WorldWideScience

Sample records for biomarker developmental laboratories

  1. Biomarkers of adult and developmental neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neurotoxicity may be defined as any adverse effect on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system by a biological, chemical, or physical agent. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to assess adult and developmental neurotoxicity due to the complex and diverse functions of the nervous system. The overall strategy for understanding developmental neurotoxicity is based on two assumptions: (1) significant differences in the adult versus the developing nervous system susceptibility to neurotoxicity exist and they are often developmental stage dependent; (2) a multidisciplinary approach using neurobiological, including gene expression assays, neurophysiological, neuropathological, and behavioral function is necessary for a precise assessment of neurotoxicity. Application of genomic approaches to developmental studies must use the same criteria for evaluating microarray studies as those in adults including consideration of reproducibility, statistical analysis, homogenous cell populations, and confirmation with non-array methods. A study using amphetamine to induce neurotoxicity supports the following: (1) gene expression data can help define neurotoxic mechanism(s) (2) gene expression changes can be useful biomarkers of effect, and (3) the site-selective nature of gene expression in the nervous system may mandate assessment of selective cell populations

  2. Epigenetic biomarkers in laboratory diagnostics: emerging approaches and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Juan; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Pallardó, Federico V; García-Giménez, José Luis

    2013-06-01

    Epigenetics has emerged as a new and promising field in recent years. Lifestyle, stress, drugs, physiopathological situations and pharmacological interventions have a great impact on the epigenetic code of the cells by altering the methylome, miRNA expression and the covalent histone modifications. Since there exists a need to find new biomarkers and improve diagnosis for several diseases, the research on epigenetic biomarkers for molecular diagnostics encourages the translation of this field from the bench to clinical practice. In this context, deciphering intricate epigenetic modifications involved in several molecular processes is a challenge that will be solved in the near future. In this review, the authors present an overview of the high-throughput technologies and laboratory techniques available for epigenetic studies, and also discuss which of them are more reliable to be used in a clinical diagnostic laboratory. In addition, the authors describe the most promising epigenetic biomarkers in lung, colorectal and prostate cancer, in which most advances have been achieved. Finally, the authors describe epigenetic biomarkers in some rare diseases; these rare syndromes are paradigms for a specific impaired molecular pathway, thus providing valuable information on the discovery of new epigenetic biomarkers. PMID:23782253

  3. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  4. The effect of lead on the developmental stability of Drosophila subobscura through selection in laboratory conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbalija Zorana; Kenig B.; Plavša Jovana; Stamenković-Radak Marina; Anđelković M.

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), the increased variation of bilateral symmetry in a sample of individuals, can indicate disturbance in developmental stability caused by environmental and/or genomic stress. This developmental instability was analyzed in Drosophila subobscura maintained for seven generations on two different concentrations of lead in laboratory conditions. The FA4 index showed that the genotypes reared on the higher lead concentration were in developmental homeostasis, except for ma...

  5. The effect of lead on the developmental stability of Drosophila subobscura through selection in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurbalija Zorana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA, the increased variation of bilateral symmetry in a sample of individuals, can indicate disturbance in developmental stability caused by environmental and/or genomic stress. This developmental instability was analyzed in Drosophila subobscura maintained for seven generations on two different concentrations of lead in laboratory conditions. The FA4 index showed that the genotypes reared on the higher lead concentration were in developmental homeostasis, except for males in the F7 generation, for both wing size parameters. The results show that different degrees of lead pollution cause different responses to selection of the exposed population in laboratory conditions.

  6. Identification of transcriptome signatures and biomarkers specific for potential developmental toxicants inhibiting human neural crest cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallocca, Giorgia; Grinberg, Marianna; Henry, Margit; Frickey, Tancred; Hengstler, Jan G; Waldmann, Tanja; Sachinidis, Agapios; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Leist, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    The in vitro test battery of the European research consortium ESNATS ('novel stem cell-based test systems') has been used to screen for potential human developmental toxicants. As part of this effort, the migration of neural crest (MINC) assay has been used to evaluate chemical effects on neural crest function. It identified some drug-like compounds in addition to known environmental toxicants. The hits included the HSP90 inhibitor geldanamycin, the chemotherapeutic arsenic trioxide, the flame-retardant PBDE-99, the pesticide triadimefon and the histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and trichostatin A. Transcriptome changes triggered by these substances in human neural crest cells were recorded and analysed here to answer three questions: (1) can toxicants be individually identified based on their transcript profile; (2) how can the toxicity pattern reflected by transcript changes be compacted/dimensionality-reduced for practical regulatory use; (3) how can a reduced set of biomarkers be selected for large-scale follow-up? Transcript profiling allowed clear separation of different toxicants and the identification of toxicant types in a blinded test study. We also developed a diagrammatic system to visualize and compare toxicity patterns of a group of chemicals by giving a quantitative overview of altered superordinate biological processes (e.g. activation of KEGG pathways or overrepresentation of gene ontology terms). The transcript data were mined for potential markers of toxicity, and 39 transcripts were selected to either indicate general developmental toxicity or distinguish compounds with different modes-of-action in read-across. In summary, we found inclusion of transcriptome data to largely increase the information from the MINC phenotypic test. PMID:26705709

  7. Developmental effects of mercury on Etheostoma caeruleum and E. spectabile: Predictable biomarkers of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, J.R. [Southeast Missouri State Univ., Cape Girardeau, MO (United States). Dept. of Biology

    1995-12-31

    Etheostoma caeruleum and E. spectabile are sympatric teleostean species of the Family Percidae. The ova diameters and incubation times are different: E. caeruleum (1.9mm and 12-d), E. spectabile (1.2mm and 8-d). For both species, cleavage stage (4--8 cell), mid-blastula, mid-neurula, and early-eye stage embryos were exposed to + {minus}1 a 24-h static-renewal test of 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 {micro}gHg {sup ++}L{sup {minus}1} to assess the effects of stage-specific initial mercury exposure on the embryo-larval responses. In addition, cleavage stage embryos were exposed to a 1-d, 2-d, and 4-d static-renewal toxicity test to determine the influence that exposure duration to mercury has on embryolarval responses. Five replicates of 10 embryos each were incubated at 18 C for each concentration and exposure variation. Embryos were allowed to develop until all had hatched or died. Four embryonic responses were assessed for each species and exposure protocol: 96-h LC50, AB50, SH50 and VH50. The typical nonstressor specific terata were noted for each species with an increase in percent of embryos expressing abnormal developmental patterns with increase mercury concentrations and severity of exposure. These included dwarfism, cephalic complications, ophthalmic abnormalities, cardiovascular abnormalities, various edema, and haemorrhagia. Hatching success and viability of hatch were likewise reduced with increasing severity of exposure and mercury concentration. Previously undetected terata that were observed in the first hatch included scoliosis, lordosis, kyphosis, synarthrodic jaws, and grossly enlarged yolk sacs.

  8. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Kevin S.; Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, RUSSIA); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  9. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia National Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory.

  10. Multiple Biomarker Responses in Corbicula fluminea Exposed to Copper in Laboratory Toxicity Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnail, Estefanía; Buruaem, Lucas M; Araujo, Giuliana S; Abessa, Denis M S; DelValls, T Ángel

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the alteration of the enzymatic system of the freshwater Asian clam exposed to different copper concentrations. Individuals of Corbicula fluminea were exposed to different concentrations of dissolved Cu (0.5, 1, and 2 mg L(-1)) for 7 days, then, biomarkers of oxidative stress (GST, GPx, GR), exposure (MTs), effect (AChE), and damage (LPO, DNA strand breaks) were quantified. Results showed positive correlations between dissolved metal concentrations and GPx, MTs, and DNA damage, and negative correlation with GST and AChE. In contrast, no clear trend was found for GR and LPO. In general, the established mechanisms of protection might have a beneficial effect on the decreasing ROS attack on membrane and the activation of the metallothioneins. Integrated biomarker analysis revealed that the measured alterations are well correlated with the levels of increasing dissolved copper concentrations in water, demonstrating the effectiveness of this organism for biomonitoring approach purposes. PMID:27090524

  11. Developmental origins of metabolic disorders: The need for biomarker candidates and therapeutic targets from adequate preclinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Gonzalez-Bulnes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The investigation on obesity and associated disorders have changed from an scenario in which genome drove the phenotype to a dynamic setup in which prenatal and early-postnatal conditions are determinant. However, research in human beings is difficult due to confounding factors (lifestyle and socioeconomic heterogeneity plus ethical issues. Hence, there is currently an intensive effort for developing adequate preclinical models, aiming for an adequate combination of basic studies in rodent models and specific preclinical studies in large animals. The results of these research strategies may increase the identification and development of contrasted biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  12. Search for Chemical Biomarkers on Mars Using the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument Suite on the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Conrad, P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Eigenbrode, J.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    One key goal for the future exploration of Mars is the search for chemical biomarkers including complex organic compounds important in life on Earth. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) will provide the most sensitive measurements of the organic composition of rocks and regolith samples ever carried out in situ on Mars. SAM consists of a gas chromatograph (GC), quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), and tunable laser spectrometer to measure volatiles in the atmosphere and released from rock powders heated up to 1000 C. The measurement of organics in solid samples will be accomplished by three experiments: (1) pyrolysis QMS to identify alkane fragments and simple aromatic compounds; pyrolysis GCMS to separate and identify complex mixtures of larger hydrocarbons; and (3) chemical derivatization and GCMS extract less volatile compounds including amino and carboxylic acids that are not detectable by the other two experiments.

  13. Protective effects of green tea on antioxidative biomarkers in chemical laboratory workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakol, Heidary Shayesteh; Akram, Ranjbar; Azam, Sayadi; Nahid, Zadkhosh

    2015-09-01

    Chemical materials are environmental contaminants, are extensively used in laboratories, and may cause various forms of health hazards in laboratory workers. Therefore, this toxicity most likely is a result of the oxidative metabolism of chemical to reactive products. As green tea (GT) possesses antioxidant effects, the objective of this study was to examine any amelioration oxidative stress in chemical laboratory workers drinking one cup (3 g/300 ml water) of freshly prepared tea once daily. Baseline characteristics including age, sex, smoking, fruit consumption, and duration of exposure were recorded via questionnaire to the subjects. Saliva level oxidative stress parameters such as total antioxidant capacity (TAC), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated before and after consumption of GT in these workers. Treatment of subjects with GT induced a significant reduction in saliva GPx activity (406.61 ± 22.07 vs. 238.96 ± 16.26 U/l p = 0.001) and induction in TAC (0.46 ± 0.029 μmol/ml vs. 0.56 ± 0.031, p = 0.016). No statistically significant alteration was found for saliva SOD (0.080 ± 0.0019 vs. 0.079 ± 0.0014, p > 0.05) and CAT (20.36 ± 0.69 vs. 19.78 ± 0.71, p > 0.05) after 28 days treatment by GT. These results demonstrate that drinking GT during chemical exposure can reduce several parameters indicative of oxidative stress. In conclusion, using GT as a dietary supplement can be a rational protocol to control source of hazards in chemical laboratory workers. PMID:23576111

  14. Evaluation of different biomarkers to predict individual radiosensitivity in an inter-laboratory comparison--lessons for future studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Greve

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a powerful cure for several types of solid tumours, but its application is often limited because of severe side effects in individual patients. With the aim to find biomarkers capable of predicting normal tissue side reactions we analysed the radiation responses of cells from individual head and neck tumour and breast cancer patients of different clinical radiosensitivity in a multicentric study. Multiple parameters of cellular radiosensitivity were analysed in coded samples of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs and derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs from 15 clinical radio-hypersensitive tumour patients and compared to age- and sex-matched non-radiosensitive patient controls and 15 lymphoblastoid cell lines from age- and sex- matched healthy controls of the KORA study. Experimental parameters included ionizing radiation (IR-induced cell death (AnnexinV, induction and repair of DNA strand breaks (Comet assay, induction of yH2AX foci (as a result of DNA double strand breaks, and whole genome expression analyses. Considerable inter-individual differences in IR-induced DNA strand breaks and their repair and/or cell death could be detected in primary and immortalised cells with the applied assays. The group of clinically radiosensitive patients was not unequivocally distinguishable from normal responding patients nor were individual overreacting patients in the test system unambiguously identified by two different laboratories. Thus, the in vitro test systems investigated here seem not to be appropriate for a general prediction of clinical reactions during or after radiotherapy due to the experimental variability compared to the small effect of radiation sensitivity. Genome-wide expression analysis however revealed a set of 67 marker genes which were differentially induced 6 h after in vitro-irradiation in lymphocytes from radio-hypersensitive and non-radiosensitive patients. These results warrant future validation in larger

  15. Evaluation of tissue and cellular biomarkers to assess 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) exposure in earthworms: effects-based assessment in laboratory studies using Eisenia andrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robidoux, Pierre Yves; Svendsen, Claus; Sarrazin, Manon; Hawari, Jalal; Thiboutot, Sonia; Ampleman, Guy; Weeks, Jason M; Sunahara, Geoffrey I

    2002-01-01

    The lysosomal neutral red retention time (NRRT) assay, a biomarker for lysosomal membrane stability, and the total immune activity (TIA) assay, a measure of non-specific immune system activity, were used in laboratory studies to assess the toxic effects of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) on earthworms (Eisenia andrei) in vivo. The results were compared with the concentration of TNT and its metabolites in earthworm tissue, as well as standard sublethal toxicity endpoints including growth (i.e. weight change) and reproduction effects from previously published studies. Filter paper experiments indicated a significant decrease in NRRT at >or=1.8 micro g TNT cm(-2), whereas sublethal (weight loss) and lethal effects to earthworms were detected at >or=3.5 and 7.1 micro g TNT cm(-2), respectively. Experiments in artificial soil showed that NRRT effects could be detected at lower TNT concentrations (>or=55 mg TNT kg(-1) soil dry weight) compared with other sublethal endpoints (effects on growth and reproduction). The TIA biomarker did not significantly respond to TNT. Copper (as CuSO4, filter paper contact tests) and 2-chloroacetamide (soil tests), which were used as reference toxicants, also decreased the NRRT. The use of the NRRT assay linked with tissue concentrations of TNT metabolites in earthworms was identified as a potentially appropriate biomarker approach for TNT exposure assessment under laboratory conditions and a novel tool for effects-based risk assessment. PMID:12171758

  16. An inter-laboratory investigation of the Arctic sea ice biomarker proxy IP25 in marine sediments: key outcomes and recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt, S. T.; Brown, T. A.; Ampel, L.; Cabedo-Sanz, P.; Fahl, K.; Kocis, J. J.; Massé, G.; Navarro-Rodriguez, A.; Ruan, J.; Xu, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the results of an inter-laboratory investigation into the identification and quantification of the Arctic sea ice biomarker proxy IP25 in marine sediments. Seven laboratories took part in the study, which consisted of the analysis of IP25 in a series of sediment samples from different regions of the Arctic, sub-Arctic and Antarctic, additional sediment extracts and purified standards. The results obtained allowed 4 key outcomes to be determined. First, IP25 was identified by all laboratories in sediments from the Canadian Arctic with inter-laboratory variation in IP25 concentration being substantially larger than within individual laboratories. This greater variation between laboratories was attributed to the difficulty in accurately determining instrumental response factors for IP25, even though laboratories were supplied with appropriate standards. Second, the identification of IP25 by 3 laboratories in sediment from SW Iceland that was believed to represent a blank, was interpreted as representing a better limit of detection or quantification for such laboratories, contamination or mis-identification. These alternatives could not be distinguished conclusively with the data available, although it is noted that the precision of these data was significantly poorer compared with the other IP25 concentration measurements. Third, 3 laboratories reported the occurrence of IP25 in a sediment sample from the Antarctic Peninsula even though this biomarker is believed to be absent from the Southern Ocean. This anomaly is attributed to a combined chromatographic and mass spectrometric interference that results from the presence of a di-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) pseudo-homologue of IP25 that occurs in Antarctic sediments. Finally, data are presented that suggest that extraction of IP25 is consistent between Accelerated Solvent Extraction (ASE) and sonication methods and that IP25 concentrations based on 7-hexylnonadecane as an internal standard

  17. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova; A A Novikov; Nasonov, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD) is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE) drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers) that allow one to conduct immunological monit...

  18. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Kevin S. (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Long, Finis W.; Sinebryukhov, Vadim A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Kim, Alexandre A. (High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia); Wakeland, Peter Eric (Ketech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); McKee, G. Randall; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Struve, Kenneth William; Savage, Mark Edward; Stygar, William A.; LeChien, Keith R.; Matzen, Maurice Keith

    2010-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores

  19. The high current, fast, 100ns, Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) developmental project at Sandia Laboratories and HCEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., USA, in collaboration with the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI), Tomsk, Russia, is developing a new paradigm in pulsed power technology: the Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) technology. This technological approach can provide very compact devices that can deliver very fast high current and high voltage pulses straight out of the cavity with out any complicated pulse forming and pulse compression network. Through multistage inductively insulated voltage adders, the output pulse, increased in voltage amplitude, can be applied directly to the load. The load may be a vacuum electron diode, a z-pinch wire array, a gas puff, a liner, an isentropic compression load (ICE) to study material behavior under very high magnetic fields, or a fusion energy (IFE) target. This is because the output pulse rise time and width can be easily tailored to the specific application needs. In this paper we briefly summarize the developmental work done in Sandia and HCEI during the last few years, and describe our new MYKONOS Sandia High Current LTD Laboratory. An extensive evaluation of the LTD technology is being performed at SNL and the High Current Electronic Institute (HCEI) in Tomsk Russia. Two types of High Current LTD cavities (LTD I-II, and 1-MA LTD) were constructed and tested individually and in a voltage adder configuration (1-MA cavity only). All cavities performed remarkably well and the experimental results are in full agreement with analytical and numerical calculation predictions. A two-cavity voltage adder is been assembled and currently undergoes evaluation. This is the first step towards the completion of the 10-cavity, 1-TW module. This MYKONOS voltage adder will be the first ever IVA built with a transmission line insulated with deionized water. The LTD II cavity renamed LTD III will serve as a test bed for evaluating a number of different types of switches, resistors, alternative capacitor configurations, cores

  20. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  1. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  2. The promise of biomarkers in diagnosing major depression in primary care: the present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redei, Eva E; Mehta, Neha S

    2015-08-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder, but it can be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Most people with depression are seen in primary care settings, where there are limited resources to diagnose and treat the patient. There is a lack of clinically validated objective laboratory-based diagnostic tests to diagnose MDD; however, it is clear that these tests could greatly improve the correct and timely diagnosis. This review aims to give a cross-sectional view of current efforts of DNA methylomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic approaches to identify biomarkers. We outline our view of the biomarker developmental steps from discovery to clinical application. We then propose that better cooperation will lead us closer to the common goal of identifying biological biomarkers for major depression. "The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing." Albert Einstein. PMID:26081681

  3. Developmental Dyspraxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Developmental Dyspraxia Information Page Synonym(s): Dyspraxia Table of Contents (click ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Developmental Dyspraxia? Developmental dyspraxia is a disorder characterized by an ...

  4. Unraveling the Miswired Connectome: A Developmental Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Di Martino, Adriana; Damien A Fair; Kelly, Clare; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Thomason, Moriah E.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Luna, Beatriz; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Milham, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of mental illnesses can be conceptualized as developmental disorders of neural interactions within the connectome, or developmental miswiring. The recent maturation of pediatric in vivo brain imaging is bringing within reach the identification of clinically meaningful brain-based biomarkers of developmental disorders. Even more auspicious, is the ability to study the evolving connectome throughout life, beginning in utero, which promises to move the field from topological ph...

  5. Imaging Biomarkers or Biomarker Imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Mitterhauser

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since biomarker imaging is traditionally understood as imaging of molecular probes, we highly recommend to avoid any confusion with the previously defined term “imaging biomarkers” and, therefore, only use “molecular probe imaging (MPI” in that context. Molecular probes (MPs comprise all kinds of molecules administered to an organism which inherently carry a signalling moiety. This review highlights the basic concepts and differences of molecular probe imaging using specific biomarkers. In particular, PET radiopharmaceuticals are discussed in more detail. Specific radiochemical and radiopharmacological aspects as well as some legal issues are presented.

