals on BC surfaces resulted in increased cell attachment.

  10. Biomimetic three-dimensional nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotube chitosan nanocomposite for bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Im O

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Owen Im1, Jian Li2, Mian Wang2, Lijie Grace Zhang2,3, Michael Keidar2,31Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC; 2Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 3Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Nanotechnology, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USABackground: Many shortcomings exist in the traditional methods of treating bone defects, such as donor tissue shortages for autografts and disease transmission for allografts. The objective of this study was to design a novel three-dimensional nanostructured bone substitute based on magnetically synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT, biomimetic hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite, and a biocompatible hydrogel (chitosan. Both nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT have a biomimetic nanostructure, excellent osteoconductivity, and high potential to improve the load-bearing capacity of hydrogels.Methods: Specifically, three-dimensional porous chitosan scaffolds with different concentrations of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and SWCNT were created to support the growth of human osteoblasts (bone-forming cells using a lyophilization procedure. Two types of SWCNT were synthesized in an arc discharge with a magnetic field (B-SWCNT and without a magnetic field (N-SWCNT for improving bone regeneration.Results: Nanocomposites containing magnetically synthesized B-SWCNT had superior cytocompatibility properties when compared with nonmagnetically synthesized N-SWCNT. B-SWCNT have much smaller diameters and are twice as long as their nonmagnetically prepared counterparts, indicating that the dimensions of carbon nanotubes can have a substantial effect on osteoblast attachment.Conclusion: This study demonstrated that a chitosan nanocomposite with both B-SWCNT and 20% nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite could achieve a higher osteoblast density when compared with the other experimental groups, thus making this nanocomposite

  11. Hierarcially biomimetic bone materials: from nanometer to millimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG W.; CUI F. Z.; LIAO S. S.

    2001-01-01

    @@ The bone composite was produced by biomimetic synthesis. It shows some features of natural bone in both composition and microstructure. And the collagen moleculars and the nano-crystal hydroxyapatite assemble into ultrastructure similar to natural bone. It possesses porous structure with porosity from 100μm to 500μm after mixed with PLA (poly lactic acid).

  12. Low temperature synthesis and characterization of carbonated hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Aneela; Asghar, Muhammad Nadeem; Kanwal, Qudsia; Kazmi, Mohsin; Sadiqa, Ayesha

    2016-08-01

    Carbonate substituted hydroxyapatite (CHA) nanorods were synthesized via coprecipitation method from aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and diammonium hydrogen phosphate (with urea as carbonate ion source) in the presence of ammonium hydroxide solution at 70 °C at the conditions of pH 11. The obtained powders were physically characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), and FTIR and Raman spectroscopy. The particle size was evaluated by Dynamic light scattering (DLS). The chemical structural analysis of as prepared sample was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After ageing for 12 h, and heat treatment at 1000 °C for 1 h, the product was obtained as highly crystalline nanorods of CHA.

  13. Surface modification of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals by grafting polymers containing phosphonic acid groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung Woo; Lee, Hong Jae; Kim, Kyung Ja; Kim, Hyun-Min; Lee, Sang Cheon

    2006-12-01

    A novel approach for the surface modification of hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals is described by grafting polymerization of vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) using a redox initiating system in an aqueous media. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and XRD analyses confirmed the modification reaction on HAp surfaces. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP MS) showed that the Ca/P molar ratio decreased from 1.67 to 1.36 with increasing the feed VPA amount. Zeta potentials of unmodified HAp and modified HAp in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions (pH 7.4, ionic strength = 10 mM) were negative and decreased with increasing the amount of grafted PVPA. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements and time-dependent phase monitoring indicated that the colloidal stability of modified HAp over unmodified HAp in water dramatically increased and tended to exist as single nanocrystals without aggregation.

  14. Silica enhanced formation of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 deg. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadjadi, M.S., E-mail: m.s.sadjad@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Sciences and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, H.R. [Department of Chemistry, Sciences and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meskinfam, M. [Department of Chemistry, Tonekabon Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tonekabon (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Shahid Beheshti, Eveen Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-17

    Highlights: {yields} We report on fast formation of hexagonal nanocrystals of calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) in silica-containing simulated body fluid solution at 37 deg. C. {yields} Bioactivity and biodegradability of TCP precursor have been confirmed by the dissolution of TCP and formation of a bone like layer of new HA nanoparticles outside of the precursor after 24 h soaking in SBF solution. {yields} Successive nucleation and formation of tiny hexagonal HA nanoplates and nanorods have been confirmed by TEM results after 24 h soaking of TCP in silica-containing BSF solution. - Abstract: The chemical modification of implant (prosthesis) surfaces is being investigated worldwide for improving the fixation of orthopaedic and dental implants. The main goal in this surface modification approach is to achieve a faster bone growth and chemical bonding of the implant to the newly generated and/or remodeled bone. In this work, we report fast formation of hexagonal nanocrystals of calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) in simulated body fluid (SBF, inorganic components of human blood plasma) solutions at 37 deg. C, using calcium phosphate (TCP) and sodium silicate as precursors. Characterization and chemical analysis of the synthesized powders were performed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated enhanced nucleation and formation of bone like layer of HA nanocrystals at the surface of TCP nanoparticles and occurrence of HA nanocrystals during 24 h soaking of TCP in SBF solution containing silica ions. The average size of a nanoparticle, using Scherrer formula, was found to be 18.2 nm.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of novel biomimetic PLLA/cellulose/hydroxyapatite nanocomposite for bone repair applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eftekhari, Samin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); El Sawi, Ihab; Bagheri, Zahra Shaghayegh [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); Turcotte, Ginette [Department of Chemical Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada); Bougherara, Habiba, E-mail: habiba.bougherara@ryerson.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and characterize a novel biomimetic nanocomposite that closely mimics the properties of real bone such as morphology, composition and mechanical characteristics. This novel porous nanocomposite is composed of cotton-sourced cellulose microcrystals, hydroxyapatite nanoparticles and poly L-lactide acid. A unique combination of commonly used fabrication procedures has been developed including pre-treatment of particles using a coupling agent. The effect of various weight ratios of the reinforcing agents was evaluated to assess their influence on the chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties of the nanocomposites. The prepared nanocomposites were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and compression testing. Our results indicated the presence of molecular interactions between all components leading to an increase of the crystallinity of the polymer from 50% to 80%. Compression test results revealed that increasing the weight ratio of microcrystalline cellulose/poly L-lactide acid and hydroxyapatite/poly L-lactide acid from 0.1 to 0.5 enhanced the compressive yield stress from 0.127 to 2.2 MPa and The Young's modulus from 6.6 to 38 MPa, respectively. It was found that the fabricated nanocomposites are comparable with the trabecular bone from compositional, structural, and mechanical point of view. - Highlights: • Fabrication of PLLA/HA/cellulose composites that mimic the spongeous bone • Homogenous dispersion of the reinforcing agents in the PLLA matrix was attained. • More efficient interface between the PLLA and the reinforcing agents was achieved. • Preliminary in vitro biocompatibility test showed the nontoxicity of the composite. • The crystallinity, the compressive strength and modulus were investigated.

  16. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C. M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-05-01

    CaCO3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO3 continuous films on Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca2+, exposed to CO2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γs) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γs of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  17. Biomimetic helical rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium for improving orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Yupeng; Rodriguez, Jose; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Natural bone consists of hard nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) in a nanostructured protein-based soft hydrogel template (ie, mostly collagen). For this reason, nanostructured HA has been an intriguing coating material on traditionally used titanium for improving orthopedic applications. In addition, helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), newly developed materials which form through the self-assembly process of DNA base pair building blocks in body solutions, are soft nanotubes with a helical architecture that mimics natural collagen. Thus, the objective of this in vitro study was for the first time to combine the promising attributes of HRNs and nanocrystalline HA on titanium and assess osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions. Different sizes of nanocrystalline HA were synthesized in this study through a wet chemical precipitation process following either hydrothermal treatment or sintering. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that HRNs aligned with nanocrystalline HA, which indicates a high affinity between both components. Some of the nanocrystalline HA formed dense coatings with HRNs on titanium. More importantly, results demonstrated enhanced osteoblast adhesion on the HRN/nanocrystalline HA-coated titanium compared with conventional uncoated titanium. Among all the HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings tested, osteoblast adhesion was the greatest when HA nanometer particle size was the smallest. In this manner, this study demonstrated for the first time that biomimetic HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings on titanium were cytocompatible for osteoblasts and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic implants.

  18. Ribose mediated crosslinking of collagen-hydroxyapatite hybrid scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration using biomimetic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, Gopal Shankar; Gostynska, Natalia; Campodoni, Elisabetta; Dapporto, Massimiliano; Montesi, Monica; Panseri, Silvia; Tampieri, Anna; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio; Sprio, Simone; Sandri, Monica

    2017-08-01

    This study explores for the first time the application of ribose as a highly biocompatible agent for the crosslinking of hybrid mineralized constructs, obtained by bio-inspired mineralization of self-assembling Type I collagen matrix with magnesium-doped-hydroxyapatite nanophase, towards a biomimetic mineralized 3D scaffolds (MgHA/Coll) with excellent compositional and structural mimicry of bone tissue. To this aim, two different crosslinking mechanisms in terms of pre-ribose glycation (before freeze drying) and post-ribose glycation (after freeze drying) were investigated. The obtained results explicate that with controlled freeze-drying, highly anisotropic porous structures with opportune macro-micro porosity are obtained. The physical-chemical features of the scaffolds characterized by XRD, FTIR, ICP and TGA demonstrated structural mimicry analogous to the native bone. The influence of ribose greatly assisted in decreasing solubility and increased enzymatic resistivity of the scaffolds. In addition, enhanced mechanical behaviour in response to compressive forces was achieved. Preliminary cell culture experiments reported good cytocompatibility with extensive cell adhesion, proliferation and colonization. Overall, scaffolds developed by pre-ribose glycation process are preferred, as the related crosslinking technique is more facile and robust to obtain functional scaffolds. As a proof of concept, we have demonstrated that ribose crosslinking is cost-effective, safe and functionally effective. This study also offers new insights and opportunities in developing promising scaffolds for bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals functionalized with alendronate as bioactive components for bone implant coatings to decrease osteoclastic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosco, Ruggero; Iafisco, Michele; Tampieri, Anna; Jansen, John A.; Leeuwenburgh, Sander C. G.; van den Beucken, Jeroen J. J. P.

    2015-02-01

    The integration of bone implants within native bone tissue depends on periprosthetic bone quality, which is severely decreased in osteoporotic patients. In this work, we have synthesized bone-like hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nHA) using an acid-base neutralization reaction and analysed their physicochemical properties. Subsequently, we have functionalized the nHA with alendronate (nHAALE), a well-known bisphosphonate drug used for the treatment of osteoporosis. An in vitro osteoclastogenesis test was carried out to evaluate the effect of nHAALE on the formation of osteoclast-like cells from monocytic precursor cells (i.e. RAW264.7 cell line) showing that nHAALE significantly promoted apoptosis of osteoclast-like cells. Subsequently, nHA and nHAALE were deposited on titanium disks using electrospray deposition (ESD), for which characterisation of the deposited coatings confirmed the presence of alendronate in nHAALE coatings with nanoscale thickness of about 700 nm. These results indicate that alendronate linked to hydroxyapatite nanocrystals has therapeutic potential and nHAALE can be considered as an appealing coating constituent material for orthopaedic and oral implants for application in osteoporotic patients.

  20. Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Growth on Functionalized Surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-Zr-Nb Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypchuk, Ie V; Petranovskaya, A L; Gorbyk, P P; Korduban, A M; Markovsky, P E; Ivasishin, O M

    2015-12-01

    A biomimetic approach for coating titanium-containing alloys with hydroxyapatite (HA) is reported in the article. Two types of Ti-containing alloys were chosen as an object for coating: Ti-6Al-4V (recommended for orthopedic application) and a novel highly biocompatible Ti-Zr-Nb alloy, with good mechanical compatibility due to a modulus that is more close to that of human bones (E ≈ 50 GPa instead of 110 GPa in Ti-6Al-4V). Coating process was carried out in a 10×-concentrated simulated body fluid (SBF)-synthetic analog of human body plasma. The effect of oxidized and carboxylated alloy surface on formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite has been studied. By XRD, we found influence of thermal conditions on HA crystal formation and size. SEM images and Fourier transform infrared confirmed that hydroxyapatite with different morphology, crystallinity, and Ca/P ratio formed on metallic surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that in the Ti-6AL-4V sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 0.97, whereas in the Ti-Zr-Nb sample the observed Ca/P ratio reach 1.15.

  1. Obtaining hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium by the biomimetic method; Obtencion de recubrimientos de hidroxiapatita sobre titanio mediante el metodo biomimetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paz, A.; Martin, Y.; Pazos, L. M.; Parodi, M. B.; Ybarra, G. O.; Gonzalez, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, a study about the deposition of hydroxyapatite on a titanium substrate employing the biomimetic method is presented. A solution with high content of calcium and phosphorus (SCS) was used. In addition, activation of titanium with hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid and a subsequent heat treatment was performed. The characterization of materials used and the coating obtained was carried out by Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). As a result of the activation processes a hydrated titanium oxide was formed. On the active surface, a coating of hydroxyapatite was obtained after a period of 24 h, which has a thickness of about 2-4 {mu}m. (Author) 21 refs.

  2. Biomimetic nanocomposites of carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite: novel three dimensional load bearing bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Subhadra; Sinha, Arvind

    2014-03-01

    An innovative biomimetic synthesis of novel three dimensional micro/macro porous carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocomposites having four systematically different compositions has been established for its possible application as a load bearing synthetic bone graft. Our process, being in situ, involves a simple and cost effective route akin to a matrix mediated biomineralization process. Developed synthesis route not only controls the size of HA particles in the range of 15-50 nm, embedded in CMC matrix, but also assists in the formation of a mechanically strong three dimensional nanocomposite structures due to physical cross linking of HA impregnated CMC matrix. The process does not involve any toxic cross linker and works at near ambient conditions. The nanocomposites are systematically structurally and mechanically characterized using various techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), solid state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Universal mechanical test. It reveals that the ionic/polar or electrostatic interactions are the main driving force for formation of load bearing three dimensional nanocomposites via a process similar to matrix mediated biomineralization. Compressive strength and compressive modulus of nanocomposites, being in the range of 1.74-12 MPa and 157-330 MPa, respectively, meet the desired range of compressive strength for the synthetic grafts used in cancellous bone. An increase in the compressive strength with increase in the porosity has been an interesting observation in the present study. In vitro cytotoxicity of the synthesized nanocomposites has been evaluated using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) isolated from Wistar rat.

  3. Rapidly in situ forming biodegradable hydrogels by combining alginate and hydroxyapatite nanocrystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The in situ forming biodegradable polymer scaffolds are important biomaterials for tissue engineering and drug delivery.Hydrogels derived from natural proteins and polysaccharides are ideal tissue engineering scaffolds since they resemble the extracellular matrices of the tissue comprising various amino acids and sugar based macromolecules.This work presented an injectable system from partially oxidized alginate and hydroxyapatite(HAP) nanocrystal for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications.In situ release of calcium cations from HAP nanocrystal was adopted through lowering the pH with slow hydrolysis of D-glucono-δ-lactone(GDL) and homogeneous alginate gels were formulated as scaffolds with defined dimensions.The gelation time could be controlled to be in 10-15 min.The SEM observations confirmed the porous 3D hydrogel structure with interconnected pores ranging from 20 to 300 μm and the HAP particles dispersed in the scaffolds uniformly.The potential applications such as tissue engineering scaffold and injectable drug delivery system were demonstrated by subcutaneous implant test in test rats.

  4. Biomimetic hierarchical growth and self-assembly of hydroxyapatite/titania nanocomposite coatings and their biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathanael, A. Joseph, E-mail: ajosephnc@yahoo.com [Department of Nano, Medical and Polymer Materials, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Im, Young Min [Department of Nano, Medical and Polymer Materials, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Tae Hwan, E-mail: taehwanoh@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Nano, Medical and Polymer Materials, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Yuvakkumar, R. [Department of Nanomaterials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore (India)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel ‘bowtie’ like biomimetic HA/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite coatings were prepared. • Simple sol–gel method was used to achieve this novel structure. • Details analysis confirms the formation of bowtie like structure in many ways. • Their functional analysis showed their enhanced activity for biomedical application. - Abstract: This article describes a systematic study of the biomimetic hierarchical growth of hydroxyapatite (HA)/titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanocomposite layered coatings applied by a simple sol–gel dip coating method. Highly stable HA and TiO{sub 2} sols were prepared prior to inducing biomimetic hierarchical growth. Initially, the samples formed a small leaf like structure; however, increasing the dipping cycle resulted in formation of an elongated seed-like structure. Increasing the number of dipping cycles further resulted in a ‘bowtie’ or straw-bale like nanowire structure with a length of 500 nm and a width of 100 nm. Each nanowire like structure had a width of very few nanometers. The crystalline structures, micro/nano structures and surface properties of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy respectively. In vitro cellular assays revealed that the growth of the cells in the ‘bowtie’ like structure improved over other samples.

  5. in situ ring-opening polymerization of hydroxyapatite/poly(ethylene adipate)--(ethylene terephthalate) biomimetic composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Punnama Siriphannon; Pathavuth Monvisade

    2013-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite/poly(ethylene adipate)--poly(ethylene terephthalate) biomaterials (HAp/PEA--PET) have been prepared by ring opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic oligo(ethylene adipate)--oligo(ethylene terephthalate) (C-OEA--C-OET) in the porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) scaffolds at 250 °C for 24 h under vacuum. The content of ROP-PEA--PET in the HAp/PEA--PET composite was about 20 wt% with the values of number average molecular weight ($\\bar{M}$n) and weight average molecular weight ($\\bar{M}$W) of 3380 and 7160 g/mol, respectively. Compressive strength and modulus of the HAp/PEA--PET composites were about 29 and 246 MPa, respectively. These mechanical properties were higher than those of the porous HAp templates and natural cancellous bone. In vitro bioactivity of the HAp/PEA--PET composites was studied by soaking in simulated body fluid (SBF) under the flowing system at the rate of 130 mL/day for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The formation of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals was observed on the composite surfaces through the consumption of calcium and phosphorus from the SBF solution, indicating the bioactivity of these HAp/PEA--PET composites. These results indicated the competency of HAp/PEA--PET composites for biomedical applications.

  6. Hydroxyapatite coating on stainless steel by biomimetic method; Recobrimento de hidroxiapatita em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos pelo metodo biomimetico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, V.M.; Maia Filho, A.L.M.; Silva, G.; Sousa, E. de; Cardoso, K.R., E-mail: katiarc@univap.b [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (IPD/UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento

    2010-07-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are widely used in implants due to their high mechanical strength and corrosion, however, are not able to connect to bone tissue and were classified as bioinert. The calcium phosphate ceramics such as hydroxyapatite (HA) are bioactive materials and create strong chemical bonds with bone tissue, but its brittleness and low fracture toughness render its use in conditions of high mechanical stress. The coating of steel with the bioactive ceramics such as HA, combines the properties of interest of both materials, accelerating bone formation around the implant. In this study, austenitic stainless steel samples were coated with apatite using the biomimetic method. The effect of three different surface conditions of steel and the immersion time in the SBF solution on the coating was evaluated. The samples were characterized by SEM, EDS and X-ray diffraction. (author)

  7. Evaluation of zinc-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres for the construction of a novel biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weilin; Sun, Tuan-Wei; Qi, Chao; Ding, Zhenyu; Zhao, Huakun; Zhao, Shichang; Shi, Zhongmin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Daoyun; He, Yaohua

    2017-01-01

    Biomaterials with high osteogenic activity are desirable for sufficient healing of bone defects resulting from trauma, tumor, infection, and congenital abnormalities. Synthetic materials mimicking the structure and composition of human trabecular bone are of considerable potential in bone augmentation. In the present study, a zinc (Zn)-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres (Zn-MHMs)/collagen scaffold (Zn-MHMs/Coll) was developed through a lyophilization fabrication process and designed to mimic the trabecular bone. The Zn-MHMs were synthesized through a microwave-hydrothermal method by using creatine phosphate as an organic phosphorus source. Zn-MHMs that consist of hydroxyapatite nanosheets showed relatively uniform spherical morphology, mesoporous hollow structure, high specific surface area, and homogeneous Zn distribution. They were additionally investigated as a drug nanocarrier, which was efficient in drug delivery and presented a pH-responsive drug release behavior. Furthermore, they were incorporated into the collagen matrix to construct a biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone tissue regeneration. The Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds showed an interconnected pore structure in the range of 100–300 μm and a sustained release of Zn ions. More importantly, the Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds could enhance the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, the bone defect repair results of critical-sized femoral condyle defect rat model demonstrated that the Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds could enhance bone regeneration compared with the Coll or MHMs/Coll scaffolds. The results suggest that the biomimetic Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds may be of enormous potential in bone repair and regeneration.

  8. Evaluation of zinc-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres for the construction of a novel biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weilin; Sun, Tuan-Wei; Qi, Chao; Ding, Zhenyu; Zhao, Huakun; Zhao, Shichang; Shi, Zhongmin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Daoyun; He, Yaohua

    2017-01-01

    Biomaterials with high osteogenic activity are desirable for sufficient healing of bone defects resulting from trauma, tumor, infection, and congenital abnormalities. Synthetic materials mimicking the structure and composition of human trabecular bone are of considerable potential in bone augmentation. In the present study, a zinc (Zn)-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres (Zn-MHMs)/collagen scaffold (Zn-MHMs/Coll) was developed through a lyophilization fabrication process and designed to mimic the trabecular bone. The Zn-MHMs were synthesized through a microwave-hydrothermal method by using creatine phosphate as an organic phosphorus source. Zn-MHMs that consist of hydroxyapatite nanosheets showed relatively uniform spherical morphology, mesoporous hollow structure, high specific surface area, and homogeneous Zn distribution. They were additionally investigated as a drug nanocarrier, which was efficient in drug delivery and presented a pH-responsive drug release behavior. Furthermore, they were incorporated into the collagen matrix to construct a biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone tissue regeneration. The Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds showed an interconnected pore structure in the range of 100-300 μm and a sustained release of Zn ions. More importantly, the Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds could enhance the osteogenic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, the bone defect repair results of critical-sized femoral condyle defect rat model demonstrated that the Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds could enhance bone regeneration compared with the Coll or MHMs/Coll scaffolds. The results suggest that the biomimetic Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds may be of enormous potential in bone repair and regeneration.

  9. Effect of osteogenesis imperfecta mutations in tropocollagen molecule on strength of biomimetic tropocollagen-hydroxyapatite nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Devendra K.; Tomar, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a genetic disorder that affects cellular synthesis of Type-I collagen fibrils and causes extreme bone fragility. This study reports the effects of OI mutations in Tropocollagen (TC) molecules on strength of model Tropocollagen-Hydroxyapatite biomaterials with two different mineral [hydroxyapatite (HAP)] distributions using three dimensional atomistic simulations. Results show that the effect of TC mutations on the strength of TC-HAP biomaterials is insignificant. Instead, change in mineral distribution showed significant impact on the overall strength of TC-HAP biomaterials. Study suggests that TC mutations manifest themselves by changing the mineral distribution during hydroxyapatite growth and nucleation period.

  10. Co-precipitation of tobramycin into biomimetically coated orthopedic fixation pins employing submicron-thin seed layers of hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörensen, Jan H; Lilja, Mirjam; Åstrand, Maria; Sörensen, Torben C; Procter, Philip; Strømme, Maria; Steckel, Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    The migration, loosening and cut-out of implants and nosocomial infections are current problems associated with implant surgery. New innovative strategies to overcome these issues are emphasized in today's research. The current work presents a novel strategy involving co-precipitation of tobramycin with biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) formation to produce implant coatings that control local drug delivery to prevent early bacterial colonization of the implant. A submicron- thin HA layer served as seed layer for the co-precipitation process and allowed for incorporation of tobramycin in the coating from a stock solution of antibiotic concentrations as high as 20 mg/ml. Concentrations from 0.5 to 20 mg/ml tobramycin and process temperatures of 37 °C and 60 °C were tested to assess the optimal parameters for a thin tobramycin- delivering HA coating on discs and orthopedic fixation pins. The morphology and thickness of the coating and the drug-release profile were evaluated via scanning electron microscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. The coatings delivered pharmaceutically relevant amounts of tobramycin over a period of 12 days. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest release period ever observed for a fast-loaded biomimetic implant coating. The presented approach could form the foundation for development of combination device/antibiotic delivery vehicles tailored to meet well-defined clinical needs while combating infections and ensuring fast implant in-growth.

  11. Biomimetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Ramachandra Rao

    2003-06-01

    The well-organised multifunctional structures, systems and biogenic materials found in nature have attracted the interest of scientists working in many disciplines. The efforts have resulted in the development of a new and rapidly growing field of scientific effort called biomimetics. In this article we present a few natural materials and systems and explore how ideas from nature are being interpreted and modified to suit efforts aimed at designing better machines and synthesising newer materials.

  12. Strength and fatigue properties of three-step sintered dense nanocrystal hydroxyapatite bioceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Guang; Qiu, Zhi-Ye; Cui, Han; Wang, Chang-Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Lee, In-Seop; Dong, Yu-Qi; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2013-06-01

    Dense hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic is a promising material for hard tissue repair due to its unique physical properties and biologic properties. However, the brittleness and low compressive strength of traditional HA ceramics limited their applications, because previous sintering methods produced HA ceramics with crystal sizes greater than nanometer range. In this study, nano-sized HA powder was employed to fabricate dense nanocrystal HA ceramic by high pressure molding, and followed by a three-step sintering process. The phase composition, microstructure, crystal dimension and crystal shape of the sintered ceramic were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Mechanical properties of the HA ceramic were tested, and cytocompatibility was evaluated. The phase of the sintered ceramic was pure HA, and the crystal size was about 200 nm. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the HA ceramic were comparable to human cortical bone, especially the good fatigue strength overcame brittleness of traditional sintered HA ceramics. Cell attachment experiment also demonstrated that the ceramics had a good cytocompatibility.

  13. Evaluation of zinc-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres for the construction of a novel biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone augmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu W

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Weilin Yu,1,* Tuan-Wei Sun,2,3,* Chao Qi,2,3 Zhenyu Ding,1 Huakun Zhao,1 Shichang Zhao,1 Zhongmin Shi,1 Ying-Jie Zhu,2,3 Daoyun Chen,1 Yaohua He1,4 1Department of Orthopedics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, 2State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, 3University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 4School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Biomaterials with high osteogenic activity are desirable for sufficient healing of bone defects resulting from trauma, tumor, infection, and congenital abnormalities. Synthetic materials mimicking the structure and composition of human trabecular bone are of considerable potential in bone augmentation. In the present study, a zinc (Zn-doped mesoporous hydroxyapatite microspheres (Zn-MHMs/collagen scaffold (Zn-MHMs/Coll was developed through a lyophilization fabrication process and designed to mimic the trabecular bone. The Zn-MHMs were synthesized through a microwave-hydrothermal method by using creatine phosphate as an organic phosphorus source. Zn-MHMs that consist of hydroxyapatite nanosheets showed relatively uniform spherical morphology, mesoporous hollow structure, high specific surface area, and homogeneous Zn distribution. They were additionally investigated as a drug nanocarrier, which was efficient in drug delivery and presented a pH-responsive drug release behavior. Furthermore, they were incorporated into the collagen matrix to construct a biomimetic scaffold optimized for bone tissue regeneration. The Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds showed an interconnected pore structure in the range of 100–300 µm and a sustained release of Zn ions. More importantly, the Zn-MHMs/Coll scaffolds could enhance the osteogenic differentiation

  14. Luminescence Enhanced Eu(3+)/Gd(3+) Co-Doped Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Imaging Agents In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunfei; He, Wangmei; Li, Fang; Perera, Thalagalage Shalika Harshani; Gan, Lin; Han, Yingchao; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Dai, Honglian

    2016-04-27

    Biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescent nano material can be used as an alternative bioimaging agent for early cancer diagnosis, which is crucial to achieve successful treatment. Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocyrstals have good biocompatibility and biodegradability, and can be used as an excellent host for luminescent rare earth elements. In this study, based on the energy transfer from Gd(3+) to Eu(3+), the luminescence enhanced imaging agent of Eu/Gd codoping HAP (HAP:Eu/Gd) nanocrystals are obtained via coprecipitation with plate-like shape and no change in crystal phase composition. The luminescence can be much elevated (up to about 120%) with a nonlinear increase versus Gd doping content, which is due to the energy transfer ((6)PJ of Gd(3+) → (5)HJ of Eu(3+)) under 273 nm and the possible combination effect of the cooperative upconversion and the successive energy transfer under 394 nm, respectively. Results demonstrate that the biocompatible HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals can successfully perform cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The intracellular HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystals display good biodegradability with a cumulative degradation of about 65% after 72 h. This biocompatible, biodegradable, and luminescence enhanced HAP:Eu/Gd nanocrystal has the potential to act as a fluorescent imaging agent in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Biomimetic helical rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium for improving orthopedic implants

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Lijie Zhang1, Yupeng Chen2, Jose Rodriguez3, Hicham Fenniri3, Thomas J Webster11Division of Engineering, 2Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Natural bone consists of hard nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) in a nanostructured protein-based soft hydrogel template (ie, mostly collagen). For this reason, nanostructured HA has been an intriguing coa...

  16. Biomimetic composite microspheres of collagen/chitosan/nano-hydroxyapatite: In-situ synthesis and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Shu-Hua; Liang, Mian-Hui; Wang, Peng; Luo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    The collagen/chitosan/hydroxyapatite (COL/CS/HA) composite microspheres with a good spherical form and a high dispersity were successfully obtained using an in-situ synthesis method. The FT-IR and XRD results revealed that the inorganic phase in the microspheres was crystalline HA containing carbonate ions. The morphology of the composite microspheres was dependent on the HA content, and a more desirable morphology was achieved when 20 wt.% HA was contained. The composite microspheres exhibited a narrow particle distribution, most of which ranged from 5 to 10 μm. In addition, the needle-like HA nano-particles were uniformly distributed in the composite microspheres, and their crystallinity and crystal size decreased with the HA content.

  17. Synthesis of nanogranular Fe3O4/biomimetic hydroxyapatite for potential applications in nanomedicine: structural and magnetic characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bianco, L.; Lesci, I. G.; Fracasso, G.; Barucca, G.; Spizzo, F.; Tamisari, M.; Scotti, R.; Ciocca, L.

    2015-06-01

    We realized the synthesis of a novel nanogranular system consisting of magnetite nanoparticles embedded in biomimetic carbonate hydroxyapatite (HA), for prospective uses in bone tissue engineering. An original two-step method was implemented: in the first step, magnetite nanoparticles are prepared by refluxing an aqueous solution of Fe(SO4) and Fe2(SO4)3 in an excess of tetrabutilammonium hydroxide acting as surfactant; then, the magnetite nanoparticles are coated with a Ca(OH)2 layer, to induce the growth of HA directly on their surface, by reaction of Ca(OH)2 with HPO42-. Two nanogranular samples were collected with magnetite content ˜0.8 and ˜4 wt%. The magnetite nanoparticles and the composite material were investigated by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These analyses provided information on the structure of the nanoparticles (mean size ˜6 nm) and revealed the presence of surface hydroxyl groups, which promoted the subsequent growth of the HA phase, featuring a nanocrystalline lamellar structure. The magnetic study, by a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer, has shown that both the as-prepared and the HA-coated magnetite nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at T = 300 K, but the magnetization relaxation process is dominated by dipolar magnetic interactions of comparable strength. In the three samples, a collective frozen magnetic regime is established below T ˜ 20 K. These results indicate that the magnetite nanoparticles tend to form agglomerates in the as-prepared state, which are not substantially altered by the HA growth, coherently with the creation of electrostatic hydrogen bonds among the surface hydroxyl groups.

  18. Hydroxyapatite Mineralization on the Calcium Chloride Blended Polyurethane Nanofiber via Biomimetic Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, R.; Nam, Ki Taek; Navamathavan, R.; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hak Yong

    2011-12-01

    Polyurethane nanofibers containing calcium chloride (CaCl2) were prepared via an electrospinning technique for the biomedical applications. Polyurethane nanofibers with different concentration of CaCl2 were electrospun, and their bioactivity evaluation was conducted by incubating in biomimetic simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. The morphology, structure and thermal properties of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. SEM images revealed that the CaCl2 salt incorporated homogeneously to form well-oriented nanofibers with smooth surface and uniform diameters along their lengths. The SBF incubation test confirmed the formation of apatite-like materials, exhibiting enhanced bioactive behavior of the polyurethane/CaCl2 composite nanofibers. This study demonstrated that the electrospun polyurethane containing CaCl2 composite nanofibers enhanced the in vitro bioactivity and supports the growth of apatite-like materials.

  19. Study of the growth kinetics of biomimetically grown hydroxyapatite coatings in large gradient magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Ya-Jing; Liu, Yang-Yang [School of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, 710072 (China); Institute of Special Environmental Biophysics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, 710072 (China); Yin, Da-Chuan, E-mail: yindc@nwpu.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Key Laboratory for Space Bioscience and Biotechnology, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, 710072 (China); Institute of Special Environmental Biophysics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, 710072 (China)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Inducing ability of self-assembly monolayers in large gradient magnetic fields. • Bonding information of functional groups obtained by first principles calculations. • The gravity fields affected the compositions of the apatite layers. - Abstract: Large gradient magnetic fields simultaneously provide both strong magnetic and simulated gravitational fields. Processes in such environments are subject to the influences of these two fields. Previous studies have shown that the deposition of hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings induced by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is affected by large gradient magnetic fields. To further clarify the mechanism, we examined the effects of gravitational and magnetic fields on the deposition kinetics of the SAMs and the HAp coatings via surface analysis and molecular simulation. The chemical compositions of the SAMs and the HAp coatings in the fields were detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of the SAMs to induce the deposition of apatite was investigated via first principles calculations, which were performed to obtain information about the bonding interactions between the self-assembled functional groups and the –PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} ions in simulated body fluid (SBF). The experimental results showed that the fields affected the compositions of the apatite layers. The first principles calculation results showed that the –PO{sub 4}H{sup 2−} functional group exhibited a stronger ability to induce apatite deposition than the –COOH functional group. This result suggested that hydrogen phosphate root groups are better nucleation sites than carboxyl root groups.

  20. Preparation and Characterization of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite-Resorbable Polymer Composites for Hard Tissue Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebner, Kristopher Robert

    Autografts are the orthopedic "gold standard" for repairing bone voids. Autografts are osteoconductive and do not elicit an immune response, but they are in short supply and require a second surgery to harvest the bone graft. Allografts are currently the most common materials used for the repair of segmental defects in hard tissue. Unlike autografts, allografts can cause an undesirable immune response and the possibility of disease transmission is a major concern. As an alternative to the above approaches, recent research efforts have focused on the use of composite materials made from hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioresorbable polymers, such as poly-L-lactide (PLLA). Recent results have shown that the surface hydroxides on HA can initiate the ring opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactide and other lactones creating a composite with superior interfacial strength. This thesis demonstrates that the surface of porous biologically derived HA substrates, such as coralline HA and trabecular bone, can be used to initiate the ROP of L-lactide and other lactones from the vapor phase. This process increases the strength of the porous scaffold through the deposition of a thin, uniform polymer coating, while maintaining the porous structure. The kinetics of the chemical vapor deposition polymerization (CVDP) are described using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The reaction temperature and monomer vapor pressure are found to affect the rate of the polymerization. Also described in this thesis is the preparation of a porous polymer scaffold that mimics the structure of demineralized bone matrix (DBM). This demineralized bone matrix simulant (DBMS) is created using anorganic bovine bone as a template to initiate the polymerization of various lactones, followed by the removal of the HA scaffold. This material retained its shape and exhibits mechanical properties superior to DBM. Finally it is shown that HA can be used to initiate the ROP of a-caprolactam and the biocompatibility

  1. Biomimetic magnesium–carbonate-apatite nanocrystals endowed with strontium ions as anti-osteoporotic trigger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iafisco, Michele, E-mail: michele.iafisco@istec.cnr.it; Ruffini, Andrea; Adamiano, Alessio; Sprio, Simone; Tampieri, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The present work investigates the preparation of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO{sub 3} and Sr to be used as starting materials for the development of nanostructured bio-devices for regeneration of osteoporotic bone. Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO{sub 3} ions were inserted in the apatite structure to mimic the composition of bone apatite, whereas the addition of increasing quantities of Sr ions, from 0 up to 12 wt.%, as anti-osteoporotic agent, was evaluated. The chemical–physical features, the morphology, the degradation rates, the ion release kinetics as well as the in vitro bioactivity of the as-prepared apatites were fully evaluated. The results indicated that the incorporation of 12 wt.% of Sr can be viewed as a threshold for the structural stability of Mg–CO{sub 3}-apatite. Indeed, incorporation of lower quantity of Sr did not induce considerable variations in the chemical structure of Mg–CO{sub 3}-apatite, while when the Sr doping extent reached 12 wt.%, a dramatically destabilizing effect was detected on the crystal structure thus yielding alteration of the symmetry and distortion of the PO{sub 4}. As a consequence, this apatite exhibited the fastest degradation kinetic and the highest amount of Sr ions released when tested in physiological conditions. In this respect, the surface crystallization of new calcium phosphate phase when immersed in physiological-like solution occurred by different mechanisms and extents due to the different structural chemistry of the variously doped apatites. Nevertheless, all the apatites synthesized in this work exhibited in vitro bioactivity demonstrating their potential use to develop biomedical devices with anti-osteoporotic functionality. - Highlights: • Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites co-substituted with Mg, CO{sub 3} and Sr were prepared. • Biological-like amounts of Mg and CO{sub 3} were inserted to mimic the composition of bone apatite. • The addition of increasing

  2. Manipulation of cellulose nanocrystal surface sulfate groups toward biomimetic nanostructures in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoppe, Justin O; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-08-01

    We report a facile aqueous procedure to create multivalent displays of sulfonated ligands on CNCs for future applications as viral inhibitors. CNCs were decorated with model compounds containing sulfonate groups via reactions of epoxides and isothiocyanates with amines under alkaline conditions. At first, surface sulfate groups of CNCs were hydrolytically cleaved by alkaline hydrolysis to increase the number of available surface hydroxyls. Success of desulfation was confirmed via dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). CNC surface hydroxyl groups were then activated with epichlorohydrin before subsequent reactions. As proof of concept toward aqueous pathways for functionalizing nanoparticles with sulfonated ligands, 3-chloro-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonic acid sodium salt hydrate (CPSA) and 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate sodium salt monohydrate (4-SPITC) were chosen as model compounds to react with homobifunctional 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine) (EBEA) molecular spacer. The approaches presented are not only applicable to polysaccharide nanocrystals, but also other classes of polymeric and inorganic substrates presenting surface hydroxyl groups, as in the case of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), silica or glass. CNCs carrying sulfonated ligands were characterized by ATR-FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Surface chemical compositions of desired elements were determined via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We anticipate that with these facile aqueous procedures as the proof of concept, a diverse library of target-specific functionalities can be conjugated to CNCs for applications in nanomedicine, especially related to viral inhibition.

  3. Biologically Inspired Self-assembling Synthesis of Bone-like Nano-hydroxyapatite/PLGA- (PEG-ASP)n Composite: A New Biomimetic Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffold Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A new biomimetic bone tissue engineering scaffold material, nano-HA/ PLGA-( PEG- ASP )n composite, was synthesized by a biologically inspired self assembling approach. A novel biodegradable PLGA( PEG-ASP ) n copolymer with pendant amine functional groups and enhanced hydrophilicity was synthesized by bulk ring-opening copolymerization by DL-lactide( DLLA ) and glycolide( GA ) with Aspartic acid ( ASP )-Polyethylene glycol( PEG ) alt-prepolymer. A Three-dimensional, porous scaffold of the PLGA-( PEG-ASP )n copolymer was fabricated by a solvent casting, particulate leaching process. The scaffold was then incubated in modified simulated body fluid ( mSBF ) . Growth of HA nanocrystals on the inner pore surfaces of the porous scaffold is confirmed by calcium ion binding analyses, SEM, mass increase measurements and quantification of phosphate content within scaffolds . SEM analysis demonstrated the nucleation and growth of a continuous bonelike, low crystalline carbonated HA nanocrystals on the inner pore surfawes of the PLGA-( PEG-ASP)n scaffolds. The amount of calcium binding, total mass and the mass of pbosphate on experimental PLGA-( PEG- ASP )n scaffolds at different incubation times in mSBF was significantly greater than that of control PLGA scaffolds . This nano-HA/ PLGA- ( PEG-ASP )n composite shows some features of natural bone both in main composition and hierarchical microstructure. The ASPPEG alt-prepolymer modified PLGA copolymer provide a controllable high surface density and distribution of anionic functional groups which would enhauce nucleation and growth of bonelike mineral following exposure to mSBF. This biomimetic treatment provides a simple method for surface funetionalization and subsequent mineral nucleation and self-assembling on biodegradable polymer scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  4. Preparation and in vitro bioactivity of poly(D,L-lactide) composite containing hydroxyapatite nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, C. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Weng, J. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)], E-mail: jweng@home.swjtu.edu.cn; Lu, X.; Zhou, S.B.; Wan, J.X.; Qu, S.X.; Feng, B.; Li, X.H. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Technologies of Materials, Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2008-12-01

    The nano-sized hydroxyapatite (n-HA) was incorporated into poly(D,L-Lactide) (PDLLA) to form a bioactive and biodegradable composite for application in hard tissue replacement and regeneration. Thin film of PDLLA composite containing 20 mass% of n-HA fillers was successfully developed through integration of solvent co-blending and hot pressing techniques. firstly, n-HA and PDLLA were chemically synthesized, respectively, then mixed together and homogeneously dispersed in N,N-dimethyl formamide(DMF) solvent, finally, the dried blended hybrid containing PDLLA matrix and n-HA fillers was put into the mould and compacted by hot-pressing machine under 8 MPa pressure at 110 deg. C for 15 min. In vitro studies were conducted using the simulated body fluid(SBF). Composite specimens were soaked in SBF from 1 day to 21 days prior to surface analysis. Results obtained from scanning electron microscopy(SEM) examination, Energy dispersive X-ray detector(EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that a layer of non-stoichiometric apatite formed within 7 days on HA/PDLLA composite surface after its immersion in SBF, demonstrating moderate in vitro bioactivity of n-HA/PDLLA composite, though a moderate rate of apatite formation in SBF was found on initial stage of immersion periods for n-HA/PDLLA composite, compared to the other biomaterial composite. This type of composite film exhibited certain desirable bioactive characteristics, and they are promising bone candidates to develop novel bioactive composites for biomedical application.

  5. Effect of plasma surface functionalization on preosteoblast cells spreading and adhesion on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer formed on a titanium surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Sung Woon; Ko, Yeong Mu; Kim, Byung Hoon, E-mail: kim5055@chosun.ac.kr

    2013-12-15

    This study examined the plasma surface modification of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) formed on a titanium (Ti) surface as well as its influence on the behavior of preosteoblast cells. Ti substrates pre-treated with a plasma-polymerized thin film rich in carboxyl groups were subjected to a biomimetic process in a simulated body fluid solution to synthesize the HAp. The HAp layer grown on Ti substrate was then coated with two types of plasma polymerized acrylic acid and allyl amine thin film. The different types of Ti substrates were characterized by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. HAp with a Ca/P ratio from 1.25 to 1.38 was obtained on the Ti substrate and hydrophilic carboxyl (-COOH) and amine (-NH{sub 2}) functional groups were introduced to its surface. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the surface of the HAp coatings and the morphology of MC3T3-E1 cells. These results showed that the -COOH-modified HAp surfaces promoted the cell spreading synergistically by changing the surface morphology and chemical state.-NH{sub 2} modified HAp had the lowest cell spreading and proliferation compared to HAp and -COOH-modified HAp. These results correspond to fluorescein analysis, which showed many more cell spreading of COOH/HAp/Ti surface compared to HAp and NH{sub 2} modified HAp. A MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferation. The results showed that the proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells increased in the order of COOH/HAp/Ti > HAp/Ti > NH{sub 2}/Ti > Ti, corresponding to the effect of cell spreading for 6 days. The change in morphology and the chemical surface properties of the biomaterial via plasma polymerization can affect the behavior of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  6. Biomimetic fiber mesh scaffolds based on gelatin and hydroxyapatite nano-rods: Designing intrinsic skills to attain bone reparation abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartuqui, Javier; Gravina, A Noel; Rial, Ramón; Benedini, Luciano A; Yahia, L'Hocine; Ruso, Juan M; Messina, Paula V

    2016-09-01

    Intrinsic material skills have a deep effect on the mechanical and biological performance of bone substitutes, as well as on its associated biodegradation properties. In this work we have manipulated the preparation of collagenous derived fiber mesh frameworks to display a specific composition, morphology, open macroporosity, surface roughness and permeability characteristics. Next, the effect of the induced physicochemical attributes on the scaffold's mechanical behavior, bone bonding potential and biodegradability were evaluated. It was found that the scaffold microstructure, their inherent surface roughness, and the compression strength of the gelatin scaffolds can be modulated by the effect of the cross-linking agent and, essentially, by mimicking the nano-scale size of hydroxyapatite in natural bone. A clear effect of bioactive hydroxyapatite nano-rods on the scaffolds skills can be appreciated and it is greater than the effect of the cross-linking agent, offering a huge perspective for the upcoming progress of bone implant technology.

  7. Improving osteointegration and osteogenesis of three-dimensional porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds by polydopamine-assisted biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Yang, Wei; Li, Xiaokang; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Cairu; Meng, Xiangfei; Pei, Yifeng; Fan, Xiangli; Lan, Pingheng; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Xiaojie; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-18

    Titanium alloys with various porous structures can be fabricated by advanced additive manufacturing techniques, which are attractive for use as scaffolds for bone defect repair. However, modification of the scaffold surfaces, particularly inner surfaces, is critical to improve the osteointegration of these scaffolds. In this study, a biomimetic approach was employed to construct polydopamine-assisted hydroxyapatite coating (HA/pDA) onto porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds fabricated by the electron beam melting method. The surface modification was characterized with the field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, water contact angle measurement, and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Attachment and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells on the scaffold surface were significantly enhanced by the HA/pDA coating compared to the unmodified surfaces. Additionally, MC3T3-E1 cells grown on the HA/pDA-coated Ti6Al4V scaffolds displayed significantly higher expression of runt-related transcription factor-2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin, and collagen type-1 compared with bare Ti6Al4V scaffolds after culture for 14 days. Moreover, microcomputed tomography analysis and Van-Gieson staining of histological sections showed that HA/pDA coating on surfaces of porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds enhanced osteointegration and significantly promoted bone regeneration after implantation in rabbit femoral condylar defects for 4 and 12 weeks. Therefore, this study provides an alternative to biofunctionalized porous Ti6Al4V scaffolds with improved osteointegration and osteogenesis functions for orthopedic applications.

  8. Biocompatibility and mineralization activity of fresh or set white mineral trioxide aggregate, biomimetic carbonated apatite, and synthetic hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danesh, Farzad; Tootian, Zahra; Jahanbani, Jahanfar; Rabiee, Mahmood; Fazelipour, Simin; Taghva, Orod; Shabaninia, Shahryar

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of apatite formation on tissue contact with white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and compare this apatite with a synthetic hydroxyapatite (SHAp) in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats. Thirty-three Wistar rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes filled with WMTA, apatite formed by WMTA (BCAp), and an SHAp along with empty tubes were implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 15, 30, and 60 days. Set MTA covered with BCAp (set MTA/BCAp) was implanted as well. The specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and von Kossa and evaluated for inflammatory reactions and mineralization through a light microscope. All groups evoked a moderate chronic inflammatory reaction at 15 days, which subsided with time. No statistically significant difference was found among the groups (p >.05). BCAp did not stimulate mineralization. WMTA, SHAp, and set MTA/BCAp induced significantly more dystrophic calcification than BCAp (p .05). Our results suggested a possible role of apatite formation on the mineralization induction characteristics of WMTA, which indicated a definite effect on biocompatibility. BCAp produced by WMTA differed from SHAp in mineralization activity. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Monoclinic Hydroxyapatite Nanoplates Hybrid Composite with Improved Compressive Strength, and Porosity for Bone Defect Repair: Biomimetic Synthesis and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Farghaly, Ahmed A; Guo, Zhenzhao; Zhao, Pengg; Li, Hong; Zhou, Changren; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Calcium phosphate cement (CPC) has been used for bone restoration despite its intrinsic fragile property. In order to enhance the CPC mechanical properties, biopolymers were introduced as filler to prepare CPC based cements. Chitosan/tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP)/dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) based cement for bone repair has been prepared in the study. Solidification of the prepared cement was carried out in a simulate body fluid at 37 degrees C. The introduction of chitosan improved the mechanical performance of the as-prepared CPC hybrid nanocomposite. FTIR, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, XRD, and SAED were used to characterize the CPC nanocomposite. Data simulations have been performed to assist in determining the crystalline phase/s in the CPC hybrid nanocomposite. Based on the SAED, HRTEM measurements and data simulations, a monoclinic phase of hydroxyapatite (HAP) with a plate-like structure was obtained in the CPC system, which is believed to be responsible for the observed enhancement in CPC mechanical properties. The obtained composite has a biocompatibility comparable to that of commercial sample.

  10. Role of magnesium on the biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Sarma, Bikash

    2016-10-01

    Biomimetic depositions of calcium phosphate (CaP) are carried out using simulated body fluid (SBF), calcifying solution and newly developed magnesium containing calcifying solution. Calcium phosphate has a rich phase diagram and is well known for its excellent biocompatibility and bioactivity. The most common phase is hydroxyapatite (HAp), an integral component of human bone and tooth, widely used in orthopedic and dental applications. In addition, calcium phosphate nanoparticles show promise for the targeted drug delivery. The doping of calcium phosphate by magnesium, zinc, strontium etc. can change the protein uptake by CaP nanocrystals. This work describes the role of magnesium on the nucleation and growth of CaP on Ti and its oxide substrates. X-ray diffraction studies confirm formation of HAp nanocrystals which closely resemble the structure of bone apatite when grown using SBF and calcifying solution. It has been observed that magnesium plays crucial role in the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate. A low magnesium level enhances the crystallinity of HAp while higher magnesium content leads to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) phase. Interestingly, the deposition of ACP phase is rapid when magnesium ion concentration in the solution is 40% of calcium plus magnesium ions concentration. Moreover, high magnesium content alters the morphology of CaP films.

  11. Development and Characterization of a Bioinspired Bone Matrix with Aligned Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite on Collagen Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsi-Chin Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of three-dimensional (3D scaffolds have been designed to mimic the biological spontaneous bone formation characteristics by providing a suitable microenvironment for osteogenesis. In view of this, a natural bone-liked composite scaffold, which was combined with inorganic (hydroxyapatite, Hap and organic (type I collagen, Col phases, has been developed through a self-assembly process. This 3D porous scaffold consisting of a c-axis of Hap nanocrystals (nHap aligning along Col fibrils arrangement is similar to natural bone architecture. A significant increase in mechanical strength and elastic modulus of nHap/Col scaffold is achieved through biomimetic mineralization process when compared with simple mixture of collagen and hydroxyapatite method. It is suggested that the self-organization of Hap and Col produced in vivo could also be achieved in vitro. The oriented nHap/Col composite not only possesses bone-like microstructure and adequate mechanical properties but also enhances the regeneration and reorganization abilities of bone tissue. These results demonstrated that biomimetic nHap/Col can be successfully reconstructed as a bone graft substitute in bone tissue engineering.

