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Sample records for biomimetic extracellular elasticity

  1. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-01-01

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a ‘soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for β-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of β-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a ‘soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of β-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues' unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis. PMID:18843297

  2. Laminin and biomimetic extracellular elasticity enhance functional differentiation in mammary epithelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcaraz, Jordi; Xu, Ren; Mori, Hidetoshi; Nelson, Celeste M.; Mroue, Rana; Spencer, Virginia A.; Brownfield, Doug; Radisky, Derek C.; Bustamante, Carlos; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-10-20

    In the mammary gland, epithelial cells are embedded in a 'soft' environment and become functionally differentiated in culture when exposed to a laminin-rich extracellular matrix gel. Here, we define the processes by which mammary epithelial cells integrate biochemical and mechanical extracellular cues to maintain their differentiated phenotype. We used single cells cultured on top of gels in conditions permissive for {beta}-casein expression using atomic force microscopy to measure the elasticity of the cells and their underlying substrata. We found that maintenance of {beta}-casein expression required both laminin signalling and a 'soft' extracellular matrix, as is the case in normal tissues in vivo, and biomimetic intracellular elasticity, as is the case in primary mammary epithelial organoids. Conversely, two hallmarks of breast cancer development, stiffening of the extracellular matrix and loss of laminin signalling, led to the loss of {beta}-casein expression and non-biomimetic intracellular elasticity. Our data indicate that tissue-specific gene expression is controlled by both the tissues unique biochemical milieu and mechanical properties, processes involved in maintenance of tissue integrity and protection against tumorigenesis.

  3. Advances in biomimetic regeneration of elastic matrix structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, Balakrishnan; Bashur, Chris A; Ramamurthi, Anand

    2012-10-01

    Elastin is a vital component of the extracellular matrix, providing soft connective tissues with the property of elastic recoil following deformation and regulating the cellular response via biomechanical transduction to maintain tissue homeostasis. The limited ability of most adult cells to synthesize elastin precursors and assemble them into mature crosslinked structures has hindered the development of functional tissue-engineered constructs that exhibit the structure and biomechanics of normal native elastic tissues in the body. In diseased tissues, the chronic overexpression of proteolytic enzymes can cause significant matrix degradation, to further limit the accumulation and quality (e.g., fiber formation) of newly deposited elastic matrix. This review provides an overview of the role and importance of elastin and elastic matrix in soft tissues, the challenges to elastic matrix generation in vitro and to regenerative elastic matrix repair in vivo, current biomolecular strategies to enhance elastin deposition and matrix assembly, and the need to concurrently inhibit proteolytic matrix disruption for improving the quantity and quality of elastogenesis. The review further presents biomaterial-based options using scaffolds and nanocarriers for spatio-temporal control over the presentation and release of these biomolecules, to enable biomimetic assembly of clinically relevant native elastic matrix-like superstructures. Finally, this review provides an overview of recent advances and prospects for the application of these strategies to regenerating tissue-type specific elastic matrix structures and superstructures.

  4. Biomimetics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Ramachandra Rao

    2003-06-01

    The well-organised multifunctional structures, systems and biogenic materials found in nature have attracted the interest of scientists working in many disciplines. The efforts have resulted in the development of a new and rapidly growing field of scientific effort called biomimetics. In this article we present a few natural materials and systems and explore how ideas from nature are being interpreted and modified to suit efforts aimed at designing better machines and synthesising newer materials.

  5. The molecular elasticity of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhauser, Andres F.; Marszalek, Piotr E.; Erickson, Harold P.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    1998-05-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are thought to provide a rigid mechanical anchor that supports and guides migrating and rolling cells. Here we examine the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin by using atomic-force-microscopy techniques. Our results indicate that tenascin is an elastic protein. Single molecules of tenascin could be stretched to several times their resting length. Force-extension curves showed a saw-tooth pattern, with peaks of force at 137pN. These peaks were ~25nm apart. Similar results have been obtained by study of titin. We also found similar results by studying recombinant tenascin fragments encompassing the 15 fibronectin type III domains of tenascin. This indicates that the extensibility of tenascin may be due to the stretch-induced unfolding of its fibronectin type III domains. Refolding of tenascin after stretching, observed when the force was reduced to near zero, showed a double-exponential recovery with time constants of 42 domains refolded per second and 0.5 domains per second. The former speed of refolding is more than twice as fast as any previously reported speed of refolding of a fibronectin type III domain,. We suggest that the extensibility of the modular fibronectin type III region may be important in allowing tenascin-ligand bonds to persist over long extensions. These properties of fibronectin type III modules may be of widespread use in extracellular proteins containing such domain,.

  6. Biomimetic aggrecan reduces cartilage extracellular matrix from degradation and lowers catabolic activity in ex vivo and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shaili; Lee, Aeju; Choi, Kuiwon; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Youn, Inchan; Trippel, Stephen B; Panitch, Alyssa

    2013-09-01

    Aggrecan, a major macromolecule in cartilage, protects the extracellular matrix (ECM) from degradation during the progression of osteoarthritis (OA). However, aggrecan itself is also susceptible to proteolytic cleavage. Here, the use of a biomimetic proteoglycan (mAGC) is presented, which functionally mimics aggrecan but lacks the known cleavage sites, protecting the molecule from proteolytic degradation. The objective of this study is to test the efficacy of this molecule in ex vivo (human OA synovial fluid) and in vivo (Sprague-Dawley rats) osteoarthritic models. These results indicate that mAGC's may protect articular cartilage against the loss of key ECM components, and lower catabolic protein and gene expression in both models. This suppression of matrix degradation has the potential to provide a healthy environment for tissue repair.

  7. Fabrication of a biomimetic elastic intervertebral disk scaffold using additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whatley, Benjamin R; Kuo, Jonathan; Shuai, Cijun; Wen Xuejun [Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program, Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States); Damon, Brooke J, E-mail: xjwen@clemson.edu, E-mail: xuejun@musc.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425 (United States)

    2011-03-24

    A custom-designed three-dimensional additive manufacturing device was developed to fabricate scaffolds for intervertebral disk (IVD) regeneration. This technique integrated a computer with a device capable of 3D movement allowing for precise motion and control over the polymer scaffold resolution. IVD scaffold structures were designed using computer-aided design to resemble the natural IVD structure. Degradable polyurethane (PU) was used as an elastic scaffold construct to mimic the elastic nature of the native IVD tissue and was deposited at a controlled rate using ultra-fine micropipettes connected to a syringe pump. The elastic PU was extruded directly onto a collecting substrate placed on a freezing stage. The three-dimensional movement of the computer-controlled device combined with the freezing stage enabled precise control of polymer deposition using extrusion. The addition of the freezing stage increased the polymer solution viscosity and hardened the polymer solution as it was extruded out of the micropipette tip. This technique created scaffolds with excellent control over macro- and micro-structure to influence cell behavior, specifically for cell adhesion, proliferation, and alignment. Concentric lamellae were printed at a high resolution to mimic the native shape and structure of the IVD. Seeded cells aligned along the concentric lamellae and acquired cell morphology similar to native tissue in the outer portion of the IVD. The fabricated scaffolds exhibited elastic behavior during compressive and shear testing, proving that the scaffolds could support loads with proper fatigue resistance without permanent deformation. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were comparable to those of native IVD tissue.

  8. Fabrication of a biomimetic elastic intervertebral disk scaffold using additive manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A custom-designed three-dimensional additive manufacturing device was developed to fabricate scaffolds for intervertebral disk (IVD) regeneration. This technique integrated a computer with a device capable of 3D movement allowing for precise motion and control over the polymer scaffold resolution. IVD scaffold structures were designed using computer-aided design to resemble the natural IVD structure. Degradable polyurethane (PU) was used as an elastic scaffold construct to mimic the elastic nature of the native IVD tissue and was deposited at a controlled rate using ultra-fine micropipettes connected to a syringe pump. The elastic PU was extruded directly onto a collecting substrate placed on a freezing stage. The three-dimensional movement of the computer-controlled device combined with the freezing stage enabled precise control of polymer deposition using extrusion. The addition of the freezing stage increased the polymer solution viscosity and hardened the polymer solution as it was extruded out of the micropipette tip. This technique created scaffolds with excellent control over macro- and micro-structure to influence cell behavior, specifically for cell adhesion, proliferation, and alignment. Concentric lamellae were printed at a high resolution to mimic the native shape and structure of the IVD. Seeded cells aligned along the concentric lamellae and acquired cell morphology similar to native tissue in the outer portion of the IVD. The fabricated scaffolds exhibited elastic behavior during compressive and shear testing, proving that the scaffolds could support loads with proper fatigue resistance without permanent deformation. Additionally, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were comparable to those of native IVD tissue.

  9. Biomimetic wet adhesion of viscoelastic liquid films anchored on micropatterned elastic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Sandip; Mangal, Rahul; Malasi, Abhinav; Sharma, Ashutosh

    2012-10-16

    Inspired by the natural adhesives in the toe pads of arthropods and some other animals, we explore the effectiveness and peel failure of a thin viscoelastic liquid film anchored on a micropatterned elastic surface. In particular, we focus on the role of the substrate pattern in adhesion energy of the liquid layer and in allowing its clean separation without cohesive failure. Peel tests on the microfabricated wet adhesives showed two distinct modes of adhesive (interfacial) and cohesive (liquid bulk) failures depending on the pattern dimensions. The adhesion energy of a viscoelastic liquid layer on an optimized micropatterned elastic substrate is ~3.5 times higher than that of a control flat bilayer and ~26 times higher than that of a viscoelastic film on a rigid substrate. Adhesive liquid layers anchored by narrow microchannels undergo clean, reversible adhesive failure rather than the cohesive failure seen on flat substrates. An increase in the channel width engenders cohesive failure in which droplets of the wet adhesive remain on the peeled surface. PMID:23035779

  10. 'Universal' microstructural patterns in cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular bone materials: micromechanics-based prediction of anisotropic elasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Andreas; Hellmich, Christian

    2007-02-21

    Bone materials are characterized by an astonishing variability and diversity. Still, because of 'architectural constraints' due to once chosen material constituents and their physical interaction, the fundamental hierarchical organization or basic building plans of bone materials remain largely unchanged during biological evolution. Such universal patterns of microstructural organization govern the mechanical interaction of the elementary components of bone (hydroxyapatite, collagen, water; with directly measurable tissue-independent elastic properties), which are here quantified through a multiscale homogenization scheme delivering effective elastic properties of bone materials: at a scale of 10nm, long cylindrical collagen molecules, attached to each other at their ends by approximately 1.5nm long crosslinks and hosting intermolecular water inbetween, form a contiguous matrix called wet collagen. At a scale of several hundred nanometers, wet collagen and mineral crystal agglomerations interpenetrate each other, forming the mineralized fibril. At a scale of 5-10microm, the extracellular solid bone matrix is represented as collagen fibril inclusions embedded in a foam of largely disordered (extrafibrillar) mineral crystals. At a scale above the ultrastructure, where lacunae are embedded in extracellular bone matrix, the extravascular bone material is observed. Model estimates predicted from tissue-specific composition data gained from a multitude of chemical and physical tests agree remarkably well with corresponding acoustic stiffness experiments across a variety of cortical and trabecular, extracellular and extravascular materials. Besides from reconciling the well-documented, seemingly opposed concepts of 'mineral-reinforced collagen matrix' and 'collagen-reinforced mineral matrix' for bone ultrastructure, this approach opens new possibilities in the exploitation of computer tomographic data for nano-to-macro mechanics of bone organs. PMID:17074362

  11. Non-linear elasticity of extracellular matrices enables contractile cells to communicate local position and orientation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer

    Full Text Available Most tissue cells grown in sparse cultures on linearly elastic substrates typically display a small, round phenotype on soft substrates and become increasingly spread as the modulus of the substrate increases until their spread area reaches a maximum value. As cell density increases, individual cells retain the same stiffness-dependent differences unless they are very close or in molecular contact. On nonlinear strain-stiffening fibrin gels, the same cell types become maximally spread even when the low strain elastic modulus would predict a round morphology, and cells are influenced by the presence of neighbors hundreds of microns away. Time lapse microscopy reveals that fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells on fibrin deform the substrate by several microns up to five cell lengths away from their plasma membrane through a force limited mechanism. Atomic force microscopy and rheology confirm that these strains locally and globally stiffen the gel, depending on cell density, and this effect leads to long distance cell-cell communication and alignment. Thus cells are acutely responsive to the nonlinear elasticity of their substrates and can manipulate this rheological property to induce patterning.

  12. Overexpression of HTRA1 leads to ultrastructural changes in the elastic layer of Bruch's membrane via cleavage of extracellular matrix components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vierkotten

    Full Text Available Variants in the chromosomal region 10q26 are strongly associated with an increased risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Two potential AMD genes are located in this region: ARMS2 and HTRA1 (high-temperature requirement A1. Previous studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the promotor region of HTRA1 result in overexpression of HTRA1 protein. This study investigated the role of HTRA1 overexpression in the pathogenesis of AMD. Transgenic Htra1 mice overexpressing the murine protein in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer of the retina were generated and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence staining and Western Blot analysis. The elastic layer of Bruch's membrane (BM in the Htra1 transgenic mice was fragmented and less continuous than in wild type (WT controls. Recombinant HTRA1 lacking the N-terminal domain cleaved various extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. Subsequent Western Blot analysis revealed an overexpression of fibronectin fragments and a reduction of fibulin 5 and tropoelastin in the RPE/choroid layer in transgenic mice compared to WT. Fibulin 5 is essential for elastogenesis by promoting elastic fiber assembly and maturation. Taken together, our data implicate that HTRA1 overexpression leads to an altered elastogenesis in BM through fibulin 5 cleavage. It highlights the importance of ECM related proteins in the development of AMD and links HTRA1 to other AMD risk genes such as fibulin 5, fibulin 6, ARMS2 and TIMP3.

  13. Embedded SMA wire actuated biomimetic fin: a module for biomimetic underwater propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenlong; Hang, Guanrong; Wang, Yangwei; Li, Jian; Du, Wei

    2008-04-01

    An embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuated biomimetic fin is presented, and based on this module for biomimetic underwater propulsion, a micro robot fish (146 mm in length, 30 g in weight) and a robot squid (242 mm in length, 360 g in weight) were developed. Fish swim by undulating their body and/or fins. Squid and cuttlefish can also swim by undulating their fins. To simplify engineering modeling, the undulating swimming movement is assumed to be the integration of the movements of many flexible bending segments connected in parallel or in series. According to this idea, a biomimetic fin which can bend flexibly was developed. The musculature of a cuttlefish fin was investigated to aid the design of the biomimetic fin. SMA wires act as 'muscle fibers' to drive the biomimetic fin just like the transverse muscles of the cuttlefish fin. During the bending phase, elastic energy is stored in the elastic substrate and skin, and during the return phase, elastic energy is released to power the return movement. Theorem analysis of the bending angle was performed to estimate the bending performance of the biomimetic fin. Experiments were carried out on single-face fins with latex rubber skin and silicone skin (SF-L and SF-S) to compare the bending angle, return time, elastic energy storage and reliability. Silicone was found to be the better skin. A dual-face fin with silicone skin (DF-S) was tested in water to evaluate the actuating performance and to validate the reliability. Thermal analysis of the SMA temperature was performed to aid the control strategy. The micro robot fish and robot squid employ one and ten DF-S, respectively. Swimming experiments with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The speed and steering radius of the micro robot fish reached 112 mm s-1 and 136 mm, respectively, and the speed and rotary speed of the robot squid reached 40 mm s-1 and 22° s-1, respectively.

  14. Embedded SMA wire actuated biomimetic fin: a module for biomimetic underwater propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An embedded shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuated biomimetic fin is presented, and based on this module for biomimetic underwater propulsion, a micro robot fish (146 mm in length, 30 g in weight) and a robot squid (242 mm in length, 360 g in weight) were developed. Fish swim by undulating their body and/or fins. Squid and cuttlefish can also swim by undulating their fins. To simplify engineering modeling, the undulating swimming movement is assumed to be the integration of the movements of many flexible bending segments connected in parallel or in series. According to this idea, a biomimetic fin which can bend flexibly was developed. The musculature of a cuttlefish fin was investigated to aid the design of the biomimetic fin. SMA wires act as 'muscle fibers' to drive the biomimetic fin just like the transverse muscles of the cuttlefish fin. During the bending phase, elastic energy is stored in the elastic substrate and skin, and during the return phase, elastic energy is released to power the return movement. Theorem analysis of the bending angle was performed to estimate the bending performance of the biomimetic fin. Experiments were carried out on single-face fins with latex rubber skin and silicone skin (SF-L and SF-S) to compare the bending angle, return time, elastic energy storage and reliability. Silicone was found to be the better skin. A dual-face fin with silicone skin (DF-S) was tested in water to evaluate the actuating performance and to validate the reliability. Thermal analysis of the SMA temperature was performed to aid the control strategy. The micro robot fish and robot squid employ one and ten DF-S, respectively. Swimming experiments with different actuation frequencies were carried out. The speed and steering radius of the micro robot fish reached 112 mm s−1 and 136 mm, respectively, and the speed and rotary speed of the robot squid reached 40 mm s−1 and 22° s−1, respectively

  15. Biomimetic Flow Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casas, J.; Liu, Chang; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetic flow sensors are biologically inspired devices that measure the speed and direction of fluids. This survey starts by describing the role and functioning of airflow-sensing hairs in arthropods and in fishes, carries on with the biomimetic MEMS implementations, both for air and water flow s

  16. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  17. Biomimetic microenvironments for regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sagar N; Kim, Bogeun; Walma, Alexander M Cruz; Choi, Sung Chul; Wu, Hui; Mao, Jeremy J; Jun, Ho-Wook; Cheon, Kyounga

    2016-01-01

    Regenerative endodontics has been proposed to replace damaged and underdeveloped tooth structures with normal pulp-dentin tissue by providing a natural extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicking environment; stem cells, signaling molecules, and scaffolds. In addition, clinical success of the regenerative endodontic treatments can be evidenced by absence of signs and symptoms; no bony pathology, a disinfected pulp, and the maturation of root dentin in length and thickness. In spite of the various approaches of regenerative endodontics, there are several major challenges that remain to be improved: a) the endodontic root canal is a strong harbor of the endodontic bacterial biofilm and the fundamental etiologic factors of recurrent endodontic diseases, (b) tooth discolorations are caused by antibiotics and filling materials, (c) cervical root fractures are caused by endodontic medicaments, (d) pulp tissue is not vascularized nor innervated, and (e) the dentin matrix is not developed with adequate root thickness and length. Generally, current clinical protocols and recent studies have shown a limited success of the pulp-dentin tissue regeneration. Throughout the various approaches, the construction of biomimetic microenvironments of pulp-dentin tissue is a key concept of the tissue engineering based regenerative endodontics. The biomimetic microenvironments are composed of a synthetic nano-scaled polymeric fiber structure that mimics native pulp ECM and functions as a scaffold of the pulp-dentin tissue complex. They will provide a framework of the pulp ECM, can deliver selective bioactive molecules, and may recruit pluripotent stem cells from the vicinity of the pulp apex. The polymeric nanofibers are produced by methods of self-assembly, electrospinning, and phase separation. In order to be applied to biomedical use, the polymeric nanofibers require biocompatibility, stability, and biodegradability. Therefore, this review focuses on the development and application of the

  18. Biomimetic thin film synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Gordon, N.R.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this program is to develop a new process for forming thin film coatings and to demonstrate that the biomimetic thin film technology developed at PNL is useful for industrial applications. In the biomimetic process, mineral deposition from aqueous solution is controlled by organic functional groups attached to the underlying substrate surface. The coatings process is simple, benign, inexpensive, energy efficient, and particularly suited for temperature sensitive substrate materials (such as polymers). In addition, biomimetic thin films can be deposited uniformly on complex shaped and porous substrates providing a unique capability over more traditional line-of-sight methods.

  19. Biomimetic magnetic nanocomposite for smart skins

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    We report a biomimetic tactile sensor consisting of magnetic nanocomposite artificial cilia and magnetic sensors. The nanocomposite is fashioned from polydimethylsiloxane and iron nanowires and exhibits a permanent magnetic behavior. This enables remote operation without an additional magnetic field to magnetize the nanowires, which simplifies device integration. Moreover, the highly elastic and easy patternable nanocomposite is corrosion resistant and thermally stable. The highly sensitive and power efficient tactile sensors can detect vertical and shear forces from interactions with objects. The sensors can operate in dry and wet environment with the ability to measure different properties such as the texture and the movement or stability of objects, with easily adjustable performance.

  20. Design and demonstration of a biomimetic wing section using lightweight piezoceramic composite actuator (LIPCA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sahng M.; Lee, Sangki; Park, Hoon C.; Yoon, Kwang J.; Goo, Nam Seo

    2003-08-01

    Biomimetic wing sections actuated by piezoceramics actuator LIPCA have been designed and their actuation displacements estimated by using the thermal analogy and MSC/NASTRAN based on the linear elasticity. The wing sections are fabricated as the design and tested for evaluation. Measured actuation displacements were larger than the estimated values mainly due to the material non-linearity of the PZT wafer. The biomimetic wing sections can be used for control surfaces of small scale UAVs.

  1. Biomimetic sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju Hun; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Desai, Malav S.; Ren, Shuo; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2015-11-01

    Detection of desired target chemicals in a sensitive and selective manner is critically important to protect human health, environment and national security. Nature has been a great source of inspiration for the design of sensitive and selective sensors. In this mini-review, we overview the recent developments in bio-inspired sensor development. There are four major components of sensor design: design of receptors for specific targets; coating materials to integrate receptors to transducing machinery; sensitive transducing of signals; and decision making based on the sensing results. We discuss the biomimetic methods to discover specific receptors followed by a discussion about bio-inspired nanocoating material design. We then review the recent developments in phage-based bioinspired transducing systems followed by a discussion of biomimetic pattern recognition-based decision making systems. Our review will be helpful to understand recent approaches to reverse-engineer natural systems to design specific and sensitive sensors.

  2. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mukkamala, Ravindranath; Chen, Qing; Hu, Hopin; Baude, Dominique

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  3. Biomimetic magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Klem

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles are of considerable interest because of their potential use in high-density memory devices, spintronics, and applications in diagnostic medicine. The conditions for synthesis of these materials are often complicated by their high reaction temperatures, costly reagents, and post-processing requirements. Practical applications of magnetic nanoparticles will require the development of alternate synthetic strategies that can overcome these impediments. Biomimetic approaches to materials chemistry have provided a new avenue for the synthesis and assembly of magnetic nanomaterials that has great potential for overcoming these obstacles.

  4. Biomimetic electrospun nanofibers for tissue regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Susan; Li Bojun; Ma Zuwei; Wei He; Chan Casey; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative (NUSNNI), Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2006-09-15

    Nanofibers exist widely in human tissue with different patterns. Electrospinning nanotechnology has recently gained a new impetus due to the introduction of the concept of biomimetic nanofibers for tissue regeneration. The advanced electrospinning technique is a promising method to fabricate a controllable continuous nanofiber scaffold similar to the natural extracellular matrix. Thus, the biomedical field has become a significant possible application field of electrospun fibers. Although electrospinning has developed rapidly over the past few years, electrospun nanofibers are still at a premature research stage. Further comprehensive and deep studies on electrospun nanofibers are essential for promoting their biomedical applications. Current electrospun fiber materials include natural polymers, synthetic polymers and inorganic substances. This review briefly describes several typically electrospun nanofiber materials or composites that have great potential for tissue regeneration, and describes their fabrication, advantages, drawbacks and future prospects. (topical review)

  5. Acquired disorders of elastic tissue: Part II. decreased elastic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kevan G; Bercovitch, Lionel; Dill, Sara W; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2004-08-01

    Elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix are integral components of dermal connective tissue. The resilience and elasticity required for normal structure and function of the skin are attributable to the network of elastic tissue. Advances in our understanding of elastic tissue physiology provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of elastic tissue disorders. Many acquired disorders are nevertheless poorly understood owing to the paucity of reported cases. Several acquired disorders in which loss of dermal elastic tissue produces prominent clinical and histopathologic features have recently been described, including middermal elastolysis, papular elastorrhexis, and pseudoxanthoma-like papillary dermal elastolysis, which must be differentiated from more well-known disorders such as anetoderma, acquired cutis laxa, and acrokeratoelastoidosis. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should have an understanding of the similarities and differences between acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are characterized by a loss of elastic tissue.

  6. Biomimetics in Tribology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebeshuber, I. C.; Majlis, B. Y.; Stachelberger, H.

    Science currently goes through a major change. Biology is evolving as new Leitwissenschaft, with more and more causation and natural laws being uncovered. The term `technoscience' denotes the field where science and technology are inseparably interconnected, the trend goes from papers to patents, and the scientific `search for truth' is increasingly replaced by search for applications with a potential economic value. Biomimetics, i.e. knowledge transfer from biology to technology, is a field that has the potential to drive major technical advances. The biomimetic approach might change the research landscape and the engineering culture dramatically, by the blending of disciplines. It might substantially support successful mastering of current tribological challenges: friction, adhesion, lubrication and wear in devices and systems from the meter to the nanometer scale. A highly successful method in biomimectics, the biomimicry innovation method, is applied in this chapter to identify nature's best practices regarding two key issues in tribology: maintenance of the physical integrity of a system, and permanent as well as temporary attachment. The best practices identified comprise highly diverse organisms and processes and are presented in a number of tables with detailed references.

  7. Biomimetic Cilia Based on MEMS Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2008-01-01

    A review on the research of Micro Electromechanical Systems (MEMS) technology based biomimetic cilia is presented. Biomimetic cilia, enabled by the advancement of MEMS technology, have been under dynamic development for the past decade. After a brief description of the background of cilia and MEMS technology, different biomimetic cilia applications are reviewed. Biomimetic cilia micro-actuators, including micromachined polyimide bimorph biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, electro-statically actuated polymer biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, and magnetically actuated nanorod array biomimetic cilia micro-actuator, are presented. Subsequently micromachined underwater flow biomimetic cilia micro-sensor is studied, followed by acoustic flow micro-sensor. The fabrication of these MEMS-based biomimetic cilia devices, characterization of their physical properties, and the results of their application experiments are discussed.

  8. A Biomimetic Haptic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mitchinson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The design and implementation of the periphery of an artificial whisker sensory system is presented. It has been developed by adopting a biomimetic approach to model the structure and function of rodent facial vibrissae. The artificial vibrissae have been formed using composite materials and have the ability to be actively moved or whisked. The sensory structures at the root of real vibrissae has been modelled and implemented using micro strain gauges and Digital Signal Processors. The primary afferents and vibrissal trigeminal ganglion have been modelled using empirical data taken from electrophysiological measurements, and implemented in real-time using a Field Programmable Gate Array. Pipelining techniques were employed to maximise the utility of the FPGA hardware. The system is to be integrated into a more complete whisker sensory model, including neural structures within the central nervous system, which can be used to orient a mobile robot.

  9. Biomimetic thin film deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieke, P.R.; Graff, G.E.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.; Baskaran, S.; Song, L.; Tarasevich, B.J.; Fryxell, G.E.

    1995-09-01

    Biological mineral deposition for the formation of bone, mollusk shell and other hard tissues provides materials scientists with illustrative materials processing strategies. This presentation will review the key features of biomineralization and how these features can be of technical importance. We have adapted existing knowledge of biomineralization to develop a unique method of depositing inorganic thin films and coating. Our approach to thin film deposition is to modify substrate surfaces to imitate the proteins found in nature that are responsible for controlling mineral deposition. These biomimetic surfaces control the nucleation and growth of the mineral from a supersaturated aqueous solution. This has many processing advantages including simple processing equipment, environmentally benign reagents, uniform coating of highly complex shapes, and enhanced adherence of coating. Many different types of metal oxide, hydroxide, sulfide and phosphate materials with useful mechanical, optical, electronic and biomedical properties can be deposited.

  10. BIOMIMETIC STRATEGIES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS. TERPENES

    OpenAIRE

    V. Kulcitki

    2012-01-01

    The current paper represents an outline of the selected contributions to the biomimetic procedures and approaches for the synthesis of terpenes with complex structure and diverse functionalisation pattern. These include homologation strategies, cyclisations, rearrangements, as well as biomimetic remote functionalisations.

  11. Biomimetic Production of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Devens

    2004-03-01

    The basic reaction for hydrogen generation is formation of molecular hydrogen from two electrons and two protons. Although there are many possible sources for the protons and electrons, and a variety of mechanisms for providing the requisite energy for hydrogen synthesis, the most abundant and readily available source of protons and electrons is water, and the most attractive source of energy for powering the process is sunlight. Not surprisingly, living systems have evolved to take advantage of these sources for materials and energy. Thus, biology provides paradigms for carrying out the reactions necessary for hydrogen production. Photosynthesis in green plants uses sunlight as the source of energy for the oxidation of water to give molecular oxygen, protons, and reduction potential. Some photosynthetic organisms are capable of using this reduction potential, in the form of the reduced redox protein ferredoxin, to reduce protons and produce molecular hydrogen via the action of an hydrogenase enzyme. A variety of other organisms metabolize the reduced carbon compounds that are ultimately the major products of photosynthesis to produce molecular hydrogen. These facts suggest that it might be possible to use light energy to make molecular hydrogen via biomimetic constructs that employ principles similar to those used by natural organisms, or perhaps with hybrid "bionic" systems that combine biomimetic materials with natural enzymes. It is now possible to construct artificial photosynthetic systems that mimic some of the major steps in the natural process.(1) Artificial antennas based on porphyrins, carotenoids and other chromophores absorb light at various wavelengths in the solar spectrum and transfer the harvested excitation energy to artificial photosynthetic reaction centers.(2) In these centers, photoinduced electron transfer uses the energy from light to move an electron from a donor to an acceptor moiety, generating a high-energy charge-separated state

  12. [Biomimetic sensors in biomedical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayet, Landry; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The recent research on both the synthesis of membrane proteins by cell-free systems and the reconstruction of planar lipid membranes, has led to the development of a cross-technology to produce biosensors or filters. Numerous biomimetic membranes are currently being standardized and used by the industry, such as filters containing aquaporin for water desalination, or used in routine at the laboratory scale, for example the bacteriorhodopsin as a light sensor. In the medical area, several fields of application of these biomimetic membranes are under consideration today, particularly for the screening of therapeutic molecules and for the developing of new tools in diagnosis, patient monitoring and personalized medicine. PMID:26152170

  13. Trade elasticities

    OpenAIRE

    Jean Imbs; Isabelle Mejean

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the aggregate export and import price elasticities implied by a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand system, for more than 30 countries at various stages of development. Trade elasticities are given by weighted averages of sector-specific elasticities of substitution, that we estimate structurally. Both weights and substitution elasticities can be chosen to compute the response of trade to specific shocks to relative prices, bilateral or global. We document considerabl...

  14. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  15. Integrating Biologically Inspired Nanomaterials and Table-top Stereolithography for 3D Printed Biomimetic Osteochondral Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Nathan J.; O’Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-01-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. I...

  16. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helix Nielsen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    membrane-based sensor and/or separation devices? In the development of biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channels (ion and water channels) and carriers (transporters) are important. Generally, each class of transport proteins conducts specific molecular species in and out of the cell while...... generally have a lower turnover but are capable of transport against gradients. For both classes of proteins, their unique flux-properties make them interesting as candidates in biomimetic sensor/separation devices. An ideal sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually...... current developments of biomimetic sensor/separation devices....

  17. Biological and Biomimetic Comb Polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristeidis Papagiannopoulos

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Some new phenomena involved in the physical properties of comb polyelectrolyte solutions are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to synthetic biomimetic materials, and the structures formed by these molecules are compared with those of naturally occurring glycoprotein and proteoglycan solutions. Developments in the determination of the structure and dynamics (viscoelasticity of comb polymers in solution are also covered. Specifically the appearance of multi-globular structures, helical instabilities, liquid crystalline phases, and the self-assembly of the materials to produce hierarchical comb morphologies is examined. Comb polyelectrolytes are surface active and a short review is made of some recent experiments in this area that relate to their morphology when suspended in solution. We hope to emphasize the wide variety of phenomena demonstrated by the vast range of naturally occurring comb polyelectrolytes and the challenges presented to synthetic chemists designing biomimetic materials.

  18. Chitosan-based biomimetic scaffolds and methods for preparing the same

    OpenAIRE

    Filée, Patrick; Freichels, Astrid; Jérôme, Christine; Aqil, Abdelhafid; Colige, Alain; Tchemtchoua Tateu, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The invention concerns chitosan-based biomimetic scaffolds and methods for modulating their intrinsic properties such as rigidity, elasticity, resistance to mechanical stress, porosity, biodegradation and absorbance of exudates. Therefore, the present invention relates to a layered chitosan-based scaffold wherein said layered scaffold comprises at least two fused layers, wherein at least one layer consists of a chitosan nanofiber scaffold membrane and at least one of the other layers of a por...

  19. BIOMIMETIC STRATEGIES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS. TERPENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kulcitki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The current paper represents an outline of the selected contributions to the biomimetic procedures and approaches for the synthesis of terpenes with complex structure and diverse functionalisation pattern. These include homologation strategies, cyclisations, rearrangements, as well as biomimetic remote functionalisations.

  20. Self-assembled Biodegradable Nanoparticles and Polysaccharides as Biomimetic ECM Nanostructures for the Synergistic effect of RGD and BMP-2 on Bone Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenming; Dong, Li; Han, Lu; Wang, Kefeng; Lu, Xiong; Fang, Liming; Qu, Shuxin; Chan, Chun Wai

    2016-01-01

    Producing biomimetic extracellular matrix (ECM) is an effective approach to improve biocompatibility of medical devices. In this study, biomimetic ECM nanostructures are constructed through layer-by-layer self-assembling positively charged chitosan (Chi), negatively charged oxidized sodium alginate (OAlg), and positively charged bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles. The BSA-based nanoparticles in the self-assembled films not only result in porous nanostructures similar to natural ECM, but also preserve the activity and realize the sustained release of Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). The results of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) culture demonstrate that the penta-peptide glycine-arginine-glycine-aspartate-serine (GRGDS) grafted Chi/OAlg films favor cell adhesion and proliferation. GRGDS and BMP-2 in biomimetic ECM nanostructures synergistically promote BMSC functions and new bone formation. The RGD and BMP incorporated biomimetic ECM coatings could be applied on a variety of biomedical devices to improve the bioactivity and biocompatibility. PMID:27121121

  1. Elastic fibres in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Andrew K; Simpson, Andreja; Steer, Ruth; Cain, Stuart A; Kielty, Cay M

    2013-08-20

    Elastic fibres are insoluble components of the extracellular matrix of dynamic connective tissues such as skin, arteries, lungs and ligaments. They are laid down during development, and comprise a cross-linked elastin core within a template of fibrillin-based microfibrils. Their function is to endow tissues with the property of elastic recoil, and they also regulate the bioavailability of transforming growth factor β. Severe heritable elastic fibre diseases are caused by mutations in elastic fibre components; for example, mutations in elastin cause supravalvular aortic stenosis and autosomal dominant cutis laxa, mutations in fibrillin-1 cause Marfan syndrome and Weill-Marchesani syndrome, and mutations in fibulins-4 and -5 cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa. Acquired elastic fibre defects include dermal elastosis, whereas inflammatory damage to fibres contributes to pathologies such as pulmonary emphysema and vascular disease. This review outlines the latest understanding of the composition and assembly of elastic fibres, and describes elastic fibre diseases and current therapeutic approaches.

  2. Biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on pore walls improves osteointegration of poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplaine, H; Lebourg, M; Ripalda, P; Vidaurre, A; Sanz-Ramos, P; Mora, G; Prósper, F; Ochoa, I; Doblaré, M; Gómez Ribelles, J L; Izal-Azcárate, I; Gallego Ferrer, G

    2013-01-01

    Polymer-ceramic composites obtained as the result of a mineralization process hold great promise for the future of tissue engineering. Simulated body fluids (SBFs) are widely used for the mineralization of polymer scaffolds. In this work an exhaustive study with the aim of optimizing the mineralization process on a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) macroporous scaffold has been performed. We observed that when an air plasma treatment is applied to the PLLA scaffold its hydroxyapatite nucleation ability is considerably improved. However, plasma treatment only allows apatite deposition on the surface of the scaffold but not in its interior. When a 5 wt % of synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles is mixed with PLLA a more abundant biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer grows inside the scaffold in SBF. The morphology, amount, and composition of the generated biomimetic hydroxyapatite layer on the pores' surface have been analyzed. Large mineralization times are harmful to pure PLLA as it rapidly degrades and its elastic compression modulus significantly decreases. Degradation is retarded in the composite scaffolds because of the faster and extensive biomimetic apatite deposition and the role of HAp to control the pH. Mineralized scaffolds, covered by an apatite layer in SBF, were implanted in osteochondral lesions performed in the medial femoral condyle of healthy sheep. We observed that the presence of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on the pore's surface of the composite scaffold produces a better integration in the subchondral bone, in comparison to bare PLLA scaffolds. PMID:23152082

  3. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  4. Biopolymer Elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, S

    2003-01-01

    In recent years molecular elasticity has emerged as an active area of research: there are experiments that probe mechanical properties of single biomolecules such as DNA and Actin, with a view to understanding the role of elasticity of these polymers in biological processes such as transcription and protein-induced DNA bending. Single molecule elasticity has thus emerged as an area where there is a rich cross-fertilization of ideas between biologists, chemists and theoretical physicists. In this article we present a perspective on this field of research.

  5. Biomimetic, Catalytic Oxidation in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-lchi Murahashi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Oxidation is one of the most fundamental reactions in organic synthesis. Owing to the current need to develop forward-looking technology that is environmentally acceptable with respect many aspects. The most attractive approaches are biomimetic oxidation reactions that are closely related to the metabolism of living things. The metabolisms are governed by a variety of enzymes such as cytochrome P-450 and flavoenzyme.Simulation of the function of these enzymes with simple transition metal complex catalyst or organic catalysts led to the discovery of biomimetic, catalytic oxidations with peroxides[1]. We extended such biomimetic methods to the oxidation with molecular oxygen under mild conditions.

  6. Researches and developments of biomimetics in tribology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Zhendong; TONG Jin; REN Luquan

    2006-01-01

    Animals and plants have developed optimal geometric structures, smart topological materials and multi-functional surface textures with excellent tribological characteristics through the evolution of thousand millions of years and become models for tribological design. This paper puts forward the definition and fundament of biomimetic tribology, investigates the status of self-cleaning of liquid-solid interface, adhesion between animals' feet and solid surface, wear characteristics of biological surfaces and biomimetic design, as well as the friction and bionic design on liquid-solid interface. The further developments of the tribological biomimetics are discussed.

  7. Challenges in Commercializing Biomimetic Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Perry

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One category includes customer-related barriers, which can be influenced to some extent. Another category includes market-technical-related barriers, which can be very difficult to overcome by an organization/company aiming at successfully introducing their innovation on the market—in particular if both the organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments relevant for biomimetic aquaporin membranes.

  8. Molecular motor assembly of a biomimetic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Active biological molecules and functional structures can be fabricated into a bio-mimetic system by using molecular assembly method. Such materials can be used for the drug delivery, disease diagnosis and therapy, and new nanodevice construction.

  9. Biomimetic catalysis: Taking on the turnover challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, Richard J.

    2016-03-01

    Emulating the efficiency with which enzymes catalyse reactions has often been used as inspiration to develop self-assembled cages. Now two studies present approaches to achieving catalyst turnover -- one of the biggest challenges in achieving truly biomimetic catalysis.

  10. Biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book addresses the possibilities and challenges in mimicking biological membranes and creating membrane-based sensor and separation devices. It covers recent advances in developing biomimetic membranes for technological applications with a focus on the use of integral membrane protein mediated transport. It describes the fundamentals of biosensing as well as separation and shows how the two processes work together in biological systems. The book provides an overview of the current state of the art, points to areas that need further investigation and anticipates future directions in the field. Biomimetics is a truly cross-disciplinary approach and this is exemplified by the challenges in mimicking osmotic processes as they occur in nature using aquaporin protein water channels as central building blocks. In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, both channel and carrier proteins are important and examples of how these may be reconstituted and controlled in biomimetic membranes are ...

  11. Biomimetic Active Touch with Fingertips and Whiskers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepora, Nathan F

    2016-01-01

    This study provides a synthetic viewpoint that compares, contrasts, and draws commonalities for biomimetic perception over a range of tactile sensors and tactile stimuli. Biomimetic active perception is formulated from three principles: (i) evidence accumulation based on leading models of perceptual decision making; (ii) action selection with an evidence-based policy, here based on overt focal attention; and (iii) sensory encoding of evidence based on neural coding. Two experiments with each of three biomimetic tactile sensors are considered: the iCub (capacitive) fingertip, the TacTip (optical) tactile sensor, and BIOTACT whiskers. For each sensor, one experiment considers a similar task (perception of shape and location) and the other a different tactile perception task. In all experiments, active perception with a biomimetic action selection policy based on focal attention outperforms passive perception with static or random action selection. The active perception also consistently reaches superresolved accuracy (hyperacuity) finer than the spacing between tactile elements. Biomimetic active touch thus offers a common approach for biomimetic tactile sensors to accurately and robustly characterize and explore non-trivial, uncertain environments analogous to how animals perceive the natural world. PMID:27168603

  12. Biomimetic mechanism for micro aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Darryll J. (Inventor); Bohorquez, Felipe A. (Inventor); Sirohi, Jayant (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic pitching and flapping mechanism including a support member, at least two blade joints for holding blades and operatively connected to the support member. An outer shaft member is concentric with the support member, and an inner shaft member is concentric with the outer shaft member. The mechanism allows the blades of a small-scale rotor to be actuated in the flap and pitch degrees of freedom. The pitching and the flapping are completely independent from and uncoupled to each other. As such, the rotor can independently flap, or independently pitch, or flap and pitch simultaneously with different amplitudes and/or frequencies. The mechanism can also be used in a non-rotary wing configuration, such as an ornithopter, in which case the rotational degree of freedom would be suppressed.

  13. Challenges in commercializing biomimetic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Madsen, Steen Ulrik; Jørgensen, Tine Elkjær;

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of selective water channel proteins—aquaporins—has prompted growing interest in using these proteins, as the building blocks for designing new types of membranes. However, as with any other new and potentially disruptive technology, barriers for successful market entry exist. One...... barriers and challenges associated with introducing biomimetic aquaporin membranes. These include technical issues in membrane production and product testing. Then we discuss possible business models for introducing new technologies in general, followed by a presentation of beach-head market segments...... organization and the technology are at early stages. Often, one faces barriers from both these categories at the same time, which makes it necessary to gain insight of the particular market when introducing a new innovative product. In this review we present the basic concepts and discuss some of these...

  14. Biomimetic use of genetic algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Dessalles, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genetic algorithms are considered as an original way to solve problems, probably because of their generality and of their "blind" nature. But GAs are also unusual since the features of many implementations (among all that could be thought of) are principally led by the biological metaphor, while efficiency measurements intervene only afterwards. We propose here to examine the relevance of these biomimetic aspects, by pointing out some fundamental similarities and divergences between GAs and the genome of living beings shaped by natural selection. One of the main differences comes from the fact that GAs rely principally on the so-called implicit parallelism, while giving to the mutation/selection mechanism the second role. Such differences could suggest new ways of employing GAs on complex problems, using complex codings and starting from nearly homogeneous populations.

  15. Elastic Beanstalk

    CERN Document Server

    Vliet, Jurg; Wel, Steven; Dowd, Dara

    2011-01-01

    While it's always been possible to run Java applications on Amazon EC2, Amazon's Elastic Beanstalk makes the process easier-especially if you understand how it works beneath the surface. This concise, hands-on book not only walks you through Beanstalk for deploying and managing web applications in the cloud, you'll also learn how to use this AWS tool in other phases of development. Ideal if you're a developer familiar with Java applications or AWS, Elastic Beanstalk provides step-by-step instructions and numerous code samples for building cloud applications on Beanstalk that can handle lots

  16. Challenges in biomimetic design and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Barfoed, Michael; Shu, Li

    Biomimetic design copies desired principles found in nature and implement them into artificial applications. Applications could be products we use in our daily life but it can also be used to inspire material innovation. However there are significant challenges in performing biomimetic design. One....... This is a key issue in design and innovation work where problem identification and systematic search for suitable solution principle are major activities. One way to deal with this challenge is to use a biology search method. The use of such a method is illustrated with a case story describing the design...... including the terminology and knowledge organisation. It is often easy to recognise the splendour of a biological solution, but it can be much more difficult to understand the underlying mechanisms. Another challenge in biomimetic design is the search and identification of relevant solutions in nature...

  17. Laser technology in biomimetics basics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Belegratis, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Lasers are progressively more used as versatile tools for fabrication purposes. The wide range of available powers, wavelengths, operation modes, repetition rates etc. facilitate the processing of a large spectrum of materials at exceptional precision and quality. Hence, manifold methods were established in the past and novel methods are continuously under development. Biomimetics, the translation from nature-inspired principles to technical applications, is strongly multidisciplinary. This field offers intrinsically a wide scope of applications for laser based methods regarding structuring and modification of materials. This book is dedicated to laser fabrication methods in biomimetics. It introduces both, a laser technology as well as an application focused approach.  The book covers the most important laser lithographic methods and various biomimetics application scenarios ranging from coatings and biotechnology to construction, medical applications and photonics.

  18. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic

  19. Minimally invasive restorative dentistry: a biomimetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malterud, Mark I

    2006-08-01

    When providing dental treatment for a given patient, the practitioner should use a minimally invasive technique that conserves sound tooth structure as a clinical imperative. Biomimetics is a tenet that guides the author's practice and is generally described as the mimicking of natural life. This can be accomplished in many cases using contemporary composite resins and adhesive dental procedures. Both provide clinical benefits and support the biomimetic philosophy for treatment. This article illustrates a minimally invasive approach for the restoration of carious cervical defects created by poor hygiene exacerbated by the presence of orthodontic brackets.

  20. Tissue bionics: examples in biomimetic tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W

    2008-09-01

    Many important lessons can be learnt from the study of biological form and the functional design of organisms as design criteria for the development of tissue engineering products. This merging of biomimetics and regenerative medicine is termed 'tissue bionics'. Clinically useful analogues can be generated by appropriating, modifying and mimicking structures from a diversity of natural biomatrices ranging from marine plankton shells to sea urchin spines. Methods in biomimetic materials chemistry can also be used to fabricate tissue engineering scaffolds with added functional utility that promise human tissues fit for the clinic.

  1. Basic Components of Connective Tissues and Extracellular Matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjær, Michael

    2014-01-01

    in matrix tissue where it provides elastic recoil and resilience to a variety of connective tissues, e.g., aorta and ligaments. Elastic fibers regulate activity of TGFβs through their association with fibrillin microfibrils. Elastin also plays a role in cell adhesion, cell migration, and has the ability...... of specific organ systems, but they also provide a scaffold for elastogenesis in elastic tissues. Fibrillin is important for the assembly of elastin into elastic fibers. Mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene are closely associated with Marfan syndrome. Fibulins are tightly connected with basement membranes......, elastic fibers and other components of extracellular matrix and participate in formation of elastic fibers. Tenascins are ECM polymorphic glycoproteins found in many connective tissues in the body. Their expression is regulated by mechanical stress both during development and in adulthood. Tenascins...

  2. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2 and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm-2, which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications.Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm-2

  3. Proteins and Peptides in Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Alfredo Gonzalez

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses recent advances and the main advantages of block copolymers for functional membrane protein reconstitution in biomimetic polymeric membranes. A rational approach to the reconstitution of membrane proteins in a functional form can be addressed by a more holistic view by usin...

  4. Major intrinsic proteins in biomimetic membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Claus Hélix

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes define the structural and functional boundaries in living cells and their organelles. The integrity of the cell depends on its ability to separate inside from outside and yet at the same time allow massive transport of matter in and out the cell. Nature has elegantly met this challenge by developing membranes in the form of lipid bilayers in which specialized transport proteins are incorporated. This raises the question: is it possible to mimic biological membranes and create a membrane based sensor and/or separation device? In the development of a biomimetic sensor/separation technology, a unique class of membrane transport proteins is especially interesting-the major intrinsic proteins (MIPs). Generally, MIPs conduct water molecules and selected solutes in and out of the cell while preventing the passage of other solutes, a property critical for the conservation of the cells internal pH and salt concentration. Also known as water channels or aquaporins they are highly efficient membrane pore proteins some of which are capable of transporting water at very high rates up to 10(9) molecules per second. Some MIPs transport other small, uncharged solutes, such as glycerol and other permeants such as carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide and the metalloids antimonite, arsenite, silicic and boric acid depending on the effective restriction mechanism of the protein. The flux properties of MIPs thus lead to the question ifMIPs can be used in separation devices or as sensor devices based on, e.g., the selective permeation of metalloids. In principle a MIP based membrane sensor/separation device requires the supporting biomimetic matrix to be virtually impermeable to anything but water or the solute in question. In practice, however, a biomimetic support matrix will generally have finite permeabilities to both electrolytes and non-electrolytes. The feasibility of a biomimetic MIP device thus depends on the relative transport

  5. Biomimetically Enhanced Demineralized Bone Matrix for Bone Regenerative Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Demineralized bone matrix (DBM is one of the most widely used bone graft materials in dentistry. However, the ability of DBM to reliably and predictably induce bone regeneration has always been a cause for concern. The quality of DBM varies greatly depending on several donor dependent factors and also manufacturing techniques. In order to standardize the quality and to enable reliable and predictable bone regeneration, we have generated a biomimetically-enhanced version of DBM (BE-DBM using clinical grade commercial DBM as a control. We have generated the BE-DBM by incorporating a cell-derived pro-osteogenic extracellular matrix (ECM within clinical grade DBM. In the present study, we have characterized the BE-DBM and evaluated its ability to induce osteogenic differentiation of human marrow derived stromal cells (HMSCs with respect to clinical grade commercial DBM. Our results indicate that the BE-DBM contains significantly more pro-osteogenic factors than DBM and enhances HMSC differentiation and mineralized matrix formation in vitro and in vivo. Based on our results, we envision that the BE-DBM has the potential to replace DBM as the bone graft material of choice.