  6. Biomarkers in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Brian J; Blount, Patricia L; Rabinovitch, Peter S

    2003-04-01

    This article provides a framework for clinicians who are attempting the difficult task of interpreting the Barrett's biomarker literature with the goal of improving care for their patients. Although many articles. including more that 60 proposed biomarkers, have been published on this subject, only a few describe phase 3 and 4 studies that are of interest to the clinical gastroenterologist (Table 1). For year, dysplasia grade has been the sole means of risk stratification for patients with BE, and it likely will continue to be used in the foreseeable future. The current authors believe that dysplasia classification can be valuable using the team management approach and quality controls described previously. Significant problems, however, have emerged in phase 2 through 4 studies of dysplasia that make it imperative for the Barrett's field to incorporate additional biomarkers as they are validated. These problems include poor reproducibility of dysplasia interpretations, poor predictive value for negative, indefinite, and low-grade dysplasia, and inconsistent results for HGD in different centers, all of which makes it virtually impossible to develop national guidelines for surveillance. Some studies have even suggested that endoscopic biopsy surveillance using dysplasia may not be worthwhile. Currently, flow cytometric tetraploidy and aneuploidy have progressed furthest in biomarker validation (see Table 1). With proper handling, endoscopic biopsy specimens can be shipped to reference laboratories that have the instruments, computer analytic methods, and expertise to reproducibly detect tetraploidy and aneuploidy. The results of phase 4 studies indicate that flow cytometry appears to be useful in detecting a subset of patients who do not have HGD and yet have an increased risk of progression to cancer that cannot be identified by dysplasia grade. For many reasons, the authors anticipate that the number of validated biomarkers will increase substantially in the

  7. Biomarkers: A Challenging Conundrum in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, Peter; King, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    The use of biomarkers has proven utility in cardiovascular medicine and holds great promise for future advances, but their application requires considerable rigor in thinking and methodology. Numerous confounding factors can cloud the clinical and investigative uses of biomarkers. Yet, the thoughtful and critical use of biomarkers can doubtless aid discovery of new pathogenic pathways, identify novel therapeutic targets, and provide a bridge between the laboratory and the clinic. Biomarkers can provide diagnostic and prognostic tools to the practitioner. The careful application of biomarkers can also help design and guide clinical trials required to establish the efficacy of novel interventions to improve patient outcomes. Point of care testing, technological advances, such as microfluidic and wearable devices, and the power of omics approaches all promise to elevate the potential contributions of biomarkers to discovery science, translation, clinical trials, and the practice of cardiovascular medicine. PMID:26543097

  8. Reproductive biomarkers responses induced by xenoestrogens in the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus inhabiting a South American reservoir: An integrated field and laboratory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Paula S.; Pinheiro, Ana Paula B. [Departamento de Morfologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, C.P. 486, 30161-970, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Bazzoli, Nilo [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Zoologia de Vertebrados, Pontifícia Universidade Católica de Minas Gerais, PUC Minas, Belo Horizonte 30535-610, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Rizzo, Elizete, E-mail: ictio@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Morfologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Belo Horizonte, C.P. 486, 30161-970, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2014-05-01

    Field studies evaluating the effects of endocrine disruption chemicals (EDCs) on the fish reproduction are scarce worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess hepatic levels of vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata proteins (Zrp) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and relating them to reproductive endpoints in a wild fish population habiting a reservoir that receive domestic sewage, agricultural and industrial residues. Adult fish Astyanax fasciatus were sampled during the reproductive season in five sites from the Furnas Reservoir, Grande River, and Paraguay–Paraná basin. As a control to field data, fish were experimentally exposed via dietary intake, to oestradiol benzoate (OB) for 7 days. Fish from site with little anthropogenic interference showed hepatic levels of Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II similar to those from the non-treated experimental group. In sites located immediately downstream from the municipal wastewater discharges, the water total oestrogen was >120 ng/l, and male fish displayed increased Vtg and Zrp and decreased IGF-I levels similar to OB treated fish. In females, levels of Vtg, Zrp, IGF-I and IGF-II suggest an impairment of final oocyte maturation and spawning, as also detected by frequency of over-ripening, follicular atresia and fecundity. At the sites that receive agricultural and industrial residues, the water total oestrogen was <50 ng/l and females showed decreased Zrp and increased IGF-II levels associated to reduced diameter of vitellogenic follicles, indicating an inhibition of oocyte growth. Overall, the current study reports oestrogenic contamination impairing the reproduction of a wild fish from a hydroeletric reservoir and, the data contribute to improving the current knowledge on relationship between hepatic Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II, and reproductive endpoints in a teleost fish. In addition, our data point out novel reproductive biomarkers (IGF-I, IGF-II and over-ripening) to assessing xenoestrogenic

  9. Reproductive biomarkers responses induced by xenoestrogens in the characid fish Astyanax fasciatus inhabiting a South American reservoir: An integrated field and laboratory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field studies evaluating the effects of endocrine disruption chemicals (EDCs) on the fish reproduction are scarce worldwide. The goal of this study was to assess hepatic levels of vitellogenin (Vtg), zona radiata proteins (Zrp) and insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II), and relating them to reproductive endpoints in a wild fish population habiting a reservoir that receive domestic sewage, agricultural and industrial residues. Adult fish Astyanax fasciatus were sampled during the reproductive season in five sites from the Furnas Reservoir, Grande River, and Paraguay–Paraná basin. As a control to field data, fish were experimentally exposed via dietary intake, to oestradiol benzoate (OB) for 7 days. Fish from site with little anthropogenic interference showed hepatic levels of Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II similar to those from the non-treated experimental group. In sites located immediately downstream from the municipal wastewater discharges, the water total oestrogen was >120 ng/l, and male fish displayed increased Vtg and Zrp and decreased IGF-I levels similar to OB treated fish. In females, levels of Vtg, Zrp, IGF-I and IGF-II suggest an impairment of final oocyte maturation and spawning, as also detected by frequency of over-ripening, follicular atresia and fecundity. At the sites that receive agricultural and industrial residues, the water total oestrogen was <50 ng/l and females showed decreased Zrp and increased IGF-II levels associated to reduced diameter of vitellogenic follicles, indicating an inhibition of oocyte growth. Overall, the current study reports oestrogenic contamination impairing the reproduction of a wild fish from a hydroeletric reservoir and, the data contribute to improving the current knowledge on relationship between hepatic Vtg, Zrp and IGF-I and IGF-II, and reproductive endpoints in a teleost fish. In addition, our data point out novel reproductive biomarkers (IGF-I, IGF-II and over-ripening) to assessing xenoestrogenic

  10. Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental disabilities are severe, long-term problems. They may be physical, such as blindness. They may affect mental ability, such as learning disorders. Or the problem can be both physical and mental, such as Down ...

  11. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in antioxidant therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Mañon Rossi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are used regularly in medical practice to provide objective markers of health status of a person, as well as the physiological response of the body to a pharmacological therapeutic intervention. In the specific case of the use of antioxidant products (antioxidant therapy, it is necessary to measure both biomarkers of oxidative stress level of the person as those that are specific to a physiological or pathological progression of a disease disorder. This paper describes the main biomarkers of oxidative general and specific stress as well as laboratory techniques, which should be taken into account when measuring the effectiveness of antioxidant therapies.

  12. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard;

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work...

  13. Combination of biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurfjell, Lennart; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Lundqvist, Roger;

    2012-01-01

    The New National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer's Association diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease (AD) incorporate biomarkers in the diagnostic criteria and suggest division of biomarkers into two categories: Aβ accumulation and neuronal degeneration or injury....

  14. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  15. Genomic Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael F; Nathanson, Katherine L; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Clinical risk assessment for cancer predisposition includes a three-generation pedigree and physical examination to identify inherited syndromes. Additionally genetic and genomic biomarkers may identify individuals with a constitutional basis for their disease that may not be evident clinically. Genomic biomarker testing may detect molecular variations in single genes, panels of genes, or entire genomes. The strength of evidence for the association of a genomic biomarker with disease risk may be weak or strong. The factors contributing to clinical validity and utility of genomic biomarkers include functional laboratory analyses and genetic epidemiologic evidence. Genomic biomarkers may be further classified as low, moderate or highly penetrant based on the likelihood of disease. Genomic biomarkers for breast cancer are comprised of rare highly penetrant mutations of genes such as BRCA1 or BRCA2, moderately penetrant mutations of genes such as CHEK2, as well as more common genomic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms, associated with modest effect sizes. When applied in the context of appropriate counseling and interpretation, identification of genomic biomarkers of inherited risk for breast cancer may decrease morbidity and mortality, allow for definitive prevention through assisted reproduction, and serve as a guide to targeted therapy . PMID:26987529

  16. Developmental Scaffolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The concept of scaffolding has wide resonance in several scientific fields. Here we attempt to adopt it for the study of development. In this perspective, the embryo is conceived as an integral whole, comprised of several hierarchical modules as in a recurrent circularity of emerging patterns...... molecular signalling to the complexity of sign recognition proper of a cellular community. In this semiotic perspective, the apparent goal directness of any developmental strategy should no longer be accounted for by a predetermined genetic program, but by the gradual definition of the relationships...

  17. Genotoxicity Biomarkers: Application in Histopathology Laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Ladeira, Carina; Viegas, Susana; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Manuel Carmo; Brito, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Most cancers results from man-made and natural environmental exposures (such as tobacco smoke; chemical pollutants in air, water, food, drugs; radon; and infectious agents) acting in concert with both genetic and acquired characteristics. It has been estimated that without these environmental factors, cancer incidence would be dramatically reduced, by as much as 80%-90%. The modulation of environmental factors by host susceptibility was rarely evaluated. However, within the past few years, th...

  18. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démonet, Jean-François; Taylor, Margot J; Chaix, Yves

    2004-05-01

    Developmental dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is a disorder in which children with normal intelligence and sensory abilities show learning deficits for reading. Substantial evidence has established its biological origin and the preponderance of phonological disorders even though important phenotypic variability and comorbidity have been recorded. Diverse theories have been proposed to account for the cognitive and neurological aspects of dyslexia. Findings of genetic studies show that different loci affect specific reading disability although a direct relation has not been established between symptoms and a given genomic locus. In both children and adults with dyslexia, results of neuroimaging studies suggest defective activity and abnormal connectivity between regions crucial for language functions--eg, the left fusiform gyrus for reading--and changes in brain activity associated with performance improvement after various remedial interventions. PMID:15121410

  19. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2015-01-01

    This review uses a levels-of-analysis framework to summarize the current understanding of developmental dyslexia's etiology, brain bases, neuropsychology, and social context. Dyslexia is caused by multiple genetic and environmental risk factors as well as their interplay. Several candidate genes have been identified in the past decade. At the brain level, dyslexia is associated with aberrant structure and function, particularly in left hemisphere reading/language networks. The neurocognitive influences on dyslexia are also multifactorial and involve phonological processing deficits as well as weaknesses in other oral language skills and processing speed. We address contextual issues such as how dyslexia manifests across languages and social classes as well as what treatments are best supported. Throughout the review, we highlight exciting new research that cuts across levels of analysis. Such work promises eventually to provide a comprehensive explanation of the disorder as well as its prevention and remediation. PMID:25594880

  20. Developmental dyspraxia and developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, M; Möbs, I

    1995-12-01

    This article discusses the role developmental dyspraxia plays in developmental coordination disorder (DCD), based upon a review of literature on apraxia, developmental dyspraxia, and DCD. Apraxia and dyspraxia have often been equated with DCD. However, it is argued that apraxia and dyspraxia primarily refer to the problems of motor sequencing and selection, which not all children with DCD exhibit. The author proposes to distinguish developmental dyspraxia from DCD. Other issues discussed include the assessment, etiology, and treatment of developmental dyspraxia and DCD, and the relationship between DCD and learning disabilities. A research agenda is offered regarding future directions to overcome current limitation. PMID:8866511

  1. The role of metabolic biomarkers in drug toxicity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Laura K; Beger, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metabolic profiling is a technique that can potentially provide more sensitive and specific biomarkers of toxicity than the current clinical measures benefiting preclinical and clinical drug studies. Both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) platforms have been used for metabolic profiling studies of drug toxicity. Not only can both techniques provide novel biomarker(s) of toxicity but the combination of both techniques gives a broader range of metabolites evaluated. Changes in metabolic patterns can provide insight into mechanism(s) of toxicity and help to eliminate a potentially toxic new chemical entity earlier in the developmental process. Metabolic profiling offers numerous advantages in toxicological research and screening as sample collection and preparation are relatively simple. Further, sample throughput, reproducibility, and accuracy are high. The area of drug toxicity of therapeutic compounds has already been impacted by metabolic profiling studies and will continue to be impacted as new, more specific biomarker(s) are found. In order for a biomarker or pattern of biomarkers to be accepted, it must be shown that they originate from the target tissue of interest. Metabolic profiling studies are amenable to any biofluid or tissue sample making it possible to link the changes noted in urine for instance as originating from renal injury. Additionally, the ease of sample collection makes it possible to follow a single animal or subject over time in order to determine whether and when the toxicity resolves itself. This review focuses on the advantages of metabolic profiling for drug toxicity studies. PMID:20020895

  2. "Do I Need to Know This for the Exam?" Using Popular Media, Inquiry-based Laboratories, and a Community of Scientific Practice to Motivate Students to Learn Developmental Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri, Marga; Broussard, Christine

    2008-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges instructors face is getting students to connect with the subject in a manner that encourages them to learn. In this essay, we describe the redesign of our Developmental Biology course to foster a deeper connection between students and the field of developmental biology. In our approach, we created a community of…

  3. Nanomaterials based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Bansi D.; Kumar, Saurabh; Mouli Pandey, Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors have enormous potential to contribute to the evolution of new molecular diagnostic techniques for patients suffering with cancerous diseases. A major obstacle preventing faster development of biosensors pertains to the fact that cancer is a highly complex set of diseases. The oncologists currently rely on a few biomarkers and histological characterization of tumors. Some of the signatures include epigenetic and genetic markers, protein profiles, changes in gene expression, and post-translational modifications of proteins. These molecular signatures offer new opportunities for development of biosensors for cancer detection. In this context, conducting paper has recently been found to play an important role towards the fabrication of a biosensor for cancer biomarker detection. In this paper we will focus on results of some of the recent studies obtained in our laboratories relating to fabrication and application of nanomaterial modified paper based biosensors for cancer biomarker detection.

  4. Biomarkers in Severe Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao Chloe; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have been critical for studies of disease pathogenesis and the development of new therapies in severe asthma. In particular, biomarkers of type 2 inflammation have proven valuable for endotyping and targeting new biological agents. Because of these successes in understanding and marking type 2 inflammation, lack of knowledge regarding non-type 2 inflammatory mechanisms in asthma will soon be the major obstacle to the development of new treatments and management strategies in severe asthma. Biomarkers can play a role in these investigations as well by providing insight into the underlying biology in human studies of patients with severe asthma. PMID:27401625

  5. Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-RenLiu; Qian Liu; Jing Li; Sulpicio G. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    1 IntroductionMillions of newborn and infants receive anesthetic,sedative and analgesic drugs for surgery and painful procedures on a daily basis.Recent laboratory reports clearly demonstrate that anesthetic and sedative drugs induced both neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive deficits in laboratory models.This issue is of paramount interest to pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists because it questions the safety of anesthetics used for fetal and neonatal anesthesia[1-2].In an attempt to summarize the rapidly expanding laboratorybased literature on anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN),this review will examine published reports on the characterization,mechanisms and alleviation of this phenomenon.

  6. Functional, biochemical, and histological biomarkers for immunocompetence in fish-eating birds of the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasman, K.A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Scanlon, P.F. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States); Fox, G.A. [Canadian Wildlife Service, Hull, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The authors studied the effects of environmental contaminants on immune function and related biochemical and histological biomarkers in herring gulls (Larus argentatus) and Caspian terns (Sterna caspia) from the Great Lakes. An epidemiological analysis strongly supported the hypothesis that suppression of T-cell-mediated immunity was associated with high perinatal exposure to persistent organochlorines (primarily PCBs). Suppression of T cell function (measured by the phytohemagglutinin skin test) was most severe in colonies in Lake Ontario and Saginaw Bay for both species and in western Lake Erie (1992) for herring gulls. In herring gull chicks, the mass of the thymus decreased as liver EROD increased. Both species exhibited biologically significant differences among sites in anti-SRBC antibody titers, but there were few associations with organochlorines. In Caspian terns and, to a lesser degree, in herring gulls, plasma retinol decreased as organochlorines increased. In both species, plasma thyroxine concentrations differed significantly among sites, but there were no apparent associations with contaminants. Although thyroxine and retinol often are associated with immune function in laboratory studies, there were few consistent relationships between these variables and T-cell- and antibody-mediated immunity in this field study. These biochemical variables may be poor surrogate biomarkers for immune function in wild birds, although they are important indicators for other physiological systems. The histology of the thymus, bursa of Fabricius, and spleen were examined for developmental and functional abnormalities and the presence of infections.

  7. Validation of New Cancer Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, Michael J; Sturgeon, Catherine M; Söletormos, Georg; Barak, Vivian; Molina, Rafael; Hayes, Daniel F; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Bossuyt, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Biomarkers are playing increasingly important roles in the detection and management of patients with cancer. Despite an enormous number of publications on cancer biomarkers, few of these biomarkers are in widespread clinical use. CONTENT: In this review, we discuss the key steps in...... advancing a newly discovered cancer candidate biomarker from pilot studies to clinical application. Four main steps are necessary for a biomarker to reach the clinic: analytical validation of the biomarker assay, clinical validation of the biomarker test, demonstration of clinical value from performance of...... the biomarker test, and regulatory approval. In addition to these 4 steps, all biomarker studies should be reported in a detailed and transparent manner, using previously published checklists and guidelines. Finally, all biomarker studies relating to demonstration of clinical value should be...

  8. Biomarkers in Airway Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M Leung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The inherent limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted clinicians and scientists to search for surrogate markers of airway diseases. Although few biomarkers have been widely accepted into the clinical armamentarium, the authors explore three sources of biomarkers that have shown promise as indicators of disease severity and treatment response. In asthma, exhaled nitric oxide measurements can predict steroid responsiveness and sputum eosinophil counts have been used to titrate anti-inflammatory therapies. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory plasma biomarkers, such as fibrinogen, club cell secretory protein-16 and surfactant protein D, can denote greater severity and predict the risk of exacerbations. While the multitude of disease phenotypes in respiratory medicine make biomarker development especially challenging, these three may soon play key roles in the diagnosis and management of airway diseases.

  9. Biomarkers for immune thrombocytopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lingjia; Zhang, Chunmei; Zhang, Liping; Shi, Yongyu; Ji, Xuebin

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia is an autoimmune disease with abnormal biomarkers. Immune thrombocytopenia pathogenesis is a complicated process in which the patient’s immune system is activated by platelet autoantigens resulting in immune mediated platelet destruction or suppression of platelet production. The autoantibodies produced by autoreactive B cells against self antigens are considered to play a crucial role. In addition, biomarkers such as transforming growth factor-beta1,Toll-like receptor...

  10. The role of biomarkers in reproductive and developmental toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Clarkson, T.W.

    1987-01-01

    A massive outbreak of methylmercury poisoning took place in the winter of 1971-1972 due to the consumption of homemade bread contaminated with a methylmercury fungicide. The longitudinal analysis of the mother's head hair, collected after delivery of the baby, provided a means of recapitulating exposure to methylmercury during pregnancy. Methylmercury is incorporated into newly formed hair at a concentration that is proportional to the simultaneous concentration in blood. Since hair grows at ...

  11. Developmental reading disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001406.htm Developmental reading disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Developmental reading disorder is a reading disability that occurs when ...

  12. Predictive biomarkers for personalised anti-cancer drug use: discovery to clinical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alymani, Nayef A; Smith, Murray D; Williams, David J; Petty, Russell D

    2010-03-01

    A priority translational research objective in cancer medicine is the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for solid tumours. Ideally, co-discovery of predictive biomarkers occurs in parallel to facilitate clinical development of agents and ultimately personalise clinical use. However, the identification of clinically useful predictive biomarkers for solid tumours has proven challenging with many initially promising biomarkers failing to translate into clinically useful applications. In particular, the 'failure' of a predictive biomarker has often only become apparent at a relatively late stage in investigation. Recently, the field has recognised the need to develop a robust clinical biomarker development methodology to facilitate the process. This review discusses the recent progress in this area focusing on the key stages in the biomarker development process: discovery, validation, qualification and implementation. Concentrating on predictive biomarkers for selecting systemic therapies for individual patients in the clinic, the advances and progress in each of these stages in biomarker development are outlined and the key remaining challenges are discussed. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the challenges identified and how they have been addressed. Overall, we find that significant progress has been made towards a formalised biomarker developmental process. This holds considerable promise for facilitating the translation of predictive biomarkers from discovery to clinical implementation. Further enhancements could eventually be found through alignment with regulatory processes. PMID:20138504

  13. The Domain of Developmental Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Rutter, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes how developmental psychopathology differs from related disciplines, including abnormal psychology, psychiatry, clinical child psychology, and developmental psychology. Points out propositions underlying a developmental perspective and discusses implications for research in developmental psychopathology. (Author/RH)

  14. Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development—Iodine Review1234

    OpenAIRE

    Rohner, Fabian; Zimmermann, Michael; Jooste, Pieter; Pandav, Chandrakant; Caldwell, Kathleen; Raghavan, Ramkripa; Raiten, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) project is to provide state-of-the-art information and service with regard to selection, use, and interpretation of biomarkers of nutrient exposure, status, function, and effect. Specifically, the BOND project seeks to develop consensus on accurate assessment methodologies that are applicable to researchers (laboratory/clinical/surveillance), clinicians, programmers, and policy makers (data consumers). The BOND project is als...

  15. Sex-specific urinary biomarkers for diagnosing bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-jun; Huang, Hua; Zhao, Li-bo; Zhou, De-zhi; Yang, Yong-tao; Zheng, Peng; Yang, De-yu; He, Peng; Zhou, Jing-jing; Fang, Liang; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Sex-based differences are prominent in affective disorders, but there are no biomarkers available to support sex-specific, laboratory-based diagnostics for male and female bipolar disorder (BD) patients. Here, a NMR-based metabonomic approach was used to preliminarily identify sex-specific urinary metabolite biomarkers for diagnosing male and female BD patients. A male-specific biomarker panel consisting of four metabolites (α-hydroxybutyrate, choline, formate, and N-methylnicotinamide) effectively discriminated between male BD and healthy controls (HC) subjects, achieving an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.942. A female-specific biomarkers panel consisting of four metabolites (α-hydroxybutyrate, oxalacetate, acetone, and N-methylnicotinamide) effectively discriminated between female BD and HC subjects, achieving an AUC of 0.909. The male-specific biomarker panel displayed low discriminatory power in the female group, and the female-specific biomarker panel displayed low discriminatory power in the male group. Moreover, several other metabolites showed different trends between male and female BD subjects. These findings suggest that male and female BD patients have distinct biomarker fingerprints and that these two sex-specific biomarker panels may serve as effective diagnostic tools in distinguishing male and female BD patients from their healthy counterparts. Our work may provide a window into the mechanisms underlying the pathoetiology of BD in both men and women. PMID:25531985

  16. Auditory Processing in Noise: A Preschool Biomarker for Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Woodruff Carr, Kali; Thompson, Elaine C.; Anderson, Samira; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R.; Zecker, Steven G.; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Learning to read is a fundamental developmental milestone, and achieving reading competency has lifelong consequences. Although literacy development proceeds smoothly for many children, a subset struggle with this learning process, creating a need to identify reliable biomarkers of a child’s future literacy that could facilitate early diagnosis and access to crucial early interventions. Neural markers of reading skills have been identified in school-aged children and adults; many pertain to t...

  17. Mass spectrometry for biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chaochao; Liu, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Rodland, Karin D.; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-06-19

    Biomarkers potentially play a crucial role in early disease diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy. In the past decade, mass spectrometry based proteomics has become increasingly important in biomarker development due to large advances in technology and associated methods. This chapter mainly focuses on the application of broad (e.g. shotgun) proteomics in biomarker discovery and the utility of targeted proteomics in biomarker verification and validation. A range of mass spectrometry methodologies are discussed emphasizing their efficacy in the different stages in biomarker development, with a particular emphasis on blood biomarker development.

  18. What is developmental dyspraxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, D

    1995-12-01

    The idea of developmental dyspraxia has been discussed in the research literature for almost 100 years. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus regarding both the definition and description of this disorder. This paper presents a neuropsychologically based operational definition of developmental dyspraxia that emphasizes that developmental dyspraxia is a disorder of gesture. Research that has investigated the development of praxis is discussed. Further, different types of gestural disorders displayed by children and different mechanisms that underlie developmental dyspraxia are compared to and contrasted with adult acquired apraxia. The impact of perceptual-motor, language, and cognitive impairments on children's gestural development and the possible associations between these developmental disorders and developmental dyspraxia are also examined. Also, the relationship among limb, orofacial, and verbal dyspraxia is discussed. Finally, problems that exist in the neuropsychological assessment of developmental dyspraxia are discussed and recommendations concerning what should be included in such an assessment are presented. PMID:8838385

  19. Developmental origin of immune diseases - Environmental influences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strom, M.; Halldorsson, T. I.; Hansen, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that developmental exposures to environmental chemicals may have long lasting adverse consequences for the development of the immune system. In humans such findings have mostly been explored for persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including polychlorinated biphenyls...... (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, andmorerecently perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Developmental exposures to PCBs have, for example, been associated with both otitis media and lower respiratory infections. Evidence regarding asthma and allergic disease is less well established, partly due to lack of...... years of age we have examined the long term consequences of in utero exposure to POPs on offspring use of asthma medication and biomarkers of allergic airway disease. Using registry based information on offspring use of asthma medication until 20 years of age, prenatal exposures to PCB-118 and...

  20. Biomarkers of the Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikio Shoji

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biomarker studies on dementia are summarized here. CSF Aβ40, Aβ42, total tau, and phosphorylated tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD and prediction of onset of AD from mild cognitive impairment (MCI. Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD, MCI, and preclinical AD were proposed by National Institute of Aging (NIA and Alzheimer's Association in August 2010. In these new criteria, progress in biomarker identification and amyloid imaging studies in the past 10 years have added critical information. Huge contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential therapy for cure of AD is urgently expected.