  12. Biomimetic Mineralization of Recombinamer-Based Hydrogels toward Controlled Morphologies and High Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuping; Chen, Xi; Fok, Alex; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; Aparicio, Conrado

    2015-11-25

    The use of insoluble organic matrices as a structural template for the bottom-up fabrication of organic-inorganic nanocomposites is a powerful way to build a variety of advanced materials with defined and controlled morphologies and superior mechanical properties. Calcium phosphate mineralization in polymeric hydrogels is receiving significant attention in terms of obtaining biomimetic hierarchical structures with unique mechanical properties and understanding the mechanisms of the biomineralization process. However, integration of organic matrices with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, different in morphology and composition, has not been well-achieved yet at nanoscale. In this study, we synthesized thermoresponsive hydrogels, composed of elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), to template mineralization of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals using a biomimetic polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. Different from conventional mineralization where minerals were deposited on the surface of organic matrices, they were infiltrated into the frameworks of ELR matrices, preserving their microporous structure. After 14 days of mineralization, an average of 78 μm mineralization depth was achieved. Mineral density up to 1.9 g/cm(3) was found after 28 days of mineralization, which is comparable to natural bone and dentin. In the dry state, the elastic modulus and hardness of the mineralized hydrogels were 20.3 ± 1.7 and 0.93 ± 0.07 GPa, respectively. After hydration, they were reduced to 4.50 ± 0.55 and 0.10 ± 0.03 GPa, respectively. These values were lower but still on the same order of magnitude as those of natural hard tissues. The results indicated that inorganic-organic hybrid biomaterials with controlled morphologies can be achieved using organic templates of ELRs. Notably, the chemical and physical properties of ELRs can be tuned, which might help elucidate the mechanisms by which living organisms regulate the mineralization process.

  13. Biomimetic organization of collagen matrices to template bone-like microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, Brian; Bradley, Patrick; Saxena, Neha; Ruberti, Jeffrey W; Gower, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    The mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone is essential in vertebrates to provide structure, locomotion, and protect vital organs, while also acting as a calcium and phosphate reservoir to maintain homeostasis. Bone's structure comprises mainly structural collagen fibrils, hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and water, and it is the organization of the densely-packed collagen matrix that directs the organization of the mineral crystallites. Biogenic mineralization occurs when osteoblasts release "mineral bearing globules" which fuse into the preformed collagen matrix, and upon crystallization of this amorphous precursor, the fibrils become embedded with [001] oriented nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite. Our prior work has shown that this nanostructured organization of bone can be reproduced in vitro using the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process. In this report, our focus is on using biomimetic processing to recreate both the nano- and micro-structure of lamellar bone. We first applied molecular crowding techniques to acidic, type-I collagen solutions to form dense, liquid crystalline collagen (LCC) scaffolds with cholesteric order. We subsequently mineralized these LCCs via the PILP process to achieve a high degree of intrafibrillar mineral, with compositions and organization similar to that of native bone and with a "lamellar" microstructure generated by the twisting LCC template. In depth characterization of the nano- and micro-structure was performed, including optical and electron microscopy, X-ray and electron diffraction, and thermogravimetric analyses. The results of this work lead us closer to our goal of developing hierarchically structured, collagen-hydroxyapatite composites which can serve as fully synthetic, bioresorbable, load-bearing bone substitutes that are remodeled by the native BRU. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Carboxylated Agarose (CA)-Silk Fibroin (SF) Dual Confluent Matrices Containing Oriented Hydroxyapatite (HA) Crystals: Biomimetic Organic/Inorganic Composites for Tibia Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing-Xiao; Ran, Jia-Bing; Chen, Si; Jiang, Pei; Shen, Xin-Yu; Tong, Hua

    2016-07-11

    By in situ combining the dual cross-linking matrices of the carboxylated agarose (CA) and the silk fibroin (SF) with the hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals, the CA-SF/HA composites with optimal physicochemical and biological properties were obtained, which were designed to meet the clinical needs of load-bearing bone repair. With the synergistic modulation of the dual organic matrices, the HA nanoparticles presented sheet and rod morphologies due to the preferred orientation, which successfully simulated the biomineralization in nature. The chemical reactivity of the native agarose (NA) was significantly enhanced via carboxylation, and the CA exhibited higher thermal stability than the NA. In the presence of SF, the composites showed optimal mechanical properties that could meet the standard of bone repair. The degradation of the composites in the presence of CA and SF was significantly delayed such that the degradation rate of the implant could satisfy the growth rate of the newly formed bone tissue. The in vitro tests confirmed that the CA-SF/HA composite scaffolds enabled the MG63 cells to proliferate and differentiate well, and the CA/HA composite presented greater capability of promoting the cell behaviors than the NA/HA composite. After 24 days of implantation, newly formed bone was observed at the tibia defect site and around the implant. Extensive osteogenesis was presented in the rats treated with the CA-SF/HA composites. In general, the CA-SF/HA composites prepared in this work had the great potential to be applied for repairing large bone defects.

  15. Incorporation of different antibiotics into carbonated hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium implants, release and antibiotic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, M.; Bezemer, J.M.; de Groot, K.; Layrolle, P.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) coatings were applied onto titanium implants by using a biomimetic precipitation method. Different antibiotics were incorporated into the CHA coatings and their release and efficacy against bacteria growth were studied in vitro. The following antibiotics were used

  16. Preparation of Bone-Like Apatite Coating on Surface of Ti-25Nb-2Zr Alloy by Biomimetic Growth Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu; HUANG Runmin; CUI Zhenduo; YANG Xianjin

    2009-01-01

    A bone-like apatite layer consisting of nano-crystals of apatite phase was prepared on the surface of Ti-25Nb-2Zr alloy by chemical biomimetic growth method. TiNbZr alloy specimens were first oxidized at 500℃ for 2 h in the air. Then, they were immersed in 40℃ saturated Na2HPO4 solution for 15 h and 25 ℃ saturated Ca(OH)2 solution for 8 h in turn for pre-calcification. The pre-calcified specimens were immersed in modified simulated body fluid up to 15 d for biomimetic growth. After common oxidization, amorphous titania and anatase were detected on the specimen surface. Except for the substantial amount of calcium and phosphorus, no new phase appeared on the pre-calcified specimens. After the coating process, it was found that the (002) orientation was the preferred orientation during the growing period of hydroxyapatite. The inorganic composition and structure of the coating are very similar to those of human thigh bone, which will be advantageous for its application as biomedical material.

  17. Ferroelectric polarization in nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite thin films on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S B; Tofail, S A M; Kholkin, A L; Wojtaś, M; Gregor, M; Gandhi, A A; Wang, Y; Bauer, S; Krause, M; Plecenik, A

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone--a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics.

  18. Ferroelectric Polarization in Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Thin Films on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. B.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Kholkin, A. L.; Wojtaś, M.; Gregor, M.; Gandhi, A. A.; Wang, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krause, M.; Plecenik, A.

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone- a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics.

  19. Mineralization of Hydroxyapatite Regulated by Recombinant Human-like Collagen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    We reported recombinant human-like type I collagen inducing growth of hydroxyapatite crystals in vitro in the form of self-assembly of nano-fibrils of mineralized collagen resembling extracellular matrix, which obey the same rules, but is superior to the collagen derived from animal tissues because the latter may carry diseases of animals and cause immunological reactions. The mineralized collagen fibrils aligned parallel to each other to form mineralized collagen fibers. Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals grew on the surface of these collagen fibrils with the c-axis of nanocrystals of HA orienting along the longitudinal axis of the fibrils.

  20. Solid state NMR method development and studies of biological and biomimetic nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yanyan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes application and development of advanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for complex materials, in particular organic-inorganic nanocomposites and thermoelectric tellurides. The apatite-collagen interface, essential for understanding the biomineralization process in bone and engineering the interface for controlled bio-mimetic synthesis and optimized mechanical properties, is buried within the nanocomposite of bone. We used multinuclear solid-state NMR to study the composition and structure of the interface. Citrate has been identified as the main organic molecule strongly bound to the apatite surface with a density of 1/(2 nm)2, covering 1/6 of the total surface area in bovine bone. Citrate provides more carboxylate groups, one of the key functional groups found to affect apatite nucleation and growth, than all the non-collagenous proteins all together in bone; thus we propose that citrate stabilizes apatite crystals at a very small thickness of ~3 nm (4 unit cells) to increase bone fracture tolerance. The hypothesis has been confirmed in vitro by adding citrate in the bio-mimetic synthesis of polymerhydroxyapatite nanocomposites. The results have shown that the size of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals decreases as increasing citrate concentration. With citrate concentrations comparable to that in body fluids, similar-sized nanocrystals as in bone have been produced. Besides the dimensions of the apatite crystals, the composition of bone also affects its biofunctional and macroscopic mechanical properties; therefore, our team also extended its effort to enhance the inorganic portion in our bio-mimetic synthesis from originally 15 wt% to current 50 wt% compared to 65 wt% in bovine bone, by using Lysine-Leucine hydroxyapatite nucleating diblock co-polypeptide, which forms a gel at very low concentration. In this thesis, various advanced solid state NMR techniques have been employed to characterize nanocomposites

  1. One step synthesis of silver nanorods by autoreduction of aqueous silver ions with hydroxyapatite: An inorganic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Sujatha K; Sastry, Thotapalli Parvathaleswara; Sreedhar, B; Mandal, Asit Baran

    2007-02-01

    In this report, a novel method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles on the surface of hydroxyapatite is described. Hydroxyapatite crystals are synthesized from acid mineralized solution, a byproduct of bone glue industries, by a simple chemical precipitation method, which results in the formation of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. The reduction of silver ions occurs by the electron transfer from the hydroxyl groups on the surface of hydroxyapatite. This results in the formation of silver nanorods and needle shaped nanoparticles that are bound on the surface of hydroxyapatite, and the observed silver nanocrystals show anisotropic structure. Thus, hydroxyapatite crystals can be used as a new class of inorganic scaffolds for the synthesis of nanomaterials with implications in designing inorganic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites for different applications.

  2. An efficient biomimetic coating methodology for a prosthetic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adawy, Alaa, E-mail: a.adawy@science.ru.nl [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I. [Biomaterials Department, National Research Centre, Giza (Egypt)

    2013-04-01

    The combination of the load-bearing metallic implants with the bioactive materials in the design of synthetic implants is an important aspect in the biomaterials research. Biomimetic coating of bioinert alloys with calcium phosphate phases provides a good alternative to the prerequisite for the continual replacement of implants because of the failure of bone-implant integration. We attempted to accelerate the biomimetic coating process of stainless steel alloy (316L) with biomimetic apatite. In addition, we investigated the incorporation of functioning minerals such as strontianite and smithsonite into the deposited layer. In order to develop a highly mature apatite coating, our method requires soaking of the pre-treated alloy in highly concentrated synthetic body fluid for only few hours. Surface characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Also, the deposited apatitic layers were analysed by powder diffraction X-ray analysis (XRD). 316L surface showed the growth of highly crystalline, low carbonated hydroxyapatite, after only 6 h of the whole soaking process. Highlights: ► The manuscript describes a fast and efficient biomimetic coating methodology. ► This methodology can be used for metallic implants. ► 316L was coated with crystalline hydroxyapatite. ► Addition of strontium and zinc lead to the deposition of brushite. ► Coating of all synthetic solutions is highly crystalline.

  3. Waste utilization for the controlled synthesis of nanosized hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayar, Suprabha, E-mail: Suprabha.nayar@gmail.com [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India); Guha, Avijit [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur (India)

    2009-05-05

    This work uses biomolecules in waste and medicinally important materials for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles. Orange and potato peel, eggshell, papaya leaf and calendula flower extracts have varied biomolecules, which exert a significant, control on the in situ synthesis of nanosized hydroxyapatite particles. The biomimetic synthesis of inorganic particles using known matrices is already well established, however, there are only a few reports using compound extracts. The synthesized nanocomposite has been characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy studies. Role of varied biomolecules in controlled inorganic synthesis may have tremendous technological impact.

  4. Hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticles coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ilisei, Simona; Luca, Constantin

    2014-02-01

    The present paper is focused on a study regarding the possibility of obtaining hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticle coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold. The method applied is based on a combined strategy involving hydroxyapatite biomimetic deposition on polyurethane surface using a Supersaturated Calcification Solution (SCS), combined with silver ions reduction and in-situ crystallization processes on hydroxyapatite-polyurethane surface by sample immersing in AgNO3 solution. The morphology, composition and phase structure of the prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The data obtained show that a layer of hydroxyapatite was deposited on porous polyurethane support and the silver nanoparticles (average size 34.71 nm) were dispersed among and even on the hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane surface acts as a reducer and a stabilizing agent for silver ions. The surface plasmon resonance peak in UV-Vis absorption spectra showed an absorption maximum at 415 nm, indicating formation of silver nanoparticles. The hydroxyapatite-silver polyurethane scaffolds were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the obtained data were indicative of good antibacterial properties of the materials.

  5. Hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticles coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela, E-mail: gciobanu03@yahoo.co.uk; Ilisei, Simona; Luca, Constantin

    2014-02-01

    The present paper is focused on a study regarding the possibility of obtaining hydroxyapatite-silver nanoparticle coatings on porous polyurethane scaffold. The method applied is based on a combined strategy involving hydroxyapatite biomimetic deposition on polyurethane surface using a Supersaturated Calcification Solution (SCS), combined with silver ions reduction and in-situ crystallization processes on hydroxyapatite-polyurethane surface by sample immersing in AgNO{sub 3} solution. The morphology, composition and phase structure of the prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements. The data obtained show that a layer of hydroxyapatite was deposited on porous polyurethane support and the silver nanoparticles (average size 34.71 nm) were dispersed among and even on the hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite/polyurethane surface acts as a reducer and a stabilizing agent for silver ions. The surface plasmon resonance peak in UV-Vis absorption spectra showed an absorption maximum at 415 nm, indicating formation of silver nanoparticles. The hydroxyapatite-silver polyurethane scaffolds were tested against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and the obtained data were indicative of good antibacterial properties of the materials. - Highlights: • The hydroxyapatite and silver nanoparticles were grown on the polyurethane scaffold • The hydroxyapatite/polyurethane acts as reducing agent, stabilizer and matrix for Ag • The samples were well characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD, XPS, UV-visible spectroscopy • The hydroxyapatite/silver polyurethane scaffold shows antibacterial property.

  6. Nanocrystal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tisdale, William; Prins, Ferry; Weidman, Mark; Beck, Megan

    2016-11-01

    A method of preparing monodisperse MX semiconductor nanocrystals can include contacting an M-containing precursor with an X donor to form a mixture, where the molar ratio between the M containing precursor and the X donor is large. Alternatively, if additional X donor is added during the reaction, a smaller ratio between the M containing precursor and the X donor can be used to prepare monodisperse MX semiconductor nanocrystals.

  7. Biomimetic Flow Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, J.; Liu, Chang; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic flow sensors are biologically inspired devices that measure the speed and direction of fluids. This survey starts by describing the role and functioning of airflow-sensing hairs in arthropods and in fishes, carries on with the biomimetic MEMS implementations, both for air and water flow s

  8. Incorporation of different antibiotics into carbonated hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium implants, release and antibiotic efficacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stigter, M.; Bezemer, J.; Groot, de K.; Layrolle, P.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) coatings were applied onto titanium implants by using a biomimetic precipitation method. Different antibiotics were incorporated into the CHA coatings and their release and efficacy against bacteria growth were studied in vitro. The following antibiotics were used wit

  9. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  10. Biomimetics: nature based innovation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    "Based on the concept that nature offers numerous sources of inspiration for inventions related to mechanisms, materials, processes, and algorithms, this book covers the topic of biomimetics and the inspired innovation...

  11. Biomimetic growth and substrate dependent mechanical properties of bone like apatite nucleated on Ti and magnetron sputtered TiO2 nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Das, Apurba; Barman, Pintu; Pal, Arup R.

    2016-04-01

    This report presents findings on biomimetic growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals on Ti and sputtered TiO2 substrates. The possibility of TiO2 nanostructure as candidate materials for future biomedical applications has been explored through the comparison of microstructural and mechanical properties of bone like apatite grown on Ti and nano-TiO2 surfaces. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction studies reveal formation of carbonate apatite with apparent domain size in the nanoscale range. A better interaction at the nano-TiO2/nano-HAp interface due to higher interfacial area could promote the growth of bone like apatite. The crystal phases, crystallinity, and surface morphology of nano-TiO2 are considered as parameters to understand the nucleation and growth of apatite with different mechanical properties at the nanoscale. The methodology of x-ray line profile analysis encompasses deconvolution of merged peaks by preserving broadening due to nanosized HAp aggregates. The Young’s modulus of bone like apatite exhibits crystallographic directional dependence which suggests the presence of elastic anisotropy in bone like apatite. The lattice contraction in the c-direction is associated with the degree of carbonate substitution in the apatite lattice. The role of residual stress is critical for the lattice distortion of HAp deposited at physiological conditions of temperature and pH of human blood plasma. The ion concentration is crucial for the uniformity, crystallinity, and mechanical behaviour of the apatite.

  12. Biomimetic matrices self-initiating the induction of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Ugo; Roden, Laura C; Ferretti, Carlo; Klar, Roland M

    2011-09-01

    The new strategy of tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine at large, is to construct biomimetic matrices to mimic nature's hierarchical structural assemblages and mechanisms of simplicity and elegance that are conserved throughout genera and species. There is a direct spatial and temporal relationship of morphologic and molecular events that emphasize the biomimetism of the remodeling cycles of the osteonic corticocancellous bone versus the "geometric induction of bone formation," that is, the induction of bone by "smart" concavities assembled in biomimetic matrices of macroporous calcium phosphate-based constructs. The basic multicellular unit of the corticocancellous bone excavates a trench across the bone surface, leaving in its wake a hemiosteon rather than an osteon, that is, a trench with cross-sectional geometric cues of concavities after cyclic episodes of osteoclastogenesis, eventually leading to osteogenesis. The concavities per se are geometric regulators of growth-inducing angiogenesis and osteogenesis as in the remodeling processes of the corticocancellous bone. The concavities act as a powerful geometric attractant for myoblastic/myoendothelial and/or endothelial/pericytic stem cells, which differentiate into bone-forming cells. The lacunae, pits, and concavities cut by osteoclastogenesis within the biomimetic matrices are the driving morphogenetic cues that induce bone formation in a continuum of sequential phases of resorption/dissolution and formation. To induce the cascade of bone differentiation, the soluble osteogenic molecular signals of the transforming growth factor β supergene family must be reconstituted with an insoluble signal or substratum that triggers the bone differentiation cascade. By carving a series of repetitive concavities into solid and/or macroporous biomimetic matrices of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite or biphasic hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate, we were able to embed smart biologic functions within

  13. Aqueous synthesis and characterization of bovine hemoglobin-conjugated cadmium sulfide nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Guangrui [Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power, Zhengzhou 450011 (China); Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Du, Xian; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Ganqing; Zhang, Qiuxia; Wu, Jiulin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • CdS nanocrystals were synthesized by biomimetic method in bovine hemoglobin (BHb) solution. • The study of the interaction between Cd{sup 2+}/CdS and BHb. • The optical properties of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals. • The synthesis process of BHb-conjugated CdS nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. • The change of secondary structure of BHb after binding to CdS nanocrystals. - Abstract: Cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals with average diameter about 5.5 nm were synthesized in aqueous solution of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) via simple biomimetic method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations were used to determine the structure and morphology of CdS nanocrystals. It was revealed that amount of BHb, chelating of Cd{sup 2+} to BHb and reaction temperature were key factors in controlling shape and dispersion of CdS nanocrystals. The binding sites of BHb to CdS nanocrystals and the change of secondary structure of protein have been identified by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. It was found that conjugating of BHb with Cd{sup 2+} and CdS could protect nanocrystals from agglomerating. Moreover, the thermostability of BHb enhanced after conjugating with CdS nanocrystals. The interaction mechanism of BHb with Cd{sup 2+}/CdS was also proposed. The quantum-confined effect of CdS nanocrystals was confirmed by ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectrum. The nanocrystals exhibited a well-defined photoluminescence (PL) emission feature at about 510 nm with narrow full width at half maximum (FWHM)

  14. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite: A New Material for the Preservation and Restoration of the Built Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ronald J; Renshaw, Joanna C; Hamilton, Andrea

    2017-09-20

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) is by weight the world's most produced man-made material and is used in a variety of applications in environments ranging from buildings, to nuclear wasteforms, and within the human body. In this paper, we present for the first time the direct deposition of biogenic hydroxyapatite onto the surface of OPC in a synergistic process which uses the composition of the cement substrate. This hydroxyapatite is very similar to that found in nature, having a similar crystallite size, iron and carbonate substitution, and a semi-crystalline structure. Hydroxyapatites with such a structure are known to be mechanically stronger and more biocompatible than synthetic or biomimetic hydroxyapatites. The formation of this biogenic hydroxyapatite coating therefore has significance in a range of contexts. In medicine, hydroxyapatite coatings are linked to improved biocompatibility of ceramic implant materials. In the built environment, hydroxyapatite coatings have been proposed for the consolidation and protection of sculptural materials such as marble and limestone, with biogenic hydroxyapatites having reduced solubility compared to synthetic apatites. Hydroxyapatites have also been established as effective for the adsorption and remediation of environmental contaminants such as radionuclides and heavy metals. We identify that in addition to providing a biofilm scaffold for nucleation, the metabolic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens increases the pH of the growth medium to a suitable level for hydroxyapatite formation. The generated ammonia reacts with phosphate in the growth medium, producing ammonium phosphates which are a precursor to the formation of hydroxyapatite under conditions of ambient temperature and pressure. Subsequently, this biogenic deposition process takes place in a simple reaction system under mild chemical conditions and is cheap and easy to apply to fragile biological or architectural surfaces.

  15. Water-Soluble Cellulose Derivatives Are Sustainable Additives for Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Mineralization

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The effect of cellulose-based polyelectrolytes on biomimetic calcium phosphate mineralization is described. Three cellulose derivatives, a polyanion, a polycation, and a polyzwitterion were used as additives. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy show that, depending on the composition of the starting solution, hydroxyapatite or brushite precipitates form. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy also show that significant amounts of nitrate ions are incorporated i...

  16. Biomimetics: process, tools and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayemi, P E; Wanieck, K; Zollfrank, C; Maranzana, N; Aoussat, A

    2017-01-23

    Biomimetics applies principles and strategies abstracted from biological systems to engineering and technological design. With a huge potential for innovation, biomimetics could evolve into a key process in businesses. Yet challenges remain within the process of biomimetics, especially from the perspective of potential users. We work to clarify the understanding of the process of biomimetics. Therefore, we briefly summarize the terminology of biomimetics and bioinspiration. The implementation of biomimetics requires a stated process. Therefore, we present a model of the problem-driven process of biomimetics that can be used for problem-solving activity. The process of biomimetics can be facilitated by existing tools and creative methods. We mapped a set of tools to the biomimetic process model and set up assessment sheets to evaluate the theoretical and practical value of these tools. We analyzed the tools in interdisciplinary research workshops and present the characteristics of the tools. We also present the attempt of a utility tree which, once finalized, could be used to guide users through the process by choosing appropriate tools respective to their own expertize. The aim of this paper is to foster the dialogue and facilitate a closer collaboration within the field of biomimetics.

  17. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings synthesized by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visan, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Grossin, D. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Stefan, N.; Duta, L.; Miroiu, F.M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Stan, G.E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, RO-077125, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Sopronyi, M.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Freche, M.; Marsan, O.; Charvilat, C. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Ciuca, S. [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the deposition by MAPLE of biomimetic apatite coatings on Ti substrates. • This is the first report of MAPLE deposition of hydrated biomimetic apatite films. • Biomimetic apatite powder was synthesized by double decomposition process. • Non-apatitic environments, of high surface reactivity, are preserved post-deposition. • We got the MAPLE complete transfer as thin film of a hydrated, delicate material. -- Abstract: We report the deposition by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings on titanium substrates, with potential application in tissue engineering. The targets were prepared from metastable, nanometric, poorly crystalline apatite powders, analogous to mineral bone, synthesized through a biomimetic approach by double decomposition process. For the deposition of thin films, a KrF* excimer laser source was used (λ = 248 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≤ 25 ns). The analyses revealed the existence, in synthesized powders, of labile non-apatitic mineral ions, associated with the formation of a hydrated layer at the surface of the nanocrystals. The thin film analyses showed that the structural and chemical nature of the nanocrystalline apatite was prevalently preserved. The perpetuation of the non-apatitic environments was also observed. The study indicated that MAPLE is a suitable technique for the congruent transfer of a delicate material, such as the biomimetic hydrated nanohydroxyapatite.

  18. Inflammatory Response to Nano- and Microstructured Hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Gemma; Espanol, Montserrat; Xia, Wei; Persson, Cecilia; Ginebra, Maria-Pau; Ott, Marjam Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact) and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact). Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate’s microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials. PMID:25837264

  19. Inflammatory response to nano- and microstructured hydroxyapatite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Mestres

    Full Text Available The proliferation and activation of leukocytes upon contact with a biomaterial play a crucial role in the degree of inflammatory response, which may then determine the clinical failure or success of an implanted biomaterial. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether nano- and microstructured biomimetic hydroxyapatite substrates can influence the growth and activation of macrophage-like cells. Hydroxyapatite substrates with different crystal morphologies consisting of an entangled network of plate-like and needle-like crystals were evaluated. Macrophage proliferation was evaluated on the material surface (direct contact and also in extracts i.e. media modified by the material (indirect contact. Additionally, the effect of supplementing the extracts with calcium ions and/or proteins was investigated. Macrophage activation on the substrates was evaluated by quantifying the release of reactive oxygen species and by morphological observations. The results showed that differences in the substrate's microstructure play a major role in the activation of macrophages as there was a higher release of reactive oxygen species after culturing the macrophages on plate-like crystals substrates compared to the almost non-existent release on needle-like substrates. However, the difference in macrophage proliferation was ascribed to different ionic exchanges and protein adsorption/retention from the substrates rather than to the texture of materials.

  20. Accelerated Nucleation of Hydroxyapatite Using an Engineered Hydrophobin Fusion Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Melanie; Facey, Sandra J; Henkes, Thorsten M; Subkowski, Thomas; Hauer, Bernhard

    2016-05-09

    Calcium phosphate mineralization is of particular interest in dental repair. A biomimetic approach using proteins or peptides is a highly promising way to reconstruct eroded teeth. In this study, the screening of several proteins is described for their binding and nucleating activities toward hydroxyapatite. Out of 27 tested candidates, only two hydrophobin fusion proteins showed binding abilities to hydroxyapatite in a mouthwash formulation and an increased nucleation in artificial saliva. Using a semirational approach, one of the two candidates (DEWA_5), a fusion protein consisting of a truncated section of the Bacillus subtilis synthase YaaD, the Aspergillus nidulans hydrophobin DEWA, and the rationally designed peptide P11-4 described in the literature, could be further engineered toward a faster mineral formation. The variants DEWA_5a (40aaYaaD-SDSDSD-DEWA) and DEWA_5b (40aaYaaD-RDRDRD-DEWA) were able to enhance the nucleation activity without losing the ability to form hydroxyapatite. In the case of variant DEWA_5b, an additional increase in the binding toward hydroxyapatite could be achieved. Especially with the variant DEWA_5a, the protein engineering of the rationally designed peptide sequence resulted in a resemblance of an amino acid motif that is found in nature. The engineered peptide resembles the amino acid motif in dentin phosphoprotein, one of the major proteins involved in dentinogenesis.

  1. Amelogenin and Enamel Biomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qichao; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Mature tooth enamel is acellular and does not regenerate itself. Developing technologies that rebuild tooth enamel and preserve tooth structure is therefore of great interest. Considering the importance of amelogenin protein in dental enamel formation, its ability to control apatite mineralization in vitro, and its potential to be applied in fabrication of future bio-inspired dental material this review focuses on two major subjects: amelogenin and enamel biomimetics. We review the most recent findings on amelogenin secondary and tertiary structural properties with a focus on its interactions with different targets including other enamel proteins, apatite mineral, and phospholipids. Following a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and its mechanical properties we will present the state-of-the-art strategies in the biomimetic reconstruction of human enamel. PMID:26251723

  2. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  3. Amelogenin and Enamel Biomimetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, Qichao; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Mature tooth enamel is acellular and does not regenerate itself. Developing technologies that rebuild tooth enamel and preserve tooth structure is therefore of great interest. Considering the importance of amelogenin protein in dental enamel formation, its ability to control apatite mineralization in vitro, and its potential to be applied in fabrication of future bio-inspired dental material this review focuses on two major subjects: amelogenin and enamel biomimetics. We review the most recen...

  4. Novel Nanocrystal Floating Gate Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Huimei

    2012-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigating the feasibility of engineering nanocrystals and tunnel oxide layer with a novel structure. Several novel devices are demonstrated to improve the performance of the novel nanocrystal memories.A novel TiSi2 nanocrystal memory was demonstrated. TiSi2 nanocrystals were synthesized on SiO2 by annealing Ti covered Si nanocrystals. Compared to the reference Si nanocrystal memory, both experiment and simulation results show that TiSi2 nanocrystal memory exhibits ...

  5. Evaluation of Bone Healing on Sandblasted and Acid Etched Implants Coated with Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite: An In Vivo Study in Rabbit Femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lory Melin Svanborg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at investigating if a coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals would enhance bone healing over time in trabecular bone. Sandblasted and acid etched titanium implants with and without a submicron thick coat of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals (nano-HA were implanted in rabbit femur with healing times of 2, 4, and 9 weeks. Removal torque analyses and histological evaluations were performed. The torque analysis did not show any significant differences between the implants at any healing time. The control implant showed a tendency of more newly formed bone after 4 weeks of healing and significantly higher bone area values after 9 weeks of healing. According to the results from this present study, both control and nano-HA surfaces were biocompatible and osteoconductive. A submicron thick coating of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals deposited onto blasted and acid etched screw shaped titanium implants did not enhance bone healing, as compared to blasted and etched control implants when placed in trabecular bone.

  6. Surface chemical modification of nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helms, Brett Anthony; Milliron, Delia Jane; Rosen, Evelyn Louise; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Llordes, Anna

    2017-03-14

    Nanocrystals comprising organic ligands at surfaces of the plurality of nanocrystals are provided. The organic ligands are removed from the surfaces of the nanocrystals using a solution comprising a trialkyloxonium salt in a polar aprotic solvent. The removal of the organic ligands causes the nanocrystals to become naked nanocrystals with cationic surfaces.

  7. Biomimetism, biomimetic matrices and the induction of bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, Ugo

    2009-09-01

    the induction of bone formation, the emergence of the skeleton, of the vertebrates and of Homo species * Different strategies for the induction of bone formation. Biological significance of redundancy and synergistic induction of bone formation. Biomimetism and biomimetic matrices self-assembling the induction of bone formation The concavity: the shape of life and the induction of bone formation. Influence of geometry on the expression of the osteogenic phenotype. Conclusion and therapeutic perspectives on porous biomimetic matrices with intrinsic osteoinductivity Bone formation by induction initiates by invocation of osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily; when combined with insoluble signals or substrata, the osteogenic soluble signals trigger the ripple-like cascade of cell differentiation into osteoblastic cell lines secreting bone matrix at site of surgical implantation. A most exciting and novel strategy to initiate bone formation by induction is to carve smart self-inducing geometric concavities assembled within biomimetic constructs. The assembly of a series of repetitive concavities within the biomimetic constructs is endowed with the striking prerogative of differentiating osteoblast-like cells attached to the biomimetic matrices initiating the induction of bone formation as a secondary response. Importantly, the induction of bone formation is initiated without the exogenous application of the osteogenic soluble molecular signals of the TGF-beta superfamily. This manuscript reviews the available data on this fascinating phenomenon, i.e. biomimetic matrices that arouse and set into motion the mammalian natural ability to heal thus constructing biomimetic matrices that in their own right set into motion inductive regenerative phenomena initiating the cascade of bone differentiation by induction biomimetizing the remodelling cycle of the primate cortico-cancellous bone.

  8. Biomimetic Receptors and Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz L. Dickert

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In biomimetics, living systems are imitated to develop receptors for ions, molecules and bioparticles. The most pertinent idea is self-organization in analogy to evolution in nature, which created the key-lock principle. Today, modern science has been developing host-guest chemistry, a strategy of supramolecular chemistry for designing interactions of analytes with synthetic receptors. This can be realized, e.g., by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs or molecular imprinting. The strategies are used for solid phase extraction (SPE, but preferably in developing recognition layers of chemical sensors.

  9. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  10. Mineralization of Zein Films by Biomimetic Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xiaoning; ZHANG Yanxiang; MA Ying; ZENG Sheng; WANG Shaozhen; MA Yalu

    2015-01-01

    The transparent or opaque zein film was prepared by a phase separation method with a zein ethanol aqueous solution. The circular zein film was self-assembled on the air-water interface. According to the images by scanning elec-tron microscopy, the upper surface of film is flat and smooth and the downward surface presents a complex reticulation structure of corn protein fiber. Zein film as a biomimetic mineralization template is used to synthesize calcium phosphate crystals by a bioinspired mineralization process. Randomly oriented apatite crystals appear on the both surfaces of zein film after immersion in 10´simulated body fluid, and the phase composition and morphology of the deposited calcium apatite are also distinguished from deposited location and immersion time. The phase transformation process from dical-cium phosphate dihydrate into hydroxyapatite (HAp) phase was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Based on the results by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the Ca/P ratio of the deposited apatite increases with the transformation from DCPD to HAp. The HAp/Zein films possess the excellent biodegradable structural features, and the coating of HAp crystallites has some potential applications for bone repair and regeneration.

  11. Mineralization of Zein Films by Biomimetic Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Xiaoning; ZHANG; Yanxiang; MA; Ying; ZENG; Sheng; WANG; Shaozhen; MA; Yalu

    2015-01-01

    The transparent or opaque zein film was prepared by a phase separation method with a zein ethanol aqueous solution.The circular zein film was self-assembled on the air-water interface.According to the images by scanning electron microscopy,the upper surface of film is flat and smooth and the downward surface presents a complex reticulation structure of corn protein fiber.Zein film as a biomimetic mineralization template is used to synthesize calcium phosphate crystals by a bioinspired mineralization process.Randomly oriented apatite crystals appear on the both surfaces of zein film after immersion in lOxsimulated body fluid,and the phase composition and morphology of the deposited calcium apatite are also distinguished from deposited location and immersion time.The phase transformation process from dicalcium phosphate dihydrate into hydroxyapatite(HAp) phase was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction,transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,respectively.Based on the results by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy,the Ca/P ratio of the deposited apatite increases with the transformation from DCPD to HAp.The HAp/Zein films possess the excellent biodegradable structural features,and the coating of HAp crystallites has some potential applications for bone repair and regeneration.

  12. Hydroxyapatite with environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popa, C. L. [National Institute of Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG 07, Bucharest, Magurele, Romania and Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor, CP MG-1, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Ciobanu, C. S.; Predoi, D., E-mail: dpredoi@gmail.com [National Institute of Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG 07, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Petre, C. C.; Jiga, G. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Engineering and Management of Technological Systems, Department of Strength of Materials, 060032, Bucharest (Romania); Motelica-Heino, M. [ISTO, UMR 7327 CNRS-Université d' Orléans, 1A rue de la Férollerie 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Iconaru, S. L. [National Institute of Materials Physics, P.O. Box MG 07, Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 405 Atomistilor, CP MG-1, 077125 Magurele (Romania); ISTO, UMR 7327 CNRS-Université d' Orléans, 1A rue (France)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to synthetize new nanoparticles based on methyltrimethoxysilane coated hydroxyapatite (MTHAp) for lead removal in aqueous solutions. The morphological and compositional analysis of MTHAp was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). Removal experiments of Pb{sup 2+} ions were carried out in aqueous solutions with controlled concentration of Pb{sup 2+} and at fixed pH of 5. After the removal experiment of Pb{sup 2+} ions from solutions, porous hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were transformed into PbMTHAp-5 via the adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} ions followed by a cation exchange reaction. Our results demonstrate that the porous hydroxyapatite nanoparticles can be used as an adsorbent for removing Pb{sup 2+} ions from aqueous solution.

  13. Biomimetics in Tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebeshuber, I. C.; Majlis, B. Y.; Stachelberger, H.

    Science currently goes through a major change. Biology is evolving as new Leitwissenschaft, with more and more causation and natural laws being uncovered. The term `technoscience' denotes the field where science and technology are inseparably interconnected, the trend goes from papers to patents, and the scientific `search for truth' is increasingly replaced by search for applications with a potential economic value. Biomimetics, i.e. knowledge transfer from biology to technology, is a field that has the potential to drive major technical advances. The biomimetic approach might change the research landscape and the engineering culture dramatically, by the blending of disciplines. It might substantially support successful mastering of current tribological challenges: friction, adhesion, lubrication and wear in devices and systems from the meter to the nanometer scale. A highly successful method in biomimectics, the biomimicry innovation method, is applied in this chapter to identify nature's best practices regarding two key issues in tribology: maintenance of the physical integrity of a system, and permanent as well as temporary attachment. The best practices identified comprise highly diverse organisms and processes and are presented in a number of tables with detailed references.

  14. Biomimetic Cilia Based on MEMS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2008-01-01

    A review on the research of Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology based biomimetic cilia is presented. Biomimetic cilia, enabled by the advancement of MEMS technology, have been under dynamic development for the past decade. After a brief description of the background of cilia and MEMS technology, different biomimetic cilia applications are reviewed. Biomimetic cilia micro-actuators, including micromachined polyimide bimorph biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, electro-statically actuated polymer biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, and magnetically actuated nanorod array biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, are presented. Subsequently micromachined underwater flow biomimetic cilia micro-sensor is studied, followed by acoustic flow micro-sensor. The fabrication of these MEMS-based biomimetic cilia devices, characterization of their physical properties, and the results of their application experiments are discussed.

  15. The influence of plasma technology coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of 3D hydroxyapatite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Laura; Zanini, Stefano; Giannoni, Paolo; Landi, Elena; Villa, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Riccardi, Claudia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Doglia, Silvia M; Nicotra, Francesco; Cipolla, Laura

    2012-11-01

    The development of advanced materials with biomimetic features in order to elicit desired biological responses and to guarantee tissue biocompatibility is recently gaining attention for tissue engineering applications. Bioceramics, such as hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are now used in a number of different applications throughout the body, covering all areas of the skeleton, due to their biological and chemical similarity to the inorganic phases of bones. When bioactive sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) is desired, biomolecular modification of these materials is needed. In the present work, we investigated the influence of plasma surface modification coupled to chemical grafting on the cell growth compliance of HA 3D scaffolds.

  16. Greater osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Castro, Nathan J; Li, Jian; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2012-10-01

    With an increasingly active and aging population, a growing number of orthopedic procedures are performed annually. However, traditional orthopedic implants face many complications such as infection, implant loosening, and poor host tissue integration leading to implant failure. Metal implant materials such as titanium and its alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications mainly based on their excellent mechanical properties and biological inertness. Since human bone extracellular matrix is nanometer in dimension comprised of rich nanostructured hydroxyapatite particles and collagen nanofibers, it is highly desirable to design a biologically-inspired nanostructured coating which renders the biocompatible titanium surface into a biomimetic and bioactive interface, thus enhancing osteoblast adhesion and promoting osseointegration. For this purpose, a biomimetic nanostructured coating based on nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and single wall carbon nanotubes was designed. Specifically, nano hydroxyapatites with good crystallinity and biomimetic dimensions were prepared via a wet chemistry method and hydrothermal treatment. Microcrystalline hydroxyapatite with larger grain sizes can be obtained without hydrothermal treatment. The carbon nanotubes with different diameter and length were synthesized via an arc plasma method in the presence or absence of a magnetic field. Transmission electron microscopy images illustrate the regular, rod-like nanocrystalline and biomimetic nanostructure of hydrothermally treated nano hydroxyapatite. In addition, the length of carbon nanotubes can be significantly increased under external magnetic fields when compared to nanotubes produced without a magnetic field. More importantly, the in vitro study demonstrated for the first time that osteoblast and mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation were greater on titanium with hydrothermally treated nanocrystalline hydroxyapatites/magnetically treated carbon nanotubes, which suggests

  17. MD SIMULATION FOR NANOCRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马新玲; 杨卫

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamic (MD) provided an ab initio simulation for nano-scale mechanical behavior of materials, provided that the inter-atomic potential is accurately prescribed. MD is particularly suitable in simulating the formation, the deformation, and the evolution of nanocrystals under a fast strain rate. To tackle large scale system and nano-seconds time duration, parallel algorithm is desired. The present paper reviews the recent advances in MD simulation for nanocrystals with attention focused on the applications toward nanomechanics. The examined issues are: formation of nanocrystalline metals, nanoindentation on nanocrystals, fast deformation of nanocrystals, orderdisorder transition, and nano-particle impact.

  18. Relative biological evaluation of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals surface-grafted with L-lactic acid oligomer/poly(lactide-co-glycolde) cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells%改性纳米羟基磷灰石/PLGA材料同骨髓基质干细胞复合后相关生物学评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭羽莹; 张舵; 李玉新; 孙颖; 徐洋; 李春; 金洪娟; 邵英

    2011-01-01

    背景:改性纳米羟基磷灰石/聚乙交酯-丙交酯复合材料(L-lactic acid oligomer/Poly(lactide-co-glycolde),PLGA/g-HA)因具有良好的稳定性及机械性能,目前备受关注.目的:观察骨髓基质干细胞和改性PLGA/g-HA体外复合后的细胞活性及生物相容性.方法:原代培养兔骨髓基质干细胞,传代培养至第3代,MTT比色法检测在不同浓度PLGA/g-HA浸提液(10%、30%、50%、80%)中骨髓基质干细胞的增殖情况,以及骨髓基质干细胞在PLGA/g-HA表面的黏附性及其细胞形态.结果与结论:于培养后1,3 d测得在不同浓度浸提液下骨髓基质干细胞的A值,10%浸提液组和对照组相比无显著性差异,4种浓度浸提液的细胞毒性均为1级;扫描电镜观察到骨髓基质干细胞在PLGA/g-HA表面逐渐伸展,形成伪足,最终牢固锚定在材料表面.提示在PLGA/g-HA的浸提液中骨髓基质干细胞能够发生增殖,对细胞无毒性.骨髓基质干细胞可以黏附在PLGA/g-HA表面且形态正常,生长状态良好,证明PLGA/g-HA具有良好的相容性和黏附性,可作为修复骨缺损的复合组织工程骨.%BACKGROUND: The hydroxyapatite nanocrystals surface-grafted with L-lactic acid oligomer/poly (lactide-co-glycolde) (PLGA/g-HA) composite material is preferable to good stability and favorable mechanical property. As scaffold cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs).OBJECTIVE: To study the bioactivity and biocompatibility of BMSCs cultured with PLGA/g-HA composite material in vitro.METHODS: Third passage BMSCs of rabbits were cultured in PLGA/g-HA extract at different concentrations (10%, 30%, 50%and 80%), and cell proliferation was detected by MTT method. Meanwhile, the cell adhesion and morphology were observed with scanning electron microscopy.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference between 10% group and negative group at 1 and 3 days after culture. The cytotoxic grade was Grade 1 in all the four

  19. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  20. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mitchinson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primary afferents and vibrissal trigeminal ganglion have been modelled using empirical data taken from electrophysiological measurements, and implemented in real-time using a Field Programmable Gate Array. Pipelining techniques were employed to maximise the utility of the FPGA hardware. The system is to be integrated into a more complete whisker sensory model, including neural structures within the central nervous system, which can be used to orient a mobile robot.

  1. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J. Pearson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primary afferents and vibrissal trigeminal ganglion have been modelled using empirical data taken from electrophysiological measurements, and implemented in real-time using a Field Programmable Gate Array. Pipelining techniques were employed to maximise the utility of the FPGA hardware. The system is to be integrated into a more complete whisker sensory model, including neural structures within the central nervous system, which can be used to orient a mobile robot.

  2. Hydroxyapatite coatings for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings are of great importance in the biological and biomedical coatings fields, especially in the current era of nanotechnology and bioapplications. With a bonelike structure that promotes osseointegration, hydroxyapatite coating can be applied to otherwise bioinactive implants to make their surface bioactive, thus achieving faster healing and recovery. In addition to applications in orthopedic and dental implants, this coating can also be used in drug delivery. Hydroxyapatite Coatings for Biomedical Applications explores developments in the processing and property characteri

  3. PREFACE: Symposium 13: Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2011-10-01

    Preface to Symposium 13 (Ceramics for Medicine, Biotechnology and Biomimetics) of the International Congress on Ceramics III, 14-18 November 2010, Osaka, Japan Ceramic materials are now widely used in biomedical fields, such as applications of artificial bones, joints and teeth. The high potential of ceramics to exhibit biological functionality is expected to produce novel materials supporting biotechnology. These applications are governed by the interactions of materials and biological molecules. So far, 'bioceramics' is a type of biomaterial used for repairing damaged tissues. The orthopaedic application of bioceramics has advanced rapidly since the invention of Bioglass® that was found to encourage direct bonding with living bone. Hydroxyapatite and calcium phosphate ceramics are now popular bioceramics for use in artificial bones. While the bone-bonding behavior of materials was understood phenomenologically, very little has been known about the mechanism of either hard or soft tissue attachment or tissue growth on ceramic-based materials, such as glasses, glass-ceramics, ceramic composites and organic-inorganic hybrids. This symposium discussed the scientific understanding of the interface between biomedical materials and soft/hard tissues, and the design and construction of nanoscopic interfaces. It also involved establishment of biomimetic structures, characterization of natural life-related hard and soft tissues, and their formation mechanisms for a wide range of applications in biotechnology through 45 oral presentations including 5 invited lectures and 45 posters. I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the organizers of this symposium in the ICC3 conference. I am also grateful to the invited speakers, all the participants and organizing committee of the ICC3. It is my great pleasure that this proceedings could be published as the fruit of this symposium's achievement, which includes the contributions in all aspect of scientific understanding and

  4. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  5. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, J. S.; Wood, D. J.; Milne, S. J.

    2006-02-01

    A hydrothermal method of synthesizing hydroxyapatite by heating a precipitate, formed by mixing Ca(NO3)2bold dot4H2O and (NH4)2HPO4 with distilled water, in a hydrothermal reactor at 200 °C for 24-72 hrs is described. A treatment time of 24 hrs produced single phase (as shown by XRD) hydroxyapatite powder, however for longer treatment times XRD patterns were indicative of the presence of a secondary phase, monetite (CaHPO4). SEM examination of the treated powders displayed particles of rod-like morphology with dimensions 100-500 nm in length and 10-60 nm in diameter. Preliminary results on the use of the particles for the infiltration of dentine tubules are presented.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl, J S; Wood, D J; Milne, S J [Institute for Materials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-22

    A hydrothermal method of synthesizing hydroxyapatite by heating a precipitate, formed by mixing Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} with distilled water, in a hydrothermal reactor at 200 deg. C for 24-72 hrs is described. A treatment time of 24 hrs produced single phase (as shown by XRD) hydroxyapatite powder, however for longer treatment times XRD patterns were indicative of the presence of a secondary phase, monetite (CaHPO{sub 4}). SEM examination of the treated powders displayed particles of rod-like morphology with dimensions 100-500 nm in length and 10-60 nm in diameter. Preliminary results on the use of the particles for the infiltration of dentine tubules are presented.

  7. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Rios-Santos, Jose-Vicente; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-05-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite's high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

  8. Biomimetic Versus Sintered Calcium Phosphates: The In Vitro Behavior of Osteoblasts and Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Joanna-Maria; Guillem-Marti, Jordi; Montufar, Edgar Benjamin; Espanol, Montserrat; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2017-02-21

    The fabrication of calcium phosphates using biomimetic routes, namely, precipitation processes at body temperature, results in distinct features compared to conventional sintered calcium phosphate ceramics, such as a high specific surface area (SSA) and micro- or nanometric crystal size. The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of these parameters on cell response, focusing on two bone cell types: rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) and human osteoblastic cells (SaOS-2). Biomimetic calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) was obtained by a low temperature setting reaction, and α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and β-tricalcium phosphate were subsequently obtained by sintering CDHA either at 1400°C or 1100°C. Sintered stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA) was also prepared using ceramic routes. The materials were characterized in terms of SSA, skeletal density, porosity, and pore size distribution. SaOS-2 cells and rMSCs were seeded either directly on the surfaces of the materials or on glass coverslips subsequently placed on top of the materials to expose the cells to the CaP-induced ionic changes in the culture medium, while avoiding any topography-related effects. CDHA produced higher ionic fluctuations in both cell culture media than sintered ceramics, with a strong decrease of calcium and a release of phosphate. Indirect contact cell cultures revealed that both cell types were sensitive to these ionic modifications, resulting in a decrease in proliferation rate, more marked for CDHA, this effect being more pronounced for rMSCs. In direct contact cultures, good cell adhesion was found on all materials, but, while cells were able to proliferate on the sintered calcium phosphates, cell number was significantly reduced with time on biomimetic CDHA, which was associated to a higher percentage of apoptotic cells. Direct contact of the cells with biomimetic CDHA resulted also in a higher alkaline phosphatase activity for both cell types compared to sintered Ca

  9. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  10. Biomimetic composite scaffolds containing bioceramics and collagen/gelatin for bone tissue engineering - A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttappan, Shruthy; Mathew, Dennis; Nair, Manitha B

    2016-12-01

    Bone is a natural composite material consisting of an organic phase (collagen) and a mineral phase (calcium phosphate, especially hydroxyapatite). The strength of bone is attributed to the apatite, while the collagen fibrils are responsible for the toughness and visco-elasticity. The challenge in bone tissue engineering is to develop such biomimetic composite scaffolds, having a balance between biological and biomechanical properties. This review summarizes the current state of the field by outlining composite scaffolds made of gelatin/collagen in combination with bioactive ceramics for bone tissue engineering application.

  11. Development of biomimetic nanocomposites as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Arundhati; Mitra, Tapas; Gnanamani, Arumugam; Das, Manas; Kundu, Patit Paban

    2016-05-05

    Here, we have developed biomimetic nanocomposites containing chitosan, poly(vinyl alcohol) and nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide as bone extracellular matrix for human osteoblastic cells and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy images revealed interconnected macroporous structures. Moreover, in this study, the problem related to fabricating a porous composite with good mechanical strength has been resolved by incorporating 5wt% of nano-hydroxyapatite-zinc oxide into chitosan-poly(vinyl alcohol) matrix; the present composite showed high tensile strength (20.25MPa) while maintaining appreciable porosity (65.25%). These values are similar to human cancellous bone. These nanocomposites also showed superior water uptake, antimicrobial and biodegradable properties than the previously reported results. Compatibility with human blood and pH was observed, indicating nontoxicity of these materials to the human body. Moreover, proliferation of osteoblastic MG-63 cells onto the nanocomposites was also observed without having any negative effect.

  12. Nanocrystal diffusion doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaskin, Vladimir A; Barrows, Charles J; Erickson, Christian S; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2013-09-25

    A diffusion-based synthesis of doped colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals is demonstrated. This approach involves thermodynamically controlled addition of both impurity cations and host anions to preformed seed nanocrystals under equilibrium conditions, rather than kinetically controlled doping during growth. This chemistry allows thermodynamic crystal compositions to be prepared without sacrificing other kinetically trapped properties such as shape, size, or crystallographic phase. This doping chemistry thus shares some similarities with cation-exchange reactions, but proceeds without the loss of host cations and excels at the introduction of relatively unreactive impurity ions that have not been previously accessible using cation exchange. Specifically, we demonstrate the preparation of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Se (0 ≤ x ≤ ∼0.2) nanocrystals with narrow size distribution, unprecedentedly high Mn(2+) content, and very large magneto-optical effects by diffusion of Mn(2+) into seed CdSe nanocrystals grown by hot injection. Controlling the solution and lattice chemical potentials of Cd(2+) and Mn(2+) allows Mn(2+) diffusion into the internal volumes of the CdSe nanocrystals with negligible Ostwald ripening, while retaining the crystallographic phase (wurtzite or zinc blende), shape anisotropy, and ensemble size uniformity of the seed nanocrystals. Experimental results for diffusion doping of other nanocrystals with other cations are also presented that indicate this method may be generalized, providing access to a variety of new doped semiconductor nanostructures not previously attainable by kinetic routes or cation exchange.