  6. Bundle Formation in Biomimetic Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Maarten; Pape, A C H; Voets, Ilja K; Rowan, Alan E; Portale, Giuseppe; Kouwer, Paul H J

    2016-08-01

    Bundling of single polymer chains is a crucial process in the formation of biopolymer network gels that make up the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. This bundled architecture leads to gels with distinctive properties, including a large-pore-size gel formation at very low concentrations and mechanical responsiveness through nonlinear mechanics, properties that are rarely observed in synthetic hydrogels. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we study the bundle formation and hydrogelation process of polyisocyanide gels, a synthetic material that uniquely mimics the structure and mechanics of biogels. We show how the structure of the material changes at the (thermally induced) gelation point and how factors such as concentration and polymer length determine the architecture, and with that, the mechanical properties. The correlation of the gel mechanics and the structural parameters obtained from SAXS experiments is essential in the design of future (synthetic) mimics of biopolymer networks.

  7. Electroactive biomimetic collagen-silver nanowire composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Abeni; Vagin, Mikhail; Khalaf, Hazem; Bertazzo, Sergio; Hodder, Peter; Dånmark, Staffan; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Altimiras, Jordi; Aili, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Electroactive biomaterials are widely explored as bioelectrodes and as scaffolds for neural and cardiac regeneration. Most electrodes and conductive scaffolds for tissue regeneration are based on synthetic materials that have limited biocompatibility and often display large discrepancies in mechanical properties with the surrounding tissue causing problems during tissue integration and regeneration. This work shows the development of a biomimetic nanocomposite material prepared from self-assembled collagen fibrils and silver nanowires (AgNW). Despite consisting of mostly type I collagen fibrils, the homogeneously embedded AgNWs provide these materials with a charge storage capacity of about 2.3 mC cm(-2) and a charge injection capacity of 0.3 mC cm(-2), which is on par with bioelectrodes used in the clinic. The mechanical properties of the materials are similar to soft tissues with a dynamic elastic modulus within the lower kPa range. The nanocomposites also support proliferation of embryonic cardiomyocytes while inhibiting the growth of both Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis. The developed collagen/AgNW composites thus represent a highly attractive bioelectrode and scaffold material for a wide range of biomedical applications. PMID:27385421

  8. Mechanics of Biomimetic Liposomes Encapsulating an Actin Shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevorkian, Karine; Manzi, John; Pontani, Léa-Lætitia; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-12-15

    Cell-shape changes are insured by a thin, dynamic, cortical layer of cytoskeleton underneath the plasma membrane. How this thin cortical structure impacts the mechanical properties of the whole cell is not fully understood. Here, we study the mechanics of liposomes or giant unilamellar vesicles, when a biomimetic actin cortex is grown at the inner layer of the lipid membrane via actin-nucleation-promoting factors. Using a hydrodynamic tube-pulling technique, we show that tube dynamics is clearly affected by the presence of an actin shell anchored to the lipid bilayer. The same force pulls much shorter tubes in the presence of the actin shell compared to bare membranes. However, in both cases, we observe that the dynamics of tube extrusion has two distinct features characteristic of viscoelastic materials: rapid elastic elongation, followed by a slower elongation phase at a constant rate. We interpret the initial elastic regime by an increase of membrane tension due to the loss of lipids into the tube. Tube length is considerably shorter for cortex liposomes at comparable pulling forces, resulting in a higher spring constant. The presence of the actin shell seems to restrict lipid mobility, as is observed in the corral effect in cells. The viscous regime for bare liposomes corresponds to a leakout of the internal liquid at constant membrane tension. The presence of the actin shell leads to a larger friction coefficient. As the tube is pulled from a patchy surface, membrane tension increases locally, leading to a Marangoni flow of lipids. As a conclusion, the presence of an actin shell is revealed by its action that alters membrane mechanics.

  9. The Top of the Biomimetic Triangle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei P. Sommer; Dan Zhu; Matthias Wiora; Hans-Joerg Fecht

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing observational evidence indicating that crystalline interfacial water layers play a central role in evolution and biology. For instance in cellular recognition processes, in particular during first contact events, where cells decide upon survival or entering apoptosis. Understanding water layers is thus crucial in biomedical engineering, specifically in the design of biomaterials inspired by biomimetic principles. Whereas there is ample experimental evidence for crystalline interfacial water layers on surfaces in air, their subaquatic presence could not be verified directly, so far. Analysing a polarity dependent asym- metry in the surface conductivity on hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond, we show that crystalline interfacial water layers persist subaquatically. Nanoscopic interfacial water layers with an order different from that of bulk water have been identified at room temperature on both hydrophilic and hydrophobic model surfaces - in air and subaquatically. Their generalization and systematic inclusion into the catalogue of physical and chemical determinants of biocompatibility complete the biomimetic triangle.

  10. Green Tribology Biomimetics, Energy Conservation and Sustainability

    CERN Document Server

    Bhushan, Bharat

    2012-01-01

    Tribology is the study of friction, wear and lubrication. Recently, the concept of “green tribology” as “the science and technology of the tribological aspects of ecological balance and of environmental and biological impacts” was introduced. The field of green tribology includes tribological technology that mimics living nature (biomimetic surfaces) and thus is expected to be environmentally friendly, the control of friction and wear that is of importance for energy conservation and conversion, environmental aspects of lubrication and surface modification techniques, and tribological aspects of green applications such as wind-power turbines or solar panels. This book is the first comprehensive volume on green tribology. The chapters are prepared by leading experts in their fields and cover such topics as biomimetics, environmentally friendly lubrication, tribology of wind turbines and renewable sources of energy, and ecological impact of new technologies of surface treatment.

  11. Action of Chicory Fructooligosaccharides on Biomimetic Membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa, A. F.; Henrique, R. S.; A. S. Lucho; V. Paffaro; J.M. Schneedorf

    2014-01-01

    Fructooligosaccharides from chicory (FOSC) are functional prebiotic foods recognized to exert several well-being effects in human health and animal production, as decreasing blood lipids, modulating the gut immune system, enhancing mineral bioavailability, and inhibiting microbial growth, among others. Mechanisms of actions directly on cell metabolism and structure are however little known. In this sense this work was targeted to investigate the interaction of FOSC with biomimetic membranes (...

  12. Design of graded biomimetic osteochondral composite scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Tampieri, Anna; Sandri, Monica; Landi, Elena; Pressato, Daniele; Francioli, Silvia; Quarto, Rodolfo; Martin, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    With the ultimate goal to generate suitable materials for the repair of osteochondral defects, in this work we aimed at developing composite osteochondral scaffolds organized in different integrated layers, with features which are biomimetic for articular cartilage and subchondral bone and can differentially support formation of such tissues. A biologically inspired mineralization process was first developed to nucleate Mg-doped hydroxyapatite crystals on type I collagen fibers during their s...

  13. Biomimetic Composite Structural T-joints

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vimal Kumar Thummalapalli; Steven L.Donaldson

    2012-01-01

    Biological structural fixed joints exhibit unique attributes,including highly optimized fiber paths which minimize stress concentrations.In addition,since the joints consist of continuous,uncut fiber architectures,the joints enable the organism to transport information and chemicals from one part of the body to the other.To the contrary,sections of man-made composite material structures are often joined using bolted or bonded joints,which involve low strength and high stress concentrations.These methods are also expensive to achieve.Additional functions such as fluid transport,electrical signal delivery,and thermal conductivity across the joints typically require parasitic tubes,wires,and attachment clips.By using the biomimetic methods,we seek to overcome the limitations which are present in the conventional methods. In the present work,biomimetic co-cured composite sandwich T-joints were constructed using unidirectional glass fiber,epoxy resin,and structural foam.The joints were fabricated using the wet lay-up vacuum bag resin infusion method.Foam sandwich T-joints with multiple continuous fiber architectures and sandwich foam thickness were prepared.The designs were tested in quasi-static bending using a mechanical load frame.The significantweight savings using the biomimetic approaches is discussed,as well as a comparison of failure modes versus architecture is described.

  14. Biomimetic nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maria Carmona-RibeiroBiocolloids Lab, Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Química, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Mimicking nature is a powerful approach for developing novel lipid-based devices for drug and vaccine delivery. In this review, biomimetic assemblies based on natural or synthetic lipids by themselves or associated to silica, latex or drug particles will be discussed. In water, self-assembly of lipid molecules into supramolecular structures is fairly well understood. However, their self-assembly on a solid surface or at an interface remains poorly understood. In certain cases, hydrophobic drug granules can be dispersed in aqueous solution via lipid adsorption surrounding the drug particles as nanocapsules. In other instances, hydrophobic drug molecules attach as monomers to borders of lipid bilayer fragments providing drug formulations that are effective in vivo at low drug-to-lipid-molar ratio. Cationic biomimetic particles offer suitable interfacial environment for adsorption, presentation and targeting of biomolecules in vivo. Thereby antigens can effectively be presented by tailored biomimetic particles for development of vaccines over a range of defined and controllable particle sizes. Biomolecular recognition between receptor and ligand can be reconstituted by means of receptor immobilization into supported lipidic bilayers allowing isolation and characterization of signal transduction steps.Keywords: cationic lipid, phospholipids, bilayer fragments, vesicles, silica, polymeric particles, antigens, novel cationic immunoadjuvants, drugs

  15. Computational Elastic Knots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Xin

    2013-05-01

    Elastic rods have been studied intensively since the 18th century. Even now the theory of elastic rods is still developing and enjoying popularity in computer graphics and physical-based simulation. Elastic rods also draw attention from architects. Architectural structures, NODUS, were constructed by elastic rods as a new method of form-finding. We study discrete models of elastic rods and NODUS structures. We also develop computational tools to find the equilibria of elastic rods and the shape of NODUS. Applications of elastic rods in forming torus knot and closing Bishop frame are included in this thesis.

  16. Extracellular matrix composition of the cricopharyngeus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Raquel Aguiar; Sennes, Luiz Ubirajara; Mauad, Thais; Imamura, Rui; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Carrau, Ricardo Luis

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the presence and distribution of total collagen, type I and type III collagen, elastic fibers, fibronectin, and versican in the endomysium of cricopharyngeus muscles from adults of various ages. The study was a cross-sectional analysis of human cricopharyngeus muscles. Twenty-seven muscles obtained from autopsies of men and women ranging in age from 28 to 92 years were analyzed with the Picrosirius method, oxidized Weigert resorcin-fuchsin, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Collagen had the highest density among the analyzed components. Elastic fibers surrounded each muscle cell; they were aligned longitudinally by their long axis and associated with traversing fibers, thereby forming a fiber network with embedded muscle cells. The fibronectin and versican contents varied widely among the specimens. We found no statistically significant differences between the proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and factors such as gender and race. We conclude that the higher proportion of type I and type III collagen is compatible with the cricopharyngeus muscle's sphincteric behavior, and the arrangement of the elastic fibers may also contribute to the muscle's elasticity. We found no statistically significant correlation between the ECM components and age. PMID:21874509

  17. Towards the LIVING envelope: Biomimetics for building envelope adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Badarnah Kadri, L.

    2012-01-01

    Several biomimetic design strategies are available for various applications, though the research on biomimetics as a design tool in architecture is still challenging. This is due to a lack of systematic design tools required for identifying relevant organisms, or natural systems, and abstracting the

  18. Acquired disorders of elastic tissue: part I. Increased elastic tissue and solar elastotic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kevan G; Bercovitch, Lionel; Dill, Sara W; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2004-07-01

    Elastic fibers in the extracellular matrix are an integral component of dermal connective tissue. The resilience and elasticity required for normal structure and function of the skin may be attributed to the network of elastic tissue. Advances in our understanding of elastic tissue physiology provide a foundation for studying the pathogenesis of elastic tissue disorders. Many acquired disorders are nevertheless poorly understood due to the paucity of reported cases. Several acquired disorders in which accumulation or elastotic degeneration of dermal elastic fibers produces prominent clinical and histopathologic features have recently been described. They include elastoderma, linear focal elastosis, and late-onset focal dermal elastosis and must be differentiated from better-known disorders, among them acquired pseudoxanthoma elasticum, elastosis perforans serpiginosa, and Favré-Racouchot syndrome. Learning objective At the conclusion of this learning activity, participants should understand the similarities and differences between acquired disorders of elastic tissue that are characterized by an increase in elastic tissue, as well as the spectrum of solar elastotic dermatoses.

  19. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  20. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jangsun; Jeong, Yoon; Park, Jeong Min; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hong, Jong Wook; Choi, Jonghoon

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark's skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations.

  1. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  2. Artificial bacterial biomimetic nanoparticles synergize pathogen-associated molecular patterns for vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefert, Alyssa L; Caplan, Michael J; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2016-08-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) sense microorganisms via pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by both extra- and intracellular Toll-like Receptors (TLRs), initiating immune responses against invading pathogens. Bacterial PAMPs include extracellular lipopolysaccharides and intracellular unmethylated CpG-rich oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG). We hypothesized that a biomimetic approach involving antigen-loaded nanoparticles (NP) displaying Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPLA) and encapsulating CpG may function as an effective "artificial bacterial" biomimetic vaccine platform. This hypothesis was tested in vitro and in vivo using NP assembled from biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) polymer, surface-modified with MPLA, and loaded with CpG and model antigen Ovalbumin (OVA). First, CpG potency, characterized by cytokine profiles, titers, and antigen-specific T cell responses, was enhanced when CpG was encapsulated in NP compared to equivalent concentrations of surface-presented CpG, highlighting the importance of biomimetic presentation of PAMPs. Second, NP synergized surface-bound MPLA with encapsulated CpG in vitro and in vivo, inducing greater pro-inflammatory, antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1)-skewed cellular and antibody-mediated responses compared to single PAMPs or soluble PAMP combinations. Importantly, NP co-presentation of CpG and MPLA was critical for CD8(+) T cell responses, as vaccination with a mixture of NP presenting either CpG or MPLA failed to induce cellular immunity. This work demonstrates a rational methodology for combining TLR ligands in a context-dependent manner for synergistic nanoparticulate vaccines. PMID:27162077

  3. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-09-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation. PMID:26234364

  4. Integrating biologically inspired nanomaterials and table-top stereolithography for 3D printed biomimetic osteochondral scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Nathan J.; O'Brien, Joseph; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-08-01

    The osteochondral interface of an arthritic joint is notoriously difficult to regenerate due to its extremely poor regenerative capacity and complex stratified architecture. Native osteochondral tissue extracellular matrix is composed of numerous nanoscale organic and inorganic constituents. Although various tissue engineering strategies exist in addressing osteochondral defects, limitations persist with regards to tissue scaffolding which exhibit biomimetic cues at the nano to micro scale. In an effort to address this, the current work focused on 3D printing biomimetic nanocomposite scaffolds for improved osteochondral tissue regeneration. For this purpose, two biologically-inspired nanomaterials have been synthesized consisting of (1) osteoconductive nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA) (primary inorganic component of bone) and (2) core-shell poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanospheres encapsulated with chondrogenic transforming growth-factor β1 (TGF-β1) for sustained delivery. Then, a novel table-top stereolithography 3D printer and the nano-ink (i.e., nHA + nanosphere + hydrogel) were employed to fabricate a porous and highly interconnected osteochondral scaffold with hierarchical nano-to-micro structure and spatiotemporal bioactive factor gradients. Our results showed that human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell adhesion, proliferation, and osteochondral differentiation were greatly improved in the biomimetic graded 3D printed osteochondral construct in vitro. The current work served to illustrate the efficacy of the nano-ink and current 3D printing technology for efficient fabrication of a novel nanocomposite hydrogel scaffold. In addition, tissue-specific growth factors illustrated a synergistic effect leading to increased cell adhesion and directed stem cell differentiation.

  5. Enhancing Osteoconduction of PLLA-Based Nanocomposite Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration Using Different Biomimetic Signals to MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Baldini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In bone engineering, the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stromal cells rely on signaling from chemico-physical structure of the substrate, therefore prompting the design of mimetic “extracellular matrix”-like scaffolds. In this study, three-dimensional porous poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA-based scaffolds have been mixed with different components, including single walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, micro-hydroxyapatite particles (HA, and BMP2, and treated with plasma (PT, to obtain four different nanocomposites: PLLA + CNT, PLLA + CNTHA, PLLA + CNT + HA + BMP2 and PLLA + CNT + HA + PT. Adult bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were derived from the femur of orthopaedic patients, seeded on the scaffolds and cultured under osteogenic induction up to differentiation and mineralization. The release of specific metabolites and temporal gene expression profiles of marrow-derived osteoprogenitors were analyzed at definite time points, relevant to in vitro culture as well as in vivo differentiation. As a result, the role of the different biomimetic components added to the PLLA matrix was deciphered, with BMP2-added scaffolds showing the highest biomimetic activity on cells differentiating to mature osteoblasts. The modification of a polymeric scaffold with reinforcing components which also work as biomimetic cues for cells can effectively direct osteoprogenitor cells differentiation, so as to shorten the time required for mineralization.

  6. Rapid biomimetic mineralization of collagen fibrils and combining with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for bone defects healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bihua; Luo, Xueshi; Li, Zhiwen; Zhuang, Caiping; Li, Lihua; Lu, Lu; Ding, Shan; Tian, Jinhuan; Zhou, Changren

    2016-11-01

    Collagen biomineralization is regulated by complicated interactions between the collagen matrix and non-collagenous extracellular proteins. Here, the use of sodium tripolyphosphate to simulate the templating functional motif of the C-terminal fragment of non-collagenous proteins is reported, and a low molecular weight polyacrylic acid served as a sequestration agent to stabilize amorphous calcium phosphate into nanoprecursors. Self-assembled collagen fibrils served as a fixed template for achieving rapid biomimetic mineralization in vitro. Results demonstrated that, during the mineralization process, intrafibrillar and extrafibrillar hydroxyapatite mineral with collagen fibrils formed and did so via bottom-up nanoparticle assembly based on the non-classical crystallization approach in the presence of these dual biomimetic functional analogues. In vitro human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (hUCMSC) culture found that the mineralized scaffolds have a better cytocompatibility in terms of cell viability, adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation into osteoblasts. A rabbit femoral condyle defect model was established to confirm the ability of the n-HA/collagen scaffolds to facilitate bone regeneration and repair. The images of gross anatomy, MRI, CT and histomorphology taken 6 and 12weeks after surgery showed that the biomimetic mineralized collagen scaffolds with hUCMSCs can promote the healing speed of bone defects in vivo, and both of the scaffolds groups performing better than the bone defect control group. As new bone tissue formed, the scaffolds degraded and were gradually absorbed. All these results demonstrated that both of the scaffolds and cells have better histocompatibility. PMID:27523994

  7. Integration of microfluidic chip with biomimetic hydrogel for 3D controlling and monitoring of cell alignment and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Ho; Lee, Ki Hwa; Lee, Jeonghoon; Choi, Hyuk; Lee, Donghee; Park, Yongdoo; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-04-01

    A biomimetic hydrogel was integrated into microfluidic chips to monitor glioma cell alignment and migration. The extracellular matrix-based biomimetic hydrogel was remodeled by matrix metalloprotease (MMP) secreted by glioma cells and the hydrogel could thus be used to assess cellular behavior. Both static and dynamic cell growth conditions (flow rate of 0.1 mL/h) were used. Cell culture medium with and without vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insensitive VEGF and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) were employed to monitor cell behavior. A concentration gradient formed in the hydrogel resulted in differences in cell behavior. Glioma cell viability in the microchannel was 75-85%. Cells in the VEGF-loaded microchannels spread extensively, degrading the MMP-sensitive hydrogel, and achieved cell sizes almost fivefold larger than seen in the control medium. Our integrated system can be used as a model for the study of cellular behavior in a controlled microenvironment generated by fluidic conditions in a biomimetic matrix.

  8. Biomimetic hemocompatible coatings through immobilization of hyaluronan derivatives on metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Benjamin; Winnik, Françoise M; Merhi, Yahye; Griesser, Hans J; Tabrizian, Maryam

    2008-10-21

    Biomimetic coatings offer exciting options to modulate the biocompatibility of biomaterials. The challenge is to create surfaces that undergo specific interactions with cells without promoting nonspecific fouling. This work reports an innovative approach toward biomimetic surfaces based on the covalent immobilization of a carboxylate terminated PEGylated hyaluronan (HA-PEG) onto plasma functionalized NiTi alloy surfaces. The metal substrates were aminated via two different plasma functionalization processes. Hyaluronan, a natural glycosaminoglycan and the major constituent of the extracellular matrix, was grafted to the substrates by reaction of the surface amines with the carboxylic acid terminated PEG spacer using carbodiimide chemistry. The surface modification was monitored at each step by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). HA-immobilized surfaces displayed increased hydrophilicity and reduced fouling, compared to bare surfaces, when exposed to human platelets (PLT) in an in vitro assay with radiolabeled platelets (204.1 +/- 123.8 x 10 (3) PLT/cm (2) vs 538.5 +/- 100.5 x 10 (3) PLT/cm (2) for bare metal, p surfaces were successfully created as demonstrated by XPS chemical imaging. The bioactive surfaces described present unique features, which result from the synergy between the intrinsic biological properties of hyaluronan and the chemical composition and morphology of the polymer layer immobilized on a metal surface.

  9. Biomimetic synthesis for precursor of muscone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Muscone is a precious fragrant compound scarce in nature. Many attempts have been made to synthesize this unique natural product. In this work, the one- carbon unit transfer reaction of tetrahydrofolate coenzyme was initiated. Benzimidazolium salt was used as the tetrahydrofolate coenzyme model at formic acid oxidation level and di-Grignard reagent as the nucleophile to which one-carbon unit was transferred; the biomimetic synthesis of 2,15- hexade-canedione, a precursor of muscone, was successfully accomplished by using the addition-hydrolysis reaction of benzimidazolium salt with Grignard reagent. And an impor-tant useful method for the synthesis of muscone is provided.

  10. Biotechnologies and biomimetics for civil engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Labrincha, J; Diamanti, M; Yu, C-P; Lee, H

    2015-01-01

    Putting forward an innovative approach to solving current technological problems faced by human society, this book encompasses a holistic way of perceiving the potential of natural systems. Nature has developed several materials and processes which both maintain an optimal performance and are also totally biodegradable, properties which can be used in civil engineering. Delivering the latest research findings to building industry professionals and other practitioners, as well as containing information useful to the public, ‘Biotechnologies and Biomimetics for Civil Engineering’ serves as an important tool to tackle the challenges of a more sustainable construction industry and the future of buildings.

  11. Tailored antireflective biomimetic nanostructures for UV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morhard, Christoph; Pacholski, Claudia; Spatz, Joachim P [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Lehr, Dennis; Brunner, Robert; Helgert, Michael [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 10, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Sundermann, Michael, E-mail: Pacholski@mf.mpg.de [Carl Zeiss Jena GmbH, Technology Center, Carl-Zeiss-Strasse 56, D-73447 Oberkochen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Antireflective surfaces composed of biomimetic sub-wavelength structures that employ the 'moth eye principle' for reflectance reduction are highly desirable in many optical applications such as solar cells, photodetectors and laser optics. We report an efficient approach for the fabrication of antireflective surfaces based on a two-step process consisting of gold nanoparticle mask generation by micellar block copolymer nanolithography and a multi-step reactive ion etching process. Depending on the RIE process parameters nanostructured surfaces with tailored antireflective properties can easily be fabricated that show optimum performance for specific applications.

  12. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.H. Florenzano

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic, monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied, which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities

  13. Effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenzano, F H; Politi, M J

    1997-02-01

    The effect of urea on biomimetic aggregates (aqueous and reversed micelles, vesicles and monolayers) was investigated to obtain insights into the effect of the denaturant on structured macromolecules. Direct evidence obtained from light scattering (static and dynamic), monolayer maximum isothermal compression and ionic conductivity measurements, together with indirect evidence from fluorescence photodissociation, fluorescence suppression, and thermal reactions, strongly indicates the direct interaction mechanism of urea with the aggregates. Preferential solvation of the surfactant headgroups by urea results in an increase in the monomer dissociation degree (when applied), which leads to an increase in the area per headgroup and also in the loss of counterion affinities. PMID:9239302

  14. Biomimetic chitosan-calcium phosphate composites with potential applications as bone substitutes: preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Constantin E; Popa, Marcel I; Verestiuc, Liliana

    2012-04-01

    A novel biomimetic technique for obtaining chitosan-calcium phosphates (Cs-CP) scaffolds are presented: calcium phosphates are precipitated from its precursors, CaCl(2) and NaH(2) PO(4) on the Cs matrix, under physiological conditions (human body temperature and body fluid pH; 37°C and pH = 7.2, respectively). Materials composition and structure have been confirmed by various techniques: elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). FTIR and SEM data have shown the arrangement of the calcium phosphates-hydroxyapatite (CP-Hap) onto Cs matrix. In this case the polymer is acting as glue, bonding the calcium phosphates crystals. Behavior in biological simulated fluids (phosphate buffer solution-PBS and PBS-albumin) revealed an important contribution of the chelation between -NH3(+) and Ca(2+) on the scaffold interaction with aqueous mediums; increased quantities of chitosan in composites permit the interaction with human albumin and improve the retention of fluid. The composites are slightly degraded by the lysozyme which facilitates an in vivo degradation control of bone substitutes. Modulus of elasticity is strongly dependent of the ratio chitosan/calcium phosphates and recommends the obtained biomimetic composites as promising materials for a prospective bone application. PMID:22121073

  15. Extracellular Gd-CA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Henrik S; Marckmann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Until recently it was believed that extracellular gadolinium-based contrast agents were safe for both the kidneys and all other organs within the dose range up to 0.3 mmol/kg body weight. However, in 2006, it was demonstrated that some gadolinium-based contrast agents may trig the development of ...

  16. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  17. Bacterial extracellular lignin peroxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Donald L.; Ramachandra, Muralidhara

    1993-01-01

    A newly discovered lignin peroxidase enzyme is provided. The enzyme is obtained from a bacterial source and is capable of degrading the lignin portion of lignocellulose in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The enzyme is extracellular, oxidative, inducible by lignin, larch wood xylan, or related substrates and capable of attacking certain lignin substructure chemical bonds that are not degradable by fungal lignin peroxidases.

  18. Extracellular granzymes in inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensink, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that granzymes released by cytotoxic lymphocytes induce cell death in virus-infected cells and tumor cells. Next to this intracellular role of granzymes in triggering apoptosis, granzymes also exist extracellularly in the circulation of patients with autoimmune diseases

  19. Biomimetic High-Density Lipoproteins from a Gold Nanoparticle Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthi, Andrea Jane

    For hundreds of years the field of chemistry has looked to nature for inspiration and insight to develop novel solutions for the treatment of human diseases. The ability of chemists to identify, mimic, and modifiy small molecules found in nature has led to the discovery and development of many important therapeutics. Chemistry on the nanoscale has made it possible to mimic natural, macromolecular structures that may also be useful for understanding and treating diseases. One example of such a structure is high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The goal of this work is to use a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) as a template to synthesize functional mimics of HDL and characterize their structure and function. Chapter 1 details the structure and function of natural HDL and how chemistry on the nanoscale provides new strategies for mimicking HDL. This Chapter also describes the first examples of using nanoparticles to mimic HDL. Chapter 2 reports the synthesis and characterization of biomimetic HDL using different sizes of Au NPs and different surface chemistries and how these variables can be used to tailor the properties of biomimetic HDL. From these studies the optimal strategy for synthesizing biomimetic HDL was determined. In Chapter 3, the optimization of the synthesis of biomimetic HDL is discussed as well as a full characterization of its structure. In addition, the work in this chapter shows that biomimetic HDL can be synthesized on a large scale without alterations to its structure or function. Chapter 4 focuses on understanding the pathways by which biomimetic HDL accepts cholesterol from macrophage cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that biomimetic HDL is able to accept cholesterol by both active and passive pathways of cholesterol efflux. In Chapter 5 the preliminary results of in vivo studies to characterize the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of biomimetic HDL are presented. These studies suggest that biomimetic HDL traffics through tissues prone to

  20. Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) Modified Biomimetic Polymeric Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xufeng NIU; Yuanliang WANG; Yanfeng LUO; Juan XIN; Yonggang LI

    2005-01-01

    The new generation of biomaterials focuses on the design of biomimetic polymeric materials that are capable of eliciting specific cellular responses and directing new tissue formation. Since Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequences have been found to promote cell adhesion in 1984, numerous polymers have been functionalized with RGD peptides for tissue engineering applications. This review gave the advance in RGD modified biomimetic polymeric materials,focusing on the mechanism of RGD, the surface and bulk modification of polymer with RGD peptides and the evaluation in vitro and in vivo of the modified biomimetic materials.

  1. Biomimetics as a design methodology – possibilities and challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetics – or bionik as it is called in parts of Europe – offer a number of promising opportunities and challenges for the designer. The paper investigates how biomimetics as a design methodology is used in engineering design by looking at examples of biological searches and highlight...... the possibilities and challenges. Biomimetics for engineering design is explored through an experiment involving 12 design engineering students. For 7 selected problem areas they searched biology literature available at a university library and identified a number of biological solutions. Central solution...

  2. Biomimetics applied to centering in micro-assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, L.H.; Lenau, Torben Anker; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the application of a biomimetic search method to develop ideas for centering objects in micro-assembly. Biomimetics involves the imitation of biological phenomena to solve problems. An obstacle to the use of biomimetics in engineering is knowledge of biological phenomena...... that is relevant to the problem at hand. The method described here starts with an engineering problem, and then systematically searches for analogous biological phenomena using functional keywords. This method is illustrated by finding and using analogies for the problem of positioning and centering objects during...

  3. Biomimetic multifunctional surfaces inspired from animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yin, Wei; Li, Wen; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2016-08-01

    Over millions of years, animals have evolved to a higher intelligent level for their environment. A large number of diverse surface structures on their bodies have been formed to adapt to the extremely harsh environment. Just like the structural diversity existed in plants, the same also applies true in animals. Firstly, this article provides an overview and discussion of the most common functional surface structures inspired from animals, such as drag reduction, noise reduction, anti-adhesion, anti-wear, anti-erosion, anti-fog, water capture, and optical surfaces. Then, some typical characteristics of morphologies, structures, and materials of the animal multifunctional surfaces were discussed. The adaptation of these surfaces to environmental conditions was also analyzed. It mainly focuses on the relationship between their surface functions and their surface structural characteristics. Afterwards, the multifunctional mechanisms or principles of these surfaces were discussed. Models of these structures were provided for the development of structure materials and machinery surfaces. At last, fabrication techniques and existing or potential technical applications inspired from biomimetic multifunctional surfaces in animals were also discussed. The application prospects of the biomimetic functional surfaces are very broad, such as civil field of self-cleaning textile fabrics and non-stick pots, ocean field of oil-water separation, sports field of swimming suits, space development field of lens arrays. PMID:27085632

  4. The peritoneal elastic lamina.

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, P J

    1991-01-01

    The structure and extent of the submesothelial elastic tissue of the peritoneum, tentatively termed the peritoneal elastic lamina (lamina elastica peritonei, LEP), was studied in autopsy and biopsy material by light microscopy. The investigation confirms the presence of a well-defined network of elastic fibres just beneath the basement membrane of the visceral and parietal peritoneum in man. The LEP is claimed to be analogous to similar elastic tissue in other serosal cavities, the pleura and...

  5. Biomimetic Extracellular Matrix Mediated Somatic Stem Cell Differentiation: Applications in Dental Pulp Tissue Regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram eRavindran; ANNE eGEORGE

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world’s population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have...

  6. Biomimetic Extracellular Matrix Mediated Somatic Stem Cell Differentiation: Applications in Dental Pulp Tissue Regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world’s population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  7. Biomimetic extracellular matrix mediated somatic stem cell differentiation: applications in dental pulp tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most widely prevalent infectious diseases in the world. It affects more than half of the world's population. The current treatment for necrotic dental pulp tissue arising from dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality making it prone for secondary infections. Over the past decade, several tissue-engineering approaches have attempted regeneration of the dental pulp tissue. Although several studies have highlighted the potential of dental stem cells, none have transitioned into a clinical setting owing to limited availability of dental stem cells and the need for growth factor delivery systems. Our strategy is to utilize the intact ECM of pulp cells to drive lineage specific differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. From a clinical perspective, pulp ECM scaffolds can be generated using cell lines and patient specific somatic stem cells can be used for regeneration. Our published results have shown the feasibility of using pulp ECM scaffolds for odontogenic differentiation of non-dental mesenchymal cells. This focused review discusses the issues surrounding dental pulp tissue regeneration and the potential of our strategy to overcome these issues.

  8. Biomimetics materials, structures and processes : examples, ideas and case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bruckner, Dietmar; Hellmich, Christian; Schmiedmayer, Heinz-Bodo; Stachelberger, Herbert; Gebeshuber, Ille

    2011-01-01

    The book presents an outline of current activities in the field of biomimetics and integrates a variety of applications comprising biophysics, surface sciences, architecture and medicine. Biomimetics as innovation method is characterised by interdisciplinary information transfer from the life sciences to technical application fields aiming at increased performance, functionality and energy efficiency. The contributions of the book relate to the research areas: - Materials and structures in nanotechnology and biomaterials - Biomimetic approaches to develop new forms, construction principles and design methods in architecture - Information and dynamics in automation, neuroinformatics and biomechanics Readers will be informed about the latest research approaches and results in biomimetics with examples ranging from bionic nano-membranes to function-targeted design of tribological surfaces and the translation of natural auditory coding strategies.

  9. A review paper on biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, X.; De Groot,, P.A.J.; Wang, D.; Hu, Q; Wismeijer, D.; Liu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate coatings have been developed for bone regeneration and repair because of their biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and easy preparation. They can be rendered osteoinductive by incorporating an osteogenic agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2), into the crystalline lattice work in physiological situations. The biomimetic calcium phosphate coating enables a controlled, slow and local release of BMP-2 when it undergoes cell mediated coating degradation ...

  10. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly cons...

  11. Aloe vera Induced Biomimetic Assemblage of Nucleobase into Nanosized Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Sherwani, Asif; Owais, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Aim Biomimetic nano-assembly formation offers a convenient and bio friendly approach to fabricate complex structures from simple components with sub-nanometer precision. Recently, biomimetic (employing microorganism/plants) synthesis of metal and inorganic materials nano-particles has emerged as a simple and viable strategy. In the present study, we have extended biological synthesis of nano-particles to organic molecules, namely the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), using Aloe vera lea...

  12. Extracellular matrix synthesis in vascular disease: hypertension, and atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ponticos, M.; Smith, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) within the vascular network provides both a structural and regulatory role. The ECM is a dynamic composite of multiple proteins that form structures connecting cells within the network. Blood vessels are distended by blood pressure and, therefore, require ECM components with elasticity yet with enough tensile strength to resist rupture. The ECM is involved in conducting mechanical signals to cells. Most importantly, ECM regulates cellular function through chemical s...

  13. Biomimetic mineral coatings in dental and orthopaedic implantology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-lian LIU; Klaas de GROOT; Ernst B.HUNZIKER

    2009-01-01

    Biomimetic techniques are used to deposit coatings of calcium phosphate upon medical devices. The procedure is conducted under near-physiological, or "biomimetic", conditions of temperature and pH primarily to improve their biocompatibility and biodegradability of the materials. The inorganic layers genelated by biomi-metic methods resemble bone mineral, and can be degraded within a biological milieu.The biomimetic coating technique involves the nuclea-tion and growth of bone-like crystals upon a pretreated substrate by immersing this in a supersaturated solution of calcium phosphate under physiological conditions of temperature (37~C) and pH (7.4). The method, originally developed by Kokubo in 1990, has since undergone improvement and refinement by several groups of investigators.Biomimetic coatings are valuable in that they can serve as a vehicle for the slow and sustained release of osteogenic agents at the site of implantation. This attribute is rendered possible by the near-physiological conditions under which these coatings are prepared, which permits an incorporation of binactive agents into the inorganic crystal latticework rather than their nlere superficial adsorption onto preformed layers. In addition, the biomimetic coating technique can be applied to implants of an organic as well as of an inorganic nature and to those with irregular surface geometries, which is not possible using conventional methodologies.

  14. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2010-01-01

    The paper illustrates how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the bi......The paper illustrates how biomimetics can be applied in sensor design. Biomimetics is an engineering discipline that uses nature as an inspiration source for generating ideas for how to solve engineering problems. Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis...... of the biological solutions, identification of design principles and design of the desired artefact. We use a search method developed at University of Toronto. It is based on formulation of relevant keywords and search for occurrences in a standard university biology textbook. Most often a simple formulation...... of keywords and a following search is not enough to generate a sufficient amount of useful ideas or the search gives to many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms. The paper also reviews a number...

  15. Clues for biomimetics from natural composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, Shaul; Meirovitch, Sigal; Sharon, Sigal; Heyman, Arnon; Kaplan, David L; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Bio-inspired material systems are derived from different living organisms such as plants, arthropods, mammals and marine organisms. These biomaterial systems from nature are always present in the form of composites, with molecular-scale interactions optimized to direct functional features. With interest in replacing synthetic materials with natural materials due to biocompatibility, sustainability and green chemistry issues, it is important to understand the molecular structure and chemistry of the raw component materials to also learn from their natural engineering, interfaces and interactions leading to durable and highly functional material architectures. This review will focus on applications of biomaterials in single material forms, as well as biomimetic composites inspired by natural organizational features. Examples of different natural composite systems will be described, followed by implementation of the principles underlying their composite organization into artificial bio-inspired systems for materials with new functional features for future medicine. PMID:22994958

  16. Progress of Biomimetic Artificial Nose and Tongue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Liu, Qingjun

    2009-05-01

    As two of the basic senses of human beings, olfaction and gustation play a very important role in daily life. These two types of chemical sensors are important for recognizing environmental conditions. Electronic nose and electronic tongue, which mimics animals' olfaction and gustation to detect odors and chemical components, have been carried out due to their potential commercial applications for biomedicine, food industry and environmental protection. In this report, the biomimetic artificial nose and tongue is presented. Firstly, the smell and taste sensors mimicking the mammalian olfaction and gustation was described, and then, some mimetic design of electronic nose and tongue for odorants and tastants detection are developed. Finally, olfactory and gustatory biosensors are presented as the developing trends of this field.

  17. Biomimetic Hybrid Nanocontainers with Selective Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, Lea; Burns, Jonathan R; Kim, Jungyeon; Cecchin, Denis; Hindley, James; Pyne, Alice L B; Gaitzsch, Jens; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Howorka, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Chemistry plays a crucial role in creating synthetic analogues of biomacromolecular structures. Of particular scientific and technological interest are biomimetic vesicles that are inspired by natural membrane compartments and organelles but avoid their drawbacks, such as membrane instability and limited control over cargo transport across the boundaries. In this study, completely synthetic vesicles were developed from stable polymeric walls and easy-to-engineer membrane DNA nanopores. The hybrid nanocontainers feature selective permeability and permit the transport of organic molecules of 1.5 nm size. Larger enzymes (ca. 5 nm) can be encapsulated and retained within the vesicles yet remain catalytically active. The hybrid structures constitute a new type of enzymatic nanoreactor. The high tunability of the polymeric vesicles and DNA pores will be key in tailoring the nanocontainers for applications in drug delivery, bioimaging, biocatalysis, and cell mimicry. PMID:27560310

  18. Electrochemical characterization of hydrogels for biomimetic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peláez, L.; Romero, V.; Escalera, S.;

    2011-01-01

    ) or a photoinitiator (P) to encapsulate and stabilize biomimetic membranes for novel separation technologies or biosensor applications. In this paper, we have investigated the electrochemical properties of the hydrogels used for membrane encapsulation. Specifically, we studied the crosslinked hydrogels by using...... electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), and we demonstrated that chemically crosslinked hydrogels had lower values for the effective electrical resistance and higher values for the electrical capacitance compared with hydrogels with photoinitiated crosslinking. Transport numbers were obtained using......〉 and 〈Pw〉 values than PEG‐1000‐DMA‐P and PEG‐400‐DA‐P hydrogels. In conclusion, our results show that hydrogel electrochemical properties can be controlled by the choice of polymer and type of crosslinking used and that their water and salt permeability properties are congruent with the use of hydrogels...

  19. Biomimetic Membrane Arrays on Cast Hydrogel Supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roerdink-Lander, Monique; Ibragimova, Sania; Rein Hansen, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    , provides mechanical support but at the cost of small molecule transport through the membrane−support sandwich. To stabilize biomimetic membranes while allowing transport through a membrane−support sandwich, we have investigated the feasibility of using an ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE)/hydrogel...... sandwich as the support. The sandwich is realized as a perforated surface-treated ETFE film onto which a hydrogel composite support structure is cast. We report a simple method to prepare arrays of lipid bilayer membranes with low intrinsic electrical conductance on the highly permeable, self......-supporting ETFE/hydrogel sandwiches. We demonstrate how the ETFE/hydrogel sandwich support promotes rapid self-thinning of lipid bilayers suitable for hosting membrane-spanning proteins....

  20. Biomimetics for architecture & design nature, analogies, technology

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This book provides the readers with a timely guide to the application of biomimetic principles in architecture and engineering design. As a result of a combined effort by two internationally recognized authorities, the biologist Werner Nachtigall and the architect Göran Pohl, the book describes the principles which can be used to compare nature and technology, and at the same time it presents detailed explanations and examples showing how biology can be used as a source of inspiration and “translated” in building and architectural solutions (biomimicry). Even though nature cannot be directly copied, the living world can provide architects and engineers with a wealth of analogues and inspirations for their own creative designs. But how can analysis of natural entities give rise to advanced and sustainable design? By reporting on the latest bionic design methods and using extensive artwork, the book guides readers through the field of nature-inspired architecture, offering an extraordinary resource for pro...

  1. Development of a Biomimetic Quadruped Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanhtam Ho; Sunghac Choi; Sangyoon Lee

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the design and prototype of a small quadruped robot whose walking motion is realized by two piezocomposite actuators. In the design, biomimetic ideas are employed to obtain the agility of motions and sustainability of a heavy load. The design of the robot legs is inspired by the leg configuration of insects, two joints (hip and knee) of the leg enable two basic motions, lifting and stepping. The robot frame is designed to have a slope relative to the horizontal plane, which makes the robot move forward. In addition, the bounding locomotion of quadruped animals is implemented in the robot. Experiments show that the robot can carry an additional load of about 100 g and run with a fairly high velocity. The quadruped prototype can be an important step towards the goal of building an autonomous mobile robot actuated by piezocomposite actuators.

  2. Biomimetic artificial sphincter muscles: status and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Vanessa; Fattorini, Elisa; Karapetkova, Maria; Osmani, Bekim; Töpper, Tino; Weiss, Florian; Müller, Bert

    2016-04-01

    Fecal incontinence is the involuntary loss of bowel content and affects more than 12% of the adult population, including 45% of retirement home residents. Severe fecal incontinence is often treated by implanting an artificial sphincter. Currently available implants, however, have long-term reoperation rates of 95% and definitive explantation rates of 40%. These statistics show that the implants fail to reproduce the capabilities of the natural sphincter and that the development of an adaptive, biologically inspired implant is required. Dielectric elastomer actuators (DEA) are being developed as artificial muscles for a biomimetic sphincter, due to their suitable response time, reaction forces, and energy consumption. However, at present the operation voltage of DEAs is too high for artificial muscles implanted in the human body. To reduce the operating voltage to tens of volts, we are using microfabrication to reduce the thickness of the elastomer layer to the nanometer level. Two microfabrication methods are being investigated: molecular beam deposition and electrospray deposition. This communication covers the current status and a perspective on the way forward, including the long-term prospects of constructing a smart sphincter from low-voltage sensors and actuators based on nanometer-thin dielectric elastomer films. As DEA can also provide sensory feedback, a biomimetic sphincter can be designed in accordance with the geometrical and mechanical parameters of its natural counterpart. The availability of such technology will enable fast pressure adaption comparable to the natural feedback mechanism, so that tissue atrophy and erosion can be avoided while maintaining continence du ring daily activities.

  3. Biomimetic oral mucin from polymer micelle networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Authimoolam, Sundar Prasanth

    Mucin networks are formed by the complexation of bottlebrush-like mucin glycoprotein with other small molecule glycoproteins. These glycoproteins create nanoscale strands that then arrange into a nanoporous mesh. These networks play an important role in ensuring surface hydration, lubricity and barrier protection. In order to understand the functional behavior in mucin networks, it is important to decouple their chemical and physical effects responsible for generating the fundamental property-function relationship. To achieve this goal, we propose to develop a synthetic biomimetic mucin using a layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition approach. In this work, a hierarchical 3-dimensional structures resembling natural mucin networks was generated using affinity-based interactions on synthetic and biological surfaces. Unlike conventional polyelectrolyte-based LBL methods, pre-assembled biotin-functionalized filamentous (worm-like) micelles was utilized as the network building block, which from complementary additions of streptavidin generated synthetic networks of desired thickness. The biomimetic nature in those synthetic networks are studied by evaluating its structural and bio-functional properties. Structurally, synthetic networks formed a nanoporous mesh. The networks demonstrated excellent surface hydration property and were able capable of microbial capture. Those functional properties are akin to that of natural mucin networks. Further, the role of synthetic mucin as a drug delivery vehicle, capable of providing localized and tunable release was demonstrated. By incorporating antibacterial curcumin drug loading within synthetic networks, bacterial growth inhibition was also demonstrated. Thus, such bioactive interfaces can serve as a model for independently characterizing mucin network properties and through its role as a drug carrier vehicle it presents exciting future opportunities for localized drug delivery, in regenerative applications and as bio

  4. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range.

  5. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kuflik, Eric; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an Elastically Decoupling Relic (ELDER), which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross-section of its elastic scattering on Standard Model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross-section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the $10^{-3}-1$ fb range.

  6. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Written in an engaging, easy-to-follow style, the recipes will help you to extend the capabilities of ElasticSearch to manage your data effectively.If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications, manage data, or have decided to start using ElasticSearch, this book is ideal for you. This book assumes that you've got working knowledge of JSON and Java

  7. Elastically Decoupling Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Eric; Perelstein, Maxim; Lorier, Nicolas Rey-Le; Tsai, Yu-Dai

    2016-06-01

    We present a novel dark matter candidate, an elastically decoupling relic, which is a cold thermal relic whose present abundance is determined by the cross section of its elastic scattering on standard model particles. The dark matter candidate is predicted to have a mass ranging from a few to a few hundred MeV, and an elastic scattering cross section with electrons, photons and/or neutrinos in the 10^{-3}-1  fb range. PMID:27314712

  8. Elastic Appearance Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Fagertun, Jens; Larsen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a fusion of the active appearance model (AAM) and the Riemannian elasticity framework which yields a non-linear shape model and a linear texture model – the active elastic appearance model (EAM). The non-linear elasticity shape model is more flexible than the usual linear...... subspace model, and it is therefore able to capture more complex shape variations. Local rotation and translation invariance are the primary explanation for the additional flexibility. In addition, we introduce global scale invariance into the Riemannian elasticity framework which together with the local...

  9. Design and Dynamic Analysis of a Novel Biomimetic Robotics Hip Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Bingyan Cui; Liwen Chen; Zhijun Wang; Yuanhao Zhao; Zhanxian Li; Zhenlin Jin

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the workspace and the carrying capacity of biomimetic robotics hip joint, a novel biomimetic robotics hip joint was developed. The biomimetic robotics hip joint is mainly composed of a moving platform, frame, and 3-RRR orthogonal spherical parallel mechanism branched chains, and has the characteristics of compact structure, large bearing capacity, high positioning accuracy, and good controllability. The functions of the biomimetic robotics hip joint are introduced, such a...

  10. ElasticSearch cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Paro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    If you are a developer who implements ElasticSearch in your web applications and want to sharpen your understanding of the core elements and applications, this is the book for you. It is assumed that you've got working knowledge of JSON and, if you want to extend ElasticSearch, of Java and related technologies.