  1. Life-Long Implications of Developmental Exposure to Environmental Stressors: New Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Barouki, Robert; Bellinger, David C; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Chadwick, Lisa H; Cordier, Sylvaine; Etzel, Ruth A; Gray, Kimberly A; Ha, Eun-Hee; Junien, Claudine; Karagas, Margaret; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Paige Lawrence, B; Perera, Frederica P; Prins, Gail S; Puga, Alvaro; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Sherr, David H; Sly, Peter D; Suk, William; Sun, Qi; Toppari, Jorma; van den Hazel, Peter; Walker, Cheryl L; Heindel, Jerrold J

    2015-10-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) paradigm is one of the most rapidly expanding areas of biomedical research. Environmental stressors that can impact on DOHaD encompass a variety of environmental and occupational hazards as well as deficiency and oversupply of nutrients and energy. They can disrupt early developmental processes and lead to increased susceptibility to disease/dysfunctions later in life. Presentations at the fourth Conference on Prenatal Programming and Toxicity in Boston, in October 2014, provided important insights and led to new recommendations for research and public health action. The conference highlighted vulnerable exposure windows that can occur as early as the preconception period and epigenetics as a major mechanism than can lead to disadvantageous "reprogramming" of the genome, thereby potentially resulting in transgenerational effects. Stem cells can also be targets of environmental stressors, thus paving another way for effects that may last a lifetime. Current testing paradigms do not allow proper characterization of risk factors and their interactions. Thus, relevant exposure levels and combinations for testing must be identified from human exposure situations and outcome assessments. Testing of potential underpinning mechanisms and biomarker development require laboratory animal models and in vitro approaches. Only few large-scale birth cohorts exist, and collaboration between birth cohorts on a global scale should be facilitated. DOHaD-based research has a crucial role in establishing factors leading to detrimental outcomes and developing early preventative/remediation strategies to combat these risks. PMID:26241067

  2. Developmental Triclosan Exposure Decreases Maternal and Offspring Thyroxine in Rats*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiological and laboratory data have demonstrated that disruption of maternal thyroid hormones during fetal developmental may result in irreversible neurological consequences in offspring. In a short-term exposure paradigm, triclosan decreased systemic thyroxine (T4) concentr...

  3. Doing Developmental Research: A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals.…

  4. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  5. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Mairéad G.; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Mason, Warren P., E-mail: warren.mason@uhn.ca [Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6)-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]), microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  6. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Diaz-Prieto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The “omics” tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets or novel biomarkers present in plasma.

  7. Proteomic Biomarkers of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivanco, F; Padial, L R; Darde, V M; de la Cuesta, F; Alvarez-Llamas, G; Diaz-Prieto, Natacha; Barderas, M G

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY: Biomarkers provide a powerful approach to understanding the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. They have application in screening, diagnostic, prognostication, prediction of recurrences and monitoring of therapy. The "omics" tool are becoming very useful in the development of new biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases. Among them, proteomics is especially fitted to look for new proteins in health and disease and is playing a significant role in the development of new diagnostic tools in cardiovascular diagnosis and prognosis. This review provides an overview of progress in applying proteomics to atherosclerosis. First, we describe novel proteins identified analysing atherosclerotic plaques directly. Careful analysis of proteins within the atherosclerotic vascular tissue can provide a repertoire of proteins involved in vascular remodelling and atherogenesis. Second, we discuss recent data concerning proteins secreted by atherosclerotic plaques. The definition of the atheroma plaque secretome resides in that proteins secreted by arteries can be very good candidates of novel biomarkers. Finally we describe proteins that have been differentially expressed (versus controls) by individual cells which constitute atheroma plaques (endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, macrophages and foam cells) as well as by circulating cells (monocytes, platelets) or novel biomarkers present in plasma. PMID:19578499

  8. In situ evaluation of cadmium biomarkers in green algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Dana F.; Davis, Thomas A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Tercier-Waeber, Mary-Lou [Analytical and Biophysical Environmental Chemistry, University of Geneva, Sciences II, 30 Quai Ernest-Ansermet, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); England, Roxane [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Wilkinson, Kevin J., E-mail: kj.wilkinson@umontreal.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Montreal, P.O. Box 6128, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    In situ measurements provide data that are the highly representative of the natural environment. In this paper, laboratory-determined biomarkers of Cd stress that were previously identified for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were tested in two French rivers: a contaminated site on the Riou Mort River and an 'uncontaminated' reference site on the Lot River. Transcript abundance levels were determined by real time qPCR for biomarkers thought to be Cd sensitive. Transcript levels were significantly higher (>5 fold) for organisms exposed to the contaminated site as compared to those exposed at the uncontaminated site. Biomarker mRNA levels were best correlated to free Cd (Cd{sup 2+}) rather than intracellular Cd, suggesting that they may be useful indicators of in situ stress. The paper shows that biomarker expression levels increased with time, were sensitive to metal levels and metal speciation and were higher in the 'contaminated' as opposed to the 'reference' site. - Highlights: > Biomarkers of Cd stress were tested in a contaminated and a reference site. > The organism was viable under exposure conditions and metal accumulation occurred. > Biomarker levels were correlated to Cd{sup 2+} and were higher in the contaminated site. - Algal transcription levels of several biomarkers were studied in two natural waters in situ.

  9. In situ evaluation of cadmium biomarkers in green algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In situ measurements provide data that are the highly representative of the natural environment. In this paper, laboratory-determined biomarkers of Cd stress that were previously identified for the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, were tested in two French rivers: a contaminated site on the Riou Mort River and an 'uncontaminated' reference site on the Lot River. Transcript abundance levels were determined by real time qPCR for biomarkers thought to be Cd sensitive. Transcript levels were significantly higher (>5 fold) for organisms exposed to the contaminated site as compared to those exposed at the uncontaminated site. Biomarker mRNA levels were best correlated to free Cd (Cd2+) rather than intracellular Cd, suggesting that they may be useful indicators of in situ stress. The paper shows that biomarker expression levels increased with time, were sensitive to metal levels and metal speciation and were higher in the 'contaminated' as opposed to the 'reference' site. - Highlights: → Biomarkers of Cd stress were tested in a contaminated and a reference site. → The organism was viable under exposure conditions and metal accumulation occurred. → Biomarker levels were correlated to Cd2+ and were higher in the contaminated site. - Algal transcription levels of several biomarkers were studied in two natural waters in situ.

  10. Improved multimodal biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment diagnosis: data from ADNI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Torteya, Antonio; Treviño-Alvarado, Víctor; Tamez-Peña, José

    2013-02-01

    The accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) confers many clinical research and patient care benefits. Studies have shown that multimodal biomarkers provide better diagnosis accuracy of AD and MCI than unimodal biomarkers, but their construction has been based on traditional statistical approaches. The objective of this work was the creation of accurate AD and MCI diagnostic multimodal biomarkers using advanced bioinformatics tools. The biomarkers were created by exploring multimodal combinations of features using machine learning techniques. Data was obtained from the ADNI database. The baseline information (e.g. MRI analyses, PET analyses and laboratory essays) from AD, MCI and healthy control (HC) subjects with available diagnosis up to June 2012 was mined for case/controls candidates. The data mining yielded 47 HC, 83 MCI and 43 AD subjects for biomarker creation. Each subject was characterized by at least 980 ADNI features. A genetic algorithm feature selection strategy was used to obtain compact and accurate cross-validated nearest centroid biomarkers. The biomarkers achieved training classification accuracies of 0.983, 0.871 and 0.917 for HC vs. AD, HC vs. MCI and MCI vs. AD respectively. The constructed biomarkers were relatively compact: from 5 to 11 features. Those multimodal biomarkers included several widely accepted univariate biomarkers and novel image and biochemical features. Multimodal biomarkers constructed from previously and non-previously AD associated features showed improved diagnostic performance when compared to those based solely on previously AD associated features.

  11. The Alzheimer's Association external quality control program for cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasson, Ulf; Persson, Staffan;

    2011-01-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers amyloid β (Aβ)-42, total-tau (T-tau), and phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) demonstrate good diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, there are large variations in biomarker measurements between studies, and between and within laboratories. The...

  12. Imaging biomarkers in tauopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dani, Melanie; Edison, Paul; Brooks, David J

    2016-01-01

    Abnormally aggregated tau protein is central to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia variants, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The post-mortem cortical density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates with pre-morbid cognitive dysfunction and neuron loss. Selective PET ligands including [18F]THK5117, [18F]THK5351, [18F]AV1451 (T807) and [11C]PBB3 now provide in vivo imaging information about the timing and distribution of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases. They are potential imaging biomarkers for both supporting diagnosis and tracking disease progression. Here, we discuss the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, their state of development and the new clinical information that has been revealed. PMID:26299160

  13. Towards Improved Biomarker Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldahl, Karin

    actually identify strong biomarkers when strict validation is applied; the latter phenomenon is to some extentmasked by a publication bias, but has been widely observed among researchers working with omics data. In this thesis, the background of this apparent small effect size of the biomarkers is...... is used both for regression and classification purposes. This method has proven its strong worth in the multivariate data analysis throughout an enormous range of applications; a very classic data type is near infrared (NIR) data, but many similar data types have also be very successful. On that...... application types are different and introduce a larger complexity, weaker signals andmany potential sources of experimental and analytical bias and errors. The risk of the latter is further increased by the complexity of the entire omics experimental setup which often involves various project partners with...

  14. Biomarkers for Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikako Ishigamori

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common epithelial malignancy in the world. Since CRC develops slowly from removable precancerous lesions, detection of the lesion at an early stage by regular health examinations can reduce the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. Colonoscopy significantly improves the detection rate of CRC, but the examination is expensive and inconvenient. Therefore, we need novel biomarkers that are non-invasive to enable us to detect CRC quite early. A number of validation studies have been conducted to evaluate genetic, epigenetic or protein markers for identification in the stool and/or serum. Currently, the fecal occult blood test is the most widely used method of screening for CRC. However, advances in genomics and proteomics will lead to the discovery of novel non-invasive biomarkers.

  15. Biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Tara; Copur, M Sitki

    2012-01-01

    The hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors and carries a poor survival rate. The management of patients at risk for developing HCC remains challenging. Increased understanding of cancer biology and technological advances have enabled identification of a multitude of pathological, genetic, and molecular events that drive hepatocarcinogenesis leading to discovery of numerous potential biomarkers in this disease. They are currently being aggressively evaluated to establish their value in early diagnosis, optimization of therapy, reducing the emergence of new tumors, and preventing the recurrence after surgical resection or liver transplantation. These markers not only help in prediction of prognosis or recurrence but may also assist in deciding appropriate modality of therapy and may represent novel potential targets for therapeutic interventions. In this paper, a summary of most relevant available data from published papers reporting various tissue and serum biomarkers involved in hepatocellular carcinoma was presented. PMID:22655201

  16. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  17. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancreatic cancer. It is hoped for the future that the understanding of genetic alterations will lead to the rapid discovery of an effective biomarker of pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this thesis we vis...

  18. The 2D:4D digit ratio as biomarker for substance abuse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernstrand, A.M.; Van Den Borne, L.; Lensvelt, L.M.H.; Ribbert, L.L.A.; De With, A.C.; Goede, L.X.Y.; Garssen, J.; Verster, J.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The second (2D, index finger) to fourth (4D, ring finger) digit ratio is a biomarker for prenatal testosterone and estrogen exposure. It has been hypothesized that the developmental origins of health and behavior are modulated by the presence or absence of prenatal sex hormones. Several stu

  19. Biomarkers of Ovarian Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Roudebush

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary function of the female ovary is the production of a mature and viable oocyte capable of fertilization and subsequent embryo development and implantation. At birth, the ovary contains a finite number of oocytes available for folliculogenesis. This finite number of available oocytes is termed “the ovarian reserve”. The determination of ovarian reserve is important in the assessment and treatment of infertility. As the ovary ages, the ovarian reserve will decline. Infertility affects approximately 15-20% of reproductive aged couples. The most commonly used biomarker assay to assess ovarian reserve is the measurement of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH on day 3 of the menstrual cycle. However, antimüllerian hormone and inhibin-B are other biomarkers of ovarian reserve that are gaining in popularity since they provide direct determination of ovarian status, whereas day 3 FSH is an indirect measurement. This review examines the physical tools and the hormone biomarkers used to evaluate ovarian reserve.

  20. Predictive biomarker discovery through the parallel integration of clinical trial and functional genomics datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Larkin, J.M.; Gerlinger, M.;

    2010-01-01

    RNA screens to identify and validate functionally important genomic or transcriptomic predictive biomarkers of individual drug response in patients. PREDICT's approach to predictive biomarker discovery differs from conventional associative learning approaches, which can be susceptible to the detection of...... European network providing the technological and clinical platform for large-scale functional genomic biomarker discovery. Here we review our current understanding of molecular mechanisms driving resistance to anti-angiogenesis agents, the current limitations of laboratory and clinical trial strategies and...... how the PREDICT consortium will endeavour to identify a new generation of predictive biomarkers....

  1. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  2. Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennike, Tue; Birkelund, Svend; Stensballe, Allan;

    2014-01-01

    with medications with the concomitant risk of adverse events. In addition, identification of disease and course specific biomarker profiles can be used to identify biological pathways involved in the disease development and treatment. Knowledge of disease mechanisms in general can lead to improved future...... before. In this review, we report the current status of the proteomics IBD biomarkers and discuss various emerging proteomic strategies for identifying and characterizing novel biomarkers, as well as suggesting future targets for analysis....

  3. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudit Verma

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person’s genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed.

  4. Biomarker Identification Using Text Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular biomarkers has become one of the important tasks for scientists to assess the different phenotypic states of cells or organisms correlated to the genotypes of diseases from large-scale biological data. In this paper, we proposed a text-mining-based method to discover biomarkers from PubMed. First, we construct a database based on a dictionary, and then we used a finite state machine to identify the biomarkers. Our method of text mining provides a highly reliable approach to discover the biomarkers in the PubMed database.

  5. A review of molecular biomarkers for bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miakhil I

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous molecular markers for bladder cancer have been identified and investigated with various laboratory techniques. Molecular markers are isolated from tissue, serum and urine. They fall into proteomic, genetic and epigenetic categories. Some of molecular markers show promising results in terms of facilitating early diagnosis and guiding treatment. Molecular markers or the so- called biomarkers can provide additional information alongside staging, grading and lymphovascular invasion, for better prognostication.Aim:This studyprovides an up-to-date review of the frequently studied and most important biomarkers that have shown consistent relevance in relation to bladder cancer. Methods: The key words were searched on the PubMed, Google scholar and NHS library search engines. Results: More than twenty biomarkers as per our methodology were identified but only half of them have shown consistence relevance in bladder cancer. Conclusion: It is envisaged that a combination of a few biomarkers, which are investigated frequently and have shown clinical relevance, could possibly provide useful information in predicting recurrence and provide useful prognostic information. So far none of the biomarkers for bladder cancer are adopted in the UK standard practice. Despite that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA had approved some of these biomarkers, none of the urology associations incorporated them in to their guidelines as yet. However, it won’t be long before a final consensus is reached to integrate molecular staging in to the current TNM staging system.

  6. Current techniques for assessing developmental neurotoxicity of pesticides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu GAO; Ying TIAN; Xiaoming SHEN

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphates (OPs) and Pyrethroids (PRY) have been widely used in agriculture and in the home as broad spectrum insecticides, but may produce considerable risk to human health, especially to children. Children are more susceptible to environmental exposure, and concern about the neurotoxic effects of pesticide exposure on children is increasing. There is a need for better understanding of the potential developmental neu-rotoxicity of pesticides. Techniques for assessing devel-opmental neurotoxicity of pesticides will continue to be developed, rendering a need for flexibility of testing para-digms. Current techniques used in evaluating the devel-opmental neurotoxicity of OPs and PRY are presented in this review. These include: (1) In vitro techniques (PC12 cells, C6 cells and other cell models); (2) Non-mammalian models (sea urchins, zebrafish and other non-mammalian models); and (3) In vivo mammalian models (morpho-logical techniques, neurobehavioral assessments and biomarkers).

  7. Chiral Biomarkers in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The chirality of organic molecules with the asymmetric location of group radicals was discovered in 1848 by Louis Pasteur during his investigations of the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by crystals of sodium ammonium paratartrate. It is well established that the amino acids in proteins are exclusively Levorotary (L-aminos) and the sugars in DNA and RNA are Dextrorotary (D-sugars). This phenomenon of homochirality of biological polymers is a fundamental property of all life known on Earth. Furthermore, abiotic production mechanisms typically yield recemic mixtures (i.e. equal amounts of the two enantiomers). When amino acids were first detected in carbonaceous meteorites, it was concluded that they were racemates. This conclusion was taken as evidence that they were extraterrestrial and produced by abiologically. Subsequent studies by numerous researchers have revealed that many of the amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites exhibit a significant L-excess. The observed chirality is much greater than that produced by any currently known abiotic processes (e.g. Linearly polarized light from neutron stars; Circularly polarized ultraviolet light from faint stars; optically active quartz powders; inclusion polymerization in clay minerals; Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis of parity violations, etc.). This paper compares the measured chirality detected in the amino acids of carbonaceous meteorites with the effect of these diverse abiotic processes. IT is concluded that the levels observed are inconsistent with post-arrival biological contamination or with any of the currently known abiotic production mechanisms. However, they are consistent with ancient biological processes on the meteorite parent body. This paper will consider these chiral biomarkers in view of the detection of possible microfossils found in the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data obtained on these morphological biomarkers will be

  8. Pervasive Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ultimately cure this and similar disorders. NIH Patient Recruitment for Pervasive Developmental Disorders Clinical Trials At NIH ... 1055 (TTY) National Institute of Child Health and Human Information Resource Center P.O. Box 3006 Rockville, MD 20847 ...

  9. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do if you’re concerned » Developmental Monitoring and Screening A child’s growth and development are followed through ... to prevent illness. Some health conditions, such as asthma, gastrointestinal symptoms, eczema and skin allergies, and migraine ...

  10. Developmental Effects of Ghrelin

    OpenAIRE

    Steculorum, Sophie M.; Bouret, Sebastien G.

    2011-01-01

    Ghrelin is a pleiotropic hormone that was originally described as promoting feeding and stimulating growth hormone release in adults. A growing body of evidence suggests that ghrelin may also exert developmental and organizational effects during perinatal life. The perinatal actions of ghrelin include the regulation of early developmental events such as blastocyst development and perinatal growth. Moreover, alterations in perinatal ghrelin levels result in structural differences in various pe...

  11. Life Span Developmental Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Eryılmaz, Ali

    2011-01-01

    The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of...

  12. Towards Deep Developmental Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sigaud, Olivier; Droniou, Alain

    2016-01-01

    International audience Deep learning techniques are having an undeniable impact on general pattern recognition issues. In this paper, from a developmental robotics perspective, we scrutinize deep learning techniques under the light of their capability to construct a hierarchy of meaningful multimodal representations from the raw sensors of robots. These investigations reveal the differences between the methodological constraints of pattern recognition and those of developmental robotics. I...

  13. Continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies in developmental toxicology: Report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity, 14-16 May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Roland; Rauch, Martina; Gall, Andrea; Buschmann, Jochen; Clark, Ruth; Fuchs, Antje; Kan, Haidong; Heinrich, Verena; Kellner, Rupert; Knudsen, Thomas B; Li, Weihua; Makris, Susan L; Ooshima, Yojiro; Paumgartten, Francisco; Piersma, Aldert H; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Schaefer, Christof; Shiota, Kohei; Ulbrich, Beate; Ding, Xuncheng; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article is a report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity held in May 2014. The main aim of the workshop was the continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies used in the assessment of embryo- and fetotoxic findings. The following main topics were discussed: harmonized categorization of external, skeletal, visceral and materno-fetal findings into malformations, variations and grey zone anomalies, aspects of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals, and innovations for new methodologies in developmental toxicology. The application of Version 2 terminology in the DevTox database was considered as a useful improvement in the categorization of developmental anomalies. Participants concluded that initiation of a project for comparative assessments of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals could support regulatory risk assessment and university-based training. Improvement of new methodological approaches for alternatives to animal testing should be triggered for a better understanding of developmental outcomes. PMID:26073002

  14. Imaging Biomarkers in Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Rosalyn A.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Singnurkar, Amit; Snider, Denis P.; Valliant, John F.; Gulenchyn, Karen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Immune-based therapies have been in use for decades but recent work with immune checkpoint inhibitors has now changed the landscape of cancer treatment as a whole. While these advances are encouraging, clinicians still do not have a consistent biomarker they can rely on that can accurately select patients or monitor response. Molecular imaging technology provides a noninvasive mechanism to evaluate tumors and may be an ideal candidate for these purposes. This review provides an overview of the mechanism of action of varied immunotherapies and the current strategies for monitoring patients with imaging. We then describe some of the key researches in the preclinical and clinical literature on the current uses of molecular imaging of the immune system and cancer. PMID:26949344

  15. Biomarkers for lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangar, Richard C.; Varnum, Susan M.

    2014-09-02

    A biomarker, method, test kit, and diagnostic system for detecting the presence of lymphoma in a person are disclosed. The lymphoma may be Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The person may be a high-risk subject. In one embodiment, a plasma sample from a person is obtained. The level of at least one protein listed in Table S3 in the plasma sample is measured. The level of at least one protein in the plasma sample is compared with the level in a normal or healthy subject. The lymphoma is diagnosed based upon the level of the at least one protein in the plasma sample in comparison to the normal or healthy level.

  16. New biomarkers for sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-xin XIE

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a higher sepsis rate in the intensive care unit (ICU patients, which is one of the most important causes for patient death, but the sepsis lacks specific clinical manifestations. Exploring sensitive and specific molecular markers for infection that accurately reflect infection severity and prognosis is very clinically important. In this article, based on our previous study, we introduce some new biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis and predicting the prognosis and severity of sepsis. Increase of serum soluble(s triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1 suggests a poor prognosis of septic patients, and changes of locus rs2234237 of sTREM-1 may be the one of important mechanisms. Additionally, urine sTREM-1 can provide an early warning of possible secondary acute kidney injury (AKI in sepsis patients. Serum sCD163 level was found to be a more important factor than procalcitonin (PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in prognosis of sepsis, especially severe sepsis. Moreover, urine sCD163 also shows excellent performance in the diagnosis of sepsis and sepsis-associated AKI. Circulating microRNAs, such as miR-150, miR-297, miR-574-5p, miR -146a , miR-223, miR -15a and miR-16, also play important roles in the evaluation of status of septic patients. In the foreseeable future, newly-emerging technologies, including proteomics, metabonomics and trans-omics, may exert profound effects on the discovery of valuable biomarkers for sepsis.

  17. Update on Biomarkers for the Detection of Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Fassbender

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is histologically characterized by the displacement of endometrial tissue to extrauterine locations including the pelvic peritoneum, ovaries, and bowel. An important cause of infertility and pelvic pain, the individual and global socioeconomic burden of endometriosis is significant. Laparoscopy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of the condition. However, the invasive nature of surgery, coupled with the lack of a laboratory biomarker for the disease, results in a mean latency of 7–11 years from onset of symptoms to definitive diagnosis. Unfortunately, the delay in diagnosis may have significant consequences in terms of disease progression. The discovery of a sufficiently sensitive and specific biomarker for the nonsurgical detection of endometriosis promises earlier diagnosis and prevention of deleterious sequelae and represents a clear research priority. In this review, we describe and discuss the current status of biomarkers of endometriosis in plasma, urine, and endometrium.