  13. Interaction between a bisphosphonate, tiludronate, and biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaud, Patricia; Gras, Pierre; Coppel, Yannick; Rey, Christian; Sarda, Stéphanie

    2013-02-19

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are well established as successful antiresorptive agents for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis and Paget's disease. The aim of this work was to clarify the reaction mechanisms between a BP molecule, tiludronate, and the nanocrystalline apatite surface. The adsorption of tiludronate on well-characterized synthetic biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites with homogeneous but different compositions and surface characteristics was investigated to determine the effect of the nanocrystalline apatite substrate on the adsorption behavior. The results show that the adsorption of tiludronate on nanocrystalline biomimetic apatite surfaces varies over a large range. The most immature apatitic samples exhibited the highest affinity and the greatest amount adsorbed at saturation. Maturation of the nanocrystals induces a decrease of these values. The amount of phosphate ion released per adsorbed BP molecule varied, depending on the nanocrystalline substrate considered. The adsorption mechanism, although associated with a release of phosphate ions, cannot be considered as a simple ion exchange process involving one or two phosphate ions on the surface. A two-step process is proposed consisting of a surface binding of BP groups to calcium ions associated with a proton release inducing the protonation of surface orthophosphate ions and their eventual solubilization.

  14. Biomimetically triggered inorganic crystal transformation by biomolecules: a new understanding of biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenge; Chu, Xiaobin; Wang, Ben; Pan, Haihua; Xu, Xurong; Tang, Ruikang

    2009-08-06

    Phase transformation is an important strategy in biomineralization. However, the role of biomolecules in the mineral transition is poorly understood despite the fact that the biomineralization society greatly highlights the organic controls in the formation of the inorganic phase. Here, we report an induced biomimetic phase transformation from brushite (a widely used calcium phosphate precursor in biological cement) to hydroxyapatite (main inorganic composition of skeletal mineral) by citrate (a rich organic component in bone tissue). The transformation in the absence of the organic additive cannot be spontaneously initiated in an aqueous solution with a pH of 8.45 (no phase transition is detected in 4 days), which is explained by a high interfacial energy barrier between brushite-solution and hydroxyapatite-solution interfaces. Citrate can oppositely regulate these two interfaces, which decreases and increases the stabilities of brushite and hydroxyapatite surfaces in the solution, respectively. Thus, the interfacial energy barrier can be greatly reduced in the presence of citrate and the reaction is triggered; e.g., at 1 mM citrate, the total transformation from brushite to hydroxyapatite can be completed within 3 days. The relationship between the transition kinetics and citrate concentration is also studied. The work reveals how the organic components direct solid-solid phase transformation, which can be understood by an energetic control of the interfacial barrier. It is emphasized that the terms of interfacial energy must be taken into account in the studies of phase transformation. We suggest that this biomimetic approach may provide an in-depth understanding of biomineralization.

  15. Precipitation of hydroxyapatite on electrospun polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugavel, Suganya; Reddy, Venugopal Jayarama; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Lakshmi, B S; Dev, Vr Giri

    2014-07-01

    Advances in electrospun nanofibres with bioactive materials have enhanced the scope of fabricating biomimetic scaffolds for tissue engineering. The present research focuses on fabrication of polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds by electrospinning followed by hydroxyapatite deposition by calcium-phosphate dipping method for bone tissue engineering. Morphology, composition, hydrophilicity and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds along with controls polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin nanofibrous scaffolds were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, contact angle and tensile tests, respectively. Adipose-derived stem cells cultured on polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds displayed highest cell proliferation, increased osteogenic markers expression (alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin), osteogenic differentiation and increased mineralization in comparison with polycaprolactone control. The obtained results indicate that polycaprolactone/aloe vera/silk fibroin-hydroxyapatite nanofibrous scaffolds have appropriate physico-chemical and biological properties to be used as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration.

  16. Simultaneous control of nanocrystal size and nanocrystal{nanocrystal separation in CdS nanocrystal assembly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sameer Sapra; D D Sarma

    2005-10-01

    We report an easy, one pot synthesis to prepare ordered CdS nanocrystals with varying inter-particle separation and characterize the particle separation using x-ray diffraction at low and wide angles.

  17. Nanocrystals for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthani, Matthew G; Korgel, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are promising materials for low-cost large-area electronic device fabrication. They can be synthesized with a wide variety of chemical compositions and size-tunable optical and electronic properties as well as dispersed in solvents for room-temperature deposition using various types of printing processes. This review addresses research progress in large-area electronic device applications using nanocrystal-based electrically active thin films, including thin-film transistors, light-emitting diodes, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics.

  18. Effects of synthesis factors on the morphology, crystallinity and crystal size of hydroxyapatite precipitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lian-feng; WANG Wei-hua; ZHANG Wen-guang; WANG Cheng-tao

    2005-01-01

    The growing necessity of biomaterials has increased the interest in hydroxyapatite. Small differences in particle sizes, stoichiometry, morphology, crystallinity could lead to different clinical behaviors. In the present work, stoichiometry and nanocrystal hydroxyapatite were prepared by wet chemical precipitation method.The effects of concentration of reagents, reaction temperatures and reaction time were studied. Transmission Electron Microscopy, Electron Diffraction, X - ray Diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy were used to characterize the precipitated hydroxyapatite powders. X -ray Diffraction and TEM micrographs results showed that crystallinity, morphology and particle sizes were largely dependent on reaction temperature. Chemical analysis showed that the purity of the precipitated hydroxyapatite depends on reaction time and reaction temperature. Degree of supersaturation and stirring could affect the crystallization process. Particles showed acicular morphology, and had a size of 20 -30 nm in length at 20 ℃and 37 ℃ and 150 - 160 nm in length at 75 ℃. Particles were monocrystalline at 20 ℃ and 37 ℃, and were polycrystalline at 55 ℃ and 75 ℃. The results showed that hydroxyapatite powders with different particle size and morphology could be obtained with carefully controlled reaction conditions.

  19. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær

    2015-01-01

    of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...

  20. Biomimetic Remineralization of Carious Lesions by Self-Assembling Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, L; Stevanovic, S; Wuttig, S; Wimberger, S; Hofer, J; Müller, B; Pieles, U

    2017-07-01

    Caries is the most common disease in the world. Great efforts have been undertaken for prevention and to identify a regenerative treatment solution for dental caries. Self-assembling β-sheet forming peptides have previously shown to form 3-dimensional fiber networks supporting tissue regeneration. In particular, the self-assembling peptide P11-4 has shown potential in the treatment and prevention of dental caries. It has previously been shown that application of monomeric P11-4 solution to early carious lesions can increase net mineral gain by forming de novo hydroxyapatite crystals. The hypothesis for the mode of action was that monomeric self-assembling peptide P11-4 diffuses into the subsurface lesion body and assembles therein into higher order fibrils, facilitating mineralization of the subsurface volume by mimicking the natural biomineralization of the tooth enamel, and it remains within the lesion body as a scaffold built-in by the newly formed hydroxyapatite. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of action of the self-assembling peptide P11-4 supporting mineralization of carious enamel. By various analytical methods, it could be shown that the self-assembling peptide P11-4 diffuses into the subsurface lesion, assembles into higher formed aggregates throughout the whole volume of the lesion, and supports nucleation of de novo hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and consequently results in increased mineral density within the subsurface carious lesion. The results showed that the application of self-assembling peptide P11-4 can facilitate the subsurface regeneration of the enamel lesion by supporting de novo mineralization in a similar mode of action as has been shown for the natural formation of dental enamel.

  1. Ionic Colloidal Molding as a Biomimetic Scaffolding Strategy for Uniform Bone Tissue Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Jia, Jinpeng; Kim, Jimin P; Shen, Hong; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Qiang; Xu, Meng; Bi, Wenzhi; Wang, Xing; Yang, Jian; Wu, Decheng

    2017-02-21

    Inspired by the highly ordered nanostructure of bone, nanodopant composite biomaterials are gaining special attention for their ability to guide bone tissue regeneration through structural and biological cues. However, bone malformation in orthopedic surgery is a lingering issue, partly due to the high surface energy of traditional nanoparticles contributing to aggregation and inhomogeneity. Recently, carboxyl-functionalized synthetic polymers have been shown to mimic the carboxyl-rich surface motifs of non-collagenous proteins in stabilizing hydroxyapatite and directing intrafibrillar mineralization in-vitro. Based on this biomimetic approach, it is herein demonstrated that carboxyl functionalization of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) can achieve great material homogeneity in nanocomposites. This ionic colloidal molding method stabilizes hydroxyapatite precursors to confer even nanodopant packing, improving therapeutic outcomes in bone repair by remarkably improving mechanical properties of nanocomposites and optimizing controlled drug release, resulting in better cell in-growth and osteogenic differentiation. Lastly, better controlled biomaterial degradation significantly improved osteointegration, translating to highly regular bone formation with minimal fibrous tissue and increased bone density in rabbit radial defect models. Ionic colloidal molding is a simple yet effective approach of achieving materials homogeneity and modulating crystal nucleation, serving as an excellent biomimetic scaffolding strategy to rebuild natural bone integrity.

  2. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor...... or as sensor devices based on e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix...... will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport contribution from both protein and biomimetic support matrix. Also the biomimetic matrix must be encapsulated in order to protect it and make...

  3. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  4. Biomimetic membranes and methods of making biomimetic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, Susan; Brinker, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, David Michael; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Yang, Shaorong

    2016-11-08

    The present disclosure is directed to biomimetic membranes and methods of manufacturing such membranes that include structural features that mimic the structures of cellular membrane channels and produce membrane designs capable of high selectivity and high permeability or adsorptivity. The membrane structure, material and chemistry can be selected to perform liquid separations, gas separation and capture, ion transport and adsorption for a variety of applications.

  5. MRI of orbital hydroxyapatite implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flanders, A.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); De Potter, P. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rao, V.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tom, B.M. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, C.L. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shields, J.A. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Wills Eye Inst., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our aim was to use MRI for the postsurgical assessment of a new form of integrated orbital implant composed of a porous calcium phosphate hydroxyapatite substrate. We studied ten patients 24-74 years of age who underwent enucleation and implantation of a hydroxyapatite ball; 5-13 months after surgery, each patient was examined by spin-echo MRI, with fat suppression and gadolinium enhancement. Fibrovascular ingrowth was demonstrated in all ten patients as areas of enhancement at the periphery of the hydroxyapatite sphere that extended to the center to a variable degree. The radiologist should aware of the MRI appearances of the coralline hydroxyapatite orbital implant since it is now widely used following enucleation. MRI is a useful means to determine successful incorporation of the substrate into the orbital tissues. The normal pattern of contrast enhancement should not be mistaken for recurrent tumor or infection. (orig.)

  6. Large scale biomimetic membrane arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    To establish planar biomimetic membranes across large scale partition aperture arrays, we created a disposable single-use horizontal chamber design that supports combined optical-electrical measurements. Functional lipid bilayers could easily and efficiently be established across CO2 laser micro......-structured 8 x 8 aperture partition arrays with average aperture diameters of 301 +/- 5 mu m. We addressed the electro-physical properties of the lipid bilayers established across the micro-structured scaffold arrays by controllable reconstitution of biotechnological and physiological relevant membrane...... peptides and proteins. Next, we tested the scalability of the biomimetic membrane design by establishing lipid bilayers in rectangular 24 x 24 and hexagonal 24 x 27 aperture arrays, respectively. The results presented show that the design is suitable for further developments of sensitive biosensor assays...

  7. Biological and Biomimetic Comb Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the determination of the structure and dynamics (viscoelasticity of comb polymers in solution are also covered. Specifically the appearance of multi-globular structures, helical instabilities, liquid crystalline phases, and the self-assembly of the materials to produce hierarchical comb morphologies is examined. Comb polyelectrolytes are surface active and a short review is made of some recent experiments in this area that relate to their morphology when suspended in solution. We hope to emphasize the wide variety of phenomena demonstrated by the vast range of naturally occurring comb polyelectrolytes and the challenges presented to synthetic chemists designing biomimetic materials.

  8. Bio-mimetic mineralization potential of collagen hydrolysate obtained from chromium tanned leather waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Madhu, S; Chandra Babu, N K; Shanthi, C

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics serve as an alternative to autogenous-free bone grafting by virtue of their excellent biocompatibility. However, chemically synthesized HA lacks the strong load-bearing capacity as required by bone. The bio-mimetic growth of HA crystals on collagen surface provides a feasible solution for synthesizing bone substitutes with the desired properties. This study deals with the utilization of the collagen hydrolysate recovered from leather waste as a substrate for promoting HA crystal growth. Bio-mimetic growth of HA was induced by subjecting the hydrolysate to various mineralization conditions. Parameters that would have a direct effect on crystal growth were varied to determine the optimal conditions necessary. Maximum mineralization was achieved with a combination of 10mM of CaCl2, 5mM of Na2HPO4, 100mM of NaCl and 0.575% glutaraldehyde at a pH of 7.4. The metal-protein interactions leading to formation of HA were identified through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystal dimensions were determined to be in the nanoscale range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The size and crystallinity of bio-mimetically grown HA indicate that hydrolysate from leather waste can be used as an ideal alternative substrate for bone growth.

  9. Engineering Tough Materials: Biomimetic Eggshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-30

    at 300 oC indicates the intra-crystalline protein degradation conditions. Figure 4.6, shows the TGA analysis of pure calcite crystals that were...synthesized using the same parameters with that of BSA-entrapped calcites. Comparison of TGA analysis of eggshell crystals and biomimetic synthesis of BSA...powder and analysed using TGA under the same experimental conditions. The result of the TGA analysis of eggshell powder is shown in Figure 4.6. Similar

  10. Synthesis of Ag{sub 2}S nanorods by biomimetic method in the lysozyme matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Dezhi, E-mail: dezhiqin@163.com; Zhang, Li; He, Guoxu; Zhang, Qiuxia

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Firstly, Ag{sub 2}S nanorods were synthesized by biomimetic method in the lysozyme solutions. • The study of the interaction between Ag{sup +} and the lysozyme. • Discussion of possible formation mechanism of Ag{sub 2}S nanorods. • The synthesis process of lyso-conjugated Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals is facile, effective and environment friendly. - Abstract: Ag{sub 2}S nanorods were successfully synthesized by biomimetic route in the lysozyme solution at physiological temperature and atmospheric pressure. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images revealed that the prepared nanorods are uniform and monodisperse with homogeneous size about 50 nm in diameter and 150 nm in length. The optical property of Ag{sub 2}S nanocrystals was studied by the ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, the results show that the products exhibit well-defined emission at 471 nm and 496 nm excited by 292 nm. The interaction of Ag{sup +}/Ag{sub 2}S with the lysozyme was investigated through Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, which shows that the cooperation effect of the lysozyme and Ag{sup +} could be responsible for the formation of as obtained Ag{sub 2}S nanorods.

  11. Biomimetic Mineralization on a Macroporous Cellulose-Based Matrix for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odeta Petrauskaite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the biomimetic mineralization on a cellulose-based porous matrix with an improved biological profile. The cellulose matrix was precalcified using three methods: (i cellulose samples were treated with a solution of calcium chloride and diammonium hydrogen phosphate; (ii the carboxymethylated cellulose matrix was stored in a saturated calcium hydroxide solution; (iii the cellulose matrix was mixed with a calcium silicate solution in order to introduce silanol groups and to combine them with calcium ions. All the methods resulted in a mineralization of the cellulose surfaces after immersion in a simulated body fluid solution. Over a period of 14 days, the matrix was completely covered with hydroxyapatite crystals. Hydroxyapatite formation depended on functional groups on the matrix surface as well as on the precalcification method. The largest hydroxyapatite crystals were obtained on the carboxymethylated cellulose matrix treated with calcium hydroxide solution. The porous cellulose matrix was not cytotoxic, allowing the adhesion and proliferation of human osteoblastic cells. Comparatively, improved cell adhesion and growth rate were achieved on the mineralized cellulose matrices.

  12. Biomimetic apatite-based composite materials obtained by spark plasma sintering (SPS): physicochemical and mechanical characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillet, Fabien; Laurencin, Danielle; Grossin, David; Drouet, Christophe; Estournes, Claude; Chevallier, Geoffroy; Rey, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites are biomimetic compounds analogous to bone mineral and are at the origin of the bioactivity of most biomaterials used as bone substitutes. Their unique surface reactivity originates from the presence of a hydrated layer containing labile ions (mostly divalent ones). So the setup of 3D biocompatible apatite-based bioceramics exhibiting a high reactivity requests the development of «low» temperature consolidation processes such as spark plasma sintering (SPS), in order to preserve the characteristics of the hydrated nanocrystals. However, mechanical performances may still need to be improved for such nanocrystalline apatite bioceramics, especially in view of load-bearing applications. The reinforcement by association with biopolymers represents an appealing approach, while preserving the advantageous biological properties of biomimetic apatites. Herein, we report the preparation of composites based on biomimetic apatite associated with various quantities of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, 1-20 wt%), a natural fibrous polymer. The SPS-consolidated composites were analyzed from both physicochemical (X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, solid state NMR) and mechanical (Brazilian test) viewpoints. The preservation of the physicochemical characteristics of apatite and cellulose in the final material was observed. Mechanical properties of the composite materials were found to be directly related to the polymer/apatite ratios and a maximum crushing strength was reached for 10 wt% of MCC.

  13. Biomimetic Microelectronics for Regenerative Neuronal Cuff Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Münzenrieder, Niko; Karnaushenko, Dmitriy D; Koch, Britta; Meyer, Anne K; Baunack, Stefan; Petti, Luisa; Tröster, Gerhard; Makarov, Denys; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2015-11-18

    Smart biomimetics, a unique class of devices combining the mechanical adaptivity of soft actuators with the imperceptibility of microelectronics, is introduced. Due to their inherent ability to self-assemble, biomimetic microelectronics can firmly yet gently attach to an inorganic or biological tissue enabling enclosure of, for example, nervous fibers, or guide the growth of neuronal cells during regeneration.

  14. BIOMIMETIC STRATEGIES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS. TERPENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kulcitki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The current paper represents an outline of the selected contributions to the biomimetic procedures and approaches for the synthesis of terpenes with complex structure and diverse functionalisation pattern. These include homologation strategies, cyclisations, rearrangements, as well as biomimetic remote functionalisations.

  15. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The paper illustrates how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis...... of biomimetic studies of sense organs in animals....

  16. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating of additively manufactured porous CoCr implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindahl, Carl [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Xia, Wei, E-mail: wei.xia@angstrom.uu.se [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Engqvist, Håkan [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Engineering Sciences, Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Snis, Anders [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Arcam AB, Krokslätts Fabriker 27 A, SE-431 37 Mölndal (Sweden); Lausmaa, Jukka [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Chemistry, Materials and Surfaces, SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Borås (Sweden); Palmquist, Anders [BIOMATCELL Vinn Excellence Center of Biomaterials and Cell Therapy, Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Biomaterials, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • A route for coating complex shaped electron beam melted implants is presented. • Biomimetic HA coatings were deposited on CoCr alloys using a solution method. • Deposited biomimetic coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient. • Coating morphology was plate-like with crystallites forming roundish flowers. • Present coating procedure could be useful for porous implants made by EBM. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study the feasibility to use a biomimetic method to prepare biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on CoCr substrates with short soaking times and to characterize the properties of such coatings. A second objective was to investigate if the coatings could be applied to porous CoCr implants manufactured by electron beam melting (EBM). The coating was prepared by immersing the pretreated CoCr substrates and EBM implants into the phosphate-buffered solution with Ca{sup 2+} in sealed plastic bottles, kept at 60 °C for 3 days. The formed coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient and composed of plate-like crystallites forming roundish flowers in the size range of 300–500 nm. Cross-section imaging showed a thickness of 300–500 nm. In addition, dissolution tests in Tris–HCl up to 28 days showed that a substantial amount of the coating had dissolved, however, undergoing only minor morphological changes. A uniform coating was formed within the porous network of the additive manufactured implants having similar thickness and morphology as for the flat samples. In conclusion, the present coating procedure allows coatings to be formed on CoCr and could be used for complex shaped, porous implants made by additive manufacturing.

  17. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  18. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  19. Preparation and characterization of nano hydroxyapatite sol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王友法; 闫玉华; 任卫; 曹献英; 李世普

    2004-01-01

    Nano hydroxyapatite has special biological effects when it interacts with cells. The method of preparation of nano hydroxyapatite crystals in water and the stability of hydroxyapatite sol are reported. Nanometer sized hydroxyapatite crystals were synthesized by precipitation with monocalcium phosphate and calcium hydroxide. The size of the crystals is 30 - 50 nm as determined by laser light scattering and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The shape of the crystals particles is either sphere or rod-shaped. Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) micro-probe X-ray fluorescence analysis and TEM analysis reveal that hydroxyapatite crystals can pass human liver cancer cell membrane in the form of particles.

  20. Design of a biomimetic polymer-composite hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Habiba; Bureau, Martin; Campbell, Melissa; Vadean, Aurelian; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2007-07-01

    A new biomimetic composite hip prosthesis (stem) was designed to obtain properties similar to those of the contiguous bone, in particular stiffness, to allow normal loading of the surrounding femoral bone. This normal loading would reduce excessive stress shielding, known to result in bone loss, and micromotions at the bone-implant interface, leading to aseptic prosthetic loosening. The design proposed is based on a hollow substructure made of hydroxyapatite-coated, continuous carbon fiber (CF) reinforced polyamide 12 (PA12) composite with an internal soft polymer-based core. Different composite configurations were studied to match the properties of host tissue. Nonlinear three-dimensional analysis of the hip prosthesis was carried out using a three-dimensional finite element bone model based on the composite femur. The performance of composite-based hip and titanium alloy-based (Ti-6Al-4V) stems embedded into femoral bone was compared. The effect of core stiffness and ply configuration was also analyzed. Results show that stresses in composite stem are lower than those in Ti stem, and that the femoral bone implanted with composite structure sustains more load than the one implanted with Ti stem. Micromotions in the composite stem are significantly smaller than those in Ti stem over the entire bone-implant surface because of the favorable interfacial stress distribution.

  1. Silk-Hydroxyapatite Nanoscale Scaffolds with Programmable Growth Factor Delivery for Bone Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhaozhao; Fan, Zhihai; Huang, Xiaowei; Lu, Qiang; Xu, Weian; Kaplan, David L

    2016-09-21

    Osteoinductive biomaterials are attractive for repairing a variety of bone defects, and biomimetic strategies are useful toward developing bone scaffolds with such capacity. Here, a multiple biomimetic design was developed to improve the osteogenesis capacity of composite scaffolds consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HA) and silk fibroin (SF). SF nanofibers and water-dispersible HA nanoparticles were blended to prepare the nanoscaled composite scaffolds with a uniform distribution of HA with a high HA content (40%), imitating the extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) was loaded in the SF scaffolds and HA to tune BMP-2 release. In vitro studies showed the preservation of BMP-2 bioactivity in the composite scaffolds, and programmable sustained release was achieved through adjusting the ratio of BMP-2 loaded on SF and HA. In vitro and in vivo osteogenesis studies demonstrated that the composite scaffolds showed improved osteogenesis capacity under suitable BMP-2 release conditions, significantly better than that of BMP-2 loaded SF-HA composite scaffolds reported previously. Therefore, these biomimetic SF-HA nanoscaled scaffolds with tunable BMP-2 delivery provide preferable microenvironments for bone regeneration.

  2. Biomimetic graphene films and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Lai; Chen, Qi-Dai; Jin, Zhi; Kim, Eunkyoung; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2012-07-01

    Biomimetic fabrication has long been considered a short cut to the rational design and production of artificial materials or devices that possess fascinating properties, just like natural creatures. Considering the fact that graphene exhibits a lot of exceptional properties in a wide range of scientific fields, biomimetic fabrication of graphene multiscale structures, denoted as biomimetic graphene, is of great interest in both fundamental research and industrial applications. Especially, the combination of graphene with biomimetic structures would realize structural and functional integrity, and thus bring a new opportunity of developing novel graphene-based devices with remarkable performance. In this feature article, we highlight the recent advances in biomimetic graphene films and their structure-defined properties. Functionalized graphene films with multiscale structures inspired from a wide range of biomaterials including rose petals, butterfly wings, nacre and honeycomb have been collected and presented. Moreover, both current challenges and future perspectives of biomimetic graphene are discussed. Although research of the so-called ``biomimetic graphene'' is still at an early stage, it might become a ``hot topic'' in the near future.

  3. Biomimetics for next generation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelat, Francois

    2007-12-15

    Billions of years of evolution have produced extremely efficient natural materials, which are increasingly becoming a source of inspiration for engineers. Biomimetics-the science of imitating nature-is a growing multidisciplinary field which is now leading to the fabrication of novel materials with remarkable mechanical properties. This article discusses the mechanics of hard biological materials, and more specifically of nacre and bone. These high-performance natural composites are made up of relatively weak components (brittle minerals and soft proteins) arranged in intricate ways to achieve specific combinations of stiffness, strength and toughness (resistance to cracking). Determining which features control the performance of these materials is the first step in biomimetics. These 'key features' can then be implemented into artificial bio-inspired synthetic materials, using innovative techniques such as layer-by-layer assembly or ice-templated crystallization. The most promising approaches, however, are self-assembly and biomineralization because they will enable tight control of structures at the nanoscale. In this 'bottom-up' fabrication, also inspired from nature, molecular structures and crystals are assembled with a little or no external intervention. The resulting materials will offer new combinations of low weight, stiffness and toughness, with added functionalities such as self-healing. Only tight collaborations between engineers, chemists, materials scientists and biologists will make these 'next-generation' materials a reality.

  4. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  5. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine; Braekevelt, Sylvie; Lauritzen, Karsten; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes. PMID:26556379

  6. Challenges in biomimetic design and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Barfoed, Michael; Shu, Li

    Biomimetic design copies desired principles found in nature and implement them into artificial applications. Applications could be products we use in our daily life but it can also be used to inspire material innovation. However there are significant challenges in performing biomimetic design. One...... including the terminology and knowledge organisation. It is often easy to recognise the splendour of a biological solution, but it can be much more difficult to understand the underlying mechanisms. Another challenge in biomimetic design is the search and identification of relevant solutions in nature...

  7. Biomimetic, Catalytic Oxidation in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-lchi Murahashi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Oxidation is one of the most fundamental reactions in organic synthesis. Owing to the current need to develop forward-looking technology that is environmentally acceptable with respect many aspects. The most attractive approaches are biomimetic oxidation reactions that are closely related to the metabolism of living things. The metabolisms are governed by a variety of enzymes such as cytochrome P-450 and flavoenzyme.Simulation of the function of these enzymes with simple transition metal complex catalyst or organic catalysts led to the discovery of biomimetic, catalytic oxidations with peroxides[1]. We extended such biomimetic methods to the oxidation with molecular oxygen under mild conditions.

  8. Researches and developments of biomimetics in tribology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhendong; TONG Jin; REN Luquan

    2006-01-01

    Animals and plants have developed optimal geometric structures, smart topological materials and multi-functional surface textures with excellent tribological characteristics through the evolution of thousand millions of years and become models for tribological design. This paper puts forward the definition and fundament of biomimetic tribology, investigates the status of self-cleaning of liquid-solid interface, adhesion between animals' feet and solid surface, wear characteristics of biological surfaces and biomimetic design, as well as the friction and bionic design on liquid-solid interface. The further developments of the tribological biomimetics are discussed.

  9. The Einstein nanocrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bertoldi, D S; Miranda, E N

    2016-01-01

    We study the simplest possible model of nanocrystal consisting in a simple cubic lattice with a small number of atoms (NA ~ 10-10^3), where each atom is linked to its nearest neighbor by a quantum harmonic potential. Some properties (entropy, temperature, specific heat) of the nanocrystal are calculated numerically but exactly within the framework of the microcanonical ensemble. We find that the presence of a surface in the nanocrystal modifies the thermostatistic properties to a greater extent than the small number of atoms in the system. The specific heat Cv behaves similarly to the Einstein solid, with an asymptotic value for high temperatures that differs from that of the Dulong-Petit law by a term of the order of NA^(-1/3) and that can be explained easily in terms of the surface. The entropy is non-additive, but this is due to the presence of the surface and we show that the additivity is recovered in the thermodynamic limit. Finally, we find that, when calculations follow the canonical ensemble, results...

  10. Synthesis and Doping of Silicon Nanocrystals for Versatile Nanocrystal Inks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Nicolaas Johannes

    The impact of nanotechnology on our society is getting larger every year. Electronics are becoming smaller and more powerful, the "Internet of Things" is all around us, and data generation is increasing exponentially. None of this would have been possible without the developments in nanotechnology. Crystalline semiconductor nanoparticles (nanocrystals) are one of the latest developments in the field of nanotechnology. This thesis addresses three important challenges for the transition of silicon nanocrystals from the lab bench to the marketplace: A better understanding of the nanocrystal synthesis was obtained, the electronic properties of the nanocrystals were characterized and tuned, and novel silicon nanocrystal inks were formed and applied using simple coating technologies. Plasma synthesis of nanocrystals has numerous advantages over traditional solution-based synthesis methods. While the formation of nanoparticles in low pressure nonthermal plasmas is well known, the heating mechanism leading to their crystallization is poorly understood. A combination of comprehensive plasma characterization with a nanoparticle heating model presented here reveals the underlying plasma physics leading to crystallization. The model predicts that the nanoparticles reach temperatures as high as 900 K in the plasma as a result of heating reactions on the nanoparticle surface. These temperatures are well above the gas temperature and sufficient for complete nanoparticle crystallization. Moving the field of plasma nanoparticle synthesis to atmospheric pressures is important for lowering its cost and making the process attractive for industrial applications. The heating and charging model for silicon nanoparticles was adapted in Chapter 3 to study plasmas maintained over a wide range of pressures (10 -- 105 Pa). The model considers three collisionality regimes and determines the dominant contribution of each regime under various plasma conditions. Strong nanoparticle cooling at

  11. Laser surface alloying of 316L stainless steel coated with a bioactive hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaith, El-Sayed; Hodgson, Simon; Sharp, Martin

    2015-02-01

    Laser surface alloying is a powerful technique for improving the mechanical and chemical properties of engineering components. In this study, laser surface irradiation process employed in the surface modification off 316L stainless steel substrate using hydroxyapatite-titanium oxide to provide a composite ceramic layer for the suitability of applying this technology to improve the biocompatibility of medical alloys and implants. Fusion of the metal surface incorporating hydroxyapatite-titania ceramic particles using a 30 W Nd:YAG laser at different laser powers, 40, 50 and 70% power and a scan speed of 40 mm s(-1) was observed to adopt the optimum condition of ceramic deposition. Coatings were evaluated in terms of microstructure, surface morphology, composition biocompatibility using XRD, ATR-FTIR, SEM and EDS. Evaluation of the in vitro bioactivity by soaking the treated metal in SBF for 10 days showed the deposition of biomimetic apatite.

  12. Multi-Functions of Carbonated Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite (CDHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan

    Natural bone is a complex composite mainly constituted of inorganic minerals and organic collagen molecules. Calcium phosphate (CaP) based materials have been proposed as the predominant bone substitute for bone tissue engineering applications due to their chemical similarity to bone mineral. Amorphous carbonated calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) is an important compound among CaP materials because of the amorphous crystallite structure. The presence of extra ions in its lattice structure not only influences cell attachment and proliferation of osteoblasts, but also helps in bone metabolism. Biomimetic coating approach is the most widely used approach to produce CDHA coatings to implant. It is a process using simulated body fluid (SBF) to deposit bone-like CDHA coating to various material surfaces. The CDHA formation mechanism, SBF compositions and reacting conditions of biomimetic coating have already been sufficiently studied and compared in the past 20 years. It is an attempt in this thesis to explore new applications of SBF in biomedical research, focusing on different biomaterial applications: 1) based on the low temperature reaction condition of SBF, bisphosphonate incorporated CDHA coatings were deposited onto Ti6Al4V surface for the treatment of osteoporosis; 2) amorphous calcium phosphate nanospheres with extra elements in the lattice structure were prepared by a novel microwave assisted approach, providing a new potential of CaP materials production; 3) CDHA particles formed in SBF can be used as great fillers with biopolymers for preparing biocomposites for biomedical applications; 4) based on the high activity of CDHA amorphous structure and the stabilization ability of ethanol, yttrium and europium doped calcium phosphates were prepared using CDHA as a sacrificing template. In the end, future work based on these observations in the thesis is addressed, including areas of drug delivery, biocomposite fabrication and preparation of functionalized

  13. Biomimetic synthesis and biocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan scaffold for bone tissue engineering%仿生组装纳米羟基磷灰石/壳聚糖骨修复材料的制备及其生物相容性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴涛; 南开辉; 金丹; 江汕; 赵培冉; 裴国献

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨以一种简单、廉价的方法制备纳米羟基磷灰石/壳聚糖(n-HA/CS)复合材料,并评价其理化特征和生物相容性. 方法采用原位沉析和冷冻干燥法制备n-HA/CS支架,通过扫描电镜、组织切片染色、X线衍射和傅立叶红外光谱分析其微观形貌和组成;采用万能材料试验机分析材料的力学性能.采用材料浸提液和表面接种考察n-HA/CS复合材料对第3代人骨髓基质干细胞(hBMSCs)黏附、增殖的影响,评估其细胞相容性.将n-HA/CS复合材料植入新西兰大白兔背部肌袋,经组织学染色后评价其组织相容性. 结果 n-HA/CS复合材料具有多孔结构,孔隙率为(88.65±2.34)%,孔径为(112.63±20.47) μm,HA晶体颗粒长度为200~700 nm,且分散均匀;X线衍射和红外光谱分析表明合成的HA是含CO32-弱结晶纳米晶体.材料的断裂强度为(1.47±0.15)MPa,弹性模量为(37.52±3.43)kPa,可满足非负重部位骨修复要求.n-HA/CS材料浸提液未明显抑制hBMSCs的增殖,直接接种在n-HA/CS复合材料表面的细胞黏附、增殖功能正常;组织相容性实验也表明,植入4周后组织炎性反应明显减轻,12周后材料基本降解并由新生组织爬行替代. 结论采用原位沉析和冷冻干燥法制备的n-HA/CS复合材料具有良好的理化性质和生物相容性,有望应用于组织工程骨的构建.%Objective To evaluate the physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of nano-hydroxyapatite/chitosan (n-HA/CS) scaffolds. Methods n-HA/CS scaffolds were generated by in situ hybridization and freeze-drying technology. The microscopic morphology and components of the composite were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), morphology, X-ray diffraction (XRD) examination and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) . The effects of u-HA/CS scaffolds on adherence and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) were evaluated by leaching liquor and scaffolds surface

  14. Synthesis of chitosan/hydroxyapatite membranes coated with hydroxycarbonate apatite for guided tissue regeneration purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Alexandre Félix; Filho, Edson de Almeida; Rigo, Eliana Cristina da Silva; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega

    2011-02-01

    Chitosan, which is a non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible biopolymer, has been widely researched for several applications in the field of biomaterials. Calcium phosphate ceramics stand out among the so-called bioceramics for their absence of local or systemic toxicity, their non-response to foreign bodies or inflammations, and their apparent ability to bond to the host tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most important bioceramics because it is the main component of the mineral phase of bone. The aim of this work was to produce chitosan membranes coated with hydroxyapatite using the modified biomimetic method. Membranes were synthesized from a solution containing 2% of chitosan in acetic acid (weight/volume) via the solvent evaporation method. Specimens were immersed in a sodium silicate solution and then in a 1.5 SBF (simulated body fluid) solution. The crystallinity of the HA formed over the membranes was correlated to the use of the nucleation agent (the sodium silicate solution itself). Coated membranes were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy - SEM, X-ray diffraction - XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - FTIR. The results indicate a homogeneous coating covering the entire surface of the membrane and the production of a semi-crystalline hydroxyapatite layer similar to the mineral phase of human bone.

  15. Synthesis of chitosan/hydroxyapatite membranes coated with hydroxycarbonate apatite for guided tissue regeneration purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, Alexandre Felix [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Department of Materials Engineering, DEMa, UFSCar, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Almeida Filho, Edson de, E-mail: edsonafilho@yahoo.com.br [University Estadual Paulista, Department of Physical Chemistry - IQ, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Silva Rigo, Eliana Cristina da [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Basic Science - FZEA-ZAB, Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Ortega Boschi, Anselmo [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Department of Materials Engineering, DEMa, UFSCar, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-02-15

    Chitosan, which is a non-toxic, biodegradable and biocompatible biopolymer, has been widely researched for several applications in the field of biomaterials. Calcium phosphate ceramics stand out among the so-called bioceramics for their absence of local or systemic toxicity, their non-response to foreign bodies or inflammations, and their apparent ability to bond to the host tissue. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the most important bioceramics because it is the main component of the mineral phase of bone. The aim of this work was to produce chitosan membranes coated with hydroxyapatite using the modified biomimetic method. Membranes were synthesized from a solution containing 2% of chitosan in acetic acid (weight/volume) via the solvent evaporation method. Specimens were immersed in a sodium silicate solution and then in a 1.5 SBF (simulated body fluid) solution. The crystallinity of the HA formed over the membranes was correlated to the use of the nucleation agent (the sodium silicate solution itself). Coated membranes were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy - SEM, X-ray diffraction - XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy - FTIR. The results indicate a homogeneous coating covering the entire surface of the membrane and the production of a semi-crystalline hydroxyapatite layer similar to the mineral phase of human bone.

  16. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite whisker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shi-pu; ZHANG Yong; WANG You-fa; YAN Yu-hua

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCITION Hydroxyapatite (Ca10 (PO4) 6 (OH)2, HA) is a material with biological activity, which has good biocompatibility and is the major mineral constituent of vertebrate hard tissues, such as bone, tooth and some ectopic calcification. As an implanting material, it can induce the growth of new bone, and supply supporting frame for new bone.

  18. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyley, Samuel; Thielemans, Wim

    2014-06-01

    Chemical modification of cellulose nanocrystals is an increasingly popular topic in the literature. This review analyses the type of cellulose nanocrystal modification reactions that have been published in the literature thus far and looks at the steps that have been taken towards analysing the products of the nanocrystal modifications. The main categories of reactions carried out on cellulose nanocrystals are oxidations, esterifications, amidations, carbamations and etherifications. More recently nucleophilic substitutions have been used to introduce more complex functionality to cellulose nanocrystals. Multi-step modifications are also considered. This review emphasizes quantification of modification at the nanocrystal surface in terms of degree of substitution and the validity of conclusions drawn from different analysis techniques in this area. The mechanisms of the modification reactions are presented and considered with respect to the effect on the outcome of the reactions. While great strides have been made in the quality of analytical data published in the field of cellulose nanocrystal modification, there is still vast scope for improvement, both in data quality and the quality of analysis of data. Given the difficulty of surface analysis, cross-checking of results from different analysis techniques is fundamental for the development of reliable cellulose nanocrystal modification techniques.

  19. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  20. Doping of CdSe Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, John

    2003-10-01

    What happens to a nanocrystal when it is doped with electrons? We doped CdSe nanocrystals with potassium metal and sodium biphenyl, potassium and sodium acting as the charge carriers. In order to monitor the properties of the doped nanocrystals we used Electron Spin Resonance and luminescence techniques. In this poster we present findings and problems encountered in doping CdSe nanocrystals.

  1. Molecular motor assembly of a biomimetic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Active biological molecules and functional structures can be fabricated into a bio-mimetic system by using molecular assembly method. Such materials can be used for the drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy, and new nanodevice construction.

  2. Development of a Molecularly Imprinted Biomimetic Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelyn C. Alocilja

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The technique of molecular imprinting produces artificial receptor sites in apolymer that can be used in a biomimetic sensor. This research extends previous studies ofa molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP biomimetic sensor for the small drug theophylline.The presence of theophylline in the biomimetic sensor was monitored by analyzing thepeak currents from cyclic voltammetry experiments. The functional working range of theMIP modified electrode was 2 - 4 mM theophylline. The concentration of theophyllinethat resulted in the best signal was 3 mM. The MIP sensor showed no response to thestructurally related molecule caffeine, and therefore was selective to the target analytetheophylline. This research will provide the foundation for future studies that will result indurable biomimetic sensors that can offer a viable alternative to current sensors.

  3. Biomimetic design method for innovation and sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Helfman Cohen, Yael

    2017-01-01

    Presenting a novel biomimetic design method for transferring design solutions from nature to technology, this book focuses on structure-function patterns in nature and advanced modeling tools derived from TRIZ, the theory of inventive problem-solving. The book includes an extensive literature review on biomimicry as an engine of both innovation and sustainability, and discusses in detail the biomimetic design process, current biomimetic design methods and tools. The structural biomimetic design method for innovation and sustainability put forward in this text encompasses (1) the research method and rationale used to develop and validate this new design method; (2) the suggested design algorithm and tools including the Findstructure database, structure-function patterns and ideality patterns; and (3) analyses of four case studies describing how to use the proposed method. This book offers an essential resource for designers who wish to use nature as a source of inspiration and knowledge, innovators and sustain...

  4. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the possibilities and challenges in mimicking biological membranes and creating membrane-based sensor and separation devices. It covers recent advances in developing biomimetic membranes for technological applications with a focus on the use of integral membrane protein mediated transport. It describes the fundamentals of biosensing as well as separation and shows how the two processes work together in biological systems. The book provides an overview of the current state of the art, points to areas that need further investigation and anticipates future directions in the field. Biomimetics is a truly cross-disciplinary approach and this is exemplified by the challenges in mimicking osmotic processes as they occur in nature using aquaporin protein water channels as central building blocks. In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channel and carrier proteins are important and examples of how these may be reconstituted and controlled in biomimetic membranes are ...

  5. Mechanical Properties of Nanocrystal Supercrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tam, Enrico; Podsiadlo, Paul; Shevchenko, Elena; Ogletree, D. Frank; Delplancke-Ogletree, Marie-Paule; Ashby, Paul D.

    2009-12-30

    Colloidal nanocrystals attract significant interest due to their potential applications in electronic, magnetic, and optical devices. Nanocrystal supercrystals (NCSCs) are particularly appealing for their well ordered structure and homogeneity. The interactions between organic ligands that passivate the inorganic nanocrystal cores critically influence their self-organization into supercrystals, By investigating the mechanical properties of supercrystals, we can directly characterize the particle-particle interactions in a well-defined geometry, and gain insight into both the self-assembly process and the potential applications of nanocrystal supercrystals. Here we report nanoindentation studies of well ordered lead-sulfide (Pbs) nanocrystal supercrystals. Their modulus and hardness were found to be similar to soft polymers at 1.7 GPa and 70 MPa respectively and the fractures toughness was 39 KPa/m1/2, revealing the extremely brittle nature of these materials.

  6. Biomimetic synthesis of modified calcium phosphate fine powders and their in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergulova, R.; Tepavitcharova, S.; Rabadjieva, D.; Sezanova, K.; Ilieva, R.; Alexandrova, R.; Andonova-Lilova, B.

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetic approach and subsequent high-temperature treatment were used to synthesize ion modified calcium phosphate fine powders. Thus, using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as an ion modifier, a bi-phase mixture of ion modified β-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (β-TCP + HA) was prepared. The use of SBF electrolyte solution enriched with Mg2+ or Zn2+ yielded monophase β-tricalcium phosphate additionally modified with Mg2+ or Zn2+ (Mg-β-TCP or Zn-β-TCP). The in vitro behavior of the prepared powders on cell viability and proliferation of murine BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts and of human Lep 3 cells was studied by MTT test assays and Mosmann method after 72 h incubation. The relative cell viability was calculated.

  7. Biomimetic synthesis of modified calcium phosphate fine powders and their in vitro studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergulova, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Tepavitcharova, S., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Rabadjieva, D., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Sezanova, K., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com; Ilieva, R., E-mail: rumigg@yahoo.com [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Alexandrova, R.; Andonova-Lilova, B. [Institute of Experimental Morphology, Pathology and Anthropology with Museum, BAS, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Bl. 25, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-12-16

    Biomimetic approach and subsequent high-temperature treatment were used to synthesize ion modified calcium phosphate fine powders. Thus, using Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) as an ion modifier, a bi-phase mixture of ion modified β-tricalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite (β-TCP + HA) was prepared. The use of SBF electrolyte solution enriched with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} yielded monophase β-tricalcium phosphate additionally modified with Mg{sup 2+} or Zn{sup 2+} (Mg-β-TCP or Zn-β-TCP). The in vitro behavior of the prepared powders on cell viability and proliferation of murine BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts and of human Lep 3 cells was studied by MTT test assays and Mosmann method after 72 h incubation. The relative cell viability was calculated.

  8. Silicon nanocrystal inks, films, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Lance Michael; Kortshagen, Uwe Richard

    2015-09-01

    Silicon nanocrystal inks and films, and methods of making and using silicon nanocrystal inks and films, are disclosed herein. In certain embodiments the nanocrystal inks and films include halide-terminated (e.g., chloride-terminated) and/or halide and hydrogen-terminated nanocrystals of silicon or alloys thereof. Silicon nanocrystal inks and films can be used, for example, to prepare semiconductor devices.

  9. Biomimetic mechanism for micro aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Darryll J. (Inventor); Bohorquez, Felipe A. (Inventor); Sirohi, Jayant (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic pitching and flapping mechanism including a support member, at least two blade joints for holding blades and operatively connected to the support member. An outer shaft member is concentric with the support member, and an inner shaft member is concentric with the outer shaft member. The mechanism allows the blades of a small-scale rotor to be actuated in the flap and pitch degrees of freedom. The pitching and the flapping are completely independent from and uncoupled to each other. As such, the rotor can independently flap, or independently pitch, or flap and pitch simultaneously with different amplitudes and/or frequencies. The mechanism can also be used in a non-rotary wing configuration, such as an ornithopter, in which case the rotational degree of freedom would be suppressed.

  10. Biomimetic use of genetic algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Dessalles, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are considered as an original way to solve problems, probably because of their generality and of their "blind" nature. But GAs are also unusual since the features of many implementations (among all that could be thought of) are principally led by the biological metaphor, while efficiency measurements intervene only afterwards. We propose here to examine the relevance of these biomimetic aspects, by pointing out some fundamental similarities and divergences between GAs and the genome of living beings shaped by natural selection. One of the main differences comes from the fact that GAs rely principally on the so-called implicit parallelism, while giving to the mutation/selection mechanism the second role. Such differences could suggest new ways of employing GAs on complex problems, using complex codings and starting from nearly homogeneous populations.

  11. Biomimetic and Bioinspired Synthesis of Nanomaterials/Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zan, Guangtao; Wu, Qingsheng

    2016-03-16

    In recent years, due to its unparalleled advantages, the biomimetic and bioinspired synthesis of nanomaterials/nanostructures has drawn increasing interest and attention. Generally, biomimetic synthesis can be conducted either by mimicking the functions of natural materials/structures or by mimicking the biological processes that organisms employ to produce substances or materials. Biomimetic synthesis is therefore divided here into "functional biomimetic synthesis" and "process biomimetic synthesis". Process biomimetic synthesis is the focus of this review. First, the above two terms are defined and their relationship is discussed. Next different levels of biological processes that can be used for process biomimetic synthesis are compiled. Then the current progress of process biomimetic synthesis is systematically summarized and reviewed from the following five perspectives: i) elementary biomimetic system via biomass templates, ii) high-level biomimetic system via soft/hard-combined films, iii) intelligent biomimetic systems via liquid membranes, iv) living-organism biomimetic systems, and v) macromolecular bioinspired systems. Moreover, for these five biomimetic systems, the synthesis procedures, basic principles, and relationships are discussed, and the challenges that are encountered and directions for further development are considered.

  12. Nanofiber generation of hydroxyapatite and fluor-hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Won; Kim, Hyoun-Ee

    2006-05-01

    In this study, we produced hydroxyapatite (HA) and fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) bioceramics as a novel geometrical form, the nanoscale fiber, for the biomedical applications. Based on the sol-gel precursors of the apatites, an electrospinning technique was introduced to generate nanoscale fibers. The diameter of the fibers was exploited in the range of a few micrometers to hundreds of nanometers (1.55 microm-240 nm) by means of adjusting the concentration of the sols. Through the fluoridation of apatite, the solubility of the fiber was tailored and the fluorine ions were well released from the FHA. The HA and FHA nanofibers produced in this study are considered to find potential applications in the biomaterials and tissue engineering fields.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T G; Choi, B W; Jankowski, A F

    2000-10-25

    A technique is developed to construct bulk hydroxyapatite (HAp) with different cellular structures. The technique involves the initial synthesis of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powder from an aqueous solution using water-soluble compounds and then followed by spray drying into agglomerated granules. The granules were further cold pressed and sintered into bulks at elevated temperatures. The sintering behavior of the HAp granules was characterized and compared with those previously reported. Resulting from the fact that the starting HAp powders were extremely fine, a relatively low activation energy for sintering was obtained. In the present study, both porous and dense structures were produced by varying powder morphology and sintering parameters. Porous structures consisting of open cells were constructed. Sintered structures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray tomography. In the present paper, hydroxyapatite coatings produced by magnetron sputtering on silicon and titanium substrates will also be presented. The mechanical properties of the coatings were measured using nanoindentation techniques and microstructures examined using transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Coralline hydroxyapatite in complex acetabular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasielewski, Ray C; Sheridan, Kate C; Lubbers, Melissa A

    2008-04-01

    This retrospective study examined whether a coralline hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute adequately repaired bone defects during complex acetabular reconstructions. Seventeen patients who underwent acetabular revision using Pro Osteon 500 were assessed to determine whether any cups required re-revision, whether bone had incorporated into the coralline hydroxyapatite grafts, and whether the coralline hydroxyapatite grafts resorbed with time. At latest follow-up, no cups required re-revision, but 1 had failed. Radiographic evidence of bone incorporation was observed in every coralline hydroxyapatite graft. Graft resorption was not observed.

  15. Enhancing Osteoconduction of PLLA-Based Nanocomposite Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Using Different Biomimetic Signals to MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Baldini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In bone engineering, the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells rely on signaling from chemico-physical structure of the substrate, therefore prompting the design of mimetic “extracellular matrix”-like scaffolds. In this study, three-dimensional porous poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA-based scaffolds have been mixed with different components, including single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, micro-hydroxyapatite particles (HA, and BMP2, and treated with plasma (PT, to obtain four different nanocomposites: PLLA + CNT, PLLA + CNTHA, PLLA + CNT + HA + BMP2 and PLLA + CNT + HA + PT. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were derived from the femur of orthopaedic patients, seeded on the scaffolds and cultured under osteogenic induction up to differentiation and mineralization. The release of specific metabolites and temporal gene expression profiles of marrow-derived osteoprogenitors were analyzed at definite time points, relevant to in vitro culture as well as in vivo differentiation. As a result, the role of the different biomimetic components added to the PLLA matrix was deciphered, with BMP2-added scaffolds showing the highest biomimetic activity on cells differentiating to mature osteoblasts. The modification of a polymeric scaffold with reinforcing components which also work as biomimetic cues for cells can effectively direct osteoprogenitor cells differentiation, so as to shorten the time required for mineralization.

  16. Biomolecular Assembly of Gold Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheel, Christine Marya [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-05-20

    Over the past ten years, methods have been developed to construct discrete nanostructures using nanocrystals and biomolecules. While these frequently consist of gold nanocrystals and DNA, semiconductor nanocrystals as well as antibodies and enzymes have also been used. One example of discrete nanostructures is dimers of gold nanocrystals linked together with complementary DNA. This type of nanostructure is also known as a nanocrystal molecule. Discrete nanostructures of this kind have a number of potential applications, from highly parallel self-assembly of electronics components and rapid read-out of DNA computations to biological imaging and a variety of bioassays. My research focused in three main areas. The first area, the refinement of electrophoresis as a purification and characterization method, included application of agarose gel electrophoresis to the purification of discrete gold nanocrystal/DNA conjugates and nanocrystal molecules, as well as development of a more detailed understanding of the hydrodynamic behavior of these materials in gels. The second area, the development of methods for quantitative analysis of transmission electron microscope data, used computer programs written to find pair correlations as well as higher order correlations. With these programs, it is possible to reliably locate and measure nanocrystal molecules in TEM images. The final area of research explored the use of DNA ligase in the formation of nanocrystal molecules. Synthesis of dimers of gold particles linked with a single strand of DNA possible through the use of DNA ligase opens the possibility for amplification of nanostructures in a manner similar to polymerase chain reaction. These three areas are discussed in the context of the work in the Alivisatos group, as well as the field as a whole.