  11. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  12. Biomimetic electrochemistry from conducting polymers. A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Composition and properties of conducting polymers change during reactions. ► These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices. ► The state of the art for artificial muscles sensing working conditions was reviewed. ► Smart membranes, drug delivery devices and nervous interfaces were also reviewed. - Abstract: Films of conducting polymers in the presence of electrolytes can be oxidized or reduced by the flow of anodic or cathodic currents. Ions and solvent are exchanged during a reaction for charge and osmotic pressure balance. A reactive conducting polymer contains ions and solvent. Such variation of composition during a reaction is reminiscent of the biological processes in cells. Along changes to the composition of the material during a reaction, there are also changes to other properties, including: volume (electrochemomechanical), colour (electrochromic), stored charge (electrical storage), porosity or permselectivity (electroporosity), stored chemicals, wettability and so on. Most of those properties mimic similar property changes in organs during their functioning. These properties are being exploited to develop biomimetic reactive and soft devices: artificial muscles and polymeric actuators; supercapacitors and all organic batteries; smart membranes; electron-ion transducers; nervous interfaces and artificial synapses, or drug delivery devices. In this review we focus on the state of the art for artificial muscles, smart membranes and electron-ion transducers. The reactive nature of those devices provide them with a unique advantage related to the present days technologies: any changes in the surrounding physical or chemical variable acting on the electrochemical reaction rate will be sensed by the device while working. Working under constant current (driving signal), the evolution of the device potential or the evolution of the consumed electrical energy (sensing signals) senses and quantifies the

  13. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  14. 3D bioprinting of BM-MSCs-loaded ECM biomimetic hydrogels for in vitro neocartilage formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Marco; Idaszek, Joanna; Szöke, Krisztina; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Dentini, Mariella; Barbetta, Andrea; Brinchmann, Jan E; Święszkowski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how to print 3D biomimetic hydrogel scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering with high cell density (>10(7) cells ml(-1)), high cell viability (85 ÷ 90%) and high printing resolution (≈100 μm) through a two coaxial-needles system. The scaffolds were composed of modified biopolymers present in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cartilage, namely gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), chondroitin sulfate amino ethyl methacrylate (CS-AEMA) and hyaluronic acid methacrylate (HAMA). The polymers were used to prepare three photocurable bioinks with increasing degree of biomimicry: (i) GelMA, (ii) GelMA + CS-AEMA and (iii) GelMA + CS-AEMA + HAMA. Alginate was added to the bioinks as templating agent to form stable fibers during 3D printing. In all cases, bioink solutions were loaded with bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). After printing, the samples were cultured in expansion (negative control) and chondrogenic media to evaluate the possible differentiating effect exerted by the biomimetic matrix or the synergistic effect of the matrix and chondrogenic supplements. After 7, 14, and 21 days, gene expression of the chondrogenic markers (COL2A1 and aggrecan), marker of osteogenesis (COL1A1) and marker of hypertrophy (COL10A1) were evaluated qualitatively by means of fluorescence immunocytochemistry and quantitatively by means of RT-qPCR. The observed enhanced viability and chondrogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs, as well as high robustness and accuracy of the employed deposition method, make the presented approach a valid candidate for advanced engineering of cartilage tissue. PMID:27431574

  15. Biomimetics: forecasting the future of science, engineering, and medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jangsun Hwang,1 Yoon Jeong,1,2 Jeong Min Park,3 Kwan Hong Lee,1,2,4 Jong Wook Hong,1,2 Jonghoon Choi1,2 1Department of Bionano Technology, Graduate School, Hanyang University, Seoul, 2Department of Bionano Engineering, Hanyang University ERICA, Ansan, Korea; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 4OpenView Venture Partners, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Biomimetics is the study of nature and natural phenomena to understand the principles of underlying mechanisms, to obtain ideas from nature, and to apply concepts that may benefit science, engineering, and medicine. Examples of biomimetic studies include fluid-drag reduction swimsuits inspired by the structure of shark’s skin, velcro fasteners modeled on burrs, shape of airplanes developed from the look of birds, and stable building structures copied from the backbone of turban shells. In this article, we focus on the current research topics in biomimetics and discuss the potential of biomimetics in science, engineering, and medicine. Our report proposes to become a blueprint for accomplishments that can stem from biomimetics in the next 5 years as well as providing insight into their unseen limitations. Keywords: biomimicry, tissue engineering, biomaterials, nature, nanotechnology, nanomedicine

  16. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Steckel

    Full Text Available We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  17. Effects of Biomimetic Surface Designs on Furrow Opener Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Tong; Ballel. Z. Moayad; Yun-hai Ma; Ji-yu Sun; Dong-hui Chen; Hong-lei Jia; Lu-quan Ren

    2009-01-01

    The effects of biomimetic designs of tine furrow opener surface on equivalent pressure and pressure in the direction of motion on opener surface against soil were studied by finite element method (FEM) simulation and the effects of these designs on tool force and power requirements were examined experimentally. Geometrical structures of the cuticle surfaces of dung beetle (Copris ochus Motschulsky) were examined by stereoscopy. The structures of the cuticle surfaces and Ultra High Mo-lecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) material were modeled on surface of tine furrow opener as biomimetic designs. Seven furrow openers were analyzed in ANSYS program (a FEM simulation software). The biomimetic furrow opener surfaces with UHMWPE structures were found to have lower equivalent pressure and pressure in the direction of motion as compared to the conventional surface and to the biomimetic surfaces with textured steel-35 structures. It was found that the tool force and power were increased with the cutting depth and operating speed and the biomimetic furrow opener with UHMWPE tubular section ridges showed the lowest resistance and power requirement against soil.

  18. Sustainability assessment of a lightweight biomimetic ceiling structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intensive and continuous debate centres on the question of whether biomimetics has a specific potential to contribute to sustainability. In the context of a case study, the objective of this paper is to contribute to this debate by presenting the first systematic approach to assess the sustainability of a complex biomimetic product. The object of inquiry is a lecture hall's ribbed slab. Based on criteria suggested by the Association of German Engineers (VDI), it has been verified that the slab has been correctly defined as biomimetic. Moreover, a systematic comparative product sustainability assessment has been carefully carried out. For purposes of comparison, estimated static calculations have been performed for conceivable current state-of-the-art lightweight ceiling structures. Alternative options are a hollow article slab and a pre-stressed flat slab. Besides a detailed benefit analysis and a discussion of social effects, their costs have also been compared. A particularly detailed life cycle assessment on the respective environmental impacts has also been performed. Results show that the biomimetic ribbed slab built in the 1960s is able to keep up with the current state-of-the-art lightweight solutions in terms of sustainability. These promising results encourage a systematic search for a broad range of sustainable biomimetic solutions. (paper)

  19. Numerical Analysis of Erosion Caused by Biomimetic Axial Fan Blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Qiu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage caused by erosion has been reported in several industries for a wide range of situations. In the present work, a new method is presented to improve the erosion resistance of machine components by biomimetic method. A numerical investigation of solid particle erosion in the standard and biomimetic configuration blade of axial fan is presented. The analysis consists in the application of the discrete phase model, for modeling the solid particles flow, and the Eulerian conservation equations to the continuous phase. The numerical study employs computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, based on a finite volume method. User-defined function was used to define wear equation. Gas/solid flow axial fan was simulated to calculate the erosion rate of the particles on the fan blades and comparatively analyzed the erosive wear of the smooth surface, the groove-shaped, and convex hull-shaped biomimetic surface axial flow fan blade. The results show that the groove-shaped biomimetic blade antierosion ability is better than that of the other two fan blades. Thoroughly analyze of antierosion mechanism of the biomimetic blade from many factors including the flow velocity contours and flow path lines, impact velocity, impact angle, particle trajectories, and the number of collisions.

  20. BatSLAM: Simultaneous localization and mapping using biomimetic sonar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckel, Jan; Peremans, Herbert

    2013-01-01

    We propose to combine a biomimetic navigation model which solves a simultaneous localization and mapping task with a biomimetic sonar mounted on a mobile robot to address two related questions. First, can robotic sonar sensing lead to intelligent interactions with complex environments? Second, can we model sonar based spatial orientation and the construction of spatial maps by bats? To address these questions we adapt the mapping module of RatSLAM, a previously published navigation system based on computational models of the rodent hippocampus. We analyze the performance of the proposed robotic implementation operating in the real world. We conclude that the biomimetic navigation model operating on the information from the biomimetic sonar allows an autonomous agent to map unmodified (office) environments efficiently and consistently. Furthermore, these results also show that successful navigation does not require the readings of the biomimetic sonar to be interpreted in terms of individual objects/landmarks in the environment. We argue that the system has applications in robotics as well as in the field of biology as a simple, first order, model for sonar based spatial orientation and map building.

  1. Conventional vs Biomimetic Approaches to the Exploration of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellery, A.

    It is not usual to refer to convention in planetary exploration missions by virtue of the innovation required for such projects. The term conventional refers to the methodologies, tools and approaches typically adopted in engineering that are applied to such missions. Presented is a "conventional" Mars rover mission in which the author was involved - ExoMars - into which is interspersed references to examples where biomimetic approaches may yield superior capabilities. Biomimetics is a relatively recently active area of research which seeks to examine how biological systems solve the problem of survival in the natural environment. Biological organisms are autonomous entities that must survive in a hostile world adapting both adaptivity and robustness. It is not then surprising that biomimetics is particularly useful when applied to robotic elements of a Mars exploration mission. I present a number of areas in which biomimetics may yield new solutions to the problem of Mars exploration - optic flow navigation, potential field navigation, genetically-evolved neuro-controllers, legged locomotion, electric motors implementing muscular behaviour, and a biomimetic drill based on the wood wasp ovipositor. Each of these techniques offers an alternative approach to conventional ones. However, the perceptive hurdles are likely to dwarf the technical hurdles in implementing many of these methods in the near future.

  2. Elasticity and Geomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R. O.; Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    1996-04-01

    This book concisely examines the use of elasticity in solving geotechnical engineering problems. In a highly illustrated and user-friendly format, it provides a thorough grounding in the linear theory of elasticity and an understanding of the applications. The first two chapters present a basic framework of the theory of elasticity and describe test procedures for the determination of elastic parameters for soils. Chapters 3 and 4 present the fundamental solutions of Boussinesque, Kelvin, and Mindlin, and use these to formulate solutions to problems of practical interest in geotechnical engineering. The book concludes with a sequence of appendices designed to provide the interested student with details of elasticity theory that are peripheral to the main text. Each chapter concludes with a set of questions for the student to answer. The book is appropriate for upper level students in civil engineering and engineering geology.

  3. Osteoinductive peptide-functionalized nanofibers with highly ordered structure as biomimetic scaffolds for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao X

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Xiang Gao,1,2,* Xiaohong Zhang,3,* Jinlin Song,1,2 Xiao Xu,4 Anxiu Xu,1 Mengke Wang,4 Bingwu Xie,1 Enyi Huang,2 Feng Deng,1,2 Shicheng Wei2–41College of Stomatology, 2Chongqing Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases and Biomedical Sciences, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 3Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, 4Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The construction of functional biomimetic scaffolds that recapitulate the topographical and biochemical features of bone tissue extracellular matrix is now of topical interest in bone tissue engineering. In this study, a novel surface-functionalized electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL nanofiber scaffold with highly ordered structure was developed to simulate the critical features of native bone tissue via a single step of catechol chemistry. Specially, under slightly alkaline aqueous solution, polydopamine (pDA was coated on the surface of aligned PCL nanofibers after electrospinning, followed by covalent immobilization of bone morphogenetic protein-7-derived peptides onto the pDA-coated nanofiber surface. Contact angle measurement, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the presence of pDA and peptides on PCL nanofiber surface. Our results demonstrated that surface modification with osteoinductive peptides could improve cytocompatibility of nanofibers in terms of cell adhesion, spreading, and proliferation. Most importantly, Alizarin Red S staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunostaining, and Western blot revealed that human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on aligned nanofibers with osteoinductive peptides exhibited enhanced osteogenic differentiation potential than

  4. Biomimetic Mineralization of Recombinamer-Based Hydrogels toward Controlled Morphologies and High Mineral Density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuping; Chen, Xi; Fok, Alex; Rodriguez-Cabello, Jose Carlos; Aparicio, Conrado

    2015-11-25

    The use of insoluble organic matrices as a structural template for the bottom-up fabrication of organic-inorganic nanocomposites is a powerful way to build a variety of advanced materials with defined and controlled morphologies and superior mechanical properties. Calcium phosphate mineralization in polymeric hydrogels is receiving significant attention in terms of obtaining biomimetic hierarchical structures with unique mechanical properties and understanding the mechanisms of the biomineralization process. However, integration of organic matrices with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals, different in morphology and composition, has not been well-achieved yet at nanoscale. In this study, we synthesized thermoresponsive hydrogels, composed of elastin-like recombinamers (ELRs), to template mineralization of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals using a biomimetic polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. Different from conventional mineralization where minerals were deposited on the surface of organic matrices, they were infiltrated into the frameworks of ELR matrices, preserving their microporous structure. After 14 days of mineralization, an average of 78 μm mineralization depth was achieved. Mineral density up to 1.9 g/cm(3) was found after 28 days of mineralization, which is comparable to natural bone and dentin. In the dry state, the elastic modulus and hardness of the mineralized hydrogels were 20.3 ± 1.7 and 0.93 ± 0.07 GPa, respectively. After hydration, they were reduced to 4.50 ± 0.55 and 0.10 ± 0.03 GPa, respectively. These values were lower but still on the same order of magnitude as those of natural hard tissues. The results indicated that inorganic-organic hybrid biomaterials with controlled morphologies can be achieved using organic templates of ELRs. Notably, the chemical and physical properties of ELRs can be tuned, which might help elucidate the mechanisms by which living organisms regulate the mineralization process.

  5. Biomimetic Coacervate Environments for Protein Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Sarah; McCall, Patrick; Srivastava, Samavayan; Kovar, David; Gardel, Margaret; Tirrell, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Living cells have evolved sophisticated intracellular organization strategies that are challenging to reproduce synthetically. Biomolecular function depends on both the structure of the molecule itself and the properties of the surrounding medium. The ability to simulate the in vivo environment and isolate biological networks for study in an artificial milieu without sacrificing the crowding, structure, and compartmentalization of a cellular environment, represent engineering challenges with tremendous potential to impact both biological studies and biomedical applications. Emerging experience has shown that polypeptide-based complex coacervation (electrostatically-driven liquid-liquid phase separation) produces a biomimetic microenvironment capable of tuning protein biochemical activity. We have investigated the effect of polypeptide-based coacervates on the dynamic self-assembly of cytoskeletal actin filaments. Coacervate materials are able to directly affect the nucleation and assembly dynamics. We observe effects that can be attributed to the length and chemical specificity of the encapsulating polypeptides, as well as the overall crowded nature of a polymer-rich coacervate phase. Coacervate-based systems are particularly attractive for use in biochemical assays because the compartmentalization afforded by liquid-liquid phase separation does not necessarily inhibit the transport of molecules across the compartmental barrier.

  6. Mineralization of Zein Films by Biomimetic Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xiaoning; ZHANG Yanxiang; MA Ying; ZENG Sheng; WANG Shaozhen; MA Yalu

    2015-01-01

    The transparent or opaque zein film was prepared by a phase separation method with a zein ethanol aqueous solution. The circular zein film was self-assembled on the air-water interface. According to the images by scanning elec-tron microscopy, the upper surface of film is flat and smooth and the downward surface presents a complex reticulation structure of corn protein fiber. Zein film as a biomimetic mineralization template is used to synthesize calcium phosphate crystals by a bioinspired mineralization process. Randomly oriented apatite crystals appear on the both surfaces of zein film after immersion in 10´simulated body fluid, and the phase composition and morphology of the deposited calcium apatite are also distinguished from deposited location and immersion time. The phase transformation process from dical-cium phosphate dihydrate into hydroxyapatite (HAp) phase was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Based on the results by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the Ca/P ratio of the deposited apatite increases with the transformation from DCPD to HAp. The HAp/Zein films possess the excellent biodegradable structural features, and the coating of HAp crystallites has some potential applications for bone repair and regeneration.

  7. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  8. Biomimetic Pattern Recognition Theory and Its Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShoujue; ZHAOXingtao

    2004-01-01

    Biomimetic pattern recogntion (BPR),which is based on “cognition” instead of “classification”,is much closer to the function of human being. The basis of BPR is the Principle of homology-continuity (PHC),which means the difference between two samples of the same class must be gradually changed. The aim of BPR is to find an optimal covering in the feature space, which emphasizes the “similarity” among homologous group members, rather than “division” in traditional pattern recognition. Some applications of BPR are surveyed, in which the results of BPR are much better than the results of Support Vector Machine. A novel neuron model, Hyper sausage neuron (HSN), is shown as a kind of covering units in BPR. The mathematical description of HSN is given and the 2-dimensional discriminant boundary of HSN is shown. In two special cases, in which samples are distributed in a line segment and a circle, both the HSN networks and RBF networks are used for covering. The results show that HSN networks act better than RBF networks in generalization, especially for small sample set, which are consonant with the results of the applications of BPR. And a brief explanation of the HSN networks' advantages in covering general distributed samples is also given.

  9. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-01

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections. PMID:26992656

  10. Development of Underwater Microrobot with Biomimetic Locomotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Microrobots have powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields. They should have a compact structure, be easy to manufacture, have efficient locomotion, be driven by low voltage and have a simple control system. To meet these purposes, inspired by the leg of stick insects, we designed a novel type of microrobot with biomimetic locomotion with 1-DOF (degree of freedom legs. The locomotion includes two ionic conducting polymer film (ICPF actuators to realize the 2-DOF motion. We developed several microrobots with this locomotion. Firstly, we review a microrobot, named Walker-1, with 1-DOF motion. And then a new microrobot, named Walker-2, utilizing six ICPF actuators, with 3-DOF motion is introduced. It is 47 mm in diameter and 8 mm in height (in static state. It has 0.61 g of dried weight. We compared the two microrobot prototypes, and the result shows that Walker-2 has some advantages, such as more flexible moving motion, good balance, less water resistance, more load-carrying ability and so on. We also compared it with some insect-inspired microrobots and some microrobots with 1-DOF legs, and the result shows that a microrobot with this novel type of locomotion has some advantages. Its structure has fewer actuators and joints, a simpler control system and is compact. The ICPF actuator decides that it can be driven by low voltage (less than 5 V and move in water. A microrobot with this locomotion has powerful applications in biomedical and naval fields.

  11. Software architecture of biomimetic underwater vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praczyk, Tomasz; Szymak, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous underwater vehicles are vehicles that are entirely or partly independent of human decisions. In order to obtain operational independence, the vehicles have to be equipped with a specialized software. The main task of the software is to move the vehicle along a trajectory with collision avoidance. Moreover, the software has also to manage different devices installed on the vehicle board, e.g. to start and stop cameras, sonars etc. In addition to the software embedded on the vehicle board, the software responsible for managing the vehicle by the operator is also necessary. Its task is to define mission of the vehicle, to start, to stop the mission, to send emergency commands, to monitor vehicle parameters, and to control the vehicle in remotely operated mode. An important objective of the software is also to support development and tests of other software components. To this end, a simulation environment is necessary, i.e. simulation model of the vehicle and all its key devices, the model of the sea environment, and the software to visualize behavior of the vehicle. The paper presents architecture of the software designed for biomimetic autonomous underwater vehicle (BAUV) that is being constructed within the framework of the scientific project financed by Polish National Center of Research and Development.

  12. A multi-electrode biomimetic electrolocation sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayekar, K.; Damalla, D.; Gottwald, M.; Bousack, H.; von der Emde, G.

    2012-04-01

    We present the concept of an active multi-electrode catheter inspired by the electroreceptive system of the weakly electric fish, Gnathonemus petersii. The skin of this fish exhibits numerous electroreceptor organs which are capable of sensing a self induced electrical field. Our sensor is composed of a sending electrode and sixteen receiving electrodes. The electrical field produced by the sending electrode was measured by the receiving electrodes and objects were detected by the perturbation of the electrical field they induce. The intended application of such a sensor is in coronary diagnostics, in particular in distinguishing various types of plaques, which are major causes of heart attack. For calibration of the sensor system, finite element modeling (FEM) was performed. To validate the model, experimental measurements were carried out with two different systems. The physical system was glass tubing with metal and plastic wall insertions as targets. For the control of the experiment and for data acquisition, the software LabView designed for 17 electrodes was used. Different parameters of the electric images were analyzed for the prediction of the electrical properties and size of the inserted targets in the tube. Comparisons of the voltage modulations predicted from the FEM model and the experiments showed a good correspondence. It can be concluded that this novel biomimetic method can be further developed for detailed investigations of atherosclerotic lesions. Finally, we discuss various design strategies to optimize the output of the sensor using different simulated models to enhance target recognition.

  13. Biomimetic visual detection based on insect neurobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, David C.

    2001-11-01

    With a visual system that accounts for as much as 30% of the lifted mass, flying insects such as dragonflies and hoverflies invest more in vision than any other animal. Impressive visual performance is subserved by a surprisingly simple visual system. In a typical insect eye, between 2,000 and 30,000 pixels in the image are analyzed by fewer than 200,000 neurons in underlying neural circuits. The combination of sophisticated visual processing with an approachable level of complexity has made the insect visual system a leading model for biomimetic approaches to computer vision. Much neurobiological research has focused on neural circuits used for detection of moving patterns (e.g. optical flow during flight) and moving targets (e.g. prey). Research from several labs has led to great advances in our understanding of the neural mechanisms involved, and has spawned neuromorphic hardware based on key processes identified in neurobiological experiments. Despite its attractions, the highly non-linear nature of several key stages in insect visual processing presents a challenge to understanding. I will describe examples of adaptive elements of neural circuits in the fly visual system which analyze the direction and velocity of wide-field optical flow patterns and the result of experiments that suggest that these non-linearities may contribute to robust responses to natural image motion.

  14. Effective Length Design of Humanoid Robot Fingers Using Biomimetic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Ho Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose an effective design method for the phalangeal parameters and the total size of humanoid robot fingers based on a biomimetic optimization. For the optimization, an interphalangeal joint coordination parameter and the length constraints inherent in human fingers are considered from a biomimetic perspective. A reasonable grasp formulation is also taken into account from the viewpoint of power grasping, where the grasp space of a humanoid robot finger is importantly considered to determine the phalangeal length parameters. The usefulness of the devised biomimetic optimization method is shown through the design examples of various humanoid robot fingers. In fact, the optimization-based finger design method enables us to determine effectively the proper phalangeal size of humanoid robot fingers for human-like object handling tasks. In addition, we discuss its contribution to the structural configuration and coordinated motion of a humanoid robot finger, and address its practical availability in terms of effective finger design.

  15. Biomimetic Nanotechnology: A Powerful Means to address Global Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Gebeshuber, Ille C

    2010-01-01

    Biomimetic nanotechnology is a prominent research area at the meeting place of life sciences with engineering and physics: it is a continuously growing field that deals with knowledge transfer from biology to nanotechnology. Biomimetic nanotechnology is a field that has the potential to substantially support successful mastering of major global challenges. The Millennium Project was commissioned by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2002 to develop a concrete action plan for the world to reverse the grinding poverty, hunger and disease affecting billions of people. It states 15 Global Challenges: sustainable development, water, population and resources, democratization, long-term perspectives, information technology, the rich-poor gap, health, capacity to decide, peace and conflict, status of women, transnational crime, energy, science and technology and global ethics. The possible contributions to master these challenges with the help of biomimetic nanotechnology will be discussed in detail.

  16. Tribological and electrochemical studies on biomimetic synovial fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, tribological and electrochemical performances of the new biomimetic synovial fluids were studied according to different composition concentrations, including hyaluronic acid, albumin and alendronic acid sodium. By using Taguchi method, the composition contents of the biomimetic synovial fluids were designed. Items such as friction coefficient, mean scar diameter and viscosity were investigated via a four-ball tribo-tester, viscosity meter and optical microscope. Polarization studies were carried out to analyze the electrochemical behaviour of the fluids. Results showed that hyaluronic acid dominates the viscosity of the fluids. High albumin concentration will reduce friction, while increasing wear rate due to the electro-chemical effect. Alendronic acid sodium is found to reduce the biocorrosion of CoCrMo as well as provide better lubricating. In conclusion, biomimetic synovial fluids partially recover the functions of natural synovial fluids and provide good lubricating property.

  17. PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Keith Kin Kei

    Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.

  18. Elastic chitosan/chondroitin sulfate multilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, M P; Cleymand, F; Mano, J F

    2016-01-01

    Freestanding multilayered films were obtained using layer-by-layer (LbL) technology from the assembly of natural polyelectrolytes, namely chitosan (CHT) and chondroitin sulfate (CS). The morphology and the transparency of the membranes were evaluated. The influence of genipin (1 and 2 mg ml(-1)), a naturally-derived crosslinker agent, was also investigated in the control of the mechanical properties of the CHT/CS membranes. The water uptake ability can be tailored by changing the crosslinker concentration that also controls the Young's modulus and ultimate tensile strength. The maximum extension tends to decrease upon crosslinking with the highest genipin concentration, compromising the elastic properties of CHT/CS membranes: nevertheless, when using a lower genipin concentration, the ultimate tensile stress is similar to the non-crosslinked one, but exhibits a significantly higher modulus. Moreover, the crosslinked multilayer membranes exhibited shape memory properties, through a simple hydration action. The in vitro biological assays showed better L929 cell adhesion and proliferation when using the crosslinked membranes and confirmed the non-cytotoxicity of the developed CHT/CS membranes. Within this research work, we were able to construct freestanding biomimetic multilayer structures with tailored swelling, mechanical and biological properties that could find applicability in a variety of biomedical applications. PMID:27200488

  19. Isotropic Versus Bipolar Functionalized Biomimetic Artificial Basement Membranes and Their Evaluation in Long-Term Human Cell Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Angela; Wistlich, Laura; Heffels, Karl-Heinz; Walles, Heike; Groll, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    In addition to dividing tissues into compartments, basement membranes are crucial as cell substrates and to regulate cellular behavior. The development of artificial basement membranes is indispensable for the ultimate formation of functional engineered tissues; however, pose a challenge due to their complex structure. Herein, biodegradable electrospun polyester meshes are presented, exhibiting isotropic or bipolar bioactivation as a biomimetic and biofunctional model of the natural basement membrane. In a one-step preparation process, reactive star-shaped prepolymer additives, which generate a hydrophilic fiber surface, are electrospun with cell-adhesion-mediating peptides, derived from major components of the basement membrane. Human skin cells adhere to the functionalized meshes, and long-term co-culture experiments confirm that the artificial basement membranes recapitulate and preserve tissue specific functions. Several layers of immortalized human keratinocytes grow on the membranes, differentiating toward the surface and expressing typical epithelial markers. Fibroblasts migrate into the reticular lamina mimicking part of the mesh. Both cells types begin to produce extracellular matrix proteins and to remodel the initial membrane. It is shown at the example of skin that the artificial basement membrane design provokes biomimetic responses of different cell types and can thus be used as basis for the future development of basement membrane containing tissues. PMID:27283510

  20. Elastic membranes in confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  1. Desalination by biomimetic aquaporin membranes: Review of status and prospects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, C.Y.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, R.;

    2013-01-01

    Based on their unique combination of offering high water permeability and high solute rejection aquaporin proteins have attracted considerable interest over the last years as functional building blocks of biomimetic membranes for water desalination and reuse. The purpose of this review...... is to provide an overview of the properties of aquaporins, their preparation and characterization. We discuss the challenges in exploiting the remarkable properties of aquaporin proteins for membrane separation processes and we present various attempts to construct aquaporin in membranes for desalination......; including an overview of our own recent developments in aquaporin-based membranes. Finally we outline future prospects of aquaporin based biomimetic membrane for desalination and water reuse....

  2. Biomimetic actuators using electroactive polymers (EAP) as artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2006-01-01

    Evolution has resolved many of nature's challenges leading to lasting solutions with maximal performance and effective use of resources. Nature's inventions have always inspired human achievements leading to effective materials, structures, tools, mechanisms, processes, algorithms, methods, systems and many other benefits. The field of mimicking nature is known as Biomimetics and one of its topics includes electroactive polymers that gain the moniker artificial muscles. Integrating EAP with embedded sensors, self-repair and many other capabilities that are used in composite materials can add greatly to the capability of smart biomimetic systems. Such development would enable fascinating possibilities potentially turning science fiction ideas into engineering reality.

  3. Towards ultrahydrophobic surfaces: a biomimetic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mock, Ulrike [Department of Chemistry and Physics of Interfaces, University of Freiburg, Institute for Microsystems Technology, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Foerster, Ralf [Department of Process Technology, University of Freiburg, Institute for Microsystems Technology, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Menz, Wolfgang [Department of Process Technology, University of Freiburg, Institute for Microsystems Technology, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ruehe, Juergen [Department of Chemistry and Physics of Interfaces, University of Freiburg, Institute for Microsystems Technology, Georges-Koehler-Allee 103, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2005-03-09

    We report on efforts to mimic the wetting behaviour of surfaces or leaves of certain plants, which are rendered ultrahydrophobic through a dense layer of hairs grown on top of the leaf. We use a simple moulding approach to obtain elastic hydrophilic hydrogel networks with pillar structures that may serve as model systems for such hairy surfaces. In order to generate such structures, we first generate either a steel master or directly use a lady's mantle leaf. Second, the master is moulded against a silicone to yield an elastomer, which is a negative of the hairy surface. A subsequent radical polymerization in the negative leads to the formation of an elastic hydrogel even for the very high aspect ratios characteristic of the natural system. The results of some preliminary contact angle measurements on the obtained structures are discussed.

  4. Study of elastic system fibers in human gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Augusto Soares Machado

    Full Text Available Objective: To map the participation of the elastic system fibers of human gingiva. Methods: To conduct this study, fragments of human gingiva from ten individuals aged between 18 and 60 years, removed after periodontal surgery for prosthetic purposes, were analyzed by the histochemical and immuno-histochemical methods, to evaluate the participation of the elastic system fibers in this tissue. Results: The results demonstrated the presence of three type of elastic system fibers, that is to say, oxitalan, elaunin and elastic fibers,distributed as follows: 1 the oxitalan fibers form a network of thin fibers, located close to the basal membrane, at the level of the conjunctive tissue papillae; 2 elaunin fibers are found in close contact with the oxitalan fibers in the papillary and submaxillary regions, following the collagen fiber bundles; 3 a small quantity of elastic fibers were observed, dispersed throughout the deeper conjunctive tissue and around the blood vessels. Conclusion: The three types of elastic system fibers, that is, oxitalan, elaunin and elastic fibers are normal constituents of the extracellular matrixof human gingiva conjunctive tissue.

  5. Deflation of elastic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilliet, Catherine; Quemeneur, François; Marmottant, Philippe; Imhof, Arnout; Pépin-Donat, Brigitte; van Blaaderen, Alfons

    2010-03-01

    The deflation of elastic spherical surfaces has been numerically investigated, and show very different types of deformations according the range of elastic parameters, some of them being quantitatively explained through simple calculations. This allows to retrieve various shapes observed on hollow shells (from colloidal to centimeter scale), on lipid vesicles, or on some biological objects. The extension of this process to other geometries allows to modelize vegetal objects such as the ultrafast trap of carnivorous plants.

  6. ELASTICITY OF PARTY DEMAND

    OpenAIRE

    Yaskova L.V.

    2012-01-01

    On basis of sociological researches political parties as social organizations in Russia (on the example of regional branches of Lipetsk region political parties) on the entry into force of the law «About political parties» 2001 till the present moment are analyzed. It is underlined the change of volume of party space actors during various elective periods, characterized by elasticity of party demand. The factors defining elasticity of party demand are concluded. The estimation of party demand...

  7. Mastering ElasticSearch

    CERN Document Server

    Kuc, Rafal

    2013-01-01

    A practical tutorial that covers the difficult design, implementation, and management of search solutions.Mastering ElasticSearch is aimed at to intermediate users who want to extend their knowledge about ElasticSearch. The topics that are described in the book are detailed, but we assume that you already know the basics, like the query DSL or data indexing. Advanced users will also find this book useful, as the examples are getting deep into the internals where it is needed.

  8. Elasticity of developing cardiac tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, Stephanie; Swift, Joe; Krieger, Christine; Discher, Dennis

    2011-03-01

    Proper development and function of the heart from the tissue to cellular scale depends on a compliant ECM. Here we study the maturation of embryonic cardiac tissue mechanics in parallel with the effects of extracellular mechanics on individual cardiomyocyte function throughout early development. We used micropipette aspiration to measure local and bulk elastic moduli (E) of embryonic avian heart tissue from days 2-12. We observe stiffening of the early heart tube from E = 1 kPa at day 1 to E = 2 kPa at day 4, reaching neonatal values by day 12. Treating heart tubes with blebbistatin led to 30% decrease in E, indicating a significant but partial actomyosin contribution to mechanics at these stages. We performed a proteomic analysis of intact and decellularized 2-4 day heart tubes by mass spectrometry to quantify the ECM present at these stages. Isolated cardiomyocytes from 2-4 day chick embryos were cultured on collagen-coated PA gels of various stiffnesses. Beating magnitude was modulated by substrates with E = 1-2 kPa, similar to physiological E at those stages.

  9. Biomimetic processing of oriented crystalline ceramic layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesarano, J.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this project was to develop the capabilities for Sandia to fabricate self assembled Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of various materials and to exploit their two-dimensional crystalline structure to promote the growth of oriented thin films of inorganic materials at room temperature. This includes the design and synthesis of Langmuir-active (amphiphilic) organic molecules with end groups offering high nucleation potential for various ceramics. A longer range goal is that of understanding the underlying principles, making it feasible to use the techniques presented in this report to fabricate unique oriented films of various materials for electronic, sensor, and membrane applications. Therefore, whenever possible, work completed in this report was completed with the intention of addressing the fundamental phenomena underlying the growth of crystalline, inorganic films on template layers of highly organized organic molecules. This problem was inspired by biological processes, which often produce exquisitely engineered structures via templated growth on polymeric layers. Seashells, for example, exhibit great toughness owing to their fine brick-and-mortar structure that results from templated growth of calcium carbonate on top of layers of ordered organic proteins. A key goal in this work, therefore, is to demonstrate a positive correlation between the order and orientation of the template layer and that of the crystalline ceramic material grown upon it. The work completed was comprised of several parallel efforts that encompassed the entire spectrum of biomimetic growth from solution. Studies were completed on seashells and the mechanisms of growth for calcium carbonate. Studies were completed on the characterization of LB films and the capability developed for the in-house fabrication of these films. Standard films of fatty acids were studied as well as novel polypeptides and porphyrins that were synthesized.

  10. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  11. Desnutrição materna durante a lactação em ratos Wistar: efeitos sobre as fibras elásticas da matriz extracelular na traqueia dos filhotes Maternal malnutrition during lactation in Wistar rats: effects on elastic fibers of the extracellular matrix in the trachea of offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Moreira de Andrade

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Investigar os efeitos da desnutrição proteica materna durante a lactação sobre as fibras elásticas da traqueia de filhotes de ratos Wistar. MÉTODOS: Ao nascimento, 12 filhotes machos de duas ratas Wistar foram igualmente divididos em dois grupos: grupo controle, cuja mãe recebeu água e dieta padrão de laboratório ad libitum durante a lactação, e grupo restrição proteica (RP, cuja mãe recebeu água ad libitum e dieta isoenergética com RP (8% de proteína. Aos 21 dias de vida, os filhotes foram sacrificados, e suas traqueias foram ressecadas. As fibras elásticas foram coradas pelo método de resorcina-fucsina de Weigert (precedido de oxidação e avaliadas sob microscopia óptica. As determinações morfométricas foram feitas por estereologia, utilizando o método de contagem de pontos, e expressas em densidade volumétrica. RESULTADOS: As fibras elásticas foram identificadas abaixo da mucosa traqueal, sendo a maioria em distribuição longitudinal. Além disso, camadas circulares bem definidas de fibras elásticas envolviam as superfícies interna e externa do anel cartilaginoso. Não houve diferenças entre os grupos quanto à organização e distribuição das fibras elásticas. A densidade volumétrica das fibras elásticas dos filhotes nos grupos controle e RP foi de, respectivamente, 2,46 ± 0,99% e 3,25 ± 1,13% (p OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of maternal protein malnutrition during lactation on the elastic fibers in the tracheas of Wistar rat pups. METHODS: At delivery, 12 male pups of two Wistar rat dams were equally divided into two groups: control, in which the dam received water and standard rat chow ad libitum during lactation; and protein-restricted (PR, in which the dam received water ad libitum and an isoenergetic PR diet (8% protein. At 21 days of age, the pups were killed and their tracheas were excised. The elastic fibers were stained with Weigert's resorcin-fuchsin (after oxidation and

  12. On constant elasticities of demand

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés Vázquez

    1998-01-01

    While the Slutsky matrix and duality theory have been used to establish that constant elasticity demand functions imply unitary income elasticities, zero cross price elasticities and own price elasticities equal to minus one, this note shows that these results can also be straightforwardly derived from the simple assumption that demand functions satisfy the budget constraint with strict equality.

  13. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Algieri

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported.

  14. Hierarcially biomimetic bone materials: from nanometer to millimeter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG W.; CUI F. Z.; LIAO S. S.

    2001-01-01

    @@ The bone composite was produced by biomimetic synthesis. It shows some features of natural bone in both composition and microstructure. And the collagen moleculars and the nano-crystal hydroxyapatite assemble into ultrastructure similar to natural bone. It possesses porous structure with porosity from 100μm to 500μm after mixed with PLA (poly lactic acid).

  15. An efficient biomimetic coating methodology for a prosthetic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adawy, Alaa, E-mail: a.adawy@science.ru.nl [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Fattah, Wafa I. [Biomaterials Department, National Research Centre, Giza (Egypt)

    2013-04-01

    The combination of the load-bearing metallic implants with the bioactive materials in the design of synthetic implants is an important aspect in the biomaterials research. Biomimetic coating of bioinert alloys with calcium phosphate phases provides a good alternative to the prerequisite for the continual replacement of implants because of the failure of bone-implant integration. We attempted to accelerate the biomimetic coating process of stainless steel alloy (316L) with biomimetic apatite. In addition, we investigated the incorporation of functioning minerals such as strontianite and smithsonite into the deposited layer. In order to develop a highly mature apatite coating, our method requires soaking of the pre-treated alloy in highly concentrated synthetic body fluid for only few hours. Surface characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS). Also, the deposited apatitic layers were analysed by powder diffraction X-ray analysis (XRD). 316L surface showed the growth of highly crystalline, low carbonated hydroxyapatite, after only 6 h of the whole soaking process. Highlights: ► The manuscript describes a fast and efficient biomimetic coating methodology. ► This methodology can be used for metallic implants. ► 316L was coated with crystalline hydroxyapatite. ► Addition of strontium and zinc lead to the deposition of brushite. ► Coating of all synthetic solutions is highly crystalline.

  16. Biomimetic flavin-catalysed reactions for organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, H; Imada, Y; Murahashi, S-I

    2015-07-28

    Using simple riboflavin related compounds as biomimetic catalysts, catalytic oxidation of various substrates with hydrogen peroxide or molecular oxygen can be performed selectively under mild conditions. The principle of these reactions is fundamental and will provide a wide scope for environmentally benign future practical methods.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Modular Biomimetic Infochemical Communication System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rácz, Z.; Cole, M.; Gardner, J.W.; Chowdhury, M.F.; Bula, W.P.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Karout, S.; Capurro, A.; Pearce, T.C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here the design and implementation of a novel biomimetic infochemical communication system that employs airborne molecules alone to communicate over space and time. The system involves the design and fabrication of a microsystem capable of producing and releasing a precise mix of biosynt

  18. A biomimetic tactile sensing system based on polyvinylidene fluoride film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yi; Tian, Hongying; Guo, Chao; Li, Xiang; Sun, Hongshuai; Wang, Peiyuan; Qian, Chenghui; Wang, Shuhong; Wang, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film has been widely investigated as a sensing material due to its outstanding properties such as biocompatibility, high thermal stability, good chemical resistance, high piezo-, pyro- and ferro-electric properties. This paper reports on the design, test, and analysis of a biomimetic tactile sensor based on PVDF film. This sensor consists of a PVDF film with aluminum electrodes, a pair of insulating layers, and a "handprint" friction layer with a copper foil. It is designed for easy fabrication and high reliability in outputting signals. In bionics, the fingerprint of the glabrous skin plays an important role during object handling. Therefore, in order to enhance friction and to provide better manipulation, the ridges of the fingertips were introduced into the design of the proposed tactile sensor. And, a basic experimental study on the selection of the high sensitivity fingerprint type for the biomimetic sensor was performed. In addition, we proposed a texture distinguish experiment to verify the sensor sensitivity. The experiment's results show that the novel biomimetic sensor is effective in discriminating object surface characteristics. Furthermore, an efficient visual application program (LabVIEW) and a quantitative evaluation method were proposed for the verification of the biomimetic sensor. The proposed tactile sensor shows great potential for contact force and slip measurements.

  19. Case Study in Biomimetic Design: Handling and Assembly of Microparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Li; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Gegeckaite, Asta;

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the application of the biomimetic design process to the development of automated gripping devices for microparts. Handling and assembly of micromechanical parts is complicated by size effects that occur when part dimensions are scaled down. A common complication involves...

  20. Diffraction from relief gratings on a biomimetic elastomer cast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomimetic optical elements combine the optimized designs of nature with the versatility of materials engineering. We employ a beetle carapace as the template for fabricating relief gratings on an elastomer substrate. Biological surface features are successfully replicated by a direct casting procedure. Far-field diffraction effects are discussed in terms of the Fraunhofer approximation in Fourier space.

  1. 3D Modelling of Biological Systems for Biomimetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shujun Zhang; Kevin Hapeshi; Ashok K. Bhattacharya

    2004-01-01

    With the advanced development of computer-based enabling technologies, many engineering, medical, biology,chemistry, physics and food science etc have developed to the unprecedented levels, which lead to many research and development interests in various multi-discipline areas. Among them, biomimetics is one of the most promising and attractive branches of study. Biomimetics is a branch of study that uses biological systems as a model to develop synthetic systems.To learn from nature, one of the fundamental issues is to understand the natural systems such animals, insects, plants and human beings etc. The geometrical characterization and representation of natural systems is an important fundamental work for biomimetics research. 3D modeling plays a key role in the geometrical characterization and representation, especially in computer graphical visualization. This paper firstly presents the typical procedure of 3D modelling methods and then reviews the previous work of 3D geometrical modelling techniques and systems developed for industrial, medical and animation applications. Especially the paper discusses the problems associated with the existing techniques and systems when they are applied to 3D modelling of biological systems. Based upon the discussions, the paper proposes some areas of research interests in 3D modelling of biological systems and for Biomimetics.

  2. A Laboratory Exercise to Introduce Inorganic Biomimetic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Donald M.

    1985-01-01

    Biomimetic chemistry is concerned with the synthesis of small, molecular weight molecules which mimic the properties of metal-containing sites within certain biologically significant species. A series of experiments for an advanced undergraduate laboratory is described as a way to introduce this area into the chemistry curriculum. (JN)

  3. Nonlinear elastic waves in materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rushchitsky, Jeremiah J

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of the book is a coherent treatment of the theory of propagation in materials of nonlinearly elastic waves of displacements, which corresponds to one modern line of development of the nonlinear theory of elastic waves. The book is divided on five basic parts: the necessary information on waves and materials; the necessary information on nonlinear theory of elasticity and elastic materials; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – longitudinal, vertically and horizontally polarized transverse plane nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of one-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – cylindrical and torsional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement; analysis of two-dimensional nonlinear elastic waves of displacement – Rayleigh and Love nonlinear elastic surface waves. The book is addressed first of all to people working in solid mechanics – from the students at an advanced undergraduate and graduate level to the scientists, professional...

  4. Elasticity of plagioclase feldspars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. Michael; Angel, Ross J.; Ross, Nancy L.

    2016-02-01

    Elastic properties are reported for eight plagioclase feldspars that span compositions from albite (NaSi3AlO8) to anorthite (CaSi2Al2O8). Surface acoustic wave velocities measured using Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering and compliance sums from high-pressure X-ray compression studies accurately determine all 21 components of the elasticity tensor for these triclinic minerals. The overall pattern of elasticity and the changes in individual elastic components with composition can be rationalized on the basis of the evolution of crystal structures and chemistry across this solid-solution join. All plagioclase feldspars have high elastic anisotropy; a* (the direction perpendicular to the b and c axes) is the softest direction by a factor of 3 in albite. From albite to anorthite the stiffness of this direction undergoes the greatest change, increasing twofold. Small discontinuities in the elastic components, inferred to occur between the three plagioclase phases with distinct symmetry (C1>¯, I1>¯, and P1>¯), appear consistent with the nature of the underlying conformation of the framework-linked tetrahedra and the associated structural changes. Measured body wave velocities of plagioclase-rich rocks, reported over the last five decades, are consistent with calculated Hill-averaged velocities using the current moduli. This confirms long-standing speculation that previously reported elastic moduli for plagioclase feldspars are systematically in error. The current results provide greater assurance that the seismic structure of the middle and lower crusts can be accurately estimated on the basis of specified mineral modes, chemistry, and fabric.

  5. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Dremin, I M

    2012-01-01

    When colliding, the high energy hadrons can either produce new particles or scatter elastically without change of their quantum num- bers and other particles produced. Namely elastic scattering of hadrons is considered in this review paper. Even though the inelastic processes dominate at high energies, the elastic scattering constitutes the notice- able part of the total cross section ranging between 18 and 25% with some increase at higher energies. The scattering proceeds mostly at small angles and reveals peculiar dependences at larger angles disclos- ing the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and di?erent dynamical mechanisms. The fast decreasing Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoul- ders and dips and then by the power-like decrease. Results of various theoretical approaches are compared with exper- imental data. Phenomenological models pretending to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition requires the exponen- tial re...

  6. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  7. Proteoliposomes as matrix vesicles' biomimetics to study the initiation of skeletal mineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.S. Simão

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During the process of endochondral bone formation, chondrocytes and osteoblasts mineralize their extracellular matrix by promoting the formation of hydroxyapatite (HA seed crystals in the sheltered interior of membrane-limited matrix vesicles (MVs. Ion transporters control the availability of phosphate and calcium needed for HA deposition. The lipidic microenvironment in which MV-associated enzymes and transporters function plays a crucial physiological role and must be taken into account when attempting to elucidate their interplay during the initiation of biomineralization. In this short mini-review, we discuss the potential use of proteoliposome systems as chondrocyte- and osteoblast-derived MVs biomimetics, as a means of reconstituting a phospholipid microenvironment in a manner that recapitulates the native functional MV microenvironment. Such a system can be used to elucidate the interplay of MV enzymes during catalysis of biomineralization substrates and in modulating in vitro calcification. As such, the enzymatic defects associated with disease-causing mutations in MV enzymes could be studied in an artificial vesicular environment that better mimics their in vivo biological milieu. These artificial systems could also be used for the screening of small molecule compounds able to modulate the activity of MV enzymes for potential therapeutic uses. Such a nanovesicular system could also prove useful for the repair/treatment of craniofacial and other skeletal defects and to facilitate the mineralization of titanium-based tooth implants.

  8. Oxygen-plasma-modified biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds for enhanced compatibility of cardiovascular implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Pappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds have been extensively used in several biomedical applications for tissue engineering due to their morphological resemblance to the extracellular matrix (ECM. Especially, there is a need for the cardiovascular implants to exhibit a nanostructured surface that mimics the native endothelium in order to promote endothelialization and to reduce the complications of thrombosis and implant failure. Thus, we herein fabricated poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds, to serve as coatings for cardiovascular implants and guide tissue regeneration. Oxygen plasma treatment was applied in order to modify the surface chemistry of the scaffold and its effect on cell attachment and growth was evaluated. The conditions of the surface modification were properly adjusted in order to define those conditions of the treatment that result in surfaces favorable for cell growth, while maintaining morphological integrity and mechanical behavior. Goniometry (contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS measurements were used to evaluate the morphological and chemical changes induced by the plasma treatment. Moreover, depth-sensing nanoindentation was performed to study the resistance of the plasma-treated scaffolds to plastic deformation. Lastly, the cell studies indicated that all scaffolds were cytocompatible, with the plasma-treated ones expressing a more pronounced cell viability and adhesion. All the above findings demonstrate the great potential of these biomimetic tissue-engineering constructs as efficient coatings for enhanced compatibility of cardiovascular implants.