  18. Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis: An Up-to-Date Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafeim Katsavos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, the effort of establishing satisfactory biomarkers for multiple sclerosis has been proven to be very difficult, due to the clinical and pathophysiological complexities of the disease. Recent knowledge acquired in the domains of genomics-immunogenetics and neuroimmunology, as well as the evolution in neuroimaging, has provided a whole new list of biomarkers. This variety, though, leads inevitably to confusion in the effort of decision making concerning strategic and individualized therapeutics. In this paper, our primary goal is to provide the reader with a list of the most important characteristics that a biomarker must possess in order to be considered as reliable. Additionally, up-to-date biomarkers are further divided into three subgroups, genetic-immunogenetic, laboratorial, and imaging. The most important representatives of each category are presented in the text and for the first time in a summarizing workable table, in a critical way, estimating their diagnostic potential and their efficacy to correlate with phenotypical expression, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, disability, and therapeutical response. Special attention is given to the “gold standards” of each category, like HLA-DRB1* polymorphisms, oligoclonal bands, vitamin D, and conventional and nonconventional imaging techniques. Moreover, not adequately established but quite promising, recently characterized biomarkers, like TOB-1 polymorphisms, are further discussed.

  19. Synergistic Effect of High Charge and Energy Particle Radiation and Chronological Age on Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Tissue Degeneration: A Ground-Based Study Using the Vertebrate Laboratory Model Organism Oryzias latipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High charge and energy (HZE) particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish), were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration

  20. Synergistic effect of high charge and energy particle radiation and chronological age on biomarkers of oxidative stress and tissue degeneration: a ground-based study using the vertebrate laboratory model organism Oryzias latipes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zheng

    Full Text Available High charge and energy (HZE particles are a main hazard of the space radiation environment. Uncertainty regarding their health effects is a limiting factor in the design of human exploration-class space missions, that is, missions beyond low earth orbit. Previous work has shown that HZE exposure increases cancer risk and elicits other aging-like phenomena in animal models. Here, we investigate how a single exposure to HZE particle radiation, early in life, influences the subsequent age-dependent evolution of oxidative stress and appearance of degenerative tissue changes. Embryos of the laboratory model organism, Oryzias latipes (Japanese medaka fish, were exposed to HZE particle radiation at doses overlapping the range of anticipated human exposure. A separate cohort was exposed to reference γ-radiation. Survival was monitored for 750 days, well beyond the median lifespan. The population was also sampled at intervals and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. HZE particle radiation dose and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid peroxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in PPARGC1A mRNA, which encodes a transcriptional co-activator required for expression of oxidative stress defense genes and for mitochondrial maintenance. Consistent with chronic oxidative stress, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Livers also had distinctive, cystic lesions. Depending on the endpoint, effects of γ-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Results provide a quantitative and qualitative framework for understanding relative contributions of HZE particle radiation exposure and aging to chronic oxidative stress and tissue degeneration.

  1. Network biomarkers, interaction networks and dynamical network biomarkers in respiratory diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaodan; Chen, Luonan; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Identification and validation of interaction networks and network biomarkers have become more critical and important in the development of disease-specific biomarkers, which are functionally changed during disease development, progression or treatment. The present review headlined the definition, significance, research and potential application for network biomarkers, interaction networks and dynamical network biomarkers (DNB). Disease-specific interaction networks, network biomarkers, or DNB...

  2. Biomarkers of latent TB infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruhwald, Morten; Ravn, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    For the last 100 years, the tuberculin skin test (TST) has been the only diagnostic tool available for latent TB infection (LTBI) and no biomarker per se is available to diagnose the presence of LTBI. With the introduction of M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma release assays (IGRAs), a new area of...... in vitro immunodiagnostic tests for LTBI based on biomarker readout has become a reality. In this review, we discuss existing evidence on the clinical usefulness of IGRAs and the indefinite number of potential new biomarkers that can be used to improve diagnosis of latent TB infection. We also...... present early data suggesting that the monocyte-derived chemokine inducible protein-10 may be useful as a novel biomarker for the immunodiagnosis of latent TB infection....

  3. Urinary Biomarkers of Brain Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manxia An

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are the measurable changes associated with a physiological or pathophysiological process. Unlike blood, urine is not subject to homeostatic mechanisms. Therefore, greater fluctuations could occur in urine than in blood, better reflecting the changes in human body. The roadmap of urine biomarker era was proposed. Although urine analysis has been attempted for clinical diagnosis, and urine has been monitored during the progression of many diseases, particularly urinary system diseases, whether urine can reflect brain disease status remains uncertain. As some biomarkers of brain diseases can be detected in the body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid and blood, there is a possibility that urine also contain biomarkers of brain diseases. This review summarizes the clues of brain diseases reflected in the urine proteome and metabolome.

  4. Biomarker in archaeological soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedner, Katja; Glaser, Bruno; Schneeweiß, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The use of biomarkers in an archaeological context allow deeper insights into the understanding of anthropogenic (dark) earth formation and from an archaeological point of view, a completely new perspective on cultivation practices in the historic past. During an archaeological excavation of a Slavic settlement (10th/11th C. A.D.) in Brünkendorf (Wendland region in Northern Germany), a thick black soil (Nordic Dark Earth) was discovered that resembled the famous terra preta phenomenon. For the humid tropics, terra preta could act as model for sustainable agricultural practices and as example for long-term CO2-sequestration into terrestrial ecosystems. The question was whether this Nordic Dark Earth had similar properties and genesis as the famous Amazonian Dark Earth in order to find a model for sustainable agricultural practices and long term CO2-sequestration in temperate zones. For this purpose, a multi-analytical approach was used to characterize the sandy-textured Nordic Dark Earth in comparison to less anthropogenically influenced soils in the adjacent area in respect of ecological conditions (e.g. amino sugar), input materials (faeces) and the presence of stable soil organic matter (black carbon). Amino sugar analyses showed that Nordic Dark Earth contained higher amounts of microbial residues being dominated by soil fungi. Faecal biomarkers such as stanols and bile acids indicated animal manure from omnivores and herbivores but also human excrements. Black carbon content of about 30 Mg ha-1 in the Nordic Dark Earth was about four times higher compared to the adjacent soil and in the same order of magnitude compared to terra preta. Our data strongly suggest parallels to anthropogenic soil formation in Amazonia and in Europe by input of organic wastes, faecal material and charred organic matter. An obvious difference was that in terra preta input of human-derived faecal material dominated while in NDE human-derived faecal material played only a minor role

  5. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.' PMID:27242648

  6. Arguments from Developmental Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  7. The Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge

    2001-01-01

    AbstractIn the nineties, the concept of the developmental work (DW) has become a significant point of orientation for the actors on Danish labour market. The DW has moved the focus of the labour market from wages and working time towards work and production. For employees, the DW promises...

  8. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  9. Mammary Glands: Developmental Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mammary gland progresses from the accumulation of a few cells in the embryonic ectoderm to a highly arborescent tubulo-alveolar gland capable of secreting a highly nutritious product for consumption. Throughout this progression, various changes occur during each developmental stage: prenatal, pr...

  10. Biomarkers in Acute Lung Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bhargava, Maneesh; Wendt, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Acute Lung Injury (ALI) result in high permeability pulmonary edema causing hypoxic respiratory failure with high morbidity and mortality. As the population ages, the incidence of ALI is expected to rise. Over the last decade, several studies have identified biomarkers in plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid providing important insights into the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of ALI. Several biomarkers have been validated in subjec...

  11. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    OpenAIRE

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-01-01

    In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011), but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac bi...

  12. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    of telomere length and associated damage, and the accompanying changes that take place elicit signals that have an impact on a number of molecules and downstream events. Precise measurements of replicative senescence biomarkers in biological samples from individuals could be clinically associated...... with their chronological age and present health status, help define their current rate of aging and contribute to establish personalized therapy plans to reduce, counteract or even avoid the appearance of aging biomarkers....

  13. Biomarkers of environmental benzene exposure.

    OpenAIRE

    Weisel, C; Yu, R; Roy, A; Georgopoulos, P.

    1996-01-01

    Environmental exposures to benzene result in increases in body burden that are reflected in various biomarkers of exposure, including benzene in exhaled breath, benzene in blood and urinary trans-trans-muconic acid and S-phenylmercapturic acid. A review of the literature indicates that these biomarkers can be used to distinguish populations with different levels of exposure (such as smokers from nonsmokers and occupationally exposed from environmentally exposed populations) and to determine d...

  14. Analysis of biomarker data a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Looney, Stephen W

    2015-01-01

    A "how to" guide for applying statistical methods to biomarker data analysis Presenting a solid foundation for the statistical methods that are used to analyze biomarker data, Analysis of Biomarker Data: A Practical Guide features preferred techniques for biomarker validation. The authors provide descriptions of select elementary statistical methods that are traditionally used to analyze biomarker data with a focus on the proper application of each method, including necessary assumptions, software recommendations, and proper interpretation of computer output. In addition, the book discusses

  15. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  16. Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder in HIV infection and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Monteiro de Almeida

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive impairment and major depressive disorder (MDD are common HIV-1 central nervous system (CNS complications. Their frequencies in AIDS patients are 36% and 45%, respectively. The diagnoses of HIV cognitive impairment are made by clinical criteria, no single laboratory test or biomarker establishes the diagnosis. Factors of indirect neuronal injury related with the pathophysiology of the HIV infection in the CNS, are the factors studied as biomarkers. In the present no biomarker is established to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment, much still needs to be done. We review in this paper some biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid that could be valuable to the diagnosis of HIV cognitive impairment. Diagnosing depression in the context of HIV can be challenging, to identify a biomarker that could help in the diagnosis would be very important, although MDD risks and neurobiology are still poorly understood.

  17. Neuroimmune biomarkers in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasik, Jakub; Rahmoune, Hassan; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a heterogeneous psychiatric disorder with a broad spectrum of clinical and biological manifestations. Due to the lack of objective tests, the accurate diagnosis and selection of effective treatments for schizophrenia remains challenging. Numerous technologies have been employed in search of schizophrenia biomarkers. These studies have suggested that neuroinflammatory processes may play a role in schizophrenia pathogenesis, at least in a subgroup of patients. The evidence indicates alterations in both pro- and anti-inflammatory molecules in the central nervous system, which have also been found in peripheral tissues and may correlate with schizophrenia symptoms. In line with these findings, certain immunomodulatory interventions have shown beneficial effects on psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia patients, in particular those with distinct immune signatures. In this review, we evaluate these findings and their potential for more targeted drug interventions and the development of companion diagnostics. Although currently no validated markers exist for schizophrenia patient stratification or the prediction of treatment efficacy, we propose that utilisation of inflammatory markers for diagnostic and theranostic purposes may lead to novel therapeutic approaches and deliver more effective care for schizophrenia patients. PMID:25124519

  18. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory The Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose...

  19. TRWG developmental pathway for biospecimen-based assessment modalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Translational Research Working Group; Srivastava, Sudhir; Gray, Joe W.; Reid, Brian J.; Grad, Oren; Greenwood, Addison; Hawk, Ernest T.

    2008-09-03

    The Translational Research Working Group (TRWG) was created as a national initiative to evaluate the current status of NCI's investment in translational research and envision its future. The TRWG conceptualized translational research as a set of six developmental processes or pathways focused on various clinical goals. One of those pathways describes the development of biospecimen-based assays that utilize biomarkers for the detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of response to cancer treatment. The biospecimen-based assessment modality (BM) pathway was conceived not as comprehensive description of the corresponding real-world processes, but rather as a tool designed to facilitate movement of a candidate assay through the translational process to the point where it can be handed off for definitive clinical testing. This paper introduces the pathway in the context of prior work and discusses key challenges associated with the biomarker development process in light of the pathway.

  20. EEG complexity as a biomarker for autism spectrum disorder risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tierney Adrienne

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex neurodevelopmental disorders may be characterized by subtle brain function signatures early in life before behavioral symptoms are apparent. Such endophenotypes may be measurable biomarkers for later cognitive impairments. The nonlinear complexity of electroencephalography (EEG signals is believed to contain information about the architecture of the neural networks in the brain on many scales. Early detection of abnormalities in EEG signals may be an early biomarker for developmental cognitive disorders. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate that the modified multiscale entropy (mMSE computed on the basis of resting state EEG data can be used as a biomarker of normal brain development and distinguish typically developing children from a group of infants at high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD, defined on the basis of an older sibling with ASD. Methods Using mMSE as a feature vector, a multiclass support vector machine algorithm was used to classify typically developing and high-risk groups. Classification was computed separately within each age group from 6 to 24 months. Results Multiscale entropy appears to go through a different developmental trajectory in infants at high risk for autism (HRA than it does in typically developing controls. Differences appear to be greatest at ages 9 to 12 months. Using several machine learning algorithms with mMSE as a feature vector, infants were classified with over 80% accuracy into control and HRA groups at age 9 months. Classification accuracy for boys was close to 100% at age 9 months and remains high (70% to 90% at ages 12 and 18 months. For girls, classification accuracy was highest at age 6 months, but declines thereafter. Conclusions This proof-of-principle study suggests that mMSE computed from resting state EEG signals may be a useful biomarker for early detection of risk for ASD and abnormalities in cognitive development in infants. To our knowledge, this is

  1. Biomarkers of nutrition for development—iodine review1-4

    OpenAIRE

    Rohner, Fabian; Jooste, Pieter; Zimmerman, Michael; Pandav, Chandrakant; Caldwell, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the Biomarkers of Nutrition for Development (BOND) project is to provide state-of-the-art information and service with regard to selection, use, and interpretation of biomarkers of nutrient exposure, status, function, and effect. Specifically, the BOND project seeks to develop consensus on accurate assessment methodologies that are applicable to researchers (laboratory/clinical/surveillance), clinicians, programmers, and policy makers (data consumers). The BOND project is als...

  2. Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xie, Hongzhi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Aaron S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, W Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shively, John E [NON LANL

    2008-01-01

    The sensor team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor for the detection of biomarkers associated with the disease. We have previously demonstrated the application of this technology to the sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen in serum and nipple aspirate fluid from breast cancer patients. In this publication, we report improvements to this technology that will facilitate transition to a point-of-care diagnostic system and/or robust research tool.

  3. Exosomes in developmental signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGough, Ian John; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2016-07-15

    In order to achieve coordinated growth and patterning during development, cells must communicate with one another, sending and receiving signals that regulate their activities. Such developmental signals can be soluble, bound to the extracellular matrix, or tethered to the surface of adjacent cells. Cells can also signal by releasing exosomes - extracellular vesicles containing bioactive molecules such as RNA, DNA and enzymes. Recent work has suggested that exosomes can also carry signalling proteins, including ligands of the Notch receptor and secreted proteins of the Hedgehog and WNT families. Here, we describe the various types of exosomes and their biogenesis. We then survey the experimental strategies used so far to interfere with exosome formation and critically assess the role of exosomes in developmental signalling. PMID:27436038

  4. Anomalies and developmental defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amonalies and developmental defects in trachea and bronchi (tracheal bronch us, diverticulum of trachea or bronchus, defects due to atresia of bronchial tre e, tracheobronchomegaly), lung vessels (aneurisms of pulmonary artery, agenesia, aplasia and hypoplasia of pulmonary artery,anomalies of pulmonary veins, varico sis of pulmonary veins), pulmonary tissue (lung sequestration, congenital lobar pulmonary emphysema, essential hemosiderosis), have beendescribed. The problems of the diagnosis of the above-mentioned diseases using roentgenograms are consid ered

  5. Variability of CSF Alzheimer's disease biomarkers: implications for clinical practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J B Vos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers are increasingly being used for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of CSF intralaboratory and interlaboratory variability on diagnostic CSF-based AD classification of subjects and identified causes of this variation. METHODS: We measured CSF amyloid-β (Aβ 1-42, total tau (t-tau, and phosphorylated tau (p-tau by INNOTEST enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assays (ELISA in a memory clinic population (n = 126. Samples were measured twice in a single or two laboratories that served as reference labs for CSF analyses in the Netherlands. Predefined cut-offs were used to classify CSF biomarkers as normal or abnormal/AD pattern. RESULTS: CSF intralaboratory variability was higher for Aβ1-42 than for t-tau and p-tau. Reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification (normal vs. abnormal of 26% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 10% based on t-tau, and 29% based on p-tau. The changes in absolute biomarker concentrations were paralleled by a similar change in levels of internal control samples between different assay lots. CSF interlaboratory variability was higher for p-tau than for Aβ1-42 and t-tau, and reanalysis led to a change in biomarker classification of 12% of the subjects based on Aβ1-42, 1% based on t-tau, and 22% based on p-tau. CONCLUSIONS: Intralaboratory and interlaboratory CSF variability frequently led to change in diagnostic CSF-based AD classification for Aβ1-42 and p-tau. Lot-to-lot variation was a major cause of intralaboratory variability. This will have implications for the use of these biomarkers in clinical practice.

  6. Analytical Aspects of the Implementation of Biomarkers in Clinical Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipkova, Maria; López, Olga Millán; Picard, Nicolas; Noceti, Ofelia; Sommerer, Claudia; Christians, Uwe; Wieland, Eberhard

    2016-04-01

    In response to the urgent need for new reliable biomarkers to complement the guidance of the immunosuppressive therapy, a huge number of biomarker candidates to be implemented in clinical practice have been introduced to the transplant community. This includes a diverse range of molecules with very different molecular weights, chemical and physical properties, ex vivo stabilities, in vivo kinetic behaviors, and levels of similarity to other molecules, etc. In addition, a large body of different analytical techniques and assay protocols can be used to measure biomarkers. Sometimes, a complex software-based data evaluation is a prerequisite for appropriate interpretation of the results and for their reporting. Although some analytical procedures are of great value for research purposes, they may be too complex for implementation in a clinical setting. Whereas the proof of "fitness for purpose" is appropriate for validation of biomarker assays used in exploratory drug development studies, a higher level of analytical validation must be achieved and eventually advanced analytical performance might be necessary before diagnostic application in transplantation medicine. A high level of consistency of results between laboratories and between methods (if applicable) should be obtained and maintained to make biomarkers effective instruments in support of therapeutic decisions. This overview focuses on preanalytical and analytical aspects to be considered for the implementation of new biomarkers for adjusting immunosuppression in a clinical setting and highlights critical points to be addressed on the way to make them suitable as diagnostic tools. These include but are not limited to appropriate method validation, standardization, education, automation, and commercialization. PMID:26418704

  7. Collagen fragment biomarkers as serological biomarkers of lean body mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, A.; Dalgas, U.; Primdahl, H.;

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss of muscle mass and function is an important complication to ageing and a range of pathologies, including, but not restricted to, cancer, organ failures, and sepsis. A number of interventions have been proposed ranging from exercise to anabolic pharmacological therapy, with varying...... success. Easily applicable serological biomarkers of lean and/or muscle mass and change therein would benefit monitoring of muscle mass during muscle atrophy as well as during recovery. We set out to validate if novel peptide biomarkers derived from Collagen III and VI were markers of lean body mass (LBM...

  8. Biomarkers in fibromyalgia: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomelli C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Camillo Giacomelli,* Francesca Sernissi,* Alessandra Rossi, Stefano Bombardieri, Laura BazzichiRheumatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy *These authors contributed equally to the manuscript Abstract: Fibromyalgia is a common syndrome diagnosed by clinical criteria. The main symptom of fibromyalgia is pain, but patients frequently also complain about other nonspecific symptoms, such as headache, sleep disturbance, mood disorder, and cognitive impairment. In the light of the multifactorial origin of the disease and of the lack of objective diagnostic findings, several attempts have been made to find a reliable biomarker. For this reason, over the years, a number of patients and various biological samples have been studied, using many different approaches and techniques. Despite this, none of these studies has been able to find the proper biomarker. The aim of this review is to provide a critical overview of the current environment characterizing the search for fibromyalgia biomarkers. Keywords: genetics, proteomics, oxidative stress, fibromyalgia

  9. Biomarkers of silicosis: Potential candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica dust is widely prevalent in the atmosphere and more common than the other types of dust, thus making silicosis the most frequently occurring pneumoconiosis. In India also, studies carried out by National Institute of Occupational Health have shown high prevalence of silicosis in small factories and even in nonoccupational exposed subjects. The postero-anterior chest radiographs remain the key tool in diagnosing and assessing the extent and severity of interstitial lung disease. Although Computed Tomography detects finer anatomical structure than radiography it could not get popularity because of its cost. On the basis of histological features of silicosis many potential biomarkers such as Cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor, Interleukin 1, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme, Serum Copper, Fas ligand (FasL, etc. have been tried. However, further studies are needed to establish these potential biomarkers as true biomarker of silicosis.

  10. Predicting Developmental Toxicity of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxRefDB contains prenatal guideline study data from rats and rabbits for over 240 chemicals that overlap with the ToxCast in vitro high throughput screening project. A subset of these compounds were tested in Stemina Biomarker Discovery's developmental toxicity platform, a...

  11. Potential blood biomarkers for stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, Carlos M; Mourino-Alvarez, Laura; Akerstrom, Finn; Padial, Luis R; Vivanco, Fernando; Gil-Dones, Felix; Barderas, Maria G

    2012-08-01

    Stroke is one of the most common causes of death worldwide and a major cause of acquired disability in adults. Despite advances in research during the last decade, prevention and treatment strategies still suffer from significant limitations, and therefore new theoretical and technical approaches are required. Technological advances in the proteomic and metabolomic areas, during recent years, have permitted a more effective search for novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets that may allow for effective risk stratification and early diagnosis with subsequent rapid treatment. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the latest candidate proteins and metabolites proposed as new potential biomarkers in stroke. PMID:22967080

  12. Biomarker Detection using PS2-Thioaptamers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AM Biotechnologies (AM) will develop a system to detect and quantify bone demineralization biomarkers as outlined in SBIR Topic "Technologies to Detect Biomarkers"....