  17. Silicon nanocrystals as handy biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Kouki; Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Futamura, Yasuhiro; Tilley, Richard; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2007-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have brighter and longer fluorescence than organic dyes. Therefore, QDs can be applied to biotechnology, and have capability to be applied to medical technology. Currently, among the several types of QDs, CdSe with a ZnS shell is one of the most popular QDs to be used in biological experiments. However, when the CdSe QDs were applied to clinical technology, potential toxicological problems due to CdSe core should be considered. To eliminate the problem, silicon nanocrystals, which have the potential of biocompatibility, could be a candidate of alternate probes. Silicon nanocrystals have been synthesized using several techniques such as aerosol, electrochemical etching, laser pyrolysis, plasma deposition, and colloids. Recently, the silicon nanocrystals were reported to be synthesized in inverse micelles and also stabilized with 1-heptene or allylamine capping. Blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was observed when excited with a UV light. The nanocrystals covered with 1-heptene are hydrophobic, whereas the ones covered with allylamine are hydrophilic. To test the stability in cytosol, the water-soluble nanocrystals covered with allylamine were examined with a Hela cell incorporation experiment. Bright blue fluorescence of the nanocrystals was detected in the cytosol when excited with a UV light, implying that the nanocrystals were able to be applied to biological imaging. In order to expand the application range, we synthesized and compared a series of silicon nanocrystals, which have variable surface modification, such as alkyl group, alcohol group, and odorant molecules. This study will provide a wider range of optoelectronic applications and bioimaging technology.

  18. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Herrera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA, calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality.

  19. Targeted Delivery of Hyaluronan-Immobilized Magnetic Ceramic Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsi-Chin; Wang, Tzu-Wei; Hsieh, Shun-Yu; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Kang, Pei-Leun

    2016-01-01

    Effective cancer therapy relies on delivering the therapeutic agent precisely to the target site to improve the treatment outcome and to minimize side effects. Although surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are the standard methods commonly used in clinics, hyperthermia has been developed as a new and promising strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, magnetic bioceramic hydroxyapatite (mHAP) nanocrystals have been developed as heat mediator for intracellular hyperthermia. Hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mHAP nanocrystals are synthesized by a wet chemical precipitation process to achieve active targeting. The results demonstrate that the HA targeting moiety conjugated by a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer arm is successfully immobilized on the surface of mHAP. The HA-modified mHAP possesses relatively good biocompatibility, an adequate biodegradation rate and superparamagnetic properties. The HA-modified mHAP could be localized and internalized into HA receptor-overexpressed malignant cells (e.g., MDA-MB-231 cell) and used as the heat generating agent for intracellular hyperthermia. The results from this study indicate that biocompatible HA-modified mHAP shows promise as a novel heat mediator and a specific targeting nanoagent for intracellular hyperthermia cancer therapy.

  20. Calcifying tissue regeneration via biomimetic materials chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Goto, Tazuko K; Kim, Kye-Seong; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-12-06

    Materials chemistry is making a fundamental impact in regenerative sciences providing many platforms for tissue development. However, there is a surprising paucity of replacements that accurately mimic the structure and function of the structural fabric of tissues or promote faithful tissue reconstruction. Methodologies in biomimetic materials chemistry have shown promise in replicating morphologies, architectures and functional building blocks of acellular mineralized tissues dentine, enamel and bone or that can be used to fully regenerate them with integrated cell populations. Biomimetic materials chemistry encompasses the two processes of crystal formation and mineralization of crystals into inorganic formations on organic templates. This review will revisit the successes of biomimetics materials chemistry in regenerative medicine, including coccolithophore simulants able to promote in vivo bone formation. In-depth knowledge of biomineralization throughout evolution informs the biomimetic materials chemist of the most effective techniques for regenerative framework construction exemplified via exploitation of liquid crystals (LCs) and complex self-organizing media. Therefore, a new innovative direction would be to create chemical environments that perform reaction-diffusion exchanges as the basis for building complex biomimetic inorganic structures. This has evolved widely in biology, as have LCs, serving as self-organizing templates in pattern formation of structural biomaterials. For instance, a study is highlighted in which artificially fabricated chiral LCs, made from bacteriophages are transformed into a faithful copy of enamel. While chemical-based strategies are highly promising at creating new biomimetic structures there are limits to the degree of complexity that can be generated. Thus, there may be good reason to implement living or artificial cells in 'morphosynthesis' of complex inorganic constructs. In the future, cellular construction is probably

  1. Doped semiconductor nanocrystal junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borowik, Ł.; Mélin, T., E-mail: thierry.melin@isen.iemn.univ-lille1.fr [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS-UMR8520, Avenue Poincaré, F-59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Nguyen-Tran, T.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces, CNRS-UMR7647, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2013-11-28

    Semiconductor junctions are the basis of electronic and photovoltaic devices. Here, we investigate junctions formed from highly doped (N{sub D}≈10{sup 20}−10{sup 21}cm{sup −3}) silicon nanocrystals (NCs) in the 2–50 nm size range, using Kelvin probe force microscopy experiments with single charge sensitivity. We show that the charge transfer from doped NCs towards a two-dimensional layer experimentally follows a simple phenomenological law, corresponding to formation of an interface dipole linearly increasing with the NC diameter. This feature leads to analytically predictable junction properties down to quantum size regimes: NC depletion width independent of the NC size and varying as N{sub D}{sup −1/3}, and depleted charge linearly increasing with the NC diameter and varying as N{sub D}{sup 1/3}. We thus establish a “nanocrystal counterpart” of conventional semiconductor planar junctions, here however valid in regimes of strong electrostatic and quantum confinements.

  2. Photoresponsive Cellulose Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris S Argyropoulos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this communication a method for the creation of fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles using click chemistry and subsequent photodimerization of the installed side‐ chains is demonstrated. In the first step, the primary hydroxyl groups on the surface of the CNCs were converted to carboxylic acids by using TEMPO‐mediated hypohalite oxidation. The alkyne groups, essential for the click reaction, were introduced into the surface of TEMPO‐ oxidized CNCs via carbodiimide‐mediated formation of an amide linkage between monomers carrying an amine functionality and carboxylic acid groups on the surface of the TEMPO‐oxidized CNCs. Finally, the reaction of surface‐modified TEMPO‐oxidized cellulose nanocrystals and azido‐bearing coumarin and anthracene monomers were carried out by means of a click chemistry, i.e., Copper(I‐catalyzed Azide‐Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC to produce highly photo‐responsive and fluorescent cellulose nanoparticles. Most significantly, the installed coumarin and/or anthracene side‐chains were shown to undergo UV‐induced [2+2] and [4+4] cycloaddition reactions, bringing and locking the cellulose nanocrystals together. This effort paves the way towards creating, cellulosic photo responsive nano‐arrays with the potential of photo reversibility since these reactions are known to be reversible at varying wavelengths.

  3. Dense and porous titanium substrates with a biomimetic calcium phosphate coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, A.A., E-mail: aantunesr@yahoo.com.br [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Balestra, R.M. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rocha, M.N. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Peripolli, S.B. [Materials Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Normalization and Quality, No. 50 Nossa Senhora das Gracas Street, Building 3, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Andrade, M.C. [Polytechnic Institute of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro State University, s/n, Alberto Rangel Street, 28630-050 Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, L.C. [Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Program, COPPE, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, P.O. Box 68505, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, M.V. [Powder Technology Laboratory, Materials Processing and Characterization Division, National Institute of Technology, No. 82 Venezuela Avenue, Room 602, 20081-312 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A biomimetic coating method with simplified solution is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are submitted to chemical and heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Titanium substrates are coated with biocompatible calcium phosphate phases. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simplified solution shows potential to be applied as a coating technique. - Abstract: The present work studied a biomimetic method using a simplified solution (SS) with calcium and phosphorus ions for coating titanium substrates, in order to improve their bioactivity. Commercially pure titanium dense sheet, microporous and macroporous titanium samples, both produced by powder metallurgy, were treated in NaOH solution followed by heat-treating and immersed in SS for 7, 14 or 21 days. The samples characterization was performed by quantitative metallographic analysis, confocal scanning optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and low angle X-ray diffraction. The results showed coatings with calcium phosphate precipitation in all samples, with globular or plate-like morphology, typical of hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate, respectively, indicating that the solution (SS) has potential for coating titanium substrates. In addition, the different surfaces of substrates had an effect on the formed calcium phosphate phase and thickness of coatings, depending on the substrate type and imersion time in the simplified solution.

  4. The Construction and Investigation of PLGA Artificial Bone by Biomimetic Mineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ming; ZHENG Qixin; WANG Jinguang; WANG yuntao; HAO Jie

    2005-01-01

    To modify the surface property of poly lactide co-glycolide (PLGA) by biomimetic mineralization to construct a new kind of artificial bone. PLGA films and 3 diamensional (3-D) porous scaffolds hydrolyzed in alkaline solution were minerilized in SBF for 14 days. The morphology and composition of the mineral grown on PLGA were analyzed with SEM, FTIR and XRD. The porosity of the scaffolds was detected by using the liquid displacement method. The compressive strength of the scaffolds was detected by using a Shimadzu universal mechanic tester. An obvious mineral coating was detected on the surface of films and scaffolds. The main component of the mineral was carbonated hydroxyapatite (HA) similar to the major mineral component of bone tissues. The porosity of the un-mineralized and mineralized porous scaffolds was (84.86±8.52) % and (79.70±7.70) % respectively. The compressive strength was 0. 784±0. 156 N/mm2 in un-mineralized 3-D porous PLGA and 0. 858±0. 145 N/mm2 in mineralized 3-D porous PLGA. There were no significant differences between the mineralized and un-mineralized scaffolds (P>0. 05) in porosity and biomechanics. Biomimetic mineralization is a suitable method to construct artificial bone.

  5. Fabrication of highly porous biodegradable biomimetic nanocomposite as advanced bone tissue scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla Abdal-hay

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of bioinspired or biomimetic materials is currently a challenge in the field of tissue regeneration. In-situ 3D biomimetic microporous nanocomposite scaffold has been developed using a simple lyophilization post hydrothermal reaction for bone healing applications. The fabricated 3D porous scaffold possesses advantages of good bonelike apatite particles distribution, thermal properties and high porous interconnected network structure. High dispersion bonelike apatite nanoparticles (NPs rapidly nucleated and deposited from surrounding biological minerals within chitosan (CTS matrices using hydrothermal technique. After that, freeze-drying method was applied on the composite solution to form the desired porous 3D architecture. Interestingly, the porosity and pore size of composite scaffold were not significantly affected by the particles size and particles content within the CTS matrix. Our results demonstrated that the compression modulus of porous composite scaffold is twice higher than that of plain CTS scaffold, indicating a maximization of the chemical interaction between polymer matrix and apatite NPs. Cytocompatibility test for MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts cell line using MTT-indirect assay test showed that the fabricated 3D microporous nanocomposite scaffold possesses higher cell proliferation and growth than that of pure CTS scaffold. Collectively, our results suggest that the newly developed highly porous apatite/CTS nanocomposite scaffold as an alternative of hydroxyapatite/CTS scaffold may serve as an excellent porous 3D platform for bone tissue regeneration.

  6. Modulation of enamel matrix proteins on the formation and nano-assembly of hydroxyapatite in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hong, E-mail: tlihong@jnu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Huang Weiya [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taizhou, Taizhou University, Zhejiang 317000 (China); Zhang Yuanming [Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Xue Bo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510630 (China); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Natural enamel has a hierarchically nanoassembled architecture that is regulated by enamel matrix proteins (EMPs) during the formation of enamel crystals. To understand the role of EMPs on enamel mineralization, calcium phosphate (CaP) growth experiments in both the presence and absence of native rat EMPs in a single diffusion system were conducted. The morphology and organization of formed CaP crystals were examined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), High-Resolution Transmission Microscopy (HRTEM) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). In the system containing the EMPs, hydroxyapatite (HAP) with hierarchical lamellar nanostructure can be formed and the aligned HAP assembly tightly bundled by 3-4 rod-like nanocrystals like an enamel prism. However, in the absence of EMPs, only a sheet-like structure of octacalcium phosphate (OCP) phase was presented. EMPs promote HAP formation and inhibit the growth of OCP on the (010) plane. It is discussed that the organized Amelogenin/Amorphous Calcium Phosphate might be the precursor to the bundled HAP crystal prism. The study benefits the understanding of biomineralization of tooth enamel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An aligned hydroxyapatite crystal bundled by rod-like nanosize crystals was obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An organized Amel/ACP would be the precursor of the bundled hydroxyapatite crystal prism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EMPs inhibit the growth of octacalcium phosphate in a defined plane.

  7. Cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers by spin coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontturi, Eero; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Kontturi, Katri S; Ahonen, Päivi; Thüne, Peter C; Laine, Janne

    2007-09-11

    Dilute concentrations of cellulose nanocrystal solutions were spin coated onto different substrates to investigate the effect of the substrate on the nanocrystal submonolayers. Three substrates were probed: silica, titania, and amorphous cellulose. According to atomic force microscopy (AFM) images, anionic cellulose nanocrystals formed small aggregates on the anionic silica substrate, whereas a uniform two-dimensional distribution of nanocrystals was achieved on the cationic titania substrate. The uniform distribution of cellulose nanocrystal submonolayers on titania is an important factor when dimensional analysis of the nanocrystals is desired. Furthermore, the amount of nanocrystals deposited on titania was multifold in comparison to the amounts on silica, as revealed by AFM image analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Amorphous cellulose, the third substrate, resulted in a somewhat homogeneous distribution of the nanocrystal submonolayers, but the amounts were as low as those on the silica substrate. These differences in the cellulose nanocrystal deposition were attributed to electrostatic effects: anionic cellulose nanocrystals are adsorbed on cationic titania in addition to the normal spin coating deposition. The anionic silica surface, on the other hand, causes aggregation of the weakly anionic cellulose nanocrystals which are forced on the repulsive substrate by spin coating. The electrostatically driven adsorption also influences the film thickness of continuous ultrathin films of cellulose nanocrystals. The thicker films of charged nanocrystals on a substrate of opposite charge means that the film thickness is not independent of the substrate when spin coating cellulose nanocrystals in the ultrathin regime (<100 nm).

  8. Bio-mimetic mineralization potential of collagen hydrolysate obtained from chromium tanned leather waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Madhu, S. [School of Bio Science and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India); Chandra Babu, N.K. [Tannery Division, CSIR-Central Leather Research Institute, Chennai 600 020, Tamil Nadu (India); Shanthi, C., E-mail: cshanthi@vit.ac.in [School of Bio Science and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramics serve as an alternative to autogenous-free bone grafting by virtue of their excellent biocompatibility. However, chemically synthesized HA lacks the strong load-bearing capacity as required by bone. The bio-mimetic growth of HA crystals on collagen surface provides a feasible solution for synthesizing bone substitutes with the desired properties. This study deals with the utilization of the collagen hydrolysate recovered from leather waste as a substrate for promoting HA crystal growth. Bio-mimetic growth of HA was induced by subjecting the hydrolysate to various mineralization conditions. Parameters that would have a direct effect on crystal growth were varied to determine the optimal conditions necessary. Maximum mineralization was achieved with a combination of 10 mM of CaCl{sub 2}, 5 mM of Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}, 100 mM of NaCl and 0.575% glutaraldehyde at a pH of 7.4. The metal–protein interactions leading to formation of HA were identified through Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. The crystal dimensions were determined to be in the nanoscale range by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The size and crystallinity of bio-mimetically grown HA indicate that hydrolysate from leather waste can be used as an ideal alternative substrate for bone growth. - Highlights: • Collagen hydrolysate, extracted from leather industry waste is subjected to biomineralization. • Optimal conditions required for HA growth are identified. • FTIR studies reveal higher Ca−COO{sup −} and low C−N stretch with higher HA formation. • AFM and SEM studies reveal nanometer ranged HA crystals.

  9. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  10. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  11. Biomimetics applied to centering in micro-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, L.H.; Lenau, Torben Anker; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a biomimetic search method to develop ideas for centering objects in micro-assembly. Biomimetics involves the imitation of biological phenomena to solve problems. An obstacle to the use of biomimetics in engineering is knowledge of biological phenomena...

  12. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds.

  13. Biomimetic materials design for cardiac tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, David A; Hodge, Alexander J; Lipke, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. In the absence of sufficient numbers of organs for heart transplant, alternate approaches for healing or replacing diseased heart tissue are under investigation. Designing biomimetic materials to support these approaches will be essential to their overall success. Strategies for cardiac tissue engineering include injection of cells, implantation of three-dimensional tissue constructs or patches, injection of acellular materials, and replacement of valves. To replicate physiological function and facilitate engraftment into native tissue, materials used in these approaches should have properties that mimic those of the natural cardiac environment. Multiple aspects of the cardiac microenvironment have been emulated using biomimetic materials including delivery of bioactive factors, presentation of cell-specific adhesion sites, design of surface topography to guide tissue alignment and dictate cell shape, modulation of mechanical stiffness and electrical conductivity, and fabrication of three-dimensional structures to guide tissue formation and function. Biomaterials can be engineered to assist in stem cell expansion and differentiation, to protect cells during injection and facilitate their retention and survival in vivo, and to provide mechanical support and guidance for engineered tissue formation. Numerous studies have investigated the use of biomimetic materials for cardiac regeneration. Biomimetic material design will continue to exploit advances in nanotechnology to better recreate the cellular environment and advance cardiac regeneration. Overall, biomimetic materials are moving the field of cardiac regenerative medicine forward and promise to deliver new therapies in combating heart disease.

  14. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaoguang [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhao, Xu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: lyi99@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yang, Tao [Department of Stomatology, Children' s Hospital of Changchun, 130051 (China); Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO{sub 3} layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO{sub 3} layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO{sub 3} coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of enamel slices etched for 60 s and repaired by the two-step method with Glu concentration of 20.00 mmol/L. (A) The boundary (dotted line) of the repaired areas (b) and unrepaired areas (a). (Some selected areas of etched enamel slices were coated with a nail polish before the reaction, which was removed by acetone after the reaction); (B) high magnification image of Ga, (C) high magnification image of Gb. In situ fabrication of

  15. Nonclassical radiation from diamond nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Beveratos, A; Gacoin, T; Poizat, J P; Grangier, P; Beveratos, Alexios; Brouri, Rosa; Gacoin, Thierry; Poizat, Jean-Philippe; Grangier, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    The quantum properties of the fluorescence light emitted by diamond nanocrystals containing a single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colored center is investigated. We have observed photon antibunching with very low background light. This system is therefore a very good candidate for the production of single photon on demand. In addition, we have measured larger NV center lifetime in nanocrystals than in the bulk, in good agreement with a simple quantum electrodynamical model.

  16. Biomimetic Nanofibrillation in Two-Component Biopolymer Blends with Structural Analogs to Spider Silk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lan; Xu, Huan; Li, Liang-Bin; Hsiao, Benjamin S.; Zhong, Gan-Ji; Li, Zhong-Ming

    2016-10-01

    Despite the enormous potential in bioinspired fabrication of high-strength structure by mimicking the spinning process of spider silk, currently accessible routes (e.g., microfluidic and electrospinning approaches) still have substantial function gaps in providing precision control over the nanofibrillar superstructure, crystalline morphology or molecular orientation. Here the concept of biomimetic nanofibrillation, by copying the spiders’ spinning principles, was conceived to build silk-mimicking hierarchies in two-phase biodegradable blends, strategically involving the stepwise integration of elongational shear and high-pressure shear. Phase separation confined on nanoscale, together with deformation of discrete phases and pre-alignment of polymer chains, was triggered in the elongational shear, conferring the readiness for direct nanofibrillation in the latter shearing stage. The orderly aligned nanofibrils, featuring an ultralow diameter of around 100 nm and the “rigid-soft” system crosslinked by nanocrystal domains like silk protein dopes, were secreted by fine nanochannels. The incorporation of multiscale silk-mimicking structures afforded exceptional combination of strength, ductility and toughness for the nanofibrillar polymer composites. The proposed spider spinning-mimicking strategy, offering the biomimetic function integration unattainable with current approaches, may prompt materials scientists to pursue biopolymer mimics of silk with high performance yet light weight.

  17. Extreme biomimetic approach for developing novel chitin-GeO2 nanocomposites with photoluminescent properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcin Wysokowski[1; Mykhailo Motylenko[2; Jan Beyer[3; Anna Makarova[4; Hartmut Stocker[5; Juliane Walter[5; Roberta Galli[6; Sabine Kaiser[5; Denis Vyalikh[4,7; Vasilii V. Bazhenov[5; laroslav Petrenko[5; Allison L Stelling[8; Serguei L. Molodtsovs[5,9,10; Dawid Stawski[11; Krzysztof J.Kurzydfowski[12; Enrico Langer[13; Mikhail V Tsurkan[14; Teofil Jesionowski[1; Johannes Heitmann[3; Dirk C. Meyer[5; Hermann Ehrlich[5

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an extreme biomimetics route for the creation of nano- structured biocomposites utilizing a chitinous template of poriferan origin. The specific thermal stability of the nanostructured chitinous template allowed for the formation under hydrothermal conditions of a novel germanium oxide- chitin composite with a defined nanoscale structure. Using a variety of analytical techniques (FTIR, Raman, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, EDS-mapping, selected area for the electron diffraction pattern (SAEDP), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)), we showed that this bioorganic scaffold induces the growth of GeO2 nanocrystals with a narrow (150-300 nm) size distri- bution and predominantly hexagonal phase, demonstrating the chitin template's control over the crystal morphology. The formed GeO2-chitin composite showed several specific physical properties, such as a striking enhancement in photo- luminescence exceeding values previously reported in GeOR-based biomaterials. These data demonstrate the potential of extreme biomimetics for developing new-generation nanostructured materials.

  18. Template synthesis of ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lijun; Jell, Gavin; Dong, Yixiang; Jones, Julian R; Stevens, Molly M

    2011-08-28

    Hydroxyapatite has found wide application in bone tissue engineering. Here we use a macroporous carbon template to generate highly ordered macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics composed of close-packed hollow spherical pores with interconnected channels. The template has advantages for the preparation of ordered materials.

  19. Hydroxyapatite/polymer composites for bone replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Qing

    1997-01-01

    To improve the mechanical properties and the bioactivity of PolyacitveTM, hydroxyapatite particles were chosen as filler to reinforce the polymer. In making composites, the interface between hydroxyapatite particles and polymer plays an important role in determining the ultimate mechanical propertie

  20. Hydroxyapatite/polymer composites for bone replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Q.; Liu, Qing

    1997-01-01

    To improve the mechanical properties and the bioactivity of PolyacitveTM, hydroxyapatite particles were chosen as filler to reinforce the polymer. In making composites, the interface between hydroxyapatite particles and polymer plays an important role in determining the ultimate mechanical propertie

  1. Biomimetic endodontics: the final evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David J

    2007-07-01

    We are seeing a gradual evolution by a small but growing number of endodontists and general dentists toward delicate biomimetic, microscope-based shaping. This old-fashioned respect for periradicular dentin is paired with microscopes, ultrasonics, and an appreciation for root morphology. Although no 2 roots are the same, general anatomic patterns allow the microscope-equipped clinician to search for major pulpal regions that will yield a high probability of cleaning and shaping the clinically available pulpal zones. There are complex, anatomically improbable, and clinically impossible areas of pulp that are beyond the reach of even the most gifted hands. Regardless, the clinician has the responsibility to begin each procedure seeking perfection and joyfully finishing with excellence. The shapes that were introduced during the Schilder (crown-down) era have served as a transitional technique to allow the first real 3-dimensional compaction of gutta-percha. Nonetheless, endodontics is in the end a restoratively driven procedure. Large, arbitrary, round shapes create beautiful endodontics but can dramatically weaken the tooth. The shaping philosophy advanced in this treatise allows perfectly adequate shapes to achieve the hydraulics needed for modern obturation. It will require different skills and materials to shape, pack, and restore the exotic architecture of nature. (See Tables 1 to 3.).

  2. Biomimetics, color, and the arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Franziska

    2015-03-01

    Color as dramatic, dynamic and dazzling as the iridescent hues on the wings of certain butterflies has never been encountered in the art world. Unlike and unmatched by the chemical pigments of the artists' palette, this changeable color is created by transparent, colorless nanostructures that, as with prisms, diffract and reflect light to render spectral color visible. Until now, iridescent colors, by their very nature, have defied artists' best efforts to fully capture these rainbow hues. Now, for the first time, the artist and researcher Franziska Schenk employs latest nature-inspired color-shift technology to actually simulate the iridescence of butterflies and beetles on canvas. Crucially, studying the ingenious ways in which a range of such displays are created by insects has provided the artist with vital clues on how to adapt and adopt these challenging optical nano-materials for painting. And indeed, after years of meticulous and painstaking research both in the lab and studio, the desired effect is achieved. The resulting paintings, like an iridescent insect, do in fact fluctuate in perceived color - depending on the light and viewing angle. In tracing the artist's respective biomimetic approach, the paper not only provides an insight into the new color technology's evolution and innovative artistic possibilities, but also suggests what artists can learn from nature.

  3. Biomimetic Enamel Regeneration Mediated by Leucine-Rich Amelogenin Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, S Y; Litman, A; Margolis, H C; Yamakoshi, Y; Simmer, J P

    2017-01-01

    We report here a novel biomimetic approach to the regeneration of human enamel. The approach combines the use of inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi) to control the onset and rate of enamel regeneration and the use of leucine-rich amelogenin peptide (LRAP), a nonphosphorylated 56-amino acid alternative splice product of amelogenin, to regulate the shape and orientation of growing enamel crystals. This study builds on our previous findings that show LRAP can effectively guide the formation of ordered arrays of needle-like hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals in vitro and on the known role mineralization inhibitors, like PPi, play in the regulation of mineralized tissue formation. Acid-etched enamel surfaces of extracted human molars, cut perpendicular or parallel to the direction of the enamel rods, were exposed to a PPi-stabilized supersaturated calcium phosphate (CaP) solution containing 0 to 0.06 mg/mL LRAP for 20 h. In the absence of LRAP, PPi inhibition was reversed by the presence of etched enamel surfaces and led to the formation of large, randomly distributed plate-like HA crystals that were weakly attached, regardless of rod orientation. In the presence of 0.04 mg/mL LRAP, however, densely packed mineral layers, comprising bundles of small needle-like HA crystals, formed on etched surfaces that were cut perpendicular to the enamel rods. These crystals were strongly attached, and their arrangement reflected to a significant degree the underlying enamel prism pattern. In contrast, under the same conditions with LRAP, little to no crystal formation was found on enamel surfaces that were cut parallel to the direction of the enamel rods. These results suggest that LRAP preferentially interacts with ab surfaces of mature enamel crystals, inhibiting their directional growth, thus selectively promoting linear growth along the c-axis of enamel crystals. The present findings demonstrate a potential for the development of a new approach to regenerate enamel structure and properties.

  4. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  5. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized and highly efficient transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create...... membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... generally have a lower turnover but are capable of transport against gradients. For both classes of proteins, their unique flux-properties make them interesting as candidates in biomimetic sensor/separation devices. An ideal sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually...

  6. Coupling of metals and biominerals: characterizing the interface between ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys and hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allenstein, Uta; Selle, Susanne; Tadsen, Meike; Patzig, Christian; Höche, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; Mayr, Stefan G

    2015-07-22

    Durable, mechanically robust osseointegration of metal implants poses one of the largest challenges in contemporary orthopedics. The application of biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) coatings as mediators for enhanced mechanical coupling to natural bone constitutes a promising approach. Motivated by recent advances in the field of smart metals that might open the venue for alternate therapeutic concepts, we explore their mechanical coupling to sputter-deposited HAp layers in a combined experimental-theoretical study. While experimental delamination tests and comprehensive structural characterization, including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, are utilized to establish structure-property relationships, density functional theory based total energy calculations unravel the underlying physics and chemistry of bonding and confirm the experimental findings. Experiments and modeling indicate that sputter-deposited HAp coatings are strongly adherent to the exemplary ferromagnetic shape-memory alloys, Ni-Mn-Ga and Fe-Pd, with delamination stresses and interface bonding strength exceeding the physiological scales by orders of magnitude.

  7. Comparison of crystallinity between natural hydroxyapatite and synthetic cp-Ti /HA coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Molena de Assis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Commercial purity titanium (cp-Ti, and some of its alloys are important materials in the medical field because of their excellent biocompatibility and mechanical properties. Recently a simple chemical method to induce bioactivity in these inert metallic materials was reported. In this work, the biomimetic chemical process has been used to modify the surface of cp-Ti with the formation of a deposit layer of apatite (a calcium phosphate compound. The main purpose was to study the influence of heat treatment on changes in crystallinity in the deposited phases. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy showed that the apatite coatings heat treated between 400 and 600 °C were less crystalline, similar to biological apatites. Upon heat treatment at temperatures above 700 °C, the apatite coatings appeared more crystalline, and were a mixture of hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and magnesium phosphate.

  8. Minimally invasive restorative dentistry: a biomimetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Mark I

    2006-08-01

    When providing dental treatment for a given patient, the practitioner should use a minimally invasive technique that conserves sound tooth structure as a clinical imperative. Biomimetics is a tenet that guides the author's practice and is generally described as the mimicking of natural life. This can be accomplished in many cases using contemporary composite resins and adhesive dental procedures. Both provide clinical benefits and support the biomimetic philosophy for treatment. This article illustrates a minimally invasive approach for the restoration of carious cervical defects created by poor hygiene exacerbated by the presence of orthodontic brackets.

  9. Biomimetic microsensors inspired by marine life

    CERN Document Server

    Kottapalli, Ajay Giri Prakash; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    This book narrates the development of various biomimetic microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensors, such as pressure, flow, acceleration, chemical, and tactile sensors, that are inspired by sensing phenomenon that exist in marine life. The research described in this book is multi-faceted and combines the expertise and understanding from diverse fields, including biomimetics, microfabrication, sensor engineering, MEMS design, nanotechnology, and material science. A series of chapters examine the design and fabrication of MEMS sensors that function on piezoresistive, piezoelectric, strain gauge, and chemical sensing principles. By translating nature-based engineering solutions to artificial manmade technology, we could find innovative solutions to critical problems.

  10. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  11. Fabrication of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite doped degradable composite hollow fiber for guided and biomimetic bone tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ning [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634 (United States); Nichols, Heather L. [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634 (United States); Tylor, Shila [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634 (United States); Wen Xuejun [Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634 (United States)]. E-mail: xjwen@clemson.edu

    2007-04-15

    Natural bone tissue possesses a nanocomposite structure interwoven in a three-dimensional (3-D) matrix, which plays critical roles in conferring appropriate physical and biological properties to the bone tissue. Single type of material may not be sufficient to mimic the composition, structure and properties of native bone, therefore, composite materials consisting of both polymers, bioceramics, and other inorganic materials have to be designed. Among a variety of candidate materials, polymer-nanoparticle composites appear most promising for bone tissue engineering applications because of superior mechanical properties, improved durability, and surface bioactivity when compared with conventional polymers or composites. The long term objective of this project is to use highly aligned, bioactive, biodegradable scaffold mimicking natural histological structure of human long bone, and to engineer and regenerate human long bone both in vitro and in vivo. In this study, bioactive, degradable, and highly permeable composite hollow fiber membranes (HFMs) were fabricated using a wet phase phase-inversion approach. The structure of the hollow fiber membranes was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM); degradation behavior was examined using weigh loss assay, gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC); and bioactivity was evaluated with the amount of calcium deposition from the culture media onto HFM surface. Doping PLGA HFMs with nanoHA results in a more bioactive and slower degrading HFM than pure PLGA HFMs.

  12. Hydroxyapatite-Bioglass-Titanium Biomaterials Used as Dense Bulk in Double-layer Biomimetic Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianpeng ZOU; Jianming RUAN; Baiyun HUANG; Jianben LIU; Zhigang ZHAO

    2004-01-01

    Sintering shrinkage, compressive strength, bending strength, chemical composition and their relationships with microstructure of HA-Ti and HA-BG-Ti biomaterials were studied. The results show that sintering shrinkage curve of HA-BG-Ti composite changes just like S shape (23.1%-16.2%-21.8%-17.1%) with increase of Ti content, and sintering shrinkage of HA-BG-Ti composite is always higher than that of HA-Ti composite. The approach also indicates that compressive strength and bending strength of HA-BG-Ti composite are always higher than that of HA-Ti composite. Basically, with its compressive strength and bending strength equaling to 211.5 MPa and 132.1 MPa respectively, HA-10 vol. pct BG-60 vol. pct Ti composite can meet the mechanical properties requirements of the outer dense bulk. Furthermore, microstructure analysis shows that interfacial integration of HA-BG-Ti composite is better than that of HA-Ti composite. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM-EDAX analysis, brittle new phases including calcium titanate and calcium carbonate are detected in HA-Ti composite. New phases in HA-Ti composite and complex strong binding force accompanied by elemental diffusion of Si, Ti in HA-BG-Ti composite can explain theoretically the great difference of mechanical properties of HA-Ti and HA-BG-Ti composites.

  13. Biomimetic organic-inorganic nanocomposite coatings for titanium implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikirić, Maja Dutour; Gergely, Csilla; Elkaim, Rene; Wachtel, Ellen; Cuisinier, Frederic J G; Füredi-Milhofer, Helga

    2009-06-01

    A new class of organic-inorganic nanocomposites, to be used as coatings for surface enhancement of metal implants for bone replacement and repair, has been prepared by a biomimetic three-step procedure: (1) embedding amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) particles between organic polyelectrolyte multilayers (PE MLs), (2) in situ transformation of ACP to octacalcium phospate (OCP) and/or poorly crystalline apatite nanocrystals by immersion of the material into a metastable calcifying solution (MCS) and (3) deposition of a final PE ML. The organic polyelectrolytes used were poly-L-glutamic acid and poly-L-lysine. The nanocomposites obtained by each successive step were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS), and XRD, and their suitability as coatings for metal implants was examined by mechanical and in vitro biological tests. Coatings obtained by the first deposition step are mechanically unstable and therefore not suitable. During the second step, upon immersion into MCS, ACP particles were transformed into crystalline calcium phosphate, with large platelike OCP crystals as the top layer. After phase transformation, the nanocomposite was strongly attached to the titanium, but the top layer did not promote cell proliferation. However, when the coating was topped with an additional PE ML (step 3), smoother surfaces were obtained, which facilitated cell adhesion and proliferation as shown by in vitro biological tests using primary human osteoblasts (HO) directly seeded onto the nanocomposites. In fact, cell proliferation on nanocomposites with top PE MLs was far superior than on any of the individual components and was equivalent to proliferation on the golden standard (plastic).

  14. Semiconductor nanocrystal-based phagokinetic tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A; Parak, Wolfgang J; Le Gros, Mark; Boudreau, Rosanne

    2014-11-18

    Methods for determining metabolic properties of living cells through the uptake of semiconductor nanocrystals by cells. Generally the methods require a layer of neutral or hydrophilic semiconductor nanocrystals and a layer of cells seeded onto a culture surface and changes in the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals are detected. The observed changes made to the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals can be correlated to such metabolic properties as metastatic potential, cell motility or migration.

  15. Enhanced colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borum, La Rhonda Terese

    Hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2 is the most thermodynamically stable calcium phosphate in physiological environments. Hence, it is the main inorganic mineral found in bone and teeth. Its colloidal stability, however, is poor because hydroxyapatite (HAp) particles exhibit sediment formation upon standing at short time periods, where agglomerates form and lead to non-homogeneous suspensions. Surface modification is a promising method to tailor the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite for biomaterial applications. Three techniques to modify the HAp surface and enhance the colloidal stability of HAp were investigated. Modified particles were characterized by methods sensitive to surface chemistry changes, such as sedimentation studies, diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, and electrophoresis. Sedimentation studies demonstrated how effective each technique was in improving the colloidal stability of hydroxyapatite particles. Electrophoresis provided information on electrostatic interactions within each system. The first technique entailed an esterification reaction of the HAp surface with dodecyl alcohol at elevated temperatures. DRIFT results showed that dodecyl groups from the alcohol replaced acidic hydroxyl and phosphate sites on the HAp surface, giving rise to enhanced colloidal stability through steric interactions in ethanol suspensions. TGA curves gave insight to the degree of esterification for the esterified particles. Higher reaction temperatures give rise to a higher degree of esterification resulting in better colloidal stability. The second technique applied a silica coating on the HAp surface by the hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate in ethanol. Silica was coated onto the HAp surface at 5--75 wt% loading amounts. A combination of acid dissolution and x-ray diffraction (XRD), along with BET showed that the silica coating is complete at 50 wt% silica loading. The silica coating

  16. Ostrich eggshell as calcium source for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite partially substituted with zinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. M. Ferreira

    Full Text Available Abstract In the present study, hydroxyapatite and Zn-substituted hydroxyapatite powders were synthesized using ostrich eggshell as a calcium source. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun, and X-ray diffraction (XRD to identify the present phases, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative chemical analysis of the synthesized and heat treated powders. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique was used before and after heat treatments at 700, 900 and 1100 °C in order to identify the functional groups present, as an additional technique to the XRD analysis. The results presented in this study represent a promising method for synthesis of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite partially substituted with zinc, since the results showed no undesirable phases or impurities in the produced powders. It was observed that Zn-substituted hydroxyapatite showed higher thermal stability, when compared to pure hydroxyapatite.

  17. Ostrich eggshell as calcium source for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite partially substituted with zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, J.R.M.; Louro, L.H.L.; Costa, A.M.; Silva, M.H. Prado da [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campos, J.B. de, E-mail: josericardo@r-crio.com, E-mail: louro@ime.eb.br, E-mail: andrea@r-crio.com, E-mail: brantjose@gmail.com, E-mail: marceloprado@ime.eb.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-10-15

    In the present study, hydroxyapatite and Zn-substituted hydroxyapatite powders were synthesized using ostrich eggshell as a calcium source. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the present phases, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative chemical analysis of the synthesized and heat treated powders. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique was used before and after heat treatments at 700, 900 and 1100 °C in order to identify the functional groups present, as an additional technique to the XRD analysis. The results presented in this study represent a promising method for synthesis of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite partially substituted with zinc, since the results showed no undesirable phases or impurities in the produced powders. It was observed that Zn-substituted hydroxyapatite showed higher thermal stability, when compared to pure hydroxyapatite. (author)

  18. Preparation of collagen/hydroxyapatite/alendronate hybrid hydrogels as potential scaffolds for bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; He, Zhiwei; Han, Fengxuan; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Chen, Liang; Li, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Development of biomimetic scaffolds represents a promising direction in bone tissue engineering. In this study, we designed a two-step process to prepare a type of biomimetic hybrid hydrogels that were composed of collagen, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and alendronate (ALN), an anti-osteoporosis drug. First, water-soluble ALN-conjugated HAP (HAP-ALN) containing 4.0wt.% of ALN was synthesized by treating HAP particles with ALN. Hydrogels were then formed from HAP-ALN conjugate and collagen under physiological conditions using genipin (GNP) as the crosslinker. Depending on the ALN/collagen molar ratio and GNP concentration, the gelation time of hydrogels ranged from 5 to 37min. Notably, these hybrid hydrogels exhibited markedly improved mechanical property (storage modulus G'=38-187kPa), higher gel contents, and lower swelling ratios compared to the hydrogels prepared from collagen alone under similar conditions. Moreover, they showed tunable degradation behaviors against collagenase. The collagen/HAP-ALN hybrid hydrogels supported the adhesion and growth of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells well. Such tough yet enzymatically degradable hybrid hydrogels hold potential as scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Energy-based and biomimetic robotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkertsma, Gerrit Adriaan

    2017-01-01

    All physical systems interact by exchanging power, or energy. This energy can be explicitly taken into account when designing robotic systems, in dynamic models of systems and controllers, leading to more insight in energy-related effects. In this thesis, a biomimetic cheetah robot is developed, by

  20. Calcifying tissue regeneration via biomimetic materials chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Green, David W.; Goto, Tazuko K.; Kim, Kye-Seong; Jung, Han-Sung

    2014-01-01

    Materials chemistry is making a fundamental impact in regenerative sciences providing many platforms for tissue development. However, there is a surprising paucity of replacements that accurately mimic the structure and function of the structural fabric of tissues or promote faithful tissue reconstruction. Methodologies in biomimetic materials chemistry have shown promise in replicating morphologies, architectures and functional building blocks of acellular mineralized tissues dentine, enamel...

  1. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by usin...

  2. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by using...

  3. Substituted hydroxyapatites with antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency.

  4. [Fracture of macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetchessi, A T; Pech-Gourg, G; Metellus, P; Fuentes, S

    2012-12-01

    Different prosthesis implants are offered to perform a cranioplasty after a decompressive craniectomy when autologous bone graft cannot be used. The authors report the case of a 25-year-old man who benefited a unilateral decompressive craniectomy after a severe head trauma. Seven months later, a cranioplasty using custom macroporous hydroxyapatite prosthesis was performed. The postoperative course was marked by a generalized seizure leading to a traumatic head injury. The CT-scan showed a comminutive fracture of the prosthesis and an extradural hematoma. The patient underwent a removal of the fractured prosthesis and an evacuation of the extradural clot. The postoperative course was uneventful with a Glasgow outcome scale score at 5. A second cranioplasty using a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) implant was performed. Among cranioplasty prosthesis solutions, hydroxyapatite implants seem to have similar property to the bone. However, its weak mechanic resistance is an actual problem in patients susceptible to present generalized seizures with consecutive head impact. Hence, in patients with decompressive craniectomy who are exposed to potential brain injury, we favor the use of more resistant implant as PEEK prosthesis.

  5. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Kolmas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency.

  6. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements.

  7. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-04-29

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml(-1) HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel composites

  8. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J.; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J.

    2009-04-01

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml-1 HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel composites

  9. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lijie; Webster, Thomas J [Division of Engineering, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J; Fenniri, Hicham [National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: hicham.fenniri@ualberta.ca, E-mail: thomas_webster@brown.edu

    2009-04-29

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml{sup -1} HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel

  10. Minocycline-released hydroxyapatite-gelatin nanocomposite and its cytocompatibility in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou Xiaochen; Zhu Xiaopeng; Zhou Jian; Cai Huaqiong; Li Quanli [Key Laboratory of Oral Disease Research of Anhui Province, Stomatologic Hospital and Collage, Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China); Tang Jian, E-mail: ql-li@126.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, The First Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei (China)

    2011-04-15

    The incorporation of antibacterial agents into biomaterials is extremely desirable for repairing bone defects. Minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, is active against aerobic, anaerobic, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and can enhance bone formation, decrease connective tissue breakdown and diminish bone resorption. In this study, a novel minocycline-releasing biomaterial was synthesized using a biomimetic method. A measured amount of an acidic hydroxyapatite and minocycline solution was respectively added to a gelatin solution and kept at 40 deg. C and pH 7-8 for 2 h. The mixture was aged overnight, lyophilized and a hydroxyapatite-gelatin-minocycline composite was obtained. The composite was co-cultured with rat bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro. Our results show that nanohydroxyapatite was distributed evenly in the fibrils of the gelatin. Minocycline was incorporated into the composite and could be released from the composite particles slowly over 2 weeks in vitro. The composite promoted BMSC adhesion, proliferation and differentiation in vitro. The approach described here may provide a basis for the preparation of an antibacterial biomaterial for bone regeneration.

  11. Biomimetics of human movement: functional or aesthetic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Christopher M

    2009-09-01

    How should robotic or prosthetic arms be programmed to move? Copying human smooth movements is popular in synthetic systems, but what does this really achieve? We cannot address these biomimetic issues without a deep understanding of why natural movements are so stereotyped. In this article, we distinguish between 'functional' and 'aesthetic' biomimetics. Functional biomimetics requires insight into the problem that nature has solved and recognition that a similar problem exists in the synthetic system. In aesthetic biomimetics, nature is copied for its own sake and no insight is needed. We examine the popular minimum jerk (MJ) model that has often been used to generate smooth human-like point-to-point movements in synthetic arms. The MJ model was originally justified as maximizing 'smoothness'; however, it is also the limiting optimal trajectory for a wide range of cost functions for brief movements, including the minimum variance (MV) model, where smoothness is a by-product of optimizing the speed-accuracy trade-off imposed by proportional noise (PN: signal-dependent noise with the standard deviation proportional to mean). PN is unlikely to be dominant in synthetic systems, and the control objectives of natural movements (speed and accuracy) would not be optimized in synthetic systems by human-like movements. Thus, employing MJ or MV controllers in robotic arms is just aesthetic biomimetics. For prosthetic arms, the goal is aesthetic by definition, but it is still crucial to recognize that MV trajectories and PN are deeply embedded in the human motor system. Thus, PN arises at the neural level, as a recruitment strategy of motor units and probably optimizes motor neuron noise. Human reaching is under continuous adaptive control. For prosthetic devices that do not have this natural architecture, natural plasticity would drive the system towards unnatural movements. We propose that a truly neuromorphic system with parallel force generators (muscle fibres) and noisy

  12. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  13. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  14. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parak, Wolfgang J.; Gerion, Daniele; Pellegrino, Teresa; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine; Williams, Shara C.; Boudreau, Rosanne; LeGros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2003-07-01

    Due to their interesting properties, research on colloidal nanocrystals has moved in the last few years from fundamental research to first applications in materials science and life sciences. In this review some recent biological applications of colloidal nanocrystals are discussed, without going into biological or chemical details. First, the properties of colloidal nanocrystals and how they can be synthesized are described. Second, the conjugation of nanocrystals with biological molecules is discussed. And third, three different biological applications are introduced: (i) the arrangement of nanocrystal-oligonucleotide conjugates using molecular scaffolds such as single-stranded DNA, (ii) the use of nanocrystal-protein conjugates as fluorescent probes for cellular imaging, and (iii) a motility assay based on the uptake of nanocrystals by living cells.

  16. Semiconductor Nanocrystals for Biological Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-06-28

    Conventional organic fluorophores suffer from poor photo stability, narrow absorption spectra and broad emission feature. Semiconductor nanocrystals, on the other hand, are highly photo-stable with broad absorption spectra and narrow size-tunable emission spectra. Recent advances in the synthesis of these materials have resulted in bright, sensitive, extremely photo-stable and biocompatible semiconductor fluorophores. Commercial availability facilitates their application in a variety of unprecedented biological experiments, including multiplexed cellular imaging, long-term in vitro and in vivo labeling, deep tissue structure mapping and single particle investigation of dynamic cellular processes. Semiconductor nanocrystals are one of the first examples of nanotechnology enabling a new class of biomedical applications.

  17. Enhanced osteoconductivity of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite by system instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang Cho, Jung; Um, Seung-Hoon; Su Yoo, Dong; Chung, Yong-Chae; Hye Chung, Shin; Lee, Jeong-Cheol; Rhee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-07-01

    The effect of substituting sodium for calcium on enhanced osteoconductivity of hydroxyapatite was newly investigated. Sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was synthesized by reacting calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid with sodium nitrate followed by sintering. As a control, pure hydroxyapatite was prepared under identical conditions, but without the addition of sodium nitrate. Substitution of calcium with sodium in hydroxyapatite produced the structural vacancies for carbonate ion from phosphate site and hydrogen ion from hydroxide site of hydroxyapatite after sintering. The total system energy of sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects calculated by ab initio methods based on quantum mechanics was much higher than that of hydroxyapatite, suggesting that the sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite was energetically less stable compared with hydroxyapatite. Indeed, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited higher dissolution behavior of constituent elements of hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF) and Tris-buffered deionized water compared with hydroxyapatite, which directly affected low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity by increasing the degree of apatite supersaturation in SBF. Actually, sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite exhibited markedly improved low-crystalline hydroxyl-carbonate apatite forming capacity in SBF and noticeably higher osteoconductivity 4 weeks after implantation in calvarial defects of New Zealand white rabbits compared with hydroxyapatite. In addition, there were no statistically significant differences between hydroxyapatite and sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite on cytotoxicity as determined by BCA assay. Taken together, these results indicate that sodium-substituted hydroxyapatite with structural defects has promising potential for use as a bone grafting material due to its enhanced osteoconductivity compared with hydroxyapatite.

  18. Spectral analysis of allogeneic hydroxyapatite powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timchenko, P. E.; Timchenko, E. V.; Pisareva, E. V.; Vlasov, M. Yu; Red’kin, N. A.; Frolov, O. O.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the application of Raman spectroscopy to the in vitro analysis of the hydroxyapatite powder samples produced from different types of animal bone tissue during demineralization process at various acid concentrations and exposure durations. The derivation of the Raman spectrum of hydroxyapatite is attempted by the analysis of the pure powders of its known constituents. Were experimentally found spectral features of hydroxyapatite, based on analysis of the line amplitude at wave numbers 950-965 cm-1 ((PO4)3- (ν1) vibration) and 1065-1075 cm-1 ((CO3)2-(ν1) B-type replacement). Control of physicochemical properties of hydroxyapatite was carried out by Raman spectroscopy. Research results are compared with an infrared Fourier spectroscopy.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and application of nano hydroxyapatite and nanocomposite of hydroxyapatite with granular activated carbon for the removal of Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernando, M. Shanika [Department of Chemistry, University of Colombo, Colombo 03 (Sri Lanka); Silva, Rohini M. de, E-mail: rohini@chem.cmb.ac.lk [Department of Chemistry, University of Colombo, Colombo 03 (Sri Lanka); Silva, K.M. Nalin de [Department of Chemistry, University of Colombo, Colombo 03 (Sri Lanka); Sri Lanka Institute of Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology and Science Park, Mahenwatta, Pitipana, Homagama (Sri Lanka)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of neat nano Hydroxyapatite using wet chemical precipitation methods. • This resulted rod like nanocrystals with a diameter around 50–80 nm. • Impregnation of of nano HAp onto the granular activated carbon (GAC) was achieved. • Materials were characterized using FT-IR, PXRD, and SEM. • Adsorption studies were conducted for Pb{sup 2+} ions. • The adsorption data were evaluated according to isotherm models. - Abstract: Synthesis of neat nano hydroxyapatite (HAp) was carried out using wet chemical precipitation methods at low temperature and this resulted rod like HAp nanocrystals with a diameter around 50–80 nm and length of about 250 nm. Impregnation of nano HAp onto the granular activated carbon (GAC) to prepare hydroxyapatite granular activated carbon nanocomposite (C-HAp) was carried out using in situ synthesis of nano HAp in the presence of GAC. The samples of neat nano HAp and C-HAp composite were characterized using Fourier-Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Detailed adsorption studies of neat nano HAp, C-HAp and neat GAC were conducted for Pb{sup 2+} ions at room temperature at different pH levels. The adsorption data for Pb{sup 2+} ions was evaluated according to both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models for both neat nano HAp and C-HAp separately at ambient temperature, 298 K. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted well with Langmuir adsorption isotherm for neat nano HAp with an adsorption capacity in the range of 138–83 mg g{sup −1}. For C-HAp nanocomposite the adsorption data were well fitted with Freundlich model and the calculated adsorption capacity was in the range of 9–14 mg g{sup −1}. Leaching of Ca{sup 2+} ions by neat nano HAp and C-HAp were also analyzed as a function of pH. It was found that the leaching of Ca{sup 2+} was high in neat HAp than C-HAp. The leaching of Ca{sup 2+} by neat HAp and C

  20. An investigation into photofunctional interfaces of 8-hydroxyquinoline/hydroxyapatite hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagaya, Motohiro; Motozuka, Satoshi

    2017-04-01

    Organic/inorganic hybrids of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8Hq) molecule and hydroxyapatite nanocrystal (HAp) were mechanochemically prepared. In the hybrids, a green photoluminescence peak at 500 nm newly appeared, suggesting the chemical bonding of the 8Hq molecule with the Ca2+ ions of HAp. Then, the organic/inorganic interfacial photofunction was clarified by a molecular orbital calculation. The interfacial chemical bonding between the O and N atoms of 8Hq and the Ca2+ ions of HAp was attributed to both covalent Osbnd Ca and ionic Nsbnd Ca. The resultant wave functions revealed that the green luminescence was attributed to metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from the O atoms of phosphate group (HAp) to the π-cloud (8Hq) in the HOMO of the hybrids. Therefore, the photofunctional interfaces of the hybrids were successfully demonstrated.