  9. Mechanics of elastic composites

    CERN Document Server

    Cristescu, Nicolaie Dan; Soós, Eugen

    2003-01-01

    This is a comprehensive, reader-friendly treatment of the theory behind modern elastic composite materials. The treatment includes recently developed results and methods drawn from research papers published in Eastern Europe that until now were unavailable in many western countries. Among the book''s many notable features is the inclusion of more than 400 problems, many of which are solved at the end of the book. Mechanics of Elastic Composites is an outstanding textbook for graduate-level course work and a valuable reference for engineers and researchers. Developed over many years by leading

  10. Anisotropic elastic plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hwu, Chyanbin

    2010-01-01

    As structural elements, anisotropic elastic plates find wide applications in modern technology. The plates here are considered to be subjected to not only in plane load but also transverse load. In other words, both plane and plate bending problems as well as the stretching-bending coupling problems are all explained in this book. In addition to the introduction of the theory of anisotropic elasticity, several important subjects have are discussed in this book such as interfaces, cracks, holes, inclusions, contact problems, piezoelectric materials, thermoelastic problems and boundary element a

  11. ElasticSearch server

    CERN Document Server

    Rogozinski, Marek

    2014-01-01

    This book is a detailed, practical, hands-on guide packed with real-life scenarios and examples which will show you how to implement an ElasticSearch search engine on your own websites.If you are a web developer or a user who wants to learn more about ElasticSearch, then this is the book for you. You do not need to know anything about ElastiSeach, Java, or Apache Lucene in order to use this book, though basic knowledge about databases and queries is required.

  12. Hybrid elastic solids

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Yun

    2011-06-26

    Metamaterials can exhibit electromagnetic and elastic characteristics beyond those found in nature. In this work, we present a design of elastic metamaterial that exhibits multiple resonances in its building blocks. Band structure calculations show two negative dispersion bands, of which one supports only compressional waves and thereby blurs the distinction between a fluid and a solid over a finite frequency regime, whereas the other displays super anisotropy-in which compressional waves and shear waves can propagate only along different directions. Such unusual characteristics, well explained by the effective medium theory, have no comparable analogue in conventional solids and may lead to novel applications. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  13. An elastic second skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Betty; Kang, Soo-Young; Akthakul, Ariya; Ramadurai, Nithin; Pilkenton, Morgan; Patel, Alpesh; Nashat, Amir; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.; Anderson, R. Rox; Langer, Robert

    2016-08-01

    We report the synthesis and application of an elastic, wearable crosslinked polymer layer (XPL) that mimics the properties of normal, youthful skin. XPL is made of a tunable polysiloxane-based material that can be engineered with specific elasticity, contractility, adhesion, tensile strength and occlusivity. XPL can be topically applied, rapidly curing at the skin interface without the need for heat- or light-mediated activation. In a pilot human study, we examined the performance of a prototype XPL that has a tensile modulus matching normal skin responses at low strain (skin barrier function, pharmaceutical delivery and wound dressings.

  14. Hyperplasia of elastic tissue in hepatic schistosomal fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilton A. Andrade

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available Elastic tissue hyperplasia, revealed by means of histological, immunocytochemical and ultrastructural methods, appeared as a prominent change in surgical liver biopsies taken from 61 patients with schistosomal periportal and septal fibrosis. Such hyperplasia was absent in ecperimental murine schistosomiasis, including mice with "pipe-stem" fibrosis. Displaced connective tissue cells in periportal areas, such as smooth muscle cells, more frequently observed in human material, could be the site of excessive elastin synthesis, and could explain the differences observed in human and experimental materials. Elastic tissue, sometimes represented by its microfibrillar components, also appeared to be more condensed in areas of matrix (collagen degradation, suggesting a participation of this tissue in the remodelling of the extracellular matrix. By its rectratile properties elastic tissue hyperplasia in hepatic schistosomiasis can cause vascular narrowing and thus play a role in the pathogenesis of portal hypeertension.

  15. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Pu; Guangji Li; Hanlu Huang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES) method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark s...

  16. Nanoindentation Mechanical Properties and Structural Biomimetic Models of Three Species of Insects Wings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Jin; CHANG Zhiyong; YANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin; LIU Xianping; CHETWYND Derek G; CHEN Donghui; SUN Jiyu

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking insect flights were used to design and develop new engineering materials. Although extensive research was done to study various aspects of lfying insects. Because the detailed mechanics and underlying principles involved in insect lfights remain largely unknown. A systematic study was carried on insect lfights by using a combination of several advanced techniques to develop new models for the simulation and analysis of the wing membrane and veins of three types of insect wings, namely dragonfly (Pantala lfavescensFabricius), honeybee (Apis cerana cerana Fabricius) and lfy (Sarcophaga carnaria Linnaeus). In order to gain insights into the lfight mechanics of insects, reverse engineering methods were used to establish three-dimensional geometrical models of the membranous wings, so we can make a comparative analysis. Then nano-mechanical test of the three insect wing membranes was performed to provide experimental parameter values for mechanical models in terms of nano-hardness and elastic modulus. Finally, a computational model was established by using the ifnite element analysis (ANSYS) to analyze and compare the wings under a variety of simpliifed load regimes that are concentrated force, uniform line-load and a torque. This work opened up the possibility towards developing an engineering basis for the biomimetic design of thin solid iflms and 2D advanced engineering composite materials.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on extracellular matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, F. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: f.mohamed@ex.ac.uk; Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU72XH (United Kingdom); Winlove, C.P. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Exeter EX44QL (United Kingdom)

    2007-09-21

    The extracellular matrix is a ubiquitous and important component of tissues. We investigated the effects of ionizing radiation on the physical properties of its principal macromolecular components, pericardial collagen, ligament elastin and hyaluronan, a representative glycosaminoglycan. Samples were exposed to X-rays from an electron linear accelerator in the range of 10-100 Gy to cover the range of irradiation exposure during radiotherapy. A uniaxial mechanical testing protocol was used to characterize the fibrous proteins. For pericardial tissue the major change was an increase in the elastic modulus in the toe region of the curve ({<=}20% strain), from 23{+-}18 kPa for controls to 57{+-}22 kPa at a dose of 10 Gy (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05). At larger strain ({>=}20% strain), the elastic modulus in the linear region decreased from 1.92{+-}0.70 MPa for control pericardium tissue to 1.31{+-}0.56 MPa (p=0.01, {alpha}=0.05) for 10 Gy X-irradiated sample. Similar observations have been made previously on tendon collagen at larger strains. For elastin, the stress-strain relationship was linear up to 30% strain, but the elastic modulus decreased significantly with irradiation (controls 626{+-}65 kPa, irradiated 474{+-}121 kPa (p=0.02, {alpha}=0.05), at 10 Gy X-irradiation). The results suggest that for collagen the primary effect of irradiation is generation of additional cross-links, while for elastin chain scissions are important. The viscosity of HA (at 1.25% w/v and 0.125% w/v) was measured by both cone and plate and capillary viscometry, the former providing measurement at uniform shear rate and the latter providing a more sensitive indication of changes at low viscosity. Both techniques revealed a dose-dependent reduction in viscosity (from 3400{+-}194 cP for controls to 1500{+-}88 cP at a shear rate of 2 s{sup -1} and dose of 75 Gy), again suggesting depolymerization.

  18. Biomimetic tissue-engineered systems for advancing cancer research: NCI Strategic Workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuessler, Teresa K; Chan, Xin Yi; Chen, Huanhuan Joyce; Ji, Kyungmin; Park, Kyung Min; Roshan-Ghias, Alireza; Sethi, Pallavi; Thakur, Archana; Tian, Xi; Villasante, Aranzazu; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Moore, Nicole M; Nagahara, Larry A; Kuhn, Nastaran Z

    2014-10-01

    Advanced technologies and biomaterials developed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine present tractable biomimetic systems with potential applications for cancer research. Recently, the National Cancer Institute convened a Strategic Workshop to explore the use of tissue biomanufacturing for development of dynamic, physiologically relevant in vitro and ex vivo biomimetic systems to study cancer biology and drug efficacy. The workshop provided a forum to identify current progress, research gaps, and necessary steps to advance the field. Opportunities discussed included development of tumor biomimetic systems with an emphasis on reproducibility and validation of new biomimetic tumor models, as described in this report.

  19. Frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion for interstratified dispersive elastic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Zhaoyun; Yin, Xingyao; Wu, Guochen

    2016-08-01

    The elastic impedance equation is extended to frequency dependent elastic impedance equation by taking partial derivative to frequency. With this equation as the forward solver, a practical frequency dependent elastic impedance inversion approach is presented to implement the estimation of the interstratified dispersive elastic parameters which makes full use of the frequency information of elastic impedances. Three main steps are included in this approach. Firstly, the elastic Bayesian inversion is implemented for the estimation of elastic impedances from different incident angle. Secondly, with those estimated elastic impedances, their variations are used to estimate P-wave velocity and S-wave velocity. Finally, with the prior elastic impedance and P-wave and S-wave velocity information, the frequency dependent elastic variation with incident angle inversion is presented for the estimation of the interstratified elastic parameters. With this approach, the interstratified elastic parameters rather than the interface information can be estimated, making easier the interpretation of frequency dependent seismic attributes. The model examples illustrate the feasibility and stability of the proposed method in P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion estimation. The field data example validates the possibility and efficiency in hydrocarbon indication of the estimated P-wave velocity dispersion and S-wave velocity dispersion.

  20. Models and prototypes of biomimetic devices to architectural purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Titotto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some results of an ongoing interdisciplinary research about models and prototypes of biomimetic devices via installations and the focus of this paper is to outline this research role in architectural purposes as it perpasses the cultural and heritage contexts by being a way of understanding and living in the world as well as taking place in the world as devices or environments that pass on to future generations to use, learn from and be inspired by. Both the theoretical and the experimental work done so far point out that installations built with association of laser cutting and rapid prototyping techniques might be on the best feasible ways for developing and testing new technologies involved in biomimetic devices to architectural purposes that put both tectonics and nature as their central theme. 

  1. Biomimetic Adhesive Materials Containing Cyanoacryl Group for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sueng Hwan Jo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For underwater adhesives with biocompatible and more flexible bonds using biomimetic adhesive groups, DOPA-like adhesive molecules were modified with cyanoacrylates to obtain different repeating units and chain length copolymers. The goal of this work is to copy the mechanisms of underwater bonding to create synthetic water-borne underwater medical adhesives through blending of the modified DOPA and a triblock copolymer (PEO-PPO-PEO for practical application to repair wet living tissues and bones, and in turn, to use the synthetic adhesives to test mechanistic hypotheses about the natural adhesive. The highest values in stress and modulus of the biomimetic adhesives prepared in wet state were 165 kPa and 33 MPa, respectively.

  2. Surface Modifications of Support Partitions for Stabilizing Biomimetic Membrane Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Mark; Hansen, Jesper Schmidt; Jensen, Karin Bagger Stibius;

    2011-01-01

    Black lipid membrane (BLM) formation across apertures in an ethylene tetra-fluoroethylene (ETFE) partition separating two aqueous compartments is an established technique for the creation of biomimetic membranes. Recently multi-aperture BLM arrays have attracted interest and in order to increase...... with a high signal-to-noise (s/n) ratio. We demonstratesd this by reconstituting gA and α-hemolysin (α-HL) into BLM arrays. The improvement in membrane array lifetime and s/n ratio demonstrates that surface plasma polymerization of the supporting partition can be used to increase the stability of biomimetic...... BLM array stability we studied the effect of covalently modifying the partition substrate using surface plasma polymerization with hydrophobic n-hexene, 1-decene and hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) as modification groups. Average lifetimes across singlesided HMDSO modified partitions or using 1-decene...

  3. Biomimetic strengthening polylactide scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guofu; MOU Shenzhou; ZHOU Lingping; LIAO Susan; YIN Zhimin; CUI Fuzhai

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,a new polylactide(PLA)-based scaffold composite by biomimetic synthesis was designed.The novel composite mainly consists ofnano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA),which is the main inorganic content in natural bone tissue for the PLA.The crystal degree of the n-HA in the composite is low and the crystal size is very small,which is similar to that of natural bone.The compressive strength of the composite is higher than that of the PLA scaffold.Using the osteoblast culture technique,we detected cell behaviors on the biomaterial in vitro by SEM,and the cell affinity of the composite was found to be higher than that of the PLA scaffold.The biomimetic three-dimensional porous composite can serve as a kind of excellent scaffold material for bone tissue engineering because of its microstructure and properties.

  4. Sensing in nature: using biomimetics for design of sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Cheong, Hyunmin; Shu, Li

    2008-01-01

    of sense organs in animals and illustrates how a formal search method developed at University of Toronto can be applied to sensor design. Design/methodology/approach – Using biomimetics involves a search for relevant cases, a proper analysis of the biological solutions, identification of design principles...... and design of the desired artefact. The present search method is based on formulation of relevant keywords and search for occurrences in a standard university biology textbook. Most often a simple formulation of keywords and a following search is not enough to generate a sufficient amount of useful ideas...... or the search gives too many results. This is handled by a more advanced search strategy where the search is either widened or it is focused further mainly using biological synonyms. Findings – A major problem in biomimetic design is finding the relevant analogies to actual design tasks in nature. Research...

  5. Design of biomimetic camouflage materials based on angiosperm leaf organs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The micro structures and reflectance spectra of angiosperm leaves were compared with those of angiosperm petals. The study indicated that angiosperm leaf organs had identical micro structures and reflectance characteristics in the wave band of near infrared. Micro structures and compositions of leaf organs were the crucial factors influencing their reflectance spectra. The model of biomimetic materials based on angiosperm leaf organs was introduced and verified. From 300 to 2600 nm, the similarity coefficients of reflectance spectra of the foam containing water and Platanus Orientalis Linn. leaves were all above 0.969. The biomimetic camou- flage material exhibited almost the same reflectance spectra with those of green leaves in ultraviolet, visible and near infrared wave bands. And its "concolor and conspectrum" effect might take on reconnaissance of hyperspectral and ultra hy- perspectral imaging.

  6. Elastic modulus of biopolymer matrix in nacre measured using coupled atomic force microscopy bending and inverse finite element techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel approach combining the atomic force microscopy probing of nacre biopolymer strand and the inverse finite element analysis has been used to directly measure the elastic modulus of nacre biopolymer matrix. An elastic modulus of 11 ± 3 GPa was determined for the first time from the direct measurement of the nacre biopolymer matrix. This property is essential for a fundamental understanding of the roles that the biopolymer matrix plays in nacre's strengthening and toughening, and provides guidelines in selecting engineering polymers for biomimetic materials design and fabrication. Such coupled experimental and modeling techniques should find more applications in studying the mechanical behavior of biological materials. Highlights: → Modulus of nacre biopolymer was directly measured using AFM and inverse FEM. → An elastic modulus of 10.57 ± 2.56 GPa was determined for nacre biopolymer matrix. → New approach developed in this study is useful for testing of biological materials.

  7. Methods for biomimetic remineralization of human dentine: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Ying Cao; May Lei Mei; Quan-Li Li; Edward Chin Man Lo; Chun Hung Chu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved wi...

  8. Biomimetics in Modern Organizations – Laws or Metaphors?

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Schatten; Miroslav Zugaj

    2011-01-01

    Biomimetics, the art and science of imitating nature and life for technological solutions is discussed from a modern organization theory perspective. The main hypothesis of this article is that there are common laws in nature that are applicable to living, social and likewise organizational systems. To take advantage of these laws, the study of nature's principles for their application to organizations is proposed - a process which is in product and technology design known as bionic creativit...

  9. Biomimetic supramolecular metallohosts for binding and activation of dioxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Sprakel, Vera Stefanie Irene

    2004-01-01

    Host-guest chemistry involves the binding of a specific substrate in a receptor via molecular recognition based on supramolecular interactions. Metal-containing derivatives of receptors for the selective supramolecular binding of dihydroxybenzene substrates, which receptors model oxygen binding enzymes both in structure and in function are described in this thesis with the ultimate goal to realize biomimetic catalysis. A PY2-appended receptor 1 and a TPA-appended receptor 2 and the bis-copper...

  10. Biomimetic Crawling Motion of Soft and Slender Gel-worm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Miao LIANG; Jian XU; Li Na ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Inspired by the locomotion of terrestrial limbless animals, the present work attempt to study the motion of biomimetic system based on poly(vinyl alcohol)/dimethylsulfoxide gel. The system was operated in air by employing a non-contacted DC electric field. The results showed that the gel exhibited a long-range snail-like motion and had a very fast response rate.

  11. Flight mechanism and design of biomimetic micro air vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This paper summaries the investigations on natural flyers and development of bio-mimetic micro air vehicles(MAVs)at NUAA,China,where the authors have led a group to conduct research for a decade. The investigations include the studies of low Reynolds number aerodynamics,unsteady computational fluid dynamics and flight control for the fixed-wing MAVs,the bird-like MAVs,the dragonfly-like MAVs and the bee-like MAVs.

  12. Neural Networks Integrated Circuit for Biomimetics MEMS Microrobot

    OpenAIRE

    Ken Saito; Kazuaki Maezumi; Yuka Naito; Tomohiro Hidaka; Kei Iwata; Yuki Okane; Hirozumi Oku; Minami Takato; Fumio Uchikoba

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC) which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated by micro fabrication technology. The mechanical system of the robot was equipped with small size rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and six legs to realize the ant-like switching behavior. The NNIC generat...

  13. Flisht mechanism and design of biomimetic micro air vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ANG HaiSong; XIAO TianHang; DUAN WenBo

    2009-01-01

    This paper summaries the investigations on natural flyers and development of bio-mimetic micro air vehicles(MAVs)at NUAA,China,where the authors have led a group to conduct research for a decade.The investigations include the studies of low Reynolds number aerodynamics,unsteady computational fluid dynamics and flight control for the fixed-wing MAVs,the bird-like MAVs,the dragonfly-like MAVs and the bee-like MAVs.

  14. Aquaporin-Based Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes: Approaches and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habel, Joachim Erich Otto; Hansen, Michael; Kynde, Søren;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, aquaporin biomimetic membranes (ABMs) for water separation have gained considerable interest. Although the first ABMs are commercially available, there are still many challenges associated with further ABM development. Here, we discuss the interplay of the main components of ABMs...... thin film interfacial polymerization techniques. Finally, we describe some new developments in interfacial polymerization using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane cages for increasing the physical and chemical durability of thin film composite membranes....

  15. Approximation by planar elastic curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Gravesen, Jens; Nørbjerg, Toke Bjerge

    2015-01-01

    We give an algorithm for approximating a given plane curve segment by a planar elastic curve. The method depends on an analytic representation of the space of elastic curve segments, together with a geometric method for obtaining a good initial guess for the approximating curve. A gradient......-driven optimization is then used to find the approximating elastic curve....

  16. Extracellular matrix biomimicry for the creation of investigational and therapeutic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellowe, Amanda S; Gonzalez, Anjelica L

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a web of fibrous proteins that serves as a scaffold for tissues and organs, and is important for maintaining homeostasis and facilitating cellular adhesion. Integrin transmembrane receptors are the primary adhesion molecules that anchor cells to the ECM, thus integrating cells with their microenvironments. Integrins play a critical role in facilitating cell-matrix interactions and promoting signal transduction, both from the cell to the ECM and vice versa, ultimately mediating cell behavior. For this reason, many advanced biomaterials employ biomimicry by replicating the form and function of fibrous ECM proteins. The ECM also acts as a reservoir for small molecules and growth factors, wherein fibrous proteins directly bind and present these bioactive moieties that facilitate cell activity. Therefore biomimicry can be enhanced by incorporating small molecules into ECM-like substrates. Biomimetic ECM materials have served as invaluable research tools for studying interactions between cells and the surrounding ECM, revealing that cell-matrix signaling is driven by mechanical forces, integrin engagement, and small molecules. Mimicking pathological ECMs has also elucidated disease specific cell behaviors. For example, biomimetic tumor microenvironments have been used to induce metastatic cell behaviors, and have thereby shown promise for in vitro cancer drug testing and targeting. Further, ECM-like substrates have been successfully employed for autologous cell recolonization for tissue engineering and wound healing. As we continue to learn more about the mechanical and biochemical characteristics of the ECM, these properties can be harnessed to develop new biomaterials, biomedical devices, and therapeutics. PMID:26053111

  17. Fabrication of Biomimetic Water Strider Legs Covered with Setae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-guo Zhou; Zhi-wen Liu

    2009-01-01

    Water striders have remarkable water-repellent legs that enable them to stand effortlessly and move quickly on water. Fluid physics indicates this feature is due to a surface-tension effect caused by the special hierarchical structure of the legs, which are covered with a large number of inclined setae with fine nanogrooves inducing water resistance. This inspires us to fabricate special water-repellent structure on functional surfaces through the cooperation between the surface treatment and the surface micro- and nanostructures, which may bring great advantages in a wide variety of applications. In this paper we present a procedure for fabricating biomimetic water strider legs covered with setae using Polycarbonate Track-Etched (PCTE) membranes as templates. By choosing appropriate membrane lengths, diameters, pitches and densities of the setae, the biomimetic legs can be fabricated conveniently and at a low cost. Furthermore we investigated the relationship between stiffness of the molding materials, high aspect ratio and density, which affect the fidelity of fabrication and self adhesion, to optimize the stability of setae. The knowledge we gained from this study will offer important insights into the biomimetic design and fabrication of water strider setae.

  18. Biomimetic coating of calcium phosphate on biometallic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Er-lin; YANG Ke

    2005-01-01

    The biomimetic coating process in comparison with other processes is reviewed. This processing shows advantages in the surface bio-modification, such as low cost and flexible processing, wide range of apatite composition and thickness, non-line-of-sight characteristic and possibility to coat polymers and porous implants. The bio-mimetic apatite coating is made up of larger number of globules with size of 1-5μm. Each globule is a group of numerous flakes with a size range of 100-200nm to 30μm in length and 0.1-1μm in thickness. In-vitro and in-vivo studies show that the biomimetic apatite coating can promote an early and strong bonding to bone or promote the bone in-growth into the porous structure, which will be beneficial to the cementless stable fixation of orthopaedic implants. Recently developed co-precipitation of a kind of protein molecules into the HA coating shows much promising.

  19. Bottom-Up Synthesis and Sensor Applications of Biomimetic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The combination of nanotechnology, biology, and bioengineering greatly improved the developments of nanomaterials with unique functions and properties. Biomolecules as the nanoscale building blocks play very important roles for the final formation of functional nanostructures. Many kinds of novel nanostructures have been created by using the bioinspired self-assembly and subsequent binding with various nanoparticles. In this review, we summarized the studies on the fabrications and sensor applications of biomimetic nanostructures. The strategies for creating different bottom-up nanostructures by using biomolecules like DNA, protein, peptide, and virus, as well as microorganisms like bacteria and plant leaf are introduced. In addition, the potential applications of the synthesized biomimetic nanostructures for colorimetry, fluorescence, surface plasmon resonance, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrical resistance, electrochemistry, and quartz crystal microbalance sensors are presented. This review will promote the understanding of relationships between biomolecules/microorganisms and functional nanomaterials in one way, and in another way it will guide the design and synthesis of biomimetic nanomaterials with unique properties in the future.

  20. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues. (paper)

  1. Introduction to linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Phillip L

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Linear Elasticity, 3rd Edition, provides an applications-oriented grounding in the tensor-based theory of elasticity for students in mechanical, civil, aeronautical, and biomedical engineering, as well as materials and earth science. The book is distinct from the traditional text aimed at graduate students in solid mechanics by introducing the subject at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The author's presentation allows students to apply the basic notions of stress analysis and move on to advanced work in continuum mechanics, plasticity, plate and shell theory, composite materials, viscoelasticity and finite method analysis. This book also:  Emphasizes tensor-based approach while still distilling down to explicit notation Provides introduction to theory of plates, theory of shells, wave propagation, viscoelasticity and plasticity accessible to advanced undergraduate students Appropriate for courses following emerging trend of teaching solid mechan...

  2. Elastic platonic shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Ee Hou; Nelson, David R; Mahadevan, L

    2013-10-25

    On microscopic scales, the crystallinity of flexible tethered or cross-linked membranes determines their mechanical response. We show that by controlling the type, number, and distribution of defects on a spherical elastic shell, it is possible to direct the morphology of these structures. Our numerical simulations show that by deflating a crystalline shell with defects, we can create elastic shell analogs of the classical platonic solids. These morphologies arise via a sharp buckling transition from the sphere which is strongly hysteretic in loading or unloading. We construct a minimal Landau theory for the transition using quadratic and cubic invariants of the spherical harmonic modes. Our approach suggests methods to engineer shape into soft spherical shells using a frozen defect topology.

  3. A magnetic nanocomposite for biomimetic flow sensing

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    A magnetic nanocomposite has been implemented as artificial hair on a giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) thin-film sensor for flow sensing. The 500 μm long and 100 μm in diameter pillars are composed of iron nanowires incorporated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The nanowires\\' length and diameter are 6 μm and 35 nm, respectively. Upon fluid flow, the pillars are deflected, causing a change in the magnetic field at the GMI element and a corresponding change in impedance. The permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires in combination with the GMI sensor and the high elasticity of the PDMS pillars result in a high-performance flow sensor with low power consumption and potential for remote detection. No additional magnetic field is required to magnetize the nanowires or bias the sensor, which simplifies miniaturization and integration in microsystems. At a power consumption of 31.6 μW, air flow rates up to 190 mm s-1 can be detected with a sensitivity of 24 mΩ (mm)-1 s and a resolution of 0.56 mm s-1 while the range for water flow is up to 7.8 mm s-1 with a sensitivity of 0.9 Ω (mm)-1 s and a resolution of 15 μm s-1. When power consumption is reduced to as low as 80 nW a high resolution of 32 μm s-1 is still maintained.

  4. Elastic scattering of hadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2013-01-01

    Colliding high-energy hadrons either produce new particles or scatter elastically with their quantum numbers conserved and no other particles produced. We consider the latter case here. Although inelastic processes dominate at high energies, elastic scattering contributes considerably (18-25%) to the total cross section. Its share first decreases and then increases at higher energies. Small-angle scattering prevails at all energies. Some characteristic features can be seen that provide information on the geometrical structure of the colliding particles and the relevant dynamical mechanisms. The steep Gaussian peak at small angles is followed by the exponential (Orear) regime with some shoulders and dips, and then by a power-law decrease. Results from various theoretical approaches are compared with experimental data. Phenomenological models claiming to describe this process are reviewed. The unitarity condition predicts an exponential fall for the differential cross section with an additional substructure to occur exactly between the low momentum transfer diffraction cone and a power-law, hard parton scattering regime under high momentum transfer. Data on the interference of the Coulomb and nuclear parts of amplitudes at extremely small angles provide the value of the real part of the forward scattering amplitude. The real part of the elastic scattering amplitude and the contribution of inelastic processes to the imaginary part of this amplitude (the so-called overlap function) are also discussed. Problems related to the scaling behavior of the differential cross section are considered. The power-law regime at highest momentum transfer is briefly described.

  5. Nonlinear mechanical response of the extracellular matrix: learning from articular cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Sarah; Das, Moumita

    2015-03-01

    We study the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on nonlinear shear and compression response. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage tissue which has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen that acts as a stiff, reinforcing matrix, and a flexible aggrecan network that facilitates deformability. We model this system as a double network hydrogel made of interpenetrating networks of stiff and flexible biopolymers respectively. We study the linear and nonlinear mechanical response of the model ECM to shear and compression forces using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings.

  6. Deficiency of tenascin-X causes abnormalities in dermal elastic fiber morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers, MC; van Vlijmen-Willems, IM; van Kuppevelt, TH; Mecham, RP; Steijlen, PM; Bristow, J; Schalkwijk, J

    2004-01-01

    Deficiency of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-X (TNX) was recently described as the molecular basis of a new, recessive type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Here we report gross abnormalities of the elastic fibers and microfibrils in the dermis of these patients, and reduced dermal collagen con

  7. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  8. Biomimetic material strategies for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P., E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.sg [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Venugopal, J. [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School for Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2011-04-08

    Cardiovascular disease precedes many serious complications including myocardial infarction (MI) and it remains a major problem for the global community. Adult mammalian heart has limited ability to regenerate and compensate for the loss of cardiomyocytes. Restoration of cardiac function by replacement of diseased myocardium with functional cardiomyocytes is an intriguing strategy because it offers a potential cure for MI. Biomaterials are fabricated in nanometer scale dimensions by combining the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical aspects of material for potential tissue engineering (TE) applications. Synthetic polymers offer advantageous in their ability to tailor the mechanical properties, and natural polymers offer cell recognition sites necessary for cell, adhesion and proliferation. Cardiac tissue engineering (TE) aim for the development of a bioengineered construct that can provide physical support to the damaged cardiac tissue by replacing certain functions of the damaged extracellular matrix and prevent adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction after MI. Electrospun nanofibers are applied as heart muscle patches, while hydrogels serve as a platform for controlled delivery of growth factors, prevent mechanical complications and assist in cell recruitment. This article reviews the applications of different natural and synthetic polymeric materials utilized as cardiac patches, injectables or 3D constructs for cardiac TE. Smart organization of nanoscale assemblies with synergistic approaches of utilizing nanofibers and hydrogels could further advance the field of cardiac tissue engineering. Rapid innovations in biomedical engineering and cell biology will bring about new insights in the development of optimal scaffolds and methods to create tissue constructs with relevant contractile properties and electrical integration to replace or substitute the diseased myocardium.

  9. Plants and Animals as Concept Generators for the Development of Biomimetic Cable Entry Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom Masseiter; Uwe Scharf; Thomas Speck

    2008-01-01

    Many animals and plants have high potential to serve as concept generators for developing biomimetic materials and structures. We present some ideas based on structural and functional properties of plants and animals that led to the development of two types of biomimetic cable entry systems. Those systems have been realized on the level of functional demonstrators.

  10. A future of living machines?: International trends and prospects in biomimetic and biohybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Tony J.; Lepora, Nathan; Vershure, Paul F. M. J.

    2014-03-01

    Research in the fields of biomimetic and biohybrid systems is developing at an accelerating rate. Biomimetics can be understood as the development of new technologies using principles abstracted from the study of biological systems, however, biomimetics can also be viewed from an alternate perspective as an important methodology for improving our understanding of the world we live in and of ourselves as biological organisms. A biohybrid entity comprises at least one artificial (engineered) component combined with a biological one. With technologies such as microscale mobile computing, prosthetics and implants, humankind is moving towards a more biohybrid future in which biomimetics helps us to engineer biocompatible technologies. This paper reviews recent progress in the development of biomimetic and biohybrid systems focusing particularly on technologies that emulate living organisms—living machines. Based on our recent bibliographic analysis [1] we examine how biomimetics is already creating life-like robots and identify some key unresolved challenges that constitute bottlenecks for the field. Drawing on our recent research in biomimetic mammalian robots, including humanoids, we review the future prospects for such machines and consider some of their likely impacts on society, including the existential risk of creating artifacts with significant autonomy that could come to match or exceed humankind in intelligence. We conclude that living machines are more likely to be a benefit than a threat but that we should also ensure that progress in biomimetics and biohybrid systems is made with broad societal consent.

  11. Biomimetically inspired short access to the 2-aminoimidazole-fused tetracyclic core of (+/-)-dibromoagelaspongin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon, Sylvain; Tran, Huu Dau Elise; Martin, Marie-Thérèse; Retailleau, Pascal; Zaparucha, Anne; Al-Mourabit, Ali

    2009-06-18

    A six-step synthesis of the tetracyclic core of the natural compound (+/-)-dibromoagelaspongin, isolated from Agelas sp. Sponge, was achieved from the commercially available 5-aminopentan-1-ol, 2-trichloroacetylpyrrole, and 2-aminopyrimidine. Following a biomimetic inspired approach, successive oxidative reactions including the final DMDO biomimetic oxidation gave the interesting triaminomethane-fused core. PMID:19445491

  12. Biomimetics in materials science self-healing, self-lubricating, and self-cleaning materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nosonovsky, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Biomimetics in Materials Science provides a comprehensive theoretical and practical review of biomimetic materials with self-healing, self-lubricating and self-cleaning properties. These three topics are closely related and constitute rapidly developing areas of study. The field of self-healing materials requires a new conceptual understanding of this biomimetic technology, which is in contrast to traditional  engineering processes such as wear and fatigue.  Biomimetics in Materials Science is the first monograph to be devoted to these materials. A new theoretical framework for these processes is presented based on the concept of multi-scale structure of entropy and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, together with a detailed review of the available technology. The latter includes experimental, modeling, and simulation results obtained on self-healing/lubricating/cleaning materials since their emergence in the past decade. Describes smart, biomimetic materials in the context of nanotechnology, biotechnology, an...

  13. Substrate-dependent cell elasticity measured by optical tweezers indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousafzai, Muhammad S.; Ndoye, Fatou; Coceano, Giovanna; Niemela, Joseph; Bonin, Serena; Scoles, Giacinto; Cojoc, Dan

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, cell elasticity has been widely investigated as a potential label free indicator for cellular alteration in different diseases, cancer included. Cell elasticity can be locally measured by pulling membrane tethers, stretching or indenting the cell using optical tweezers. In this paper, we propose a simple approach to perform cell indentation at pN forces by axially moving the cell against a trapped microbead. The elastic modulus is calculated using the Hertz-model. Besides the axial component, the setup also allows us to examine the lateral cell-bead interaction. This technique has been applied to measure the local elasticity of HBL-100 cells, an immortalized human cell line, originally derived from the milk of a woman with no evidence of breast cancer lesions. In addition, we have studied the influence of substrate stiffness on cell elasticity by performing experiments on cells cultured on two substrates, bare and collagen-coated, having different stiffness. The mean value of the cell elastic modulus measured during indentation was 26±9 Pa for the bare substrate, while for the collagen-coated substrate it diminished to 19±7 Pa. The same trend was obtained for the elastic modulus measured during the retraction of the cell: 23±10 Pa and 13±7 Pa, respectively. These results show the cells adapt their stiffness to that of the substrate and demonstrate the potential of this setup for low-force probing of modifications to cell mechanics induced by the surrounding environment (e.g. extracellular matrix or other cells).

  14. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  15. Extracellular matrix in ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, R J; Irving-Rodgers, H F; van Wezel, I L

    2000-05-25

    A lot is known about the control of the development of ovarian follicles by growth factors and hormones, but less is known about the roles of extracellular matrix in the control of follicular growth and development. In this review we focus on the specialized extracellular matrix of the basal laminas that are present in ovarian follicles. These include the follicular basal lamina itself, the Call-Exner bodies of the membrana granulosa, the subendothelial and arteriole smooth muscle basal laminas in the theca, and the basal lamina-like material of the thecal matrix. We discuss the evidence that during follicle development the follicular basal lamina changes in composition, that many of its components are produced by the granulosa cells, and that the follicular basal laminas of different follicles have different ultrastructural appearances, linked to the shape of the aligning granulosa cells. All these studies suggest that the follicular basal lamina is extremely dynamic during follicular development. PMID:10963877

  16. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  17. Dynamic Elastic Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jack; Meyer, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    This is an exploration of dynamic tides on elastic bodies. The body is thought of as a dynamical system described by its modes of oscillation. The dynamics of these modes are governed by differential equations that depend on the rheology. The modes are damped by dissipation. Tidal friction occurs as exterior bodies excite the modes and the modes act back on the tide raising body. The whole process is governed by a closed set of differential equations. Standard results from tidal theory are recovered in a two-timescale approximation to the solution of these differential equations.

  18. Mathematical foundations of elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marsden, Jerrold E

    1994-01-01

    This advanced-level study approaches mathematical foundations of three-dimensional elasticity using modern differential geometry and functional analysis. It is directed to mathematicians, engineers and physicists who wish to see this classical subject in a modern setting with examples of newer mathematical contributions. Prerequisites include a solid background in advanced calculus and the basics of geometry and functional analysis.The first two chapters cover the background geometry ― developed as needed ― and use this discussion to obtain the basic results on kinematics and dynamics of con

  19. Elasticities of traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Zgonec, Katja

    2009-01-01

    Elasticity is usually the common standard according to which we observe the responses of consumers and sellers to the changes on the market; the latter are influenced by various factors: the price of substitutes and complementary goods, the preferences and consumer’s income. However, in transport we also consider the following factors – the reason for travel, time period, how much time there is to spare and vehicles. Thus, in my dissertation I strive to point out just how much the demand for ...

  20. Anti-wear properties on 20CrMnTi steel surfaces with biomimetic non-smooth units

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In order to gain a sufficient wear resistance for applications, the biomimetic non-smooth units in concave were fabricated on the surfaces of 20CrMnTi steel using a biomimetic laser remelting technology. The diameter and distribution of the concaves were optimized using orthogonal experiment. The microstructures of the biomimetic non-smooth units were examined. The anti-wear behaviors were investigated by the rolling wear test with lubricant. The results of wear tests indicated that the biomimetic surfaces exhibit a higher anti-wear ability than the smooth surfaces. The biomimetic surface with concaves of 250 μm in diameter and transverse distance of 270 μm and longitudinal distance of 400 μm exhibits the best anti-wear property. The enhancement of wear resistance can be mainly attributed to the action of biomimetic non-smooth units and the super fined microstructure and hardness in the biomimetic unit zones.

  1. Elastic emission polishing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewenthal, M.; Loseke, K.; Dow, T.A.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    Elastic emission polishing, also called elastic emission machining (EEM), is a process where a stream of abrasive slurry is used to remove material from a substrate and produce damage free surfaces with controlled surface form. It is a noncontacting method utilizing a thick elasto-hydrodynamic film formed between a soft rotating ball and the workpiece to control the flow of the abrasive. An apparatus was built in the Center, which consists of a stationary spindle, a two-axis table for the workpiece, and a pump to circulate the working fluid. The process is controlled by a programmable computer numerical controller (CNC), which presently can operate the spindle speed and movement of the workpiece in one axis only. This apparatus has been used to determine material removal rates on different material samples as a function of time, utilizing zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}) particles suspended in distilled water as the working fluid. By continuing a study of removal rates the process should become predictable, and thus create a new, effective, yet simple tool for ultra-precision mechanical machining of surfaces.

  2. Polysoaps: Configurations and Elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, A.

    1997-03-01

    Simple polymers are very long, flexible, linear molecules. Amphiphiles, soaps, are small molecules comprising of a part that prefers water over oil and a part that prefers oil over water. By combining the two we arrive at an interesting, little explored, class of materials: Polysoaps. These comprise of a water soluble backbone incorporating, at intervals, covalently bound amphiphilic monomers. In water, the polymerised amphiphiles aggregate into self assembled units known as micelles. This induces a dramatic modification of the spatial configurations of the polymers. What were featureless random coils now exhibit intramolecular, hierachial self organisation. Due to this self organisation it is necessary to modify the paradigms describing the large scale behaviour of these polymers: Their configurations, dimensions and elasticity. Understanding the behaviour of these polymers is of practical interest because of their wide range of industrial applications, ranging from cosmetics to paper coating. It is of fundamental interest because polysoaps are characterised by a rugged free energy landscape that is reminiscent of complex systems such as proteins and glasses. The talk concerns theoretical arguments regarding the following issues: (i) The design parameters that govern the spatial configurations of the polysoaps, (ii) The interaction between polysoaps and free amphiphiles, (iii) The effect of the intramolecular self organisation on the elasticity of the chains.

  3. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle extracellular matrix with aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel; Kjaer, M; Mackey, A L

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of skeletal muscle is critical for force transmission and for the passive elastic response of skeletal muscle. Structural, biochemical, cellular, and functional changes in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the deterioration in muscle mechanical properties with aging...... in skeletal muscle ECM contribute to the increased stiffness and impairment in force generated by the contracting muscle fibers seen with aging. The cellular interactions provide and potentially coordinate an adaptation to mechanical loading and ensure successful regeneration after muscle injury. Some...

  4. Mathematical Models for Elastic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaggio, Piero

    1997-10-01

    During the seventeenth century, several useful theories of elastic structures emerged, with applications to civil and mechanical engineering problems. Recent and improved mathematical tools have extended applications into new areas such as mathematical physics, geomechanics, and biomechanics. This book offers a critically filtered collection of the most significant theories dealing with elastic slender bodies. It includes mathematical models involving elastic structures that are used to solve practical problems with particular emphasis on nonlinear problems.

  5. A novel soft biomimetic microrobot with two motion attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liwei; Guo, Shuxiang; Li, Maoxun; Mao, Shilian; Xiao, Nan; Gao, Baofeng; Song, Zhibin; Asaka, Kinji

    2012-01-01

     A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7.14 mm/s. Obstacle

  6. A Novel Soft Biomimetic Microrobot with Two Motion Attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Shi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available  A variety of microrobots have commonly been used in the fields of biomedical engineering and underwater operations during the last few years. Thanks to their compact structure, low driving power, and simple control systems, microrobots can complete a variety of underwater tasks, even in limited spaces. To accomplish our objectives, we previously designed several bio-inspired underwater microrobots with compact structure, flexibility, and multi-functionality, using ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC actuators. To implement high-position precision for IPMC legs, in the present research, we proposed an electromechanical model of an IPMC actuator and analysed the deformation and actuating force of an equivalent IPMC cantilever beam, which could be used to design biomimetic legs, fingers, or fins for an underwater microrobot. We then evaluated the tip displacement of an IPMC actuator experimentally. The experimental deflections fit the theoretical values very well when the driving frequency was larger than 1 Hz. To realise the necessary multi-functionality for adapting to complex underwater environments, we introduced a walking biomimetic microrobot with two kinds of motion attitudes: a lying state and a standing state. The microrobot uses eleven IPMC actuators to move and two shape memory alloy (SMA actuators to change its motion attitude. In the lying state, the microrobot implements stick-insect-inspired walking/rotating motion, fish-like swimming motion, horizontal grasping motion, and floating motion. In the standing state, it implements inchworm-inspired crawling motion in two horizontal directions and grasping motion in the vertical direction. We constructed a prototype of this biomimetic microrobot and evaluated its walking, rotating, and floating speeds experimentally. The experimental results indicated that the robot could attain a maximum walking speed of 3.6 mm/s, a maximum rotational speed of 9°/s, and a maximum floating speed of 7

  7. Biomimetic hybrid nanofibrous substrates for mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into osteogenic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy [Cellular and Molecular Epigenetics Lab, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Tham, Allister Yingwei [Cellular and Molecular Epigenetics Lab, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Ramakrishna, Seeram [Center for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh, E-mail: dineshkumar@ntu.edu.sg [Cellular and Molecular Epigenetics Lab, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2015-04-01

    Mimicking native extracellular matrix with electrospun porous bio-composite nanofibrous scaffolds has huge potential in bone tissue regeneration. The aim of this study is to fabricate porous poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly-(ε-caprolactone)/silk fibroin/ascorbic acid/tetracycline hydrochloride (PLACL/SF/AA/TC) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA) was deposited by calcium-phosphate dipping method for bone tissue engineering (BTE). Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized for fiber morphology, hydrophilicity, porosity, mechanical test and chemical properties by FT-IR and EDX analysis. The results showed that the fiber diameter and pore size of scaffolds observed around 228 ± 62–320 ± 22 nm and 1.5–6.9 μm respectively. Resulting nanofibrous scaffolds are highly porous (87–94%) with ultimate tensile strength observed in the range of 1.51–4.86 MPa and also showed better hydrophilic properties after addition of AA, TC and n-HA. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on these bio-composite nanofibrous scaffolds and stimulated to osteogenic differentiation in the presence of AA/TC/n-HA for BTE. The cell proliferation and biomaterial interactions were studied using MTS assay, SEM and CMFDA dye exclusion methods. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was proven by using alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization and double immunofluorescence staining of both CD90 and osteocalcin. The observed results suggested that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AA/TC/n-HA biocomposite hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds have good potential for the differentiation of MSCs into osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • We fabricated and characterized hybrid porous nanofibrous scaffolds. • PLACL/SF/AA/TC/n-HA scaffolds promote cell differentiation and mineralization. • Porous nanofibrous scaffolds initiate MSC differentiation into osteogenic cells. • Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds have good potential for bone tissue engineering.

  8. Biomimetic hybrid nanofibrous substrates for mesenchymal stem cells differentiation into osteogenic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimicking native extracellular matrix with electrospun porous bio-composite nanofibrous scaffolds has huge potential in bone tissue regeneration. The aim of this study is to fabricate porous poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly-(ε-caprolactone)/silk fibroin/ascorbic acid/tetracycline hydrochloride (PLACL/SF/AA/TC) and nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA) was deposited by calcium-phosphate dipping method for bone tissue engineering (BTE). Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds were characterized for fiber morphology, hydrophilicity, porosity, mechanical test and chemical properties by FT-IR and EDX analysis. The results showed that the fiber diameter and pore size of scaffolds observed around 228 ± 62–320 ± 22 nm and 1.5–6.9 μm respectively. Resulting nanofibrous scaffolds are highly porous (87–94%) with ultimate tensile strength observed in the range of 1.51–4.86 MPa and also showed better hydrophilic properties after addition of AA, TC and n-HA. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on these bio-composite nanofibrous scaffolds and stimulated to osteogenic differentiation in the presence of AA/TC/n-HA for BTE. The cell proliferation and biomaterial interactions were studied using MTS assay, SEM and CMFDA dye exclusion methods. Osteogenic differentiation of MSCs was proven by using alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization and double immunofluorescence staining of both CD90 and osteocalcin. The observed results suggested that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AA/TC/n-HA biocomposite hybrid nanofibrous scaffolds have good potential for the differentiation of MSCs into osteogenesis for bone tissue engineering. - Highlights: • We fabricated and characterized hybrid porous nanofibrous scaffolds. • PLACL/SF/AA/TC/n-HA scaffolds promote cell differentiation and mineralization. • Porous nanofibrous scaffolds initiate MSC differentiation into osteogenic cells. • Biomimetic nanofibrous scaffolds have good potential for bone tissue engineering

  9. Polycyclic Polyprenylated Xanthones from Symphonia globulifera: Isolation and Biomimetic Electrosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Kevin; Neudörffer, Anne; Kritsanida, Marina; Michel, Sylvie; Lallemand, Marie-Christine; Largeron, Martine

    2015-08-28

    Two regioisomeric polycyclic xanthones, 3,16-oxyguttiferone A (2) and 1,16-oxyguttiferone A (3), which are polyprenylated acylphloroglucinol-derived analogues, were isolated from the seeds of Symphonia globulifera, together with their presumed o-dihydroxybenzoyl precursor, guttiferone A (1). Anodic oxidation of 1 into the corresponding o-quinone species proved to be an efficient biomimetic method to generate xanthones 2 and 3 in high overall yield and to confirm their structures. Both compounds displayed cytotoxicity against the HCT 116 colon carcinoma cell line with IC₅₀ values of 8 and 3 μM, respectively. PMID:26221771

  10. Touch stimulated pulse generation in biomimetic single-layer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Onejae; Chun, Hyunsuk; Choi, Eunseok; Choi, Jungbong; Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Dongpyo; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun; Lee, Seung-Beck

    2016-02-01

    Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac point in the graphene energy band, which generates a sharp peak in the measured resistance. We found that by changing the gate potential it was possible to modulate the threshold pressure and using a series of graphene channels, a train of pulses were generated during a transient pressurizing stimulus demonstrating biomimetic behaviour.Detecting variation in contact pressure is a separate sensing mode in the human somatosensory system that differs from the detection of pressure magnitude. If pressure magnitude and variation sensing can be achieved simultaneously, an advanced biomimetic tactile system that better emulates human senses may be developed. We report on a novel single-layer graphene based artificial mechanoreceptor that generates a resistance pulse as the contact stimulus passes a specific threshold pressure, mimicking the generation of action potentials in a biological fast-adapting mechanoreceptor. The electric field from a flexible membrane gate electrode placed above a graphene channel raises the Fermi level from the valence band as pressure deflects the membrane. The threshold pressure is reached when the Fermi level crosses the Dirac

  11. UV photofunctionalization promotes nano-biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saita M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Makiko Saita,1 Takayuki Ikeda,1,2 Masahiro Yamada,1,3 Katsuhiko Kimoto,4 Masaichi Chang-Il Lee,5 Takahiro Ogawa1 1Division of Advanced Prosthodontics, Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology, UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Department of Complete Denture Prosthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan; 3Division of Molecular and Regenerative Prosthodontics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Dentistry, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan; 4Department of Prosthodontics and Oral Rehabilitation, 5Yokosuka-Shonan Disaster Health Emergency Research Center and ESR Laboratories, Kanagawa Dental University Graduate School of Dentistry, Yokosuka, Japan Background: Although biomimetic apatite coating is a promising way to provide titanium with osteoconductivity, the efficiency and quality of deposition is often poor. Most titanium implants have microscale surface morphology, and an addition of nanoscale features while preserving the micromorphology may provide further biological benefit. Here, we examined the effect of ultraviolet (UV light treatment of titanium, or photofunctionalization, on the efficacy of biomimetic apatite deposition on titanium and its biological capability.Methods and results: Micro-roughed titanium disks were prepared by acid-etching with sulfuric acid. Micro-roughened disks with or without photofunctionalization (20-minute exposure to UV light were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF for 1 or 5 days. Photofunctionalized titanium disks were superhydrophilic and did not form surface air bubbles when immersed in SBF, whereas non-photofunctionalized disks were hydrophobic and largely covered with air bubbles during immersion. An apatite-related signal was observed by X-ray diffraction on photofunctionalized titanium after 1 day of SBF immersion, which was equivalent to the one observed after 5 days of immersion of control titanium. Scanning electron microscopy revealed nodular apatite deposition

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotube reinforced biomimetic bundled gel fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Takahashi, Haruko; Sasaki, Naruo; Matsunaga, Yukiko T

    2016-08-19

    This work describes the fabrication and characterization of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based biomimetic bundled gel fibres. The bundled gel fibres were reinforced with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). A phase-separated aqueous solution with MWCNT and HPC was transformed into a bundled fibrous structure after being injected into a co-flow microfluidic device and applying the sheath flow. The resulting MWCNT-bundled gel fibres consist of multiple parallel microfibres. The mechanical and electrical properties of MWCNT-bundled gel fibres were improved and their potential for tissue engineering applications as a cell scaffold was demonstrated. PMID:27200527

  13. Acoustic beam control in biomimetic projector via velocity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Wenwu; Dong, Erqian; Song, Zhongchang; Li, Songhai; Tang, Liguo; Zhang, Sai

    2016-07-01

    A biomimetic projector (BioP) based on computerized tomography of pygmy sperm whale's biosonar system has been designed using gradient-index (GRIN) material. The directivity of this BioP device was investigated as function of frequency and the velocity gradient of the GRIN material. A strong beam control over a broad bandwidth at the subwavelength scale has been achieved. Compared with a bare subwavelength source, the main lobe pressure of the BioP is about five times as high and the angular resolution is one order of magnitude better. Our results indicate that this BioP has excellent application potential in miniaturized underwater sonars.