  13. Proteomics in Discovery of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Biomarkers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To discover new proteomic biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was used to discover biomarkers for differentiating hepatocellular carcinoma and chronic liver disease. A population of 50 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 33 patients with chronic liver disease was studied. Results: Twelve proteomic biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma were detected in this study. Three proteomic biomarkers were highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and nine proteomic biomarkers were highly expressed in chronic liver disease. The most valuable proteomic biomarker with m/z=11498 had no similar diagnostic value as α-fetoprotein. Conclusion:Some of the twelve proteomic biomarkers may become new biomarkers of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  14. Biomarkers for the prediction of acute ongoing arterial plaque rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo YL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Yuan-Lin Guo, Jian-Jun Li Division of Dyslipidemia, State Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease, Fu Wai Hospital, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is the main cause of mortality for coronary artery disease (CAD. Accordingly, earlier detection and diagnosis might be a key point for reducing the mortality in patients with ACS. One promising strategy is biomarker measurement in patients with ACS. Biomarkers are generally considered to be plasma measurements of molecules, proteins, or enzymes that provide independent diagnostic and prognostic values that can reflect underlying disease state and condition, especially repeated measurements. Nowadays, the most widely used biomarkers to identify or predict ACS are high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and high sensitivity troponin T/I (hs-TnT/I. The aim of the present review was principally to summarize recent evidence regarding some new biomarkers by which we could directly predict acute ongoing arterial plaque rupture, which may help to identify at-risk patients earlier than hs-CRP or hs-TnT/I. Keywords: matrix metalloproteinase-9, lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2, myeloperoxidase, soluble lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1, pregnancy-associated plasma protein A, placental growth factor, acute coronary syndrome

  15. Predicting human developmental toxicity of pharmaceuticals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teratogens, substances that may cause fetal abnormalities during development, are responsible for a significant number of birth defects. Animal models used to predict teratogenicity often do not faithfully correlate to human response. Here, we seek to develop a more predictive developmental toxicity model based on an in vitro method that utilizes both human embryonic stem (hES) cells and metabolomics to discover biomarkers of developmental toxicity. We developed a method where hES cells were dosed with several drugs of known teratogenicity then LC-MS analysis was performed to measure changes in abundance levels of small molecules in response to drug dosing. Statistical analysis was employed to select for specific mass features that can provide a prediction of the developmental toxicity of a substance. These molecules can serve as biomarkers of developmental toxicity, leading to better prediction of teratogenicity. In particular, our work shows a correlation between teratogenicity and changes of greater than 10% in the ratio of arginine to asymmetric dimethylarginine levels. In addition, this study resulted in the establishment of a predictive model based on the most informative mass features. This model was subsequently tested for its predictive accuracy in two blinded studies using eight drugs of known teratogenicity, where it correctly predicted the teratogenicity for seven of the eight drugs. Thus, our initial data shows that this platform is a robust alternative to animal and other in vitro models for the prediction of the developmental toxicity of chemicals that may also provide invaluable information about the underlying biochemical pathways.

  16. Personalized medicine using DNA biomarkers: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Ziegler, Andreas; Koch, Armin; Krockenberger, Katja; Großhennig, Anika

    2012-01-01

    Biomarkers are of increasing importance for personalized medicine, with applications including diagnosis, prognosis, and selection of targeted therapies. Their use is extremely diverse, ranging from pharmacodynamics to treatment monitoring. Following a concise review of terminology, we provide examples and current applications of three broad categories of biomarkers—DNA biomarkers, DNA tumor biomarkers, and other general biomarkers. We outline clinical trial phases for identifying and validat...

  17. Schizotypy From a Developmental Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Debbané, Martin; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2014-01-01

    The schizotypy construct focuses attention on the liability to develop schizophrenia-spectrum disorders, yet traditionally, the schizotypy models have put more emphasis on stress-vulnerability interactions rather than developmental dynamics of emerging risk for psychopathology. Indeed, developmental accounts of this emerging personality trait have rarely been explicitly formulated. In this position article, we wish to convey some of the basic developmental tenets of schizotypy, and how they c...

  18. Proteomic Biomarkers for Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacerovsky, Marian; Lenco, Juraj; Musilova, Ivana;

    2014-01-01

    This review aimed to identify, synthesize, and analyze the findings of studies on proteomic biomarkers for spontaneous preterm birth (PTB). Three electronic databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) were searched for studies in any language reporting the use of proteomic biomarkers for PTB published...... literature, there are no specific proteomic biomarkers capable of accurately predicting PTB....

  19. Zebra finch as a developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Siu-Shan; Wrabel, Anna; Nagai, Hiroki; Ladher, Raj K; Sheng, Guojun

    2015-11-01

    The domesticated zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) is a well-established animal model for studying vocal learning. It is also a tractable model for developmental analyses. The finch genome has been sequenced and methods for its transgenesis have been reported. Hatching and sexual maturation in this species takes only two weeks and three months, respectively. Finch colonies can be established relatively easily and its eggs are laid at a stage earlier than in other common avian experimental models, facilitating the analysis of very early avian development. Representing the Neoaves to which 95% of all bird species belong, the finch can potentially complement two existing, Galloanserae developmental models, the chick, and quail. Here, we provide a step-by-step guide for how to set up a finch colony in a conventional laboratory environment. Technical tips are offered to optimize hens' productivity and ensure a constant supply of fertilized finch eggs. Methods of handling finch eggs and embryos for subsequent embryological, cellular, or molecular analyses are also discussed. We conclude by emphasizing scientific values and cost effectiveness of maintaining a finch colony for avian developmental studies. genesis 53:669-677, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26385755

  20. Biomarkers in sarcoidosis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadzai H

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasib Ahmadzai,1,2 Wei Sheng Joshua Loke,1 Shuying Huang,1 Cristan Herbert,1 Denis Wakefield,3 Paul S Thomas2 1Inflammation and Infection Research Centre (IIRC, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Respiratory Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Immunology of the Eye Clinic, St Vincent's Clinic, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW, Australia Abstract: Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of undetermined etiology invariably affecting the lungs and thoracic lymph nodes. It has been termed an “immune paradox”, as there is peripheral anergy despite exaggerated inflammation at disease sites. The disease is usually self-limiting, although some individuals experience unremitting inflammation that may progress into pulmonary fibrosis and death. The inflammatory process is largely a T helper-1-driven immune response. Given its heterogeneous clinical manifestations, diagnosis is usually a clinical conundrum. Clinical and radiological findings alone are often inadequate to confirm the diagnosis. At present, sarcoidosis is usually a diagnosis of exclusion, confirmed by histological evidence of noncaseating granulomas in the absence of known granulomagenic agents. This has compelled researchers to look for disease-specific biomarkers that can help diagnose sarcoidosis and delineate its disease course, severity, and prognosis. In this review we highlight various investigations used to diagnose sarcoidosis, outline proposed biomarkers, and discuss novel methods of sampling biomarkers. Keywords: sarcoidosis, biomarkers, inflammatory markers, exhaled breath condensate, proteomics, granuloma

  1. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...

  2. Developmental immunotoxicology of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy metal, lead, is a known developmental immunotoxicant that has been shown to produce immune alterations in humans as well as other species. Unlike many compounds that exert adverse immune effects, lead exposure at low to moderate levels does not produce widespread loss of immune cells. In contrast, changes resulting from lead exposure are subtle at the immune cell population level but, nevertheless, can be functionally dramatic. A hallmark of lead-induced immunotoxicity is a pronounced shift in the balance in T helper cell function toward T helper 2 responses at the expense of T helper 1 functions. This bias alters the nature and range of immune responses that can be produced thereby influencing host susceptibility to various diseases. Immunotoxic responses to lead appear to differ across life stages not only quantitatively with regard to dose response, but also qualitatively in terms of the spectrum of immune alterations. Experimental studies in several lab animal species suggest the latter stages of gestation are a period of considerable sensitivity for lead-induced immunotoxicity. This review describes the basic characteristics of lead-induced immunotoxicity emphasizing experimental animal results. It also provides a framework for the consideration of toxicant exposure effects across life stages. The existence of and probable basis for developmental windows of immune hyper-susceptibility are presented. Finally, the potential for lead to serve as a perinatal risk factor for childhood asthma as well as other diseases is considered

  3. Using artificial neural network tools to analyze microbial biomarker data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, C.C.; Schryver, J.C.; Almeida, J.S.; Pfiffner, S.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    2004-03-17

    A major challenge in the successful implementation of bioremediation is understanding the structure of the indigenous microbial community and how this structure is affected by environmental conditions. Culture-independent approaches that use biomolecular markers have become the key to comparative microbial community analysis. However, the analysis of biomarkers from environmental samples typically generates a large number of measurements. The large number and complex nonlinear relationships among these measurements makes conventional linear statistical analysis of the data difficult. New data analysis tools are needed to help understand these data. We adapted artificial neural network (ANN) tools for relating changes in microbial biomarkers to geochemistry. ANNs are nonlinear pattern recognition methods that can learn from experience to improve their performance. We have successfully applied these techniques to the analysis of membrane lipids and nucleic acid biomarker data from both laboratory and field studies. Although ANNs typically outperform linear data analysis techniques, the user must be aware of several considerations and issues to ensure that analysis results are not misleading: (1) Overfitting, especially in small sample size data sets; (2) Model selection; (3) Interpretation of analysis results; and (4) Availability of tools (code). This poster summarizes approaches for addressing each of these issues. The objectives are: (1) Develop new nonlinear data analysis tools for relating microbial biomolecular markers to geochemical conditions; (2) Apply these nonlinear tools to field and laboratory studies relevant to the NABIR Program; and (3) Provide these tools and guidance in their use to other researchers.

  4. Four decades of teaching developmental biology in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunz, Horst

    2003-01-01

    I have taught developmental biology in Essen for 30 years. Since my department is named Zoophysiologie (Zoophysiology), besides Developmental Biology, I also have to teach General Animal Physiology. This explains why the time for teaching developmental biology is restricted to a lecture course, a laboratory course and several seminar courses. However, I also try to demonstrate in the lecture courses on General Physiology the close relationship between developmental biology, physiology, morphology, anatomy, teratology, carcinogenesis, evolution and ecology (importance of environmental factors on embryogenesis). Students are informed that developmental biology is a core discipline of biology. In the last decade, knowledge about molecular mechanisms in different organisms has exponentially increased. The students are trained to understand the close relationship between conserved gene structure, gene function and signaling pathways, in addition to or as an extension of, classical concepts. Public reports about the human genome project and stem cell research (especially therapeutic and reproductive cloning) have shown that developmental biology, both in traditional view and at the molecular level, is essential for the understanding of these complex topics and for serious and non-emotional debate. PMID:12705670

  5. Chasing the Effects of Pre-Analytical Confounders - A Multicenter Study on CSF-AD Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leitão, Maria João; Baldeiras, Inês; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Core cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers - Aβ42, Tau, and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) - have been recently incorporated in the revised criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, their widespread clinical application lacks standardization. Pre-analytical sample handling and storage...... play an important role in the reliable measurement of these biomarkers across laboratories. AIM: In this study, we aim to surpass the efforts from previous studies, by employing a multicenter approach to assess the impact of less studied CSF pre-analytical confounders in AD-biomarkers quantification....... METHODS: Four different centers participated in this study and followed the same established protocol. CSF samples were analyzed for three biomarkers (Aβ42, Tau, and pTau) and tested for different spinning conditions [temperature: room temperature (RT) vs. 4°C; speed: 500 vs. 2000 vs. 3000 g], storage...

  6. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, Tore; Amundson, Sally A,; Blakely, William F.; Burns, Frederic J.; Chen, Allen; Dainiak, Nicholas; Franklin, Stephen; Leary, Julie A.; Loftus, David J.; Morgan, William F.; Pellmar, Terry C.; Stolc, Viktor; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Vaughan, Andrew T.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2008-05-01

    A summary is provided of presentations and discussions from the NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop held September 27-28, 2007, at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Invited speakers were distinguished scientists representing key sectors of the radiation research community. Speakers addressed recent developments in the biomarker and biotechnology fields that may provide new opportunities for health-related assessment of radiation-exposed individuals, including for long-duration space travel. Topics discussed include the space radiation environment, biomarkers of radiation sensitivity and individual susceptibility, molecular signatures of low-dose responses, multivariate analysis of gene expression, biomarkers in biodefense, biomarkers in radiation oncology, biomarkers and triage following large-scale radiological incidents, integrated and multiple biomarker approaches, advances in whole-genome tiling arrays, advances in mass-spectrometry proteomics, radiation biodosimetry for estimation of cancer risk in a rat skin model, and confounding factors. Summary conclusions are provided at the end of the report.

  7. Developmental Math: What's the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental mathematics has been under the radar within higher education for some time. The reality is that there are many proven best practices in developmental math. Unfortunately, there are many obstacles that prevent student success. Moreover, the high rates of attrition and failure have led state legislators and college administrators to…

  8. Deep biomarkers of human aging: Application of deep neural networks to biomarker development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putin, Evgeny; Mamoshina, Polina; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Moskalev, Alexey; Kolosov, Alexey; Ostrovskiy, Alexander; Cantor, Charles; Vijg, Jan; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-01-01

    One of the major impediments in human aging research is the absence of a comprehensive and actionable set of biomarkers that may be targeted and measured to track the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. In this study, we designed a modular ensemble of 21 deep neural networks (DNNs) of varying depth, structure and optimization to predict human chronological age using a basic blood test. To train the DNNs, we used over 60,000 samples from common blood biochemistry and cell count tests from routine health exams performed by a single laboratory and linked to chronological age and sex. The best performing DNN in the ensemble demonstrated 81.5 % epsilon-accuracy r = 0.90 with R2 = 0.80 and MAE = 6.07 years in predicting chronological age within a 10 year frame, while the entire ensemble achieved 83.5% epsilon-accuracy r = 0.91 with R2 = 0.82 and MAE = 5.55 years. The ensemble also identified the 5 most important markers for predicting human chronological age: albumin, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, urea and erythrocytes. To allow for public testing and evaluate real-life performance of the predictor, we developed an online system available at http://www.aging.ai. The ensemble approach may facilitate integration of multi-modal data linked to chronological age and sex that may lead to simple, minimally invasive, and affordable methods of tracking integrated biomarkers of aging in humans and performing cross-species feature importance analysis. PMID:27191382

  9. Deep biomarkers of human aging: Application of deep neural networks to biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putin, Evgeny; Mamoshina, Polina; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Moskalev, Alexey; Kolosov, Alexey; Ostrovskiy, Alexander; Cantor, Charles; Vijg, Jan; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-05-01

    One of the major impediments in human aging research is the absence of a comprehensive and actionable set of biomarkers that may be targeted and measured to track the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. In this study, we designed a modular ensemble of 21 deep neural networks (DNNs) of varying depth, structure and optimization to predict human chronological age using a basic blood test. To train the DNNs, we used over 60,000 samples from common blood biochemistry and cell count tests from routine health exams performed by a single laboratory and linked to chronological age and sex. The best performing DNN in the ensemble demonstrated 81.5 % epsilon-accuracy r = 0.90 with R(2) = 0.80 and MAE = 6.07 years in predicting chronological age within a 10 year frame, while the entire ensemble achieved 83.5% epsilon-accuracy r = 0.91 with R(2) = 0.82 and MAE = 5.55 years. The ensemble also identified the 5 most important markers for predicting human chronological age: albumin, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, urea and erythrocytes. To allow for public testing and evaluate real-life performance of the predictor, we developed an online system available at http://www.aging.ai. The ensemble approach may facilitate integration of multi-modal data linked to chronological age and sex that may lead to simple, minimally invasive, and affordable methods of tracking integrated biomarkers of aging in humans and performing cross-species feature importance analysis. PMID:27191382

  10. Incorporating biomarkers in ecological risk assessment of chemical contaminants of soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Reinecke

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil is an important but complex natural resource which is increasingly used as sink for chemicals. The monitoring of soil quality and the assessment of risks posed by contaminants have become crucial. This study deals with the potential use of biomarkers in the monitoring of soils and the assessment of risk resulting from contamination. Apart from an overview of the existing literature on biomarkers, the results of various of our field experiments in South African soils are discussed. Biomarkers may have potential in the assessment of risk because they can indicate at an early stage that exposure has taken place and that a toxic response has been initiated. It is therefore expected that early biomarkers will play an increasing role as diagnostic tools for determining exposure to chemicals and the resulting effects. They may have predictive value that can assist in the prevention or minimising of risks. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of using our results on biomarker responses of soil dwelling organisms to predict changes at higher organisational levels (which may have ecological implications. Our recent experimental results on the evaluation of various biomarkers in both the laboratory and the field are interpreted and placed in perspective within the broader framework of response biology. The aim was further to contribute to the development and application of biomarkers in regulatory risk assessment schemes of soils. This critical review of our own and recent literature on biomarkers in ecotoxicology leads to the conclusion that biomarkers can, under certain conditions, be useful tools in risk assessment. Clear relationships between contamination loads in soil organisms and certain biomarker responses were determined in woodlice, earthworms and terrestrial snails. Clear correlations were also established in field experiments between biomarker responses and changes at the population level. This indicated that, in

  11. Altered functional connectivity in persistent developmental stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Jia, Fanlu; Siok, Wai Ting; Tan, Li Hai

    2016-01-01

    Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS) is a speech disorder that impairs communication skills. Despite extensive research, the core causes of PDS are elusive. Converging evidence from task-induced neuroimaging methods has demonstrated the contributions of the basal ganglia and the cerebellum to PDS, but such task-state neuroimaging findings are often confounded by behavioral performance differences between subjects who stutter and normal controls. Here, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated functional connectivity within cerebellar-cortical and basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks in 16 adults who stutter and 18 age-matched fluent speakers. Seed-to-voxel analysis demonstrated that, compared to controls, adults who stutter showed alternations in functional connectivity of cerebellum to motor cortex as well as connectivity among different locals within cerebellum. Additionally, we found that functional connectivity within cerebellar circuits was significantly correlated with severity of stuttering. The alternations of functional connectivity within basal ganglia-thalamocortical networks were identified as the reduced connectivity of the putamen to the superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobules in adults who stutter. The abnormalities of resting state functional connectivity are assumed to affect language planning and motor execution critical for speaking fluently. Our findings may yield neurobiological cues to the biomarkers of PDS. PMID:26743821

  12. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Beiko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant decreases in morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and cancers, morbidity and cost associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD continue to be increasing. Failure to improve disease outcomes has been related to the paucity of interventions improving survival. Insidious onset and slow progression halter research successes in developing disease-modifying therapies. In part, the difficulty in finding new therapies is because of the extreme heterogeneity within recognized COPD phenotypes. Novel biomarkers are necessary to help understand the natural history and pathogenesis of the different COPD subtypes. A more accurate phenotyping and the ability to assess the therapeutic response to new interventions and pharmaceutical agents may improve the statistical power of longitudinal clinical studies. In this study, we will review known candidate biomarkers for COPD, proposed pathways of pathogenesis, and future directions in the field.

  13. Glycoscience aids in biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serenus Hua1,2 & Hyun Joo An1,2,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The glycome consists of all glycans (or carbohydrates within abiological system, and modulates a wide range of important biologicalactivities, from protein folding to cellular communications.The mining of the glycome for disease markers representsa new paradigm for biomarker discovery; however, this effortis severely complicated by the vast complexity and structuraldiversity of glycans. This review summarizes recent developmentsin analytical technology and methodology as applied tothe fields of glycomics and glycoproteomics. Mass spectrometricstrategies for glycan compositional profiling are described, as arepotential refinements which allow structure-specific profiling.Analytical methods that can discern protein glycosylation at aspecific site of modification are also discussed in detail.Biomarker discovery applications are shown at each level ofanalysis, highlighting the key role that glycoscience can play inhelping scientists understand disease biology.

  14. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, Jodi Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT-proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been as extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism.Hypothesis: Plasma NT-proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary cardiac disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats.Animals: Twenty-three hyperthyr...

  15. Cardiac Biomarkers in Hyperthyroid Cats

    OpenAIRE

    Sangster, J.K.; Panciera, D L; Abbott, J.A.; Zimmerman, K.C.; Lantis, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyperthyroidism has substantial effects on the circulatory system. The cardiac biomarkers NT‐proBNP and troponin I (cTNI) have proven useful in identifying cats with myocardial disease but have not been extensively investigated in hyperthyroidism. Hypothesis Plasma NT‐proBNP and cTNI concentrations are higher in cats with primary myocardial disease than in cats with hyperthyroidism and higher in cats with hyperthyroidism than in healthy control cats. Animals Twenty‐three hyperthyro...

  16. Proteomics Discovery of Disease Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Mamoun Ahram; Petricoin, Emanuel F.

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomics have shown promising initiatives in identifying novel biomarkers of various diseases. Such technologies are capable of investigating multiple samples and generating large amount of data end-points. Examples of two promising proteomics technologies are mass spectrometry, including an instrument based on surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization, and protein microarrays. Proteomics data must, however, undergo analytical processing using bioinfo...

  17. Salivary biomarkers in psychobiological medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Chiappelli, Francesco; Iribarren, Francisco Javier; Prolo, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    The value of salivary biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic assessments has become increasingly well established in medicine, pharmacology, and dentistry. Certain salivary components mirror the neuro-endocrine status of the organism. Other saliva products are protein in nature, and can serve to reflect immune surveillance processes. The autonomic nervous system regulates the process of salivation, and the concentration of yet other salivary components, such as α-amylase, which provide a re...

  18. Epigenetic biomarkers in esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaz, Andrew M; Grady, William M

    2014-01-28

    The aberrant DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes is well documented in esophageal cancer, including adenocarcinoma (EAC) and squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) as well as in Barrett's esophagus (BE), a pre-malignant condition that is associated with chronic acid reflux. BE is a well-recognized risk factor for the development of EAC, and consequently the standard of care is for individuals with BE to be placed in endoscopic surveillance programs aimed at detecting early histologic changes that associate with an increased risk of developing EAC. Yet because the absolute risk of EAC in individuals with BE is minimal, a clinical need in the management of BE is the identification of additional risk markers that will indicate individuals who are at a significant absolute risk of EAC so that they may be subjected to more intensive surveillance. The best currently available risk marker is the degree of dysplasia in endoscopic biopsies from the esophagus; however, this marker is suboptimal for a variety of reasons. To date, there are no molecular biomarkers that have been translated to widespread clinical practice. The search for biomarkers, including hypermethylated genes, for either the diagnosis of BE, EAC, or ESCC or for risk stratification for the development of EAC in those with BE is currently an area of active research. In this review, we summarize the status of identified candidate epigenetic biomarkers for BE, EAC, and ESCC. Most of these aberrantly methylated genes have been described in the context of early detection or diagnostic markers; others might prove useful for estimating prognosis or predicting response to treatment. Finally, special attention will be paid to some of the challenges that must be overcome in order to develop clinically useful esophageal cancer biomarkers. PMID:22406828

  19. Biomarkers of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, John P.; Wilson, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease affecting the lower extremities is also known as peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This disorder affects 8 to 12 million individuals in the United States, and is also increasingly prevalent in Europe and Asia (1–4). Unfortunately, most patients are not diagnosed and are not optimally treated. A blood test for PAD, if sufficiently sensitive and specific, would be expected to improve recognition and treatment of these individuals. Even a biomarker pan...

  20. Finding good biomarkers for sarcopenia

    OpenAIRE

    Scharf, Gesine; Heineke, Joerg

    2012-01-01

    The term sarcopenia describes the age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function. While this process, in principal, occurs in every adult person and already starts around the age of 40, it is associated with disability, morbidity, and increased mortality in some individuals. In the absence of clear clinical manifestation, we today lack the ability to differentiate between physiological and pathological sarcopenia. In this regard, we need good biomarkers that can be quantified in a reli...

  1. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedrick Valisa E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a knowledge gap requiring future research. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on currently available dietary biomarkers, including novel biomarkers of specific foods and dietary components, and assess the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the markers. This review revealed several biomarkers in need of additional validation research; research is also needed to produce sensitive, specific, cost-effective and noninvasive dietary biomarkers. The emerging field of metabolomics may help to advance the development of food/nutrient biomarkers, yet advances in food metabolome databases are needed. The availability of biomarkers that estimate intake of specific foods and dietary components could greatly enhance nutritional research targeting compliance to national recommendations as well as direct associations with disease outcomes. More research is necessary to refine existing biomarkers by accounting for confounding factors, to establish new indicators of specific food intake, and to develop techniques that are cost-effective, noninvasive, rapid and accurate measures of nutritional status.