  1. Hydroxyapatite/MCM-41 and SBA-15 Nano-Composites: Preparation, Characterization and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea R. Beltramone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Composites of hydroxyapatite (HaP and highly ordered large pore mesoporous silica molecular sieves such as, Al-SBA-15 and Al-MCM-41 (denoted as SBA-15 and MCM-41. respectively were developed, characterized by XRD, BET, FTIR, HRTEM and NMR-MAS, and applied to fluoride retention from contaminated water. The proposed procedure by a new route to prepare the HaP/SBA-15 and HaP/MCM-41, composites generates materials with aluminum only in tetrahedral coordination, according to the 27Al NMR-MAS results. Free OH- groups of HaP nanocrystals, within the hosts, allowed high capacity fluoride retention. The activity of fluoride retention using HaP/MCM-41 or HaP/SBA-15 was 1-2 orders of magnitude greater, respectively, than with pure HaP.

  2. Septic complication following porous hydroxyapatite cranioplasty: prosthesis retention management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccarino, Corrado; Mattogno, Pier P; Zanotti, Bruno; Bellocchi, Silvio; Verlicchi, Angela; Viaroli, Edoardo; Pastorello, Giulia; SGULò, Francesco; Ghadirpour, Reza; Servadei, Franco

    2016-05-13

    After failing of autologous cranioplasty or when the bone flap is unavailable, the alloplastic (heterologous) materials are the choice for cranial reconstruction. No agreement has been reported about the material with a significant lower risk of septic complications. This is due to extremely heterogeneous prognostic factors related not only to the material used but also to the surgical procedures and/or to the timing of the procedure. More attention should be focused on the material whose characteristic could enable a delay in bacterial colonization, where an antibiotic therapy could be effective, without need of prosthesis removal. Four cases of severe septic complication following cranioplasty with porous hydroxyapatite (HA) prosthesis are presented. Patients were conservatively treated, without heterologous bone flap removal. All of our patients presented reasons for delaying HA cranioplasty removal: Patients 1, 3 and 4 had an associated shunted hydrocephalus and the need for non- removing the prosthesis was related to the predictable recurrence of overshunting and/or sinking skin flap syndrome. In case 4 the revision surgery would have also damaged the microvascular flap with latissimus dorsi muscle used by plastic surgeon for skin reconstruction. In case 2 the patient refused revision surgery. In all cases systemic and/or radiological signs of infection were observed. In Case 2 the infective process surrounded completely the HA prosthesis, while it was located in the epidural region in Case 1 and 4. In Case 3 a surgical curettage of the infected wound was performed over the HA prosthesis. Following prosthesis retention management with antibiotic therapy, all patients revealed systemic and/or radiological signs of sepsis resolution at follow-up. The possibility to avoid a prosthesis removal with effective antibiotic treatment is mainly due to the combination of three factors: targeted antibiotic therapy, good anatomical area revascularization (resulting of an

  3. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  4. Exciton polarizability in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Shan, Jie; Islam, Mohammad A; Herman, Irving P; Bonn, Mischa; Heinz, Tony F

    2006-11-01

    The response of charge to externally applied electric fields is an important basic property of any material system, as well as one critical for many applications. Here, we examine the behaviour and dynamics of charges fully confined on the nanometre length scale. This is accomplished using CdSe nanocrystals of controlled radius (1-2.5 nm) as prototype quantum systems. Individual electron-hole pairs are created at room temperature within these structures by photoexcitation and are probed by terahertz (THz) electromagnetic pulses. The electronic response is found to be instantaneous even for THz frequencies, in contrast to the behaviour reported in related measurements for larger nanocrystals and nanocrystal assemblies. The measured polarizability of an electron-hole pair (exciton) amounts to approximately 10(4) A(3) and scales approximately as the fourth power of the nanocrystal radius. This size dependence and the instantaneous response reflect the presence of well-separated electronic energy levels induced in the system by strong quantum-confinement effects.

  5. Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Somorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-05-01

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO(2)-Pt and Pt-SiO(2), can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO(2)-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H(2), which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO(2) interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts.

  6. Energy transfer with semiconductor nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogach, A.L.; Klar, T.A.; Lupton, J.M.; Meijerink, A.; Feldmann, J.

    2009-01-01

    Fo¨ rster (or fluorescence) resonant energy transfer (FRET) is a powerful spectroscopic technique to study interactions, conformational and distance changes, in hybrid nanosystems. Semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as colloidal quantum dots, are highly efficient fluorophores with a strong band-

  7. Nanocrystals Research for Energy Efficient and Clean Energy Technologies:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2013-12-17

    Efforts centered on: nanocrystal photovoltaic fabrication, ultrafast dynamics and aberration-corrected STEM characterization of II-VI core, core/shell and alloyed nanocrystals, and fundamental investigation and applications of ultrasmall white light-emitting CdSe nanocrystal.

  8. The Top of the Biomimetic Triangle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei P. Sommer; Dan Zhu; Matthias Wiora; Hans-Joerg Fecht

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing observational evidence indicating that crystalline interfacial water layers play a central role in evolution and biology. For instance in cellular recognition processes, in particular during first contact events, where cells decide upon survival or entering apoptosis. Understanding water layers is thus crucial in biomedical engineering, specifically in the design of biomaterials inspired by biomimetic principles. Whereas there is ample experimental evidence for crystalline interfacial water layers on surfaces in air, their subaquatic presence could not be verified directly, so far. Analysing a polarity dependent asym- metry in the surface conductivity on hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond, we show that crystalline interfacial water layers persist subaquatically. Nanoscopic interfacial water layers with an order different from that of bulk water have been identified at room temperature on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic model surfaces - in air and subaquatically. Their generalization and systematic inclusion into the catalogue of physical and chemical determinants of biocompatibility complete the biomimetic triangle.

  9. Green Tribology Biomimetics, Energy Conservation and Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    Tribology is the study of friction, wear and lubrication. Recently, the concept of “green tribology” as “the science and technology of the tribological aspects of ecological balance and of environmental and biological impacts” was introduced. The field of green tribology includes tribological technology that mimics living nature (biomimetic surfaces) and thus is expected to be environmentally friendly, the control of friction and wear that is of importance for energy conservation and conversion, environmental aspects of lubrication and surface modification techniques, and tribological aspects of green applications such as wind-power turbines or solar panels. This book is the first comprehensive volume on green tribology. The chapters are prepared by leading experts in their fields and cover such topics as biomimetics, environmentally friendly lubrication, tribology of wind turbines and renewable sources of energy, and ecological impact of new technologies of surface treatment.

  10. Biomimetic Membrane Arrays on Cast Hydrogel Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerdink-Lander, Monique; Ibragimova, Sania; Rein Hansen, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bilayers are intrinsically fragile and require mechanical support in technical applications based on biomimetic membranes. Tethering the lipid bilayer membranes to solid substrates, either directly through covalent or ionic substrate−lipid links or indirectly on substrate-supported cushions......, provides mechanical support but at the cost of small molecule transport through the membrane−support sandwich. To stabilize biomimetic membranes while allowing transport through a membrane−support sandwich, we have investigated the feasibility of using an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE......)/hydrogel sandwich as the support. The sandwich is realized as a perforated surface-treated ETFE film onto which a hydrogel composite support structure is cast. We report a simple method to prepare arrays of lipid bilayer membranes with low intrinsic electrical conductance on the highly permeable, self...

  11. Green tribology. Biomimetics, energy conservation and sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nosonovsky, Michael [Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bhushan, Bharat (eds.) [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (US). Nanoprobe Lab. for Bio- and Nanotechnology and Biomimetics (NLB2)

    2012-07-01

    Tribology is the study of friction, wear and lubrication. Recently, the concept of ''green tribology'' as ''the science and technology of the tribological aspects of ecological balance and of environmental and biological impacts'' was introduced. The field of green tribology includes tribological technology that mimics living nature (biomimetic surfaces) and thus is expected to be environmentally friendly, the control of friction and wear that is of importance for energy conservation and conversion, environmental aspects of lubrication and surface modification techniques, and tribological aspects of green applications such as wind-power turbines or solar panels. This book is the first comprehensive volume on green tribology. The chapters are prepared by leading experts in their fields and cover such topics as biomimetics, environmentally friendly lubrication, tribology of wind turbines and renewable sources of energy, and ecological impact of new technologies of surface treatment. (orig.)

  12. Cell Interactions within Biomimetic Apatite Microenvironments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive ceramics, such as calcium phosphate-based materials, have been studied extensively for the regeneration of bone tissue. Accelerated apatite coatings prepared from biomimetic methods is one approach that has had a history of success in both in vitro and in vivo studies for bone regeneration [1]-[4]. However, how cells interact within the apatite microenvironment remains largely unclear, despite the vast literature available today. In response, this thesis evaluates the in vitro i...

  13. The Effect of Zirconia in Hydroxyapatite on Staphylococcus epidermidis Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widowati Siswomihardjo

    2012-01-01

    . Conclusion. The addition of zirconia into hydroxyapatite affected the growth of S. epidermidis. Hydroxyapatite with 20% zirconia proved to be an effective concentration to inhibit the growth of S. epidermidis colony.

  14. Kirigami design and fabrication for biomimetic robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Sareh, Sina

    2014-03-01

    Biomimetics faces a continual challenge of how to bridge the gap between what Nature has so effectively evolved and the current tools and materials that engineers and scientists can exploit. Kirigami, from the Japanese `cut' and `paper', is a method of design where laminar materials are cut and then forced out-of-plane to yield 3D structures. Kirimimetic design provides a convenient and relatively closed design space within which to replicate some of the most interesting niche biological mechanisms. These include complex flexing organelles such as cilia in algae, energy storage and buckled structures in plants, and organic appendages that actuate out-of-plane such as the myoneme of the Vorticella protozoa. Where traditional kirigami employs passive materials which must be forced to transition to higher dimensions, we can exploit planar smart actuators and artificial muscles to create self-actuating kirigami structures. Here we review biomimetics with respect to the kirigami design and fabrication methods and examine how smart materials, including electroactive polymers and shape memory polymers, can be used to realise effective biomimetic components for robotic, deployable structures and engineering systems. One-way actuation, for example using shape memory polymers, can yield complete self-deploying structures. Bi-directional actuation, in contrast, can be exploited to mimic fundamental biological mechanisms such as thrust generation and fluid control. We present recent examples of kirigami robotic mechanisms and actuators and discuss planar fabrication methods, including rapid prototyping and 3D printing, and how current technologies, and their limitations, affect Kirigami robotics.

  15. Biomimetic Composite Structural T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vimal Kumar Thummalapalli; Steven L.Donaldson

    2012-01-01

    Biological structural fixed joints exhibit unique attributes,including highly optimized fiber paths which minimize stress concentrations.In addition,since the joints consist of continuous,uncut fiber architectures,the joints enable the organism to transport information and chemicals from one part of the body to the other.To the contrary,sections of man-made composite material structures are often joined using bolted or bonded joints,which involve low strength and high stress concentrations.These methods are also expensive to achieve.Additional functions such as fluid transport,electrical signal delivery,and thermal conductivity across the joints typically require parasitic tubes,wires,and attachment clips.By using the biomimetic methods,we seek to overcome the limitations which are present in the conventional methods. In the present work,biomimetic co-cured composite sandwich T-joints were constructed using unidirectional glass fiber,epoxy resin,and structural foam.The joints were fabricated using the wet lay-up vacuum bag resin infusion method.Foam sandwich T-joints with multiple continuous fiber architectures and sandwich foam thickness were prepared.The designs were tested in quasi-static bending using a mechanical load frame.The significantweight savings using the biomimetic approaches is discussed,as well as a comparison of failure modes versus architecture is described.

  16. Biomimetic nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maria Carmona-RibeiroBiocolloids Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Mimicking nature is a powerful approach for developing novel lipid-based devices for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, biomimetic assemblies based on natural or synthetic lipids by themselves or associated to silica, latex or drug particles will be discussed. In water, self-assembly of lipid molecules into supramolecular structures is fairly well understood. However, their self-assembly on a solid surface or at an interface remains poorly understood. In certain cases, hydrophobic drug granules can be dispersed in aqueous solution via lipid adsorption surrounding the drug particles as nanocapsules. In other instances, hydrophobic drug molecules attach as monomers to borders of lipid bilayer fragments providing drug formulations that are effective in vivo at low drug-to-lipid-molar ratio. Cationic biomimetic particles offer suitable interfacial environment for adsorption, presentation and targeting of biomolecules in vivo. Thereby antigens can effectively be presented by tailored biomimetic particles for development of vaccines over a range of defined and controllable particle sizes. Biomolecular recognition between receptor and ligand can be reconstituted by means of receptor immobilization into supported lipidic bilayers allowing isolation and characterization of signal transduction steps.Keywords: cationic lipid, phospholipids, bilayer fragments, vesicles, silica, polymeric particles, antigens, novel cationic immunoadjuvants, drugs

  17. Characterization of a biodegradable coralline hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate composite and its clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Xu, Qingguo; Czernuszka, Jan; Triffitt, James T; Xia, Zhidao

    2013-12-01

    A partially converted, biodegradable coralline hydroxyapatite/calcium carbonate (CHACC) composite comprising a coral calcium carbonate scaffold enveloped by a thin layer of hydroxyapatite was used in the present study. The CHACC was characterized using powder x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The ability of the CHACC to promote conductive osteogenesis was assessed in vitro using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and in vivo using an immunodeficient mouse model. The clinical performance of CHACC as a bone substitute to fill voids caused by excision of bone tumours was also observed in 16 patients. The CHACC was found to consist of two overlapping layers both morphologically and chemically. Hydroxyapatite formed a thin layer of nanocrystals on the surface and a thick rough crystal layer of around 30 µm in thickness enveloping the rock-like core calcium carbonate exoskeletal architecture. hMSCs cultured on CHACC in osteogenic medium demonstrated significant osteogenic differentiation. After subcutaneous implantation of CHACC incorporating osteogenically differentiated hMSCs and an anti-resorptive agent, risedronate, into an immunodeficient mouse model, bone formation was observed on the surface of the implants. Clinical application of CHACC alone in 16 patients for bone augmentation after tumour removal showed that after implantation, visible callus formation was observed at one month and clinical bone healing achieved at four months. The majority of the implanted CHACC was degraded in 18-24 months. In conclusion, CHACC appears to be an excellent biodegradable bone graft material. It biointegrates with the host, is osteoconductive, biodegradable and can be an attractive alternative to autogenous grafts.

  18. Carboxymethyl cellulose-hydroxyapatite hybrid hydrogel as a composite material for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqui, Daniela; Torricelli, Paola; De Cagna, Milena; Fini, Milena; Barbucci, Rolando

    2014-05-01

    Natural bone is a complex inorganic-organic nanocomposite material, in which hydroxyapatite (HA) nanocrystals and collagen fibrils are well organized into hierarchical architecture over several length scales. In this work, we reported a new hybrid material (CMC-HA) containing HA drown in a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC)-based hydrogel. The strategy for inserting HA nanocrystals within the hydrogel matrix consists of making the freeze-dried hydrogel to swell in a solution containing HA microcrystals. The composite CMC-HA hydrogel has been characterized from a physicochemical and morphological point of view by means of FTIR spectroscopy, rheological measurements, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). No release of HA was measured in water or NaCl solution. The distribution of HA crystal on the surface and inside the hydrogel was determined by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and FESEM. The biological performance of CMC-HA hydrogel were tested by using osteoblast MG63 line and compared with a CMC-based hydrogel without HA. The evaluation of osteoblast markers and gene expression showed that the addition of HA to CMC hydrogel enhanced cell proliferation and metabolic activity and promoted the production of mineralized extracellular matrix.

  19. Metal dendrimers: synthesis of hierarchically stellated nanocrystals by sequential seed-directed overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Rebecca G; Skrabalak, Sara E

    2015-01-19

    Hierarchically organized structures are prevalent in nature, where such features account for the adhesion properties of gecko feet and the brilliant color variation of butterfly wings. Achieving artificial structures with multiscale features is of interest for metamaterials and biomimetic applications. However, the fabrication of such structures relies heavily on lithographic approaches, although self-assembly routes to superstructures are promising. Sequential seed-directed overgrowth is now demonstrated as a route to metal dendrimers, which are hierarchically branched nanocrystals (NCs) with a three-dimensional order analogous to that of molecular dendrimers. This method was applied to a model Au/Pd NC system; in general, the principle of sequential seed-directed overgrowth should enable the synthesis of new hierarchical inorganic structures with high symmetry.

  20. In vitro biomimetic deposition of apatite on alkaline and heat treated Ti6Al4V alloy surface

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Fatehi; F Moztarzadeh; M Solati-Hashjin; M Tahriri; M Rezvannia; R Ravarian

    2008-04-01

    Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) substrates, having the ability of biomimetic calcium phosphate-based materials, especially hydroxyapatite deposition in a simulated body fluid (SBF) means of chemical treatment (alkaline treatment) and subsequent heat treatment, was studied. The effects of alkaline treatment time, concentration and heat treatment temperature on the formation of calcium phosphate (carbonate–hydroxyapatite) on Ti6Al4V surface were examined. For this purpose, the metallic substrates were treated in 0, 5 and 10 M NaOH solutions at a temperature of 60 or 80°C for 1 and 3 days. Subsequently the substrate was heat-treated at 500, 600 and 700°C for 1 h for consolidation of the sodium titanate hydrogel layer. Finally, they were soaked in SBF for 1 and 3 days. The substrate surfaces were characterized by the techniques commonly used for bulk material such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thin film X-ray diffraction (TF–XRD). With regard to the SEM and TF–XRD results, the optimum process consists of 3 days soaking in 5 M NaOH in 80°C and subsequent heat treatment at 600°C for 1h. It is worth mentioning that the results showed that the apatite formed within 3 days on the specimen surfaces, however, there was no sign of apatite formation in the control samples (without alkaline and heat treatment) which was treated for up to 3 days immersion in SBF.

  1. Electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended inliquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongjian; Guo, Jinghua; Yin, Yadong; Augustsson, Andreas; Dong, Chungli; Nordgren, Joseph; Chang, Chinglin; Alivisatos, Paul; Thornton, Geoff; Ogletree, D. Frank; Requejo, Felix G.; de Groot, Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2007-07-16

    The electronic structure of cobalt nanocrystals suspended in liquid as a function of size has been investigated using in-situ x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. A sharp absorption peak associated with the ligand molecules is found that increases in intensity upon reducing the nanocrystal size. X-ray Raman features due to d-d and to charge-transfer excitations of ligand molecules are identified. The study reveals the local symmetry of the surface of {var_epsilon}-Co phase nanocrystals, which originates from a dynamic interaction between Co nanocrystals and surfactant + solvent molecules.

  2. Anisotropic Gold Nanocrystals:. Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiufiuc, R.; Toderas, F.; Iosin, M.; Stiufiuc, G.

    In this letter we report on successful preparation and characterization of anisotropic gold nanocrystals bio-synthesized by reduction of aqueous chloroaurate ions in pelargonium plant extract. The nanocrystals have been characterized by means of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). Using these investigation techniques, the successful formation of anisotropic single nanocrystals with the preferential growth direction along the gold (111) plane has been confirmed. The high detail phase images could give us an explanation concerning the growth mechanism of the nanocrystals.

  3. Multicolored luminescent CdS nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The observation of efficient blue, green, orange and red luminescence from CdS nanocrystals made by using a reverse micelle method was reported. The blue luminescence about 480 nm is attributed to the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs.The red luminescence around 650 nm is due to the radiative recombination of the exciton trapped in the nanocrystal surface defect states. The combination of different portion of band-edge emission and surface trap state emission results in green and orange luminescence for the nanocrystals. The CdS nanocrystals with efficient multicolored luminescence may find potential application in full color displays and biolabelings.

  4. Continuous microwave flow synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z.; Goh, Yi-Fan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini [Department of Chemistry, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Lintang, Hendrik O. [Centre for Sustainable Nanomaterials (CSNano), Ibnu Sina Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia); Hussain, Rafaqat, E-mail: rafaqat@kimia.fs.utm.my [Centre for Sustainable Nanomaterials (CSNano), Ibnu Sina Institute for Scientific and Industrial Research, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor (Malaysia)

    2015-11-01

    We have successfully used continuous microwave flow synthesis (CMFS) technique for the template free synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite. The continuous microwave flow reactor consisted of a modified 2.45 GHz household microwave, peristaltic pumps and a Teflon coil. This cost effective and efficient system was exploited to produce semi-crystalline phase pure nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Effect of microwave power, retention time and the concentration of reactants on the phase purity, degree of crystallinity and surface area of the final product was studied in detail. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the phase purity and composition of the product, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the effect of process parameters on the morphology of hydroxyapatite. The TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical particles at low microwave power; however the morphology of the particles changed to mesoporous needle and rod-like structure upon exposing the reaction mixture to higher microwave power and longer retention time inside the microwave. The in-vitro ion dissolution behavior of the as synthesized hydroxyapatite was studied by determining the amount of Ca{sup 2+} ion released in SBF solution. - Highlights: • Continuous microwave flow synthesis method was used to prepare hydroxyapatite. • Increase in microwave power enhanced the degree of crystallinity. • TEM images confirmed the presence of mesopores on the surface of HA.

  5. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing ...

  6. Towards the LIVING envelope: Biomimetics for building envelope adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badarnah Kadri, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several biomimetic design strategies are available for various applications, though the research on biomimetics as a design tool in architecture is still challenging. This is due to a lack of systematic design tools required for identifying relevant organisms, or natural systems, and abstracting the

  7. Fabrication and characterization of hydroxyapatite/Al2O3 biocomposite coating on titanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhen-jun; HE Li-ping; CHEN Zong-zhang

    2006-01-01

    A novel biocomposite coating of hydroxyapatite/Al2O3 was fabricated on titanium using a multi-step technique including physical vapor deposition(PVD), anodization, electrodeposition and hydrothermal treatment. Anodic Al2O3 layer with micrometric pore diameter was formed by anodization of the PVD-deposited aluminum film on titanium and subsequent removal of part barrier Al2O3 layer. Hydroxyapatite coating was then electrodeposited onto the as-synthesized anodic Al2O3 on titanium. A hydrothermal process was finally applied to the fabricated biocomposite coating on titanium in alkaline medium. Scanning electron microscopy(SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry(EDS) and X-ray diffractometry(XRD) were employed to investigate the morphologies and compositions of the pre- and post-hydrothermally treated hydroxyapatite/Al2O3 biocomposite coatings. The results show that micrometric plate-like Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) coatings are directly electrodeposited onto anodic Al2O3 at constant current densities ranging from 1.2 to 2.0 mA/cm2 using NaH2PO4 as the phosphorous source. After hydrothermal treatment,the micrometric plate-like CDHA coating electrodeposited at 2.0 mA/cm2 is converted into nano-network Ca-rich hydroxyapatite (CRHA) one and the adhesion strength is improved from 9.5 MPa to 21.3 MPa. A mechanism of dissolution-recrystallization was also proposed for the formation of CRHA.

  8. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5⿲ triphosphate (ATP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Khaled; El-Feki, Hafed; Marsan, Olivier; Drouet, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    ATP is a well-known energy supplier in cells. The idea to associate ATP to pharmaceutical formulations/biotechnological devices to promote cells activity by potentially modulating their microenvironment thus appears as an appealing novel approach. Since biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites have shown great promise for biomedical applications (bone regeneration, cells diagnostics/therapeutics, ⿦), thanks to a high surface reactivity and an intrinsically high biocompatibility, the present contribution was aimed at exploring ATP/apatite interactions. ATP adsorption on a synthetic carbonated nanocrystalline apatite preliminarily characterized (by XRD, FTIR, Raman, TG-DTA and SEM-EDX) was investigated in detail, pointing out a good agreement with Sips isothermal features. Adsorption characteristics were compared to those previously obtained on monophosphate nucleotides (AMP, CMP), unveiling some specificities. ATP was found to adsorb effectively onto biomimetic apatite: despite smaller values of the affinity constant KS and the exponential factor m, larger adsorbed amounts were reached for ATP as compared to AMP for any given concentration in solution. m guided by direct surface bonding rather than through stabilizing intermolecular interactions. Although standard οGads ° was estimated to only ⿿4 kJ/mol, the large value of Nmax led to significantly negative effective οGads values down to ⿿33 kJ/mol, reflecting the spontaneous character of adsorption process. Vibrational spectroscopy data (FTIR and Raman) pointed out spectral modifications upon adsorption, confirming chemical-like interactions where both the triphosphate group of ATP and its nucleic base were involved. The present study is intended to serve as a basis for future research works involving ATP and apatite nanocrystals/nanoparticles in view of biomedical applications (e.g. bone tissue engineering, intracellular drug delivery, ⿦).

  9. Study of the influence of K+, Mg2+, SO 4 2- and CO3 2- ions in the biomimetic crystallization of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and conversion into octacalcium phosphate (OCP)

    OpenAIRE

    Anahí Herrera Aparecida; Marcus Vinícius Lia Fook; Márcio Luis dos Santos; Antonio Carlos Guastaldi

    2007-01-01

    The crystallization of hydroxyapatite (HA) in aqueous solution can be described by the mechanism ACP -> OCP -> HA. In this work, it was studied the influence of K+, Mg2+, SO4(2-) and CO3(2-) ions in the formation of ACP and in its conversion to OCP, using biomimetic coatings on metallic substrates of commercially pure titanium (Ti c.p.). The results showed that Mg2+ and CO3(2-) ions favored both the formation of ACP and its conversion to OCP. Differently, K+ and SO4(2-) ions did not influence...

  10. Emission properties of biomimetic composites for dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seredin, P. V.; Goloshchapov, D. L.; Kashkarov, V. M.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Prutskij, T.

    Biocomposites based on carbonate-substituted hydroxyapatite synthesized from the biological source of calcium (Goloshchapov et al., 2013) and organic primer on the basis of amino acids found in the enamel tubules of teeth, namely, arginine, histidine, lysine and hyaluronic acid were obtained and studied in this work. Incorporation of organic primer into biocomposite formulation allowed us to obtain the emission characteristics (luminescence) that were identical to those inherent to the native tissues of the human tooth (enamel and dentine).

  11. Scaffolds for bone regeneration made of hydroxyapatite microspheres in a collagen matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholas, Rahmatullah, E-mail: rahmat.cholas@gmail.com; Kunjalukkal Padmanabhan, Sanosh, E-mail: sanosh2001@gmail.com; Gervaso, Francesca; Udayan, Gayatri; Monaco, Graziana; Sannino, Alessandro; Licciulli, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds with a structural and chemical composition similar to native bone tissue may be promising for bone tissue regeneration. In the present work hydroxyapatite mesoporous microspheres (mHA) were incorporated into collagen scaffolds containing an ordered interconnected macroporosity. The mHA were obtained by spray drying of a nano hydroxyapatite slurry prepared by the precipitation technique. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that the microspheres were composed only of hydroxyapatite (HA) phase, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed the Ca/P ratio to be 1.69 which is near the value for pure HA. The obtained microspheres had an average diameter of 6 μm, a specific surface area of 40 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis, and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analysis showed a mesoporous structure with an average pore diameter of 16 nm. Collagen/HA-microsphere (Col/mHA) composite scaffolds were prepared by freeze-drying followed by dehydrothermal crosslinking. SEM observations of Col/mHA scaffolds revealed HA microspheres embedded within a porous collagen matrix with a pore size ranging from a few microns up to 200 μm, which was also confirmed by histological staining of sections of paraffin embedded scaffolds. The compressive modulus of the composite scaffold at low and high strain values was 1.7 and 2.8 times, respectively, that of pure collagen scaffolds. Cell proliferation measured by the MTT assay showed more than a 3-fold increase in cell number within the scaffolds after 15 days of culture for both pure collagen scaffolds and Col/mHA composite scaffolds. Attractive properties of this composite scaffold include the potential to load the microspheres for drug delivery and the controllability of the pore structure at various length scales. - Highlights: • Mesoporous hydroxyapatite microsphere(mHA) synthesized by spray drying method • Porous collagen/mHA composite scaffold made by freeze

  12. Consolidation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramesh et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sintering temperature on the sinterability of synthesized nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA was investigated. The starting powder was synthesized via a novel wet chemical route. HA green compacts were prepared and sintered in atmospheric condition at various temperatures ranging from 900–1300 °C. The results revealed that the thermal stability of HA phase was not disrupted throughout the sintering regime employed. In general, the results showed that above 98% of theoretical density coupled with hardness of 7.21 GPa, fracture toughness of 1.17 MPa m1/2 and Young's modulus of above 110 GPa were obtained for HA sintered at temperature as low as 1050 °C. Although the Young's modulus increased with increasing bulk density, the hardness and fracture toughness of the sintered material started to decline when the temperature was increased beyond 1000–1050 °C despite exhibiting high densities >98% of theoretical value. The occurrence of this phenomenon is believed to be associated with a thermal-activated grain growth process.

  13. Bioactive Surface Modification of Hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiko Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish an acid-etching procedure for altering the Ca/P ratio of the nanostructured surface of hydroxyapatite (HAP by using surface chemical and morphological analyses (XPS, XRD, SEM, surface roughness, and wettability and to evaluate the in vitro response of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1 cells to the modified surfaces. This study utilized HAP and HAP treated with 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, or 60% phosphoric acid solution for 10 minutes at 25°C, followed by rinsing 3 times with ultrapure water. The 30% phosphoric acid etching process that provided a Ca/P ratio of 1.50, without destruction of the grain boundary of HAP, was selected as a surface-modification procedure. Additionally, HAP treated by the 30% phosphoric acid etching process was stored under dry conditions at 25°C for 12 hours, and the Ca/P ratio approximated to 1.00 accidentally. The initial adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation (alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and relative mRNA level for ALP of MC3T3-E1 cells on the modified surfaces were significantly promoted (P<0.05 and 0.01. These findings show that the 30% phosphoric acid etching process for the nanostructured HAP surface can alter the Ca/P ratio effectively and may accelerate the initial adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  14. Fluorescent Labeling of Nanometer Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHANG; Yuan YUAN; Changsheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    A novel surface treatment method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMPTES), was developed to immobilize the fluorescein molecule on nano-HAP (nanometer hydroxyapatite) powders. By pretreating the nano-HAP powders surface with AMPTES, fluorescein, chosen on the basis of the chemical structure of the nano- HAP powders, could be bound to the nano-HAP powders surface. The chemical compositions of nano-HAP before and after being labeled were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, phase composition, and the fluorescence characteristics of the nano-HAP powders with and without staining were also investigated. The FTIR and XPS results revealed that fiuorescein had been successfully immobilized on the surface of AMPTES-bound nano-HAP powders via the acylamide bond formation between the -COOH of fluorescein and the -NH2 of AMPTES. The labeled nano-HAP powders possessed strong fluorescent intensity with a little deviation from the maximum emission wavelength of fluorescein. But the morphology and phase composition had no obvious alteration. Under fluorescence microscopy, the labeled nano-HAP powders., even after 24 h cell incubation, exhibited strong fluorescence.

  15. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Jeong, Yoon; Park, Jeong Min; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Choi, Jonghoon

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark's skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations.

  16. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2008-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. The paper reviews a number of biomimetic studies...... of sense organs in animals and illustrates how a formal search method developed at University of Toronto can be applied to sensor design. Design/methodology/approach – Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the biological solutions, identification of design principles...... or the search gives too many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms. Findings – A major problem in biomimetic design is finding the relevant analogies to actual design tasks in nature. Research...

  17. Growth of hydroxyapatite on the cellular membrane of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for the preparation of hybrid biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Eric Reyes; Torres, Maykel González; Muñoz, Susana Vargas; Rosas, Efraín Rubio; Vázquez, Candelario; Talavera, Rogelio Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to grow hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals on the cellular wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis using a bio-mimetic method. Several strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) gene markers to differentiate the strains and confirm the identity of the isolated species to guarantee that the selected species was not harmful to human health or the environment. Three of the analyzed strains were selected because they exhibited the best nucleation and growth of HAp on the bacterial surface. This innovative method to grow HAp crystals on a cellular membrane helps to elucidate the mechanisms by which osseous tissue is formed in nature. The optimum concentration for the simulated physiological fluid (SPF) was 1.5×. The hybrid materials were characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  18. Lead sulphide nanocrystal photodetector technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saran, Rinku; Curry, Richard J.

    2016-02-01

    Light detection is the underlying principle of many optoelectronic systems. For decades, semiconductors including silicon carbide, silicon, indium gallium arsenide and germanium have dominated the photodetector industry. They can show excellent photosensitivity but are limited by one or more aspects, such as high production cost, high-temperature processing, flexible substrate incompatibility, limited spectral range or a requirement for cryogenic cooling for efficient operation. Recently lead sulphide (PbS) nanocrystals have emerged as one of the most promising new materials for photodetector fabrication. They offer several advantages including low-cost manufacturing, solution processability, size-tunable spectral sensitivity and flexible substrate compatibility, and they have achieved figures of merit outperforming conventional photodetectors. We review the underlying concepts, breakthroughs and remaining challenges in photodetector technologies based on PbS nanocrystals.

  19. Flexible Photonic Cellulose Nanocrystal Films

    OpenAIRE

    Guidetti, G.; Atifi, S; Vignolini, S; Hamad, WY

    2016-01-01

    The fabrication of self-assembled cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) films of tunable photonic and mechanical properties using a facile, green approach is demonstrated. The combination of tunable flexibility and iridescence can dramatically expand CNC coating and film barrier capabilities for paints and coating applications, sustainable consumer packaging products, as well as effective templates for photonic and optoelectronic materials and structures. CelluForce Inc., Biotechnology and Biologica...

  20. Nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite on arc-deposited TiO{sub 2} surfaces studied by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilja, Mirjam [Division for Nanotechnology and Functional Materials, Department of Engineering Sciences, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden); Butt, Umer [Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden); Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials and Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, 114 18 Stockholm (Sweden); Shen, Zhijian [Berzelii Centre EXSELENT on Porous Materials and Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, 114 18 Stockholm (Sweden); Bjöörn, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.bjoorn@sandvik.com [Sandvik Coromant Sverige AB, Lerkrogsvägen 19, 12680 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-11-01

    Understanding of nucleation and growth kinetics of biomimetically deposited hydroxyapatite (HA) on crystalline TiO{sub 2} surfaces is important with respect to the application and performance of HA as functional implant coatings. Arc-evaporation was used to deposit TiO{sub 2} coatings dominated by anatase phase, rutile phase or their mixtures. Subsequent formation of HA from phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) was investigated in real-time using in situ quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation technique (QCM-D). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the presence, morphology and crystal structure of TiO{sub 2} coatings and the formed HA. Increasing temperature of the PBS, increasing flow rate and applying a higher ion concentration in solution were found to accelerate HA nucleation process and hence affect growth kinetics. Lower PBS temperature resulted in the formation of HA coatings with flake-like morphology and increasing HA porosity. All TiO{sub 2} coatings under study enabled HA formation at body temperature, while in contrast Ti reference surfaces only supported HA nucleation and growth at elevated temperatures. QCM-D technique is a powerful tool for studying the impact of process parameters during biomimetic coating deposition on coating structure evolution in real time and provides valuable information for understanding, optimizing as well as tailoring the biomimetic HA growth processes.

  1. Tailored antireflective biomimetic nanostructures for UV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lehr, Dennis; Brunner, Robert; Helgert, Michael [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Sundermann, Michael, E-mail: Pacholski@mf.mpg.de [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Antireflective surfaces composed of biomimetic sub-wavelength structures that employ the 'moth eye principle' for reflectance reduction are highly desirable in many optical applications such as solar cells, photodetectors and laser optics. We report an efficient approach for the fabrication of antireflective surfaces based on a two-step process consisting of gold nanoparticle mask generation by micellar block copolymer nanolithography and a multi-step reactive ion etching process. Depending on the RIE process parameters nanostructured surfaces with tailored antireflective properties can easily be fabricated that show optimum performance for specific applications.

  2. Biotechnologies and biomimetics for civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Labrincha, J; Diamanti, M; Yu, C-P; Lee, H

    2015-01-01

    Putting forward an innovative approach to solving current technological problems faced by human society, this book encompasses a holistic way of perceiving the potential of natural systems. Nature has developed several materials and processes which both maintain an optimal performance and are also totally biodegradable, properties which can be used in civil engineering. Delivering the latest research findings to building industry professionals and other practitioners, as well as containing information useful to the public, ‘Biotechnologies and Biomimetics for Civil Engineering’ serves as an important tool to tackle the challenges of a more sustainable construction industry and the future of buildings.

  3. Erythrocentaurin, Biosynthesis Postulation and Biomimetic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEI,Jun; YUAN,Xiang-Hui; LIU,Zhu-Lan; LIU,Jian-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ Erythrocentaurin is a relatively simple nature product isolated from the root of Gentiana macrophylla Pall.[1] The co-existed of gentiopicroside from the same species led to speculation that erythrocentaurin is a biosynthesis product of gentiopicroside. The transformation of secologanin to carbocyclic aglycone under biomimetic condition has already known (Scheme 1).[2,3] The postulated biosynthesis pathway of erythrocentaurin may be in the same way. In the process the cyclic hemiacetal of the aglycone opened to the dialdehyde which then undergoes a vinylogous aldol reaction, and then dehydroxylation and double bond migration to the title compound (Scheme 2).

  4. Biomimetic magnetic nanocomposite for smart skins

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We report a biomimetic tactile sensor consisting of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia and magnetic sensors. The nanocomposite is fashioned from polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires and exhibits a permanent magnetic behavior. This enables remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies device integration. Moreover, the highly elastic and easy patternable nanocomposite is corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The highly sensitive and power efficient tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces from interactions with objects. The sensors can operate in dry and wet environment with the ability to measure different properties such as the texture and the movement or stability of objects, with easily adjustable performance.

  5. Aqueous foams stabilized by chitin nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tzoumaki, M.; Karefyllakis, D.; Moschakis, T.; Biliaderis, C.G.; Scholten, E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the potential use of chitin nanocrystals, as colloidal rod-like particles, to stabilize aqueous foams. Chitin nanocrystals (ChN) were prepared by acid hydrolysis of crude chitin and foams were generated mainly by sonicating the respective dispersions. The

  6. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopy and simulation of doped nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, Jan Frederik

    2003-01-01

    This thesis deals with the properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (ZnS or ZnSe) in the size range (diameter) of 2 nm to 10 nm. The nanocrystals under investigation are doped with the transition metal ions manganese or copper. The goal is to study photoluminescence and electroluminescence from dope

  8. Biomaterials supported CdS nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balu, Alina M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' Ilie Murgulescu' , Spl. Independentei 202, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Campelo, Juan M. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Luque, Rafael, E-mail: q62alsor@uco.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain); Rajabi, Fatemeh [Department of Science, Payame Noor University, PO Box 878, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Romero, Antonio A. [Departamento de Quimica Organica, Campus de Rabanales, Edificio Marie Curie, Ctra Nnal IV, Km 396, Universidad de Cordoba, E-14014 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-11-01

    CdS quantum dot materials were prepared through a simple room temperature deposition of CdS nanocrystals on biomaterials including starch and chitosan. Materials obtained were found to contain differently distributed CdS nanocrystals on the surface of the biopolymers, making them potentially interesting for biomedical applications as contrast agents and/or in photocatalysis.

  9. Emission efficiency limit of Si nanocrystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limpens, R.; Luxembourg, S.L.; Weeber, A.W.; Gregorkiewicz, T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the important obstacles on the way to application of Si nanocrystals for development of practical devices is their typically low emissivity. In this study we explore the limits of external quantum yield of photoluminescence of solid-state dispersions of Si nanocrystals in SiO2. By making use

  10. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    OpenAIRE

    George J.; Sabapathi SN

    2015-01-01

    Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers...

  11. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  12. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  13. Ostrich eggshell as calcium source for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite and hydroxyapatite partially substituted with zinc

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira,J. R. M.; Louro,L. H. L; Costa, A.M.; Campos,J. B; Prado da Silva,M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the present study, hydroxyapatite and Zn-substituted hydroxyapatite powders were synthesized using ostrich eggshell as a calcium source. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with field emission gun, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the present phases, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for quantitative chemical analysis of the synthesized and heat treated powders. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy technique was used before and after heat trea...

  14. Water-Soluble Cellulose Derivatives Are Sustainable Additives for Biomimetic Calcium Phosphate Mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Taubert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cellulose-based polyelectrolytes on biomimetic calcium phosphate mineralization is described. Three cellulose derivatives, a polyanion, a polycation, and a polyzwitterion were used as additives. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, IR and Raman spectroscopy show that, depending on the composition of the starting solution, hydroxyapatite or brushite precipitates form. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy also show that significant amounts of nitrate ions are incorporated in the precipitates. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy shows that the Ca/P ratio varies throughout the samples and resembles that of other bioinspired calcium phosphate hybrid materials. Elemental analysis shows that the carbon (i.e., polymer contents reach 10% in some samples, clearly illustrating the formation of a true hybrid material. Overall, the data indicate that a higher polymer concentration in the reaction mixture favors the formation of polymer-enriched materials, while lower polymer concentrations or high precursor concentrations favor the formation of products that are closely related to the control samples precipitated in the absence of polymer. The results thus highlight the potential of (water-soluble cellulose derivatives for the synthesis and design of bioinspired and bio-based hybrid materials.

  15. Biomimetic nanoparticles with polynucleotide and PEG mixed-monolayers enhance calcium phosphate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasconcellos, Kayla B.; McHugh, Sean M.; Dapsis, Katherine J.; Petty, Alexander R.; Gerdon, Aren E., E-mail: gerdoar@emmanuel.edu [Emmanuel College (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}) is of significant importance in biomedical applications such as bone and dental repair, and biomimetic control of mineral formation may lead to more effective restorative procedures. Gold nanoparticles are functional scaffolds on which to assemble multi-component monolayers capable of mimicking protein activity in the templated synthesis of calcium phosphate. The goal of this research was to explore nanoparticle templates with mixed-monolayers of uncharged polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and highly charged polynucleotide and amino acid molecules in their ability to influence mineralization rates and mineral particle size and morphology. This research demonstrates through time-resolved optical density and dynamic light scattering measurements that the combination of tiopronin, PEG, and DNA presented on a nanoparticle surface decreases nanoparticle aggregation from 59 to 21 nm solvated radius, increases mineralization kinetics from 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} to 3.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} OD/min, and decreases mineral particle size from 685 to 442 nm average radius. FT-IR and TEM data demonstrate that mineralized material, while initially amorphous, transforms to a semi-crystalline material when guided by template interactions. This demonstrates that surface-tailored monolayer protected cluster scaffolds are successful and controllable mineralization templates with further potential for biomedical applications involving calcium phosphate and other biomaterials.

  16. Biomimetic nanoparticles with polynucleotide and PEG mixed-monolayers enhance calcium phosphate mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Kayla B.; McHugh, Sean M.; Dapsis, Katherine J.; Petty, Alexander R.; Gerdon, Aren E.

    2013-09-01

    Biomineralization of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) is of significant importance in biomedical applications such as bone and dental repair, and biomimetic control of mineral formation may lead to more effective restorative procedures. Gold nanoparticles are functional scaffolds on which to assemble multi-component monolayers capable of mimicking protein activity in the templated synthesis of calcium phosphate. The goal of this research was to explore nanoparticle templates with mixed-monolayers of uncharged polar polyethylene glycol (PEG) molecules and highly charged polynucleotide and amino acid molecules in their ability to influence mineralization rates and mineral particle size and morphology. This research demonstrates through time-resolved optical density and dynamic light scattering measurements that the combination of tiopronin, PEG, and DNA presented on a nanoparticle surface decreases nanoparticle aggregation from 59 to 21 nm solvated radius, increases mineralization kinetics from 1.5 × 10-3 to 3.1 × 10-3 OD/min, and decreases mineral particle size from 685 to 442 nm average radius. FT-IR and TEM data demonstrate that mineralized material, while initially amorphous, transforms to a semi-crystalline material when guided by template interactions. This demonstrates that surface-tailored monolayer protected cluster scaffolds are successful and controllable mineralization templates with further potential for biomedical applications involving calcium phosphate and other biomaterials.

  17. Measuring the Valence of Nanocrystal Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, Jonathan Scharle [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this project is to understand and control the interplay between nanocrystal stoichiometry, surface ligand binding and exchange, and the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals in solution and in thin solid films. We pursued three research directions with this goal in mind: 1) We characterized nanocrystal stoichiometry and its influence on the binding of L-type and X-type ligands, including the thermodynamics of binding and the kinetics of ligand exchange. 2) We developed a quantitative understanding of the relationship between surface ligand passivation and photoluminescence quantum yield. 3) We developed methods to replace the organic ligands on the nanocrystal with halide ligands and controllably deposit these nanocrystals into thin films, where electrical measurements were used to investigate the electrical transport and internanocrystal electronic coupling.

  18. Growth of hydroxyapatite on the cellular membrane of the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis for the preparation of hybrid biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, Eric Reyes, E-mail: onomaeric@hotmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias Microbiológicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Prolongación de la 24 Sur y Ave San Claudio, Ciudad Universitaria, Col San Manuel, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue (Mexico); Torres, Maykel González, E-mail: mikegcu@fata.unam.mx [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro C.P. 76230 (Mexico); Muñoz, Susana Vargas, E-mail: vmsu@unam.mx [Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Boulevard Juriquilla 3001, Santiago de Querétaro, Querétaro C.P. 76230 (Mexico); Rosas, Efraín Rubio, E-mail: efrainrubio@yahoo.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencias Microbiológicas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Prolongación de la 24 Sur y Ave San Claudio, Ciudad Universitaria, Col San Manuel, C.P. 72570 Puebla, Pue (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to grow hydroxyapatite (HAp) crystals on the cellular wall of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis using a bio-mimetic method. Several strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST) gene markers to differentiate the strains and confirm the identity of the isolated species to guarantee that the selected species was not harmful to human health or the environment. Three of the analyzed strains were selected because they exhibited the best nucleation and growth of HAp on the bacterial surface. This innovative method to grow HAp crystals on a cellular membrane helps to elucidate the mechanisms by which osseous tissue is formed in nature. The optimum concentration for the simulated physiological fluid (SPF) was 1.5 ×. The hybrid materials were characterized by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). - Highlights: • HAp crystals are grown on the cellular wall of a GP bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis. • The growing was carried out by using a bio-mimetic method. • Hybrid materials were characterized with morphological and spectroscopic techniques. • The reported method allows understanding the mechanisms to produce osseous tissue. • The membrane of Bacillus thuringiensis can grow more HAp than Bacillus halodurans.

  19. Biomineralization-inspired synthesis of chitosan/hydroxyapatite biocomposites based on a novel bilayer rate-controlling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing-Xiao; Ran, Jia-Bing; Chen, Si; Shen, Xin-Yu; Tong, Hua

    2015-12-01

    In order to prepare sophisticated biomaterials using a biomimetic approach, a deeper understanding of biomineralization is needed. Of particular importance is the control and regulation of the mineralization process. In this study, a novel bilayer rate-controlling model was designed to investigate the factors potentially influencing mineralization. In the absence of a rate-controlling layer, nano-scale hydroxyapatite (HA) crystallites exhibited a spherical morphology, whereas, in the presence of a rate-controlling layer, HA crystallites were homogeneously dispersed and spindle-like in structure. The mineralization rate had a significant effect on controlling the morphology of crystals. Furthermore, in vitro tests demonstrated that the reaction layer containing spindle-like HA crystallites possessed superior biological properties. These results suggest that a slow mineralization rate is required for controlling the morphology of inorganic crystallites, and consumption by the rate-controlling layer ensured that the ammonia concentration remained low. This study demonstrates that a biomimetic approach can be used to prepare novel biomaterials containing HA crystallites that have different morphologies and biological properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploiting the colloidal nanocrystal library to construct electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Wang, Han; Oh, Soong Ju; Paik, Taejong; Sung, Pil; Sung, Jinwoo; Ye, Xingchen; Zhao, Tianshuo; Diroll, Benjamin T.; Murray, Christopher B.; Kagan, Cherie R.

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic methods produce libraries of colloidal nanocrystals with tunable physical properties by tailoring the nanocrystal size, shape, and composition. Here, we exploit colloidal nanocrystal diversity and design the materials, interfaces, and processes to construct all-nanocrystal electronic devices using solution-based processes. Metallic silver and semiconducting cadmium selenide nanocrystals are deposited to form high-conductivity and high-mobility thin-film electrodes and channel layers of field-effect transistors. Insulating aluminum oxide nanocrystals are assembled layer by layer with polyelectrolytes to form high-dielectric constant gate insulator layers for low-voltage device operation. Metallic indium nanocrystals are codispersed with silver nanocrystals to integrate an indium supply in the deposited electrodes that serves to passivate and dope the cadmium selenide nanocrystal channel layer. We fabricate all-nanocrystal field-effect transistors on flexible plastics with electron mobilities of 21.7 square centimeters per volt-second.

  1. Microbial Uptake, Toxicity, and Fate of Biofabricated ZnS:Mn Nanocrystals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J F Swift

    Full Text Available Despite their importance in nano-environmental health and safety, interactions between engineered nanomaterials and microbial life remain poorly characterized. Here, we used the model organism E. coli to study the penetration requirements, subcellular localization, induction of stress responses, and long-term fate of luminescent Mn-doped ZnS nanocrystals fabricated under "green" processing conditions with a minimized ZnS-binding protein. We find that such protein-coated quantum dots (QDs are unable to penetrate the envelope of unmodified E. coli but readily translocate to the cytoplasm of cells that have been made competent by chemical treatment. The process is dose-dependent and reminiscent of bacterial transformation. Cells that have internalized up to 0.5 μg/mL of nanocrystals do not experience a significant activation of the unfolded protein or SOS responses but undergo oxidative stress when exposed to high QD doses (2.5 μg/mL. Finally, although they are stable in quiescent cells over temperatures ranging from 4 to 42°C, internalized QDs are rapidly diluted by cell division in a process that does not involve TolC-dependent efflux. Taken together, our results suggest that biomimetic QDs based on low toxicity inorganic cores capped by a protein shell are unlikely to cause significant damage to the microbial ecosystem.

  2. Bone-like hydroxyapatite precipitated from 10×SBF-like solution by microwave irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolga Demirtaş, T.; Kaynak, Gökçe [Bioengineering Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe, E-mail: menemse@hacettepe.edu.tr [Bioengineering Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Chemical Engineering Department, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-04-01

    Microwave-assisted methods have been frequently used in many processes owing to their numerous advantages such as performing fast, efficient and homogenous processes and reducing side reactions. In view of these benefits, in this study it was purposed to produce bone-like hydroxyapatite (HA) by inducing biomimetic process with microwave-irradiation. This is why, concentrated body fluid (SBF) i.e. 10×SBF-like solution was used and it was precipitated in different microwave powers i.e. 90 W, 360 W, 600 W, and 1200 W and in different exposure times. For comparison, precipitation process was also carried out at room temperature for 6 h and at 80 °C for 1 h. The obtained HA structures were characterized by appropriate instrumental techniques. As a result, microwave-induced precipitation at 600 W for 9 times 30 s was determined as the optimum condition for the production of HA which has similar properties to the cortical bone. At this condition, B-type HA with 9.22% (wt.) carbonate content, 1.61 Ca/P molar ratio and amorphous structure was obtained easily, rapidly and efficiently. So, this is the first time microwave technology has been used to precipitate HA from SBF solution. - Highlights: • Simple, rapid and efficient method was developed to produce bone-like HA. • Microwave radiation and biomimetic approach via 10×SBF-like solution were combined. • Microwave irradiation at 600 W for 9 × 30 s was determined as the optimum condition. • B-type HA (carbonate content: 9.22%; 1.61 Ca/P:1.61; amorph) was produced. • This method may be employed for the effective HA coating of 3D bone scaffolds.