  14. Framing biomimetics in a strategic orientation perspective (biopreneuring)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses how design originally rooted in biology can be translated into applications outside its original domain (biomimetics), and thus become strategically important for commercial organisations. This paper will also discuss how concepts from organisation and management theory can...... somewhat overlooked. This paper fills some of that void. Business orientation literature is applied to identify some of the key strategic aspects associated with commercial translations. In closing, this paper briefly sketches out some key implications for business research and for affected decision-makers....

  15. 3-D Locomotion control for a biomimetic robot fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang ZHANG; Shuo WANG; Min TAN

    2004-01-01

    This paper concerns with 3-D locomotion control methods for a biomimetic robot fish. The system architecture of the fish is firstly presented based on a physical model of carangiform fish. The robot fish has a flexible body, a rigid caudal fin and a pair of pectoral fins, driven by several servomotors. The motion control of the robot fish are then divided into speed control, orientation control, submerge control and transient motion control, corresponding algorithms are detailed respectively.Finally, experiments and analyses on a 4-1ink, radio-controlled robot fish prototype with 3-D locomotion show its good performance.

  16. Advances in modelling of biomimetic fluid flow at different scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celata Gian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biomimetic flow at different scales has been discussed at length. The need of looking into the biological surfaces and morphologies and both geometrical and physical similarities to imitate the technological products and processes has been emphasized. The complex fluid flow and heat transfer problems, the fluid-interface and the physics involved at multiscale and macro-, meso-, micro- and nano-scales have been discussed. The flow and heat transfer simulation is done by various CFD solvers including Navier-Stokes and energy equations, lattice Boltzmann method and molecular dynamics method. Combined continuum-molecular dynamics method is also reviewed.

  17. A Home Experiment in Elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Aguirregabiria, J M; Rivas, M

    2006-01-01

    We analyze a simple problem in elasticity: the \\emph{initial} motion of an elastic bar that after being hanged from an end is suddenly released. In a second problem a point mass is attached on the top of the bar. The analytical solutions uncover some unexpected properties, which can be checked, with a digital camera or camcorder, in an alternative setup in which a spring is substituted for the bar. The theoretical model and the experiments are useful to understand the similarities and differences between the elastic properties of bar and spring. Students can take advantage of the home experiments to improve their understanding of elastic waves.

  18. Elasticity and revenue: a reappraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Quesada

    2002-01-01

    It seems from what is explained in some textbooks that, for a given demand function, price and total revenue move in the same direction when elasticity is smaller than one and move in opposite directions when elasticity is greater than one, with elasticity from point (p, q) to point (p', q'') of a demand function defined as – [(q'' – q) / q] / [(p''– p) / p]. Since these two results turn out to be false, this comment clarifies the relationship between elasticity (as previously defined),...

  19. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Ryan, E-mail: rbwagner@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Pittendrigh, Barry R. [Department of Entomology, University of Illinois, Champaign (United States); Raman, Arvind, E-mail: raman@purdue.edu [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States); Brick Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied the wing membrane of Drosophila melanogaster with atomic force microscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report the structure, elasticity, and adhesion on the wing membrane in air and nitrogen environments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results provide insight into the nature of the wing membrane enabling the development of biomimetic surface and micro air vehicles. - Abstract: Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 {mu}m long, 0.5-1 {mu}m diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m{sup 2}, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  20. Preparation, anti-biofouling and drag-reduction properties of a biomimetic shark skin surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Pu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Shark skin surfaces show non-smoothness characteristics due to the presence of a riblet structure. In this study, biomimetic shark skin was prepared by using the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS-embedded elastomeric stamping (PEES method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was used to examine the surface microstructure and fine structure of shark skin and biomimetic shark skin. To analyse the hydrophobic mechanism of the shark skin surface microstructure, the effect of biomimetic shark skin surface microstructure on surface wettability was evaluated by recording water contact angle. Additionally, protein adhesion experiments and anti-algae adhesion performance testing experiments were used to investigate and evaluate the anti-biofouling properties of the surface microstructure of biomimetic shark skin. The recorded values of the water contact angle of differently microstructured surfaces revealed that specific microstructures have certain effects on surface wettability. The anti-biofouling properties of the biomimetic shark skin surface with microstructures were superior to a smooth surface using the same polymers as substrates. Moreover, the air layer fixed on the surface of the biomimetic shark skin was found to play a key role in their antibiont adhesion property. An experiment into drag reduction was also conducted. Based on the experimental results, the microstructured surface of the prepared biomimetic shark skin played a significant role in reducing drag. The maximum of drag reduction rate is 12.5%, which is higher than the corresponding maximum drag reduction rate of membrane material with a smooth surface.

  1. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  2. The optimal elastic flagellum

    CERN Document Server

    Spagnolie, Saverio E

    2009-01-01

    Motile eukaryotic cells propel themselves in viscous fluids by passing waves of bending deformation down their flagella. An infinitely long flagellum achieves a hydrodynamically optimal low-Reynolds number locomotion when the angle between its local tangent and the swimming direction remains constant along its length. Optimal flagella therefore adopt the shape of a helix in three dimensions (smooth) and that of a sawtooth in two dimensions (non-smooth). Physically, biological organisms (or engineered micro-swimmers) must expend internal energy in order to produce the waves of deformation responsible for the motion. Here we propose a physically-motivated derivation of the optimal flagellum shape. We determine analytically and numerically the shape of the flagellar wave which leads to the fastest swimming while minimizing an appropriately-defined energetic expenditure. Our novel approach is to define an energy which includes not only the work against the surrounding fluid, but also (1) the energy stored elastic...

  3. A biomimetic projector with high subwavelength directivity based on dolphin biosonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Gao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Sai; Cao, Wenwu; Tang, Liguo; Wang, Ding; Li, Yan

    2014-09-01

    Based on computed tomography of a Yangtze finless porpoise's biosonar system, a biomimetic structure was designed to include air cavity, gradient-index material, and steel outer-structure mimicking air sacs, melon, and skull, respectively. The mainlobe pressure was about three times higher, the angular resolution was one order of magnitude higher, and the effective source size was orders of magnitude larger than those of the subwavelength source without the biomimetic structure. The superior subwavelength directivity over a broad bandwidth suggests potential applications of this biomimetic projector in underwater sonar, medical ultrasonography, and other related applications.

  4. Rapid prototyping of biomimetic vascular phantoms for hyperspectral reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Wang, Jianting; Melchiorri, Anthony J.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Mathews, Scott A.; Coburn, James C.; Sorg, Brian S.; Chen, Yu; Joshua Pfefer, T.

    2015-12-01

    The emerging technique of rapid prototyping with three-dimensional (3-D) printers provides a simple yet revolutionary method for fabricating objects with arbitrary geometry. The use of 3-D printing for generating morphologically biomimetic tissue phantoms based on medical images represents a potentially major advance over existing phantom approaches. Toward the goal of image-defined phantoms, we converted a segmented fundus image of the human retina into a matrix format and edited it to achieve a geometry suitable for printing. Phantoms with vessel-simulating channels were then printed using a photoreactive resin providing biologically relevant turbidity, as determined by spectrophotometry. The morphology of printed vessels was validated by x-ray microcomputed tomography. Channels were filled with hemoglobin (Hb) solutions undergoing desaturation, and phantoms were imaged with a near-infrared hyperspectral reflectance imaging system. Additionally, a phantom was printed incorporating two disjoint vascular networks at different depths, each filled with Hb solutions at different saturation levels. Light propagation effects noted during these measurements-including the influence of vessel density and depth on Hb concentration and saturation estimates, and the effect of wavelength on vessel visualization depth-were evaluated. Overall, our findings indicated that 3-D-printed biomimetic phantoms hold significant potential as realistic and practical tools for elucidating light-tissue interactions and characterizing biophotonic system performance.

  5. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  6. Biomimetic Drag Reduction Study on Herringbone Riblets of Bird Feather

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Chen; Fugang Rao; Xiaopeng Shang; Deyuan Zhang; Ichiro Hagiwara

    2013-01-01

    Birds have gradually formed various excellent structures such as streamlined shape and hollow shaft of feather to improve their flying performance by millions of years of natural selection.As typical property of bird feather,herringbone riblets align along the shaft of each feather,which is caused by perfect link of barbs,especially for the primary and secondary feathers of wings.Such herringbone riblets of feather are assumed to have great impact on drag reduction.In this paper,microstructures of secondary feathers of adult pigeons are investigated by SEM,and their structural parameters are statistically obtained.Based on quantitative analysis of feather structure,novel biomimetic herringbone riblets with narrow smooth edge are proposed to reduce surface drag.In comparison with traditional microgroove riblets and other drag reduction structures,the drag reduction rate of the proposed biomimetic herringbone riblets is experimentally clarified up to 16%,much higher than others.Moreover,the drag reduction mechanism of herringbone riblets are also confirmed and exploited by CFD.

  7. Helicoidal microstructure of Scarabaei cuticle and biomimetic research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, B. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)]. E-mail: bchen@cqu.edu.cn; Peng, X. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Cai, C. [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Niu, H. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wu, X. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2006-05-15

    Insect cuticles as a natural biocomposite include many favorable microstructures which have been refined over centuries and endow the cuticles excellent mechanical and physical properties, such as light weight, high strength and toughness, etc. The various microstructures of a Scarabaei cuticle are investigated with a scanning electronic microscope and reported in this paper. It is found that the cuticle is a kind of fiber-reinforced biocomposite composed of chitin-fiber layers and sclerous protein matrixes. Different chitin-fiber layers have different orientations, composed of crossed and helicoidal structures at different location. In the helicoidal structure, each fiber layer rotates with an almost fixed angle against its neighboring layer. The maximum pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is analyzed based on the representative model of the structure. The result shows that the pullout energy of the helicoidal structure is markedly larger than that of the conventional 0{sup o}-structure. A biomimetic composite with the observed helicoidal structure is designed and fabricated. A comparative test shows that the fracture toughness of the biomimetic composite is markedly larger than that of the 0{sup o}-layer composite.

  8. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  9. Biomimetics inspired surfaces for drag reduction and oleophobicity/philicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat Bhushan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of biomimetics allows one to mimic biology or nature to develop nanomaterials, nanodevices, and processes which provide desirable properties. Hierarchical structures with dimensions of features ranging from the macroscale to the nanoscale are extremely common in nature and possess properties of interest. There are a large number of objects including bacteria, plants, land and aquatic animals, and seashells with properties of commercial interest. Certain plant leaves, such as lotus (Nelumbo nucifera leaves, are known to be superhydrophobic and self-cleaning due to the hierarchical surface roughness and presence of a wax layer. In addition to a self-cleaning effect, these surfaces with a high contact angle and low contact angle hysteresis also exhibit low adhesion and drag reduction for fluid flow. An aquatic animal, such as a shark, is another model from nature for the reduction of drag in fluid flow. The artificial surfaces inspired from the shark skin and lotus leaf have been created, and in this article the influence of structure on drag reduction efficiency is reviewed. Biomimetic-inspired oleophobic surfaces can be used to prevent contamination of the underwater parts of ships by biological and organic contaminants, including oil. The article also reviews the wetting behavior of oil droplets on various superoleophobic surfaces created in the lab.

  10. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  11. Biomimetics of fetal alveolar flow phenomena using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Fishler, Rami; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sznitman, Josué

    2015-01-01

    At the onset of life in utero, the respiratory system begins as a liquid-filled tubular organ and undergoes significant morphological changes during fetal development towards establishing a respiratory organ optimized for gas exchange. As airspace morphology evolves, respiratory alveolar flows have been hypothesized to exhibit evolving flow patterns. In the present study, we have investigated flow topologies during increasing phases of embryonic life within an anatomically inspired microfluidic device, reproducing real-scale features of fetal airways representative of three distinct phases of in utero gestation. Micro-particle image velocimetry measurements, supported by computational fluid dynamics simulations, reveal distinct respiratory alveolar flow patterns throughout different stages of fetal life. While attached, streamlined flows characterize the shallow structures of premature alveoli indicative of the onset of saccular stage, separated recirculating vortex flows become the signature of developed and extruded alveoli characteristic of the advanced stages of fetal development. To further mimic physiological aspects of the cellular environment of developing airways, our biomimetic devices integrate an alveolar epithelium using the A549 cell line, recreating a confluent monolayer that produces pulmonary surfactant. Overall, our in vitro biomimetic fetal airways model delivers a robust and reliable platform combining key features of alveolar morphology, flow patterns, and physiological aspects of fetal lungs developing in utero. PMID:25759753

  12. PAGOSA Sample Problem. Elastic Precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weseloh, Wayne N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Clancy, Sean Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-03

    A PAGOSA simulation of a flyer plate impact which produces an elastic precursor wave is examined. The simulation is compared to an analytic theory for the Mie-Grüneisen equation of state and an elastic-perfectly-plastic strength model.

  13. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  14. Extracellular matrix of dental pulp stem cells: Applications in pulp tissue engineering using somatic MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram eRavindran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Caries affects approximately 90% of the world’s population. At present, the clinical treatment for dental caries is root canal therapy. This treatment results in loss of tooth sensitivity and vitality. Tissue engineering can potentially solve this problem by enabling regeneration of a functional pulp tissue. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs have been shown to be an excellent source for pulp regeneration. However, limited availability of these cells hinders its potential for clinical translation. We have investigated the possibility of using somatic mesenchymal stem cells from other sources for dental pulp tissue regeneration using a biomimetic dental pulp extracellular matrix (ECM incorporated scaffold. Human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs and human bone marrow stromal cells (HMSCs were investigated for their ability to differentiate towards an odontogenic lineage. In vitro real-time PCR results coupled with histological and immunohistochemical examination of the explanted tissues confirmed the ability of PDLSCs and HMSCs to form a vascularized pulp-like tissue. These findings indicate that the dental pulp stem derived ECM scaffold stimulated odontogenic differentiation of PDLSCs and HMSCs without the need for exogenous addition of growth and differentiation factors. This study represents a translational perspective toward possible therapeutic application of using a combination of somatic stem cells and extracellular matrix for pulp regeneration.

  15. A new approach to ultrasonic elasticity imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerig, Cameron; Ghaboussi, Jamshid; Fatemi, Mostafa; Insana, Michael F.

    2016-04-01

    Biomechanical properties of soft tissues can provide information regarding the local health status. Often the cells in pathological tissues can be found to form a stiff extracellular environment, which is a sensitive, early diagnostic indicator of disease. Quasi-static ultrasonic elasticity imaging provides a way to image the mechanical properties of tissues. Strain images provide a map of the relative tissue stiffness, but ambiguities and artifacts limit its diagnostic value. Accurately mapping intrinsic mechanical parameters of a region may increase diagnostic specificity. However, the inverse problem, whereby force and displacement estimates are used to estimate a constitutive matrix, is ill conditioned. Our method avoids many of the issues involved with solving the inverse problem, such as unknown boundary conditions and incomplete information about the stress field, by building an empirical model directly from measured data. Surface force and volumetric displacement data gathered during imaging are used in conjunction with the AutoProgressive method to teach artificial neural networks the stress-strain relationship of tissues. The Autoprogressive algorithm has been successfully used in many civil engineering applications and to estimate ocular pressure and corneal stiffness; here, we are expanding its use to any tissues imaged ultrasonically. We show that force-displacement data recorded with an ultrasound probe and displacements estimated at a few points in the imaged region can be used to estimate the full stress and strain vectors throughout an entire model while only assuming conservation laws. We will also demonstrate methods to parameterize the mechanical properties based on the stress-strain response of trained neural networks. This method is a fundamentally new approach to medical elasticity imaging that for the first time provides full stress and strain vectors from one set of observation data.

  16. A biomimetic jellyfish robot based on ionic polymer metal composite actuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomimetic jellyfish robot based on ionic polymer metal composite actuators was fabricated and activated to mimic real locomotive behavior with pulse and recovery processes. To imitate the curved shape of the jellyfish, a thermal treatment was applied to obtain a permanent initial deformation of a hemispherical form. The bio-inspired input signal was generated for mimicking real locomotion of the jellyfish. The vertical floating displacement and the thrust force of the biomimetic jellyfish robot under various input signals were measured and compared. The present results show that the bio-inspired electrical input signal with pulse-recovery process generates much higher floating velocity of the biomimetic jellyfish robot in comparison with pure sinusoidal excitations. The curved shape of the IPMC actuator through thermal treatments can be successfully applied to mimic the real biomimetic robots with smooth curves

  17. Feasibility of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) films as biomimetic coating for polymeric biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Seunghwan; Madsen, Jan Busk; Pakkanen, Kirsi I.

    2013-01-01

    Feasibility of bovine submaxillary mucin (BSM) films generated via spontaneous adsorption from aqueous solutions onto polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polystyrene (PS) surfaces have been investigated as biomimetic coatings for polymeric biomaterials. Two attributes as biomedical coatings, namely a...

  18. Methods for Improving Enzymatic Trans-glycosylation for Synthesis of Human Milk Oligosaccharide Biomimetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeuner, Birgitte; Jers, Carsten; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made within enzymatic synthesis of biomimetic, functional glycans, including, for example, human milk oligosaccharides. These compounds are mainly composed of N-acetylglucosamine, fucose, sialic acid, galactose, and glucose, and their controlled enzymatic...

  19. Influence of the Chemical Design on the Coherent Photoisomerization of Biomimetic Molecular Switches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivucci Massimo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals the effect of chemical substitutions on the photoreaction kinetics of biomimetic photoswitches displaying coherent dynamics. Ground state vibrational coherences are no longer observed when the excited state lifetime exceeds 300fs.

  20. Characterization of Microfibrillar-associated Protein 4 (MFAP4) as a Tropoelastin- and Fibrillin-binding Protein Involved in Elastic Fiber Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilecki, Bartosz; Holm, Anne T; Schlosser, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    MFAP4 (microfibrillar-associated protein 4) is an extracellular glycoprotein found in elastic fibers without a clearly defined role in elastic fiber assembly. In the present study, we characterized molecular interactions between MFAP4 and elastic fiber components. We established that MFAP4......-directed mutagenesis disclosed residues Phe(241) and Ser(203) in MFAP4 as being crucial for type I collagen, elastin, and tropoelastin binding. Furthermore, we found that MFAP4 actively promotes tropoelastin self-assembly. In conclusion, our data identify MFAP4 as a new ligand of microfibrils and tropoelastin involved...... in proper elastic fiber organization....

  1. Analysis of extracellular RNA by digital PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The transfer of extracellular RNA is emerging as an important mechanism for intracellular communication. The ability for the transfer of functionally active RNA molecules from one cell to another within vesicles such as exosomes enables a cell to modulate cellular signaling and biological processes within recipient cells. The study of extracellular RNA requires sensitive methods for the detection of these molecules. In this methods article, we will describe protocols for the detection of such extracellular RNA using sensitive detection technologies such as digital PCR. These protocols should be valuable to researchers interested in the role and contribution of extracellular RNA to tumor cell biology.

  2. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodora Stivarou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  3. Extracellular Molecules Involved in Cancer Cell Invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivarou, Theodora; Patsavoudi, Evangelia, E-mail: epatsavoudi@pasteur.gr [Department of Biochemistry, Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens 11521 (Greece); Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Egaleo, Athens 12210 (Greece)

    2015-01-26

    Nowadays it is perfectly clear that understanding and eradicating cancer cell invasion and metastasis represent the crucial, definitive points in cancer therapeutics. During the last two decades there has been a great interest in the understanding of the extracellular molecular mechanisms involved in cancer cell invasion. In this review, we highlight the findings concerning these processes, focusing in particular on extracellular molecules, including extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors, growth factors and their receptors, matrix metalloproteinases and extracellular chaperones. We report the molecular mechanisms underlying the important contribution of this pool of molecules to the complex, multi-step phenomenon of cancer cell invasion.

  4. Effect of biomimetic 3D environment of an injectable polymeric scaffold on MG-63 osteoblastic-cell response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid PLGA microspheres were fabricated and characterized in terms of their in vitro degradation behaviour. Microsphere scaffolds were then modified covalently by P-15 (GTPGPQGIAGQRGVV) to obtain a 3D bioactive collagen surrogate matrix for bone filling applications. These scaffolds were characterized for surface topography, hydrophilicity and evaluated for their effect on osteoblastic activity of MG-63 cell line vis-a-vis 2D monolayer culture. AFM and contact angle experiments indicated enhanced nano-level roughness and hydrophilicity on P-15 modification. Modified scaffolds showed enhanced cell attachment, proliferation, extracellular matrix formation, mineralization and collagen type-I expression when compared to unmodified microspheres, prerequisite for bone filling applications. On long term in vitro cell culture, however, decreased cell viability was observed which may be attributed to the acidic microenvironment generated due to polymer degradation and reduction in nutrient diffusion through the copious ECM formed in 3D scaffolds. Though a higher cell count could be obtained in 2D monolayer cell culture, it was overshadowed by weak cell attachment, poor phenotypic characteristics, decreased cell viability and low mineralization levels, over 28 day cell culture studies. Results indicate that P-15 modified microsphere scaffolds may provide a natural, biomimetic 3D environment and may be successfully exploited for non-invasive bone filling applications.

  5. A new three dimensional biomimetic hydrogel to deliver factors secreted by human mesenchymal stem cells in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Ilaria; Rossi, Filippo; Papa, Simonetta; Aloe, Rossella; Sculco, Marika; Mauri, Emanuele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Erba, Eugenio; Panini, Nicolò; Parazzi, Valentina; Barilani, Mario; Forloni, Gianluigi; Perale, Giuseppe; Lazzari, Lorenza; Veglianese, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) represents a promising strategy in spinal cord injury (SCI). However, both systemic and parenchymal hMSCs administrations show significant drawbacks as a limited number and viability of stem cells in situ. Biomaterials able to encapsulate and sustain hMSCs represent a viable approach to overcome these limitations potentially improving the stem cell therapy. In this study, we evaluate a new agarose/carbomer based hydrogel which combines different strategies to optimize hMSCs viability, density and delivery of paracrine factors. Specifically, we evaluate a new loading procedure on a lyophilized scaffold (soaked up effect) that reduces mechanical stress in encapsulating hMSCs into the hydrogel. In addition, we combine arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) tripeptide and 3D extracellular matrix deposition to increase the capacity to attach and maintain healthy hMSCs within the hydrogel over time. Furthermore, the fluidic diffusion from the hydrogel toward the injury site is improved by using a cling film that oriented efficaciously the delivery of paracrine factors in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that an improved combination as here proposed of hMSCs and biomimetic hydrogel is able to immunomodulate significantly the pro-inflammatory environment in a SCI mouse model, increasing M2 macrophagic population and promoting a pro-regenerative environment in situ.

  6. Extracellular modulators of Wnt signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Jones, E Yvonne

    2014-12-01

    Wnt morphogens are secreted signalling proteins that play leading roles in embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis throughout life. Wnt signalling is controlled by multiple mechanisms, including posttranslational modification of Wnts, antagonist binding (to Wnts or their receptors), and regulation of the availability of Wnt receptors. Recent crystallographic, structure-guided biophysical and cell-based studies have advanced our understanding of how Wnt signalling is regulated at the cell surface. Structures include Wnt in complex with the cysteine-rich domain (CRD) of Frizzled, extracellular fragments of Wnt co-receptor LRP6, LRP6-binding antagonists Dickkopf and Sclerostin, antagonists 5T4/WAIF1 and Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (WIF-1), as well as Frizzled-ubiquitin ligases ZNRF3/RNF43 (in isolation and in complexes with Wnt signalling promoters R-spondins and LGR5). We review recent discoveries and remaining questions. PMID:25460271

  7. From natural to bioassisted and biomimetic artificial water channel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboiu, Mihail; Gilles, Arnaud

    2013-12-17

    Within biological systems, natural channels and pores transport metabolites across the cell membranes. Researchers have explored artificial ion-channel architectures as potential mimics of natural ionic conduction. All these synthetic systems have produced an impressive collection of alternative artificial ion-channels. Amazingly, researchers have made far less progress in the area of synthetic water channels. The development of synthetic biomimetic water channels and pores could contribute to a better understanding of the natural function of protein channels and could offer new strategies to generate highly selective, advanced water purification systems. Despite the imaginative work by synthetic chemists to produce sophisticated architectures that confine water clusters, most synthetic water channels have used natural proteins channels as the selectivity components, embedded in the diverse arrays of bioassisted artificial systems. These systems combine natural proteins that present high water conductance states under natural conditions with artificial lipidic or polymeric matrixes. Experimental results have demonstrated that natural biomolecules can be used as bioassisted building blocks for the construction of highly selective water transport through artificial membranes. A next step to further the potential of these systems was the design and construction of simpler compounds that maintain the high conduction activity obtained with natural compounds leading to fully synthetic artificial biomimetic systems. Such studies aim to use constitutional selective artificial superstructures for water/proton transport to select functions similar to the natural structures. Moving to simpler water channel systems offers a chance to better understand mechanistic and structural behaviors and to uncover novel interactive water-channels that might parallel those in biomolecular systems. This Account discusses the incipient development of the first artificial water channels

  8. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity. PMID:26854061

  9. Extracellular matrix stiffness dictates Wnt expression through integrin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jing; Zu, Yan; Li, Jing; Du, Shuyuan; Xu, Yipu; Zhang, Lang; Jiang, Li; Wang, Zhao; Chien, Shu; Yang, Chun

    2016-02-08

    It is well established that extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness plays a significant role in regulating the phenotypes and behaviors of many cell types. However, the mechanism underlying the sensing of mechanical cues and subsequent elasticity-triggered pathways remains largely unknown. We observed that stiff ECM significantly enhanced the expression level of several members of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in both bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and primary chondrocytes. The activation of β-catenin by stiff ECM is not dependent on Wnt signals but is elevated by the activation of integrin/ focal adhesion kinase (FAK) pathway. The accumulated β-catenin then bound to the wnt1 promoter region to up-regulate the gene transcription, thus constituting a positive feedback of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. With the amplifying effect of positive feedback, this integrin-activated β-catenin/Wnt pathway plays significant roles in mediating the enhancement of Wnt signal on stiff ECM and contributes to the regulation of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation and primary chondrocyte phenotype maintenance. The present integrin-regulated Wnt1 expression and signaling contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell behaviors by ECM elasticity.

  10. Biomimetic coating of apatite/collagen composite on poly L-lactic acid facilitates cell seeding

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y; Mak, AFT; Wang, M; Li, J.

    2005-01-01

    Collagen and apatite were co-precipitated as a composite coating on poly L-lactic acid (PLLA) in an accelerated biomimetic process. The coating formed on PLLA films after 24 hours incubation was characterized. Saos-2 osteoblast-like cells were used to evaluate the cell seeding on this biomimetic composite coating. It was shown that cell seeding on PLLA films with the composite coating was greatly improved. PLLA coated with submicron collagen fibrils and submicron apatite paticulates can facil...

  11. High energy elastic hadron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the WA7 experiment at the CERN super proton synchrotron (SPS). The elastic differential cross sections of pion-proton, kaon-proton, antiproton-proton, and proton-proton at lower SPS energies over a wide range of momentum transfer were measured. Some theoretical models in the light of the experimental results are reviewed, and a comprehensive impact parameter analysis of antiproton-proton elastic scattering over a wide energy range is presented. A nucleon valence core model for high energy proton-proton and antiproton-proton elastic scattering is described

  12. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings synthesized by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visan, A. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Grossin, D. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Stefan, N.; Duta, L.; Miroiu, F.M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Stan, G.E. [National Institute of Materials Physics, RO-077125, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Sopronyi, M.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Freche, M.; Marsan, O.; Charvilat, C. [CIRIMAT – Carnot Institute, University of Toulouse, ENSIACET, 4 Allée Emile Monso, 31030 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Ciuca, S. [Politehnica University of Bucharest, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Mihailescu, I.N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma, and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, RO-77125, MG-36, Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the deposition by MAPLE of biomimetic apatite coatings on Ti substrates. • This is the first report of MAPLE deposition of hydrated biomimetic apatite films. • Biomimetic apatite powder was synthesized by double decomposition process. • Non-apatitic environments, of high surface reactivity, are preserved post-deposition. • We got the MAPLE complete transfer as thin film of a hydrated, delicate material. -- Abstract: We report the deposition by Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE) technique of biomimetic nanocrystalline apatite coatings on titanium substrates, with potential application in tissue engineering. The targets were prepared from metastable, nanometric, poorly crystalline apatite powders, analogous to mineral bone, synthesized through a biomimetic approach by double decomposition process. For the deposition of thin films, a KrF* excimer laser source was used (λ = 248 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≤ 25 ns). The analyses revealed the existence, in synthesized powders, of labile non-apatitic mineral ions, associated with the formation of a hydrated layer at the surface of the nanocrystals. The thin film analyses showed that the structural and chemical nature of the nanocrystalline apatite was prevalently preserved. The perpetuation of the non-apatitic environments was also observed. The study indicated that MAPLE is a suitable technique for the congruent transfer of a delicate material, such as the biomimetic hydrated nanohydroxyapatite.

  13. Use of biomimetic forward osmosis membrane for trace organics removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik T.; Bajraktari, Niada; Helix Nielsen, Claus;

    2015-01-01

    The use of forward osmosis for the removal of trace organics from water has recently attracted considerable attention as an alternative to traditional pressure driven membrane filtration. However, the existing forward osmosis membranes have been found to be ineffective at rejecting small neutral...... organic pollutants, which limits the applicability of the forward osmosis process. In this study a newly developed biomimetic membrane was tested for the removal of three selected trace organics that can be considered as a bench marking test for a membrane[U+05F3]s ability to reject small neutral organic...... pollutants in aqueous solution. The performance of this membrane was compared with a standard cellulose acetate forward osmosis membrane. The aquaporin membrane was found to have rejection values above 97% for all three trace organics, which was significantly higher than the cellulose acetate membrane...

  14. A gait planning method applied to hexapod biomimetic robot locomotion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Fu; Yan Jihong; Zang Xizhe; Zhao Jie

    2009-01-01

    In order to fulfill the goal of autonomous walking on rough terrain, a distributed gait planning method applied to hexapod biomimetic robot locomotion is proposed based on the research effort of gait coordination mechanism of stick insect. The mathematical relation of walking velocity and gait pattern was depicted, a set of local rules operating between adjacent legs were put forward, and a distributed network of local rules for gait control was constructed. With the interaction of adjacent legs, adaptive adjustment of phase sequence fluctuation of walking legs resulting from change of terrain conditions or variety of walking speed was implemented to generate statically stable gait. In the simulation experiments, adaptive adjustment of inter-leg phase sequence and smooth transition of velocity and gait pattern were realized, and static stableness was ensured simultaneously, which provided the hexapod robot with the capability of walking on rough terrain stably and expeditiously.

  15. Locomotion Performance of Biomimetic Fish-like Swimming Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden P.; Valdivia Y Alvarado, Pablo; Techet, Alexandra H.

    2007-11-01

    The swimming performance of a biomimetic, fish-like swimming device, designed to exploit the natural dynamics of its compliant body to achieve locomotion, is studied experimentally. A theoretical model combines beam-bending stress analysis and unsteady hydrodynamic forcing with known material properties of the robot to reveal desired geometry distributions and actuation modes. Swimming kinematics and corresponding performance of the device are also predicted and tested for a carangiform prototype device in a quiescent tank of water. Experimental swimming tests show good agreement with the simplified theoretical models. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the wake behind the device are investigated using time-resolved particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) over a range of tail beat frequencies, from 1 to 4 Hz, to asses vortical wake patterns and hydrodynamic forces. PIV data are compared to theoretical model predictions. Reynolds numbers for the swimming device are between 2500 and 8500 based on body length.

  16. CPG Network Optimization for a Biomimetic Robotic Fish via PSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Junzhi; Wu, Zhengxing; Wang, Ming; Tan, Min

    2016-09-01

    In this brief, we investigate the parameter optimization issue of a central pattern generator (CPG) network governed forward and backward swimming for a fully untethered, multijoint biomimetic robotic fish. Considering that the CPG parameters are tightly linked to the propulsive performance of the robotic fish, we propose a method for determination of relatively optimized control parameters. Within the framework of evolutionary computation, we use a combination of dynamic model and particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm to seek the CPG characteristic parameters for an enhanced performance. The PSO-based optimization scheme is validated with extensive experiments conducted on the actual robotic fish. Noticeably, the optimized results are shown to be superior to previously reported forward and backward swimming speeds. PMID:26259223

  17. The improved stability of enzyme encapsulated in biomimetic titania particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yanjun; Sun Qianyun [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Jiang Zhongyi [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)], E-mail: zhyjiang@tju.edu.cn; Zhang Lei; Li Jian; Li Lin; Sun Xiaohui [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates a novel biomimetic approach for the entrapment of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) within titania nanoparticles to improve its stability. Protamine was as the template and catalyst for the condensation of titanium (IV) bis(ammonium lactato) dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) into titania nanoparticles in which YADH was trapped. The as-prepared titania/protamine/YADH composites were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The mechanism of YADH encapsulation was tentatively proposed from a series of experimental results. The preliminary investigation showed that encapsulated YADH could retain most of its initial activity. Compared to free YADH, encapsulated YADH exhibited significantly improved thermal, pH and recycling stability. After 5 weeks storage, no substantial loss of catalytic activity for encapsulated YADH was observed.

  18. Plasmonic nanoparticles tuned thermal sensitive photonic polymer for biomimetic chameleon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yang; Liu, Lin; Cai, Zihe; Xu, Jiwen; Xu, Zhou; Zhang, Di; Hu, Xiaobin

    2016-08-01

    Among many thermo-photochromic materials, the color-changing behavior caused by temperature and light is usually lack of a full color response. And the study on visible light-stimuli chromic response is rarely reported. Here, we proposed a strategy to design a thermo-photochromic chameleon biomimetic material consisting of photonic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) copolymer and plasmonic nanoparticles which has a vivid color change triggered by temperature and light like chameleons. We make use of the plasmonic nanoparticles like gold nanoparticles and silver nanoparticles to increase the sensitivity of the responsive behavior and control the lower critical solution temperature of the thermosensitive films by tuning the polymer chain conformation transition. Finally, it is possible that this film would have colorimetric responses to the entire VIS spectrum by the addition of different plasmonic nanoparticles to tune the plasmonic excitation wavelength. As a result, this method provides a potential use in new biosensors, military and many other aspects.

  19. Bacteriorhodopsin-based bipolar photosensor for biomimetic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Katsuyuki; Haruyama, Yoshihiro; Yamada, Toshiki; Akiba, Makoto; Tominari, Yukihiro; Kaji, Takahiro; Terui, Toshifumi; Peper, Ferdinand; Tanaka, Shukichi; Katagiri, Yoshitada; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Otomo, Akira

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a promising biomaterial for several applications. Optical excitation of bR at an electrode-electrolyte interface generates differential photocurrents while an incident light is turned on and off. This unique functional response is similar to that seen in retinal neurons. The bR-based bipolar photosensor consists of the bR dip-coated thin films patterned on two ITO plates and the electrolyte solution. This bipolar photocell will function as a biomimetic photoreceptor cell. The bipolar structure, due to the photocurrent being generated in alignment with the cathodic direction, makes the excitatory and inhibitory regions possible. This scheme shows our bipolar cell can act as a basic unit of edge detection and forms the artificial visual receptive field.

  20. Efficient Enzyme-Free Biomimetic Sensors for Natural Phenol Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Garcia, Luane; Ribeiro Souza, Aparecido; Sanz Lobón, Germán; Dos Santos, Wallans Torres Pio; Alecrim, Morgana Fernandes; Fontes Santiago, Mariângela; de Sotomayor, Rafael Luque Álvarez; de Souza Gil, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The development of sensors and biosensors based on copper enzymes and/or copper oxides for phenol sensing is disclosed in this work. The electrochemical properties were studied by cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry using standard solutions of potassium ferrocyanide, phosphate/acetate buffers and representative natural phenols in a wide pH range (3.0 to 9.0). Among the natural phenols herein investigated, the highest sensitivity was observed for rutin, a powerful antioxidant widespread in functional foods and ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. The calibration curve for rutin performed at optimum pH (7.0) was linear in a broad concentration range, 1 to 120 µM (r = 0.99), showing detection limits of 0.4 µM. The optimized biomimetic sensor was also applied in total phenol determination in natural samples, exhibiting higher stability and sensitivity as well as distinct selectivity for antioxidant compounds. PMID:27529208

  1. Transport of Carbon Dioxide through a Biomimetic Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstathios Matsaridis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic membranes (BMM based on polymer filters impregnated with lipids or their analogues are widely applied in numerous areas of physics, biology, and medicine. In this paper we report the design and testing of an electrochemical system, which allows the investigation of CO2 transport through natural membranes such as alveoli barrier membrane system and also can be applied for solid-state measurements. The experimental setup comprises a specially designed two-compartment cell with BMM connected with an electrochemical workstation placed in a Faraday cage, two PH meters, and a nondispersive infrared gas analyzer. We prove, experimentally, that the CO2 transport through the natural membranes under different conditions depends on pH and displays a similar behavior as natural membranes. The influence of different drugs on the CO2 transport process through such membranes is discussed.

  2. Biomimetic synthesis of calcium-strontium apatite hollow nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this work,calcium-strontium apatite (Sr-HA) hollow nanospheres were synthesized by a facile biomimetic method.The structure and property of Sr-HA were characterized by FESEM,TEM,HRTEM,XRD and FT-IR spectroscopy.The influences of different ratios of calcium and strontium on the morphologies of the Sr-HA products were investigated.The experimental results revealed that the hollow spherical Sr-HA,with a size of 30-120 nm in diameter,could be synthesized when the molar ratio of Ca/Sr was 1:1.The possible formation mechanism of the hollow Sr-HA was proposed.The drug release experiments indicated that the hollow spherical Sr-HA had the property of sustained release.

  3. Artificial lateral line with biomimetic neuromasts to emulate fish sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yingchen; Chen Nannan; Tucker, Craig; Hu Huan; Liu Chang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Nguyen, Nam; Lockwood, Michael; Jones, Douglas L [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bleckmann, Horst, E-mail: changliu@northwestern.ed, E-mail: dl-jones@uiuc.ed [Institut fuer Zoologie, Universitaet Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Hydrodynamic imaging using the lateral line plays a critical role in fish behavior. To engineer such a biologically inspired sensing system, we developed an artificial lateral line using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and explored its localization capability. Arrays of biomimetic neuromasts constituted an artificial lateral line wrapped around a cylinder. A beamforming algorithm further enabled the artificial lateral line to image real-world hydrodynamic events in a 3D domain. We demonstrate that the artificial lateral line system can accurately localize an artificial dipole source and a natural tail-flicking crayfish under various conditions. The artificial lateral line provides a new sense to man-made underwater vehicles and marine robots so that they can sense like fish.

  4. Braking Performance of a Biomimetic Squid-Like Underwater Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md.Mahbubar Rahman; Sinpei Sugimori; Hiroshi Miki; Risa Yamamoto; Yugo Sanada; Yasuyuki Toda

    2013-01-01

    In this study,the braking performance of the undulating fin propulsion system ofa biomimetic squid-like underwater robot was investigated through free run experiment and simulation of the quasi-steady mathematical model.The quasi-steady equations of motion were solved using the measured and calculated hydrodynamic forces and compared with free-run test results.Various braking strategies were tested and discussed in terms of stopping ability and the forces acting on the stopping stage.The stopping performance of the undulating fin propulsion system tured out to be excellent considering the short stopping time and short stopping distance.This is because of the large negative thrust produced by progressive wave in opposite direction.It was confirmed that the undulating fin propulsion system can effectively perform braking even in complex underwater explorations.

  5. The Design and Implementation of a Biomimetic Robot Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhou

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel design of a biomimetic robot fish is presented. Based on the propulsion and maneuvering mechanisms of real fishes, a tail mechanical structure with cams and connecting rods for fitting carangiform fish body wave is designed, which provides the main propulsion. Two pectoral fins are mounted, and each pectoral fin can flap separately and rotate freely. Coordinating the movements of the tail and pectoral fins, the robot fish can simulate the movements of fishes in water. In order to obtain the necessary environmental information, several kinds of sensors (video, infrared, temperature, pressure and PH value sensors were mounted. Finally, the realization of the robot fish is presented.

  6. Biomimetic Nanotubes Based on Cyclodextrins for Ion-Channel Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamad-Hemouch, Hajar; Ramoul, Hassen; Abou Taha, Mohammad; Bacri, Laurent; Huin, Cécile; Przybylski, Cédric; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Thiébot, Bénédicte; Patriarche, Gilles; Jarroux, Nathalie; Pelta, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Biomimetic membrane channels offer a great potential for fundamental studies and applications. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of short cyclodextrin nanotubes, their insertion into membranes, and cytotoxicity assay. Mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the synthesis pathway leading to the formation of short nanotubes and to describe their structural parameters in terms of length, diameter, and number of cyclodextrins. Our results show the control of the number of cyclodextrins threaded on the polyrotaxane leading to nanotube synthesis. Structural parameters obtained by electron microscopy are consistent with the distribution of the number of cyclodextrins evaluated by mass spectrometry from the initial polymer distribution. An electrophysiological study at single molecule level demonstrates the ion channel formation into lipid bilayers, and the energy penalty for the entry of ions into the confined nanotube. In the presence of nanotubes, the cell physiology is not altered.

  7. Biomimetic Control of Mechanical Systems Equipped with Musculotendon Actuators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javier Moreno-Valenzuela; Adriana Salinas-Avila

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of modelling, control, and simulation of a mechanical system actuated by an agonist-antagonist musculotendon subsystem. Contraction dynamics is given by case I of Zajac's model. Saturated semi positive proportional-derivative-type controllers with switching as neural excitation inputs are proposed. Stability theory of switched system and SOSTOOLS, which is a sum of squares optimization toolbox of Matlab, are used to determine the stability of the obtained closed-loop system. To corroborate the obtained theoretical results numerical simulations are carried out. As additional contribution, the discussed ideas are applied to the biomimetic control of a DC motor, i.e., the position control is addressed assuming the presence of musculotendon actuators. Real-experiments corroborate the expected results.

  8. A Novel Bio-mimetic Wireless Micro Robot for Endoscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Dong-dong; YAN Guo-zheng; WANG Kua-dong; MA Guan-ying

    2008-01-01

    A novel bio-mimetic wireless micro robot for endoscope is developed. Its autonomous manner is earthworm-like and driven by linear actuators based on DC motor. It is different from the conventional micro robot endoscope that wireless module is used for communicating and power transfer. The fabricated micro robot system is detailedly described, including structure, micro robot locomotion principle, communication control module and wireless power transfer module. The experimental results show that the driving force of the lineaar actuator can reach to 2.55 N and supplying power is up to 480 mW DC power for receiving coil in the proposed system, which all fulfill the need of the micro robot system. The micro robot can creep reliably in the large intestine of pig and other contact environments.

  9. Artificial lateral line with biomimetic neuromasts to emulate fish sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrodynamic imaging using the lateral line plays a critical role in fish behavior. To engineer such a biologically inspired sensing system, we developed an artificial lateral line using MEMS (microelectromechanical system) technology and explored its localization capability. Arrays of biomimetic neuromasts constituted an artificial lateral line wrapped around a cylinder. A beamforming algorithm further enabled the artificial lateral line to image real-world hydrodynamic events in a 3D domain. We demonstrate that the artificial lateral line system can accurately localize an artificial dipole source and a natural tail-flicking crayfish under various conditions. The artificial lateral line provides a new sense to man-made underwater vehicles and marine robots so that they can sense like fish.

  10. Biomimetics in Modern Organizations – Laws or Metaphors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schatten

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetics, the art and science of imitating nature and life for technological solutions is discussed from a modern organization theory perspective. The main hypothesis of this article is that there are common laws in nature that are applicable to living, social and likewise organizational systems. To take advantage of these laws, the study of nature’s principles for their application to organizations is proposed – a process which is in product and technology design known as bionic creativity engineering. In a search for most interesting concepts borrowed from nature we found amoeba organizations, the theory of autopoiesis or self-creation, neural networks, heterarchies, as well as fractals and bioteaming which are described and reviewed. Additionally other concepts like swarm intelligence, stigmergy, as well as genesis and reproduction, are introduced. In the end all these ideas are summarized and guidelines for further research are given.

  11. Piezoelectrically Actuated Biomimetic Self-Contained Quadruped Bounding Robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thanhtam Ho; Sangyoon Lee

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a mesoscale self-contained quadruped mobile robot that employs two pieces of piezocomposite actuators for the bounding locomotion. The design of the robot leg is inspired by legged insects and animals,and the biomimetic concept is implemented in the robot in a simplified form, such that each leg of the robot has only one degree of freedom. The lack of degree of freedom is compensated by a slope of the robot frame relative to the horizontal plane. For the implementation of the self-contained mobile robot, a small power supply circuit is designed and installed on the robot. Experimental results show that the robot can locomote at about 50 mm.s-1 with the circuit on board, which can be considered as a significant step toward the goal of building an autonomous legged robot actuated by piezoelectric actuators.

  12. Aquaporin-Based Biomimetic Polymeric Membranes: Approaches and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Habel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, aquaporin biomimetic membranes (ABMs for water separation have gained considerable interest. Although the first ABMs are commercially available, there are still many challenges associated with further ABM development. Here, we discuss the interplay of the main components of ABMs: aquaporin proteins (AQPs, block copolymers for AQP reconstitution, and polymer-based supporting structures. First, we briefly cover challenges and review recent developments in understanding the interplay between AQP and block copolymers. Second, we review some experimental characterization methods for investigating AQP incorporation including freeze-fracture transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, stopped-flow light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering. Third, we focus on recent efforts in embedding reconstituted AQPs in membrane designs that are based on conventional thin film interfacial polymerization techniques. Finally, we describe some new developments in interfacial polymerization using polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane cages for increasing the physical and chemical durability of thin film composite membranes.

  13. Contribution of elastic tissues to the mechanics and energetics of muscle function during movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Muscle force production occurs within an environment of tissues that exhibit spring-like behavior, and this elasticity is a critical determinant of muscle performance during locomotion. Muscle force and power output both depend on the speed of contraction, as described by the isotonic force-velocity curve. By influencing the speed of contractile elements, elastic structures can have a profound effect on muscle force, power and work. In very rapid movements, elastic mechanisms can amplify muscle power by storing the work of muscle contraction slowly and releasing it rapidly. When energy must be dissipated rapidly, such as in landing from a jump, energy stored rapidly in elastic elements can be released more slowly to stretch muscle contractile elements, reducing the power input to muscle and possibly protecting it from damage. Elastic mechanisms identified so far rely primarily on in-series tendons, but many structures within muscles exhibit spring-like properties. Actomyosin cross-bridges, actin and myosin filaments, titin, and the connective tissue scaffolding of the extracellular matrix all have the potential to store and recover elastic energy during muscle contraction. The potential contribution of these elements can be assessed from their stiffness and estimates of the strain they undergo during muscle function. Such calculations provide boundaries for the possible roles these springs might play in locomotion, and may help to direct future studies of the uses of elastic elements in muscle.