  2. Developmental aspects of a life course approach to healthy ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M A; Cooper, C; Aihie Sayer, A; Eendebak, R J; Clough, G F; Beard, J R

    2016-04-15

    We examine the mechanistic basis and wider implications of adopting a developmental perspective on human ageing. Previous models of ageing have concentrated on its genetic basis, or the detrimental effects of accumulated damage, but also have raised issues about whether ageing can be viewed as adaptive itself, or is a consequence of other adaptive processes, for example if maintenance and repair processes in the period up to reproduction are traded off against later decline in function. A life course model places ageing in the context of the attainment of peak capacity for a body system, starting in early development when plasticity permits changes in structure and function induced by a range of environmental stimuli, followed by a period of decline, the rate of which depends on the peak attained as well as the later life conditions. Such path dependency in the rate of ageing may offer new insights into its modification. Focusing on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular function, we discuss this model and the possible underlying mechanisms, including endothelial function, oxidative stress, stem cells and nutritional factors such as vitamin D status. Epigenetic changes induced during developmental plasticity, and immune function may provide a common mechanistic process underlying a life course model of ageing. The life course trajectory differs in high and low resource settings. New insights into the developmental components of the life course model of ageing may lead to the design of biomarkers of later chronic disease risk and to new interventions to promote healthy ageing, with important implications for public health. PMID:26518329

  3. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henik Avishai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Methods Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test - interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence. Results The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions. Conclusions These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

  4. Developmental psychopathology: concepts and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, M; Sroufe, L A

    2000-01-01

    The defining features of developmental psychopathology concepts include attention to the understanding of causal processes, appreciation of the role of developmental mechanisms, and consideration of continuities and discontinuities between normality and psychopathology. Accomplishments with respect to these issues are reviewed in relation to attachment disorders, antisocial behavior, autism, depressive disorder, schizophrenia, and intellectual development. Major research challenges remain in relation to measurement issues, comorbidity, gender differences, cognitive processing, nature-nurture interplay, heterotypic continuity, continuities between normal variations and disorders, developmental programming, and therapeutic mechanisms in effective treatments. PMID:11014739

  5. Analytical Laboratories

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NETL’s analytical laboratories in Pittsburgh, PA, and Albany, OR, give researchers access to the equipment they need to thoroughly study the properties of materials...

  6. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.)

  7. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests check a sample of your blood, urine, or body tissues. A technician or your doctor ... compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  8. Computational Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains a number of commercial off-the-shelf and in-house software packages allowing for both statistical analysis as well as mathematical modeling...

  9. Advances in Biomarker Research in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyamal H; Adler, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, and the numbers are projected to double in the next two decades with the increase in the aging population. An important focus of current research is to develop interventions to slow the progression of the disease. However, prerequisites to it include the development of reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis which would identify at-risk groups and disease progression. In this review, we present updated evidence of already known clinical biomarkers (such as hyposmia and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD)) and neuroimaging biomarkers, as well as newer possible markers in the blood, CSF, and other tissues. While several promising candidates and methods to assess these biomarkers are on the horizon, it is becoming increasingly clear that no one candidate will clearly fulfill all the roles as a single biomarker. A multimodal and combinatorial approach to develop a battery of biomarkers will likely be necessary in the future. PMID:26711276

  10. Developmental dyslexia and vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quercia P

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Quercia,1 Léonard Feiss,2 Carine Michel31Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, France; 3University of Burgundy, Dijon, INSERM U1093, Cognition, Action et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Dijon, FranceAbstract: Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combined with an inability to manipulate language sounds and the grapheme–phoneme conversion is widely acknowledged. Numerous scientific studies have also documented the presence of eye movement anomalies and deficits of perception of low contrast, low spatial frequency, and high frequency temporal visual information in dyslexics. Anomalies of visual attention with short visual attention spans have also been demonstrated in a large number of cases. Spatial orientation is also affected in dyslexics who manifest a preference for spatial attention to the right. This asymmetry may be so pronounced that it leads to a veritable neglect of space on the left side. The evaluation of treatments proposed to dyslexics whether speech or oriented towards the visual anomalies remains fragmentary. The advent of new explanatory theories, notably cerebellar, magnocellular, or proprioceptive, is an incentive for ophthalmologists to enter the world of multimodal cognition given the importance of the eye's visual input.Keywords: reading, ocular motility, dyslexia, neglect, spatial representation

  11. Dietary biomarkers: advances, limitations and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrick Valisa E; Dietrich Andrea M; Estabrooks Paul A; Savla Jyoti; Serrano Elena; Davy Brenda M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The subjective nature of self-reported dietary intake assessment methods presents numerous challenges to obtaining accurate dietary intake and nutritional status. This limitation can be overcome by the use of dietary biomarkers, which are able to objectively assess dietary consumption (or exposure) without the bias of self-reported dietary intake errors. The need for dietary biomarkers was addressed by the Institute of Medicine, who recognized the lack of nutritional biomarkers as a ...

  12. Peripheral Blood Biomarkers in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Vij, Rekha; Noth, Imre

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we review the evidence for peripheral blood biomarkers in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a life-threatening fibrotic lung disease of unknown etiology. We focus on selected biomarkers present in peripheral blood, as they are easy to obtain, can be measured longitudinally, and have the greatest likelihood of achieving clinical utility. This article concentrates on biomarkers with mechanistic plausibility that may be directly involved in the development of IPF, including K...

  13. Biomarkers of HIV-associated Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Thabile Flepisi; Patrick Bouic; Gerhard Sissolak; Bernd Rosenkranz

    2014-01-01

    Cancer biomarkers have provided great opportunities for improving the management of cancer patients by enhancing the efficiency of early detection, diagnosis, and efficacy of treatment. Every cell type has a unique molecular signature, referred to as biomarkers, which are identifiable characteristics such as levels or activities of a myriad of genes, proteins, or other molecular features. Biomarkers can facilitate the molecular definition of cancer, provide information about the course of can...

  14. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Austin Miller; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Willie Underwood

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent meas...

  15. Fluid biomarkers in multiple system atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurens, Brice; Constantinescu, Radu; Freeman, Roy;

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing research efforts, no reliable biomarker currently exists for the diagnosis and prognosis of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Such biomarkers are urgently needed to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic guidance and also to serve as efficacy measures or surrogates of target engagem...... Parkinson's disease), metabolites of the catecholamine pathway and proteins such as α-synuclein, DJ-1 and total-tau. Beyond future efforts in biomarker discovery, the harmonization of standard operating procedures will be crucial for future success....

  16. Developmental Milestones of Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prenatal Baby Bathing & Skin Care Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Developmental Milestones of ...

  17. Developmental Disabilities Preschool Language Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Mary T.; Ritenour, J. V.

    1977-01-01

    Suggested are procedures for providing a developmental program for preschool children with communication disorders complicated by other disorders such as mental retardation, epilepsy, cerebral palsy, and other neurological dysfunctions. (IM)

  18. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field.

  19. Biological Networks for Cancer Candidate Biomarkers Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenying; Xue, Wenjin; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Due to its extraordinary heterogeneity and complexity, cancer is often proposed as a model case of a systems biology disease or network disease. There is a critical need of effective biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and/or outcome prediction from system level analyses. Methods based on integrating omics data into networks have the potential to revolutionize the identification of cancer biomarkers. Deciphering the biological networks underlying cancer is undoubtedly important for understanding the molecular mechanisms of the disease and identifying effective biomarkers. In this review, the networks constructed for cancer biomarker discovery based on different omics level data are described and illustrated from recent advances in the field. PMID:27625573

  20. Biomarkers and diagnostic tools for detection of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilpour, Akbar; Kazemzadeh-Narbat, Mehdi; Tamayol, Ali; Oklu, Rahmi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for worldwide chronic bacterial infection in humans affecting approximately half of the world's population. H. pylori is associated with significant morbidity and mortality including gastric cancer. The infection has both direct and indirect impacts on economic and overall well-being of patients; hence, there is a great need for diagnostic markers that could be used in the development of diagnostic kits. Here, we briefly review general aspects of H. pylori infection and the diagnostic biomarkers used in laboratory tests today with a focus on the potential role of microfluidic systems in future immunodiagnosis platforms. PMID:27084783

  1. Evidence of accelerated ageing in clinical drug addiction from immune, hepatic and metabolic biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Reece Albert

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Drug addiction is associated with significant disease and death, but its impact on the ageing process has not been considered. The recent demonstration that many of the items available in routine clinical pathology have applicability as biomarkers of the ageing process implies that routine clinical laboratory parameters would be useful as an initial investigation of this possibility. Methods 12,093 clinical laboratory results 1995–2006 were reviewed. To make the age ranges...

  2. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia

    OpenAIRE

    Henik Avishai; Askenazi Sarit

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Methods Fourteen university students that were...

  3. CAESAR models for developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Piclin Nadège; Pintore Marco; Young Douglas; Martin Todd; Manganaro Alberto; Cassano Antonio; Bigoni Davide; Benfenati Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The new REACH legislation requires assessment of a large number of chemicals in the European market for several endpoints. Developmental toxicity is one of the most difficult endpoints to assess, on account of the complexity, length and costs of experiments. Following the encouragement of QSAR (in silico) methods provided in the REACH itself, the CAESAR project has developed several models. Results Two QSAR models for developmental toxicity have been developed, using diffe...

  4. Developmental stability and human violence.

    OpenAIRE

    Furlow, B; Gangestad, S W; Armijo-Prewitt, T

    1998-01-01

    Developmental stability (the precision with which genotypes are translated into phenotypes under physically stressful developmental conditions), is a major source of phenotypic and behavioural variation, yet researchers have largely ignored its potential role in the ontogeny of individual propensities toward human aggression and violence. In this study, we measured fluctuating asymmetry of the body and administered aggression and fighting history questionnaires to 229 college students (139 fe...

  5. 29 CFR 1952.351 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.351 Section 1952.351 Labor... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Arizona § 1952.351 Developmental schedule. The Arizona State plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule as provided...

  6. 29 CFR 1952.161 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.161 Section 1952.161 Labor... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Iowa § 1952.161 Developmental schedule. The Iowa State plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule as amended...

  7. 29 CFR 1952.101 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.101 Section 1952.101 Labor... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Oregon § 1952.101 Developmental schedule. The Oregon plan is developmental. The schedule of developmental steps as described in the plan...

  8. 29 CFR 1952.111 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.111 Section 1952.111 Labor... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Utah § 1952.111 Developmental schedule. The Utah plan is developmental. The following is the schedule of developmental steps provided by...

  9. Epikardiales Fett als Biomarker? // Epicardial Adipose Tissue as a Biomarker?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tscharre M

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epicardial adipose tissue as the “visceral” adipose tissue of the heart is arousing more and more scientific interest, as it has numerous local and systemic effects. There is no fascia separating the epicardial adipose tissue and the myocardium and they both share its blood supply via the coronary arteries, thus allowing a possible interaction. Under normal physiological conditions, epicardial adipose tissue has mainly anti-atherogenic, thermogenic and mechanical characteristics. Under pathological conditions it becomes harmful to the myocardium and the coronary arteries. Important features in the clinical setting are correlations with coronary artery disease, heart failure, atrial fibrillation and visceral adipose tissue, thus acting as a possible biomarker of cardiovascular risk. p bKurzfassung:/b Das epikardiale Fettgewebe erweckt als „viszerales“ Fettdepot des Herzens mit zahlreichen lokalen und systemischen Effekten immer mehr wissenschaftliches Interesse. Das Fehlen einer trennenden Faszie zwischen epikardialem Fettgewebe und Myokard und die gemeinsame Blutversorgung durch die Koronararterien erlauben eine potenzielle Interaktion. Unter normalen physiologischen Verhältnissen hat das epikardiale Fettgewebe hauptsächlich anti-atherogene, thermogenetische und mechanische Funktionen. Unter pathologischen Verhältnissen schädigt es das Myokard und die Koronararterien. Einen klinischen Stellenwert hat es aufgrund von Korrelationen mit koronarer Herzerkrankung, Herzinsuffizienz, Vorhofflimmern und viszeralem Fettgewebe. Dadurch könnte es als neuer Biomarker für das kardiovaskuläre Risiko dienen.

  10. [Biomarkers in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roblin, Xavier; Cavaille, Alaric; Clavel, Léa; Paul, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Fecal calprotectine is of interest for diagnosis of IBD at the beginning. CRP and fecal calprotectine are predictive of long-term response in patients treated by anti-TNF therapy. Trough levels of anti-TNF are associated to clinical remission and mucosal healing. Detectable antibodies to anti-TNF are associated with lower response to treatment. Interventional studies are waiting before optimization of treatment in function of biomarkers. Trough levels of anti-TNF help to modify our treatment (optimization or de-escalation). PMID:24373717

  11. Biomarker Genes for Detecting Estrogenic Activity of Endocrine Disruptors via Estrogen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Yang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors (EDs are compounds used in various industrial products, drugs, and cosmetics. They can be found in the environment and disturb the endocrine and reproductive systems, resulting in adverse effects to humans and wildlife such as birth defects and developmental disorders. Since several EDs have a structure similar to that of endogenous steroid hormones such as estrogens, they intend to have an affinity for steroid hormone receptors and alter hormone-mediated metabolism by binding to these receptors. EDs are therefore a global concern and assays should be developed to efficiently determine whether these compounds are detrimental to biological systems. Diverse experimental methods may help determine the endocrine disrupting potential of EDs and evaluate the adverse effects of a single and/or combination of these reagents. Currently, biomarkers have been employed to objectively measure EDs potency and understand the underlying mechanisms. Further studies are required to develop ideal screening methods and biomarkers to determine EDs potency at environmentally relevant concentrations. In this review, we describe the biomarkers for estrogenicity of EDs identified both in vitro and in vivo, and introduce a biomarker, cabindin-D9k (CaBP-9k, that may be used to assess estrogenic activity of EDs.

  12. Developmental competence of oocytes isolated from surplus medulla tissue in connection with cryopreservation of ovarian tissue for fertility preservation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken-Jensen, Helle N; Kristensen, Stine G; Jeppesen, Janni V;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the developmental competence of immature oocytes collected from surplus medulla tissue in connection with ovarian tissue cryopreservation for fertility preservation. DESIGN: Cohort comparative study. SETTING: University laboratory in Denmark from 2011-2012. POPULATION: 69...

  13. Developmental succession of the microbiome of Culex mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Duguma, Dagne; Hall, Michael W.; Rugman-Jones, Paul; Stouthamer, Richard; Tereniu, Olle; Neufeld, Josh D.; Walton, William E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The native microflora associated with mosquitoes have important roles in mosquito development and vector competence. Sequencing of bacterial V3 region from 16S rRNA genes across the developmental stages of Culex mosquitoes (early and late larval instars, pupae and adults) was used to test the hypothesis that bacteria found in the larval stage of Culex are transstadially transmitted to the adult stage, and to compare the microbiomes of field-collected versus laboratory-reared mosqui...

  14. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  15. Biomarkers in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Serafeim Theochari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of biomarkers is to identify patients most likely to benefit from a therapeutic strategy. Pancreatic neuroendocrinetumors are rare neoplasms that arise in the endocrine tissues of the pancreas. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors represent3% of primary pancreatic neoplasms and their incidence has risen. The SMAD4 gene is located on chromosome 18q andsomeday the SMAD4 gene status may be useful for prognostic stratification and therapeutic decision. The cells respond toenvironmental signals by modulating the expressions of genes contained within the nucleus, when genes are activated aretranscribed to generate messenger RNA (mRNA. The examination of multiple expressed genes and proteins provides moreuseful information for prognostication of individual tumors. Here we summarize and discuss findings presented at the 2014ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Anna Karpathakis et al. (Abstract #212 reported data about the role of DNAmethylation in gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. Christina Lynn Roland et al. (Abstract #250 looked the impact OfSMAD4 on oncologic outcomes. Bong Kynn Kang et al. (Abstract #251 investigated prognostic biomarker using microRNAarray technology.

  16. Laboratory Building.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  17. Stable isotopes and biomarkers in microbial ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschker, H.T.S.; Middelburg, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of biomarkers in combination with stable isotope analysis is a new approach in microbial ecology and a number of papers on a variety of subjects have appeared. We will first discuss the techniques for analysing stable isotopes in biomarkers, primarily gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ra

  18. DNA Methylation Biomarkers: Cancer and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Mikeska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are naturally-occurring characteristics by which a particular pathological process or disease can be identified or monitored. They can reflect past environmental exposures, predict disease onset or course, or determine a patient’s response to therapy. Epigenetic changes are such characteristics, with most epigenetic biomarkers discovered to date based on the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation. Many tissue types are suitable for the discovery of DNA methylation biomarkers including cell-based samples such as blood and tumor material and cell-free DNA samples such as plasma. DNA methylation biomarkers with diagnostic, prognostic and predictive power are already in clinical trials or in a clinical setting for cancer. Outside cancer, strong evidence that complex disease originates in early life is opening up exciting new avenues for the detection of DNA methylation biomarkers for adverse early life environment and for estimation of future disease risk. However, there are a number of limitations to overcome before such biomarkers reach the clinic. Nevertheless, DNA methylation biomarkers have great potential to contribute to personalized medicine throughout life. We review the current state of play for DNA methylation biomarkers, discuss the barriers that must be crossed on the way to implementation in a clinical setting, and predict their future use for human disease.

  19. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  20. Dynamics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Dynamics Lab replicates vibration environments for every Navy platform. Testing performed includes: Flight Clearance, Component Improvement, Qualification, Life...

  1. Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: To conduct fundamental studies of highway materials aimed at understanding both failure mechanisms and superior performance. New standard test methods are...

  2. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikezie O. Madu, Yi Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of

  3. Recommendations to standardize preanalytical confounding factors in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Campo, Marta; Mollenhauer, Brit; Bertolotto, Antonio; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Hampel, Harald; Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Kruse, Niels; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Lehmann, Sylvain; Molinuevo, Jose L; Parnetti, Lucilla; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Sáez-Valero, Javier; Saka, Esen; Urbani, Andrea; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Verbeek, Marcel; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Teunissen, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    due to the high variability found between centers in the concentrations of both AD CSF biomarkers (Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau) and PD CSF biomarker (α-synuclein). Such a variability has been partially attributed to different preanalytical procedures between laboratories, thus highlighting...... the need to establish standardized operating procedures. Here, we merge two previous consensus guidelines for preanalytical confounding factors in order to achieve one exhaustive guideline updated with new evidence for Aβ42, total tau and phosphorylated tau, and α-synuclein. The proposed standardized...

  4. The proteomics in prostate cancer biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Shevchenko

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC represents the second most frequent type of tumor in men worldwide. Proteomics represents a promising approach for the discovery of new biomarkers able to improve the management of PC patients. Markers more specific and sensitive than prostate-specific antigen are needed for PC diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment. Moreover, proteomics could represent an important tool to identify new molecular targets for PC tailored therapy. Now several possible PC biomarkers sources, each with advantages and limitations, are under investigation, including tissues, urine, serum, plasma and prostatic fluids. Innovative high-throughput proteomic platforms are now identifying and quantifying new specific and sensitive biomarkers for PC detection, stratification and treatment. Nevertheless, many putative biomarkers are still far from being applied in clinical practice.This review aims to discuss the recent advances in PC proteomics, emphasizing biomarker discovery and their application to clinical utility for diagnosis and patient stratification.

  5. Bias in emerging biomarkers for bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, A F; Köhler, C A; Fernandes, B S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date no comprehensive evaluation has appraised the likelihood of bias or the strength of the evidence of peripheral biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD). Here we performed an umbrella review of meta-analyses of peripheral non-genetic biomarkers for BD. METHOD: The Pubmed/Medline, E......BACKGROUND: To date no comprehensive evaluation has appraised the likelihood of bias or the strength of the evidence of peripheral biomarkers for bipolar disorder (BD). Here we performed an umbrella review of meta-analyses of peripheral non-genetic biomarkers for BD. METHOD: The Pubmed......) was observed in 11 meta-analyses. Heterogeneity was high for (I 2 ⩾ 50%) 16 meta-analyses. Only two biomarkers met criteria for suggestive evidence namely the soluble IL-2 receptor and morning cortisol. The median power of included studies, using the effect size of the largest dataset as the plausible...

  6. Melanoma biomarkers: Vox clamantis in deserto (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaer, Mays; Gollapudi, Divya; Papageorgio, Chris

    2010-05-01

    Detecting malignant melanoma at an early stage, monitoring therapy, predicting recurrence and identifying patients at risk for metastasis continue to be a challenging and demanding objective. The last two decades have witnessed innovations in the field of melanoma biomarkers. However, global agreement concerning monitoring and early detection has yet to be reached. This is a review of the current literature regarding melanoma biomarkers including demographic, clinical, pathological and molecular biomarkers that are produced by melanoma or non-melanoma cells. A number of these biomarkers demonstrate promising results as possible methods for early detection, predicting recurrence and monitoring therapy. Other biomarkers appear to be promising for identifying patients at risk for metastasis. We reviewed the most pertinent information in the field thus far and how this knowledge can impact, or not, the management of melanoma patients prognostically and therapeutically. PMID:22966315

  7. Modeling winter moth Operophtera brumata egg phenology: nonlinear effects of temperature and developmental stage on developmental rate

    OpenAIRE

    Salis, Lucia; Lof, Marjolein; van Asch, Margriet; Visser, Marcel E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between an insect's developmental rate and temperature is crucial to forecast insect phenology under climate change. In the winter moth Operophtera brumata timing of egg-hatching has severe fitness consequences on growth and reproduction as egg-hatching has to match bud burst of the host tree. In the winter moth, as in many insect species, egg development is strongly affected by ambient temperatures. Here we use laboratory experiments to show for the first time ...