  3. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bas ten Harkel

    Full Text Available Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP. However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones--cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2, carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII, chloride channel 7 (CIC7, and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase, in contrast the matrix degrading

  4. The Foreign Body Giant Cell Cannot Resorb Bone, But Dissolves Hydroxyapatite Like Osteoclasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Harkel, Bas; Schoenmaker, Ton; Picavet, Daisy I.; Davison, Noel L.; de Vries, Teun J.; Everts, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body multinucleated giant cells (FBGCs) and osteoclasts share several characteristics, like a common myeloid precursor cell, multinuclearity, expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAcP) and dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP). However, there is an important difference: osteoclasts form and reside in the vicinity of bone, while FBGCs form only under pathological conditions or at the surface of foreign materials, like medical implants. Despite similarities, an important distinction between these cell types is that osteoclasts can resorb bone, but it is unknown whether FBGCs are capable of such an activity. To investigate this, we differentiated FBGCs and osteoclasts in vitro from their common CD14+ monocyte precursor cells, using different sets of cytokines. Both cell types were cultured on bovine bone slices and analyzed for typical osteoclast features, such as bone resorption, presence of actin rings, formation of a ruffled border, and characteristic gene expression over time. Additionally, both cell types were cultured on a biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating to discriminate between bone resorption and mineral dissolution independent of organic matrix proteolysis. Both cell types differentiated into multinucleated cells on bone, but FBGCs were larger and had a higher number of nuclei compared to osteoclasts. FBGCs were not able to resorb bone, yet they were able to dissolve the mineral fraction of bone at the surface. Remarkably, FBGCs also expressed actin rings, podosome belts and sealing zones—cytoskeletal organization that is considered to be osteoclast-specific. However, they did not form a ruffled border. At the gene expression level, FBGCs and osteoclasts expressed similar levels of mRNAs that are associated with the dissolution of mineral (e.g., anion exchange protein 2 (AE2), carbonic anhydrase 2 (CAII), chloride channel 7 (CIC7), and vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (v-ATPase)), in contrast the matrix degrading enzyme

  5. [A new hydroxyapatite cement for craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistner, H; Reuther, J; Reinhart, E; Kübler, N; Priessnitz, B

    1998-05-01

    A new stoechiometric mixture of 27% dicalcium-phosphate (DCPA) and 73% tetra-calcium-phosphate (TTCP) can be prepared with water intraoperatively to a paste that subsequently sets to a structurally stabile implant composed of hydroxyapatite (HA). Primary setting time is about 20 min; pH during setting ranges from 6.5 to 8.5. There is no relevant curing heat or expansion or contraction. Compressive strength is about 50 MPa, tensile strength about 8 MPa. Over a period of about 4 h in physiological milieu, the cement converts to hydroxyapatite. This product is no longer redissolvable in normal body fluid. This cement can be used for non-load-bearing applications especially in craniofacial bone surgery. Cranial defects due to tumour or trauma as well as deficits in the facial skeleton may be reconstructed using this new biomaterial. In nine of ten patients we used the hydroxyapatite cement successfully for reconstructions in the craniofacial area. Fluid control of the operation field and implant site is extremely important and sometimes difficult to achieve. Further applications could be all non-load-bearing augmentations such as filling of blocked paranasal sinuses, of dentoalveolar cysts and defects following dental apectomy or fixation of implanted hearing-aid electrodes. The perspectives for the hydroxyapatite cement include its application as a carrier for osteogenic protein preparations, especially because of its isothermic reaction and intrinsic osteoconductive characteristics.

  6. Continuous microwave flow synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Alshemary, Ammar Z; Goh, Yi-Fan; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Aini; Lintang, Hendrik O; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2015-11-01

    We have successfully used continuous microwave flow synthesis (CMFS) technique for the template free synthesis of mesoporous hydroxyapatite. The continuous microwave flow reactor consisted of a modified 2.45GHz household microwave, peristaltic pumps and a Teflon coil. This cost effective and efficient system was exploited to produce semi-crystalline phase pure nano-sized hydroxyapatite. Effect of microwave power, retention time and the concentration of reactants on the phase purity, degree of crystallinity and surface area of the final product was studied in detail. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to study the phase purity and composition of the product, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to study the effect of process parameters on the morphology of hydroxyapatite. The TEM analysis confirmed the formation of spherical particles at low microwave power; however the morphology of the particles changed to mesoporous needle and rod-like structure upon exposing the reaction mixture to higher microwave power and longer retention time inside the microwave. The in-vitro ion dissolution behavior of the as synthesized hydroxyapatite was studied by determining the amount of Ca(2+) ion released in SBF solution.

  7. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela F. Frasco

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out.

  8. Biomimetic Strategies for Sensing Biological Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawar Hussain

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The starting point of modern biosensing was the application of actual biological species for recognition. Increasing understanding of the principles underlying such recognition (and biofunctionality in general, however, has triggered a dynamic field in chemistry and materials sciences that aims at joining the best of two worlds by combining concepts derived from nature with the processability of manmade materials, e.g., sensitivity and ruggedness. This review covers different biomimetic strategies leading to highly selective (biochemical sensors: the first section covers molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP that attempt to generate a fully artificial, macromolecular mold of a species in order to detect it selectively. A different strategy comprises of devising polymer coatings to change the biocompatibility of surfaces that can also be used to immobilized natural receptors/ligands and thus stabilize them. Rationally speaking, this leads to self-assembled monolayers closely resembling cell membranes, sometimes also including bioreceptors. Finally, this review will highlight some approaches to generate artificial analogs of natural recognition materials and biomimetic approaches in nanotechnology. It mainly focuses on the literature published since 2005.

  9. Imprinting Technology in Electrochemical Biomimetic Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasco, Manuela F; Truta, Liliana A A N A; Sales, M Goreti F; Moreira, Felismina T C

    2017-03-06

    Biosensors are a promising tool offering the possibility of low cost and fast analytical screening in point-of-care diagnostics and for on-site detection in the field. Most biosensors in routine use ensure their selectivity/specificity by including natural receptors as biorecognition element. These materials are however too expensive and hard to obtain for every biochemical molecule of interest in environmental and clinical practice. Molecularly imprinted polymers have emerged through time as an alternative to natural antibodies in biosensors. In theory, these materials are stable and robust, presenting much higher capacity to resist to harsher conditions of pH, temperature, pressure or organic solvents. In addition, these synthetic materials are much cheaper than their natural counterparts while offering equivalent affinity and sensitivity in the molecular recognition of the target analyte. Imprinting technology and biosensors have met quite recently, relying mostly on electrochemical detection and enabling a direct reading of different analytes, while promoting significant advances in various fields of use. Thus, this review encompasses such developments and describes a general overview for building promising biomimetic materials as biorecognition elements in electrochemical sensors. It includes different molecular imprinting strategies such as the choice of polymer material, imprinting methodology and assembly on the transduction platform. Their interface with the most recent nanostructured supports acting as standard conductive materials within electrochemical biomimetic sensors is pointed out.

  10. ZnO tetrapod nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus C. Newton

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ZnO has received considerable attention because of its unique optical, piezoelectric, and magnetic properties. It also readily self-assembles into a family of nanocrystalline structures. We review the current status of research into ZnO tetrapod nanocrystals. These crystals consist of a ZnO core in the zinc blende structure from which four ZnO arms in the wurtzite structure radiate. The arms are cylinders of hexagonal cross section, with each arm of equal length and diameter. Possible applications in optoelectronics, photovoltaics, spintronics, and piezoelectricity are discussed.

  11. Biomimetics materials, structures and processes : examples, ideas and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Dietmar; Hellmich, Christian; Schmiedmayer, Heinz-Bodo; Stachelberger, Herbert; Gebeshuber, Ille

    2011-01-01

    The book presents an outline of current activities in the field of biomimetics and integrates a variety of applications comprising biophysics, surface sciences, architecture and medicine. Biomimetics as innovation method is characterised by interdisciplinary information transfer from the life sciences to technical application fields aiming at increased performance, functionality and energy efficiency. The contributions of the book relate to the research areas: - Materials and structures in nanotechnology and biomaterials - Biomimetic approaches to develop new forms, construction principles and design methods in architecture - Information and dynamics in automation, neuroinformatics and biomechanics Readers will be informed about the latest research approaches and results in biomimetics with examples ranging from bionic nano-membranes to function-targeted design of tribological surfaces and the translation of natural auditory coding strategies.

  12. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetics – or bionik as it is called in parts of Europe – offer a number of promising opportunities and challenges for the designer. The paper investigates how biomimetics as a design methodology is used in engineering design by looking at examples of biological searches and highlight...... the possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...... principles were formulated and used for designing technical items that could be used to solve the initial problems. Experiences are that biomimetic design can be made successfully using commonly available biological literature and internet resources and that designers without detailed biological knowledge...

  13. Quantum theory of electroabsorption in semiconductor nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepliakov, Nikita V; Leonov, Mikhail Yu; Baranov, Alexander V; Fedorov, Anatoly V; Rukhlenko, Ivan D

    2016-01-25

    We develop a simple quantum-mechanical theory of interband absorption by semiconductor nanocrystals exposed to a dc electric field. The theory is based on the model of noninteracting electrons and holes in an infinitely deep quantum well and describes all the major features of electroabsorption, including the Stark effect, the Franz-Keldysh effect, and the field-induced spectral broadening. It is applicable to nanocrystals of different shapes and dimensions (quantum dots, nanorods, and nanoplatelets), and will prove useful in modeling and design of electrooptical devices based on ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals.

  14. Size quantization in Cu2Se nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindraju, S.; Kalenga, M. P.; Airo, M.; Moloto, M. J.; Sikhwivhilu, L. M.; Moloto, N.

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report on the synthesis of size quantized copper selenide nanocrystals via the colloidal method. Different colours of the sample were obtained at different time intervals indicative of the sizes of the nanocrystals. The absorption band edges were blue-shifted from bulk indicative of quantum confinement. This was corroborated by the TEM results that showed very small particles ranging from 2 nm to 7 nm. This work therefore shows a phenomenon readily observed in cadmium chalcogenide nanocrystals but has never been reported for copper based chalcogenides.

  15. Regeneration of tooth-like hydroxyapatite depended on amelogenin functional section monolayer: a new approach for tooth repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kun; Peng, Min; Ren, Xiaohua; Liao, Chuhang; Fei, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Tooth defect due to caries, trauma, or acid corrosion are common in mankind. Ceramics, metal and resin were used to repaired tooth defect in the past hundred years, but they cannot instead enamel and dentin in depth in clinic usage for the difference in structure and element. So the formation of organized nanocrystals that resemble enamel is crucial for successful enamel remineralization. Now synthesizing a mimicking structure of human enamel using acellular methods has attracted much interest from research groups who have tried using recombinant enamel making proteins like amelogenin, surfactants, to mimic the biomineralization process to restore the enamel layer. Since amelogenin can be used in the assembly of functional nanostructures, we hypothesis that rationally designed β-sheet-forming peptides that spontaneously form three-dimensional fibrillar scaffolds in response to specific environmental triggers may potentially be used in inducing tooth-like hydroxyapatite crystal ex vivo which important to treatment/prevention of dental caries, via bioactive surface groups.

  16. Microstructure of Bioglass/Hydroxyapatite Coatings on Ti Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Composite coatings of bioglass and hydroxyapatite (briefly named HA/BG) with different hydroxyapatite contents on titanium substrate were successfully fabricated. The fabricated coatings are characterized by rough and poriform surface. The densities of the coatings decrease with the increase of HA content. There is a transition layer with a 5 μm thickness between the BG coating and the substrate. During heat-treatment, hydroxyapatite crystals with hexastyle shape have precipitated from the BG.

  17. Biomimetic mineral coatings in dental and orthopaedic implantology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-lian LIU; Klaas de GROOT; Ernst B.HUNZIKER

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic techniques are used to deposit coatings of calcium phosphate upon medical devices. The procedure is conducted under near-physiological, or "biomimetic", conditions of temperature and pH primarily to improve their biocompatibility and biodegradability of the materials. The inorganic layers genelated by biomi-metic methods resemble bone mineral, and can be degraded within a biological milieu.The biomimetic coating technique involves the nuclea-tion and growth of bone-like crystals upon a pretreated substrate by immersing this in a supersaturated solution of calcium phosphate under physiological conditions of temperature (37~C) and pH (7.4). The method, originally developed by Kokubo in 1990, has since undergone improvement and refinement by several groups of investigators.Biomimetic coatings are valuable in that they can serve as a vehicle for the slow and sustained release of osteogenic agents at the site of implantation. This attribute is rendered possible by the near-physiological conditions under which these coatings are prepared, which permits an incorporation of binactive agents into the inorganic crystal latticework rather than their nlere superficial adsorption onto preformed layers. In addition, the biomimetic coating technique can be applied to implants of an organic as well as of an inorganic nature and to those with irregular surface geometries, which is not possible using conventional methodologies.

  18. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized and highly efficient transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create...... membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... preventing the passage of others, a property critical for the overall conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Both ion and water channels are highly efficient membrane pore proteins capable of transporting solutes at very high rates, up to 109 molecules per second. Carrier proteins...

  19. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  20. Biomimetics for architecture & design nature, analogies, technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the readers with a timely guide to the application of biomimetic principles in architecture and engineering design. As a result of a combined effort by two internationally recognized authorities, the biologist Werner Nachtigall and the architect Göran Pohl, the book describes the principles which can be used to compare nature and technology, and at the same time it presents detailed explanations and examples showing how biology can be used as a source of inspiration and “translated” in building and architectural solutions (biomimicry). Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. But how can analysis of natural entities give rise to advanced and sustainable design? By reporting on the latest bionic design methods and using extensive artwork, the book guides readers through the field of nature-inspired architecture, offering an extraordinary resource for pro...

  1. Progress of Biomimetic Artificial Nose and Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Qingjun

    2009-05-01

    As two of the basic senses of human beings, olfaction and gustation play a very important role in daily life. These two types of chemical sensors are important for recognizing environmental conditions. Electronic nose and electronic tongue, which mimics animals' olfaction and gustation to detect odors and chemical components, have been carried out due to their potential commercial applications for biomedicine, food industry and environmental protection. In this report, the biomimetic artificial nose and tongue is presented. Firstly, the smell and taste sensors mimicking the mammalian olfaction and gustation was described, and then, some mimetic design of electronic nose and tongue for odorants and tastants detection are developed. Finally, olfactory and gustatory biosensors are presented as the developing trends of this field.

  2. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D.; Gu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young’s modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures. PMID:27386542

  3. Major Intrinsic Proteins in Biomimetic Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met...... this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor....../separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells...

  4. Electrochemical characterization of hydrogels for biomimetic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peláez, L.; Romero, V.; Escalera, S.

    2011-01-01

    ) or a photoinitiator (P) to encapsulate and stabilize biomimetic membranes for novel separation technologies or biosensor applications. In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of the hydrogels used for membrane encapsulation. Specifically, we studied the crosslinked hydrogels by using...... electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and we demonstrated that chemically crosslinked hydrogels had lower values for the effective electrical resistance and higher values for the electrical capacitance compared with hydrogels with photoinitiated crosslinking. Transport numbers were obtained using......〉 and 〈Pw〉 values than PEG‐1000‐DMA‐P and PEG‐400‐DA‐P hydrogels. In conclusion, our results show that hydrogel electrochemical properties can be controlled by the choice of polymer and type of crosslinking used and that their water and salt permeability properties are congruent with the use of hydrogels...

  5. Metallofoldamers supramolecular architectures from helicates to biomimetics

    CERN Document Server

    Maayan, Galia

    2013-01-01

    Metallofoldamers are oligomers that fold into three-dimensional structures in a controlled manner upon coordination with metal ions. Molecules in this class have shown an impressive ability to form single-handed helical structures and other three-dimensional architectures. Several metallofoldamers have been applied as sensors due to their selective folding when binding to a specific metal ion, while others show promise for applications as responsive materials on the basis of their ability to fold and unfold upon changes in the oxidation state of the coordinated metal ion, and as novel catalysts. Metallofoldamers: From Helicates to Biomimetic Architectures describes the variety of interactions between oligomers and metal species, with a focus on non-natural synthetic molecules. Topics covered include: the major classes of foldamers and their folding driving force metalloproteins and metalloenzymes helicates: self-assembly, structure and applications abiotic metallo-DNA metallo-PNA and iDNA metallopeptides inte...

  6. Biomimetic gyroid nanostructures exceeding their natural origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zongsong; Turner, Mark D; Gu, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using optical two-beam lithography with improved resolution and enhanced mechanical strength, we demonstrate the replication of gyroid photonic nanostructures found in the butterfly Callophrys rubi. These artificial structures are shown to have size, controllability, and uniformity that are superior to those of their biological counterparts. In particular, the elastic Young's modulus of fabricated nanowires is enhanced by up to 20%. As such, the circular dichroism enabled by the gyroid nanostructures can operate in the near-ultraviolet wavelength region, shorter than that supported by the natural butterfly wings of C. rubi. This fabrication technique provides a unique tool for extracting three-dimensional photonic designs from nature and will aid the investigation of biomimetic nanostructures.

  7. Development of a Biomimetic Quadruped Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanhtam Ho; Sunghac Choi; Sangyoon Lee

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design and prototype of a small quadruped robot whose walking motion is realized by two piezocomposite actuators. In the design, biomimetic ideas are employed to obtain the agility of motions and sustainability of a heavy load. The design of the robot legs is inspired by the leg configuration of insects, two joints (hip and knee) of the leg enable two basic motions, lifting and stepping. The robot frame is designed to have a slope relative to the horizontal plane, which makes the robot move forward. In addition, the bounding locomotion of quadruped animals is implemented in the robot. Experiments show that the robot can carry an additional load of about 100 g and run with a fairly high velocity. The quadruped prototype can be an important step towards the goal of building an autonomous mobile robot actuated by piezocomposite actuators.

  8. Bio-microfluidics: biomaterials and biomimetic designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domachuk, Peter; Tsioris, Konstantinos; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G; Kaplan, David L

    2010-01-12

    Bio-microfluidics applies biomaterials and biologically inspired structural designs (biomimetics) to microfluidic devices. Microfluidics, the techniques for constraining fluids on the micrometer and sub-micrometer scale, offer applications ranging from lab-on-a-chip to optofluidics. Despite this wealth of applications, the design of typical microfluidic devices imparts relatively simple, laminar behavior on fluids and is realized using materials and techniques from silicon planar fabrication. On the other hand, highly complex microfluidic behavior is commonplace in nature, where fluids with nonlinear rheology flow through chaotic vasculature composed from a range of biopolymers. In this Review, the current state of bio-microfluidic materials, designs and applications are examined. Biopolymers enable bio-microfluidic devices with versatile functionalization chemistries, flexibility in fabrication, and biocompatibility in vitro and in vivo. Polymeric materials such as alginate, collagen, chitosan, and silk are being explored as bulk and film materials for bio-microfluidics. Hydrogels offer options for mechanically functional devices for microfluidic systems such as self-regulating valves, microlens arrays and drug release systems, vital for integrated bio-microfluidic devices. These devices including growth factor gradients to study cell responses, blood analysis, biomimetic capillary designs, and blood vessel tissue culture systems, as some recent examples of inroads in the field that should lead the way in a new generation of microfluidic devices for bio-related needs and applications. Perhaps one of the most intriguing directions for the future will be fully implantable microfluidic devices that will also integrate with existing vasculature and slowly degrade to fully recapitulate native tissue structure and function, yet serve critical interim functions, such as tissue maintenance, drug release, mechanical support, and cell delivery.

  9. Biomimetic oral mucin from polymer micelle networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authimoolam, Sundar Prasanth

    Mucin networks are formed by the complexation of bottlebrush-like mucin glycoprotein with other small molecule glycoproteins. These glycoproteins create nanoscale strands that then arrange into a nanoporous mesh. These networks play an important role in ensuring surface hydration, lubricity and barrier protection. In order to understand the functional behavior in mucin networks, it is important to decouple their chemical and physical effects responsible for generating the fundamental property-function relationship. To achieve this goal, we propose to develop a synthetic biomimetic mucin using a layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition approach. In this work, a hierarchical 3-dimensional structures resembling natural mucin networks was generated using affinity-based interactions on synthetic and biological surfaces. Unlike conventional polyelectrolyte-based LBL methods, pre-assembled biotin-functionalized filamentous (worm-like) micelles was utilized as the network building block, which from complementary additions of streptavidin generated synthetic networks of desired thickness. The biomimetic nature in those synthetic networks are studied by evaluating its structural and bio-functional properties. Structurally, synthetic networks formed a nanoporous mesh. The networks demonstrated excellent surface hydration property and were able capable of microbial capture. Those functional properties are akin to that of natural mucin networks. Further, the role of synthetic mucin as a drug delivery vehicle, capable of providing localized and tunable release was demonstrated. By incorporating antibacterial curcumin drug loading within synthetic networks, bacterial growth inhibition was also demonstrated. Thus, such bioactive interfaces can serve as a model for independently characterizing mucin network properties and through its role as a drug carrier vehicle it presents exciting future opportunities for localized drug delivery, in regenerative applications and as bio

  10. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  11. Thermoluminescent characteristics of nano-structure hydroxyapatite:Dy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziaie, F. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Moein, N. Farhadi [Islamic Azad Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Central Tehran Branch; Shafaei, M. [Islamic Azad Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Science and Research Branch

    2014-12-15

    The thermoluminescence response of Dysprosium doped hydroxyapatite samples with different mol percentage of 0.5, 1 and 2 were studied and compared with the pure hydroxyapatite. The samples were objected to {sup 60}Co gamma rays irradiation with doses of 100 mGy to 10 Gy. The main peak in the sample glow curves were obtained at 310 C. The sensitivity of the 1 mol% Dy doped hydroxyapatite samples show the highest thermoluminescence response. Fading behavior of the irradiated samples was also studied. The experimental results show that the synthetic Dy-doped hydroxyapatite obtained by the hydrolysis method may be used in gamma radiation dosimetry.

  12. Reactive hydroxyapatite fillers for pectin biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munarin, Fabiola; Petrini, Paola; Barcellona, Giulia; Roversi, Tommaso; Piazza, Laura; Visai, Livia; Tanzi, Maria Cristina

    2014-12-01

    In this work, a novel injectable biocomposite hydrogel is produced by internal gelation, using pectin as organic matrix and hydroxyapatite either as crosslinking agent and inorganic reinforcement. Tunable gelling kinetics and rheological properties are obtained varying the hydrogels' composition, with the final aim of developing systems for cell immobilization. The reversibility by dissolution of pectin-hydroxyapatite hydrogels is achieved with saline solutions, to possibly accelerate the release of the cells or active agents immobilized. Texture analysis confirms the possibility of extruding the biocomposites from needles with diameters from 20 G to 30 G, indicating that they can be implanted with minimally-invasive approaches, minimizing the pain during injection and the side effects of the open surgery. L929 fibroblasts entrapped in the hydrogels survive to the immobilization procedure and exhibit high cell viability. On the overall, these systems result to be suitable supports for the immobilization of cells for tissue regeneration applications.

  13. Hydroxyapatite Fibers: A Review of Synthesis Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Mei-Li; He, Kun; Huang, Zhen-Nan; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza; Xiao, Gui-Yong; Lu, Yu-Peng; Shokuhfar, Tolou

    2017-08-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) exhibits excellent biocompatibility, bioactivity, osteoconductivity, non-toxicity and so on, making it a perfect candidate for biomedical applications. However, HA is not qualified to be used in load-bearing sites due to its poor flexural strength and fracture toughness. Design, synthesis and application of fibrous HA is a promising strategy to overcome the inherent brittleness. This review provides a brief description of HA and hydroxyapatite fiber (HAF), then introduces different synthesis methods of HAF and highlights the inherent merits and drawbacks involved in each method. Finally, the future perspectives in this active research area are given. The purpose of this review is to acquaint the reader with this promising new field of biomaterials research and with emphasis on recent techniques to obtain continuous, uniform and long HAF.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of carbonate hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merry, J C; Gibson, I R; Best, S M; Bonfield, W

    1998-12-01

    Substituted apatite ceramics are of clinical interest as they offer the potential to improve the bioactive properties of implants. Carbonate hydroxyapatite (CHA) has been synthesized by an aqueous precipitation method and precipitates with two different levels of carbonate, processed as powders. Sintering experiments were performed to establish the influence of carbonate in significantly reducing the temperature required to prepare high-density ceramics when compared with stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HA). High-temperature X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the phase stability of the apatites on sintering. Increasing carbonate content was shown to reduce the temperature at which decomposition occurred, to phases of CaO and beta-TCP. Mechanical testing, performed using biaxial flexure, showed that the CHA specimens had strengths similar to stoichiometric HA. Copyright 1998 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  15. Biomineralization of nanoscale single crystal hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany; Wilson, Otto C; Gugssa, Ayelle; Anderson, Winston

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite particles which formed during the subcutaneous implantation of crab shell in Sprague-Dawley rats were studied using selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The initial SAED characterization evidence indicated the presence of an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. The electron dense nanophase particles which formed in the wound healing zone displayed broad diffuse rings which usually indicate a low crystalline order or amorphous phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed that these mineralized regions contained discrete single crystal particles less than 5nm in size. Micrographs taken at successively higher magnifications revealed very small nanoparticles with a hexagonal arrangement of ion channels with characteristic spacing of 0.54nm and 0.23nm. This study revealed that single crystal hydroxyapatite nanoparticles consisting of only a few unit cells formed via a biomineralization directed process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Doped Colloidal ZnO Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizheng Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal ZnO nanocrystals are promising for a wide range of applications due to the combination of unique multifunctional nature and remarkable solution processability. Doping is an effective approach of enhancing the properties of colloidal ZnO nanocrystals in well-controlled manners. In this paper, we analyzed two synthetic strategies for the doped colloidal ZnO nanocrystals, emphasizing our understanding on the critical factors associated with the high temperature and nonaqueous approach. Latest advances of three topics, bandgap engineering, n-type doping, and dilute magnetic semiconductors related to doped ZnO nanocrystals were discussed to reveal the effects of dopants on the properties of the nanocrystalline materials.

  17. Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals in Silicon Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ferraioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on the photoluminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide are reviewed and discussed. The attention is focused on Si nanocrystals produced by high-temperature annealing of silicon rich oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of deposition parameters and layer thickness is analyzed in detail. The nanocrystal size can be roughly controlled by means of Si content and annealing temperature and time. Unfortunately, a technique for independently fine tuning the emission efficiency and the size is still lacking; thus, only middle size nanocrystals have high emission efficiency. Interestingly, the layer thickness affects the nucleation and growth kinetics so changing the luminescence efficiency.

  18. Tunable mid IR plasmon in GZO nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, M K; Bluet, J-M; Masenelli-Varlot, K; Canut, B; Boisron, O; Melinon, P; Masenelli, B

    2015-07-28

    Degenerate metal oxide nanoparticles are promising systems to expand the significant achievements of plasmonics into the infrared (IR) range. Among the possible candidates, Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals are particularly suited for mid IR, considering their wide range of possible doping levels and thus of plasmon tuning. In the present work, we report on the tunable mid IR plasmon induced in degenerate Ga-doped ZnO nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are produced by a plasma expansion and exhibit unprotected surfaces. Tuning the Ga concentration allows tuning the localized surface plasmon resonance. Moreover, the plasmon resonance is characterized by a large damping. By comparing the plasmon of nanocrystal assemblies to that of nanoparticles dispersed in an alumina matrix, we investigate the possible origins of such damping. We demonstrate that it partially results from the self-organization of the naked particles and also from intrinsic inhomogeneity of dopants.

  19. Size-Dependent Raman Shifts for nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yukun; Zhao, Xinmei; Yin, Penggang; Gao, Faming

    2016-04-22

    Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive tool for probing semiconductor nanocrystals. The underlying mechanism behind the size-dependent Raman shifts is still quite controversial. Here we offer a new theoretical method for the quantum confinement effects on the Raman spectra of semiconductor nanocrystals. We propose that the shift of Raman spectra in nanocrystals can result from two overlapping effects: the quantum effect shift and surface effect shift. The quantum effect shift is extracted from an extended Kubo formula, the surface effect shift is determined via the first principles calculations. Fairly good prediction of Raman shifts can be obtained without the use of any adjustable parameter. Closer analysis shows that the size-dependent Raman shifts in Si nanocrystals mainly result from the quantum effect shifts. For nanodiamond, the proportion of surface effect shift in Raman shift is up to about 40%. Such model can also provide a good baseline for using Raman spectroscopy as a tool to measure size.

  20. Giant Raman gain in silicon nanocrystals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sirleto, Luigi; Ferrara, Maria Antonietta; Nikitin, Timur; Novikov, Sergei; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    ... of next generation nonlinear photonic devices. Here we report the first observation of stimulated Raman scattering in silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silica matrix under non-resonant excitation at infrared wavelengths (~1.5 μm...

  1. Gas phase grown silicon germanium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, A.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Kaiser, M.; Verheijen, M. A.; Schropp, R. E. I.; Rath, J. K.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the gas phase synthesis of highly crystalline and homogeneously alloyed Si1-xGex nanocrystals in continuous and pulsed plasmas. Agglomerated nanocrystals have been produced with remarkable control over their composition by altering the precursor GeH4 gas flow in a continuous plasma. We specially highlight that in the pulsed plasma mode, we obtain quantum-sized free standing alloy nanocrystals with a mean size of 7.3 nm. The presence of Si1-xGex alloy particles is confirmed with multiple techniques, i.e. Raman spectroscopy, XRD (Xray diffraction) and HRTEM (high resolution transmission electron microscopy) studies, with each of these methods consistently yielding the same composition. The nanocrystals synthesized here have potential applications in band-gap engineering for multijunction solar cells.

  2. Heavily Doped Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David Mocatta; Guy Cohen; Jonathan Schattner; Oded Millo; Eran Rabani; Uri Banin

    2011-01-01

    ... of fundamental understanding of this heavily doped limit under strong quantum confinement. We developed a method to dope semiconductor nanocrystals with metal impurities, enabling control of the band gap and Fermi energy...

  3. Zirconia nanocrystals as submicron level biological label

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, K.; Liepins, J.; Gavare, M.; Patmalnieks, A.; Gruduls, A.; Jankovica, D.

    2012-08-01

    Inorganic nanocrystals are of increasing interest for their usage in biology and pharmacology research. Our interest was to justify ZrO2 nanocrystal usage as submicron level biological label in baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisia culture. For the first time (to our knowledge) images with sub micro up-conversion luminescent particles in biologic media were made. A set of undoped as well as Er and Yb doped ZrO2 samples at different concentrations were prepared by sol-gel method. The up-conversion luminescence for free standing and for nanocrystals with baker's yeast cells was studied and the differences in up-conversion luminescence spectra were analyzed. In vivo toxic effects of ZrO2 nanocrystals were tested by co-cultivation with baker's yeast.

  4. Charge transport in semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentzel, Tamar Shoshana

    In this thesis, we study charge transport in arrays of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots. Nanocrystals are synthesized in solution, and an organic ligand on the surface of the nanocrystal creates a potential barrier that confines charges in the nanocrystal. Optical absorption measurements reveal discrete electronic energy levels in the nanocrystals resulting from quantum confinement. When nanocrystals are deposited on a surface, they self-assemble into a close-packed array forming a nanocrystal solid. We report electrical transport measurements of a PbSe nanocrystal solid that serves as the channel of an inverted field-effect transistor. We measure the conductance as a function of temperature, source-drain bias and. gate voltage. The data indicates that holes are the majority carriers; the Fermi energy lies in impurity states in the bandgap of the nanocrystal; and charges hop between the highest occupied valence state in the nanocrystals (the 1S h states). At low source-drain voltages, the activation energy for hopping is given by the energy required to generate holes in the 1Sh state plus activation over barriers resulting from site disorder. The barriers from site disorder are eliminated with a sufficiently high source-drain bias. From the gate effect, we extract the Thomas-Fermi screening length and a density of states that is consistent with the estimated value. We consider variable-range hopping as an alternative model, and find no self-consistent evidence for it. Next, we employ charge sensing as an alternative to current measurements for studying transport in materials with localized sites. A narrow-channel MOSFET serves as a charge sensor because its conductance is sensitive to potential fluctuations in the nearby environment caused by the motion of charge. In particular, it is sensitive to the fluctuation of single electrons at the silicon-oxide interface within the MOSFET. We pattern a strip of amorphous germanium within 100 nm of the transistor. The

  5. Tailoring the nanostructured surfaces of hydroxyapatite bioceramics to promote protein adsorption, osteoblast growth, and osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kaili; Xia, Lunguo; Gan, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Chen, Hong; Jiang, Xinquan; Chang, Jiang

    2013-08-28

    To promote and understand the biological responses of the implant via nanostructured surface design is essential for the development of bioactive bone implants. However, the control of the surface topography of the bioceramics in nanoscale is a big challenge because of their brittle property. Herein, the hydroxyapatite (HAp) bioceramics with distinct nanostructured topographies were fabricated via hydrothermal treatment using α-tricalcium phosphate ceramic as hard-template under different reaction conditions. HAp bioceramics with nanosheet, nanorod and micro-nanohybrid structured surface in macroscopical size were obtained by controlling the composition of the reaction media. Comparing with the traditional sample with flat and dense surface, the fabricated HAp bioceramics with hierarchical 3D micro-nanotextured surfaces possessed higher specific surface area, which selectively enhanced adsorption of specific proteins including Fn and Vn in plasma, and stimulated osteoblast adhesion, growth, and osoteogenic differentiation. In particular, the biomimetic features of the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid surface resulted in the best ability for simultaneous enhancement of protein adsorption, osteoblast proliferation, and differentiation. The results suggest that the hierarchical micro-nanohybrid topography might be one of the critical factors to be considered in the design of functional bone grafts.

  6. Bioactive hydroxyapatite/graphene composite coating and its corrosion stability in simulated body fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janković, Ana; Eraković, Sanja [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mitrić, Miodrag [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Mike Petrovića Alasa 12-14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Matić, Ivana Z.; Juranić, Zorica D. [Institute of Oncology and Radiology of Serbia, Pasterova 14, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tsui, Gary C.P.; Tang, Chak-yin [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Mišković-Stanković, Vesna [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11 000 Belgrade (Serbia); Rhee, Kyong Yop, E-mail: rheeky@khu.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo Jin [Chemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-05

    Highlights: • Bioactive HAP/Gr coating on Ti was successfully obtained by EPD. • Increased fracture toughness of the HAP/Gr coating compared to pure HAP coating. • HAP/Gr coating exhibited superior biomimetic mineralization vs. pure HAP coating. • Gr improved the mechanical properties and thermal stability of HAP/Gr coating. • HAP/Gr coating was classified as non-cytotoxic against the targeted PBMC. - Abstract: The hydroxyapatite/graphene (HAP/Gr) composite was electrodeposited on Ti using the electrophoretic deposition process to obtain uniform bioactive coating with improved mechanical strength and favorable corrosion stability in simulated body fluid (SBF). Incorporation of Gr was verified by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron analysis. The HAP/Gr composite coating exhibited reduced surface cracks, nearly double the hardness, and elastic modulus increased by almost 50% compared to pure HAP coating, as estimated by a nanoindentation test. The bioactive HAP/Gr composite coating provided a newly formed apatite layer in SBF with enhanced corrosion stability, as evidenced by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The thermal stability of the HAP/Gr coating was improved in comparison to the pure HAP coating, and the Ca/P ratio was closer to the stoichiometric value. No antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli could be verified. The HAP/Gr composite coating was classified as non-cytotoxic when tested against healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)

  7. Bioactivity Assessment of Poly(ɛ-caprolactone/Hydroxyapatite Electrospun Fibers for Bone Tissue Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Izzat Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospinning is useful for fabricating nanofibrous structure with different composition and morphologies. It offers great advantages through its geometrical structure and biomimetic property, which can provide a suitable environmental site for cell growth. The fiber diameter is entangled by the concentration of PCL with some adjustment of parameters during electrospinning process. PCL with lower concentration had bead structure while higher concentration had smooth fiber. The incorporation of nanoparticle hydroxyapatite (nHA into poly(ɛ-caprolactone fiber was studied. The fiber diameter of PCL was increased with the addition of nHA. Composition of fiber at lower concentrations of PCL and nHA into the polymer produced fiber with a homogenous distribution of nHA in PCL fiber with less agglomeration. The immersion of PCL/nHA fiber in simulated body fluid (SBF had bone-like apatite layer on its surface while PCL showed no results. PCL/nHA showed high water uptake and had improved wettability compared to PCL alone, suggesting that PCL/nHA fibers were more hydrophilic than PCL fiber.

  8. Effect of polyaspartic acid on hydroxyapatite deposition in silk fibroin blend films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Polyaspartic acid/silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (PASP/SF-HA composites have been synthesized by biomimetic processing. SF solution was mixed with different contents of PASP to prepare the PASP/SF blend membranes. After ethanol treatment and premineralization process, the blend membranes were immersed into 1.5 simulated body fluid (1.5 SBF for 24 h to induce apatite deposition at 37±0.5°C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and X-ray diffraction (XRD results revealed that a conformation transition of SF occurred after the addition of PASP and ethanol treatment. The FTIR and XRD results also confirmed that the main component of apatite deposition was HA. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that the content of HA increased with increasing PASP concentration .Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP results revealed that the Ca/P molar ratio could reach 1.45, which was close to the Ca/P ratio of apatite. It was appropriate to conclude that the increasing content of PASP had a distinct effect on HA deposition in the blend films.

  9. In vitro bioactivity of bioresorbable porous polymeric scaffolds incorporating hydroxyapatite microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L H; Kommareddy, K P; Pilz, C; Zhou, C R; Fratzl, P; Manjubala, I

    2010-07-01

    Biomimetic composites consisting of polymer and mineral components, resembling bone in structure and composition, were produced using a rapid prototyping technique for bone tissue engineering applications. Solid freeform fabrication, known as rapid prototyping (RP) technology, allows scaffolds to be designed with pre-defined and controlled external and internal architecture. Using the indirect RP technique, a three-component scaffold with a woodpile structure, consisting of poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA), chitosan and hydroxyapatite (HA) microspheres, was produced that had a macroporosity of more than 50% together with micropores induced by lyophilization. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the preparation and construction of the composite scaffold did not affect the phase composition of the HA. The compressive strength and elastic modulus (E) for the PLLA composites are 0.42 and 1.46 MPa, respectively, which are much higher than those of chitosan/HA composites and resemble the properties of cellular structure. These scaffolds showed excellent biocompatibility and ability for three-dimensional tissue growth of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblastic cells. The pre-osteoblastic cells cultured on these scaffolds formed a network on the HA microspheres and proliferated not only in the macropore channels but also in the micropores, as seen from the histological analysis and electron microscopy. The proliferating cells formed an extracellular matrix network and also differentiated into mature osteoblasts, as indicated by alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. The properties of these scaffolds indicate that they can be used for non-load-bearing applications.

  10. Kinetic evaluation study on the bioactivity of silver doped hydroxyapatite-polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Amany A; Oudadesse, Hassane; El Sayed, Mayyada M H; Kamal, Gehan; Kamel, Mohamed; Foad, Enas

    2014-12-01

    This work investigates the effect of adding silver nanoparticles (NPs) in ppm on the bioactivity of hydroxyapatite/polyvinyl alcohol nanocomposites (HAV). HAV prepared by an in situ biomimetic approach was doped with different concentrations of silver NPs (HAV-Ag), and the formed powder samples were characterized by different techniques such as Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-EOS), X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Bioactivity was evaluated in simulated body fluid through studying the kinetics of Ca and P uptake onto the different HAV-Ag nanocomposites. Uptake profiles of Ca and P were well described by a pseudo-second order kinetic model, and the obtained kinetic parameters confirmed that the highest uptake capacities were achieved by adding less than 0.001 ppm of silver NPs which is an amount not detectable by ICP. Furthermore, HAV-Ag nanocomposites were shown to be non-toxic as well as have a strong antibacterial effect. Silver NPs significantly enhanced the bioactivity of HAV nanocomposites and thus the developed nanocomposites promise to be excellent biomaterials for bone and reconstructive surgery applications.

  11. Hydroxyapatite nanorod-reinforced biodegradable poly(L-lactic acid) composites for bone plate applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Erkin; Planell, Josep A; Hasirci, Vasif

    2011-11-01

    Novel PLLA composite fibers containing hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanorods with or without surface lactic acid grafting were produced by extrusion for use as reinforcements in PLLA-based bone plates. Fibers containing 0-50% (w/w) HAp nanorods, aligned parallel to fiber axis, were extruded. Lactic acid surface grafting of HAp nanorods (lacHAp) improved the tensile properties of composites fibers better than the non-grafted ones (nHAp). Best tensile modulus values of 2.59, 2.49, and 4.12 GPa were obtained for loadings (w/w) with 30% lacHAp, 10% nHAp, and 50% amorphous HAp nanoparticles, respectively. Bone plates reinforced with parallel rows of these composite fibers were molded by melt pressing. The best compressive properties for plates were obtained with nHAp reinforcement (1.31 GPa Young's Modulus, 110.3 MPa compressive strength). In vitro testing with osteoblasts showed good cellular attachment and spreading on composite fibers. In situ degradation tests revealed faster degradation rates with increasing HAp content. To our knowledge, this is the first study containing calcium phosphate-polymer nanocomposite fibers for reinforcement of a biodegradable bone plate or other such implants and this biomimetic design was concluded to have potential for production of polymer-based biodegradable bone plates even for load bearing applications.

  12. Development of multi-substituted hydroxyapatite nanopowders as biomedical materials for bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba Ismail, Yanny M; Wimpenny, Ian; Bretcanu, Oana; Dalgarno, Kenneth; El Haj, Alicia J

    2017-02-15

    Ionic substitutions have been proposed as a tool to control the functional behavior of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA), particularly for Bone Tissue Engineering (BTE) applications. The effect of simultaneous substitution of different levels of carbonate (CO3 ) and silicon (Si) ions in the HA lattice was investigated. Furthermore, human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were cultured on multi-substituted HA (SiCHA) to determine if biomimetic chemical compositions were osteoconductive. Of the four different compositions investigates, SiCHA-1 (0.58wt% Si) and SiCHA-2 (0.45wt% Si) showed missing bands for CO3 and Si using FTIR analysis, indicating competition for occupation of the phosphate site in the HA lattice. 500°C was considered the most favourable calcination temperature as: (i) the powders produced possessed a similar amount of CO3 (2-8wt%) and Si (<1.0wt%) as present in native bone; and (ii) there was a minimal loss of CO3 and Si from the HA structure to the surroundings during calcination. Higher Si content in SiCHA-1 led to lower cell viability and at most hindered proliferation, but no toxicity effect occurred. While, lower Si content in SiCHA-2 showed the highest ALP/DNA ratio after 21 days culture with hMSCs, indicating that the powder may stimulate osteogenic behaviour to a greater extent than other powders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Biologically inspired growth of hydroxyapatite crystals on bio-organics-defined scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chunrong, E-mail: milkhoney3@163.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian University of Technology, Fuzhou 350108 (China); Li, Yuli; Nan, Kaihui [Eye Hospital, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325027 (China)

    2013-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Petal-like crystals were observed to form on the surface of the BG/COL/ChS scaffolds. Highlights: ► Porous scaffolds were prepared using bioglass, collagen and chondroitin sulfate. ► Highly oriented HA crystals were grown on scaffolds using simulated body fluids ► The microstructure and orientation of HA were explained by molecular configuration. - Abstract: Several bio-organics-defined composite scaffolds were prepared using 58s-bioglass (BG), collagen (Col) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS). These scaffolds possess highly porous structure. X-ray diffraction of these scaffolds strongly indicated that hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals formed on their surfaces in simulated body fluids within 3 d, and similar formation process of crystals could be obtained on BG/Col and BG/Col/ChS scaffolds. The morphology and structure of the crystals were further examined by scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained indicate that an apatite with petal-like structure similar to that found on BG/Col scaffolds can be produced on BG/Col/ChS scaffolds through biomimetic synthesis, while that on BG/ChS scaffolds took place differently. The differences could be explained by self-assembly processes and the different macromolecular configurations of the Col and ChS fibrils which self-assemble spontaneously into their fibers. On the other hand, the bio-organics-defined composites have good cell biocompability. The results may be applicable to develop tailored biomaterials for peculiar bone substitute.

  14. Hydroxyapatite-enhanced tibial prosthetic fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toksvig-Larsen, S; Jorn, L P; Ryd, L; Lindstrand, A

    2000-01-01

    Sixty-two knees (60 patients) were randomized to four noncemented groups. In Groups 1, 3, and 4, the bone cuts were made with a cooled saw blade. In Group 1, 15 patients were operated on with the porous coated Osteonic 7000 tibial component. In Group 2, 15 patients were operated on with the same tibial component as in Group 1 but with the use of a standard saw blade. In Group 3, 16 patients were operated on with the hydroxyapatite-coated Osteonic tibial component, and in Group 4, 16 patients were operated on with the hydroxyapatite Duracon tibial component. All patients were followed up clinically and with roentgenstereometric analysis. There were no differences among the groups regarding clinical outcome. One knee was revised (Group 2) after 1 year because of loosening of the tibial component. The maximum migration at 1 year was 1.7 mm in Group 1, 1.9 mm in Group 2, 1.3 mm in Group 3, and 1 mm in Group 4. At the 2-year followup, the migrations were 1.8 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.4 mm, and 1 mm in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. The inducible displacement that occurred at 1 year was 0.6 mm in Group 1, 0.5 mm in Group 2, 0.4 mm in Group 3, and 0.4 mm in Group 4. The hydroxyapatite coating had a strong positive effect on the tibial component fixation. No prosthesis in the hydroxyapatite groups showed continuous migration.

  15. Adsorption of benzoxaboroles on hydroxyapatite phases

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzoccaro, Marie-Alix; Nikel, Ondrej; Sene, Saad; Philippe, Coralie; Mutin, Hubert,; Bégu, Sylvie; Vashishth, Deepak; Laurencin, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Benzoxaboroles are a family of molecules that are finding an increasing number of applications in the biomedical field, particularly as a “privileged scaffold” for the design of new drugs. Here, for the first time, we determine the interaction of these molecules with hydroxyapatites, in view of establishing (i) how benzoxaborole drugs may adsorb onto biological apatites, as this could impact on their bioavailability, and (ii) how apatite-based materials can be used for...

  16. Synthesis of new nanocrystal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Yasser Hassan Abd El-Fattah

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) have sparked great excitement in the scientific community in last two decades. NCs are useful for both fundamental research and technical applications in various fields owing to their size and shape-dependent properties and their potentially inexpensive and excellent chemical processability. These NCs are versatile fluorescence probes with unique optical properties, including tunable luminescence, high extinction coefficient, broad absorption with narrow photoluminescence, and photobleaching resistance. In the past few years, a lot of attention has been given to nanotechnology based on using these materials as building blocks to design light harvesting assemblies. For instant, the pioneering applications of NCs are light-emitting diodes, lasers, and photovoltaic devices. Synthesis of the colloidal stable semiconductor NCs using the wet method of the pyrolysis of organometallic and chalcogenide precursors, known as hot-injection approach, is the chart-topping preparation method in term of high quality and monodisperse sized NCs. The advancement in the synthesis of these artificial materials is the core step toward their applications in a broad range of technologies. This dissertation focuses on exploring various innovative and novel synthetic methods of different types of colloidal nanocrystals, both inorganic semiconductors NCs, also known as quantum dots (QDs), and organic-inorganic metal halide-perovskite materials, known as perovskites. The work presented in this thesis focuses on pursuing fundamental understanding of the synthesis, material properties, photophysics, and spectroscopy of these nanostructured semiconductor materials. This thesis contains 6 chapters and conclusions. Chapters 1?3 focus on introducing theories and background of the materials being synthesized in the thesis. Chapter 4 demonstrates our synthesis of colloidal linker--free TiO2/CdSe NRs heterostructures with CdSe QDs grown in the presence of Ti

  17. Biomineralization of nanoscale single crystal hydroxyapatite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omokanwaye, Tiffany [Catholic University of America, BONE/CRAB Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Wilson, Otto C., E-mail: wilsono@cua.edu [Catholic University of America, BONE/CRAB Lab, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Gugssa, Ayelle; Anderson, Winston [Howard University, Department of Biology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The chemical and physical characteristics of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite particles which formed during the subcutaneous implantation of crab shell in Sprague–Dawley rats were studied using selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The initial SAED characterization evidence indicated the presence of an amorphous calcium phosphate phase. The electron dense nanophase particles which formed in the wound healing zone displayed broad diffuse rings which usually indicate a low crystalline order or amorphous phase. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed that these mineralized regions contained discrete single crystal particles less than 5 nm in size. Micrographs taken at successively higher magnifications revealed very small nanoparticles with a hexagonal arrangement of ion channels with characteristic spacing of 0.54 nm and 0.23 nm. This study revealed that single crystal hydroxyapatite nanoparticles consisting of only a few unit cells formed via a biomineralization directed process. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline particles were formed during in vivo implantation of crab shell using a rat model. • High resolution TEM revealed that nanoparticles were single crystals and less than 5 nm in size. • The relative distance between spots matches the expected values for hydroxyapatite.

  18. [Generalized periarthritis calcarea (generalized hydroxyapatite disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Bahous, I

    1979-09-01

    The condition of generalized periarthritis calcarea (hydroxyapatite deposition disease) is characterised by multiple periarticular calcification which can be localised around practically any joint and also in proximity to the spine. This calcification consists of hydroxyapatite crystals which are responsible for the episodes of acute, subacute or chronic periarticular or articular inflammation so typical of the condition. Because of this one can classify periarthritis calcarea along with gout and chondrocalcinosis in the group of crystal deposition diseases. The actual cause of the calcification remains unknown but it is probable that, along with hereditary factors, disturbances in metabolism play an important role. The diagnosis of generalised periarthritis is made from the characteristic X-ray picture in conjunction with the clinical findings and, on occasion, the demonstration of hydroxyapatite crystals in the affected tissues. In the differential diagnosis gout, chondrocalcinosis, various inflammatory rheumatic conditions and septic arthritis must be excluded and various calcification processes, particularly interstitial calcinosis and lipocal cinogranulomatosis, must also be considered. Since the etiology of the calcification remains unknown to specific treatment is available. Symptomatic treatment with colchicine is mostly inadequate which is why one often has recourse to the use of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids.

  19. Preparation and crystallization control of nanoparticle hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lianfeng Guo; Wenguang Zhang; Chengtao Wang

    2004-01-01

    Nanoparticle hydroxyapatite was prepared by a wet chemical precipitation method. The effects of different synthesis conditions, I.e. Contents of reagents (0.2, 0.5 and 0.8 mol/L), reaction temperatures (20, 37, 55 and 75℃) and reaction time (0-24 h),were studied based on crystallization process analysis and the effects of washing methods (with water or alcohol) were also studied.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP) were used to characterize the powders. Chemical analysis shows that the purity of the precipitated hydroxyapatite largely depends on reaction time. X-ray diffraction and TEM micrographs results show that reaction temperature is a key factor affecting crystallinity, morphology and particle size. Degree of supersaturation and stirring also affects the crystallization. Particles are in a shape of short rod and have a size of 20-40 nm in length at 20℃ and 37℃,but acicular morphology and a size of 150-170 nm in length at 75C. Particles are monocrystalline at 20℃ and 37℃, and are polycrystalline at 55℃ and 75℃. The results show that stoichiometry hydroxyapatite with controlled particle size, morphology and crystallinity can be obtained by carefully controlling the reaction conditions.