  14. Uniqueness theorems in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Knops, Robin John

    1971-01-01

    The classical result for uniqueness in elasticity theory is due to Kirchhoff. It states that the standard mixed boundary value problem for a homogeneous isotropic linear elastic material in equilibrium and occupying a bounded three-dimensional region of space possesses at most one solution in the classical sense, provided the Lame and shear moduli, A and J1 respectively, obey the inequalities (3 A + 2 J1) > 0 and J1>O. In linear elastodynamics the analogous result, due to Neumann, is that the initial-mixed boundary value problem possesses at most one solution provided the elastic moduli satisfy the same set of inequalities as in Kirchhoffs theorem. Most standard textbooks on the linear theory of elasticity mention only these two classical criteria for uniqueness and neglect altogether the abundant literature which has appeared since the original publications of Kirchhoff. To remedy this deficiency it seems appropriate to attempt a coherent description ofthe various contributions made to the study of uniquenes...

  15. Astronomical optics and elasticity theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaitre, Gerard Rene

    2008-01-01

    Astronomical Optics and Elasticity Theory provides a very thorough and comprehensive account of what is known in this field. After an extensive introduction to optics and elasticity, the book discusses variable curvature and multimode deformable mirrors, as well as, in depth, active optics, its theory and applications. Further, optical design utilizing the Schmidt concept and various types of Schmidt correctors, as well as the elasticity theory of thin plates and shells are elaborated upon. Several active optics methods are developed for obtaining aberration corrected diffraction gratings. Further, a weakly conical shell theory of elasticity is elaborated for the aspherization of grazing incidence telescope mirrors. The very didactic and fairly easy-to-read presentation of the topic will enable PhD students and young researchers to actively participate in challenging astronomical optics and instrumentation projects.

  16. Biomimetic shark skin: design, fabrication and hydrodynamic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Lauder, George V

    2014-05-15

    Although the functional properties of shark skin have been of considerable interest to both biologists and engineers because of the complex hydrodynamic effects of surface roughness, no study to date has successfully fabricated a flexible biomimetic shark skin that allows detailed study of hydrodynamic function. We present the first study of the design, fabrication and hydrodynamic testing of a synthetic, flexible, shark skin membrane. A three-dimensional (3D) model of shark skin denticles was constructed using micro-CT imaging of the skin of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus). Using 3D printing, thousands of rigid synthetic shark denticles were placed on flexible membranes in a controlled, linear-arrayed pattern. This flexible 3D printed shark skin model was then tested in water using a robotic flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically at their self-propelled swimming speed. Compared with a smooth control model without denticles, the 3D printed shark skin showed increased swimming speed with reduced energy consumption under certain motion programs. For example, at a heave frequency of 1.5 Hz and an amplitude of ± 1 cm, swimming speed increased by 6.6% and the energy cost-of-transport was reduced by 5.9%. In addition, a leading-edge vortex with greater vorticity than the smooth control was generated by the 3D printed shark skin, which may explain the increased swimming speeds. The ability to fabricate synthetic biomimetic shark skin opens up a wide array of possible manipulations of surface roughness parameters, and the ability to examine the hydrodynamic consequences of diverse skin denticle shapes present in different shark species. PMID:24829323

  17. Biomimetic shark skin: design, fabrication and hydrodynamic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Weaver, James C; Lauder, George V

    2014-05-15

    Although the functional properties of shark skin have been of considerable interest to both biologists and engineers because of the complex hydrodynamic effects of surface roughness, no study to date has successfully fabricated a flexible biomimetic shark skin that allows detailed study of hydrodynamic function. We present the first study of the design, fabrication and hydrodynamic testing of a synthetic, flexible, shark skin membrane. A three-dimensional (3D) model of shark skin denticles was constructed using micro-CT imaging of the skin of the shortfin mako (Isurus oxyrinchus). Using 3D printing, thousands of rigid synthetic shark denticles were placed on flexible membranes in a controlled, linear-arrayed pattern. This flexible 3D printed shark skin model was then tested in water using a robotic flapping device that allowed us to either hold the models in a stationary position or move them dynamically at their self-propelled swimming speed. Compared with a smooth control model without denticles, the 3D printed shark skin showed increased swimming speed with reduced energy consumption under certain motion programs. For example, at a heave frequency of 1.5 Hz and an amplitude of ± 1 cm, swimming speed increased by 6.6% and the energy cost-of-transport was reduced by 5.9%. In addition, a leading-edge vortex with greater vorticity than the smooth control was generated by the 3D printed shark skin, which may explain the increased swimming speeds. The ability to fabricate synthetic biomimetic shark skin opens up a wide array of possible manipulations of surface roughness parameters, and the ability to examine the hydrodynamic consequences of diverse skin denticle shapes present in different shark species.

  18. EXTRACELLULAR HSPs: The Complicated Roles of Extracellular HSPs in Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Keith Calderwood

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular heat shock proteins (HSPs interact with the immune system in a very complex manner. Many such HSPs exert powerful effects on the immune response, playing both stimulatory and regulatory roles. However, the influence of the HSPs on immunity appears to be black or white in nature - rarely neutral. Thus the HSPs can act as dominant antigens and can comprise key components of anti-tumor vaccines. They can also function as powerful immunoregulatory agents and, as such are employed to treat inflammatory diseases or to extend the lifespan of tissue transplants. Small modifications in the cellular milieu have been shown to flip the allegiances of HSPs from immunoregulatory agents towards a potent inflammatory alignment. These mutable properties of HSPs may be related to the ability of these proteins to interact with multiple receptors often with mutually confounding properties in immune cells. Therefore, understanding the complex immune properties of HSPs may help us to harness their potential in treatment of a range of conditions.

  19. Proton-tetraneutron elastic scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Sherrill, B. M.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the elastic scattering of protons on a 4n system. This was used as part of the detection technique of a recent experiment [1] to search for the 4n (tetraneutron) as a bound particle. We show that it is unlikely that this process alone could yield the events reported in ref. [1], unless the 4n has an anomalously large backward elastic scattering amplitude.

  20. Integrodifferential relations in linear elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Kostin, Georgy V

    2012-01-01

    This work treats the elasticity of deformed bodies, including the resulting interior stresses and displacements.It also takes into account that some of constitutive relations can be considered in a weak form. To discuss this problem properly, the method of integrodifferential relations is used, and an advanced numerical technique for stress-strain analysis is presented and evaluated using various discretization techniques. The methods presented in this book are of importance for almost all elasticity problems in materials science and mechanical engineering.

  1. Trade elasticity and vertical specialisation

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Buono; Filippo Vergara Caffarelli

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows that vertical specialisation can increase the elasticity of trade to income, hence explaining dramatic events such as the great trade collapse. We argue that a change in the extent of vertical specialisation affects the elasticity of trade to income, while a mere change in global production levels for a given extent of vertical specialisation does not. In the model we show that only large demand shocks induce firms to vary the extent of vertical specialisation. Using panel da...

  2. Elastic response of unsaturated soils

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo, Carol; Caicedo, Bernardo; Thorel, Luc; Dano, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The elastic behavior of unsaturated soils subjected to very small strains (smaller than 10−5) was studied in the past years using different experimental devices (mainly resonant columns). The bender elements technique, now extensively used in soil mechanics, offers an efficient alternative to measure elastic properties of soils. Furthermore to enrich the common bender elements testing results providing only shear modulus values, an evolution of the bender elements technique, named bende...

  3. Extracellular DNA in oral microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Burgess, J Grant

    2015-07-01

    The extracellular matrix of microbial biofilms is critical for surface adhesion and nutrient homeostasis. Evidence is accumulating that extracellular DNA plays a number of important roles in biofilm integrity and formation on hard and soft tissues in the oral cavity. Here, we summarise recent developments in the field and consider the potential of targeting DNA for oral biofilm control.

  4. Elastic Behavior of Polymer Chains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teng Lu; Tao Chen; Hao-jun Liang

    2008-01-01

    The elastic behavior of the polymer chain was investigated in a three-dimensional off-lattice model. We sample more than 109 conformations of each kind of polymer chain by using a Monte Carlo algorithm, then analyze them with the non-Gaussian theory of rubberlike elasticity, and end with a statistical study. Through observing the effect of the chain flexibility and the stretching ratio on the mean-square end-to-end distance,the average energy, the average Helmholtz free energy, the elastic force, the contribution of energy to the elastic force, and the entropy contribution to elastic force of the polymer chain, we find that a rigid polymer chain is much easier to stretch than a flexible polymer chain. Also, a rigid polymer chain will become difficult to stretch only at a quite high stretching ratio because of the effect of the entropy contribution.These results of our simulation calculation may explain some of the macroscopic phenomena of polymer and biomacromolecular elasticity.

  5. Controlling elastic waves by transformation media

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Jin; Hu, Gengkai

    2010-01-01

    We propose a general transformed relation to control elastic waves by transformation method. The derived elastic transformed materials possess the necessary symmetry and they are validated numerically by a rotator and carpet cloak for elastic waves. The method provides a powerful tool to control elastic waves in solid, with potential applications to nondestructive testing, structure impact protection and seismology..

  6. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  7. Extracellular Control of Limb Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calve, S.; Simon, H.-G.

    Adult newts possess the ability to completely regenerate organs and appendages. Immediately after limb loss, the extracellular matrix (ECM) undergoes dramatic changes that may provide mechanical and biochemical cues to guide the formation of the blastema, which is comprised of uncommitted stem-like cells that proliferate to replace the lost structure. Skeletal muscle is a known reservoir for blastema cells but the mechanism by which it contributes progenitor cells is still unclear. To create physiologically relevant culture conditions for the testing of primary newt muscle cells in vitro, the spatio-temporal distribution of ECM components and the mechanical properties of newt muscle were analyzed. Tenascin-C and hyaluronic acid (HA) were found to be dramatically upregulated in the amputated limb and were co-expressed around regenerating skeletal muscle. The transverse stiffness of muscle measured in situ was used as a guide to generate silicone-based substrates of physiological stiffness. Culturing newt muscle cells under different conditions revealed that the cells are sensitive to both matrix coating and substrate stiffness: Myoblasts on HA-coated soft substrates display a rounded morphology and become more elongated as the stiffness of the substrate increases. Coating of soft substrates with matrigel or fibronectin enhanced cell spreading and eventual cell fusion.

  8. Elastic-plastic deformation of sandwich rod on elastic basis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Yu

    2008-01-01

    Sandwich composite material possesses advantages of both light weight and high strength.Although the mechanical behaviors of sandwich composite material with the influence of single external environment have been intensively studied,little work has been done in the study of mechanical property,in view of the nonlinear behavior of sandwich composites in the complicated external environments.In this paper,the problem about the bending of the three-layer elastic-plastic rod located on the elastic base,with a compressibly physical nonlinear core,has been studied.The mechanical response of the designed three-layer elements consisting of two bearing layers and a core has been examined.The complicated problem about curving of the three-layer rod located on the elastic base has been solved.The convergence of the proposed method of elastic solutions is examined to convince that the solution is acceptable.The calculated results indicate that the plasticity and physical nonlinearity of materials have a great influence on the deformation of the sandwich rod on the elastic basis.

  9. ESTIMATION OF POTATO DEMAND ELASTICITIES IN BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Huq, A. S. M. Anwarul; ALAM, SHAMSUL; Sabur, S. A.

    2004-01-01

    The study estimated potato demand elasticities in Bangladesh by using AIDS model with corrected Stone price index. The income elasticity of demand for potato was 0.632. The compensated and uncompensated own price elasticities indicated that all food items were price inelastic. The estimated own price elasticity indicated that if the potato price fell by 10 per cent, demand for potato would increase by 8.82 percent. The estimates of cross price elasticities indicated that the substitution effe...

  10. An extracellular material elaborated by Micrococcus sodonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAMPBELL, J N; EVANS, J B; PERRY, J J; NIVEN, C F

    1961-12-01

    Campbell, J. N. (American Meat Institute Foundation, Chicago, Ill.), James B. Evans Jerome J. Perry, and C. F. Niven, Jr. An extracellular material elaborated by Micrococcus sodonensis. J. Bacteriol. 82:828-837. 1961.-When actively growing in a yeast extract-tryptone broth, Micrococcus sodonensis produced rather large quantities of an extracellular material. On a dry weight basis, this material consisted of approximately 80% deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), 6% ribonucleic acid, 13% protein, and a small quantity of a cell pigment which contained an associated iron porphyrinlike compound. The extracellular material was not produced in other complex or synthetic media. Removal of cells from the appropriate growth medium and suspension in distilled water resulted in the prevention of formation of the material if it had not already begun, or its immediate cessation in those cells which had been actively producing the material. Cells producing the extracellular material exhibited an increasingly higher concentration of intracellular DNA as incubation proceeded, whereas cells growing under conditions not supporting such production showed a decline in intracellular DNA as the culture aged. A similar increase of intracellular DNA, but not release of extracellular material, could be effected by addition of yeast extract or high levels of purine compounds to a medium which did not support the production of extracellular material. The base composition and ratios of both extracellular and intracellular DNA produced under all conditions tested were compared and found to be similar or identical, and to correspond to the classical Watson-Crick structure for DNA. PMID:13876041

  11. Buckling modes of elastic thin films on elastic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Haixia; Huang, Rui; Chung, Jun Young; Stafford, Christopher M.; Yu, Hong-Hui

    2007-04-01

    Two buckling modes have been observed in thin films: buckle delamination and wrinkling. This letter identifies the conditions for selecting the favored buckling modes for elastic films on elastic substrates. Transition from one buckling mode to another is predicted as the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or is predicted for variation of the stiffness ratio between the substrate and the film or variation of theinterfacial defect size. The theoretical results are demonstrated experimentally by observing the coexistence of both buckling modes and mode transition in one film-substrate system.

  12. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution.

  13. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution. PMID:27040264

  14. Spherically symmetric elasticity in relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carot, J [Departament de Fisica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Cra Valldemossa pk 7.5, E-07122 Palma (Spain); Brito, I; Vaz, E G L R, E-mail: jcarot@uib.ca, E-mail: ireneb@mct.uminho.p, E-mail: evaz@mct.uminho.p

    2010-05-01

    The relativistic theory of elasticity is reviewed within the spherically symmetric context with a view towards the modelling of star interiors possessing elastic properties such as the ones expected in neutron stars. Emphasis is placed on generality in the main sections of the paper, and the results are then applied to specific examples. Along the way, a few general results for spacetimes admitting isometries are deduced, and their consequences are fully exploited in the case of spherical symmetry relating them next to the the case in which the material content of the spacetime is some elastic material. This paper extends and generalizes the pioneering work by Magli and Kijowski [1], Magli [2] and [3], and complements, in a sense, that by Karlovini and Samuelsson in their interesting series of papers [4], [5] and [6].

  15. Photoacoustic elastic oscillation and characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging and sensing have been studied extensively to probe the optical absorption of biological tissue in multiple scales ranging from large organs to small molecules. However, its elastic oscillation characterization is rarely studied and has been an untapped area to be explored. In literature, photoacoustic signal induced by pulsed laser is commonly modelled as a bipolar "N-shape" pulse from an optical absorber. In this paper, the photoacoustic damped oscillation is predicted and modelled by an equivalent mass-spring system by treating the optical absorber as an elastic oscillator. The photoacoustic simulation incorporating the proposed oscillation model shows better agreement with the measured signal from an elastic phantom, than conventional photoacoustic simulation model. More interestingly, the photoacoustic damping oscillation effect could potentially be a useful characterization approach to evaluate biological tissue's mechanical properties in terms of relaxation time, peak number and ra...

  16. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  17. Porous metal-organic frameworks for heterogeneous biomimetic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Ou, Sha; Wu, Chuan-De

    2014-04-15

    Metalloporphyrins are the active sites in monooxygenases that oxidize a variety of substrates efficiently and under mild conditions. Researchers have developed artificial metalloporphyrins, but these structures have had limited catalytic applications. Homogeneous artificial metalloporphyrins can undergo catalytic deactivation via suicidal self-oxidation, which lowers their catalytic activity and sustainability relative to their counterparts in Nature. Heme molecules in protein scaffolds can maintain high efficiency over numerous catalytic cycles. Therefore, we wondered if immobilizing metalloporphyrin moieties within porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) could stabilize these structures and facilitate the molecular recognition of substrates and produce highly efficient biomimetic catalysis. In this Account, we describe our research to develop multifunctional porphyrinic frameworks as highly efficient heterogeneous biomimetic catalysts. Our studies indicate that porous porphyrinic frameworks provide an excellent platform for mimicking the activity of biocatalysts and developing new heterogeneous catalysts that effect new chemical transformations under mild conditions. The porous structures and framework topologies of the porphyrinic frameworks depend on the configurations, coordination donors, and porphyrin metal ions of the metalloporphyrin moieties. To improve the activity of porous porphyrinic frameworks, we have developed a two-step synthesis that introduces the functional polyoxometalates (POMs) into POM-porphyrin hybrid materials. To tune the pore structures and the catalytic properties of porphyrinic frameworks, we have designed metalloporphyrin M-H8OCPP ligands with four m-benzenedicarboxylate moieties, and introduced the secondary auxiliary ligands. The porphyrin metal ions and the secondary functional moieties that are incorporated into porous metal-organic frameworks greatly influence the catalytic properties and activities of porphyrinic frameworks in

  18. Investor response to consumer elasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Nordic electricity system there is considerable uncertainty with respect to the long-term development in production capacity. The process towards liberalisation of the electricity sector started in a situation with a large reserve margin, but this margin is gradually vanishing. Since the potential investors in new production capacity are unaccustomed with investments under the new regime it is unknown if and when investments will take place. The electricity price is the key market signal to potential investors. The price is settled as a balance between supply and demand, and it is generally assumed that the demand side has an important role in this, and increasingly so. However, since consumers have not earlier had the incentive to respond to electricity prices, no reliable estimate of demand elasticity is known. The purpose of the present study is to analyse the role of electricity demand elasticity for investments in new electricity production capacity. Electricity price scenarios generated with a partial equilibrium model (Balmorel) are combined with a model of investment decisions. In this, various scenarios concerning the development in the demand elasticity are used. The simulated investment decisions are taken in a stochastic, dynamic setting, where a key point is the timing of the investment decision in relation to the gathering of new information relative to the stochastic elements. Based on this, the consequences of the development in consumer price elasticity for investments in a base load and a peak load plant are investigated. The main result of the analysis is that peak load investments can be made unprofitable by the development in consumer price elasticity, such that an investor will tend to wait with his peak load investment, until the development in consumer price elasticity has been revealed. (au)

  19. Plants as concept generators for biomimetic light-weight structures with variable stiffness and self-repair mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Speck; Tom Masselter; Bettina Prüm; Olga Speck; Rolf Luchsinger; Siegfried Fink

    2004-01-01

    Plants possess many structural and functional properties that have a high potential to serve as concept generators for the production of biomimetic technical materials and structures. We present data on two features of plants (variable stiffness due to pressure changes in cellular structures and rapid self-repair functions) that may be used as models for biomimetic projects.

  20. Price and Income Elasticities of Iranian Exports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrkar Roshan, Sedigheh

    This study investigates the export demand elasticities at the aggregate and disaggregated levels over the period 1977 to 2001 for Iran. By utilizing an export demand model and using time series techniques that account for the nonstationarity in the data, the price and income elasticities of demand are estimated by commodity class. As the elasticities of demand for various categories of exports are different, while they are crucial for policy determination. Based upon the estimated results, price and income elasticities are almost similar to those obtained in earlier studies in the case of developing countries. The main findings of this paper demonstrate that, price elasticities are smaller than -1 for all exports categories, whereas the income elasticities are found to be greater than one. The results also suggested, the income elasticities of industrial goods are higher compared to other export categories, while the lower elasticities are found in primary exports. The price and income elasticity estimates have also good statistical properties.

  1. Bacterial binding to extracellular proteins - in vitro adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, C.; Fiehn, N.-E.

    1999-01-01

    Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis......Viridans streptococci, bacterial adherence, extracellular matrix proteins, surface receptors, endocarditis...

  2. Dynamics of Elastic Excitable Media

    CERN Document Server

    Cartwright, J H E; Hernández-García, E; Piro, O; Cartwright, Julyan H. E.; Eguiluz, Victor M.; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Piro, Oreste

    1999-01-01

    The Burridge-Knopoff model of earthquake faults with viscous friction is equivalent to a van der Pol-FitzHugh-Nagumo model for excitable media with elastic coupling. The lubricated creep-slip friction law we use in the Burridge-Knopoff model describes the frictional sliding dynamics of a range of real materials. Low-dimensional structures including synchronized oscillations and propagating fronts are dominant, in agreement with the results of laboratory friction experiments. Here we explore the dynamics of fronts in elastic excitable media.

  3. Complex variable methods in elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    England, A H

    2003-01-01

    The plane strain and generalized plane stress boundary value problems of linear elasticity are the focus of this graduate-level text, which formulates and solves these problems by employing complex variable theory. The text presents detailed descriptions of the three basic methods that rely on series representation, Cauchy integral representation, and the solution via continuation. Its five-part treatment covers functions of a complex variable, the basic equations of two-dimensional elasticity, plane and half-plane problems, regions with circular boundaries, and regions with curvilinear bounda

  4. Two-dimensional elastic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Berti, S; Boffetta, G; Celani, A; Musacchio, S; 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.055306

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the effect of polymer additives on a two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow at very low Reynolds numbers by direct numerical simulations of the Oldroyd-B viscoelastic model. We find that above the elastic instability threshold the flow develops the elastic turbulence regime recently observed in experiments. We observe that both the turbulent drag and the Lyapunov exponent increase with Weissenberg, indicating the presence of a disordered, turbulent-like mixing flow. The energy spectrum develops a power-law scaling range with an exponent close to the experimental and theoretical expectations.

  5. Elastic constants for 8-OCB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Grzegorz; Zywucki, B.; Jadzyn, Jan

    1993-10-01

    The Frederiks transitions for the n-octyloxycyanobiphenyl (8-OCB) placed in the external magnetic and electric field as a function of the temperature have been studied. On the basis of threshold values Bc and Uc, the elastic constants for splay, bend and twist modes are determined. The magnetic anisotropy of 8-OCB as a function of temperature has been determined. The K11 and K33 elastic constants show the pretransitional nematic- smectic A effect. The values of critical exponents obtained from the temperature dependence of K11 and K33 in the vicinity of N-SA phase transition are discussed.

  6. Duration of an elastic collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles

    2012-07-01

    With a pedagogical goal, this paper deals with a study of the duration of an elastic collision of an inflatable spherical ball on a planar surface suitable for undergraduate studies. First, the force generated by the deformed spherical ball is obtained under assumptions that are discussed. The study of the motion of the spherical ball colliding with the planar surface allows us to determine the duration of the elastic collision. In order to check the theoretical model, an experiment is proposed to measure the duration of the collision. A more refined model built with masses and springs gives good agreement between theoretical and experimental values.

  7. How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, G; Lennon, A B; Boschetti, F; Verhegghe, B; Verdonck, P; Prendergast, P J

    2011-01-01

    A eukaryotic cell attaches and spreads on substrates, whether it is the extracellular matrix naturally produced by the cell itself, or artificial materials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds. Attachment and spreading require the cell to apply forces in the nN range to the substrate via adhesion sites, and these forces are balanced by the elastic response of the substrate. This mechanical interaction is one determinant of cell morphology and, ultimately, cell phenotype. In this paper we use a finite element model of a cell, with a tensegrity structure to model the cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules, to explore the way cells sense the stiffness of the substrate and thereby adapt to it. To support the computational results, an analytical 1D model is developed for comparison. We find that (i) the tensegrity hypothesis of the cytoskeleton is sufficient to explain the matrix-elasticity sensing, (ii) cell sensitivity is not constant but has a bell-shaped distribution over the physiological matrix-elasticity range, and (iii) the position of the sensitivity peak over the matrix-elasticity range depends on the cytoskeletal structure and in particular on the F-actin organisation. Our model suggests that F-actin reorganisation observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in response to change of matrix elasticity is a structural-remodelling process that shifts the sensitivity peak towards the new value of matrix elasticity. This finding discloses a potential regulatory role of scaffold stiffness for cell differentiation. PMID:22048898

  8. How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G De Santis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A eukaryotic cell attaches and spreads on substrates, whether it is the extracellular matrix naturally produced by the cell itself, or artificial materials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds. Attachment and spreading require the cell to apply forces in the nN range to the substrate via adhesion sites, and these forces are balanced by the elastic response of the substrate. This mechanical interaction is one determinant of cell morphology and, ultimately, cell phenotype. In this paper we use a finite element model of a cell, with a tensegrity structure to model the cytoskeleton of actin filaments and microtubules, to explore the way cells sense the stiffness of the substrate and thereby adapt to it. To support the computational results, an analytical 1D model is developed for comparison. We find that (i the tensegrity hypothesis of the cytoskeleton is sufficient to explain the matrix-elasticity sensing, (ii cell sensitivity is not constant but has a bell-shaped distribution over the physiological matrix-elasticity range, and (iii the position of the sensitivity peak over the matrix-elasticity range depends on the cytoskeletal structure and in particular on the F-actin organisation. Our model suggests that F-actin reorganisation observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in response to change of matrix elasticity is a structural-remodelling process that shifts the sensitivity peak towards the new value of matrix elasticity. This finding discloses a potential regulatory role of scaffold stiffness for cell differentiation.

  9. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  10. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an or...

  11. Optical ATP Biosensor for Extracellular ATP Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, C; Huang, C.-Y.C.; Lin, W-C

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular Adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) is an important multi-functional molecule which can mediate numerous physiological activities by activating purinergic P2 receptors. The objective of this study was to develop a novel optical ATP sensor for in-situ extracellular ATP measurement in biological tissues. The optical ATP sensor was made by applying two layers of sol-gel coating to the end of an optical fiber probe end. The first layer contained ruthenium complex for sensing changes in ...

  12. Oral lichen sclerosus expressing extracellular matrix proteins and IgG4-positive plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Aquino Xavier, Flavia Calo; Prates, Alisio Alves; Gurgel, Clarissa Araujo; De Souza, Tulio Geraldo; Andrade, Rodrigo Guimaraes; Goncalves Ramos, Eduardo Antonio; Pedreira Ramalho, Luciana Maria; Dos Santos, Jean Nunes

    2014-09-16

    Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a mucocutaneous disease with uncommon oral involvement. The etiology is not yet well understood, but LS has been associated with autoimmune, genetic, and immunological factors. We report a 47-year-old man with LS that exhibited an asymptomatic white plaque with red patches on the maxillary alveolar mucosa extending to the labial mucosa. He had no other skin disease. Positive immunostaining for tenascin and scarcity of fibronectin suggested extracellular matrix reorganization. Elastin immunostaining indicated a reduction of elastic fibers. Immunoexpression of collagen IV in blood vessels and its absence in the epithelial basement membrane, together with diffuse MMP-9 immunoexpression, suggested altered proteolytic activity. Mast cell staining bordering areas of sclerosis indicated a possible role in the synthesis of collagen. IgG4 positivity in plasma cells suggested a role in the fibrogenesis. This is an unusual presentation of oral LS and we discuss immunohistochemical findings regarding cellular and extracellular matrix components.

  13. Transcriptome of extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Royo

    Full Text Available The discovery that the cells communicate through emission of vesicles has opened new opportunities for better understanding of physiological and pathological mechanisms. This discovery also provides a novel source for non-invasive disease biomarker research. Our group has previously reported that hepatocytes release extracellular vesicles with protein content reflecting the cell-type of origin. Here, we show that the extracellular vesicles released by hepatocytes also carry RNA. We report the messenger RNA composition of extracellular vesicles released in two non-tumoral hepatic models: primary culture of rat hepatocytes and a progenitor cell line obtained from a mouse foetal liver. We describe different subpopulations of extracellular vesicles with different densities and protein and RNA content. We also show that the RNA cargo of extracellular vesicles released by primary hepatocytes can be transferred to rat liver stellate-like cells and promote their activation. Finally, we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that liver-damaging drugs galactosamine, acetaminophen, and diclofenac modify the RNA content of these vesicles. To summarize, we show that the extracellular vesicles secreted by hepatocytes contain various RNAs. These vesicles, likely to be involved in the activation of stellate cells, might become a new source for non-invasive identification of the liver toxicity markers.

  14. Cuttlebone: Characterisation, Application and Development of Biomimetic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Cadman; Shiwei Zhou; Yuhang Chen; Qing Li

    2012-01-01

    Cuttlebone signifies a special class of ultra-lightweight cellular natural material possessing unique chemical,mechanical and structural properties,which have drawn considerable attention in the literature.The aim of this paper is to better understand the mechanical and biological roles of cuttlebone.First,the existing literature concerning the characterisation and potential applications inspired by this remarkable biomaterial is critiqued.Second,the finite element-based homogenisation method is used to verify that morphological variations within individual cuttlebone samples have minimal impact on the effective mechanical properties.This finding agrees with existing literature,which suggests that cuttlebone strength is dictated by the cuttlefish habitation depth.Subsequently,this homogenisation approach is further developed to characterise the effective mechanical bulk modulus and biofluidic permeability that cuttlebone provides,thereby quantifying its mechanical and transporting functionalities to inspire bionic design of structures and materials for more extensive applications.Finally,a brief rationale for the need to design a biomimetic material inspired by the cuttlebone microstructure is provided,based on the preceding investigation.

  15. Conducting IPN actuator/sensor for biomimetic vibrissa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festin, N.; Plesse, C.; Pirim, P.; Chevrot, C.; Vidal, F.

    2014-03-01

    Electroactive polymers, or EAPs, are polymers that exhibit a change in size or shape when stimulated by an electric field. The most common applications of this type of material are in actuators and sensors. One promising technology is the elaboration of electronic conducting polymers based actuators with Interpenetrating Polymer Networks (IPNs) architecture. Their many advantageous properties as low working voltage, light weight and high lifetime make them very attractive for various applications including robotics. Conducting IPNs were fabricated by oxidative polymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene within a flexible Solid Polymer Electrolytes (SPE) combining poly(ethylene oxide) and Nitrile Butadiene Rubber. SPE mechanical properties and ionic conductivities in the presence of 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium bis-(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)-imide (EMITFSI) have been characterized. The presence of the elastomer within the SPE greatly improves the actuator performances. The free strain as well as the blocking force was characterized as a function of the actuator length. The sensing properties of those conducting IPNs allow their integration into a biomimetic perception prototype: a system mimicking the tactile perception of rat vibrissae.

  16. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-09-26

    Insect- and bird-size drones-micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 10(4)-10(5) or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  17. MIPs and Aptamers for Recognition of Proteins in Biomimetic Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menger, Marcus; Yarman, Aysu; Erdőssy, Júlia; Yildiz, Huseyin Bekir; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Scheller, Frieder W

    2016-01-01

    Biomimetic binders and catalysts have been generated in order to substitute the biological pendants in separation techniques and bioanalysis. The two major approaches use either "evolution in the test tube" of nucleotides for the preparation of aptamers or total chemical synthesis for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). The reproducible production of aptamers is a clear advantage, whilst the preparation of MIPs typically leads to a population of polymers with different binding sites. The realization of binding sites in the total bulk of the MIPs results in a higher binding capacity, however, on the expense of the accessibility and exchange rate. Furthermore, the readout of the bound analyte is easier for aptamers since the integration of signal generating labels is well established. On the other hand, the overall negative charge of the nucleotides makes aptamers prone to non-specific adsorption of positively charged constituents of the sample and the "biological" degradation of non-modified aptamers and ionic strength-dependent changes of conformation may be challenging in some application. PMID:27438862

  18. Deep reduced PEDOT films support electrochemical applications: Biomimetic color front.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toribio Fernandez OTERO

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the literature accepts, despite many controversial results, that during oxidation/reduction films of conducting polymers move from electronic conductors to insulators. Thus, engineers and device’s designers are forced to use metallic supports to reoxidize the material for reversible device work. Electrochromic front experiments appear as main visual support of the claimed insulating nature of reduced conducting polymers. Here we present a different design of the biomimetic electrochromic front that corroborates the electronic and ionic conducting nature of deep reduced films. The direct contact PEDOT metal/electrolyte and film/electrolyte was prevented from electrolyte contact until 1cm far from the metal contact with protecting Parafilm®. The deep reduced PEDOT film supports the flow of high currents promoting reaction induced electrochromic color changes beginning 1 cm far from the metal-polymer electrical contact and advancing, through the reduced film, towards the metal contact. Reverse color changes during oxidation/reduction always are initiated at the film/electrolyte contact advancing, under the protecting film, towards the film/metal contact. Both reduced and oxidized states of the film demonstrate electronic and ionic conductivities high enough to be used for electronic applications or, as self-supported electrodes, for electrochemical devices. The electrochemically stimulated conformational relaxation (ESCR model explains those results.

  19. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Insect- and bird-size drones—micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 104–105 or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight’. PMID:27528780

  20. Biomimetic 3D tissue printing for soft tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Falguni; Ha, Dong-Heon; Jang, Jinah; Han, Hyun Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Engineered adipose tissue constructs that are capable of reconstructing soft tissue with adequate volume would be worthwhile in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Tissue printing offers the possibility of fabricating anatomically relevant tissue constructs by delivering suitable matrix materials and living cells. Here, we devise a biomimetic approach for printing adipose tissue constructs employing decellularized adipose tissue (DAT) matrix bioink encapsulating human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs). We designed and printed precisely-defined and flexible dome-shaped structures with engineered porosity using DAT bioink that facilitated high cell viability over 2 weeks and induced expression of standard adipogenic genes without any supplemented adipogenic factors. The printed DAT constructs expressed adipogenic genes more intensely than did non-printed DAT gel. To evaluate the efficacy of our printed tissue constructs for adipose tissue regeneration, we implanted them subcutaneously in mice. The constructs did not induce chronic inflammation or cytotoxicity postimplantation, but supported positive tissue infiltration, constructive tissue remodeling, and adipose tissue formation. This study demonstrates that direct printing of spatially on-demand customized tissue analogs is a promising approach to soft tissue regeneration.

  1. Biomechanics and biomimetics in insect-inspired flight systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Ravi, Sridhar; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Tanaka, Hiroto

    2016-09-26

    Insect- and bird-size drones-micro air vehicles (MAV) that can perform autonomous flight in natural and man-made environments are now an active and well-integrated research area. MAVs normally operate at a low speed in a Reynolds number regime of 10(4)-10(5) or lower, in which most flying animals of insects, birds and bats fly, and encounter unconventional challenges in generating sufficient aerodynamic forces to stay airborne and in controlling flight autonomy to achieve complex manoeuvres. Flying insects that power and control flight by flapping wings are capable of sophisticated aerodynamic force production and precise, agile manoeuvring, through an integrated system consisting of wings to generate aerodynamic force, muscles to move the wings and a control system to modulate power output from the muscles. In this article, we give a selective review on the state of the art of biomechanics in bioinspired flight systems in terms of flapping and flexible wing aerodynamics, flight dynamics and stability, passive and active mechanisms in stabilization and control, as well as flapping flight in unsteady environments. We further highlight recent advances in biomimetics of flapping-wing MAVs with a specific focus on insect-inspired wing design and fabrication, as well as sensing systems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528780

  2. Biomimetic autonomous robot inspired by the Cyanea capillata (Cyro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biomimetic robot inspired by Cyanea capillata, termed as ‘Cyro’, was developed to meet the functional demands of underwater surveillance in defense and civilian applications. The vehicle was designed to mimic the morphology and swimming mechanism of the natural counterpart. The body of the vehicle consists of a rigid support structure with linear DC motors which actuate eight mechanical arms. The mechanical arms in conjunction with artificial mesoglea create the hydrodynamic force required for propulsion. The full vehicle measures 170 cm in diameter and has a total mass of 76 kg. An analytical model of the mechanical arm kinematics was developed. The analytical and experimental bell kinematics were analyzed and compared to the C. capillata. Cyro was found to reach the water surface untethered and autonomously from a depth of 182 cm in five actuation cycles. It achieved an average velocity of 8.47 cm s−1 while consuming an average power of 70 W. A two-axis thrust stand was developed to calculate the thrust directly from a single bell segment yielding an average thrust of 27.9 N for the whole vehicle. Steady state velocity during Cyro's swimming test was not reached but the measured performance during its last swim cycle resulted in a cost of transport of 10.9 J (kg ⋅ m)−1 and total efficiency of 0.03. (paper)

  3. Piezoelectric Templates - New Views on Biomineralization and Biomimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitz, Nina; Eiben, Sabine; Atanasova, Petia; Domingo, Neus; Leineweber, Andreas; Burghard, Zaklina; Bill, Joachim

    2016-05-23

    Biomineralization in general is based on electrostatic interactions and molecular recognition of organic and inorganic phases. These principles of biomineralization have also been utilized and transferred to bio-inspired synthesis of functional materials during the past decades. Proteins involved in both, biomineralization and bio-inspired processes, are often piezoelectric due to their dipolar character hinting to the impact of a template's piezoelectricity on mineralization processes. However, the piezoelectric contribution on the mineralization process and especially the interaction of organic and inorganic phases is hardly considered so far. We herein report the successful use of the intrinsic piezoelectric properties of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to synthesize piezoelectric ZnO. Such films show a two-fold increase of the piezoelectric coefficient up to 7.2 pm V(-1) compared to films synthesized on non-piezoelectric templates. By utilizing the intrinsic piezoelectricity of a biotemplate, we thus established a novel synthesis pathway towards functional materials, which sheds light on the whole field of biomimetics. The obtained results are of even broader and general interest since they are providing a new, more comprehensive insight into the mechanisms involved into biomineralization in living nature.

  4. Optimization of a tensegrity wing for biomimetic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moored, Keith W., III; Taylor, Stuart A.; Bart-Smith, Hilary

    2006-03-01

    Current attempts to build fast, efficient, and maneuverable underwater vehicles have looked to nature for inspiration. However, they have all been based on traditional propulsive techniques, i.e. rotary motors. In the current study a promising and potentially revolutionary approach is taken that overcomes the limitations of these traditional methods-morphing structure concepts with integrated actuation and sensing. Inspiration for this work comes from the manta ray (Manta birostris) and other batoid fish. These creatures are highly maneuverable but are also able to cruise at high speeds over long distances. In this paper, the structural foundation for the biomimetic morphing wing is a tensegrity structure. A preliminary procedure is presented for developing morphing tensegrity structures that include actuating elements. A shape optimization method is used that determines actuator placement and actuation amount necessary to achieve the measured biological displacement field of a ray. Lastly, an experimental manta ray wing is presented that measures the static and dynamic pressure field acting on the ray's wings during a normal flapping cycle.

  5. Biomimetic and bio-inspired uses of mollusc shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J P; Wang, Y; Backeljau, T; Chapelle, G

    2016-06-01

    Climate change and ocean acidification are likely to have a profound effect on marine molluscs, which are of great ecological and economic importance. One process particularly sensitive to climate change is the formation of biominerals in mollusc shells. Fundamental research is broadening our understanding of the biomineralization process, as well as providing more informed predictions on the effects of climate change on marine molluscs. Such studies are important in their own right, but their value also extends to applied sciences. Biominerals, organic/inorganic hybrid materials with many remarkable physical and chemical properties, have been studied for decades, and the possibilities for future improved use of such materials for society are widely recognised. This article highlights the potential use of our understanding of the shell biomineralization process in novel bio-inspired and biomimetic applications. It also highlights the potential for the valorisation of shells produced as a by-product of the aquaculture industry. Studying shells and the formation of biominerals will inspire novel functional hybrid materials. It may also provide sustainable, ecologically- and economically-viable solutions to some of the problems created by current human resource exploitation. PMID:27083864

  6. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications.

  7. Electro-active paper for a durable biomimetic actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung-Ryul; Yun, Gyu Young; Kim, Jung Hwan; Chen, Yi; Kim, Jaehwan

    2009-02-01

    Cellulose electro-active paper (EAPap), known as a smart material, has merits in terms of low voltage operation, light weight, dryness, low power consumption, biodegradability, abundance and low price. Since EAPap requires low power consumption, a remotely driven actuator has been proposed using microwave power transmission. This concept is attractive for many biomimetic systems such as crawling micro-insect robots, flying objects like dragon flies and smart wallpapers. However, the actuation performance of EAPap is sensitive to humidity and degrades with time. Thus, in this paper, a durable EAPap is studied. The fabrication of EAPap is explained and the actuation performance is shown with applied electric field, frequency, humidity level and time. The fabrication process includes dissolving cellulose fibers, eliminating solvent and Li ions with a mixture of deionized water and isopropyl alcohol, washing with water, drying and coating with gold. The morphology of the fabricated EAPap is analyzed by taking scanning electron microscope images and x-ray diffractograms. The actuation performance is tested in terms of bending displacement with frequency, time and humidity level

  8. Optimal design and motion control of biomimetic robotic fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU JunZhi; WANG Long; ZHAO Wei; TAN Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the design, optimization, and motion control of a radio-controlled, multi-link, free-swimming biomimetic robotic fish based on an opti-mized kinematic and dynamic model of fish swimming. The performance of the robotic fish is determined by both the fish's morphological characteristics and ki-nematic parameters. By applying ichthyologic theories of propulsion, a design framework that takes into consideration both mechatronic constraints in physical realization and feasibility of control methods is presented, under which a multiple linked robotic fish that integrates both the carangiform and anguilliform swimming modes can be easily developed. Taking account of both theoretic hydrodynamic issues and practical problems in engineering realization, the optimal link-length-ratios are numerically calculated by an improved constrained cyclic variable method, which are successfully applied to a series of real robotic fishes. The rhythmic movements of swimming are driven by a central pattern generator (CPG) based on nonlinear oscillations, and up-and-down motion by regulating the rotating angle of pectoral fins. The experimental results verify that the presented scheme and method are effective in design and implementation.

  9. Simulation of Biomimetic Recognition between Polymers and Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbfskie, Aaron J.; Pande, Vijay S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    1999-10-01

    Many biological processes, such as transmembrane signaling and pathogen-host interactions, are initiated by a protein recognizing a specific pattern of binding sites on part of a membrane or cell surface. By recognition, we imply that the polymer quickly finds and then adsorbs strongly on the pattern-matched region and not on others. The development of synthetic systems that can mimic such recognition between polymers and surfaces could have significant impact on advanced applications such as the development of sensors, molecular-scale separation processes, and synthetic viral inhibition agents. Attempting to affect recognition in synthetic systems by copying the detailed chemistries to which nature has been led over millenia of evolution does not seem practical for most applications. This leads us to the following question: Are there any universal strategies that can affect recognition between polymers and surfaces? Such generic strategies may be easier to implement in abiotic applications. We describe results that suggest that biomimetic recognition between synthetic polymers and surfaces is possible by exploiting certain generic strategies, and we elucidate the kinetic mechanisms by which this occurs. Our results suggest convenient model systems for experimental studies of dynamics in free energy landscapes characteristic of frustrated systems.

  10. Research on biomimetic underwater vehicles for underwater ISR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymak, Piotr; Praczyk, Tomasz; Naus, Krzysztof; Szturomski, Bogdan; Malec, Marcin; Morawski, Marcin

    2016-05-01

    Autonomous Biomimetic Underwater Vehicles BUVs driven by an undulating propulsion are a new branch in an area of an underwater robotics. They imitate both the construction and kinematics of a motion of underwater living organisms, e.g. fishes. Such vehicles have several features crucial from the point of view of military applications, e.g. larger secrecy and potential range of operation. The paper presents results of the research on BUVs carried out within two (Polish and EDA) projects both led by Polish Naval Academy. At the beginning, the initial efforts in building Polish BUV called CyberFish are included. Then, selected results of the tests of subsystems, e.g. navigational and 3D model of BUV built within national project are described. Next, the initial research achieved in the international project are showed. At the end, the schedule of the research planned to carry out within both projects is inserted. The paper is mainly focused on the hardware development of the BUVs.

  11. Biomimetic Experimental Research on Hexapod Robot's Locomotion Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; HAN Bao-ling; LUO Qing-sheng; ZHANG Chun-lin; XU Jia

    2009-01-01

    To provide hexapod robots with strategies of locomotion planning,observation experiments were operated on a kind of ant with the use of high speed digital photography and computer assistant analysis.Through digitalization of original analog video,locomotion characters of ants were obtained,the biomimetic foundation was laid for polynomial trajectory planning of multi-legged robots,which was deduced with mathematics method.In addition,five rules were concluded,which apply to hexapod robots marching locomotion planning.The first one is the fundamental strategy of multi-legged robots' leg trajectory planning.The second one helps to enhance the static and dynamic stability of multi-legged robots.The third one can improve the validity and feasibility of legs' falling points.The last two give criterions of multi-legged robots' toe trajectory figures and practical recommendatory constraints.These five rules give a good method for marching locomotion planning of multi-legged robots,and can be expended to turning planning and any other special locomotion.

  12. Dihydrobenzofuran Neolignanamides: Laccase-Mediated Biomimetic Synthesis and Antiproliferative Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardullo, Nunzio; Pulvirenti, Luana; Spatafora, Carmela; Musso, Nicolò; Barresi, Vincenza; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo; Tringali, Corrado

    2016-08-26

    The biomimetic synthesis of a small library of dihydrobenzofuran neolignanamides (the natural trans-grossamide (4) and the related compounds 21-28) has been carried out through an eco-friendly oxidative coupling reaction mediated by Trametes versicolor laccase. These products, after complete spectroscopic characterization, were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against Caco-2 (colon carcinoma), MCF-7 (mammary adenocarcinoma), and PC-3 (prostate cancer) human cells, using an MTT bioassay. The racemic neolignamides (±)-21 and (±)-27, in being the most lipophilic in the series, were potently active, with GI50 values comparable to or even lower than that of the positive control 5-FU. The racemates were resolved through chiral HPLC, and the pure enantiomers were subjected to ECD measurements to establish their absolute configurations at C-2 and C-3. All enantiomers showed potent antiproliferative activity, with, in particular, a GI50 value of 1.1 μM obtained for (2R,3R)-21. The effect of (±)-21 on the Caco-2 cell cycle was evaluated by flow cytometry, and it was demonstrated that (±)-21 exerts its antiproliferative activity by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. PMID:27504537

  13. Advances in surfaces and osseointegration in implantology. Biomimetic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Matteo; Fernandez-Yague, Marc; Lázaro, Pedro; Herrero-Climent, Mariano; Rios-Santos, Jose-Vicente; Bullon, Pedro; Gil, Francisco-Javier

    2015-05-01

    The present work is a revision of the processes occurring in osseointegration of titanium dental implants according to different types of surfaces -namely, polished surfaces, rough surfaces obtained from subtraction methods, as well as the new hydroxyapatite biomimetic surfaces obtained from thermochemical processes. Hydroxyapatite's high plasma-projection temperatures have proven to prevent the formation of crystalline apatite on the titanium dental implant, but lead to the formation of amorphous calcium phosphate (i.e., with no crystal structure) instead. This layer produce some osseointegration yet the calcium phosphate layer will eventually dissolve and leave a gap between the bone and the dental implant, thus leading to osseointegration failure due to bacterial colonization. A new surface -recently obtained by thermochemical processes- produces, by crystallization, a layer of apatite with the same mineral content as human bone that is chemically bonded to the titanium surface. Osseointegration speed was tested by means of minipigs, showing bone formation after 3 to 4 weeks, with the security that a dental implant can be loaded. This surface can be an excellent candidate for immediate or early loading procedures.

  14. Neural Networks Integrated Circuit for Biomimetics MEMS Microrobot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Saito

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will propose the neural networks integrated circuit (NNIC which is the driving waveform generator of the 4.0, 2.7, 2.5 mm, width, length, height in size biomimetics microelectromechanical systems (MEMS microrobot. The microrobot was made from silicon wafer fabricated by micro fabrication technology. The mechanical system of the robot was equipped with small size rotary type actuators, link mechanisms and six legs to realize the ant-like switching behavior. The NNIC generates the driving waveform using synchronization phenomena such as biological neural networks. The driving waveform can operate the actuators of the MEMS microrobot directly. Therefore, the NNIC bare chip realizes the robot control without using any software programs or A/D converters. The microrobot performed forward and backward locomotion, and also changes direction by inputting an external single trigger pulse. The locomotion speed of the microrobot was 26.4 mm/min when the step width was 0.88 mm. The power consumption of the system was 250 mWh when the room temperature was 298 K.

  15. Biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces: synthesis, mechanism and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Quan; Zhang, Wenwen; Dong, Chenbo; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil Sreenivasan; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-09-01

    With millions of years of natural evolution, organisms have achieved sophisticated structures, patterns or textures with complex, spontaneous multifunctionality. Among all the fascinating characteristics observed in biosystems, self-cleaning ability is regarded as one of the most interesting topics in biomimicry because of its potential applications in various fields such as aerospace, energy conversion and biomedical and environmental protection. Recently, in-depth studies have been carried out on various compelling biostructures including lotus leaves, shark skins, butterfly wings and gecko feet. To understand and mimic their self-cleaning mechanisms in artificial structures, in this article, recent progress in self-cleaning techniques is discussed and summarized. Based on the underlying self-cleaning mechanisms, the methods are classified into two categories: self-cleaning with water and without water. The review gives a succinct account of the detailed mechanisms and biomimetic processes applied to create artificial self-cleaning materials and surfaces, and provides some examples of cutting-edge applications such as anti-reflection, water repellence, self-healing, anti-fogging and micro-manipulators. The prospectives and directions of future development are also briefly proposed.