  8. Laboratory microfusion capability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the issues involved in developing a Laboratory Microfusion Capability (LMC) which is the major objective of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program within the purview of the Department of Energy's Defense Programs. The study was initiated to support a number of DOE management needs: to provide insight for the evolution of the ICF program; to afford guidance to the ICF laboratories in planning their research and development programs; to inform Congress and others of the details and implications of the LMC; to identify criteria for selection of a concept for the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and to develop a coordinated plan for the realization of an LMC. As originally proposed, the LMC study was divided into two phases. The first phase identifies the purpose and potential utility of the LMC, the regime of its performance parameters, driver independent design issues and requirements, its development goals and requirements, and associated technical, management, staffing, environmental, and other developmental and operational issues. The second phase addresses driver-dependent issues such as specific design, range of performance capabilities, and cost. The study includes four driver options; the neodymium-glass solid state laser, the krypton fluoride excimer gas laser, the light-ion accelerator, and the heavy-ion induction linear accelerator. The results of the Phase II study are described in the present report

  9. Simultaneous concentration and detection of biomarkers on paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ricky Y T; Jue, Erik; Yip, Allison T; Berg, Andrew R; Wang, Stephanie J; Kivnick, Alexandra R; Nguyen, Phuong T; Kamei, Daniel T

    2014-08-21

    The lateral-flow immunoassay (LFA) is an inexpensive point-of-care (POC) paper-based diagnostic device with the potential to rapidly detect disease biomarkers in resource-poor settings. Although LFA is inexpensive, easy to use, and requires no laboratory equipment, it is limited by its sensitivity, which remains inferior to that of gold standard laboratory-based assays. Our group is the only one to have previously utilized various aqueous two-phase systems (ATPSs) to enhance LFA detection. In those studies, the sample was concentrated by an ATPS in a test tube and could only be applied to LFA after it had been extracted manually. Here, we bypass the extraction step by seamlessly integrating a polyethylene glycol-potassium phosphate ATPS with downstream LFA detection in a simple, inexpensive, power-free, and portable all-in-one diagnostic device. We discovered a new phenomenon in which the target biomarkers simultaneously concentrate as the ATPS solution flows through the paper membranes, and our device features a 3-D paper well that was designed to exploit this phenomenon. Studies with this device, which were performed at room temperature in under 25 min, demonstrated a 10-fold improvement in the detection limit of a model protein, transferrin. Our next-generation LFA technology is rapid, affordable, easy-to-use, and can be applied to existing LFA products, thereby providing a new platform for revolutionizing the current state of disease diagnosis in resource-poor settings. PMID:24950897

  10. Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (recent update).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushil; Moon, Carolyn Seungyoun; Khogali, Azza; Haidous, Ali; Chabenne, Anthony; Ojo, Comfort; Jelebinkov, Miriana; Kurdi, Yousef; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2013-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder mostly affecting the aging population over sixty. Cardinal symptoms including, tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooling, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons are already destroyed. Hence we need early, sensitive, specific, and economical peripheral and/or central biomarker(s) for the differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. These can be classified as clinical, biochemical, genetic, proteomic, and neuroimaging biomarkers. Novel discoveries of genetic as well as nongenetic biomarkers may be utilized for the personalized treatment of PD during preclinical (premotor) and clinical (motor) stages. Premotor biomarkers including hyper-echogenicity of substantia nigra, olfactory and autonomic dysfunction, depression, hyposmia, deafness, REM sleep disorder, and impulsive behavior may be noticed during preclinical stage. Neuroimaging biomarkers (PET, SPECT, MRI), and neuropsychological deficits can facilitate differential diagnosis. Single-cell profiling of dopaminergic neurons has identified pyridoxal kinase and lysosomal ATPase as biomarker genes for PD prognosis. Promising biomarkers include: fluid biomarkers, neuromelanin antibodies, pathological forms of α-Syn, DJ-1, amyloid β and tau in the CSF, patterns of gene expression, metabolomics, urate, as well as protein profiling in the blood and CSF samples. Reduced brain regional N-acetyl-aspartate is a biomarker for the in vivo assessment of neuronal loss using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T2 relaxation time with MRI. To confirm PD diagnosis, the PET biomarkers include [(18)F]-DOPA for estimating dopaminergic neurotransmission, [(18)F]dG for mitochondrial bioenergetics, [(18)F]BMS for mitochondrial complex-1, [(11)C](R)-PK11195 for microglial activation, SPECT imaging with (123)Iflupane and βCIT for dopamine transporter, and urinary

  11. Developmental orthopaedic diseases in foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases (DOD) is seen frequently in horses which completed their maturity. Osteochondrosis, physitis, angular limb deformities, flexural deformities, juvenil arthritis, cervical vertebral anomalies, cuboidal bone abnormalities are problems investigated under Developmental Orthopaedic Diseases title. This diseases can develop single or some together in fast growing, heavy animals (especially Arabian and English Thoroughbreds). Multifactorial causes of this diseases etiopathogenesis can be listed as genetic predisposition, trauma, nutrition, vitamins/minerals and endocrine disorders. But the exact causes of these diseases are not known. In this review detailed information are given about the diseases mentioned above

  12. Update of Thyroid Developmental Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoupa, Athanasia; Kariyawasam, Dulanjalee; Carré, Aurore; Polak, Michel

    2016-06-01

    Thyroid dysgenesis (TD) is the most common cause of congenital hypothyroidism in iodine-sufficient regions and includes a spectrum of developmental anomalies. The genetic components of TD are complex. Although a sporadic disease, advances in developmental biology have revealed monogenetic forms of TD. Inheritance is not based on a simple Mendelian pattern and additional genetic elements might contribute to the phenotypic spectrum. This article summarizes the key steps of normal thyroid development and provides an update on responsible genes and underlying mechanisms of TD. Up-to-date technologies in genetics and biology will allow us to advance in our knowledge of TD. PMID:27241962

  13. Looking for biomarkers of Hg exposure by transcriptome analysis in the aquatic plant Elodea nuttallii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regier N.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed genomics tools have a promising potential to identify early biomarkers of exposure to toxicants. In the present work we used transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq of Elodea nuttallii –an invasive rooted macrophyte that is able to accumulate large amounts of metals- to identify biomarkers of Hg exposure. RNA-seq allowed identification of genes affected by Hg exposure and also unraveled plant response to the toxic metal: a change in energy/reserve metabolism caused by the inhibition of photosynthesis, and an adaptation of homeostasis networks to control accumulation of Hg. Data were validated by RT-qPCR and selected genes were further tested as biomarkers. Samples exposed in the field and to natural contaminated sediments clustered well with samples exposed to low metal concentrations under laboratory conditions. Our data suggest that this plant and/or this approach could be useful to develop new tests for water and sediment quality assessment.

  14. Molecular Imaging of Biomarkers in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Riedl, Chris C.; Dickler, Maura N.; Jhaveri, Komal; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Weber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The success of breast cancer therapy is ultimately defined by clinical endpoints such as survival. It is valuable to have biomarkers that can predict the most efficacious therapies or measure response to therapy early in the course of treatment. Molecular imaging has a promising role in complementing and overcoming some of the limitations of traditional biomarkers by providing the ability to perform noninvasive, repeatable whole-body assessments. The potential advantages of imaging biomarkers are obvious and initial clinical studies have been promising, but proof of clinical utility still requires prospective multicenter clinical trials. PMID:26834103

  15. Cardiac Biomarkers and Cycling Race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Le Goff, Jean-François Kaux, Sébastien Goffaux, Etienne Cavalier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In cycling as in other types of strenuous exercise, there exists a risk of sudden death. It is important both to understand its causes and to see if the behavior of certain biomarkers might highlight athletes at risk. Many reports describe changes in biomarkers after strenuous exercise (Nie et al., 2011, but interpreting these changes, and notably distinguishing normal physiological responses from pathological changes, is not easy. Here we have focused on the kinetics of different cardiac biomarkers: creatin kinase (CK, creating kinase midbrain (CK-MB, myoglobin (MYO, highly sensitive troponin T (hs-TnT and N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP. The population studied was a group of young trained cyclists participating in a 177-km cycling race. The group of individuals was selected for maximal homogeneity. Their annual training volume was between 10,000 and 16,000 kilometers. The rhythm of races is comparable and averages 35 km/h, depending on the race’s difficulty. The cardiac frequency was recorded via a heart rate monitor. Three blood tests were taken. The first blood test, T0, was taken approximately 2 hours before the start of the race and was intended to gather values which would act as references for the following tests. The second blood test, T1, was realized within 5 minutes of their arrival. The third and final blood test, T3, was taken 3 hours following their arrival. The CK, CK-MB, MYO, hs-TnT and NT-proBNP were measured on the Roche Diagnostic modular E (Manhein, Germany. For the statistical analysis, an ANOVA and post hoc test of Scheffé were calculated with the Statistica Software version 9.1. We noticed an important significant variation in the cardiac frequency between T0 and T1 (p < 0.0001, T0 and T3 (p < 0.0001, and T1 and T3 (p < 0.01. Table 1 shows the results obtained for the different biomarkers. CK and CK-MB showed significant variation between T0-T1 and T0-T3 (p < 0.0001. Myoglobin increased significantly

  16. AAPS and US FDA Crystal City VI workshop on bioanalytical method validation for biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Steve; Ackermann, Bradley L

    2016-02-01

    Crystal City VI Workshop on Bioanalytical Method Validation of Biomarkers, Renaissance Baltimore Harborplace Hotel, Baltimore, MD, USA, 28-29 September 2015 The Crystal City VI workshop was organized by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists in association with the US FDA to continue discussion on the bioanalysis of biomarkers. An outcome of the Crystal City V workshop, convened following release of the draft FDA Guidance for Industry on Bioanalytical Methods Validation in 2013 was the need to have further discussion on biomarker methods. Biomarkers ultimately became the sole focal point for Crystal City VI, a meeting attended by approximately 200 people and composed of industry scientists and regulators from around the world. The meeting format included several panel discussions to maximize the opportunity for dialogue among participants. Following an initial session on the general topic of biomarker assays and intended use, more focused sessions were held on chromatographic (LC-MS) and ligand-binding assays. In addition to participation by the drug development community, significant representation was present from clinical testing laboratories. The experience of this latter group, collectively identified as practitioners of CLIA (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments), helped shape the discussion and takeaways from the meeting. While the need to operate within the framework of the current BMV guidance was clearly acknowledged, a general understanding that biomarker methods validation cannot be adequately depicted by current PK-centric guidelines emerged as a consensus from the meeting. This report is not intended to constitute the official proceedings from Crystal City VI, which is expected to be published in early 2016. PMID:26795584

  17. Predictive biomarker discovery through the parallel integration of clinical trial and functional genomics datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanton, Charles; Larkin, James M; Gerlinger, Marco; Eklund, Aron C; Howell, Michael; Stamp, Gordon; Downward, Julian; Gore, Martin; Futreal, P Andrew; Escudier, Bernard; Andre, Fabrice; Albiges, Laurence; Beuselinck, Benoit; Oudard, Stephane; Hoffmann, Jens; Gyorffy, Balázs; Torrance, Chris J; Boehme, Karen A; Volkmer, Hansjuergen; Toschi, Luisella; Nicke, Barbara; Beck, Marlene; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2010-01-01

    of molecular mechanisms driving resistance to anti-angiogenesis agents, the current limitations of laboratory and clinical trial strategies and how the PREDICT consortium will endeavor to identify a new generation of predictive biomarkers. PMID:20701793

  18. Global methylmercury exposure from seafood consumption and risk of developmental neurotoxicity: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C Sheehan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To examine biomarkers of methylmercury (MeHg intake in women and infants from seafood-consuming populations globally and characterize the comparative risk of fetal developmental neurotoxicity. Methods A search was conducted of the published literature reporting total mercury (Hg in hair and blood in women and infants. These biomarkers are validated proxy measures of MeHg, a neurotoxin found primarily in seafood. Average and high-end biomarkers were extracted, stratified by seafood consumption context, and pooled by category. Medians for average and high-end pooled distributions were compared with the reference level established by a joint expert committee of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO and the World Health Organization (WHO. Findings Selection criteria were met by 164 studies of women and infants from 43 countries. Pooled average biomarkers suggest an intake of MeHg several times over the FAO/WHO reference in fish-consuming riparians living near small-scale gold mining and well over the reference in consumers of marine mammals in Arctic regions. In coastal regions of south-eastern Asia, the western Pacific and the Mediterranean, average biomarkers approach the reference. Although the two former groups have a higher risk of neurotoxicity than the latter, coastal regions are home to the largest number at risk. High-end biomarkers across all categories indicate MeHg intake is in excess of the reference value. Conclusion There is a need for policies to reduce Hg exposure among women and infants and for surveillance in high-risk populations, the majority of which live in low-and middle-income countries.

  19. Characterization of a developmental toxicity dose-response model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustman, E.M.; Wellington, D.G.; Smith, W.P.; Kimmel, C.A.

    1989-02-01

    The Rai and Van Ryzin dose-response model proposed for teratology experiments has been characterized for its appropriateness and applicability in modeling the dichotomous response data from developmental toxicity studies. Modifications were made in the initial probability statements to reflect more accurately biological events underlying developmental toxicity. Data sets used for the evaluation were obtained from the National Toxicology Program and U.S. EPA laboratories. The studies included developmental evaluations of ethylene glycol, diethylhexyl phthalate, di- and triethylene glycol dimethyl ethers, and nitrofen in rats, mice, or rabbits. Graphic examination and statistical evaluation demonstrate that this model is sensitive to the data when compared to directly measured experimental outcomes. The model was used to interpolate to low-risk dose levels, and comparisons were made between the values obtained and the no-observed-adverse-effect levels (NOAELs) divided by an uncertainty factor. Our investigation suggests that the Rai and Van Ryzin model is sensitive to the developmental toxicity end points, prenatal deaths, and malformations, and appears to model closely their relationship to dose.

  20. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... or conditions. What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical procedures that involve testing samples of blood, urine, or other tissues or ...

  1. Detection of protein biomarker using a blood glucose meter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Tian; Xiang, Yu; Lu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    mHeath technologies are recognized to play important roles in the future of personal care and medicine. However, their full potentials have not been reached, as most of current technologies are restricted to monitoring physical and behavioral parameters, such as body temperature, heart rate, blood pressure, and physical movement, while direct monitoring of biomarkers in body fluids can provide much more accurate and useful information for medical diagnostics. A major barrier to realizing the full potential of mHealth is the high costs and long cycles of developing mHealth devices capable of monitoring biomarkers in body fluids. To lower the costs and shorten the developmental cycle, we have demonstrated the leveraging of the most successful portable medical monitoring device on the market, the blood glucose meter (BGM), with FDA-approved smartphone technologies that allow for wireless transmission and remote monitoring of a wide range of non-glucose targets. In this protocol, an aptamer-based assay for quantification of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) using an off-the-shelf BGM is described. In this assay, an aptamer-based target recognition system is employed. When IFN-γ binds to the aptamer, it triggers the release of a reporter enzyme, invertase, which can catalyze the conversion of sucrose (not detected by BGM) to glucose. The glucose being produced is then detected using a BGM. The system mimics a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), where the traditional immunoassay is replaced by an aptamer binding assay; the reporter protein is replaced by invertase, and finally the optical or fluorescence detector is replaced with widely available BGMs. PMID:25626534

  2. Overview: developmental toxicology: new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Dana; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    Since regulatory agencies began implementing the use of standardized developmental toxicology protocols in the mid-1960s, our knowledge base of embryo-fetal development and technologies for experimentation has grown exponentially. These developmental toxicology protocols were a direct result of the thalidomide tragedy from earlier that decade, when large numbers of women were exposed to the drug and over 10,000 cases of phocomelia resulted. In preventing a recurrence of such tragedies, the testing protocols are immensely successful and the field of toxicology has been dedicated to using them to advance safety and risk assessment of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Recently, our perspectives on toxicity testing have been challenged by a growing awareness that while we have excelled in hazard identification, we are in dire need of improved methodologies for human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to the large numbers of environmental chemicals for which we have little toxicology data and to the growing sentiment that better alternatives to whole animals tests are needed. To provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and regulators, the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute organized a 2-day workshop titled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" to evaluate lessons learned over the past 30 years and discuss the future of toxicology testing. The following four articles describe different presentations and discussions that were held over the course of those 2 days. PMID:21770024

  3. Developmental Dyscalculia and Medical Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Ruth S.; Gross-Tsur, Varda

    1993-01-01

    Medical evaluation of seven third-grade children with developmental dyscalculia in a mainstream setting identified neurological conditions (including petit mal seizures, Gerstmann syndrome, and attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity) in all the children. Findings suggest that children who are not improving academically should undergo…

  4. Neuropsychological Aspects of Developmental Dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, R. S.; Manor, O.; Gross-Tsur, V.

    1997-01-01

    Classification of arithmetic disorders is predicated on neuropsychological features and associated learning disabilities. Assesses the compatibility of these classifications on a nonreferred, population-based cohort of children (N=139) with developmental dyscalculia. Concludes that children with dyscalculia and disabilities in reading and/or…

  5. Developmental dyscalculia: a dysconnection syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucian, Karin; Ashkenazi, Simone Schwizer; Hänggi, Jürgen; Rotzer, Stephanie; Jäncke, Lutz; Martin, Ernst; von Aster, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Numerical understanding is important for everyday life. For children with developmental dyscalculia (DD), numbers and magnitudes present profound problems which are thought to be based upon neuronal impairments of key regions for numerical understanding. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in white matter fibre integrity between children with DD and controls using diffusion tensor imaging. White matter integrity and behavioural measures were evaluated in 15 children with developmental dyscalculia aged around 10 years and 15 matched controls. The main finding, obtained by a whole brain group comparison, revealed reduced fractional anisotropy in the superior longitudinal fasciculus in children with developmental dyscalculia. In addition, a region of interest analysis exhibited prominent deficits in fibres of the superior longitudinal fasciculus adjacent to the intraparietal sulcus, which is thought to be the core region for number processing. To conclude, our results outline deficient fibre projection between parietal, temporal and frontal regions in children with developmental dyscalculia, and therefore raise the question of whether dyscalculia can be seen as a dysconnection syndrome. Since the superior longitudinal fasciculus is involved in the integration and control of distributed brain processes, the present results highlight the importance of considering broader domain-general mechanisms in the diagnosis and therapy of dyscalculia. PMID:23783231

  6. Causal Inference and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, E. Michael

    2010-01-01

    Causal inference is of central importance to developmental psychology. Many key questions in the field revolve around improving the lives of children and their families. These include identifying risk factors that if manipulated in some way would foster child development. Such a task inherently involves causal inference: One wants to know whether…

  7. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  8. Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Vygotsky is widely considered one of the most significant and influential psychologists of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, true appreciation of his theories has been hindered by a lack of understanding of the background to his thought. "Vygotsky's Developmental and Educational Psychology" aims to demonstrate how we can come to a new and…

  9. Developmental cholinotoxicants: nicotine and chlorpyrifos.

    OpenAIRE

    Slotkin, T A

    1999-01-01

    The stimulation of cholinergic receptors in target cells during a critical developmental period provides signals that influence cell replication and differentiation. Accordingly, environmental agents that promote cholinergic activity evoke neurodevelopmental damage because of the inappropriate timing or intensity of stimulation. Nicotine evokes mitotic arrest in brain cells possessing high concentrations of nicotinic cholinergic receptors. In addition, the cholinergic overstimulation programs...

  10. Ecdysone Control of Developmental Transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rewitz, Kim; Yamanaka, Naoki; O'Connor, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    The steroid hormone ecdysone is the central regulator of insect developmental transitions. Recent new advances in our understanding of ecdysone action have relied heavily on the application of Drosophila melanogaster molecular genetic tools to study insect metamorphosis. In this review, we focus on...

  11. Developmental Learning for Object Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Lyubova, Natalya; Filliat, David

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to design a visual system for a humanoid robot. Taking inspiration from child's perception and following the principles of developmental robotics, the robot should detect and learn objects from interactions with people and own experiments.

  12. The diversification of developmental biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Nathan; Dietrich, Michael R; Alomepe, Beverly S; Antrim, Amelia F; ByrneSim, Bay Lauris; He, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In the 1960s, "developmental biology" became the dominant term to describe some of the research that had previously been included under the rubrics of embryology, growth, morphology, and physiology. As scientific societies formed under this new label, a new discipline took shape. Historians, however, have a number of different perspectives on what changes led to this new field of developmental biology and how the field itself was constituted during this period. Using the General Embryological Information Service, a global index of post-World War II development-related research, we have documented and visualized significant changes in the kinds of research that occurred as this new field formed. In particular, our analysis supports the claim that the transition toward developmental biology was marked by a growth in new topics and forms of research. Although many historians privilege the role of molecular biology and/or the molecularization of biology in general during this formative period, we have found that the influence of molecular biology is not sufficient to account for the wide range of new research that constituted developmental biology at the time. Overall, our work creates a robust characterization of the changes that occurred with regard to research on growth and development in the decades following World War II and provides a context for future work on the specific drivers of those changes. PMID:26056745

  13. Developmental trends in adaptive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Smeets, Tom; Garner, Sarah R

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that memory is enhanced when information is processed for fitness-related purposes. The main objective of the current experiments was to test developmental trends in the evolutionary foundation of memory using different types of stimuli and paradigms. In Experiment 1, 11-year-olds and adults were presented with neutral, negative, and survival-related DRM word lists. We found a memory benefit for the survival-related words and showed that false memories were more likely to be elicited for the survival-related word lists than for the other lists. Experiment 2 examined developmental trends in the survival processing paradigm using neutral, negative, and survival-related pictures. A survival processing advantage was found for survival-related pictures in adults, for negative pictures in 11/12-year-olds, and for neutral pictures in 7/8-year-olds. In Experiment 3, 11/12-year-olds and adults had to imagine the standard survival scenario or an adapted survival condition (or pleasantness condition) that was designed to reduce the possibilities for elaborative processing. We found superior memory retention for both survival scenarios in children and adults. Collectively, our results evidently show that the survival processing advantage is developmentally invariant and that certain proximate mechanisms (elaboration and distinctiveness) underlie these developmental trends. PMID:23521432

  14. Biomarker yang Berhubungan dengan Kualitas Hidup Pasien Hemodialisis Kronik

    OpenAIRE

    Putri, Rosa Yulise

    2015-01-01

    Pasien yang menjalani HD dalam waktu lama cenderung mengalami penurunan kualitas hidup. Pemantauan biomarker merupakan salah satu faktor yang berperan dalam penilaian keberhasilan pengobatan pasien HD, yang secara tidak langsung juga akan berpengaruh terhadap kualitas hidup. Berdasarkan penelitian, terdapat beberapa biomarker yang berhubungan terhadap kualitas hidup pasien HD antara lain traditional biomarkers (adekuasi dialisis dan kadar Hb), nutritional biomarkers (serum kreatinin dan IMT)...

  15. Glycoprotein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Early Detection Research Network of the NCI is charged with the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for early detection and prognosis related to neoplastic disease. Our laboratory is an NCI EDRN (U01CA152813) working on "Glycoprotein biomarkers for the early detection of aggressive prostate cancer". This EDRN administratiVE! supplement is a collaboration with Robert Veltri on his project to identify men with very low risk (indolent) prostate cancer (CaP) at the diagnostic biopsy at selection for active surveillance (AS). We will assess biopsy tissue using quantitative nuclear histomorphometric measurements and molecular biomarkers to predict an unexpected catastrophic CaP in such men with indolent CaP. At Johns Hopkins Hospital w1e use the Epstein criteria that includes; PSA density (PSAD) aggressive disease from a AS diagnostic biopsy. Our approach will combine nuclear morphometry measured by digital microscopy with a unique biopsy tissue biomarker profile (DNA content, Ki67, Her2neu, CACND1 and periostin). Fc•r the molecular targets we will us•e a multiplex tissue blot (MTB) immunohistochemistry method. The Aims o'f our work include 1) to utilize retrospective archival biopsy material from 70 AS cases where the outcome was unexpected and disastrous and collect an equal number of AS cases (n=140) and perform assays for morphology and biomarker targi ts proposed, 2) and predict failure using Cox proportional hazards statistical modeling.

  16. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis biomarkers: clinical utility and a way of understanding disease pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flynn M

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Matthew Flynn, Elisabeth S Baker, Daniel J Kass Dorothy P and Richard P Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Disease, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a typically fatal disease that remains incompletely understood despite intense study and the arrival of drugs that may alter the natural history of the disease. Rendering an accurate diagnosis and predicting prognosis remain challenging problems to clinicians. One potential solution to these clinical problems is the identification of IPF biomarkers, easily measured factors that can be employed to predict clinical behavior. Candidate biomarkers have been identified by research in the laboratory on potential culprit cells or genes that may contribute to the pathogenesis of IPF. In this review, we present the current data on a number of well-studied IPF biomarker candidates and their potential role in the pathogenesis of disease. We also establish a framework for evaluating utility of incorporating these IPF biomarkers into clinical practice. Keywords: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, usual interstitial pneumonia, biomarker, matrix metalloproteinases

  17. Diagnostic value of diffusion tensor imaging derived metrics as biomarkers of cerebral changes in developmental delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Verma

    2015-01-01

    Results: Twenty-three regions of interest with 46 variables were included in the final analysis. Nineteen (82.60% regions of interest showed at least one statistically significant variable, while 24 out of 46 (54.34% variables showed statistical significance for future consideration. The important regions to be evaluated in a case of DD are the corpus callosum, bilateral forceps minor and forceps major, bilateral parietal lobes, bilateral post-central gyrus, and bilateral posterior limb internal capsule (PLIC. The regions which did not show any significance are bilateral pars triangularis and right frontal lobe. Other regions remained indeterminate and need further evaluation. Conclusion: DTI demonstrates myelination abnormality in children with DD, having a normal routine MRI.