  20. Cellulose nanocrystals: synthesis, functional properties, and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Johnsy George, SN Sabapathi Food Engineering and Packaging Division, Defence Food Research Laboratory, Siddarthanagar, Mysore, Karnataka, India Abstract: Cellulose nanocrystals are unique nanomaterials derived from the most abundant and almost inexhaustible natural polymer, cellulose. These nanomaterials have received significant interest due to their mechanical, optical, chemical, and rheological properties. Cellulose nanocrystals primarily obtained from naturally occurring cellulose fibers are biodegradable and renewable in nature and hence they serve as a sustainable and environmentally friendly material for most applications. These nanocrystals are basically hydrophilic in nature; however, they can be surface functionalized to meet various challenging requirements, such as the development of high-performance nanocomposites, using hydrophobic polymer matrices. Considering the ever-increasing interdisciplinary research being carried out on cellulose nanocrystals, this review aims to collate the knowledge available about the sources, chemical structure, and physical and chemical isolation procedures, as well as describes the mechanical, optical, and rheological properties, of cellulose nanocrystals. Innovative applications in diverse fields such as biomedical engineering, material sciences, electronics, catalysis, etc, wherein these cellulose nanocrystals can be used, are highlighted. Keywords: sources of cellulose, mechanical properties, liquid crystalline nature, surface modification, nanocomposites 

  1. Hydroxyapatite from fish scale for potential use as bone scaffold or regenerative material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suntornsaratoon, Panan [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Thongbunchoo, Jirawan [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Tang, I. Ming [Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2016-05-01

    The present paper studies the physico-chemical, bioactivity and biological properties of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is derived from fish scale (FS) (FSHA) and compares them with those of synthesized HA (sHA) obtained by co-precipitation from chemical solution as a standard. The analysis shows that the FSHA is composed of flat-plate nanocrystal with a narrow width size of about 15–20 nm and having a range of 100 nm in length and that the calcium phosphate ratio (Ca/P) is 2.01 (Ca-rich CaP). Whereas, synthesized HA consists of sub-micron HA particle having a Ca/P ratio of 1.65. Bioactivity test shows that the FSHA forms more new apatite than does the sHA after being incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 7 days. Moreover, the biocompatibility study shows a higher osteoblast like cell adhesion on the FSHA surface than on the sHA substrate after 3 days of culturing. Our results also show the shape of the osteoblast cells on the FSHA changes from being a rounded shape to being a flattened shape reflecting its spreading behavior on this surface. MTT assay and ALP analysis show significant increases in the proliferation and activity of osteoblasts over the FSHA scaffold after 5 days of culturing as compared to those covering the sHA substrates. These results confirm that the bio-materials derived from fish scale (FSHA) are biologically better than the chemically synthesized HA and have the potential for use as a bone scaffold or as regenerative materials. - Highlights: • Preparation of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is derived from fish scale (FS) (FSHA) and their bioactivities • The FSHA is composed of flat-plate nanocrystal with a narrow size of 15–20 nm. • Bioactivity test shows that the FSHA forms more new apatite than does the sHA after being incubated SBF. • In vitro cell availability tests show a higher cell adhesion on the FSHA surface.

  2. Polyimide Cellulose Nanocrystal Composite Aerogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Baochau N.; Meador, Mary Ann; Rowan, Stuart; Cudjoe, Elvis; Sandberg, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Polyimide (PI) aerogels are highly porous solids having low density, high porosity and low thermal conductivity with good mechanical properties. They are ideal for various applications including use in antenna and insulation such as inflatable decelerators used in entry, decent and landing operations. Recently, attention has been focused on stimuli responsive materials such as cellulose nano crystals (CNCs). CNCs are environmentally friendly, bio-renewable, commonly found in plants and the dermis of sea tunicates, and potentially low cost. This study is to examine the effects of CNC on the polyimide aerogels. The CNC used in this project are extracted from mantle of a sea creature called tunicates. A series of polyimide cellulose nanocrystal composite aerogels has been fabricated having 0-13 wt of CNC. Results will be discussed.

  3. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  4. Surface modification of cellulose nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Neng; DING Enyong; CHENG Rongshi

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the dispersibility of cellulose nanocrystal(CNC) particles,three difierent grafted reactions of acetylation,hydroxyethylation and hydroxypropylation were introduced to modify the CNC surface.The main advantages of these methods were the simple and easily controlled reaction conditions,and the dispersibility of the resulting products was distinctly improved.The properties of the modified CNC were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR),13 C nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR),transmission electron microscopy(TEM)and thermogravimetric analyses(TGA).The results indicated mat after desiccation,the modification products could be dispersed again in the proper solvents by ultrasonic treatments,and the diameter of their particles had no obvious changes.However,their thermal degradation behaviors were quite different.The initial decomposition temperature of the modified products via hydroxyethylation or hydroxypropylation was lower than that of modified products via acetylation.

  5. An Investigation into the Effects of Interface Stress and Interfacial Arrangement on Temperature Dependent Thermal Properties of a Biological and a Biomimetic Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomar, Vikas

    2015-01-13

    A significant effort in the biomimetic materials research is on developing materials that can mimic and function in the same way as biological tissues, on bio-inspired electronic circuits, on bio-inspired flight structures, on bio-mimetic materials processing, and on structural biomimetic materials, etc. Most structural biological and biomimetic material properties are affected by two primary factors: (1) interfacial interactions between an organic and an inorganic phase usually in the form of interactions between an inorganic mineral phase and organic protein network; and (2) structural arrangement of the constituents. Examples are exoskeleton structures such as spicule, nacre, and crustacean exoskeletons. A significant effort is being directed towards making synthetic biomimetic materials based on a manipulation of the above two primary factors. The proposed research is based on a hypothesis that in synthetic materials with biomimetic morphology thermal conductivity, k, (how fast heat is carried away) and thermal diffusivity, D, (how fast a material’s temperature rises: proportional to the ratio of k and heat capacity) can be engineered to be either significantly low or significantly high based on a combination of chosen interface orientation and interfacial arrangement in comparison to conventional material microstructures with the same phases and phase volume fractions. METHOD DEVELOPMENT 1. We have established a combined Raman spectroscopy and nanomechanical loading based experimental framework to perform environment (liquid vs. air vs. vacuum) dependent and temperature dependent (~1000 degree-C) in-situ thermal diffusivity measurements in biomaterials at nanoscale to micron scale along with the corresponding analytical theoretic calculations. (Zhang and Tomar, 2013) 2. We have also established a new classical molecular simulation based framework to measure thermal diffusivity in biomolecular interfaces. We are writing a publication currently (Qu and Tomar

  6. 2009 Clusters, Nanocrystals & Nanostructures GRC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai-Sheng Wang

    2009-07-19

    For over thirty years, this Gordon Conference has been the premiere meeting for the field of cluster science, which studies the phenomena that arise when matter becomes small. During its history, participants have witnessed the discovery and development of many novel materials, including C60, carbon nanotubes, semiconductor and metal nanocrystals, and nanowires. In addition to addressing fundamental scientific questions related to these materials, the meeting has always included a discussion of their potential applications. Consequently, this conference has played a critical role in the birth and growth of nanoscience and engineering. The goal of the 2009 Gordon Conference is to continue the forward-looking tradition of this meeting and discuss the most recent advances in the field of clusters, nanocrystals, and nanostructures. As in past meetings, this will include new topics that broaden the field. In particular, a special emphasis will be placed on nanomaterials related to the efficient use, generation, or conversion of energy. For example, we anticipate presentations related to batteries, catalysts, photovoltaics, and thermoelectrics. In addition, we expect to address the controversy surrounding carrier multiplication with a session in which recent results addressing this phenomenon will be discussed and debated. The atmosphere of the conference, which emphasizes the presentation of unpublished results and lengthy discussion periods, ensures that attendees will enjoy a valuable and stimulating experience. Because only a limited number of participants are allowed to attend this conference, and oversubscription is anticipated, we encourage all interested researchers from academia, industry, and government institutions to apply as early as possible. An invitation is not required. We also encourage all attendees to submit their latest results for presentation at the poster sessions. We anticipate that several posters will be selected for 'hot topic' oral

  7. Biomimetic modification of synthetic hydrogels by incorporation of adhesive peptides and calcium phosphate nanoparticles: in vitro evaluation of cell behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bongio

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of this work was to develop a biocompatible and biomimetic in situ crosslinkable hydrogel scaffold with an instructive capacity for bone regenerative treatment. To this end, synthetic hydrogels were functionalized with two key components of the extracellular matrix of native bone tissue, i.e. the three-amino acid peptide sequence RGD (which is the principal integrin-binding domain responsible for cell adhesion and survival of anchorage-dependent cells and calcium phosphate (CaP nanoparticles in the form of hydroxyapatite (which are similar to the inorganic phase of bone tissue. Rat bone marrow osteoblast-like cells (OBLCs were encapsulated in four different biomaterials (plain oligo(poly(ethylene glycol fumarate (OPF, RGD-modified OPF, OPF enriched with CaP nanoparticles and RGD-modified OPF enriched with CaP nanoparticles and cell survival, cell spreading, proliferation and mineralized matrix formation were determined via cell viability assay, histology and biochemical analysis for alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium. This study showed that RGD peptide sequences promoted cell spreading in OPF hydrogels and hence play a crucial role in cell survival during the early stage of culture, whereas CaP nanoparticles significantly enhanced cell-mediated hydrogel mineralization. Although cell spreading and proliferation activity were inhibited, the combined effect of RGD peptide sequences and CaP nanoparticles within OPF hydrogel systems elicited a better biological response than that of the individual components. Specifically, both a sustained cell viability and mineralized matrix production mediated by encapsulated OBLCs were observed within these novel biomimetic composite systems.

  8. Development of gelatin-chitosan-hydroxyapatite based bioactive bone scaffold with controlled pore size and mechanical strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Kanchan; Dasgupta, Sudip; Kundu, Biswanath; Bissoyi, Akalabya

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite-chitosan/gelatin (HA:Chi:Gel) nanocomposite scaffold has potential to serve as a template matrix to regenerate extra cellular matrix of human bone. Scaffolds with varying composition of hydroxyapatite, chitosan, and gelatin were prepared using lyophilization technique where glutaraldehyde (GTA) acted as a cross-linking agent for biopolymers. First, phase pure hydroxyapatite-chitosan nanocrystals were in situ synthesized by coprecipitation method using a solution of 2% acetic acid dissolved chitosan and aqueous solution of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate [Ca(NO3)2,4H2O] and diammonium hydrogen phosphate [(NH4)2H PO4]. Keeping solid loading constant at 30 wt% and changing the composition of the original slurry of gelatin, HA-chitosan allowed control of the pore size, its distribution, and mechanical properties of the scaffolds. Microstructural investigation by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a well interconnected porous scaffold with a pore size in the range of 35-150 μm. The HA granules were uniformly dispersed in the gelatin-chitosan network. An optimal composition in terms of pore size and mechanical properties was obtained from the scaffold with an HA:Chi:Gel ratio of 21:49:30. The composite scaffold having 70% porosity with pore size distribution of 35-150 μm exhibited a compressive strength of 3.3-3.5 MPa, which is within the range of that exhibited by cancellous bone. The bioactivity of the scaffold was evaluated after conducting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) - materials interaction and MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using MSCs. The scaffold found to be conducive to MSC's adhesion as evident from lamellipodia, filopodia extensions from cell cytoskeleton, proliferation, and differentiation up to 14 days of cell culture.

  9. Synthesis of nanocrystals and nanocrystal self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuoying

    Chapter 1. A general introduction is presented on nanomaterials and nanoscience. Nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their structure and properties. Ferroelectric materials and nanoparticles in particular are highlighted, especially in the case of the barium titanate, and their potential applications are discussed. Different nanocrystal synthetic techniques are discussed. Nanoparticle superlattices, the novel "meta-materials" built from self-assembly at the nanoscale, are introduced. The formation of nanoparticle superlattices and the importance and interest of synthesizing these nanostructures is discussed. Chapter 2. Advanced applications for high k dielectric and ferroelectric materials in the electronics industry continues to demand an understanding of the underlying physics in decreasing dimensions into the nanoscale. The first part of this chapter presents the synthesis, processing, and electrical characterization of nanostructured thin films (thickness ˜100 nm) of barium titanate BaTiO3 built from uniform nanoparticles (properties. We observe the BaTiO3 nanocrystals crystallize with evidence of tetragonality. Electric field dependent polarization measurements show spontaneous polarization and hysteresis, indicating ferroelectric behavior for the BaTiO 3 nanocrystalline films with grain sizes in the range of 10--30 nm. Dielectric measurements of the films show dielectic constants in the range of 85--90 over the 1 kHz--100 kHz, with low loss. We present nanocrystals as initial building blocks for the preparation of thin films which exhibit uniform nanostructured morphologies and grain sizes. In the second part of this chapter, a nonhydrolytic alcoholysis route to study the preparation of well-crystallized size-tunable BaTiO3 nanocrystals is presented. Different surfactants of amines, carboxylic acids, and alcohols were used to study the effect of size and morphological control over the nanocrystals. Techniques including X-ray diffraction, transmission

  10. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  11. Use of rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement for facial contouring surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Ji Ye; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite cement is an ideal alloplastic material to replace the autogenous bone grafts in craniofacial surgery. Hydroxyapatite cement is advantageous because it can be easily molded by hand unlike other alloplastic materials such as silicone and high-density polyethylene. For aesthetic applications of hydroxyapatite cement, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of the rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement used in facial contour augmentation, especially for the forehead and the malar area. A total of 18 cases of facial skeleton augmentation or contouring surgery using rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement (Mimix; Biomet, Warsaw, IN) were examined, and the long-term cosmetic results and any complications were also analyzed. The aims of facial contouring surgeries were to correct the following conditions: hemifacial microsomia, craniosynostosis, posttraumatic facial deformity, deformity after tumor resection, dentofacial deformity, and Romberg disease. The application sites of hydroxyapatite cement were the forehead, malar area, chin, and paranasal area. A mean of 16 g (range, 5-50 g) of the hydroxyapatite cement was used. Postoperative infection, seroma, and migration of the implant were not observed during the follow-up period of 23 months. Rapidly hardening hydroxyapatite cement, Mimix, is easy to manipulate, promptly sclerotized, and can be replaced by living bone tissue, with a low complication rate. Therefore, it can be an optimal treatment that can be used instead of other conventional types of alloplastic materials used in facial contouring surgery.

  12. Chemical modification of hydroxyapatite fiber and its characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Sheng-min; LI Shi-pu

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION In recent years, many efforts have been made towards the development of new bone substitute materials. Among these, hydroxyapatite / absorbable polymer composites have attracted much attention since such composites may have bone bonding ability due to the presence of hydroxyapatite (HA).

  13. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  14. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jangsun Hwang,1 Yoon Jeong,1,2 Jeong Min Park,3 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2,4 Jong Wook Hong,1,2 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, Korea; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 4OpenView Venture Partners, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark’s skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations. Keywords: biomimicry, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nature, nanotechnology, nanomedicine

  15. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  16. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing units of biological olfactory or taste systems at the tissue level, cellular level, or molecular level. Specifically, at the cellular level, there are mainly two categories of cells have been employed for the development of biomimetic chemical sensors, which are natural cells and bioengineered cells, respectively. Natural cells are directly isolated from biological olfactory and taste systems, which are convenient to achieve. However, natural cells often suffer from the undefined sensing properties and limited amount of identical cells. On the other hand, bioengineered cells have shown decisive advantages to be applied in the development of biomimetic chemical sensors due to the powerful biotechnology for the reconstruction of the cell sensing properties. Here, we briefly summarized the most recent advances of biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells. The development challenges and future trends are discussed as well. PMID:25482234

  17. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Steckel

    Full Text Available We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  18. Sustainability assessment of a lightweight biomimetic ceiling structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Florian; Grießhammer, Rainer; Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga

    2014-03-01

    An intensive and continuous debate centres on the question of whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability. In the context of a case study, the objective of this paper is to contribute to this debate by presenting the first systematic approach to assess the sustainability of a complex biomimetic product. The object of inquiry is a lecture hall's ribbed slab. Based on criteria suggested by the Association of German Engineers (VDI), it has been verified that the slab has been correctly defined as biomimetic. Moreover, a systematic comparative product sustainability assessment has been carefully carried out. For purposes of comparison, estimated static calculations have been performed for conceivable current state-of-the-art lightweight ceiling structures. Alternative options are a hollow article slab and a pre-stressed flat slab. Besides a detailed benefit analysis and a discussion of social effects, their costs have also been compared. A particularly detailed life cycle assessment on the respective environmental impacts has also been performed. Results show that the biomimetic ribbed slab built in the 1960s is able to keep up with the current state-of-the-art lightweight solutions in terms of sustainability. These promising results encourage a systematic search for a broad range of sustainable biomimetic solutions.

  19. Numerical Analysis of Erosion Caused by Biomimetic Axial Fan Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Qiu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by erosion has been reported in several industries for a wide range of situations. In the present work, a new method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components by biomimetic method. A numerical investigation of solid particle erosion in the standard and biomimetic configuration blade of axial fan is presented. The analysis consists in the application of the discrete phase model, for modeling the solid particles flow, and the Eulerian conservation equations to the continuous phase. The numerical study employs computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, based on a finite volume method. User-defined function was used to define wear equation. Gas/solid flow axial fan was simulated to calculate the erosion rate of the particles on the fan blades and comparatively analyzed the erosive wear of the smooth surface, the groove-shaped, and convex hull-shaped biomimetic surface axial flow fan blade. The results show that the groove-shaped biomimetic blade antierosion ability is better than that of the other two fan blades. Thoroughly analyze of antierosion mechanism of the biomimetic blade from many factors including the flow velocity contours and flow path lines, impact velocity, impact angle, particle trajectories, and the number of collisions.

  20. Biomaterial Scaffolds with Biomimetic Fluidic Channels for Hepatocyte Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Li; Jiankang He; Yaxiong Liu; Qian Zhao; Wanquan Wu; Dichen Li; Zhongmin Jin

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds play an important role in maintaining the viability and biological functions of highly metabolic hepatocytes in liver tissue engineering.One of the major challenges involves building a complex microchannel network inside three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds for efficient mass transportation.Here we presented a biomimetic strategy to generate a microchannel network within porous biomaterial scaffolds by mimicking the vascular tree of rat liver.The typical parameters of the blood vessels were incorporated into the biomimetic design of the microchannel network such as branching angle and diameter.Silk fibroin-gelatin scaffolds with biomimetic vascular tree were fabricated by combining micromolding,freeze drying and 3D rolling techniques.The relationship between the micro-channeled design and flow pattern was revealed by a flow experiment,which indicated that the scaffolds with biomimetic vascular tree exhibited unique capability in improving mass transportation inside the 3D scaffold.The 3D scaffolds,preseeded with primary hepatocytes,were dynamically cultured in a bioreactor system.The results confirmed that the pre-designed biomimetic microchannel network facilitated the generation and expansion of hepatocytes.

  1. Conventional vs Biomimetic Approaches to the Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, A.

    It is not usual to refer to convention in planetary exploration missions by virtue of the innovation required for such projects. The term conventional refers to the methodologies, tools and approaches typically adopted in engineering that are applied to such missions. Presented is a "conventional" Mars rover mission in which the author was involved - ExoMars - into which is interspersed references to examples where biomimetic approaches may yield superior capabilities. Biomimetics is a relatively recently active area of research which seeks to examine how biological systems solve the problem of survival in the natural environment. Biological organisms are autonomous entities that must survive in a hostile world adapting both adaptivity and robustness. It is not then surprising that biomimetics is particularly useful when applied to robotic elements of a Mars exploration mission. I present a number of areas in which biomimetics may yield new solutions to the problem of Mars exploration - optic flow navigation, potential field navigation, genetically-evolved neuro-controllers, legged locomotion, electric motors implementing muscular behaviour, and a biomimetic drill based on the wood wasp ovipositor. Each of these techniques offers an alternative approach to conventional ones. However, the perceptive hurdles are likely to dwarf the technical hurdles in implementing many of these methods in the near future.

  2. Nanocrystal Bioassembly: Asymmetry, Proximity, and Enzymatic Manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claridge, Shelley A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Research at the interface between biomolecules and inorganic nanocrystals has resulted in a great number of new discoveries. In part this arises from the synergistic duality of the system: biomolecules may act as self-assembly agents for organizing inorganic nanocrystals into functional materials; alternatively, nanocrystals may act as microscopic or spectroscopic labels for elucidating the behavior of complex biomolecular systems. However, success in either of these functions relies heavily uponthe ability to control the conjugation and assembly processes.In the work presented here, we first design a branched DNA scaffold which allows hybridization of DNA-nanocrystal monoconjugates to form discrete assemblies. Importantly, the asymmetry of the branched scaffold allows the formation of asymmetric2assemblies of nanocrystals. In the context of a self-assembled device, this can be considered a step toward the ability to engineer functionally distinct inputs and outputs.Next we develop an anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography purification method which allows large gold nanocrystals attached to single strands of very short DNA to be purified. When two such complementary conjugates are hybridized, the large nanocrystals are brought into close proximity, allowing their plasmon resonances to couple. Such plasmon-coupled constructs are of interest both as optical interconnects for nanoscale devices and as `plasmon ruler? biomolecular probes.We then present an enzymatic ligation strategy for creating multi-nanoparticle building blocks for self-assembly. In constructing a nanoscale device, such a strategy would allow pre-assembly and purification of components; these constructs can also act as multi-label probes of single-stranded DNA conformational dynamics. Finally we demonstrate a simple proof-of-concept of a nanoparticle analog of the polymerase chain reaction.

  3. Gallium-containing hydroxyapatite for potential use in orthopedics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnikov, P., E-mail: petrmelnikov@yahoo.com [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Teixeira, A.R.; Malzac, A. [Department of Clinical Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (Brazil); Coelho, M. de B. [Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation - EMBRAPA (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    A novel material that may be recommended for grafts and implants stimulating bone growth has been obtained by introducing gallium ions (up to 11.0 mass%) into crystalline lattice of hydroxyapatite. The doping was carried out using gallium nitrate and sodium gallate solutions. In both cases, lattice parameters of gallium-doped hydroxyapatite are identical to those of pure synthetic hydroxyapatite. Gallium does not replace calcium as a result of heterovalent substitution and consequently produces no distortions in the framework of hydroxyapatite matrix. It remains strongly fixed in the form of solid solution of intercalation. According to scanning electron microscopy images gallium insertion does not cause any morphological alterations in hydroxyapatite structure and the product developed meets physico-chemical criteria for biomaterial to be employed in orthopedic practice and local handling of traumatic injuries. Its future usage opens the opportunity to enhance osteosynthesis and calcium retention in loco.

  4. Study on carbonated hydroxyapatite as a thermoluminescence dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafaei, M.; Sardari, D. [Islamic Azad Univ., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Medical Radiation Engineering; Ziaie, F.; Larijani, M.M. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School

    2015-03-15

    In this study, carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were used for thermoluminescence dosimetry. The nano-structure carbonated hydroxyapatite synthesized via hydrolysis of CaHPO{sub 4} and CaCO{sub 3}. The obtained nano powders were characterized by XRD technique and FTIR spectroscopy system. The carbonated hydroxyapatite samples were irradiated at different doses using {sup 60}Co gamma rays, and were subjected to thermoluminescence measurement system, consequently. The TL glow curve exhibited two distinguishable peaks centered at around of 165 C and 310 C. The TL response of carbonated hydroxyapatite samples as a function of absorbed dose was linear in the range of 25-1000 Gy. Other dosimetric features of the carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles including fading and reproducibility were also investigated.

  5. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: electrospinning and calcination of hydroxyapatite/polyvinyl butyral nanofibers and growth kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakaria, S.M.; Zein, S.H. Sharif; Othman, M.R.; Jansen, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning of hydroxyapatite (HA)/polyvinyl butyral solution resulted in the formation of fibers with average diameter of 937-1440 nm. These fibers were converted into HA nanoparticles with size <100 nm after undergoing calcination treatment at 600 degrees C. The diameter of the fiber was fo

  6. Tuning of copper nanocrystals optical properties with their shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzemann, C; Brioude, A; Pileni, M-P

    2006-04-13

    Copper nanocrystals are obtained by chemical reduction of copper ions in mixed reverse micelles. A large excess of reducing agent favors producing a new generation of shaped copper nanocrystals as nanodisks, elongated nanocrystals, and cubes. By using UV-Visible spectroscopy and numerical optical simulations we demonstrate that the optical properties are tuned by the relative proportions of spheres and nanodisks.

  7. Metal halide solid-state surface treatment for nanocrystal materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luther, Joseph M.; Crisp, Ryan; Beard, Matthew C.

    2016-04-26

    Methods of treating nanocrystal and/or quantum dot devices are described. The methods include contacting the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots with a solution including metal ions and halogen ions, such that the solution displaces native ligands present on the surface of the nanocrystals and/or quantum dots via ligand exchange.

  8. A simple synthesis and characterization of CuS nanocrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ujjal K Gautam; Bratindranath Mukherjee

    2006-02-01

    Water-soluble CuS nanocrystals and nanorods were prepared by reacting copper acetate with thioacetamide in the presence of different surfactants and capping agents. The size of the nanocrystals varied from 3–20 nm depending on the reaction parameters such as concentration, temperature, solvent and the capping agents. The formation of nanocrystals was studied by using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy.

  9. Removal of Cadmium Ions from Aqueous Solution by Silicate-incorporated Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Hebin; ZHONG Hong; LIU Yu; DENG Jinyang

    2007-01-01

    This article reports a preliminary research on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite as a new environmental mineral used to remove cadmium ions from aqueous solutions. The silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was prepared by coprecipitation and calcining, and silicate was incorporated into the crystal lattice of hydroxyapatite by partial substitution of phosphate. The amount of cadmium ions removed by silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was significantly elevated, which was 76% higher than that of pure hydroxyapatite. But the sorption behavior of cadmium ions on silicate-incorporated hydroxyapatite was similar to that of pure hydroxyapatite. Morphological study revealed that silicate incorporation confined the crystal growth and increased the specific surface area of hydroxyapatite,which were in favor of enhancing the cadmium ion sorpfion capacity of the samples. Incorporation of silicate into hydroxyapatite seems to be an effective approach to improve the environmental property of hydroxyapatite on removal of aqueous cadmium ions.

  10. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  11. Biomimetic Coacervate Environments for Protein Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah; McCall, Patrick; Srivastava, Samavayan; Kovar, David; Gardel, Margaret; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Living cells have evolved sophisticated intracellular organization strategies that are challenging to reproduce synthetically. Biomolecular function depends on both the structure of the molecule itself and the properties of the surrounding medium. The ability to simulate the in vivo environment and isolate biological networks for study in an artificial milieu without sacrificing the crowding, structure, and compartmentalization of a cellular environment, represent engineering challenges with tremendous potential to impact both biological studies and biomedical applications. Emerging experience has shown that polypeptide-based complex coacervation (electrostatically-driven liquid-liquid phase separation) produces a biomimetic microenvironment capable of tuning protein biochemical activity. We have investigated the effect of polypeptide-based coacervates on the dynamic self-assembly of cytoskeletal actin filaments. Coacervate materials are able to directly affect the nucleation and assembly dynamics. We observe effects that can be attributed to the length and chemical specificity of the encapsulating polypeptides, as well as the overall crowded nature of a polymer-rich coacervate phase. Coacervate-based systems are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because the compartmentalization afforded by liquid-liquid phase separation does not necessarily inhibit the transport of molecules across the compartmental barrier.

  12. Biomimetic and microbial reduction of nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, W.T.; Le, U.; Ronda, S. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The biomimetic reduction of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) by dithiothreitol in the presence of cyanocobalamin and cobalt-centered porphyrins has been investigated. Reactions were monitored directly using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy vapor-phase spectra. Reaction rates were twofold faster for the corrin than for the cobalt-centered porphyrins. The stoichiometry showed the loss of two molecules of NO per molecule of N{sub 2}O produced. We have also demonstrated that the facultative anaerobe and chemoautotroph, Thiobacillus denitrificans, can be cultured anoxically in batch reactors using NO as a terminal electron acceptor with reduction to elemental nitrogen (N{sub 2}). We have proposed that the concentrated stream of NO{sub x}, as obtained from certain regenerable processes for the gas desulfurization and NO{sub x} removal, could be converted to N{sub 2} for disposal by contact with a culture of T. denitrificans. Four heterotrophic bacteria have also been identified that may be grown in batch cultures with succinate, yeast extract, or heat and alkali pretreated sewage sludge as carbon and energy sources and NO as a terminal electron acceptor. These are Paracoccus dentrificans, Pseudomonas denitrificans, Alcaligens denitrificans, and Thiophaera pantotropha.

  13. Development of Underwater Microrobot with Biomimetic Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microrobots have powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields. They should have a compact structure, be easy to manufacture, have efficient locomotion, be driven by low voltage and have a simple control system. To meet these purposes, inspired by the leg of stick insects, we designed a novel type of microrobot with biomimetic locomotion with 1-DOF (degree of freedom legs. The locomotion includes two ionic conducting polymer film (ICPF actuators to realize the 2-DOF motion. We developed several microrobots with this locomotion. Firstly, we review a microrobot, named Walker-1, with 1-DOF motion. And then a new microrobot, named Walker-2, utilizing six ICPF actuators, with 3-DOF motion is introduced. It is 47 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height (in static state. It has 0.61 g of dried weight. We compared the two microrobot prototypes, and the result shows that Walker-2 has some advantages, such as more flexible moving motion, good balance, less water resistance, more load-carrying ability and so on. We also compared it with some insect-inspired microrobots and some microrobots with 1-DOF legs, and the result shows that a microrobot with this novel type of locomotion has some advantages. Its structure has fewer actuators and joints, a simpler control system and is compact. The ICPF actuator decides that it can be driven by low voltage (less than 5 V and move in water. A microrobot with this locomotion has powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields.

  14. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  15. A multi-electrode biomimetic electrolocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayekar, K.; Damalla, D.; Gottwald, M.; Bousack, H.; von der Emde, G.

    2012-04-01

    We present the concept of an active multi-electrode catheter inspired by the electroreceptive system of the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus petersii. The skin of this fish exhibits numerous electroreceptor organs which are capable of sensing a self induced electrical field. Our sensor is composed of a sending electrode and sixteen receiving electrodes. The electrical field produced by the sending electrode was measured by the receiving electrodes and objects were detected by the perturbation of the electrical field they induce. The intended application of such a sensor is in coronary diagnostics, in particular in distinguishing various types of plaques, which are major causes of heart attack. For calibration of the sensor system, finite element modeling (FEM) was performed. To validate the model, experimental measurements were carried out with two different systems. The physical system was glass tubing with metal and plastic wall insertions as targets. For the control of the experiment and for data acquisition, the software LabView designed for 17 electrodes was used. Different parameters of the electric images were analyzed for the prediction of the electrical properties and size of the inserted targets in the tube. Comparisons of the voltage modulations predicted from the FEM model and the experiments showed a good correspondence. It can be concluded that this novel biomimetic method can be further developed for detailed investigations of atherosclerotic lesions. Finally, we discuss various design strategies to optimize the output of the sensor using different simulated models to enhance target recognition.

  16. Biomimetic visual detection based on insect neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, David C.

    2001-11-01

    With a visual system that accounts for as much as 30% of the lifted mass, flying insects such as dragonflies and hoverflies invest more in vision than any other animal. Impressive visual performance is subserved by a surprisingly simple visual system. In a typical insect eye, between 2,000 and 30,000 pixels in the image are analyzed by fewer than 200,000 neurons in underlying neural circuits. The combination of sophisticated visual processing with an approachable level of complexity has made the insect visual system a leading model for biomimetic approaches to computer vision. Much neurobiological research has focused on neural circuits used for detection of moving patterns (e.g. optical flow during flight) and moving targets (e.g. prey). Research from several labs has led to great advances in our understanding of the neural mechanisms involved, and has spawned neuromorphic hardware based on key processes identified in neurobiological experiments. Despite its attractions, the highly non-linear nature of several key stages in insect visual processing presents a challenge to understanding. I will describe examples of adaptive elements of neural circuits in the fly visual system which analyze the direction and velocity of wide-field optical flow patterns and the result of experiments that suggest that these non-linearities may contribute to robust responses to natural image motion.

  17. Biomimetic, Osteoconductive Non-mulberry Silk Fiber Reinforced Tricomposite Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prerak; Adhikary, Mimi; M, Joseph Christakiran; Kumar, Manishekhar; Bhardwaj, Nandana; Mandal, Biman B

    2016-11-16

    Composite biomaterials as artificial bone graft materials are pushing the present frontiers of bioengineering. In this study, a biomimetic, osteoconductive tricomposite scaffold made of hydroxyapatite (HA) embedded in non-mulberry Antheraea assama (A. assama) silk fibroin fibers and its fibroin solution is explored for its osteogenic potential. Scaffolds were physico-chemically characterized for morphology, porosity, secondary structure conformation, water retention ability, biodegradability, and mechanical property. The results revealed a ∼5-fold increase in scaffold compressive modulus on addition of HA and silk fibers to liquid silk as compared to pure silk scaffolds while maintaining high scaffold porosity (∼90%) with slower degradation rates. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results confirmed deposition of HA crystals on composite scaffolds. Furthermore, the crystallite size of HA within scaffolds was strongly regulated by the intrinsic physical cues of silk fibroin. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies indicated strong interactions between HA and silk fibroin. The fabricated tricomposite scaffolds supported enhanced cellular viability and function (ALP activity) for both MG63 osteosarcoma and human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) as compared to pure silk scaffolds without fiber or HA addition. In addition, higher expression of osteogenic gene markers such as collagen I (Col-I), osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), and bone sialoprotein (BSP) further substantiated the applicability of HA composite silk scaffolds for bone related applications. Immunostaining studies confirmed localization of Col-I and BSP and were in agreement with real-time gene expression results. These findings demonstrate the osteogenic potential of developed biodegradable tricomposite scaffolds with the added advantage of the affordability of its components as bone graft substitute materials.

  18. Supramolecular Engineering of Hierarchically Self-Assembled, Bioinspired, Cholesteric Nanocomposites Formed by Cellulose Nanocrystals and Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baolei; Merindol, Remi; Benitez, Alejandro J; Wang, Baochun; Walther, Andreas

    2016-05-04

    Natural composites are hierarchically structured by combination of ordered colloidal and molecular length scales. They inspire future, biomimetic, and lightweight nanocomposites, in which extraordinary mechanical properties are in reach by understanding and mastering hierarchical structure formation as tools to engineer multiscale deformation mechanisms. Here we describe a hierarchically self-assembled, cholesteric nanocomposite with well-defined colloid-based helical structure and supramolecular hydrogen bonds engineered on the molecular level in the polymer matrix. We use reversible addition-fragmentation transfer polymerization to synthesize well-defined hydrophilic, nonionic polymers with a varying functionalization density of 4-fold hydrogen-bonding ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) motifs. We show that these copolymers can be coassembled with cellulose nanocrystals (CNC), a sustainable, stiff, rod-like reinforcement, to give ordered cholesteric phases with characteristic photonic stop bands. The dimensions of the helical pitch are controlled by the ratio of polymer/CNC, confirming a smooth integration into the colloidal structure. With respect to the effect of the supramolecular motifs, we demonstrate that those regulate the swelling when exposing the biomimetic hybrids to water, and they allow engineering the photonic response. Moreover, the amount of hydrogen bonds and the polymer fraction are decisive in defining the mechanical properties. An Ashby plot comparing previous ordered CNC-based nanocomposites with our new hierarchical ones reveals that molecular engineering allows us to span an unprecedented mechanical property range from highest inelastic deformation (strain up to ∼13%) to highest stiffness (E ∼ 15 GPa) and combinations of both. We envisage that further rational design of the molecular interactions will provide efficient tools for enhancing the multifunctional property profiles of such bioinspired nanocomposites.

  19. Iron Oxide Nanocrystals for Magnetic Hyperthermia Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Huber

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanocrystals have been investigated extensively in the past several years for several potential applications, such as information technology, MRI contrast agents, and for drug conjugation and delivery. A specific property of interest in biomedicine is magnetic hyperthermia—an increase in temperature resulting from the thermal energy released by magnetic nanocrystals in an external alternating magnetic field. Iron oxide nanocrystals of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power using frequencies of 111.1 kHz and 629.2 kHz, and corresponding magnetic field strengths of 9 and 25 mT. Polymorphous nanocrystals as well as spherical nanocrystals and nanowires in paramagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited good heating power. A remarkable 30 °C temperature increase was observed in a nanowire sample at 111 kHz and magnetic field of 25 mT (19.6 kA/m, which is very close to the typical values of 100 kHz and 20 mT used in medical treatments.

  20. Desalination by biomimetic aquaporin membranes: Review of status and prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, R.

    2013-01-01

    Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review is to prov......Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review...... is to provide an overview of the properties of aquaporins, their preparation and characterization. We discuss the challenges in exploiting the remarkable properties of aquaporin proteins for membrane separation processes and we present various attempts to construct aquaporin in membranes for desalination......; including an overview of our own recent developments in aquaporin-based membranes. Finally we outline future prospects of aquaporin based biomimetic membrane for desalination and water reuse....

  1. Biomimetic Nanotechnology: A Powerful Means to address Global Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Gebeshuber, Ille C

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic nanotechnology is a prominent research area at the meeting place of life sciences with engineering and physics: it is a continuously growing field that deals with knowledge transfer from biology to nanotechnology. Biomimetic nanotechnology is a field that has the potential to substantially support successful mastering of major global challenges. The Millennium Project was commissioned by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2002 to develop a concrete action plan for the world to reverse the grinding poverty, hunger and disease affecting billions of people. It states 15 Global Challenges: sustainable development, water, population and resources, democratization, long-term perspectives, information technology, the rich-poor gap, health, capacity to decide, peace and conflict, status of women, transnational crime, energy, science and technology and global ethics. The possible contributions to master these challenges with the help of biomimetic nanotechnology will be discussed in detail.

  2. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  3. Tribological and electrochemical studies on biomimetic synovial fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, tribological and electrochemical performances of the new biomimetic synovial fluids were studied according to different composition concentrations, including hyaluronic acid, albumin and alendronic acid sodium. By using Taguchi method, the composition contents of the biomimetic synovial fluids were designed. Items such as friction coefficient, mean scar diameter and viscosity were investigated via a four-ball tribo-tester, viscosity meter and optical microscope. Polarization studies were carried out to analyze the electrochemical behaviour of the fluids. Results showed that hyaluronic acid dominates the viscosity of the fluids. High albumin concentration will reduce friction, while increasing wear rate due to the electro-chemical effect. Alendronic acid sodium is found to reduce the biocorrosion of CoCrMo as well as provide better lubricating. In conclusion, biomimetic synovial fluids partially recover the functions of natural synovial fluids and provide good lubricating property.

  4. Biomimetic and bioinspired nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina

    2017-03-01

    In drug targeting, the urgent need for more effective and less iatrogenic therapies is pushing toward a complete revision of carrier setup. After the era of 'articles used as homing systems', novel prototypes are now emerging. Newly conceived carriers are endowed with better biocompatibility, biodistribution and targeting properties. The biomimetic approach bestows such improved functional properties. Exploiting biological molecules, organisms and cells, or taking inspiration from them, drug vector performances are now rapidly progressing toward the perfect carrier. Following this direction, researchers have refined carrier properties, achieving significant results. The present review summarizes recent advances in biomimetic and bioinspired drug vectors, derived from biologicals or obtained by processing synthetic materials with a biomimetic approach.

  5. Superhydrophobic surfaces: from natural to biomimetic to functional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin; Su, Bao-Lian

    2011-01-15

    Nature is the creation of aesthetic functional systems, in which many natural materials have vagarious structures. Inspired from nature, such as lotus leaf, butterfly' wings, showing excellent superhydrophobicity, scientists have recently fabricated a lot of biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces by virtue of various smart and easy routes. Whilst, many examples, such as lotus effect, clearly tell us that biomimicry is dissimilar to a simple copying or duplicating of biological structures. In this feature article, we review the recent studies in both natural superhydrophobic surfaces and biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces, and highlight some of the recent advances in the last four years, including the various smart routes to construct rough surfaces, and a lot of chemical modifications which lead to superhydrophobicity. We also review their functions and applications to date. Finally, the promising routes from biomimetic superhydrophobic surfaces in the next are proposed.

  6. PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Keith Kin Kei

    Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.

  7. Synthesis of hydroxyapatite from biogenic wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teerawat Laonapakul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HAp is a major component of human bone, teeth and hard tissue. It is one of only a few bioactive materials. Since HAp is the most widely used ceramic biomaterial, various techniques have been developed to synthesize HAp. In recent years, the use of natural biogenic structures and materials for medical proposes has been motivated by limitations in producing synthetic materials. This article mainly focuses on the use of biogenic wastes to prepare HAp. These include bio-wastes, marine corals, eggshells, seashells and bio-membranes. In the present review, useful information about HAp preparation methodologies has been summarized for further research and development.

  8. In Vivo Evaluation of Hydroxyapatite Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepulveda P.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous hydroxyapatite manufactured by foaming of aqueous ceramic suspensions and setting via gelcasting of organic monomers was tested for in vivo biocompatibility in rabbit tibia for a period of 8 weeks. The foams provide tortous frameworks and large interconnected pores that support cell attachment and organisation into 3D arrays to form new tissue. The HA foam implants were progressively filled with mature new bone tissue and osteoid after the implanted period, confirming the high osteoconductive potential and high biocompatibility of HA and the suitability of foam network in providing good osteointegration. No immune or inflammatory reactions were detected.

  9. Cytocompatibility of Highly Dispersed Nano Hydroxyapatite Sol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAOXuan; WUPei-zhu; TANGShun-qing; YANYan-ling; DAIYun

    2004-01-01

    Nano hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals were prepared and dispersed in water to form HA sol by simple methods. The cytotoxicity of the sols were tested by MTT assay and lymphocytotoxicity test. Results show that the average secondary particle size of the sol containing uncalcined HA crystals is around 750 nm, within micrograde; while the sol of calcined HA contains over 88% nanoparticles with the size between 65~86 nm, in which nano HA crystals are highly dispersed. Both the HA sols have no toxicity on the proliferation of 3T3 cells and lymphocytes. It demonstrates that the nano sol is safe for the application of drug delivery.

  10. Hydrothermal fabrication of hydroxyapatite/chitosan/carbon porous scaffolds for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Teng; Liu, Yu-Tai; Tang, Sha; Sun, Jin-Liang; Guo, Ya-Ping; Zhu, Zhen-An

    2014-11-01

    Porous carbon fiber felts (PCFFs) have great applications in orthopedic surgery because of the strong mechanical strength, low density, high stability, and porous structure, but they are biologically inert. To improve their biological properties, we developed, for the first time, the hydroxyapatite (HA)/chitosan/carbon porous scaffolds (HCCPs). HA/chitosan nanohybrid coatings have been fabricated on PCFFs according to the following stages: (i) deposition of chitosan/calcium phosphate precursors on PCFFs; and (ii) hydrothermal transformation of the calcium phosphate precursors in chitosan matrix into HA nanocrystals. The scanning electron microscopy images indicate that PCFFs are uniformly covered with elongated HA nanoplates and chitosan, and the macropores in PCFFs still remain. Interestingly, the calcium-deficient HA crystals exist as plate-like shapes with thickness of 10-18 nm, width of 30-40 nm, and length of 80-120 nm, which are similar to the biological apatite. The HA in HCCPs is similar to the mineral of natural bone in chemical composition, crystallinity, and morphology. As compared with PCFFs, HCCPs exhibit higher in vitro bioactivity and biocompatibility because of the presence of the HA/chitosan nanohybrid coatings. HCCPs not only promote the formation of bone-like apatite in simulated body fluid, but also improve the adhesion, spreading, and proliferation of human bone marrow stromal cells. Hence, HCCPs have great potentials as scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering and implantation.

  11. Physico-mechanical and morphological features of zirconia substituted hydroxyapatite nano crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, S. F.; El-dek, S. I.; Ahmed, M. K.

    2017-01-01

    Zirconia doped Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanocrystals [Ca10(PO4)6−x(ZrO2)x(OH)2]; (0 ≤ x ≤ 1 step 0.2) were synthesized using simple low cost facile method. The crystalline phases were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystallinity percentage decreased with increasing zirconia content for the as-synthesized samples. The existence of zirconia as secondary phase on the grain boundaries; as observed from scanning electron micrographs (FESEM); resulted in negative values of microstrain. The crystallite size was computed and the results showed that it increased with increasing annealing temperature. Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) assured the thermal stability of the nano crystals over the temperature from room up to 1200 °C depending on the zirconia content. The corrosion rate was found to decrease around 25 times with increasing zirconia content from x = 0.0 to 1.0. Microhardness displayed both compositional and temperature dependence. For the sample (x = 0.6), annealed at 1200 °C, the former increased up to 1.2 times its original value (x = 0.0). PMID:28256557

  12. Biomimetic actuators using electroactive polymers (EAP) as artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Evolution has resolved many of nature's challenges leading to lasting solutions with maximal performance and effective use of resources. Nature's inventions have always inspired human achievements leading to effective materials, structures, tools, mechanisms, processes, algorithms, methods, systems and many other benefits. The field of mimicking nature is known as Biomimetics and one of its topics includes electroactive polymers that gain the moniker artificial muscles. Integrating EAP with embedded sensors, self-repair and many other capabilities that are used in composite materials can add greatly to the capability of smart biomimetic systems. Such development would enable fascinating possibilities potentially turning science fiction ideas into engineering reality.

  13. Designer Nanocrystal Materials for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie

    Advances in synthetic methods allow a wide range of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) to be tailored in size and shape and to be used as building blocks in the design of NC solids. However, the long, insulating ligands commonly employed in the synthesis of colloidal NCs inhibit strong interparticle coupling and charge transport once NCs are assembled into the solids state as NC arrays. We will describe the range of short, compact ligand chemistries we employ to exchange the long, insulating ligands used in synthesis and to increase interparticle coupling. These ligand exchange processes can have a dramatic influence on NC surface chemistry as well as NC organization in the solids, showing examples of short-range order. Synergistically, we use 1) thermal evaporation and diffusion and 2) wet-chemical methods to introduce extrinsic impurities and non-stoichiometry to passivate surface traps and dope NC solids. NC coupling and doping provide control over the density of states and the carrier type, concentration, mobility, and lifetime, which we characterize by a range of electronic and spectroscopic techniques. We will describe the importance of engineering device interfaces to design NC materials for solar photovoltaics.

  14. Prospects of nanoscience with nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalenko, Maksym V; Manna, Liberato; Cabot, Andreu; Hens, Zeger; Talapin, Dmitri V; Kagan, Cherie R; Klimov, Victor I; Rogach, Andrey L; Reiss, Peter; Milliron, Delia J; Guyot-Sionnnest, Philippe; Konstantatos, Gerasimos; Parak, Wolfgang J; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Korgel, Brian A; Murray, Christopher B; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2015-02-24

    Colloidal nanocrystals (NCs, i.e., crystalline nanoparticles) have become an important class of materials with great potential for applications ranging from medicine to electronic and optoelectronic devices. Today's strong research focus on NCs has been prompted by the tremendous progress in their synthesis. Impressively narrow size distributions of just a few percent, rational shape-engineering, compositional modulation, electronic doping, and tailored surface chemistries are now feasible for a broad range of inorganic compounds. The performance of inorganic NC-based photovoltaic and light-emitting devices has become competitive to other state-of-the-art materials. Semiconductor NCs hold unique promise for near- and mid-infrared technologies, where very few semiconductor materials are available. On a purely fundamental side, new insights into NC growth, chemical transformations, and self-organization can be gained from rapidly progressing in situ characterization and direct imaging techniques. New phenomena are constantly being discovered in the photophysics of NCs and in the electronic properties of NC solids. In this Nano Focus, we review the state of the art in research on colloidal NCs focusing on the most recent works published in the last 2 years.

  15. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P.; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-01

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  16. Shaping metal nanocrystals through epitaxial seeded growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habas, Susan E.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Radmilovic, Velimir; Somorjai,Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-17

    Morphological control of nanocrystals has becomeincreasingly important, as many of their physical and chemical propertiesare highly shape-dependent. Nanocrystal shape control for both single andmultiple material systems, however, remains fairly empirical andchallenging. New methods need to be explored for the rational syntheticdesign of heterostructures with controlled morphology. Overgrowth of adifferent material on well-faceted seeds, for example, allows for the useof the defined seed morphology to control nucleation and growth of thesecondary structure. Here, we have used highly faceted cubic Pt seeds todirect the epitaxial overgrowth of a secondary metal. We demonstrate thisconcept with lattice matched Pd to produce conformal shape-controlledcore-shell particles, and then extend it to lattice mismatched Au to giveanisotropic growth. Seeding with faceted nanocrystals may havesignificant potential towards the development of shape-controlledheterostructures with defined interfaces.

  17. The structure and morphology of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadavanich, Andreas V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-11-01

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals were studied using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Organically capped nanocrystals were found to have faceted shapes consistent with Wulff polyhedra after the effects of capping ligands on surface energies were taken into account. The basic shape thus derived for wurtzite (WZ) structure CdSe nanocrystals capped by tri-octyl phosphine oxide (TOPO) was a truncated hexagonal prism, elongated alone the <001> axis with (100) and (002) facets. This structure has C{sub 3v} point group symmetry. The main defect in this structure is a stacking fault (a single layer of zinc blende type stacking), which does not significantly affect the shape (does not alter the point group).

  18. Crystallization and Growth of Colloidal Nanocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Leite, Edson Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Since the size, shape, and microstructure of nanocrystalline materials strongly impact physical and chemical properties, the development of new synthetic routes to  nanocrystals with controlled composition and morphology is a key objective of the nanomaterials community. This objective is dependent on control of the nucleation and growth mechanisms that occur during the synthetic process, which in turn requires a fundamental understanding of both classical nucleation and growth and non-classical growth processes in nanostructured materials.  Recently, a novel growth process called Oriented Attachment (OA) was identified which appears to be a fundamental mechanism during the development of nanoscale  materials. OA is a special case of aggregation that provides an important route by which nanocrystals grow, defects are formed, and unique—often symmetry-defying—crystal morphologies can be produced. This growth mechanism involves reversible self-assembly of primary nanocrystals followed by reorientati...

  19. Developing New Nanoprobes from Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Aihua [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots havegarnered the spotlight as an important new class of biological labelingtool. Withoptical properties superior to conventional organicfluorophores from many aspects, such as high photostability andmultiplexing capability, quantum dots have been applied in a variety ofadvanced imaging applications. This dissertation research goes along withlarge amount of research efforts in this field, while focusing on thedesign and development of new nanoprobes from semiconductor nanocrystalsthat are aimed for useful imaging or sensing applications not possiblewith quantum dots alone. Specifically speaking, two strategies have beenapplied. In one, we have taken advantage of the increasing capability ofmanipulating the shape of semiconductor nanocrystals by developingsemiconductor quantum rods as fluorescent biological labels. In theother, we have assembled quantum dots and gold nanocrystals into discretenanostructures using DNA. The background information and synthesis,surface manipulation, property characterization and applications of thesenew nanoprobes in a few biological experiments are detailed in thedissertation.

  20. Study of hydroxyapatite behaviour during sintering of 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Szewczyk-Nykiel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available 316L stainless steel – hydroxyapatite composite biomaterials with different hydroxyapatite weight fraction in the composite wereinvestigated. Hydroxyapatite (HAp – Ca10(PO46(OH2 is well known biomaterial. HAp reveals excellent chemical and biological affinitywith bony tissues. On the other hand hydroxyapatite shows low mechanical properties. The combination of very good biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite and high mechanical properties of stainless steel seems to be a good solution. In presented research natural originhydroxyapatite and 316L austenitic stainless steel were used. In this work, metal-ceramics composites were fabricated by the powdermetallurgy technology (involving pressing and sintering process. Sintering was carried out at 1250oC in hydrogen atmosphere. Thedensity, porosity and hardness were investigated. Metallographic microscope and SEM were carried out in order to investigate themicrostructure. The horizontal NETZSCH DIL 402E dilatometer was used to evaluate the dimensional changes and phenomena occurringduring sintering. The research displayed that physical properties of sintered 316L-HAp composites decrease with increase ofhydroxyapatite content. Microstructure of investigated composites consists of austenitic and probably inclusions of hydroxyapatite andheterogeneous eutectic occurring on the grain boundaries. It was shown that amount of hydroxyapatite in the powder mixtures influencethe dimensional changes occurring during sintering.