  16. Biomimetic autonomous robot inspired by the Cyanea capillata (Cyro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Alex A; Marut, Kenneth J; Michael, Tyler; Priya, Shashank

    2013-12-01

    A biomimetic robot inspired by Cyanea capillata, termed as 'Cyro', was developed to meet the functional demands of underwater surveillance in defense and civilian applications. The vehicle was designed to mimic the morphology and swimming mechanism of the natural counterpart. The body of the vehicle consists of a rigid support structure with linear DC motors which actuate eight mechanical arms. The mechanical arms in conjunction with artificial mesoglea create the hydrodynamic force required for propulsion. The full vehicle measures 170 cm in diameter and has a total mass of 76 kg. An analytical model of the mechanical arm kinematics was developed. The analytical and experimental bell kinematics were analyzed and compared to the C. capillata. Cyro was found to reach the water surface untethered and autonomously from a depth of 182 cm in five actuation cycles. It achieved an average velocity of 8.47 cm s(-1) while consuming an average power of 70 W. A two-axis thrust stand was developed to calculate the thrust directly from a single bell segment yielding an average thrust of 27.9 N for the whole vehicle. Steady state velocity during Cyro's swimming test was not reached but the measured performance during its last swim cycle resulted in a cost of transport of 10.9 J (kg ⋅ m)(-1) and total efficiency of 0.03. PMID:24166747

  17. Biomimetic Architecture in Building Envelope Maintenance (A Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Salim N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of biomimetic architecture on building envelope is the main structure of this research. The concept is believed more sustainable and efficient for energy saving, operating cost consumption, waste recycle and design renewal in the future. The inspiration from the nature developed the intention on this study to explore on what and how this concept to overcome the problems through design. Biomimicry does catch the attention of human to study more on the system and function of its nature course. The designers are not exception influenced by this concept when the form, shape, texture and colour inspired them in their design. The domination of building form will affect the building envelope as the skin of the structure. A clear impact on building failure is begun with building envelope appearance without a proper maintenance. The faults in building design place a heavy burden on the building for the rest of its operational life and there is no compensation for it. In such situations, the responsibility falls on the shoulders of the designer.

  18. Biomimetic self-cleaning surfaces: synthesis, mechanism and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Quan; Zhang, Wenwen; Dong, Chenbo; Sreeprasad, Theruvakkattil Sreenivasan; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-09-01

    With millions of years of natural evolution, organisms have achieved sophisticated structures, patterns or textures with complex, spontaneous multifunctionality. Among all the fascinating characteristics observed in biosystems, self-cleaning ability is regarded as one of the most interesting topics in biomimicry because of its potential applications in various fields such as aerospace, energy conversion and biomedical and environmental protection. Recently, in-depth studies have been carried out on various compelling biostructures including lotus leaves, shark skins, butterfly wings and gecko feet. To understand and mimic their self-cleaning mechanisms in artificial structures, in this article, recent progress in self-cleaning techniques is discussed and summarized. Based on the underlying self-cleaning mechanisms, the methods are classified into two categories: self-cleaning with water and without water. The review gives a succinct account of the detailed mechanisms and biomimetic processes applied to create artificial self-cleaning materials and surfaces, and provides some examples of cutting-edge applications such as anti-reflection, water repellence, self-healing, anti-fogging and micro-manipulators. The prospectives and directions of future development are also briefly proposed. PMID:27628170

  19. Biomimetic solution against dewetting in a highly hydrophobic nanopore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picaud, Fabien; Paris, Guillaume; Gharbi, Tijani; Balme, Sébastien; Lepoitevin, Mathilde; Tangaraj, Vidhyadevi; Bechelany, Mikhael; Janot, Jean Marc; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Henn, François

    2016-06-14

    A water molecule is the foundation of life and is the primary compound in every living system. While many of its properties are understood in a bulk solvent, its behavior in a small hydrophobic nanopore still raises fundamental questions. For instance, a wetting/dewetting transition in a hydrophobic solid-state or a polymer nanopore occurs stochastically and can only be prevented by external physical stimuli. Controlling these transitions would be a primary requirement to improve many applications. Some biological channels, such as gramicidin A (gA) proteins, show a high rate of water and ion diffusion in their central subnanochannel while their external surface is highly hydrophobic. The diameter of this channel is significantly smaller than the inner size of the lowest artificial nanopore in which water drying occurs (i.e. 1.4 nm). In this paper, we propose an innovative idea to generate nanopore wetting as a result of which the application of an external field is no longer required. In a nanopore, the drying or wetting of the inner walls occurs randomly (in experiments and in simulations). However, we have shown how the confinement of gA, in a dried hydrophobic nanopore, rapidly generates a stable wetting of the latter. We believe that this simple idea, based on biomimetism, could represent a real breakthrough that could help to improve and develop new nanoscale applications. PMID:27157717

  20. Biomimetic smart sensors for autonomous robotic behavior II: vestibular processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuwan; Deligeorges, Socrates; Soloway, Aaron; Lichtenstein, Lee; Gore, Tyler; Hubbard, Allyn

    2009-05-01

    Limited autonomous behaviors are fast becoming a critical capability in the field of robotics as robotic applications are used in more complicated and interactive environments. As additional sensory capabilities are added to robotic platforms, sensor fusion to enhance and facilitate autonomous behavior becomes increasingly important. Using biology as a model, the equivalent of a vestibular system needs to be created in order to orient the system within its environment and allow multi-modal sensor fusion. In mammals, the vestibular system plays a central role in physiological homeostasis and sensory information integration (Fuller et al, Neuroscience 129 (2004) 461-471). At the level of the Superior Colliculus in the brain, there is multimodal sensory integration across visual, auditory, somatosensory, and vestibular inputs (Wallace et al, J Neurophysiol 80 (1998) 1006-1010), with the vestibular component contributing a strong reference frame gating input. Using a simple model for the deep layers of the Superior Colliculus, an off-the-shelf 3-axis solid state gyroscope and accelerometer was used as the equivalent representation of the vestibular system. The acceleration and rotational measurements are used to determine the relationship between a local reference frame of a robotic platform (an iRobot Packbot®) and the inertial reference frame (the outside world), with the simulated vestibular input tightly coupled with the acoustic and optical inputs. Field testing of the robotic platform using acoustics to cue optical sensors coupled through a biomimetic vestibular model for "slew to cue" gunfire detection have shown great promise.

  1. Nonlinear theory of elastic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonlinear theory of elastic shells is developed which incorporates both geometric and physical nonlinearities and which does not make use of the well known Love-Kirchhoff hypothesis. The resulting equations are formulated in tensorial notation and are reduced to the ones of common use when simplifying assumptions encountered in the especific litterature are taken. (Author)

  2. Lactoferrin Adsorbed onto Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals Controlling - In Vivo - the Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulgione, Andrea; Nocerino, Nunzia; Iannaccone, Marco; Roperto, Sante; Capuano, Federico; Roveri, Norberto; Lelli, Marco; Crasto, Antonio; Calogero, Armando; Pilloni, Argenia Paola; Capparelli, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Background The resistance of Helicobacter pylori to the antibiotic therapy poses the problem to discover new therapeutic approaches. Recently it has been stated that antibacterial, immunomodulatory, and antioxidant properties of lactoferrin are increased when this protein is surface-linked to biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanocrystals. Objective Based on these knowledge, the aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an alternative therapy against Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods Antibacterial and antinflammatory properties, humoral antibody induction, histopathological analysis and absence of side effects were evaluated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Results The tests carried out have been demonstrated better performance of lactoferrin delivered by biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanoparticles combined with cell free supernatant from probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei compared to both lactoferrin and probiotic alone or pooled. Conclusion These findings indicate the effectiveness and safety of our proposed therapy as alternative treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27384186

  3. Heart transplantation and arterial elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colvin-Adams M

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Monica Colvin-Adams,1 Nonyelum Harcourt,1 Robert LeDuc,2 Ganesh Raveendran,1 Yassir Sonbol,3 Robert Wilson,1 Daniel Duprez11Cardiovascular Division, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 2Division of Biostatistics University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Cardiovascular Division, St Luke's Hospital System, Sugar Land, TX, USAObjective: Arterial elasticity is a functional biomarker that has predictive value for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in nontransplant populations. There is little information regarding arterial elasticity in heart transplant recipients. This study aimed to characterize small (SAE and large (LAE artery elasticity in heart transplant recipients in comparison with an asymptomatic population free of overt cardiovascular disease. A second goal was to identify demographic and clinical factors associated with arterial elasticity in this unique population.Methods: Arterial pulse waveform was registered noninvasively at the radial artery in 71 heart transplant recipients between 2008 and 2010. SAEs and LAEs were derived from diastolic pulse contour analysis. Comparisons were made to a healthy cohort of 1,808 participants selected from our prevention clinic database. Multiple regression analyses were performed to evaluate associations between risk factors and SAE and LAE within the heart transplant recipients.Results: LAE and SAE were significantly lower in heart transplant recipients than in the normal cohort (P <0.01 and P < 0.0001, respectively. Female sex and history of ischemic cardiomyopathy were significantly associated with reduced LAE and SAE. Older age and the presence of moderate cardiac allograft vasculopathy were also significantly associated with reduced SAE. Transplant duration was associated with increased SAE.Conclusion: Heart transplants are associated with peripheral endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness, as demonstrated by a significant reduction in SAE and LAE when compared with a

  4. Development and functional evaluation of biomimetic silicone surfaces with hierarchical micro/nano-topographical features demonstrates favourable in vitro foreign body response of breast-derived fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Daniel J T; Oikonomou, Antonios; Hill, Ernie; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2015-06-01

    Reproducing extracellular matrix topographical cues, such as those present within acellular dermal matrix (ADM), in synthetic implant surfaces, may augment cellular responses, independent of surface chemistry. This could lead to enhanced implant integration and performance while reducing complications. In this work, the hierarchical micro and nanoscale features of ADM were accurately and reproducibly replicated in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), using an innovative maskless 3D grayscale fabrication process not previously reported. Human breast derived fibroblasts (n=5) were cultured on PDMS surfaces and compared to commercially available smooth and textured silicone implant surfaces, for up to one week. Cell attachment, proliferation and cytotoxicity, in addition to immunofluorescence staining, SEM imaging, qRT-PCR and cytokine array were performed. ADM PDMS surfaces promoted cell adhesion, proliferation and survival (p=<0.05), in addition to increased focal contact formation and spread fibroblast morphology when compared to commercially available implant surfaces. PCNA, vinculin and collagen 1 were up-regulated in fibroblasts on biomimetic surfaces while IL8, TNFα, TGFβ1 and HSP60 were down-regulated (p=<0.05). A reduced inflammatory cytokine response was also observed (p=<0.05). This study represents a novel approach to the development of functionalised biomimetic prosthetic implant surfaces which were demonstrated to significantly attenuate the acute in vitro foreign body reaction to silicone. PMID:25818416

  5. Basic components of connective tissues and extracellular matrix: elastin, fibrillin, fibulins, fibrinogen, fibronectin, laminin, tenascins and thrombospondins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halper, Jaroslava; Kjaer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Collagens are the most abundant components of the extracellular matrix and many types of soft tissues. Elastin is another major component of certain soft tissues, such as arterial walls and ligaments. Many other molecules, though lower in quantity, function as essential components of the extracellular matrix in soft tissues. Some of these are reviewed in this chapter. Besides their basic structure, biochemistry and physiology, their roles in disorders of soft tissues are discussed only briefly as most chapters in this volume deal with relevant individual compounds. Fibronectin with its muldomain structure plays a role of "master organizer" in matrix assembly as it forms a bridge between cell surface receptors, e.g., integrins, and compounds such collagen, proteoglycans and other focal adhesion molecules. It also plays an essential role in the assembly of fibrillin-1 into a structured network. Laminins contribute to the structure of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and modulate cellular functions such as adhesion, differentiation, migration, stability of phenotype, and resistance towards apoptosis. Though the primary role of fibrinogen is in clot formation, after conversion to fibrin by thrombin, it also binds to a variety of compounds, particularly to various growth factors, and as such fibrinogen is a player in cardiovascular and extracellular matrix physiology. Elastin, an insoluble polymer of the monomeric soluble precursor tropoelastin, is the main component of elastic fibers in matrix tissue where it provides elastic recoil and resilience to a variety of connective tissues, e.g., aorta and ligaments. Elastic fibers regulate activity of TGFβs through their association with fibrillin microfibrils. Elastin also plays a role in cell adhesion, cell migration, and has the ability to participate in cell signaling. Mutations in the elastin gene lead to cutis laxa. Fibrillins represent the predominant core of the microfibrils in elastic as well as non-elastic

  6. Microfluidic devices for investigation of biomimetic membranes for sensor and separation applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila Justyna

    drug candidates and in separation technologies, where an exciting example is water purification device based on biomimetic membranes containing aquaporins (highly water selective proteins). However, there are many challenges that must be overcome in order to build biomimetic membrane-based devices...... (up to 6 days) with a bilayer membrane area ~50% of the available aperture area. Highly stable membranes (up to 2 days) with a bilayer membrane area ~24% of the available aperture area were created in the developed microfluidic device. Further, reconstitution of α-hemolysin (α-HL) membrane proteins...

  7. Fingerprint attendance system based on hypersphere covering of biomimetic pattern recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Yin, Ye; Cui, Xiaojing

    2015-01-01

    Hypersphere covering of biomimetic pattern recognition method has the features of fast identification,low rate of false recognition,easy implementation,and so on.It is particularly suitable for a number of strong practical applications.In this paper,we study a biomimetic pattern recognition method based on the hypersphere string covering and apply it in a fingerprint attendance system.On the basis of analyzing actual teaching needs,we design a complete hardware and software system for the fin...

  8. Preparation of microcellular composites with biomimetic structure via supercritical fluid technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new microcellular composite material with a biomimetic structure has been prepared via the supercritical fluid (SCF) technology. The resultant material has a clear biomimetic structure like bamboo and wood. The skin region is enriched with oriented high-strength thermotropic liquid crystal polymer fibrils, while the core region with polystyrene (PS) micro-cells. The diameter and density of micro- cells can be controlled by the processing parameters such as temperature and pressure. And the skin thickness can be controlled conveniently by varying the composition of polystyrene and liquid crystal polymer.

  9. Experimental research on biomimetic drag-reducing surface application in natural gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yuehao; Zhang, Deyuan [Beihang Univ., Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation

    2012-12-15

    In the context of natural gas pipelines the application of biomimetic drag-reducing technology has been proposed for the purpose of reducing wall resistance and increasing the transportation capacity by virtue of smooth internal coating. In this article, in order to validate the drag reduction effect, the precured micro-rolling technology (PCMRT) was adopted to fabricate the biomimetic drag-reducing pipes, and the field testing experiment with natural gas was performed for the first time, achieving a maximum drag reduction of 8.68%, which proves the feasibility of the application of this new technology in natural gas pipelines. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of antiseptic apatite powders prepared at biomimetics temperature and pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumia Belouafa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Antiseptic apatite-based calcium phosphates were prepared as the single-phase powders. Phosphocalcic oxygenated apatites were synthesized from calcium salts and orthophosphate dissolved in oxygenated water solution at 30%, under the biomimetic conditions of 37 °C and pH 7.4. The characterization and chemical analysis of the synthesized biomimetic apatite powders were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, powder X ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and chemical analysis. The obtained materials are a calcium deficient apatites with different morphologies.

  11. Poverty Elasticity- a New Empirical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Erik Alencar de Figueiredo; Laurini, Márcio P.

    2012-01-01

    This note proposes a nonparametric estimation method controlled for endogeneity to calculate poverty elasticities for a panel of countries. Results show that usual estimates without control for endogeneity overestimate the growth elasticity of poverty.

  12. Fabrication and characterisation of biomimetic, electrospun gelatin fibre scaffolds for tunica media-equivalent, tissue engineered vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Y; Lekakou, C; Labeed, F; Tomlins, P

    2016-04-01

    It is increasingly recognised that biomimetic, natural polymers mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM) have low thrombogenicity and functional motifs that regulate cell-matrix interactions, with these factors being critical for tissue engineered vascular grafts especially grafts of small diameter. Gelatin constitutes a low cost substitute of soluble collagen but gelatin scaffolds so far have shown generally low strength and suture retention strength. In this study, we have devised the fabrication of novel, electrospun, multilayer, gelatin fibre scaffolds, with controlled fibre layer orientation, and optimised gelatin crosslinking to achieve not only compliance equivalent to that of coronary artery but also for the first time strength of the wet tubular acellular scaffold (swollen with absorbed water) same as that of the tunica media of coronary artery in both circumferential and axial directions. Most importantly, for the first time for natural scaffolds and in particular gelatin, high suture retention strength was achieved in the range of 1.8-1.94 N for wet acellular scaffolds, same or better than that for fresh saphenous vein. The study presents the investigations to relate the electrospinning process parameters to the microstructural parameters of the scaffold, which are further related to the mechanical performance data of wet, crosslinked, electrospun scaffolds in both circumferential and axial tubular directions. The scaffolds exhibited excellent performance in human smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation, with SMCs seeded on the top surface adhering, elongating and aligning along the local fibres, migrating through the scaffold thickness and populating a transverse distance of 186 μm and 240 μm 9 days post-seeding for scaffolds of initial dry porosity of 74 and 83%, respectively. PMID:26838874

  13. Simplifying the Price Elasticity of Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Andrews; Cynthia Benzing

    2010-01-01

    Ockham’s Razor is a reminder to keep things simple, but this principle is often ignored in the elasticity chapters of many economics textbooks. Many texts invoke slope unnecessarily and in contradictory ways. Discussions of the determinants of the price elasticity of demand have the potential to further confuse students, as do elasticity estimates that are dated and inappropriate. Principles instructors could better explain the price elasticity of demand by concentrating on the price-quantity...

  14. Revisiting the Price Elasticity of Gasoline Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Alfredo A

    2007-01-01

    In this document, we investigate the evolution of the income elasticity and the price elasticity of the demand for gasoline over the period 1975-2006. By using the Probabilistic Reduction Approach, we were able to model changes in mean heterogeneity and variance heterogeneity directly into the model. This method allowed us to determine the timing and the size of shifts in the elasticities. Our estimates are consistent with the current literature: there has been a shift in the price elasticity...

  15. Brazilian sawn wood price and income elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Rommel Noce; José Luiz Pereira de Rezende; Agostinho Lopes de Souza; Lourival Marin Mendes; Márcio Lopes; Rosa Maria Miranda Armond Carvalho; Juliana Mendes de Oliveira; Juliana Lorensi do Canto

    2010-01-01

    This study estimated the sawn wood demand price and income elasticity. Specifically it was estimated the priceelasticity of sawn wood, the cross price elasticity of wood panels and the income elasticity of Brazilian GDP. A log-log model withcorrection through outline of the mobile average (MA(1)) was used, adjusted for the period of 1971 to 2006, which showed to bestable, with satisfactory significance levels. It was observed that sawn wood demand is inelastic in relation to price and elastic...

  16. Rice Consumption Patterns and Quantity Demand Elasticities

    OpenAIRE

    Isavilanonda Somporn; Kongrithi Weerasak

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores rice consumption patterns of Thai households and estimates income and price elasticities of quantity demand. The study found that the average annual consumption of rice for Thai households was 101 kilogram per person. The income elasticity of quantity demand is positive and inelastic (close to zero). The households in urban areas tend to have less income elasticity than those in rural areas. The households in the highest income rank of 25% had negative income elasticity. T...

  17. Substrate chemistry influences the morphology and biological function of adsorbed extracellular matrix assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherratt, Michael J; Bax, Daniel V; Chaudhry, Shazia S; Hodson, Nigel; Lu, Jian R; Saravanapavan, Priya; Kielty, Cay M

    2005-12-01

    In addition to mediating cell signalling events, native extracellular matrix (ECM) assemblies interact with other ECM components, act as reservoirs for soluble signalling molecules and perform structural roles. The potential of native ECM assemblies in the manufacture of biomimetic materials has not been fully exploited due, in part, to the effects of substrate interactions on their morphology. We have previously demonstrated that the ECM components, fibrillin and type VI collagen microfibrils, exhibit substrate dependent morphologies on chemically and topographically variable heterogeneous surfaces. Using both cleaning and coating approaches on silicon wafers and glass coverslips we have produced chemically homogeneous, topographically similar substrates which cover a large amphiphilic range. Extremes of substrate amphiphilicity induced morphological changes in periodicity, curvature and lateral spreading which may mask binding sites or disrupt domain structure. Biological functionality, as assayed by the ability to support cell spreading, was significantly reduced for fibrillin microfibrils adsorbed on highly hydrophilic substrates (contact angle 20.7 degrees) compared with less hydrophilic (contact angle 38.3 degrees) and hydrophobic (contact angle 92.8 degrees) substrates. With an appropriate choice of surface chemistry, multifunctional ECM assemblies retain their native morphology and biological functionality.

  18. Extracellular matrix formation in self-assembled minimalistic bioactive hydrogels based on aromatic peptide amphiphiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mi; Ulijn, Rein V; Gough, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    The hitherto inconsistency in clinical performance for engineered skin drives the current development of novel cell-scaffolding materials; one challenge is to only extract essential characteristics from the complex native ECM (extracellular matrix) and incorporate them into a scaffold with minimal complexity to support normal cell functions. This study involved small-molecule-based bioactive hydrogels produced by the co-assembly of two aromatic peptide amphiphiles: Fmoc-FF (Fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-diphenylalanine) and Fmoc-RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid). Three-dimensionally cultured human dermal fibroblasts deposited dense ECM networks including fibronectin and collagen I within the hydrogels in a 14-day culture. The fibroblasts organized the fibrous ECM and contracted the gel without differentiating into myofibroblasts. The stiffness of the cell-gel constructs increased dramatically due to ECM formation and gel contraction. This created an economical biomimetic model-scaffold to further understand skin reconstruction in vitro and supplied a design pathway to create versatile cell-scaffolds with varied bioactivities and simplicity. PMID:24812581

  19. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins and substratum topography on corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vijaykrishna; McKee, Clayton; Cheung, Wai; Naik, Rachel; Nealey, Paul F; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    The basement membrane (BM) of the corneal epithelium presents biophysical cues in the form of topography and compliance that can impact the phenotype and behaviors of cells and their nuclei through modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, it is also well known that the intrinsic biochemical attributes of BMs can modulate cell behaviors. In this study, the influence of the combination of exogenous coating of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) (fibronectin-collagen [FNC]) with substratum topography was investigated on cytoskeletal architecture as well as alignment and migration of immortalized corneal epithelial cells. In the absence of FNC coating, a significantly greater percentage of cells aligned parallel with the long axis of the underlying anisotropically ordered topographic features; however, their ability to migrate was impaired. Additionally, changes in the surface area, elongation, and orientation of cytoskeletal elements were differentially influenced by the presence or absence of FNC. These results suggest that the effects of topographic cues on cells are modulated by the presence of surface-associated ECM proteins. These findings have relevance to experiments using cell cultureware with biomimetic biophysical attributes as well as the integration of biophysical cues in tissue-engineering strategies and the development of improved prosthetics.

  20. On Elasticity Measurement in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity is the foundation of cloud performance and can be considered as a great advantage and a key benefit of cloud computing. However, there is no clear, concise, and formal definition of elasticity measurement, and thus no effective approach to elasticity quantification has been developed so far. Existing work on elasticity lack of solid and technical way of defining elasticity measurement and definitions of elasticity metrics have not been accurate enough to capture the essence of elasticity measurement. In this paper, we present a new definition of elasticity measurement and propose a quantifying and measuring method using a continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC model, which is easy to use for precise calculation of elasticity value of a cloud computing platform. Our numerical results demonstrate the basic parameters affecting elasticity as measured by the proposed measurement approach. Furthermore, our simulation and experimental results validate that the proposed measurement approach is not only correct but also robust and is effective in computing and comparing the elasticity of cloud platforms. Our research in this paper makes significant contribution to quantitative measurement of elasticity in cloud computing.

  1. Some Measurements of Elasticities of Substitution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tinbergen (Jan)

    1946-01-01

    textabstractSo far, when measuring elasticities of demand, most econometricians have concentrated upon the plain elasticity of total demand for a given commodity. For many important problems we should, in addition, like to know something of "partial elasticities," as I might provisionally call them.

  2. Complementary energy principle for large elastic deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Yuchen

    2006-01-01

    Using the "base forces" as the fundamental unknowns to determine the state of an elastic system, the complementary energy principle for large elastic deformation is constructed for the conjugate quantities being displacement gradients, which possesses exactly the same form as that of classical linear elasticity. It is revealed that the complementary energy contains deformation part and rotation part.

  3. Eigen elastic mechanics and its variation principle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental equations and the corresponding boundary condition of elastic mechanics under mechanical representation are given by using the conception of eigen space and elastic variation principle. It is proved theoretically that the solution of anisotropic elastic mechanics consists of modal ones, which are obtained respectively from the modal equation of the different subspaces. A simple application is also given.

  4. Elasticity of the hair cover in air-retaining Salvinia surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditsche, Petra; Gorb, Elena; Mayser, Matthias; Gorb, Stanislav; Schimmel, Thomas; Barthlott, Wilhelm

    2015-11-01

    Immersed in water superhydrophobic surfaces (e.g., lotus) maintain thin temporary air films. In certain aquatic plants and animals, these films are thicker and more persistent. Floating ferns of the genus Salvinia show elaborated hierarchical superhydrophobic surface structures: a hairy cover of complex trichomes. In the case of S. molesta, they are eggbeater shaped and topped by hydrophilic tips, which pin the air-water interface and prevent rupture of contact. It has been proposed that these trichomes can oscillate with the air-water interface, when turbulences occur and thereby stabilize the air film. The deformability of such arrays of trichomes requires a certain elasticity of the structures. In this study, we determined the stiffness of the trichome coverage of S. molesta and three other Salvinia species. Our results confirm the elasticity of the trichome coverage in all investigated Salvinia species. We did not reveal a clear relationship between the time of air retention and stiffness of the trichome coverage, which means that the air retention function is additionally dependent on different parameters, e.g., the trichome shape and surface free energy. These data are not only interesting for Salvinia biology, but also important for the development of biomimetic air-retaining surfaces.

  5. Freezing resistance in Patagonian woody shrubs: the role of cell wall elasticity and stem vessel size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Jiang; Bucci, Sandra J; Arias, Nadia S; Scholz, Fabian G; Hao, Guang-You; Cao, Kun-Fang; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2016-08-01

    Freezing resistance through avoidance or tolerance of extracellular ice nucleation is important for plant survival in habitats with frequent subzero temperatures. However, the role of cell walls in leaf freezing resistance and the coordination between leaf and stem physiological processes under subzero temperatures are not well understood. We studied leaf and stem responses to freezing temperatures, leaf and stem supercooling, leaf bulk elastic modulus and stem xylem vessel size of six Patagonian shrub species from two sites (plateau and low elevation sites) with different elevation and minimum temperatures. Ice seeding was initiated in the stem and quickly spread to leaves, but two species from the plateau site had barriers against rapid spread of ice. Shrubs with xylem vessels smaller in diameter had greater stem supercooling capacity, i.e., ice nucleated at lower subzero temperatures. Only one species with the lowest ice nucleation temperature among all species studied exhibited freezing avoidance by substantial supercooling, while the rest were able to tolerate extracellular freezing from -11.3 to -20 °C. Leaves of species with more rigid cell walls (higher bulk elastic modulus) could survive freezing to lower subzero temperatures, suggesting that rigid cell walls potentially reduce the degree of physical injury to cell membranes during the extracellular freezing and/or thaw processes. In conclusion, our results reveal the temporal-spatial ice spreading pattern (from stem to leaves) in Patagonian shrubs, and indicate the role of xylem vessel size in determining supercooling capacity and the role of cell wall elasticity in determining leaf tolerance of extracellular ice formation. PMID:27217529

  6. Modeling extracellular field potentials and the frequency-filtering properties of extracellular space

    CERN Document Server

    Bedard, C; Destexhe, A; Bédard, Claude; Kroeger, Helmut; Destexhe, Alain

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular local field potentials (LFP) are usually modeled as arising from a set of current sources embedded in a homogeneous extracellular medium. Although this formalism can successfully model several properties of LFPs, it does not account for their frequency-dependent attenuation with distance, a property essential to correctly model extracellular spikes. Here we derive expressions for the extracellular potential that include this frequency-dependent attenuation. We first show that, if the extracellular conductivity is non-homogeneous, there is induction of non-homogeneous charge densities which may result in a low-pass filter. We next derive a simplified model consisting of a punctual (or spherical) current source with spherically-symmetric conductivity/permittivity gradients around the source. We analyze the effect of different radial profiles of conductivity and permittivity on the frequency-filtering behavior of this model. We show that this simple model generally displays low-pass filtering behav...

  7. Applying Biomimetic Algorithms for Extra-Terrestrial Habitat Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birge, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The objective is to simulate and optimize distributed cooperation among a network of robots tasked with cooperative excavation on an extra-terrestrial surface. Additionally to examine the concept of directed Emergence among a group of limited artificially intelligent agents. Emergence is the concept of achieving complex results from very simple rules or interactions. For example, in a termite mound each individual termite does not carry a blueprint of how to make their home in a global sense, but their interactions based strictly on local desires create a complex superstructure. Leveraging this Emergence concept applied to a simulation of cooperative agents (robots) will allow an examination of the success of non-directed group strategy achieving specific results. Specifically the simulation will be a testbed to evaluate population based robotic exploration and cooperative strategies while leveraging the evolutionary teamwork approach in the face of uncertainty about the environment and partial loss of sensors. Checking against a cost function and 'social' constraints will optimize cooperation when excavating a simulated tunnel. Agents will act locally with non-local results. The rules by which the simulated robots interact will be optimized to the simplest possible for the desired result, leveraging Emergence. Sensor malfunction and line of sight issues will be incorporated into the simulation. This approach falls under Swarm Robotics, a subset of robot control concerned with finding ways to control large groups of robots. Swarm Robotics often contains biologically inspired approaches, research comes from social insect observation but also data from among groups of herding, schooling, and flocking animals. Biomimetic algorithms applied to manned space exploration is the method under consideration for further study.

  8. Natural Ventilation with Heat Recovery: A Biomimetic Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulfikar A. Adamu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In temperate countries, heat recovery is often desirable through mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR. Drawbacks of MVHR include use of electric power and complex ducting, while alternative passive heat recovery systems in the form of roof or chimney-based solutions are limited to low rise buildings. This paper describes a biomimetic concept for natural ventilation with heat recovery (NVHR. The NVHR system mimics the process of water/mineral extraction from urine in the Loop of Henle (part of human kidney. Simulations on a facade-integrated Chamber successfully imitated the geometry and behaviour of the Loop of Henle (LoH. Using a space measuring 12 m2 in area and assuming two heat densities of 18.75 W/m2 (single occupancy or 30 W/m2 (double occupancy, the maximum indoor temperatures achievable are up to 19.3 °C and 22.3 °C respectively. These come with mean relative ventilation rates of 0.92 air changes per hour (ACH or 10.7 L·s−1 and 0.92 ACH (11.55 L·s−1, respectively, for the month of January. With active heating and single occupant, the LoH Chamber consumes between 65.7% and 72.1% of the annual heating energy required by a similar naturally ventilated space without heat recovery. The LoH Chamber could operate as stand-alone indoor cabinet, benefitting refurbishment of buildings and evading constraints of complicated ducting, external aesthetic or building age.

  9. Development of a biomimetic microfluidic oxygen transfer device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, A A; Flores, E; Koo, A; García-Cardeña, G; Borenstein, J T

    2016-08-16

    Blood oxygenators provide crucial life support for patients suffering from respiratory failure, but their use is severely limited by the complex nature of the blood circuit and by complications including bleeding and clotting. We have fabricated and tested a multilayer microfluidic blood oxygenation prototype designed to have a lower blood prime volume and improved blood circulation relative to current hollow fiber cartridge oxygenators. Here we address processes for scaling the device toward clinically relevant oxygen transfer rates while maintaining a low prime volume of blood in the device, which is required for clinical applications in cardiopulmonary support and ultimately for chronic use. Approaches for scaling the device toward clinically relevant gas transfer rates, both by expanding the active surface area of the network of blood microchannels in a planar layer and by increasing the number of microfluidic layers stacked together in a three-dimensional device are addressed. In addition to reducing prime volume and enhancing gas transfer efficiency, the geometric properties of the microchannel networks are designed to increase device safety by providing a biomimetic and physiologically realistic flow path for the blood. Safety and hemocompatibility are also influenced by blood-surface interactions within the device. In order to further enhance device safety and hemocompatibility, we have demonstrated successful coating of the blood flow pathways with human endothelial cells, in order to confer the ability of the endothelium to inhibit coagulation and thrombus formation. Blood testing results provide confirmation of fibrin clot formation in non-endothelialized devices, while negligible clot formation was documented in cell-coated devices. Gas transfer testing demonstrates that the endothelial lining does not reduce the transfer efficiency relative to acellular devices. This process of scaling the microfluidic architecture and utilizing autologous cells to

  10. The hydrodynamic function of shark skin and two biomimetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeffner, Johannes; Lauder, George V

    2012-03-01

    It has long been suspected that the denticles on shark skin reduce hydrodynamic drag during locomotion, and a number of man-made materials have been produced that purport to use shark-skin-like surface roughness to reduce drag during swimming. But no studies to date have tested these claims of drag reduction under dynamic and controlled conditions in which the swimming speed and hydrodynamics of shark skin and skin-like materials can be quantitatively compared with those of controls lacking surface ornamentation or with surfaces in different orientations. We use a flapping foil robotic device that allows accurate determination of the self-propelled swimming (SPS) speed of both rigid and flexible membrane-like foils made of shark skin and two biomimetic models of shark skin to measure locomotor performance. We studied the SPS speed of real shark skin, a silicone riblet material with evenly spaced ridges and a Speedo® 'shark skin-like' swimsuit fabric attached to rigid flat-plate foils and when made into flexible membrane-like foils. We found no consistent increase in swimming speed with Speedo® fabric, a 7.2% increase with riblet material, whereas shark skin membranes (but not rigid shark skin plates) showed a mean 12.3% increase in swimming speed compared with the same skin foils after removing the denticles. Deformation of the shark skin membrane is thus crucial to the drag-reducing effect of surface denticles. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) of the flow field surrounding moving shark skin foils shows that skin denticles promote enhanced leading-edge suction, which might have contributed to the observed increase in swimming speed. Shark skin denticles might thus enhance thrust, as well as reduce drag. PMID:22323201

  11. Controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Maki K

    2007-08-30

    Humanitarian demining requires to accurately detect, locate and deactivate every single landmine and other buried mine-like objects as safely and as quickly as possible, and in the most non-invasive manner. The quality of landmine detection affects directly the efficiency and safety of this process. Most of the available methods to detect explosives and landmines are limited by their sensitivity and/or operational complexities. All landmines leak with time small amounts of their explosives that can be found on surrounding ground and plant life. Hence, explosive signatures represent the robust primary indicator of landmines. Accordingly, developing innovative technologies and efficient techniques to identify in real-time explosives residue in mined areas represents an attractive and promising approach. Biological and biologically inspired detection technology has the potential to compete with or be used in conjunction with other artificial technology to complement performance strengths. Biological systems are sensitive to many different scents concurrently, a property that has proven difficult to replicate artificially. Understanding biological systems presents unique opportunities for developing new capabilities through direct use of trained bio-systems, integration of living and non-living components, or inspiring new design by mimicking biological capabilities. It is expected that controlled bio-systems, biotechnology and microbial techniques will contribute to the advancement of mine detection and other application domains. This paper provides directions, evaluation and analysis on the progress of controlled biological and biomimetic systems for landmine detection. It introduces and discusses different approaches developed, underlining their relative advantages and limitations, and highlighting trends, safety and ecology concern, and possible future directions. PMID:17662594

  12. Biomimetic fabrication of a three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-level hierarchical calcium phosphate/collagen/hydroxyapatite (CaP/Col/HAp) scaffold for bone tissue engineering was developed using biomimetic synthesis. Porous CaP ceramics were first prepared as substrate materials to mimic the porous bone structure. A second-level Col network was then composited into porous CaP ceramics by vacuum infusion. Finally, a third-level HAp layer was achieved by biomimetic mineralization. The three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectra, x-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the mechanical properties of the scaffold were evaluated using dynamic mechanical analysis. The results show that this scaffold exhibits a similar structure and composition to natural bone tissues. Furthermore, this three-level hierarchical biomimetic scaffold showed enhanced mechanical strength compared with pure porous CaP scaffolds. The biocompatibility and osteoinductivity of the biomimetic scaffolds were evaluated using in vitro and in vivo tests. Cell culture results indicated the good biocompatibility of this biomimetic scaffold. Faster and increased bone formation was observed in these scaffolds following a six-month implantation in the dorsal muscles of rabbits, indicating that this biomimetic scaffold exhibits better osteoinductivity than common CaP scaffolds. (papers)

  13. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  14. [Glycation of extracellular matrix proteins and its role in atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzan, Aleksandra; Chwiłkowska, Agnieszka; Kobielarz, Magdalena; Pezowicz, Celina; Gamian, Andrzej

    2012-10-29

    Glycation consists in formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGE) during non-enzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and proteins, lipids or nucleic acids. This review is focused mainly on glycation of collagen and its role in acceleration of vascular disease. Collagen is an extracellular matrix protein characterized by unique structure forming fibrils with great anti-tensile and anti-breaking strength. The protein builds the connective tissue and is responsible for biomechanical properties of blood vessels. It is reported that higher content of glycated collagen correlates with lower elasticity and greater toughness of the vessel walls and, as a consequence, a faster rate of atherosclerosis development. Numerous mechanisms connected with AGE formation are involved in atherogenesis, among others: receptor-mediated production of free radicals, triggering an inflammatory process, activation of leukocytes and thrombocytes, facilitation of LDL binding, change in level of growth factors, adhesion molecules, MMP and some other proteins' expression. The coverages allow the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent or slow down the pathological processes connected with glycation of collagen and other proteins in the artery wall. The main strategies are based on limitation of exogenous AGE, consumption of products which contain rutin, treatment with drugs which inhibit AGE formation, such as pyridoxamine, and chemicals which are able to cleave already formed AGE protein-protein crosslinks, such as ALT-711.

  15. Variants of lumbosacral elastic band.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cesar Santín Alfaro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is made an intervention research, qualitative and quantitative of two variants of lumbosacral elastic bands used in Provincial Laboratory of Technical Orthopedics in Sancti Spiritus Province, taking into account the high demand for this device and that the laboratory do not often count with the raw material needed for the original lumbosacral belt made by denim cloth which is the conventional belt. The main goal of this research is to explain the technological process and to compare the cost of production of both elastic variants with lumbosacral belt made by cloth which are offer to patients who look for this service , giving them a rapid solution so that they can feel comfortable.

  16. Elastic scattering in geometrical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebaniak, Zbigniew; Wibig, Tadeusz

    2016-10-01

    The experimental data on proton-proton elastic and inelastic scattering emerging from the measurements at the Large Hadron Collider, calls for an efficient model to fit the data. We have examined the optical, geometrical picture and we have found the simplest, linear dependence of this model parameters on the logarithm of the interaction energy with the significant change of the respective slopes at one point corresponding to the energy of about 300 GeV. The logarithmic dependence observed at high energies allows one to extrapolate the proton-proton elastic, total (and inelastic) cross sections to ultra high energies seen in cosmic rays events which makes a solid justification of the extrapolation to very high energy domain of cosmic rays and could help us to interpret the data from an astrophysical and a high energy physics point of view.

  17. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  18. Reversible Simulations of Elastic Collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Perumalla, Kalyan S.; Protopopescu, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    Consider a system of N identical hard spherical particles moving in a d-dimensional box and undergoing elastic, possibly multi-particle, collisions. We develop a new algorithm that recovers the pre-collision state from the post-collision state of the system, across a series of consecutive collisions, with essentially no memory overhead. The challenge in achieving reversibility for an n-particle collision (where, n

  19. The poverty elasticity of growth

    OpenAIRE

    Heltberg, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    How much does economic growth contribute to poverty reduction? I discuss analytical and empirical approches to assess the poverty elasticity of growth, and emphasize that the relationship between growth and poverty change is non-constant. For a given poverty measure, it depends on initial inequality and on the location of the poverty line relative to mean income. In most cases, growth is more important for poverty reduction than changes in inequality, but this does not tender inequality unimp...

  20. Multiscale Modelling of Elastic Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Børset, Kari

    2008-01-01

    Petrophysical properties in general and elasticity in particular have heterogeneous variations over many length scales. In a reservoir model, on which one for example can simulate fluid flow, seismic responses and resisitivity, it is necessary that the petrophysical parameters represent all these variations, even though the model is at a scale to coarse to capture all these properties in detail. Upscaling is a technique to bring information from one scale to a coarser in a consistent manner....

  1. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon, R; Galan, C A; Sanchez-Bajo, F, E-mail: rchacon@unex.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escuela de IngenierIas Industriales, Universidad de Extremadura, Apartado Postal 382, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  2. Teaching nonlinear dynamics through elastic cords

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We experimentally studied the restoring force of a length of stretched elastic cord. A simple analytical expression for the restoring force was found to fit all the experimental results for different elastic materials. Remarkably, this analytical expression depends upon an elastic-cord characteristic parameter which exhibits two limiting values corresponding to two nonlinear springs with different Hooke's elastic constants. Additionally, the simplest model of elastic cord dynamics is capable of exhibiting a great diversity of nonlinear phenomena, including bifurcations and chaos, thus providing a suitable alternative model system for discussing the basic essentials of nonlinear dynamics in the context of intermediate physics courses at university level.

  3. Transient waves in visco-elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ricker, Norman

    1977-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 10: Transient Waves in Visco-Elastic Media deals with the propagation of transient elastic disturbances in visco-elastic media. More specifically, it explores the visco-elastic behavior of a medium, whether gaseous, liquid, or solid, for very-small-amplitude disturbances. This volume provides a historical overview of the theory of the propagation of elastic waves in solid bodies, along with seismic prospecting and the nature of seismograms. It also discusses the seismic experiments, the behavior of waves propagated in accordance with the Stokes wave

  4. Enhanced biomimetic CO2 sequestration and CaCO3 crystallization using complex encapsulated metal organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Prakash C.; Jang, Young Nam; Lee, Seung Woo

    2013-06-01

    A new biomimetic complex (Co-BBP) that mimics the active site of carbonic anhydrase (CA) was prepared by the coordination of cobalt (II) with 2, 6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl) and was encapsulated into a metal organic framework (Co-BBP@Tb-MOF). Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration was carried out via an in vitro mineralization approach using these biomimetic catalysts. The biomimetic catalysts were expected to enhance CO2 hydration and calcium carbonate (CaCO3) crystallization based on the same mechanism as that of CA.

  5. Calcium oxalate precipitation by diffusion using laminar microfluidics: toward a biomimetic model of pathological microcalcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffite, G; Leroy, C; Bonhomme, C; Bonhomme-Coury, L; Letavernier, E; Daudon, M; Frochot, V; Haymann, J P; Rouzière, S; Lucas, I T; Bazin, D; Babonneau, F; Abou-Hassan, A

    2016-04-01

    The effect of mixing calcium and oxalate precursors by diffusion at miscible liquid interfaces on calcium oxalate crystalline phases, and in physiological conditions (concentrations and flow rates), is studied using a microfluidic channel. This channel has similar dimensions as the collection duct in human kidneys and serves as a biomimetic model in order to understand the formation of pathological microcalcifications. PMID:26974287

  6. Fish and robots swimming together: attraction towards the robot demands biomimetic locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Stefano; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    The integration of biomimetic robots in a fish school may enable a better understanding of collective behaviour, offering a new experimental method to test group feedback in response to behavioural modulations of its 'engineered' member. Here, we analyse a robotic fish and individual golden shiners (Notemigonus crysoleucas) swimming together in a water tunnel at different flow velocities. We determine the positional preference of fish with respect to the robot, and we study the flow structure using a digital particle image velocimetry system. We find that biomimetic locomotion is a determinant of fish preference as fish are more attracted towards the robot when its tail is beating rather than when it is statically immersed in the water as a 'dummy'. At specific conditions, the fish hold station behind the robot, which may be due to the hydrodynamic advantage obtained by swimming in the robot's wake. This work makes a compelling case for the need of biomimetic locomotion in promoting robot-animal interactions and it strengthens the hypothesis that biomimetic robots can be used to study and modulate collective animal behaviour. PMID:22356819

  7. Preparation of biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The hydrophobic coating has been a promising technology for improving surface performance. The surface performance of magnesium alloy has been limited in application. Furthermore, the hydrophobic of magnesium alloy is rarely investigated because magnesium alloy is an active metal alloy. In this paper, inspired by microstructure character of typical plant leaf surface such as lotus, the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface were prepared by means of wet-chemical combining electroless. The samples were immersed into AgNO3 solution in wet-chemical method firstly. Then, biomimetic hydrophobic coatings were prepared by electroless after wet-method pretreatment. The microstructure was observed by SEM and the contact angles were measured by contact angle tester. The results indicated that the biomimetic hydrophobic coatings with uniform crystalline and dense structure could be obtained on AZ91D magnesium alloy surface. The results of contact angle revealed that the biomimetic nano-composite coatings were hydrophobic. The wet-chemical method treatment on the AZ91D magnesium alloy substrate provided a rough microstructure, thus improving adhesion of the coating and the substrate.

  8. Osteointegration of biomimetic apatite coating applied onto dense and porous metal implants in femurs of goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrere, F.; Valk, van der C.M.; Meijer, G.; Dalmeijer, R.A.J.; Groot, de K.; Layrolle, P.

    2003-01-01

    Biomimetic calcium phosphate (Ca-P) coatings were applied onto dense titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) and porous tantalum (Ta) cylinders by immersion into simulated body fluid at 37 °C and then at 50 °C for 24 h. As a result, a homogeneous bone-like carbonated apatitic (BCA) coating, 30 m thick was deposite

  9. Synthetic biology and biomimetic chemistry as converging technologies fostering a new generation of smart biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, Viviana; Antonacci, Amina; Lambreva, Maya D; Litescu, Simona C; Rea, Giuseppina

    2015-12-15

    Biosensors are powerful tunable systems able to switch between an ON/OFF status in response to an external stimulus. This extraordinary property could be engineered by adopting synthetic biology or biomimetic chemistry to obtain tailor-made biosensors having the desired requirements of robustness, sensitivity and detection range. Recent advances in both disciplines, in fact, allow to re-design the configuration of the sensing elements - either by modifying toggle switches and gene networks, or by producing synthetic entities mimicking key properties of natural molecules. The present review considered the role of synthetic biology in sustaining biosensor technology, reporting examples from the literature and reflecting on the features that make it a useful tool for designing and constructing engineered biological systems for sensing application. Besides, a section dedicated to bioinspired synthetic molecules as powerful tools to enhance biosensor potential is reported, and treated as an extension of the concept of biomimetic chemistry, where organic synthesis is used to generate artificial molecules that mimic natural molecules. Thus, the design of synthetic molecules, such as aptamers, biomimetics, molecular imprinting polymers, peptide nucleic acids, and ribozymes were encompassed as "products" of biomimetic chemistry.

  10. Biomimetic synthesis and antiproliferative properties of racemic natural(-) and unnnatural(+) glyceollin I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 14-step biomimetic synthetic route to glyceollin I in ca. 1.5% overall yield has been developed. In addition to being useful for the elaboration of analogs that can contribute to SAR, this route provides practical access to analytical standards that may be used for quality control purposes when gl...

  11. Directed Fluid Flow Produced by Arrays of Magnetically Actuated Core-Shell Biomimetic Cilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiser, B. L.; Shields, A. R.; Evans, B. A.; Superfine, R.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a novel core-shell microstructure that we use to fabricate arrays of flexible, magnetically actuated biomimetic cilia. Our biomimetic cilia mimic the size and beat shape of biological cilia in order to replicate the transport of fluid driven by cilia in many biological systems including the determination of left-right asymmetry in the vertebrate embryonic nodal plate and mucociliary clearance in the lung. Our core-shell structures consist of a flexible poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) core surrounded by a shell of nickel approximately forty nanometers thick; by using a core-shell structure, we can tune the mechanical and magnetic properties independently. We present the fabrication process and the long-range transport that occurs above the beating biomimetic cilia tips and will report on progress toward biomimetic cilia induced flow in viscoelastic fluids similar to mucus in the human airway. These flows may have applications in photonics and microfluidics, and our structures may be further useful as sensors or actuators in microelectromechanical systems.