  1. Microstructural and surface modifications and hydroxyapatite coating of Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface lattices fabricated by selective laser melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Wei, Qingsong; Shi, Yusheng

    2017-06-01

    Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) lattices were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM). The as-built Ti-6Al-4V lattices exhibit an out-of-equilibrium microstructure with very fine α' martensitic laths. When subjected to the heat treatment of 1050°C for 4h followed by furnace cooling, the lattices show a homogenous and equilibrium lamellar α+β microstructure with less dislocation and crystallographic defects compared with the as-built α' martensite. The as-built lattices present very rough strut surfaces bonded with plenty of partially melted metal particles. The sand blasting nearly removed all the bonded metal particles, but created many tiny cracks. The HCl etching eliminated these tiny cracks, and subsequent NaOH etching resulted in many small and shallow micro-pits and develops a sodium titanate hydrogel layer on the surfaces of the lattices. When soaked in simulated body fluid (SBF), the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were covered with a compact and homogeneous biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) layer. This work proposes a new method for making Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices with a homogenous and equilibrium microstructure and biomimetic HA coating, which show both tough and bioactive characteristics and can be promising materials usable as bone substitutes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Biomimetic Precipitation of Uniaxially Grown Calcium Phosphate Crystals from Full-Length Human Amelogenin Sols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vuk Uskokovié; Wu Li; Stefan Habelitz

    2011-01-01

    Human dental enamel forms over a period of 2 - 4 years by substituting the enamel matrix, a protein gel mostly composed of a single protein, amelogenin with fibrous apatite nanocrystals. Self-assembly of a dense amelogenin matrix is presumed to direct the growth of apatite fibers and their organization into bundles that eventually comprise the mature enamel, the hardest tissue in the mammalian body. This work aims to establish the physicochemical and biochemical conditions for the synthesis of fibrous apatite crystals under the control of a recombinant full-length human amelogenin matrix in combination with a programmable titration system. The growth of apatite substrates was initiated from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions in the presence of dispersed amelogenin assemblies. It was shown earlier and confirmed in this study that binding of amelogenin onto apatite surfaces presents the first step that leads to substrate-specific crystal growth. In this work, we report enhanced nucleation and growth under conditions at which amelogenin and apatite carry opposite charges and adsorption of the protein onto the apatite seeds is even more favored. Experiments at pH below the isoelectric point of amelogenin showed increased protein binding to apatite and at low Ca/P molar ratios resulted in a change in crystal morphology from plate-like to fibrous and rod-shaped. Concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions in the supernatant did not show drastic decreases throughout the titration period, indicating controlled precipitation from the protein suspension metastable with respect to calcium phosphate. It is argued that ameloblasts in the developing enamel may vary the density of the protein matrix at the nano scale by varying local pH, and thus control the interaction between the mineral and protein phases. The biomimetic experimental setting applied in this study has thus proven as convenient for gaining insight into the fundamental nature of the process of

  3. Biomimetic Precipitation of Uniaxially Grown Calcium Phosphate Crystals from Full-Length Human Amelogenin Sols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uskoković, Vuk; Li, Wu; Habelitz, Stefan

    2011-06-10

    Human dental enamel forms over a period of 2 - 4 years by substituting the enamel matrix, a protein gel mostly composed of a single protein, amelogenin with fibrous apatite nanocrystals. Self-assembly of a dense amelogenin matrix is presumed to direct the growth of apatite fibers and their organization into bundles that eventually comprise the mature enamel, the hardest tissue in the mammalian body. This work aims to establish the physicochemical and biochemical conditions for the synthesis of fibrous apatite crystals under the control of a recombinant full-length human amelogenin matrix in combination with a programmable titration system. The growth of apatite substrates was initiated from supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions in the presence of dispersed amelogenin assemblies. It was shown earlier and confirmed in this study that binding of amelogenin onto apatite surfaces presents the first step that leads to substrate-specific crystal growth. In this work, we report enhanced nucleation and growth under conditions at which amelogenin and apatite carry opposite charges and adsorption of the protein onto the apatite seeds is even more favored. Experiments at pH below the isoelectric point of amelogenin showed increased protein binding to apatite and at low Ca/P molar ratios resulted in a change in crystal morphology from plate-like to fibrous and rod-shaped. Concentrations of calcium and phosphate ions in the supernatant did not show drastic decreases throughout the titration period, indicating controlled precipitation from the protein suspension metastable with respect to calcium phosphate. It is argued that ameloblasts in the developing enamel may vary the density of the protein matrix at the nano scale by varying local pH, and thus control the interaction between the mineral and protein phases. The biomimetic experimental setting applied in this study has thus proven as convenient for gaining insight into the fundamental nature of the process of

  4. Electrochemical Processes for the Formation of Hydroxyapatite Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Nur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical synthesis of hydroxyapatite particles was performed from a homogeneous solution of Na2H2EDTA.2H2O, KH2PO4 and CaCl2 without stirring to investigate the mechanism of hydroxyapa-tite formation. We found that OH- ions generated by water reduction at the cathode play an important role in the formation of hydroxyapatite particles. The OH- ions induce the liberation of Ca2+ ions and the dissociation of phosphoric acid, which serve as the reactants for the formation of hydroxyapatite particles. Two layers with a clear boundary were formed during electrolysis. The upper layer comprises the produced particles and the lower layer is a homogeneous solution. The produced particles were held in the region between the electrodes mainly due to the electrostatic interactions of charged particles in an electric field. The hydroxyapatite particles are agglomerates consisting of spherical particles. Aging the suspension for 24 h after electrolysis leads to the transformation of hydroxyapatite to brushite. Thus, if producing hydroxyapatite is desired, the particles should be continuously removed from the system. This method appears to be promising as a continuous process to produce hydroxyapatite parti-cles using an electrochemical method. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 10th April 2014; Revised: 25th May 2014; Accepted: 27th June 2014How to Cite: Nur, A., Setyawan, H., Widjaja, A., Lenggoro, I.W. (2014. Electrochemical Processes for the Formation of Hydroxyapatite Powders. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 9 (3: 168-175. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6686.168-175Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6686.168-175

  5. Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles as a Novel Gene Carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S. H.; Huang, B. Y.; Zhou, K. C.; Huang, S. P.; Liu, F.; Li, Y. M.; Xue, Z. G.; Long, Z. G.

    2004-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite crystalline nanoparticles were created by a precipitation hydrothermal technique and the majority of crystal particles were in the size range of 40-60nm and exhibited a colloidal feature when suspended in water. The gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell line cells were cultivated in the presence of10-100 μg ml-1 hydroxyapatite nanoparticle suspension and verified by MTT evaluation for their biocompatibility in vitro. The agarose gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that the HA nanoparticles potentially adsorb the green fluorescence protein EGFP-N1 plasmid DNA at pH 2 and 7, but not at pH 12. The DNA-nanoparticle complexes transfected EGFP-N1 pDNA into SGC-7901 cells in vitro with the efficiency about 80% as referenced with Lipofectmine TM 2000. In vivo animal experiment revealed no acute toxic adverse effect 2weeks after tail vein injection into mice, and TEM examination demonstrated their biodistribution and expression within the cytoplasm and also a little in the nuclei of the liver, kidney and brain tissue cells. These results suggest that the HA nanoparticle is a promising material that can be used as gene carrier, vectors.

  6. Cloning nanocrystal morphology with soft templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Dev Kumar; Pandey, Anshu

    2016-08-01

    In most template directed preparative methods, while the template decides the nanostructure morphology, the structure of the template itself is a non-general outcome of its peculiar chemistry. Here we demonstrate a template mediated synthesis that overcomes this deficiency. This synthesis involves overgrowth of silica template onto a sacrificial nanocrystal. Such templates are used to copy the morphologies of gold nanorods. After template overgrowth, gold is removed and silver is regrown in the template cavity to produce a single crystal silver nanorod. This technique allows for duplicating existing nanocrystals, while also providing a quantifiable breakdown of the structure - shape interdependence.

  7. Enhancement of the capability of hydroxyapatite formation on Zr with anodic ZrO₂ nanotubular arrays via an effective dipping pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu-Ning; Adams, Alissa; Luo, Jing-Li

    2011-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) depositions on metallic biomedical implants are widely applied to generate bioactive surfaces in simulated biological environments. Highly ordered anodic ZrO₂ nanotubes have attracted increasing interest for biomedical applications. However, previous reports showed that at least 14-28 days were required to obtain HA coating on ZrO₂ nanotubular arrays under biomimetic condition, thus capability to grow HA coating on ZrO ₂nanotubular at room temperature needs to be enhanced. In the present work, we demonstrate that ZrO₂ nanotubular arrays are suitable for an effective dipping treatment to induce more rapid HA coating. A series of ZrO₂ nanotubular arrays having different dimensions were fabricated in fluoride containing electrolyte. Then, we used a dipping treatment for biomimetic formation of an adhesive HA coating on the nanotubular arrays. The coatings formed rapidly using this procedure under biomimetic conditions and did not require a high-temperature annealing process. The as-formed ZrO₂ nanotubular arrays were treated using several dip-and-dry steps, through which the nanotubular arrays were filled and covered with calcium phosphate (CaP) nucleation sites. The specimens readily grew HA once immersed in the simulated biological fluid after 2 days immersion. The carbonated HA coating had several micron thickness after 8 days of immersion while only a thin layer of CaP were observed on annealed ZrO₂ nanotubes immersed in the same solution for the same duration. Tensile testing showed that bonding strength between HA coating and substrate was 21.6 ± 1.6 MPa. This treatment dramatically improves efficiency for promoting HA formation on anodic ZrO₂ nanotubes at room temperature. 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Biomimetic photo-actuation: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Michael P. M.; Weaver, Paul M.; Rossiter, Jonathan M.; Bond, Ian P.; Faul, Charl F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Photo-actuation, such as that observed in the reversible sun-tracking movements of heliotropic plants, is produced by a complex, yet elegant series of processes. In the heliotropic leaf movements of the Cornish Mallow, photo-actuation involves the generation, transport and manipulation of chemical signals from a distributed network of sensors in the leaf veins to a specialized osmosis driven actuation region in the leaf stem. It is theorized that such an arrangement is both efficient in terms of materials use and operational energy conversion, as well as being highly robust. We concern ourselves with understanding and mimicking these light driven, chemically controlled actuating systems with the aim of generating intelligent structures which share the properties of efficiency and robustness that are so important to survival in Nature. In this work we present recent progress in mimicking these photo-actuating systems through remote light exposure of a metastable state photoacid and the resulting signal and energy transfer through solution to a pH-responsive hydrogel actuator. Reversible actuation strains of 20% were achieved from this arrangement, with modelling then employed to reveal the critical influence hydrogel pKa has on this result. Although the strong actuation achieved highlights the progress that has been made in replicating the principles of biomimetic photo-actuation, challenges such as photoacid degradation were also revealed. It is anticipated that current work can directly lead to the development of high-performance and low-cost solartrackers for increased photovoltaic energy capture and to the creation of new types of intelligent structures employing chemical control systems.

  9. Developing a biomimetic tooth bud model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth E; Zhang, Weibo; Schiele, Nathan R; Khademhosseini, Ali; Kuo, Catherine K; Yelick, Pamela C

    2017-01-08

    A long-term goal is to bioengineer, fully functional, living teeth for regenerative medicine and dentistry applications. Biologically based replacement teeth would avoid insufficiencies of the currently used dental implants. Using natural tooth development as a guide, a model was fabricated using post-natal porcine dental epithelial (pDE), porcine dental mesenchymal (pDM) progenitor cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) encapsulated within gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels. Previous publications have shown that post-natal DE and DM cells seeded onto synthetic scaffolds exhibited mineralized tooth crowns composed of dentin and enamel. However, these tooth structures were small and formed within the pores of the scaffolds. The present study shows that dental cell-encapsulated GelMA constructs can support mineralized dental tissue formation of predictable size and shape. Individually encapsulated pDE or pDM cell GelMA constructs were analysed to identify formulas that supported pDE and pDM cell attachment, spreading, metabolic activity, and neo-vasculature formation with co-seeded endothelial cells (HUVECs). GelMa constructs consisting of pDE-HUVECS in 3% GelMA and pDM-HUVECs within 5% GelMA supported dental cell differentiation and vascular mineralized dental tissue formation in vivo. These studies are the first to demonstrate the use of GelMA hydrogels to support the formation of post-natal dental progenitor cell-derived mineralized and functionally vascularized tissues of specified size and shape. These results introduce a novel three-dimensional biomimetic tooth bud model for eventual bioengineered tooth replacement teeth in humans. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  11. Biomimetic Reversible Heat-Stiffening Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the ability of the sea cucumber to (reversibly) increase the stiffness of its dermis upon exposure to a stimulus, we herein report a stimuli-responsive nanocomposite that can reversibly increase its stiffness upon exposure to warm water. Nanocomposites composed of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) that are grafted with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) polymer embedded within a poly(vinyl acetate) (PVAc) matrix show a dramatic increase in modulus, for example, from 1 to 350 MPa upon exposure to warm water, the hypothesis being that grafting the polymers from the CNCs disrupts the interactions between the nanofibers and minimizes the mechanical reinforcement of the film. However, exposure to water above the LCST leads to the collapse of the polymer chains and subsequent stiffening of the nanocomposite as a result of the enhanced CNC interactions. Backing up this hypothesis are energy conserving dissipative particle dynamics (EDPD) simulations which show that the attractive interactions between CNCs are switched on upon the temperature-induced collapse of the grafted polymer chains, resulting in the formation of a percolating reinforcing network. PMID:28852703

  12. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  13. Preparation of Hydroxyapatite Fibers by the Homogeneous Precipitation Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discussed the preparing process of hydroxyapatite fibers which were widely used as reinforcement for biomedical materials by homogeneous precipitation method.The needle-like hydroxyapatite crystals were synthesized in an aqueous system.They were transferred from precursors-dicalcium phosphate anhydrate and octacalcium phosphate crystals.The reaction conditions were well controlled in order to obtain crystals in given morphology.The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometry(XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy(IR).They were verified to be hydroxyapatite crystals with needle-like in shape.

  14. Aerosol printing of colloidal nanocrystals by aerodynamic focusing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lejun

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, have shown promise as the active material in electronic and optoelectronic applications, because of their high quantum yield, narrow spectral emission band, size-tunable bandgap, chemical stability, and easy processibility. Meanwhile, it is still challenging to print patterns of nanocrystal films with desired linewidth and thickness, which is a critical step in fabrication of nanocrystal-based devices. In this thesis, a direct-write method of colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals has been developed. Like other direct-write techniques, this aerosol based method simplifies printing process and reduces the manufacturing cost, as it avoids mask screening, lithography, and pre-patterning of the substrate. Moreover, the aerosol printing with aerodynamic lenses needs neither microscale nozzles nor sheath gases, and is able to incorporate into the vacuum systems currently used in microelectronic fabrication. This thesis research presents systematic efforts to develop an aerosol-based method to directly write patterns of semiconductor nanocrystals from colloidal dispersions by aerodynamic focusing. First, the synthesized colloidal nanocrystals in hexane were nebulized into compact and spherical agglomerates suspending in the carrier gas. The details about the impact dynamics of individual aerosolized nanocrystal agglomerates were investigated. As building blocks of printed nanocrystal films, the agglomerate exhibited cohesive and granular behaviors during impact deformation on the substrate. The strength of cohesion between nanocrystals in the agglomerates could be adjusted by tuning the number concentration of colloidal nanocrystal dispersion. Second, ultrathin films of nanocrystals were obtained by printing monodisperse nanocrystal agglomerates. As the result of the granular property of nanocrystal agglomerates, it was found that the thickness of deposited agglomerates strongly depended on the size of agglomerates. A

  15. Coaxial electrospun aligned tussah silk fibroin nanostructured fiber scaffolds embedded with hydroxyapatite-tussah silk fibroin nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Weili; He, Jianxin; Sang, Feng; Ding, Bin; Chen, Li; Cui, Shizhong; Li, Kejing; Han, Qiming; Tan, Weilin

    2016-01-01

    The bone is a composite of inorganic and organic materials and possesses a complex hierarchical architecture consisting of mineralized fibrils formed by collagen molecules and coated with oriented hydroxyapatite. To regenerate bone tissue, it is necessary to provide a scaffold that mimics the architecture of the extracellular matrix in native bone. Here, we describe one such scaffold, a nanostructured composite with a core made of a composite of hydroxyapatite and tussah silk fibroin. The core is encased in a shell of tussah silk fibroin. The composite fibers were fabricated by coaxial electrospinning using green water solvent and were characterized using different techniques. In comparison to nanofibers of pure tussah silk, composite notably improved mechanical properties, with 90-fold and 2-fold higher initial modulus and breaking stress, respectively, obtained. Osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were cultivated on the composite to assess its suitability as a scaffold for bone tissue engineering. We found that the fiber scaffold supported cell adhesion and proliferation and functionally promoted alkaline phosphatase and mineral deposition relevant for biomineralization. In addition, the composite were more biocompatible than pure tussah silk fibroin or cover slip. Thus, the nanostructured composite has excellent biomimetic and mechanical properties and is a potential biocompatible scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  16. Cytotoxicity of hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite and fluor-hydroxyapatite: a comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiszova, M; Jantova, S; Letasiova, S; Palou, M; Cipak, L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of two formulations of hydroxyapatite (HA), namely fluorapatite (FA) and fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA). HA is used as carrier material for antibiotics or anticancer drugs during treatment of bone metastasis. Negative control, represented by HA, was included for comparative purposes. Leukemia cells were used as a model cell line, and the effect of eluates of tested biomaterials on cell proliferation/viability and mechanism of antiproliferative activity were assessed. Study design attempted to reveal the toxicity of tested biomaterials with an emphasis to decide if tested biomaterials have promise for further studies in vivo. Results showed that eluates of FA and FHA inhibit the growth of leukemia cells and induce programmed cell death through mitochondrial/caspase-9/caspase-3-dependent pathway. Due to these differences compare to HA, it is concluded that FA and FHA have promise for evaluation of their behaviour in vivo.

  17. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  18. Design and Implementation of a Modular Biomimetic Infochemical Communication System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, Z.; Cole, M.; Gardner, J.W.; Chowdhury, M.F.; Bula, W.P.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Karout, S.; Capurro, A.; Pearce, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a novel biomimetic infochemical communication system that employs airborne molecules alone to communicate over space and time. The system involves the design and fabrication of a microsystem capable of producing and releasing a precise mix of biosynt

  19. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model

  20. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, Raphael A., E-mail: rguerrero@admu.edu.ph [Department of Physics, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City (Philippines); Aranas, Erika B. [Department of Physics, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2010-10-12

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  1. Osteoclastic resorption of biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; Layrolle, P.; Barrere, F.; Bruijn, J.G.M. de; Schoonman, J.; Blitterswijk, C.A. van; Groot, K. de

    2001-01-01

    A new biomimetic method for coating metal implants enables the fast formation of dense and homogeneous calcium phosphate coatings. Titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) disks were coated with a thin, carbonated, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) by immersion in a saturated solution of calcium, phosphate, magnesi

  2. Biomimetic cilia arrays generate simultaneous pumping and mixing regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, A R; Fiser, B L; Evans, B A; Falvo, M R; Washburn, S; Superfine, R

    2010-09-07

    Living systems employ cilia to control and to sense the flow of fluids for many purposes, such as pumping, locomotion, feeding, and tissue morphogenesis. Beyond their use in biology, functional arrays of artificial cilia have been envisaged as a potential biomimetic strategy for inducing fluid flow and mixing in lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report on fluid transport produced by magnetically actuated arrays of biomimetic cilia whose size approaches that of their biological counterparts, a scale at which advection and diffusion compete to determine mass transport. Our biomimetic cilia recreate the beat shape of embryonic nodal cilia, simultaneously generating two sharply segregated regimes of fluid flow: Above the cilia tips their motion causes directed, long-range fluid transport, whereas below the tips we show that the cilia beat generates an enhanced diffusivity capable of producing increased mixing rates. These two distinct types of flow occur simultaneously and are separated in space by less than 5 microm, approximately 20% of the biomimetic cilium length. While this suggests that our system may have applications as a versatile microfluidics device, we also focus on the biological implications of our findings. Our statistical analysis of particle transport identifying an enhanced diffusion regime provides novel evidence for the existence of mixing in ciliated systems, and we demonstrate that the directed transport regime is Poiseuille-Couette flow, the first analytical model consistent with biological measurements of fluid flow in the embryonic node.

  3. 3D Modelling of Biological Systems for Biomimetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujun Zhang; Kevin Hapeshi; Ashok K. Bhattacharya

    2004-01-01

    With the advanced development of computer-based enabling technologies, many engineering, medical, biology,chemistry, physics and food science etc have developed to the unprecedented levels, which lead to many research and development interests in various multi-discipline areas. Among them, biomimetics is one of the most promising and attractive branches of study. Biomimetics is a branch of study that uses biological systems as a model to develop synthetic systems.To learn from nature, one of the fundamental issues is to understand the natural systems such animals, insects, plants and human beings etc. The geometrical characterization and representation of natural systems is an important fundamental work for biomimetics research. 3D modeling plays a key role in the geometrical characterization and representation, especially in computer graphical visualization. This paper firstly presents the typical procedure of 3D modelling methods and then reviews the previous work of 3D geometrical modelling techniques and systems developed for industrial, medical and animation applications. Especially the paper discusses the problems associated with the existing techniques and systems when they are applied to 3D modelling of biological systems. Based upon the discussions, the paper proposes some areas of research interests in 3D modelling of biological systems and for Biomimetics.

  4. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic bamboo-like hybrid microfibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Wen, Hui; Ma, Jingyun; Lykkemark, Simon; Xu, Hui; Qin, Jianhua

    2014-04-23

    Biomimetic and flexible bamboo-like hybrid fibers are produced using a novel one-step strategy. By combining a droplet microfluidic technique with a wet-spinning process, biocompatible microfibers are incorporated with polymer spheres or multicellular spheroids. As a result of the controllability of this approach, it has potential applications in materials science and tissue engineering.

  5. A biomimetic tactile sensing system based on polyvinylidene fluoride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Tian, Hongying; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hongshuai; Wang, Peiyuan; Qian, Chenghui; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensing material due to its outstanding properties such as biocompatibility, high thermal stability, good chemical resistance, high piezo-, pyro- and ferro-electric properties. This paper reports on the design, test, and analysis of a biomimetic tactile sensor based on PVDF film. This sensor consists of a PVDF film with aluminum electrodes, a pair of insulating layers, and a "handprint" friction layer with a copper foil. It is designed for easy fabrication and high reliability in outputting signals. In bionics, the fingerprint of the glabrous skin plays an important role during object handling. Therefore, in order to enhance friction and to provide better manipulation, the ridges of the fingertips were introduced into the design of the proposed tactile sensor. And, a basic experimental study on the selection of the high sensitivity fingerprint type for the biomimetic sensor was performed. In addition, we proposed a texture distinguish experiment to verify the sensor sensitivity. The experiment's results show that the novel biomimetic sensor is effective in discriminating object surface characteristics. Furthermore, an efficient visual application program (LabVIEW) and a quantitative evaluation method were proposed for the verification of the biomimetic sensor. The proposed tactile sensor shows great potential for contact force and slip measurements.

  6. Use of biomimetic forward osmosis membrane for trace organics removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik T.; Bajraktari, Niada; Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    organic pollutants, which limits the applicability of the forward osmosis process. In this study a newly developed biomimetic membrane was tested for the removal of three selected trace organics that can be considered as a bench marking test for a membrane[U+05F3]s ability to reject small neutral organic...

  7. Biomimetic flavin-catalysed reactions for organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, H; Imada, Y; Murahashi, S-I

    2015-07-28

    Using simple riboflavin related compounds as biomimetic catalysts, catalytic oxidation of various substrates with hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen can be performed selectively under mild conditions. The principle of these reactions is fundamental and will provide a wide scope for environmentally benign future practical methods.

  8. Case Study in Biomimetic Design: Handling and Assembly of Microparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Li; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves...

  9. Design and Implementation of a Modular Biomimetic Infochemical Communication System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, Z.; Cole, M.; Gardner, J.W.; Chowdhury, M.F.; Bula, W.P.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Karout, S.; Capurro, A.; Pearce, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a novel biomimetic infochemical communication system that employs airborne molecules alone to communicate over space and time. The system involves the design and fabrication of a microsystem capable of producing and releasing a precise mix of

  10. Array of Biomimetic Hair Sensor Dedicated for Flow Pattern Recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Bruinink, C.M.; Kolster, Marcel; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    Flow sensor arrays can be used to extract features from flow fields rather than averaging or providing local measurements provided the sensors in the array structure can be interrogated individually. This paper addresses the latest developments in fabrication and array interfacing of biomimetic

  11. Carbonate Hydroxyapatite and Silicon-Substituted Carbonate Hydroxyapatite: Synthesis, Mechanical Properties, and Solubility Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. T. Bang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the chemical composition, solubility, and physical and mechanical properties of carbonate hydroxyapatite (CO3Ap and silicon-substituted carbonate hydroxyapatite (Si-CO3Ap which have been prepared by a simple precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray fluorescence (XRF spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma (ICP techniques were used to characterize the formation of CO3Ap and Si-CO3Ap. The results revealed that the silicate (SiO44- and carbonate (CO32- ions competed to occupy the phosphate (PO43- site and also entered simultaneously into the hydroxyapatite structure. The Si-substituted CO3Ap reduced the powder crystallinity and promoted ion release which resulted in a better solubility compared to that of Si-free CO3Ap. The mean particle size of Si-CO3Ap was much finer than that of CO3Ap. At 750°C heat-treatment temperature, the diametral tensile strengths (DTS of Si-CO3Ap and CO3Ap were about 10.8±0.3 and 11.8±0.4 MPa, respectively.

  12. Three-dimensional biomimetic mineralization of dense hydrogel templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gao; Zhao, Dacheng; Tomsia, Antoni P; Minor, Andrew M; Song, Xiangyun; Saiz, Eduardo

    2009-07-29

    An electric-current-assisted method was used to mineralize dense hydrogels and create hydroxyapatite/hydrogel composites with unique hierarchical structures. The microstructure of the final material can be controlled by the mineralization technique and the chemistry of the organic matrix. A hydroxyapatite/hydrogel composite was obtained with a large inorganic content (approximately 60% of the weight of the organics). After being heated to 1050 degrees C, the sintered inorganic phase has a very uniformly distributed porosity and its Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area is 0.68 m(2)/g.

  13. Formation of hydroxyapatite in various aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Jacqueline Lee

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp), Ca10(PO4)6(OH) 2, is important in the field of biomaterials as it is the mineral component of bones and teeth. Biological apatites do not maintain an exact composition and are usually calcium-deficient, represented as Ca(10- x)(HPO 4)x(PO4)(6-x)(OH)(2-x), where x ranges from 0 to 1, with various ion substitutions. Formation of calcium-deficient hydroxyapatites (CDHAp) from solid calcium phosphate precursor materials was performed at physiologic temperature (37°C) in a variety of aqueous solutions. Two cement systems were utilized in these experiments: tetralcium phosphate (TetCP) with dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP). The kinetics, solution chemistry, phase evolution, and microstructure of the developed apatites were analyzed as appropriate. Reaction of beta-TCP in ammonium fluoride solutions formed HAp substituted with fluoride and calculated to be deficient in calcium. A new ratio of TetCP to DCPA was used with solutions of sodium bicarbonate to form a calcium-deficient carbonate hydroxyapatite. The capacity for sodium dihydrogen phosphate to buffer pH increases and enhance reaction kinetics in this system was also explored. Formation of a highly crystalline CDHAp was achieved by hydrolyzing beta-TCP in water for extended time periods. Lattice parameters were among the features characterized for this apatite. The hydrolysis of beta-TCP in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and simulated body fluids (SBF) was also investigated; use of SBF was found to completely inhibit formation of HAp in this system while reaction in PBS was slow in comparison to water. The effects of filler materials on the mechanical properties of a calcium phosphate cement were examined using the TetCP/DCPA system. Dense aggregates were not found to decrease compressive strength in comparison to the cement alone. The use of aggregates was found to improve the compressive strength of cement formed using NaHCO3 solution as a

  14. Epitaxial overgrowth of platinum on palladium nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Majiong; Lim, Byungkwon; Tao, Jing; Camargo, Pedro H. C.; Ma, Chao; Zhu, Yimei; Xia, Younan

    2010-11-01

    This paper describes a systematic study on the epitaxial overgrowth of Pt on well-defined Pd nanocrystals with different shapes (and exposed facets), including regular octahedrons, truncated octahedrons, and cubes. Two different reducing agents, i.e., citric acid and L-ascorbic acid, were evaluated and compared for the reduction of K2PtCl4 in an aqueous solution in the presence of Pd nanocrystal seeds. When citric acid was used as a reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of octahedral Pt shells on regular and truncated octahedrons of Pd led to the formation of Pd-Pt core-shell octahedrons, while non-conformal overgrowth of Pt on cubic Pd seeds resulted in the formation of an incomplete octahedral Pt shell. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Pt branches was observed when L-ascorbic acid was used as a reducing agent regardless of the facets expressed on the surface of Pd nanocrystal seeds. This work shows that both the binding affinity of a reducing agent to the Pt surface and the reduction kinetics for a Pt precursor play important roles in determining the mode of Pt overgrowth on Pd nanocrystal surface.

  15. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  16. Organization of 'nanocrystal molecules' using DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Johnsson, Kai P.; Peng, Xiaogang; Wilson, Troy E.; Loweth, Colin J.; Bruchez, Marcel P.; Schultz, Peter G.

    1996-08-01

    PATTERNING matter on the nanometre scale is an important objective of current materials chemistry and physics. It is driven by both the need to further miniaturize electronic components and the fact that at the nanometre scale, materials properties are strongly size-dependent and thus can be tuned sensitively1. In nanoscale crystals, quantum size effects and the large number of surface atoms influence the, chemical, electronic, magnetic and optical behaviour2-4. 'Top-down' (for example, lithographic) methods for nanoscale manipulation reach only to the upper end of the nanometre regime5; but whereas 'bottom-up' wet chemical techniques allow for the preparation of mono-disperse, defect-free crystallites just 1-10 nm in size6-10, ways to control the structure of nanocrystal assemblies are scarce. Here we describe a strategy for the synthesis of'nanocrystal molecules', in which discrete numbers of gold nanocrystals are organized into spatially defined structures based on Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions. We attach single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of defined length and sequence to individual nanocrystals, and these assemble into dimers and trimers on addition of a complementary single-stranded DNA template. We anticipate that this approach should allow the construction of more complex two-and three-dimensional assemblies.

  17. Atomic force microscopy characterization of cellulose nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roya R. Lahiji; Xin Xu; Ronald Reifenberger; Arvind Raman; Alan Rudie; Robert J. Moon

    2010-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) are gaining interest as a “green” nanomaterial with superior mechanical and chemical properties for high-performance nanocomposite materials; however, there is a lack of accurate material property characterization of individual CNCs. Here, a detailed study of the topography, elastic and adhesive properties of individual wood-derived CNCs...

  18. Silicon nanocrystal films for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechner, Robert W.

    2009-02-06

    Whether nanoparticles of silicon are really suited for such applications, whether layers fabricated from this exhibit semiconducting properties, whether they can be doped, and whether for instance via the doping the conductivity can be tuned, was studied in the present thesis. Starting material for this were on the one hand spherical silicon nanocrystals with a sharp size distribution and mean diameters in the range from 4-50 nm. Furthermore silicon particle were available, which are with 50-500 nm distinctly larger and exhibit a broad distribution of the mean size and a polycrystalline fine structure with strongly bifurcated external morphology. The small conductivities and tje low mobility values of the charge carriers in the layers of silicon nanocrystals suggest to apply suited thermal after-treatment procedures. So was found that the aluminium-induced layer exchange (ALILE) also can be transferred to the porous layers of nanocrystals. With the deuteron passivation a method was available to change the charge-carrier concentration in the polycrystalline layers. Additionally to ALILE laser crystallization as alternative after-treatment procedure of the nanocrystal layers was studied.

  19. Macroporous synthetic hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone substitute applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Thomas, ME

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available An improved strategy is described for the manufacture of macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics for bone substitute applications. This is based on a modified fugitive phase technique, which allows production of relatively open, high-strength devices...

  20. Thermal stability of hydroxyapatite in biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nilen, RWN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Biphasic calcium phosphate ceramics (BCP) comprising a mix of non-resorbable hydroxyapatite (HA) and resorbable b-tricalcium phosphate (b-TCP) are particularly suitable materials for synthetic bone substitute applications. In this study, HA...

  1. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  2. Macroporous hydroxyapatite bioceramics by solid freeform fabrication: towards custom implants

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Richter, PW

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available structure that would be impossible to make by conventional manufacturing methods. Application of this technology to the manufacture of macro porous hydroxyapatite bio ceramics for bone substitute applications is discussed. A new design is described...

  3. Physical characterization of hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, S., E-mail: smsilva@ineb.up.pt [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal); Rodriguez, M.A.; Pena, P.; De Aza, A.H.; De Aza, S. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, 28049-Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Ferraz, M.P. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias da Saude da Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Rua Carlos da Maia, 296, 4200-150 Porto (Portugal); Monteiro, F.J. [INEB - Instituto de Engenharia Biomedica, Divisao de Biomateriais, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 823, 4150-180 Porto (Portugal); Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Engenharia, Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais, Porto (Portugal)

    2009-06-01

    The present study refers to the preparation and characterization of porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds to be used as matrices for bone regeneration or as specific release vehicles. Ceramics are widely used for bone tissue engineering purposes and in this study, hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds were produced using the polymer replication method. Polyurethane sponges were used as templates and impregnated with a ceramic slurry at different ratios, and sintered at 1300 deg. C following a specific thermal cycle. The characteristics of the hydroxyapatite porous scaffolds and respective powder used as starting material, were investigated by using scanning electron microscopy, particle size distribution, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and compressive mechanical testing techniques. It was possible to produce highly porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds presenting micro and macropores and pore interconnectivity.

  4. Acceleration of biomimetic mineralization to apply in bone regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasuriya, A Champa [Department of Orthopaedics, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Shah, Chiragkumar [Department of Bioengineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Ebraheim, Nabil A [Department of Orthopaedics, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H [Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The delivery of growth factors and therapeutic drugs into bone defects is a major clinical challenge. Biomimetically prepared bone-like mineral (BLM) containing a carbonated apatite layer can be used to deliver growth factors and drugs in a controlled manner. In the conventional biomimetic process, BLM can be deposited on the biodegradable polymer surfaces by soaking them in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 16 days or more. The aim of this study was to accelerate the biomimetic process of depositing BML in the polymer surfaces. We accelerated the deposition of mineral on 3D poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) porous scaffolds to 36-48 h by modifying the biomimetic process parameters and applying surface treatments to PLGA scaffolds. The BLM was coated on scaffolds after surface treatments followed by incubation at 37 {sup 0}C in 15 ml of 5x SBF. We characterized the BLM created using the accelerated biomineralization process with wide angle x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The FTIR and XRD analyses of mineralized scaffolds show similarities between biomimetically prepared BLM, and bone bioapatite and carbonated apatite. We also found that the BLM layer on the surface of scaffolds was stable even after 21 days immersed in Tris buffered saline and cell culture media. This study suggests that BLM was stable for at least 3 weeks in both media, and therefore, BLM has a potential for use as a carrier for biological molecules for localized release applications as well as bone tissue engineering applications.

  5. Bone-repair properties of biodegradable hydroxyapatite nano-rod superstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elía, Noelia L.; Mathieu, Colleen; Hoemann, Caroline D.; Laiuppa, Juan A.; Santillán, Graciela E.; Messina, Paula V.

    2015-11-01

    Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures for the in vitro conditions of bone-repair. Experiments are underway to investigate the effects of the material microstructure, surface roughness and hydrophilicity on their osseo-integration, osteo-conduction and osteo-induction abilities. Materials were tested in the presence of both, rat primary osteoblasts and rabbit mesenchymal stem cells. The following aspects are discussed: (i) cytotoxicity and material degradation; (ii) rat osteoblast spreading, proliferation and differentiation; and (iii) rabbit mesenchymal stem cell adhesion on nano-HAp and nano-HAp/collagen type I coatings. We effectively prepared a material based on biomimetic HAp nano-rods displaying the appropriate surface topography, hydrophilicity and degradation properties to induce the in vitro desired cellular responses for bone bonding and healing. Cells seeded on the selected material readily attached, proliferated and differentiated, as confirmed by cell viability, mitochondrial metabolic activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and cytoskeletal integrity analysis by immunofluorescence localization of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein. These results highlight the influence of material's surface characteristics to determine their tissue regeneration potential and their future use in engineering osteogenic scaffolds for orthopedic implants.Nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HAp) materials show an analogous chemical composition to the biogenic mineral components of calcified tissues and depending on their topography they may mimic the specific arrangement of the crystals in bone. In this work, we have evaluated the potential of four synthesized nano-HAp superstructures

  6. Novel hydroxyapatite biomaterial covalently linked to raloxifene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meme, L; Santarelli, A; Marzo, G; Emanuelli, M; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D; Putignano, A; Dioguardi, M; Lo Muzio, L; Bambini, F

    2014-01-01

    Since raloxifene, a drug used in osteoporosis therapy, inhibits osteoclast, but not osteoblast functions, it has been suggested to improve recovery during implant surgery. The present paper describes an effective method to link raloxifene, through a covalent bond, to a nano-Hydroxyapatite-based biomaterial by interfacing with (3-aminopropyl)-Triethoxysilane as assessed by Infra Red-Fourier Transformed (IR-FT) spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). To evaluate the safety of this modified new material, the vitality of osteoblast-like cells cultured with the new biomaterial was then investigated. Raloxifene-conjugated HAbiomaterial has been shown to be a safe material easy to obtain which could be an interesting starting point for the use of a new functional biomaterial suitable in bone regeneration procedures.

  7. Dissolubility of Hydroxyapatite Powder under Hydrothermal Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The dissolubility of hydroxyapatite(HA) in the hydrothermal solution was investigated in Morey-type autoclave over a temperature range of 150 to 350 ℃ and the pH value range of 5 to 9. It is shown that the dissolubility of HA is determined as a function of temperature and time under a constant filling ratio of autoclave, and the temperature coefficient for the solubility of HA is positive. The equilibrium time attained in the hydrothermal solution is shortened with the increase of hydrothermal temperature, and the effect of temperature on the solubility is obviously stronger than that of pH value. The solubility data suggest that HA has higher dissolubility in the HA-H2O system under the hydrothermal condition than that under the normal temperature-pressure.

  8. Suspension thermal spraying of hydroxyapatite: microstructure and in vitro behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolelli, Giovanni; Bellucci, Devis; Cannillo, Valeria; Lusvarghi, Luca; Sola, Antonella; Stiegler, Nico; Müller, Philipp; Killinger, Andreas; Gadow, Rainer; Altomare, Lina; De Nardo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    In cementless fixation of metallic prostheses, bony ingrowth onto the implant surface is often promoted by osteoconductive plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings. The present work explores the use of the innovative High Velocity Suspension Flame Spraying (HVSFS) process to coat Ti substrates with thin homogeneous hydroxyapatite coatings. The HVSFS hydroxyapatite coatings studied were dense, 27-37μm thick, with some transverse microcracks. Lamellae were sintered together and nearly unidentifiable, unlike conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite. Crystallinities of 10%-70% were obtained, depending on the deposition parameters and the use of a TiO2 bond coat. The average hardness of layers with low (hardness values, all characterised by Weibull modulus in the 5-7 range, were narrower than that of conventional plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite, with a Weibull modulus of ≈3.3. During soaking in simulated body fluid, glassy coatings were progressively resorbed and replaced by a new, precipitated hydroxyapatite layer, whereas coatings with 70% crystallinity were stable up to 14days of immersion. The interpretation of the precipitation behaviour was also assisted by surface charge assessments, performed through Z-potential measurements. During in vitro tests, HA coatings showed no cytotoxicity towards the SAOS-2 osteoblast cell line, and surface cell proliferation was comparable with proliferation on reference polystyrene culture plates.

  9. Synthesis, characterization and gas sensing property of hydroxyapatite ceramic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Mahabole; R C Aiyer; C V Ramakrishna; B Sreedhar; R S Khairnar

    2005-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) biomaterial ceramic was synthesized by three different processing routes viz. wet chemical process, microwave irradiation process, and hydrothermal technique. The synthesized ceramic powders were characterized by SEM, XRD, FTIR and XPS techniques. The dielectric measurements were carried out as a function of frequency at room temperature and the preliminary study on CO gas sensing property of hydroxyapatite was investigated. The XRD pattern of the hydroxyapatite biomaterial revealed that hydroxyapatite ceramic has hexagonal structure. The average crystallite size was found to be in the range 31–54 nm. Absorption bands corresponding to phosphate and hydroxyl functional groups, which are characteristic of hydroxyapatite, were confirmed by FTIR. The dielectric constant was found to vary in the range 9–13 at room temperature. Hydroxyapatite can be used as CO gas sensor at an optimum temperature near 125°C. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies showed the Ca/P ratio of 1.63 for the HAp sample prepared by chemical process. The microwave irradiation technique yielded calcium rich HAp whereas calcium deficient HAp was obtained by hydrothermal method.

  10. In situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M. [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Oki, Aderemi, E-mail: aroki@pvamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Luo, Zhiping [Microscopy and Imaging Center and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: A facile chemical precipitation method is reported for effective in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite on graphene nanosheets. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. Display Omitted Highlights: ► It is a facile and effective method for deposition of HA on GR nanosheets. ► It avoids the use of harmful reducing agents like hydrazine, NaBH{sub 4} etc. ► GR nanosheets were produced using bio-compatible, ethylenediamine. ► The graphitic structure of synthesized GR nanosheets was high ordered. ► The ratio of Ca to P in HA was 1.64, which is close to ratio in natural bone. -- Abstract: Graphene nanosheets were effectively functionalized by in situ deposition of hydroxyapatite through a facile chemical precipitation method. Prior to grafting of hydroxyapatite, chemically modified graphene nanosheets were obtained by the reduction of graphene oxide in presence of ethylenediamine. The resulting hydroxyapatite functionalized graphene nanosheets were characterized by attenuated total reflection IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. These characterization techniques revealed the successful grafting of hydroxyapatite over well exfoliated graphene nanosheets without destroying their structure.

  11. Hydroxyapatite growth inhibition by osteopontin hexapeptide sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, L D; Saadia, M; Ishal, J S; Tishbi, N; Leiderman, E; Kuyunov, I; Recca, B; Reitblat, C; Viswanathan, R

    2010-06-15

    The effects of three acidic hexapeptides on in vitro hydroxyapatite growth were characterized by pH-stat kinetic studies, adsorption isotherms, and molecular modeling. The three peptides, pSDEpSDE, SDESDE, and DDDDDD, are equal-length model compounds for the acidic sequences in osteopontin, a protein that inhibits mineral formation in both calcified and noncalcified tissues. Growth rates from 1.67 mM calcium and 1.00 mM phosphate solution were measured at pH 7.4 and 37 degrees C in 150 mM NaCl. pSDEpSDE was a strong growth inhibitor when preadsorbed onto hydroxyapatite (HA) seeds from > or = 0.67 mM solutions, concentrations where adsorption isotherms showed relatively complete surface coverage. The nonphosphorylated SDESDE control showed no growth inhibition. Although it adsorbed to almost the same extent as pSDEpSDE, it rapidly desorbed under the pH-stat growth conditions while pSDEpSDE did not. DDDDDD exhibited weak inhibition as its concentration was increased and similar adsorption/desorption behavior to pSDEpSDE. Molecular modeling yielded binding energy trends based on simple adsorption of peptides on the [100] surface that were consistent with observed inhibition, but not for the [001] surface. The relatively unfavorable binding energies for peptides on the [001] surface suggest that their absorption will be primarily on the [100] face. The kinetic and adsorption data are consistent with phosphorylation of osteopontin acting to control mineral formation.

  12. Human-like collagen/nano-hydroxyapatite scaffolds for the culture of chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Liping; Duan, Zhiguang [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Mi, Yu; Hui, Junfeng [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Degradable Biomedical Materials, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Shaanxi R and D Center of Biomaterials and Fermentation Engineering, Northwest University, 229 Taibai North Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Chang, Le [School of Chemical Engineering, Northwest University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710069 (China)

    2013-03-01

    Three dimensional (3D) biodegradable porous scaffolds play a key role in cartilage tissue repair. Freeze-drying and cross-linking techniques were used to fabricate a 3D composite scaffold that combined the excellent biological characteristics of human-like collagen (HLC) and the outstanding mechanical properties of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA). The scaffolds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and compression tests, using Relive Registered-Sign Artificial Bone (RAB) scaffolds as a control. HLC/nHA scaffolds displayed homogeneous interconnected macroporous structure and could withstand a compression stress of 2.67 {+-} 0.37 MPa, which was higher than that of the control group. Rabbit chondrocytes were seeded on the composite porous scaffolds and cultured for 21 days. Cell/scaffold constructs were examined using SEM, histological procedures, and biochemical assays for cell proliferation and the production of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The results indicated that HLC/nHA porous scaffolds were capable of encouraging cell adhesion, homogeneous distribution and abundant GAG synthesis, and maintaining natural chondrocyte morphology compared to RAB scaffolds. In conclusion, the presented data warrants the further exploration of HLC/nHA scaffolds as a potential biomimetic platform for chondrocytes in cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human-like collagen was first used to prepare cartilage tissue engineering scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Genipin, a natural biological cross-linking agent, was introduced to treat scaffold. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We chose market product as a control.

  13. Novel applications of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Pick Chung

    We have investigated ways of modifying a common water soluble CdTe NCs to become non-photobleaching. Such NCs are capable of responding reversibly to an inter-switching of the oxygen and argon environments over multiple hours of photoexcitation. They are found to quench upon exposure to oxygen, but when the system is purged with argon, their photoluminescence (PL) revives to the original intensity. Such discovery could potentially be used as oxygen nanosensors. These PL robust CdTe NCs immobilized on glass substrates also exhibit significant changes in their PL when certain organic/bio molecules are placed in their vicinity (nanoscale). This novel technique also known as NC-organic molecule close proximity imaging (NC-cp imaging) has found to provide contrast ratio greater by a factor of 2-3 compared to conventional fluorescence imaging technique. PL of NCs is recoverable upon removal of these organic molecules, therefore validating these NCs as potential all-optical organic molecular nanosensors and, upon optimization, ultimately serving as point detectors for purposes of super-resolution microscopy (with proper instrumentation). No solvents are required for this sensing mechanism since all solutions were dried under argon flow. Furthermore, core graded shell CdSe/CdSexS1-x/CdS giant nanocrystal (g-NCs) were found to have very robust PL temperature response. At a size of 10.2 nm in diameter, these g-NCs undergo PL drop of only 30% at 355K (normalized to PL intensity at 85K). In comparison, the core step shells CdSe/CdS g-NCs at the same diameter exhibit 80% PL drop at 355K. Spectral shifting and broadening were acquired and found to be 5-10 times and 2-4 times smaller respectively than the standard CdSe core and CdSe/CdS core shell NCs. It is also discovered that these core graded shell g-NCs are largely nonblinking and have insignificant photoluminescence decay even after exciting the samples at very high irradiance (44 kW/cm2) for over an hour. These types of g

  14. Hydroxyapatite, fluor-hydroxyapatite and fluorapatite produced via the sol–gel method: dissolution behaviour and biological properties after crystallisation

    OpenAIRE

    Tredwin, CJ; Young, AM; Abou Neel, EA; Georgiou, G.; Knowles, JC

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA), fluor-hydroxyapatite (FHA) with varying levels of fluoride ion substitution and fluorapatite (FA) were synthesised by the sol–gel method as possible implant coating or bone-grafting materials. Cal- cium nitrate and triethyl phosphite were used as precursors under an ethanol–water based solution. Different amounts of ammonium fluoride were incorporated for the preparation of the FHA and FA sol–gels. After heating and powdering the sol–gels, dissolut...

  15. In vitro study of hydroxyapatite/polycaprolactone (HA/PCL) nanocomposite synthesized by an in situ sol-gel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezaei, A.; Mohammadi, M.R., E-mail: mohammadi@sharif.edu

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the most substantial mineral constituent of a bone which has been extensively used in medicine as implantable materials, owing to its good biocompatibility, bioactivity high osteoconductive, and/or osteoinductive properties. Nevertheless, its mechanical property is not utmost appropriate for a bone substitution. Therefore, a composite consist of HA and a biodegradable polymer is usually prepared to generate an apt bone scaffold. In the present work polycaprolactone (PCL), a newly remarkable biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, was employed as a matrix and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles were used as a reinforcement element of the composite. HA/PCL nanocomposites were synthesized by a new in situ sol-gel process using calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid precursors in the presence of Tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a solvent. Chemical and physical characteristics of the nanocomposite were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses. The results indicated that pure HA nanoparticles were well-incorporated and homogenously dispersed in the PCL matrix. It was found that the mechanical property of PCL was improved by addition of 20 wt.% HA nanoparticles. Furthermore, the biological property of nanocomposites was investigated under in vitro condition. For this purpose, HA/PCL scaffolds were prepared through a salt leaching process and immersed in a saturated simulated body fluid (SBF) after 3 and 7 days. It was found that a uniform layer of biomimetic HA could be deposited on the surface of HA/PCL scaffolds. Therefore, the prepared HA/PCL scaffolds showed good potential for bone tissue engineering and could be used for many clinical applications in orthopedic and maxillofacial surgery. - Graphical abstract: Preparation of HA/PCL nanocomposite and scaffold by an in situ sol-gel process is shown. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxyapatite

  16. Structure and transformation of tactoids in cellulose nanocrystal suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Xi; Hamad, Wadood Y.; MacLachlan, Mark J.

    2016-05-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals obtained from natural sources are of great interest for many applications. In water, cellulose nanocrystals form a liquid crystalline phase whose hierarchical structure is retained in solid films after drying. Although tactoids, one of the most primitive components of liquid crystals, are thought to have a significant role in the evolution of this phase, they have evaded structural study of their internal organization. Here we report the capture of cellulose nanocrystal tactoids in a polymer matrix. This method allows us to visualize, for the first time, the arrangement of cellulose nanocrystals within individual tactoids by electron microscopy. Furthermore, we can follow the structural evolution of the liquid crystalline phase from tactoids to iridescent-layered films. Our insights into the early nucleation events of cellulose nanocrystals give important information about the growth of cholesteric liquid crystalline phases, especially for cellulose nanocrystals, and are crucial for preparing photonics-quality films.

  17. Performance and Reliability of Multilayer Silicon Nanocrystal Nonvolatile Memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liudi; ZHANG Zhigang; ZHAO Yue; MAO Ping; PAN Liyang

    2009-01-01

    Nonvolatile memories (NVMs) with triple layers of silicon nanocrystals were fabricated with conventional CMOS technology.This paper explores the program/erase performance and reliability of NVMs with three layers of nanocrystals.The results indicate that the nanocrystals in the triple-layer nanocrystal NVM (NCNVM) are difficult to fully charge during the programming process.The programming speed of the triple-layer NCNVMs is quicker than that of single-layer NCNVMs,which means that the second and third layers of nanocrystals in the triple-layer NCNVM affect the charge of the first layer nanocrystals.Reliability tests show that the memory window has little degradation after 1×104 cycles.

  18. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  19. Hydrophobic starch nanocrystals preparations through crosslinking modification using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiang; Tong, Jin; Su, Xingguang; Ren, Lili

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradable starch nanocrystals prepared by an acid treatment process were modified through crosslinking modification using citric acid as reactant by a dry reaction method. The occurrence of crosslinking modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and swelling degree. X-ray diffraction, wettability tests and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified starch nanocrystals. It was found that the crosslinked starch nanocrystals displayed a higher affinity for low polar solvents such as dichloromethane. The surface of starch nanocrystals became more roughness after crosslinking modification with citric acid and the size decreased as revealed by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline structure of starch nanocrystals was basically not changed after the crosslinking modification with shorter heating time. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanocrystals are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites.

  20. Observation of Single Colloidal Platinum Nanocrystal Growth Trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Haimei; Smith, Rachel; Jun, Young-wook; Kisielowski, Christian; Dahmen, Ulrich; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-02-09

    It is conventionally assumed that the growth of monodisperse colloidal nanocrystals requires a temporally discrete nucleation followed by monomer attachment onto the existing nuclei. However, recent studies have reported violations of this classical growth model, and have suggested that inter-particle interactions are also involved during the growth. Mechanisms of nanocrystal growth still remain controversial. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we show that platinum nanocrystals can grow either by monomer attachment from solution onto the existing particles or by coalescence between the particles. Surprisingly, an initially broad size distribution of the nanocrystals can spontaneously narrow. We suggest that nanocrystals take different pathways of growth based on their size- and morphology-dependent internal energies. These observations are expected to be highly relevant for other nanocrystal systems.