  12. Can Stabilization and Inhibition of Aquaporins Contribute to Future Development of Biomimetic Membranes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet To

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of biomimetic membranes that incorporate membrane proteins, i.e., biomimetic-hybrid membranes, has increased almost exponentially. Key membrane proteins in these systems have been aquaporins, which selectively permeabilize cellular membranes to water. Aquaporins may be incorporated into synthetic lipid bilayers or to more stable structures made of block copolymers or solid-state nanopores. However, translocation of aquaporins to these alien environments has adverse consequences in terms of performance and stability. Aquaporins incorporated in biomimetic membranes for use in water purification and desalination should also withstand the harsh environment that may prevail in these conditions, such as high pressure, and presence of salt or other chemicals. In this respect, modified aquaporins that can be adapted to these new environments should be developed. Another challenge is that biomimetic membranes that incorporate high densities of aquaporin should be defect-free, and this can only be efficiently ascertained with the availability of completely inactive mutants that behave otherwise like the wild type aquaporin, or with effective non-toxic water channel inhibitors that are so far inexistent. In this review, we describe approaches that can potentially be used to overcome these challenges.

  13. Can Stabilization and Inhibition of Aquaporins Contribute to Future Development of Biomimetic Membranes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Janet; Torres, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the use of biomimetic membranes that incorporate membrane proteins, i.e., biomimetic-hybrid membranes, has increased almost exponentially. Key membrane proteins in these systems have been aquaporins, which selectively permeabilize cellular membranes to water. Aquaporins may be incorporated into synthetic lipid bilayers or to more stable structures made of block copolymers or solid-state nanopores. However, translocation of aquaporins to these alien environments has adverse consequences in terms of performance and stability. Aquaporins incorporated in biomimetic membranes for use in water purification and desalination should also withstand the harsh environment that may prevail in these conditions, such as high pressure, and presence of salt or other chemicals. In this respect, modified aquaporins that can be adapted to these new environments should be developed. Another challenge is that biomimetic membranes that incorporate high densities of aquaporin should be defect-free, and this can only be efficiently ascertained with the availability of completely inactive mutants that behave otherwise like the wild type aquaporin, or with effective non-toxic water channel inhibitors that are so far inexistent. In this review, we describe approaches that can potentially be used to overcome these challenges. PMID:26266425

  14. Biomimetic Receptors for Bioanalyte Detection by Quartz Crystal Microbalances — From Molecules to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Latif

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A universal label-free detection of bioanalytes can be performed with biomimetic quartz crystal microbalance (QCM coatings prepared by imprinting strategies. Bulk imprinting was used to detect the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs known as estradiols. The estrogen 17β-estradiol is one of the most potent EDCs, even at very low concentrations. A highly sensitive, selective and robust QCM sensor was fabricated for real time monitoring of 17β-estradiol in water samples by using molecular imprinted polyurethane. Optimization of porogen (pyrene and cross-linker (phloroglucinol levels leads to improved sensitivity, selectivity and response time of the estradiol sensor. Surface imprinting of polyurethane as sensor coating also allowed us to generate interaction sites for the selective recognition of bacteria, even in a very complex mixture of interfering compounds, while they were growing from their spores in nutrient solution. A double molecular imprinting approach was followed to transfer the geometrical features of natural bacteria onto the synthetic polymer to generate biomimetic bacteria. The use of biomimetic bacteria as template makes it possible to prepare multiple sensor coatings with similar sensitivity and selectivity. Thus, cell typing, e.g., differentiation of bacteria strains, bacteria growth profile and extent of their nutrition, can be monitored by biomimetic mass sensors. Obviously, this leads to controlled cell growth in bioreactors.

  15. Tunable sensor response by voltage-control in biomimetic hair flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We report improvements in detection limit and responsivity of biomimetic hair flow sensors by electrostatic spring-softening (ESS). Applying a DC-bias voltage to our capacitive flow sensors mediates large (80% and more) voltage-controlled electromechanical amplification of the flow signal for freque

  16. Tunable sensor response by voltage-control in biomimetic hair flow sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We report improvements in detection limit and responsivity of biomimetic hair flow sensors by electrostatic spring-softening (ESS). Applying a DC-bias voltage to our capacitive flow sensors mediates large (80% and more) voltage-controlled electro-mechanical amplification of the flow signal for frequ

  17. Towards a biomimetic gyroscope inspired by the fly's haltere using microelectromechanical systems technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Brookhuis, R.A.; Boer, de M.J.; Sanders, R.G.P.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Flies use so-called halteres to sense body rotation based on Coriolis forces for supporting equilibrium reflexes. Inspired by these halteres, a biomimetic gimbal-suspended gyroscope has been developed using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Design rules for this type of gyroscope are

  18. Design and fabrication of a biomimetic gyroscope inspired by the fly’s haltere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Brookhuis, R.A.; Boer, de M.J.; Sanders, R.G.P.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a MEMS-based gyroscopic system inspired by the fly’s haltere system. Two types of so-called biomimetic gyroscopes have been designed, fabricated and partially characterized. First measurements indicate excitable gyropscopes with natural frequencies in the o

  19. Design and fabrication of a biomimetic gyroscope inspired by the fly's haltere

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; Brookhuis, R.A.; Boer, de M.J.; Sanders, R.G.P.; Krijnen, G.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the design and fabrication of a MEMS-based gyroscopic system inspired by the fly's haltere system. Two types of so-called biomimetic gyroscopes have been designed, fabricated and their drive mode has been characterized. First measurements indicate excitable gyropscopes with natural freq

  20. A Novel General Chemistry Laboratory: Creation of Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surfaces through Replica Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanic, Samuel; Brady, Owen; Sanda, Ahmed; Gustafson, Carolina; Donhauser, Zachary J.

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetic replicas of superhydrophobic lotus and taro leaf surfaces can be made using polydimethylsiloxane. These replicas faithfully reproduce the microstructures of the leaves' surface and can be analyzed using contact angle goniometry, self-cleaning experiments, and optical microscopy. These simple and adaptable experiments were used to…

  1. Enzymatic pH control for biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.W.G.; Nejadnik, M.R.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Riet, J. te; Habibovic, P.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Z.; Li, Y.; Bomans, P.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of calcium phosphate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium con

  2. Enzymatic pH Control for Biomimetic Deposition of Calcium Phosphate Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, A.W.; Reza Nejadnik, M.; Nudelman, F.; Walboomers, X.F.; Riet, te J.; Habibovic, P.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Z.; Yubao, L.; Bomans, P.H.H.; Jansen, J.A.; Sommerdijk, N.A.J.M.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.

    2014-01-01

    The current study has focused on enzymatic decomposition of urea into carbon dioxide and ammonia as a means to increase the pH during biomimetic deposition of Calcium Phospate (CaP) onto implant surfaces. The kinetics of the enzymatically induced pH increase were studied by monitoring pH, calcium co

  3. Biomimetic 'Green' Synthesis of Nanomaterials Using Antioxidants-Vitamins, Glutathione and Polyphenols from Tea and Wine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presentation summarizes our recent activity in chemical synthesis of nanomaterials via benign biomimetic ‘greener’ alternatives,1 such as the use antioxidants present in a variety of natural products, and ubiquitous glutathione in aqueous media.2 Vitamins B1, B2, C, and tea ...

  4. A Biomimetic Strategy to Access the Silybins: Total Synthesis of (−)-Isosilybin A

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Benjamin R.; Nibbs, Antoinette E.; Scheidt, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first asymmetric, total synthesis of (−)-isosilybin A. A late-stage catalytic biomimetic cyclization of a highly functionalized chalcone is employed to form the characteristic benzopyranone ring. A robust and flexible approach to this chalcone provides an entry to the preparation of the entire isomeric family of silybin natural products.

  5. Biomimetic Mussel Adhesive Inspired Clickable Anchors Applied to the Functionalization of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goldmann, Anja S.; Schoedel, Christine; Walther, Andreas; Yuan, Jiayin; Loos, Katja; Mueller, Axel H. E.; Müller, Axel H.E.

    2010-01-01

    The functionalization of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with dopamine-derived clickable biomimetic anchors is reported. Herein, an alkyne-modified catechol-derivative is employed as the anchor, as i) the catechol-functional anchor groups possess irreversible covalent binding affinity to Fe3O4 nanop

  6. Decreased elastic fibers and increased proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum of patients with lumbar spinal canal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabe, Yutaka; Hagiwara, Yoshihiro; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Honda, Masahito; Hatori, Kouki; Sonofuchi, Kazuaki; Kanazawa, Kenji; Koide, Masashi; Sekiguchi, Takuya; Itaya, Nobuyuki; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    Elastic fibers and proteoglycans are major components of the extracellular matrix and their changes have been reported in some pathological conditions. Further, recent studies have indicated that some glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans inhibit elastic fiber assembly. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans in the ligamentum flavum and analyze their relationships to thickening of the ligamentum flavum from lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LSCS). Ligamentum flavum samples were collected from 20 patients with LSCS (thickened flavum group) and 10 patients with lumbar disc herniation (non-thickened flavum group) as a control. Elastica-Masson staining and alcian blue staining were used to compare the relationship between the changes in the elastic fibers and proteoglycans. Gene and protein expressions of the elastic fibers and proteoglycans were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Histological changes indicated that proteoglycans mainly increased on the dorsal side of the ligamentum flavum in accordance with the decreased elastic fibers in the thickened flavum group. The gene and protein expressions of fibrillin-2 and DANCE were significantly lower and decorin, lumican, osteoglycin, and versican were significantly higher in the thickened flavum group. Our study shows that elastic fibers decrease and proteoglycans increase in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased gene expression of elastogenesis and disrupted elastic fiber assembly caused by increased proteoglycans may lead to a loss of elasticity in the thickened ligamentum flavum. Decreased elasticity may cause buckling of the tissue, which leads to thickening of the ligamentum flavum. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1241-1247, 2016. PMID:26679090

  7. Dynamics of elastic interactions in soft and biological matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuval, Janni; Safran, Samuel A.

    2013-04-01

    Cells probe their mechanical environment and can change the organization of their cytoskeletons when the elastic and viscous properties of their environment are modified. We use a model in which the forces exerted by small, contractile acto-myosin filaments (e.g., nascent stress fibers in stem cells) on the extracellular matrix are modeled as local force dipoles. In some cases, the strain field caused by these force dipoles propagates quickly enough so that only static elastic interactions need be considered. On the other hand, in the case of significant energy dissipation, strain propagation is slower and may be eliminated completely by the relaxation of the cellular cytoskeleton (e.g., by cross-link dissociation). Here, we consider several dissipative mechanisms that affect the propagation of the strain field in adhered cells and consider these effects on the interaction between force dipoles and their resulting mutual orientations. This is a first step in understanding the development of orientational (nematic) or layering (smectic) order in the cytoskeleton. We use the theory to estimate the propagation time of the strain fields over a cellular distance for different mechanisms and find that in some cases it can be of the order of seconds, thus competing with the cytoskeletal relaxation time. Furthermore, for a simple system of two force dipoles, we predict that in some cases the orientation of force dipoles might change significantly with time, e.g., for short times the dipoles exhibit parallel alignment while for later times they align perpendicularly.

  8. Elastic fiber regeneration in vitro and in vivo for treatment of experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Jiang; GUO Wei; WEI Ren; ZUO Shang-wei; LIU Xiao-ping; ZHANG Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathological characteristics of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) involved the regression of extracellular matrix (ECM) in aortic walls,especially elastic structure in medial layer.As the major structural protein of aorta,elastin contributes to the extensibility and elastic recoil of the vessels.We hypothesized that overexpression of elastin in vessel walls might regenerate the elastic structure of ECM,restore the elastic structure of the aneurysmal wall,and eventually lead to a reduction of aortic diameters (ADs) in an experimental model of AAA.Methods Tropoelastin (TE) of Sprague Dawley (SD) rat was synthesized by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and used to construct adneviral vectors containing elastin precursor protein (AdTE-GFP).Cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from aortas of male SD rats were transfected with AdTE-GFP,AdGFP,adenoviral vector (AdNull),and phosphate buffered saline (PBS).Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the expression of elastin in transfected cells.The expression of elastic fibers in ECM of VSMCs transfected with AdTE-GFP were detected by fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) at 1,3,and 5 days following gene transfer.The AAA vessel walls were infused with AdTE-GFP or an empty AdNull,or PBS directly into the aneurysmal lumen.ADs of the aneurysms were compared in infused aortas.Formation of new elastic fibers in vivo was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin,and elastic von-Giesson staining.Recombinant elastin-GFP in vivo was identified by immunohistochemical staining.Results Elastic fibers were increased both in ECM of VSMC and in vessel walls after gene transfer.Histological studies revealed that the AdTE-GFP-transduced aortas had elastic fiber regeneration in the aneurysmal walls.The AdTE-GFP-transduced aortas showed a decreased AD (23.04%±14.49%,P <0.01) in AAA vessel walls.Conclusions Elastic fibers have been successfully overexpressed both in

  9. Crack tip fields in elastic and elastic-plastic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the singular stress fields in the immediate vicinity of crack tips can be described by the method of finite elements. For that purpose calculations have been performed for simple crack geometries and model l loading conditions. Linear elastic and power law-creep behaviour is considered. The numerical FE-results agree well with analytic solutions which are known for these two classes of material on the condition that the vicinity of the crack tip is modelled by a sufficiently fine mesh. (orig./HP)

  10. Morphological and ultrastructural characteristics of extracellular matrix changes in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, including its progression from dysplasia to carcinoma, "field effects", genetic changes in tumor associated mucosa (TAM and effect of matrix metalloproteinases in breaking down of matrix proteins to facilitate invasion, has been well documented. However, what remains to be done is to extrapolate this knowledge to improve patient care. Aim: The aim of this study was to observe the extracellular matrix (ECM changes with the routine histochemical stains available to most histopathologists. Materials and Methods: The study includes 72 cases of OSCC in which the tumor and adjacent normal appearing areas were sampled to study the ECM changes with hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and Verhoeff′s-Van Gieson elastic stain (VVG. Results: Basophilic fragmentation of collagen (H and E and clumped short elastic fibers (VVG were seen in 12 (16.7% cases. Of the remaining cases, 18 (25% had a dense lymphocytic infiltrate and had no demonstrable elastic fibers. Those cases with H and E changes were further studied and compared with normal mucosa for ultrastructural changes. The ultrastructural study demonstrated an increase in oxytalan, elaunin and elastic fibers and decrease in collagen fibers with some transformation changes associated with OSCCs and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion: Changes in transformation of collagen to elastic fibers and also the loss of both the fibers in areas of lymphocytic infiltration possibly indicate degradation of ECM fibers by factors released from the lymphocytes or tumor cells and the limiting effect on the tumor by ECM remodeling.

  11. The effect of extracellular matrix proteins on the cellular response of HUVECS and HOBS after covalent immobilization onto titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Martin; Kämmerer, Peer W; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Luszpinski, Marie-Anne; Förch, Renate; Brieger, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Biomimetic surface modifications are regarded as promising approach to stimulate cellular behavior at the interface of implant materials. Aim of the study was an evaluation of the cellular response of human umbilical cord cells (HUVECS) and human osteoblasts (HOBS) on titanium covalently coated with the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins fibrinogen, collagen, laminin, and osteopontin. For the surface modification, titanium discs were first amino-functionalized by plasma polymerization of allylamine. The ECM protein conjugation was performed using the linker molecule α, ω-bis-N-hydroxysuccinimide polyethylene glycol (Di-NHS linker). For surface characterization, infrared spectroscopy and fluorescein isothiocyanate staining (FITC) were used to evaluate the presence and distribution of primary amines in the plasma polymer film. Real-time analyses of the respective protein conjugation processes were performed via surface plasmon resonance kinetic measurements. All ECM proteins were immobilized successfully. Furthermore, the biological functionality of the conjugated factors fibronectin and collagen could be proven as they led to a distinct stimulation of cell adhesion of HUVECS and HOBS when compared to the control group. The highest cell coverage of HUVECS was observed on fibronectin-modified surfaces with approximately 35% and on collagen with 33% after 24 h (PT: 9.4%). For laminin, no additional effect was observed, and for osteopontin, only a slight enhancement of cell adhesion was found. A similar, cell-stimulating tendency of fibronectin and collagen was seen as well after 3 and 7 days. Biomimetic surface modification via plasma polymerization is a powerful method for biomolecule conjugation with a high retention of biological functionality and offer promising clinical perspectives.

  12. Layer-by-layer assembly of aquaporin Z-incorporated biomimetic membranes for water purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaoqi; Wang, Zhining; Wang, Xida; Wang, Shuzheng; Ding, Wande; Gao, Congjie

    2015-03-17

    We fabricated a biomimetic nanofiltration (NF) membrane by immobilizing an Aquaporin Z (AqpZ)-incorporated supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on a layer-by-layer (LbL) complex polyelectrolyte membrane to achieve excellent permeability and salt rejection with a high stability. The polyelectrolyte membranes were prepared by LbL assembly of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) with positive charges and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) with negative charges alternately on a porous hydrolyzed polyacrylonitrile (H-PAN) substrate. AqpZ-incorporated 1,2-dioleloyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammo-nium-propane (chloride salt) (DOTAP) vesicles with positive charges were deposited on the H-PAN/PEI/PSS polyelectrolytes membrane surface. The resulting biomimetic membrane exhibited a high flux of 22 L·m(-2)·h(-1) (LMH), excellent MgCl2 rejection of ∼97% and NaCl rejection of ∼75% under an operation pressure of 0.4 MPa. Due to the attractive electrostatic interaction between SLB and the polyelectrolyte membrane, the biomimetic membrane showed satisfactory stability and durability as well as stable NF flux and rejection for at least 36 h. In addition, the AqpZ-containing biomimetic membrane was immersed in a 0.24 mM (critical micellar concentration, CMC) Triton X-100 solution for 5 min. The flux and rejection were slightly influenced by the Triton X-100 treatment. The current investigation demonstrated that the AqpZ-incorporated biomimetic membranes fabricated by the LbL method led to excellent separation performances and robust structures that withstand a high operation pressure for a relatively long time. PMID:25730158

  13. Extracellular matrix and tissue engineering applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes, Hugo; Moroni, Lorenzo; Blitterswijk, van Clemens; Boer, de Jan

    2009-01-01

    The extracellular matrix is a key component during regeneration and maintenance of tissues and organs, and it therefore plays a critical role in successful tissue engineering as well. Tissue engineers should recognise that engineering technology can be deduced from natural repair processes. Due to a

  14. Extracellular calmodulin: A polypeptide signal in plants?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙大业; 唐文强; 马力耕

    2001-01-01

    Traditionally, calmodulin (CaM) was thought to be a multi-functional receptor for intracellular Ca2+ signals. But in the last ten years, it was found that CaM also exists and acts extracellularly in animal and plant cells to regulate many important physiological functions. Laboratory studies by the authors showed that extracellular CaM in plant cells can stimulate the proliferation of suspension cultured cell and protoplast; regulate pollen germination and pollen tube elongation,and stimulate the light-independent gene expression of Rubisco small subunit (rbcS). Furthermore,we defined the trans-membrane and intracellular signal transduction pathways for extracellular CaM by using a pollen system. The components in this pathway include heterotrimeric G-protein,phospholipase C, IP3, calcium signal and protein phosphorylation etc. Based on our findings, we suggest that extracellular CaM is a polypeptide signal in plants. This idea strongly argues against the traditional concept that there is no intercellular polypeptide signal in plants.

  15. [Ocular changes associated with connective tissue disorders: role of the elastic and collagen components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, M J; Bellón, J M; Buján, J

    2001-08-01

    Every day, the emerging fields of genomics and proteomics provide new information about both normal and pathological processes, among which, the extracellular matrix appears to play a significant role. Over the past decade, the classic fibrillar components of the matrix, collagen and elastin, have been the subject of extensive research leading to a wealth of information which is far form being fully interpreted. Although the basic composition and structure of the matrix components has been well established, today more than twenty five different varieties of collagen have been described, and elastic fibers are currently described as polymeric complexes, composed of at least 19 different proteins in their microfibrillar and amorphic portions. Mutations in three of the genes coding for some of the most abundant proteins in the elastic fibers give rise to a wide range of elastic tissue phenotypes, from skeletal or dermal anomalies to vascular or ocular defects. In this review, our aim was to gain insight into the fibrillar component of the extracellular matrix in an attempt to improve our understanding of certain ocular disorders.

  16. Engineering nanomaterials with a combined electrochemical and molecular biomimetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Haixia

    Biocomposite materials, such as bones, teeth, and shells, are created using mild aqueous solution-based processes near room temperature. Proteins add flexibility to these processes by facilitating the nucleation, growth, and ordering of specific inorganic materials into hierarchical structures. We aim to develop a biomimetic strategy for engineering technologically relevant inorganic materials with controlled compositions and structures, as Nature does, using proteins to orchestrate material formation and assembly. This approach involves three basic steps: (i) preparation of inorganic substrates compatible with combinatorial polypeptide screening; (ii) identification of inorganic-binding polypeptides and their engineering into inorganic-binding proteins; and (iii) protein-mediated inorganic nucleation and organization. Cuprous oxide (Cu2O), a p-type semiconductor, has been used to demonstrate all three steps. Zinc oxide (ZnO), an n-type semiconductor, has been used to show the generality of selected steps. Step (i), preparation of high quality inorganic substrates to select inorganic-binding polypeptides, was accomplished using electrochemical microfabrication to grow and pattern Cu2O and ZnO. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to verify phase purity and compositional stability of these surfaces during polypeptide screening. Step (ii), accomplished in collaboration with personnel in Prof Baneyx' lab at the University of Washington, involved incubating the inorganic substrates with the FliTrx(TM) random peptide library to identify cysteine-constrained dodecapeptides that bind the targeted inorganic. Insertion of a Cu2O-binding dodecapeptide into the DNA-binding protein TraI endowed the engineered TraI with strong affinity for Cu2O (Kd ≈ 10 -8 M). Finally, step (iii) involved nonequilibrium synthesis and organization of Cu2O nanoparticles, taking advantage of the inorganic and DNA recognition properties of the engineered TraI. The

  17. Fabrication of biomimetic nanomaterials and their effect on cell behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porri, Teresa Jane

    Cells in vivo respond to an intricate combination of chemical and mechanical signals. The corneal epithelium, a structure which prevents the admission of bacteria and undesirable molecules into the eye, grows on a basement membrane which presents both nanoscale topographic and adhesive chemical signals. An effective approach to biomaterials design takes advantage of the synergistic effects of the multiple cellular inputs which are available to engineer cell-substrate interactions. We have previously demonstrated the effects of nanoscale topography on a variety of corneal epithelial cell behaviors. To gain a better understanding of cell-level control in vivo, we employ a systems-level approach which looks at the effect of nanoscale topography in conjunction with a biomimetic surface chemistry. First, we discuss a novel method of fabricating nanoscale topography through templated electroless deposition of gold into PVP-coated polycarbonate membranes. This technique creates nanowires of gold with an uniform outer diameter that is dependent upon the size of the pores in the membrane used, and a nanowire length that is dependent upon the extent of etching into the polymer membrane. The gold nanowires can be modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols. Using these substrates, we study the effect of topographic length scale and surface chemistry on cells attached to a discontinuous nanoscale topography, and find a transition in cellular behavior at a length scale (between 600 and 2000 nm inter-wire spacing) that is commensurate with the transition length scale seen on surfaces presenting continuous grooves and ridges. Secondly, we study the effect of non-fouling peptide-modified SAMs on cellular behavior. We examine the effect of co-presented RGD and AG73 peptides and show that cell spreading is a function of the relative ratios of RGD and AG73 present on the surface. Finally, we explore the combinatorial effects of biologically relevant chemistry with

  18. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  19. Hierarchically organized architecture of potassium hydrogen phthalate and poly(acrylic acid): toward a general strategy for biomimetic crystal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2005-12-28

    A hierarchically organized architecture in multiple scales was generated from potassium hydrogen phthalate crystals and poly(acrylic acid) based on our novel biomimetic approach with an exquisite association of polymers on crystallization. PMID:16333511

  20. Wave motion in elastic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Graff, Karl F

    1991-01-01

    This highly useful textbook presents comprehensive intermediate-level coverage of nearly all major topics of elastic wave propagation in solids. The subjects range from the elementary theory of waves and vibrations in strings to the three-dimensional theory of waves in thick plates. The book is designed not only for a wide audience of engineering students, but also as a general reference for workers in vibrations and acoustics. Chapters 1-4 cover wave motion in the simple structural shapes, namely strings, longitudinal rod motion, beams and membranes, plates and (cylindrical) shells. Chapter

  1. MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION AND ELASTIC CONSTANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, T

    1985-01-01

    The deformation energy barrier for the martensitic transformation is estimated from the data of the elastic constants. The deformation energy barrier for B.C.C → F.C.C martensitic transformation is, at most, of the order of the thermal energy at room temperature. The deformation energy barrier between B.C.C. and F.C.C can be surmounted by thermal energy at temperatures higher than Ms. The martensitic transformation is proposed to be understood as the freezing process of the non-linear lattice...

  2. Variable Joint Elasticities in Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Stephan; Grimmer, Sten; Lipfert, Susanne W.; Seyfarth, Andre

    In this paper we investigate how spring-like leg behavior in human running is represented at joint level. We assume linear torsion springs in the joints and between the knee and the ankle joint. Using experimental data of the leg dynamics we compute how the spring parameters (stiffness and rest angles) change during gait cycle. We found that during contact the joints reveal elasticity with strongly changing parameters and compare the changes of different parameters for different spring arrangements. The results may help to design and improve biologically inspired spring mechanisms with adjustable parameters.

  3. Extra-cellular matrix changes in Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borges Claudia Maria da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivity of snails against parasites exhibits a primitive focal reaction, with encapsulation, phagocytosis and destruction of parasite larvae by macrophage-like cells - the hemocytes. This reaction mimics granulomatous inflammation seen in higher animals. However, different from the latter, little is known about the participation of extra-cellular matrix in such snail defense reactions. Normal and Schistosoma mansoni-infected Biomphalaria glabrata of different strains were submitted to cytological, histological, ultrastructural and biochemical methods in order to investigate the behavior of extra-cellular tissues at the site of anti-parasite reactions. In spite of the presence of two cell-types in peripheral hemolymph, only one cell-type was present at the sites of tissue reactions. Although pre-existent collagen and elastic fibers and microfibrils sometimes appeared slightly compressed around focal reactions, no evidences of duplication, synthesis or deposition of connective-tissue extra-cellular components were observed within or around the zones of reactive cell accumulations. Thus, tissue reactions against S. mansoni in the snail B. glabrata appeared exclusively dependent on one specific population of hemocytes.

  4. Hydrogel–fibre composites with independent control over cell adhesion to gel and fibres as an integral approach towards a biomimetic artificial ECM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the body, cells are surrounded by an interconnected mesh of insoluble, bioactive protein fibres to which they adhere in a well-controlled manner, embedded in a hydrogel-like highly hydrated matrix. True morphological and biochemical mimicry of this so-called extracellular matrix (ECM) remains a challenge but appears decisive for a successful design of biomimetic three-dimensional in vitro cell culture systems. Herein, an approach is presented which describes the fabrication and in vitro assessment of an artificial ECM which contains two major components, i.e. specifically biofunctionalized fibres and a semi-synthetic hyaluronic acid-based hydrogel, which allows control over cell adhesion towards both components. As proof of principle for the control of cell adhesion, RGD as well-known cell adhesive cue and the control sequence RGE are immobilized in the system. In vitro studies with primary human dermal fibroblasts were conducted to evaluate the specificity of cell adhesion and the potential of the composite system to support cell growth. Finally, one possible application example for guided cell growth is shown by the use of oriented fibres in a hydrogel matrix. (paper)

  5. Matrix elasticity, cytoskeletal forces and physics of the nucleus: how deeply do cells ‘feel’ outside and in?

    OpenAIRE

    Buxboim, Amnon; Ivanovska, Irena L.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular organization within a multicellular organism requires that a cell assess its relative location, taking in multiple cues from its microenvironment. Given that the extracellular matrix (ECM) consists of the most abundant proteins in animals and contributes both structure and elasticity to tissues, ECM probably provides key physical cues to cells. In vivo, in the vicinity of many tissue cell types, fibrous characteristics of the ECM are less discernible than the measurably distinct elas...

  6. Development of a biomimetic collagen-hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering using a SBF immersion technique.

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Munajjed, Amir A; Plunkett, Niamh A; Gleeson, John P.; Weber, Tim; Jungreuthmayer, Christian; Levingstone, Tanya; Hammer, Joachim; O'Brien, Fergal J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a biomimetic, highly porous collagen-hydroxyapatite (HA) composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering (TE), combining the biological performance and the high porosity of a collagen scaffold with the high mechanical stiffness of a HA scaffold. Pure collagen scaffolds were produced using a lyophilization process and immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) to provide a biomimetic coating. Pure collagen scaffolds served as a control. The mechanical, mat...

  7. Computation of Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onwuka, D.O

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available - In this presentation, a computer based method which uses a set of algebraic equations and statistical data, were used to compute concrete mixes for prescribeable elastic concrete modulus, and vice versa. The computer programs based on Simplex and Regression theories can be used to predict several mix proportions for obtaining a desired modulus of elasticity of concrete made from crushed granite rock and other materials. The modulus of elasticity of concrete predicted by these programs agreed with experimentally obtained values. The programs are easy and inexpensive to use, and give instant and accurate results. For example, if the modulus of elasticity is specified as input, the computer instantly prints out all possible concrete mix ratios that can yield concrete having the specified elastic modulus. When the concrete mix ratio is specified as input, the computer quickly prints out the elastic modulus of the concrete obtainable from a given concrete mix ratio.

  8. ELASTIC: A Large Scale Dynamic Tuning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectacular growth in the number of cores in current supercomputers poses design challenges for the development of performance analysis and tuning tools. To be effective, such analysis and tuning tools must be scalable and be able to manage the dynamic behaviour of parallel applications. In this work, we present ELASTIC, an environment for dynamic tuning of large-scale parallel applications. To be scalable, the architecture of ELASTIC takes the form of a hierarchical tuning network of nodes that perform a distributed analysis and tuning process. Moreover, the tuning network topology can be configured to adapt itself to the size of the parallel application. To guide the dynamic tuning process, ELASTIC supports a plugin architecture. These plugins, called ELASTIC packages, allow the integration of different tuning strategies into ELASTIC. We also present experimental tests conducted using ELASTIC, showing its effectiveness to improve the performance of large-scale parallel applications.

  9. Biomineralization of a Self-Assembled Extracellular Matrix for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yizhi, M.; Yi-Xian, Q; DiMasi, E; Xiaolan, B; Rafailovich, M; Pernodet, N

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how biomineralization occurs in the extracellular matrix (ECM) of bone cells is crucial to the understanding of bone formation and the development of a successfully engineered bone tissue scaffold. It is still unclear how ECM mechanical properties affect protein-mineral interactions in early stages of bone mineralization. We investigated the longitudinal mineralization properties of MC3T3-E1 cells and the elastic modulus of their ECM using shear modulation force microscopy, synchrotron grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD), scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The elastic modulus of the ECM fibers underwent significant changes for the mineralizing cells, which were not observed in the nonmineralizing cells. On substrates conducive to ECM network production, the elastic modulus of mineralizing cells increased at time points corresponding to mineral production, whereas that of the nonmineralizing cells did not vary over time. The presence of hydroxyapatite in mineralizing cells and the absence thereof in the nonmineralizing ones were confirmed by GIXD, and CLSM showed that a restructuring of actin occurred only for mineral-producing cells. These results show that the correct and complete development of the ECM network is required for osteoblasts to mineralize. This in turn requires a suitably prepared synthetic substrate for bone development to succeed in vitro.

  10. Eulerian formulation of elastic rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynen, Alexandre; Detournay, Emmanuel; Denoël, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    In numerous biological, medical and engineering applications, elastic rods are constrained to deform inside or around tube-like surfaces. To solve efficiently this class of problems, the equations governing the deflection of elastic rods are reformulated within the Eulerian framework of this generic tubular constraint defined as a perfectly stiff normal ringed surface. This reformulation hinges on describing the rod-deformed configuration by means of its relative position with respect to a reference curve, defined as the axis or spine curve of the constraint, and on restating the rod local equilibrium in terms of the curvilinear coordinate parametrizing this curve. Associated with a segmentation strategy, which partitions the global problem into a sequence of rod segments either in continuous contact with the constraint or free of contact (except for their extremities), this re-parametrization not only trivializes the detection of new contacts but also transforms these free boundary problems into classic two-points boundary-value problems and suppresses the isoperimetric constraints resulting from the imposition of the rod position at the extremities of each rod segment.

  11. AXISYMMETRIC ELASTICITY PROBLEM OF CUBIC QUASICRYSTAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU WANG-MIN; FAN TIAN-YOU

    2000-01-01

    A method for analyzing the elasticity problem of cubic quasicrystal is developed. The axisymmetric elasticity problem of cubic quasicrystal is reduced to a single higher-order partial differential equation by introducing a displacement function. As an example, the solutions of elastic field of cubic quasicrystal with a penny-shaped crack are obtained,and the stress intensity factor and strain energy release rate are determined.

  12. The elastic capacitor and its unusual properties

    OpenAIRE

    Partensky, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    The 'elastic capacitor' (EC) model was first introduced in studies of lipid bilayers (the major components of biological membranes). This electro-elastic model accounted for the compression of a membrane under applied voltage and allowed obtaining information about the membrane's elastic properties from the measurements of its capacitance. Later on, ECs were used to analyze the electrical breakdown of biological membranes. The EC model was also helpful in studies of electric double layers in ...

  13. Study on elastic modulus of individual ferritin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG JinHai; CUI ChengYi; ZHOU XingFei

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical property of individual ferriUn was measured with force-volume mapping (FV) under contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) in this work. The elastic modulus of individual ferritin was estimated by the Hertz mode. The estimated value of the elastic modulus of individual ferritin was about 250-800 MPs under a small deformation. In addition, the elastic modulus of individual ferritin was compared with that of the colloid gold nanoparticle.

  14. ELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF Eucalyptus citriodora WOOD

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Wagner Ballarin; Marcelo Nogueira

    2003-01-01

    This paper contributed to the elastic characterization of Eucalyptus citriodora grown inBrazil, considering an orthotropic model and evaluating its most important elastic constants.Considering this as a reference work to establish basic elastic ratios — several important elasticconstants of Brazilian woods were not determined yet - the experimental set-up utilized one tree of 65years old from plantations of “Horto Florestal Navarro de Andrade”, at Rio Claro-SP, Brazil. All theexperimental pro...

  15. Multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a spectrally resolved photoacoustic imaging method, namely multi-spectral photoacoustic elasticity tomography (PAET) for quantifying the physiological parameters and elastic modulus of biological tissues. We theoretically and experimentally examined the PAET imaging method using simulations and in vitro experimental tests. Our simulation and in vitro experimental results indicated that the reconstructions were quantitatively accurate in terms of sizes, the physiological and elastic properties of the targets. PMID:27699101

  16. Elastic properties of graphite and interstitial defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The graphite elastic constants C33 and C44, reflecting the interaction of the graphitic planes, were experimentally measured as a function of irradiation and temperature. A model of non-central strength atomic interaction was established to explain the experimental results obtained. This model is valid at zero temperature. The temperature dependence of the elastic properties was analyzed. The influence of the elastic property variations on the specific heat of the lattice at very low temperature was investigated

  17. Import Demand Elasticities and Trade Distortions

    OpenAIRE

    Kee, Hiau Looi; Nicita, Alessandro; Olarreaga, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a systematic estimation of import demand elasticities for a broad group of countries at a very disaggregated level of product detail. We use a semiflexible translog GDP function approach to formally derive import demands and their elasticities, which are estimated with data on prices and endowments. Within a theoretically consistent framework, we use the estimated elasticities to construct Feenstra's (1995) simplification of Anderson and Neary's trade restrictiveness index...

  18. Elastic, Conductive, Polymeric Hydrogels and Sponges

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Lu; Weina He; Tai Cao; Haitao Guo; Yongyi Zhang; Qingwen Li; Ziqiang Shao; Yulin Cui; Xuetong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    As a result of inherent rigidity of the conjugated macromolecular chains resulted from the delocalized π-electron system along the polymer backbone, it has been a huge challenge to make conducting polymer hydrogels elastic by far. Herein elastic and conductive polypyrrole hydrogels with only conducting polymer as the continuous phase have been simply synthesized in the indispensable conditions of 1) mixed solvent, 2) deficient oxidant, and 3) monthly secondary growth. The elastic mechanism an...

  19. Biomimetic growth and substrate dependent mechanical properties of bone like apatite nucleated on Ti and magnetron sputtered TiO2 nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Bimal K.; Das, Apurba; Barman, Pintu; Pal, Arup R.

    2016-04-01

    This report presents findings on biomimetic growth of hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals on Ti and sputtered TiO2 substrates. The possibility of TiO2 nanostructure as candidate materials for future biomedical applications has been explored through the comparison of microstructural and mechanical properties of bone like apatite grown on Ti and nano-TiO2 surfaces. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction studies reveal formation of carbonate apatite with apparent domain size in the nanoscale range. A better interaction at the nano-TiO2/nano-HAp interface due to higher interfacial area could promote the growth of bone like apatite. The crystal phases, crystallinity, and surface morphology of nano-TiO2 are considered as parameters to understand the nucleation and growth of apatite with different mechanical properties at the nanoscale. The methodology of x-ray line profile analysis encompasses deconvolution of merged peaks by preserving broadening due to nanosized HAp aggregates. The Young’s modulus of bone like apatite exhibits crystallographic directional dependence which suggests the presence of elastic anisotropy in bone like apatite. The lattice contraction in the c-direction is associated with the degree of carbonate substitution in the apatite lattice. The role of residual stress is critical for the lattice distortion of HAp deposited at physiological conditions of temperature and pH of human blood plasma. The ion concentration is crucial for the uniformity, crystallinity, and mechanical behaviour of the apatite.

  20. Applying extracellular vesicles based therapeutics in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lener, Thomas; Gimona, Mario; Aigner, Ludwig;

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), such as exosomes and microvesicles, are released by different cell types and participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes. EVs mediate intercellular communication as cell-derived extracellular signalling organelles that transmit specific information ...

  1. Mapping proteolytic cancer cell-extracellular matrix interfaces.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, K.A.; Friedl, P.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    For cancer progression and metastatic dissemination, cancer cells migrate and penetrate through extracellular tissues. Cancer invasion is frequently facilitated by proteolytic processing of components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cellular regions mediating proteolysis are diverse and depen

  2. Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

    1995-06-01

    It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

  3. Faraday wave lattice as an elastic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Domino, L; Patinet, Sylvain; Eddi, A

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterials enable the emergence of novel physical properties due to the existence of an underlying sub-wavelength structure. Here, we use the Faraday instability to shape the fluid-air interface with a regular pattern. This pattern undergoes an oscillating secondary instability and exhibits spontaneous vibrations that are analogous to transverse elastic waves. By locally forcing these waves, we fully characterize their dispersion relation and show that a Faraday pattern presents an effective shear elasticity. We propose a physical mechanism combining surface tension with the Faraday structured interface that quantitatively predicts the elastic wave phase speed, revealing that the liquid interface behaves as an elastic metamaterial.

  4. Brazilian sawn wood price and income elasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rommel Noce

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study estimated the sawn wood demand price and income elasticity. Specifically it was estimated the priceelasticity of sawn wood, the cross price elasticity of wood panels and the income elasticity of Brazilian GDP. A log-log model withcorrection through outline of the mobile average (MA(1 was used, adjusted for the period of 1971 to 2006, which showed to bestable, with satisfactory significance levels. It was observed that sawn wood demand is inelastic in relation to price and elastic inrelation to income.

  5. Application Service Program (ASP Price Elasticities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jaeweon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the price elasticities for off-line industry are well documented in academic field, the report of price elasticities for on-line to a given brand or industry in practice have beenrelatively rare. The researcher aims to try to full this gap by applying a price response function to Home Trading System’s on-line transaction data for the first time in Korean securities market. The different price elasticities among seven brands were found from -0.819 to -1.811. These results suggested that marketers should understand the price elasticity of their own HTS, before making a price decision.

  6. Elastic properties of solids at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Yu Kh; Krasilnikov, O. M.; Lugovskoy, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    This review examines the elastic response of solids under load. The definitions of isothermal and adiabatic elastic constants of ( n≥2) for a loaded crystal are given. For the case of hydrostatic pressure, two techniques are proposed for calculating the second-, third-, and fourth-order elastic constants from the energy-strain and stress-strain relations. As an example, using the proposed approach within the framework of the density functional theory, the second- to fourth-order elastic constants of bcc tungsten are calculated for the pressure range of 0-600 GPa.

  7. Elastic anomalies in Fe-Cr alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hualei; Wang, Guisheng; Punkkinen, Marko P J; Hertzman, Staffan; Johansson, Börje; Vitos, Levente

    2013-05-15

    Using ab initio alloy theory, we determine the elastic parameters of ferromagnetic and paramagnetic Fe(1-c)Cr(c) (0 ≤ c ≤ 1) alloys in the body centered cubic crystallographic phase. Comparison with the experimental data demonstrates that the employed theoretical approach accurately describes the observed composition dependence of the polycrystalline elastic moduli. The predicted single-crystal elastic constants follow complex anomalous trends, which are shown to originate from the interplay between magnetic and chemical effects. The nonmonotonic composition dependence of the elastic parameters has marked implications on the micro-mechanical properties of ferrite stainless steels. PMID:23604218

  8. Biotechnological Aspects of Microbial Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Souichiro

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a type of microbial respiration that enables electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials, including naturally-occurring metal compounds and artificial electrodes. Microorganisms harboring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, in addition to their contribution to global energy and material cycles. In this review, current knowledge on microbial EET and its application to diverse biotechnologies, including the bioremediation of toxic metals, recovery of useful metals, biocorrosion, and microbial electrochemical systems (microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis), were introduced. Two potential biotechnologies based on microbial EET, namely the electrochemical control of microbial metabolism and electrochemical stimulation of microbial symbiotic reactions (electric syntrophy), were also discussed. PMID:26004795

  9. Decellularized musculofascial extracellular matrix for tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina; Johnson, Joshua A; Chang, David W.; Zhang, Qixu

    2013-01-01

    Ideal scaffolds that represent native extracellular matrix (ECM) properties of musculofascial tissues have great importance in musculofascial tissue engineering. However, detailed characterization of musculofascial tissues’ ECM (particularly, of fascia) from large animals is still lacking. In this study, we developed a decellularization protocol for processing pig composite musculofascial tissues. Decellularized muscle (D-muscle) and decellularized fascia (D-fascia), which are two important c...

  10. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  11. Extracellular Matrix Turnover and Outflow Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Kate E Keller; Mini, Aga; Bradley, John M.; Kelley, Mary J.; Acott, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Normal homeostatic adjustment of elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) involves remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the trabecular meshwork (TM). This entails sensing elevated IOP, releasing numerous activated proteinases to degrade existing ECM and concurrent biosynthesis of replacement ECM components. To increase or decrease IOP, the quantity, physical properties and/or organization of new components should be somewhat different from those replaced in order to modify outflow resistan...

  12. Design of Artificial Modular Extracellular Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Gräter, Stefan V. W.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular functions such as cell growth, adhesion and differentiation are essentially controlled by the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical, chemical and structural properties of the ECM are consequently crucial for the selection of cells at interfaces and the formation of tissues. The objective of this thesis was to develop an artificial ECM to determine and control the parameters influencing the crosstalk between cells and their surroundings on a molecular level. Artificia...

  13. Airway and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics in COPD

    OpenAIRE

    Bidan, Cécile M.; Veldsink, Annemiek C.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common lung diseases worldwide, and is characterized by airflow obstruction that is not fully reversible with treatment. Even though airflow obstruction is caused by airway smooth muscle contraction, the extent of airway narrowing depends on a range of other structural and functional determinants that impact on active and passive tissue mechanics. Cells and extracellular matrix in the airway and parenchymal compartments respond b...

  14. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    OpenAIRE

    Sayaka Oshikawa; Hiroko Sonoda; Masahiro Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs fro...

  15. A constant current source for extracellular microiontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, T; Dillman, N; Weiss, M L

    1995-12-01

    A sophisticated constant-current source suitable for extracellular microiontophoresis of tract-tracing substances, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin, Biocytin or Fluoro-Gold, is described. This design uses a flyback switched-mode power supply to generate controllable high-voltage and operational amplifier circuitry to regulate current and provide instrumentation. Design features include a fast rise time, +/- 2000 V supply (stable output in current and voltage monitoring, and separate pumping and holding current settings. Three features of this constant-current source make it especially useful for extracellular microiontophoresis. First, the output voltage monitor permits one to follow changes in the microelectrode resistance during current injection. Second, the voltage-limit (or out-of-compliance) indicator circuitry will sound an alarm when the iontophoretic pump is unable to generate the desired current, such as when the micropipette is blocked. Third, the high-compliance voltage power supply insures up to +/- 20 microA of current through 100 M omega resistance. This device has proven itself to be a reliable constant-current source for extracellular microiontophoresis in the laboratory. PMID:8788057

  16. Extracellular quality control in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gail A. Cornwall; H. Henning von Horsten; Douglas Swartz; Seethal Johnson; Kim Chau; Sandra Whelly

    2007-01-01

    The epididymal lumen represents a unique extracellular environment because of the active sperm maturation process that takes place within its confines. Although much focus has been placed on the interaction of epididymal secretory proteins with spermatozoa in the lumen, very little is known regarding how the complex epididymal milieu as a whole is maintained, including mechanisms to prevent or control proteins that may not stay in their native folded state following secretion. Because some misfolded proteins can form cytotoxic aggregate structures known as amyloid, it is likely that control/surveillance mechanisms exist within the epididymis to protect against this process and allow sperm maturation to occur. To study protein aggregation and to identify extracellular quality control mechanisms in the epididymis, we used the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors, including cystatin-related epididymal spermatogenic and cystatin C as molecular models because both proteins have inherent properties to aggregate and form amyloid. In this chapter, we present a brief summary of protein aggregation by the amyloid pathway based on what is known from other organ systems and describe quality control mechanisms that exist intracellularly to control protein misfolding and aggregation. We then present a summary of our studies of cystatinrelated epididymal spermatogenic (CRES) oligomerization within the epididymal lumen, including studies suggesting that transglutaminase cross-linking may be one mechanism of extracellular quality control within the epididymis.

  17. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  18. Extracellular DNA: the tip of root defenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawes, Martha C; Curlango-Rivera, Gilberto; Wen, Fushi; White, Gerard J; Vanetten, Hans D; Xiong, Zhongguo

    2011-06-01

    This review discusses how extracellular DNA (exDNA) might function in plant defense, and at what level(s) of innate immunity this process might operate. A new role for extracellular factors in mammalian defense has been described in a series of studies. These studies reveal that cells including neutrophils, eosinophils, and mast cells produce 'extracellular traps' (ETs) consisting of histone-linked exDNA. When pathogens are attracted to such ETs, they are trapped and killed. When the exDNA component of ETs is degraded, trapping is impaired and resistance against invasion is reduced. Conversely, mutation of microbial genes encoding exDNases that degrade exDNA results in loss of virulence. This discovery that exDNases are virulence factors opens new avenues for disease control. In plants, exDNA is required for defense of the root tip. Innate immunity-related proteins are among a group of >100 proteins secreted from the root cap and root border cell populations. Direct tests revealed that exDNA also is rapidly synthesized and exported from the root tip. When this exDNA is degraded by the endonuclease DNase 1, root tip resistance to fungal infection is lost; when the polymeric structure is degraded more slowly, by the exonuclease BAL31, loss of resistance to fungal infection is delayed accordingly. The results suggest that root border cells may function in a manner analogous to that which occurs in mammalian cells.

  19. Extracellular matrix proteins involved in pseudoislets formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Elisa; Sencier, Marie-Christine; Langlois, A; Bietiger, William; Krafft, Mp; Pinget, Michel; Sigrist, Séverine

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins are known to mediate, through integrins, cell adhesion and are involved in a number of cellular processes, including insulin expression and secretion in pancreatic islets. We investigated whether expression of some extracellular matrix proteins were implied in islets-like structure formation, named pseudoislets. For this purpose, we cultured the β-cell line, RINm5F, during 1, 3, 5 and 7 days of culture on treated or untreated culture plate to form adherent cells or pseudoislets and analysed insulin, collagen IV, fibronectin, laminin 5 and β1-integrin expression. We observed that insulin expression and secretion were increased during pseudoislets formation. Moreover, we showed by immunohistochemistry an aggregation of insulin secreting cells in the centre of the pseudoislets. Peripheral β-cells of pseudoislets did not express insulin after 7 days of culture. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry studies showed a transient expression of type IV collagen in pseudoislets for the first 3 days of culture. Study of fibronectin expression indicated that adherent cells expressed more fibronectin than pseudoislets. In contrast, laminin 5 was more expressed in pseudoislets than in adherent cells. Finally, expression of β1-integrin was increased in pseudoislets as compared to adherent cells. In conclusion, laminin 5 and collagen IV might be implicated in pseudoislets formation whereas fibronectin might be involved in cell adhesion. These data suggested that extracellular matrix proteins may enhance the function of pseudoislets.

  20. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.