  18. Comparison of Birth-and Conception-Based Definitions of Postnatal Age in Developmental and Reproductive Rodent Toxicity Studies: Influence of Gestation Length and Timing of Neonatal Examinations on Litter Data in Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratories conducting developmental and reproductive toxicity studies with rodents use varied protocols for determining the timing of neonatal litter examinations and subsequent measurements. Most laboratories determine timing based on the day of birth (DOB); l.e., gestation le...

  19. The development and applications of biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normandy, J.; Peeters, J. [eds.

    1994-04-15

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of scientific papers presented at the second Department of Energy-supported workshop on the use and applications of biomarkers held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, from April 26--29, 1994. The abstracts present a synopsis of the latest scientific developments in biomarker research and how these developments meet with the practical needs of the occupational physician as well as the industrial hygienist and the health physicist. In addition to considering the practical applications and potential benefits of this promising technology, the potential ethical and legal ramifications of using biomarkers to monitor workers are discussed. The abstracts further present insights on the present benefits that can be derived from using biomarkers as well as a perspective on what further research is required to fully meet the needs of the medical community.

  20. The development and applications of biomarkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of scientific papers presented at the second Department of Energy-supported workshop on the use and applications of biomarkers held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, from April 26--29, 1994. The abstracts present a synopsis of the latest scientific developments in biomarker research and how these developments meet with the practical needs of the occupational physician as well as the industrial hygienist and the health physicist. In addition to considering the practical applications and potential benefits of this promising technology, the potential ethical and legal ramifications of using biomarkers to monitor workers are discussed. The abstracts further present insights on the present benefits that can be derived from using biomarkers as well as a perspective on what further research is required to fully meet the needs of the medical community

  1. 29 CFR 1952.231 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.231 Section 1952.231 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... schedule. The Kentucky state plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule as...

  2. 29 CFR 1952.123 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.123 Section 1952.123 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... schedule. The Washington State plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule...

  3. 29 CFR 1952.221 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.221 Section 1952.221 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... schedule. The Tennessee state plan is developmental. The following is the developmental schedule...

  4. Current status of biomarker research in neurology

    OpenAIRE

    Polivka, Jiri; Krakorova, Kristyna; Peterka, Marek; Topolcan, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Neurology is one of the typical disciplines where personalized medicine has been recently becoming an important part of clinical practice. In this article, the brief overview and a number of examples of the use of biomarkers and personalized medicine in neurology are described. The various issues in neurology are described in relation to the personalized medicine and diagnostic, prognostic as well as predictive blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. Such neurological domains discussed in t...

  5. Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue during exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Finsterer Josef

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Biomarkers of peripheral muscle fatigue (BPMFs) are used to offer insights into mechanisms of exhaustion during exercise in order to detect abnormal fatigue or to detect defective metabolic pathways. This review aims at describing recent advances and future perspectives concerning the most important biomarkers of muscle fatigue during exercise. Results BPMFs are classified according to the mechanism of fatigue related to adenosine-triphosphate-metabolism, acidosis, or oxid...

  6. Melanoma biomarkers: Vox clamantis in deserto (Review)

    OpenAIRE

    AL-SHAER, MAYS; GOLLAPUDI, DIVYA; PAPAGEORGIO, CHRIS

    2010-01-01

    Detecting malignant melanoma at an early stage, monitoring therapy, predicting recurrence and identifying patients at risk for metastasis continue to be a challenging and demanding objective. The last two decades have witnessed innovations in the field of melanoma biomarkers. However, global agreement concerning monitoring and early detection has yet to be reached. This is a review of the current literature regarding melanoma biomarkers including demographic, clinical, pathological and molecu...

  7. Biomarkers in precision therapy in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Reimers, Marlies S.; Zeestraten, Eliane C.M.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.; Liefers, Gerrit Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Europe. Because CRC is also a major cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, a lot of research has been focused on the discovery and development of biomarkers to improve the diagnostic process and to predict treatment outcomes. Up till now only a few biomarkers are recommended by expert panels. Current TNM criteria, however, cause substantial under- and overtreatment of CRC patients. Consequently, there is a growing need for ne...

  8. Paleo-reconstruction: Using multiple biomarker parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhengzheng

    Advanced technologies have played essential roles in the development of molecular organic geochemistry. In this thesis, we have developed several new techniques and explored their applications, alone and with previous techniques, to paleo-reconstruction. First, we developed a protocol to separate biomarker fractions for accurate measurement of compound-specific isotope analysis. This protocol involves combination of zeolite adduction and HPLC separation. Second, an integrated study of traditional biomarker parameters, diamondoids and compound-specific biomarker isotopes, differentiated oil groups from Saudi Arabia. Specifically, Cretaceous reservoired oils were divided into three groups and the Jurassic reservoired oils were divided into two groups. Third, biomarker acids provide an alternative way to characterize biodegradation. Oils from San Joaquin Valley, U.S.A. and oils from Mediterranean display drastically different acid profiles. These differences in biomarker acids probably reflect different processes of biodegradation. Fourth, by analyzing biomarker distributions in the organic-rich rocks recording the onset of Late Ordovician extinction, we propose that changes in salinity associated with eustatic sea-level fall, contributed at least locally to the extinction of graptolite species.

  9. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  10. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery. PMID:26565430

  11. Developmental Modes and Developmental Mechanisms can Channel Brain Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Charvet, Christine J.; Georg F Striedter

    2011-01-01

    Anseriform birds (ducks and geese) as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own), parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents). We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mec...

  12. Renal biomarkers in domestic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokamp, Jessica A; Nabity, Mary B

    2016-03-01

    Current conventional tests of kidney damage and function in blood (serum creatinine and urea nitrogen) and urine (urine protein creatinine ratio and urine specific gravity) are widely used for diagnosis and monitoring of kidney disease. However, they all have important limitations, and additional markers of glomerular filtration rate and glomerular and tubular damage are desirable, particularly for earlier detection of renal disease when therapy is most effective. Additionally, urinary markers of kidney damage and function may help localize damage to the affected portion of the kidney. In general, the presence of high- and intermediate-molecular weight proteins in the urine are indicative of glomerular damage, while low-molecular weight proteins and enzymes in the urine suggest tubular damage due to decreased reabsorption of proteins, direct tubular damage, or both. This review aims to discuss many of these new blood and urinary biomarkers in domestic veterinary species, focusing primarily on dogs and cats, how they may be used for diagnosis of renal disease, and their limitations. Additionally, a brief discussion of serum creatinine is presented, highlighting its limitations and important considerations for its improved interpretation in domestic species based on past literature and recent studies. PMID:26918420

  13. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Danielle; Banerjee, Abhishek; Sur, Mriganka

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss. PMID:26942018

  14. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Feldman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic effects of MeCP2, which is expressed very early in neuronal progenitors and continues to be expressed into adulthood. The effects of MeCP2 are mediated by diverse signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetic mechanisms. Attempts to reverse the effects of Rett Syndrome need to take into account the developmental dynamics and temporal impact of MeCP2 loss.

  15. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species. PMID:26920882

  16. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is psychotherapy, but is extremely rarely used for people with severe and profound disabilities, where speech cannot be the main therapeutic medium. So, those that are included in the psychotherapuetic process are predominantly clients with mild developmental disabilities, and they are mostly in cognitive-behavioral therapy. Recently, two models of (psychotherapy for persons with severe and profound developmental disabilities were developed: developmental-dynamic relationship therapy and attachment-based behaviour therapy for children. Conceptually, they both originate form developmental psychoanalytic theories.

  17. Language acquisition in developmental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Michael S. C.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter, I review recent research into language acquisition in developmental disorders, and the light that these findings shed on the nature of language acquisition in typically developing children. Disorders considered include Specific Language Impairment, autism, Down syndrome, and Williams syndrome. I argue that disorders of language should be construed in terms of differences in the constraints that shape the learning process, rather than in terms of the normal system with compone...

  18. Developmental Dynamics of Rett Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Danielle Feldman; Abhishek Banerjee; Mriganka Sur

    2016-01-01

    Rett Syndrome was long considered to be simply a disorder of postnatal development, with phenotypes that manifest only late in development and into adulthood. A variety of recent evidence demonstrates that the phenotypes of Rett Syndrome are present at the earliest stages of brain development, including developmental stages that define neurogenesis, migration, and patterning in addition to stages of synaptic and circuit development and plasticity. These phenotypes arise from the pleotropic ef...

  19. Developmental genetics in primitive chordates.

    OpenAIRE

    P. SORDINO; L. Belluzzi; De Santis, R; Smith, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in the study of the genetics and genomics of urochordates testify to a renewed interest in this chordate subphylum, believed to be the most primitive extant chordate relatives of the vertebrates. In addition to their primitive nature, many features of their reproduction and early development make the urochordates ideal model chordates for developmental genetics. Many urochordates spawn large numbers of transparent and externally developing embryos on a daily basis. Additionall...

  20. Psychology is a Developmental Science

    OpenAIRE

    Greenberg, Gary; Partridge, Ty; Mosack, Victoria; Lambdin, Charles

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we argue that psychology should be understood as a developmental science, and we place the discipline squarely in the realm of the natural sciences. The case is made that scientific progress in psychology has been (and still is) impeded by prolonged misadventures down conceptual dead ends such as biological reductionism, the nature/nurture debate, evolutionary psychology, and the persistent insistence on emphasizing dependent variables that defy observation and measurement, such...

  1. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Myers, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is “restored” via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read...

  2. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N.; Myers, Emily B.

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read...

  3. Developmental constraints on behavioural flexibility

    OpenAIRE

    Holekamp, Kay E.; Swanson, Eli M.; Van Meter, Page E.

    2013-01-01

    We suggest that variation in mammalian behavioural flexibility not accounted for by current socioecological models may be explained in part by developmental constraints. From our own work, we provide examples of constraints affecting variation in behavioural flexibility, not only among individuals, but also among species and higher taxonomic units. We first implicate organizational maternal effects of androgens in shaping individual differences in aggressive behaviour emitted by female spotte...

  4. DEVELOPMENTAL COORDINATION DISORDER IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Saeideh MIRAFKHAMI; Seyyed Hossein FAKHRAEE; Sina MIRAFKHAMI; Mojtaba YOUSEFI; Mona VARZANDEH FAR

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveIn this article, a motor skill disorder called developmental coordination disorder (DCD), that is usually first diagnosed during childhood, is explained and discussed. In the year 1987, DCD was formally recognized as a distinct disorder in children by the American Psychiatric Association  (APA). DCD is a generalized term for the children who have some degrees of impairment in the development of motor coordination and therefore have difficulties with physical skills which significantl...

  5. Developmental trends in adaptive memory

    OpenAIRE

    Otgaar, H.; Howe, M. L.; Smeets, T; Garner, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that memory is enhanced when information is processed for fitness-related purposes. The main objective of the current experiments was to test developmental trends in the evolutionary foundation of memory using different types of stimuli and paradigms. In Experiment 1, 11-year-olds and adults were presented with neutral, negative, and survival-related DRM word lists. We found a memory benefit for the survival-related words and showed that false memories were more l...

  6. Multichannel waveguides for the simultaneous detection of disease biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Price, Dominique Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grace, Wynne K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Basil I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The sensor team at the Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a waveguide-based optical biosensor that has previously been used for the detection of biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, breast cancer, anthrax and influenza in complex biological samples (e.g., serum and urine). However, no single biomarker can accurately predict disease. To address this issue, we developed a multiplex assay for the detection of components of the Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin on single mode planar optical waveguides with tunable quantum dots as the fluorescence reporter. This limited ability to multiplex is still insufficient for accurate detection of disease or for monitoring prognosis. In this manuscript, we demonstrate for the first time, the design, fabrication and successful evaluation of a multichannel planar optical waveguide for the simultaneous detection of at least three unknown samples in quadruplicate. We demonstrate the simultaneous, rapid (30 min), quantitative (with internal standard) and sensitive (limit of detection of 1 pM) detection of protective antigen and lethal factor of Bacillus anthracis in complex biological samples (serum) using specific monoclonal antibodies labeled with quantum dots as the fluorescence reporter.

  7. Quantitative imaging biomarker ontology (QIBO) for knowledge representation of biomedical imaging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Andrew J; Liu, Tiffany Ting; Savig, Erica; Suzek, Baris E; Ouellette, M; Danagoulian, J; Wernsing, G; Rubin, Daniel L; Paik, David

    2013-08-01

    A widening array of novel imaging biomarkers is being developed using ever more powerful clinical and preclinical imaging modalities. These biomarkers have demonstrated effectiveness in quantifying biological processes as they occur in vivo and in the early prediction of therapeutic outcomes. However, quantitative imaging biomarker data and knowledge are not standardized, representing a critical barrier to accumulating medical knowledge based on quantitative imaging data. We use an ontology to represent, integrate, and harmonize heterogeneous knowledge across the domain of imaging biomarkers. This advances the goal of developing applications to (1) improve precision and recall of storage and retrieval of quantitative imaging-related data using standardized terminology; (2) streamline the discovery and development of novel imaging biomarkers by normalizing knowledge across heterogeneous resources; (3) effectively annotate imaging experiments thus aiding comprehension, re-use, and reproducibility; and (4) provide validation frameworks through rigorous specification as a basis for testable hypotheses and compliance tests. We have developed the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Ontology (QIBO), which currently consists of 488 terms spanning the following upper classes: experimental subject, biological intervention, imaging agent, imaging instrument, image post-processing algorithm, biological target, indicated biology, and biomarker application. We have demonstrated that QIBO can be used to annotate imaging experiments with standardized terms in the ontology and to generate hypotheses for novel imaging biomarker-disease associations. Our results established the utility of QIBO in enabling integrated analysis of quantitative imaging data. PMID:23589184

  8. Blinded Validation of Breath Biomarkers of Lung Cancer, a Potential Ancillary to Chest CT Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michael; Bauer, Thomas L.; Cataneo, Renee N.; Lebauer, Cassie; Mundada, Mayur; Pass, Harvey I.; Ramakrishna, Naren; Rom, William N.; Vallières, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Background Breath volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been reported as biomarkers of lung cancer, but it is not known if biomarkers identified in one group can identify disease in a separate independent cohort. Also, it is not known if combining breath biomarkers with chest CT has the potential to improve the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Methods Model-building phase (unblinded): Breath VOCs were analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry in 82 asymptomatic smokers having screening chest CT, 84 symptomatic high-risk subjects with a tissue diagnosis, 100 without a tissue diagnosis, and 35 healthy subjects. Multiple Monte Carlo simulations identified breath VOC mass ions with greater than random diagnostic accuracy for lung cancer, and these were combined in a multivariate predictive algorithm. Model-testing phase (blinded validation): We analyzed breath VOCs in an independent cohort of similar subjects (n = 70, 51, 75 and 19 respectively). The algorithm predicted discriminant function (DF) values in blinded replicate breath VOC samples analyzed independently at two laboratories (A and B). Outcome modeling: We modeled the expected effects of combining breath biomarkers with chest CT on the sensitivity and specificity of lung cancer screening. Results Unblinded model-building phase. The algorithm identified lung cancer with sensitivity 74.0%, specificity 70.7% and C-statistic 0.78. Blinded model-testing phase: The algorithm identified lung cancer at Laboratory A with sensitivity 68.0%, specificity 68.4%, C-statistic 0.71; and at Laboratory B with sensitivity 70.1%, specificity 68.0%, C-statistic 0.70, with linear correlation between replicates (r = 0.88). In a projected outcome model, breath biomarkers increased the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of chest CT for lung cancer when the tests were combined in series or parallel. Conclusions Breath VOC mass ion biomarkers identified lung cancer in a

  9. Developmental dyscalculia: prevalence and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, R S; Auerbach, J; Manor, O; Gross-Tsur, V

    2000-01-01

    The prevalence of developmental dyscalculia (DC) in the school population ranges from 3-6 %, a frequency similar to that of developmental dyslexia and ADHD. These studies fulfilled the criteria for an adequate prevalence study, i.e., were population based, using standardized measures to evaluate arithmetic function. Although the variation in prevalence is within a narrow range, the differences are probably due to which definition of dyscalculia was used, the age the diagnosis was made and the instrument chosen to test for DC. The relative predominance of girls with DC may reflect a greater vulnerability to environmental influences alone or in addition to a biological predisposition. DC is not only encountered as a specific learning disability but also in diverse neurological disorders, examples of which include ADHD, developmental language disorder, epilepsy, treated phenylketonuria and Fragile X syndrome. Although the long-term prognosis of DC is as yet unknown, current data indicate that DC is a stable learning disability persisting, at least for the short term, in about half of affected children. The long-term consequences of DC and its impact on education, employment and psychological well-being have yet to be determined. PMID:11138905

  10. Developmental transcriptome of Aplysia californica'

    KAUST Repository

    Heyland, Andreas

    2010-12-06

    Genome-wide transcriptional changes in development provide important insight into mechanisms underlying growth, differentiation, and patterning. However, such large-scale developmental studies have been limited to a few representatives of Ecdysozoans and Chordates. Here, we characterize transcriptomes of embryonic, larval, and metamorphic development in the marine mollusc Aplysia californica and reveal novel molecular components associated with life history transitions. Specifically, we identify more than 20 signal peptides, putative hormones, and transcription factors in association with early development and metamorphic stages-many of which seem to be evolutionarily conserved elements of signal transduction pathways. We also characterize genes related to biomineralization-a critical process of molluscan development. In summary, our experiment provides the first large-scale survey of gene expression in mollusc development, and complements previous studies on the regulatory mechanisms underlying body plan patterning and the formation of larval and juvenile structures. This study serves as a resource for further functional annotation of transcripts and genes in Aplysia, specifically and molluscs in general. A comparison of the Aplysia developmental transcriptome with similar studies in the zebra fish Danio rerio, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and other studies on molluscs suggests an overall highly divergent pattern of gene regulatory mechanisms that are likely a consequence of the different developmental modes of these organisms. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  11. Biomarkers for osteoarthritis: investigation, identification, and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhai G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Guangju Zhai,1,2 Erfan Aref Eshghi11Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's, NL, Canada; 2Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, King's College London, London, UKAbstract: Osteoarthritis (OA is the most common form of arthritis and results in substantial morbidity and disability in the elderly, imposing a great economic burden on society. While there are drugs available on the market that mitigate pain and improve function, there are no disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs, partly because there is no reliable method that can be used to identify early OA changes. There is a pressing need to develop reliable biomarkers that can inform on the process of joint destruction in OA. Such biomarkers could aid in drug development by identifying fast progressors and detecting early response to therapy, thus reducing patient numbers and time required for clinical trials. Over the last several years, dramatic advances in our understanding of the biochemistry of cartilage have led to a cascade of studies testing proteins as biomarkers of OA. Investigation of single-nucleotide polymorphisms as genetic biomarkers and the application of technologies such as metabolomics to OA are generating potentially additional biomarkers that could help detect early OA changes. This review summarizes the data on the investigation of biochemical and genetic markers in OA and highlights the new biomarkers that are recently reported and their application and limitation in the management of OA. However, despite the dramatic growth of knowledge concerning the discovery of a number of useful biomarkers, the real breakthrough in this area is still not achieved.Keywords: osteoarthritis, biochemical markers, metabolomics, genetics, epigenetics

  12. Peptide biomarkers as evidence of perchlorate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Reema; Crawford, Ronald L; Paszczynski, Andrzej J

    2011-02-01

    Perchlorate is a known health hazard for humans, fish, and other species. Therefore, it is important to assess the response of an ecosystem exposed to perchlorate contamination. The data reported here show that a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach for the detection of perchlorate-reducing enzymes can be used to measure the ability of microorganisms to degrade perchlorate, including determining the current perchlorate degradation status. Signature peptides derived from chlorite dismutase (CD) and perchlorate reductase can be used as biomarkers of perchlorate presence and biodegradation. Four peptides each derived from CD and perchlorate reductase subunit A (PcrA) and seven peptides derived from perchlorate reductase subunit B (PcrB) were identified as signature biomarkers for perchlorate degradation, as these sequences are conserved in the majority of the pure and mixed perchlorate-degrading microbial cultures examined. However, chlorite dismutase signature biomarker peptides from Dechloromonas agitata CKB were found to be different from those in other cultures used and should also be included with selected CD biomarkers. The combination of these peptides derived from the two enzymes represents a promising perchlorate presence/biodegradation biomarker system. The biomarker peptides were detected at perchlorate concentrations as low as 0.1 mM and at different time points both in pure cultures and within perchlorate-reducing environmental enrichment consortia. The peptide biomarkers were also detected in the simultaneous presence of perchlorate and an alternate electron acceptor, nitrate. We believe that this technique can be useful for monitoring bioremediation processes for other anthropogenic environmental contaminants with known metabolic pathways. PMID:21115710

  13. Introduction: biomarkers in neurodevelopment toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, H.L.

    1987-10-01

    The search for markers of toxicant exposure and effect upon the development of organisms presents a set of challenges that differ in many ways from those encountered in the study of markers in reproduction or pregnancy. These latter two fields specify a relatively narrow set of organs or biological systems. The term development, on the other hand, can apply to any organ system, or to any set of phenomena that changes in an ordered way over time. For this reason the papers presented in the session on development were chosen to narrow the focus to neurodevelopmental markers, as such markers may be altered by neurotoxic exposure. In attempting to meet this task, the authors have been able to select a group of investigators who work at the leading edges of their respective fields of developmental neuroanatomy, neurotoxicology, neuroendocrinology, neuropsychology, and infant development. The notion that toxicants could affect behavior certainly is not new. Recent knowledge that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral observation might provide early markers of effect has given rise to two new fields: behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology.

  14. Circular RNAs as potential biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengling; Nazarali, Adil J; Ji, Shaoping

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a naturally occurring type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs which unlike linear RNAs, have covalently linked ends. They are usually stable, abundant, conserved RNA molecules and often exhibit tissue/developmental-stage specific expression. Functional circRNAs have been identified to act as microRNA sponges and RNA-binding protein (RBP) sequestering agents as well as transcriptional regulators. These multiple functional roles elicit a great potential for circRNAs in biological applications. Emerging evidence shows that circRNAs play important roles in several diseases, particularly in cancer where they act through regulating protein expression of the pivotal genes that are critical for carcinogenesis. The presence of abundant circRNAs in saliva, exosomes and clinical standard blood samples will make them potential diagnostic or predictive biomarkers for diseases, particularly for cancer development, progression and prognosis. Here, we review the current literature and provide evidence for the impact of circRNAs in cancers and their potential significance in cancer prognosis and clinical treatment. PMID:27429839

  15. Behavioural biomarkers of typical Rett syndrome: moving towards early identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einspieler, Christa; Freilinger, Michael; Marschik, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The dynamic course of Rett syndrome (RTT) is still said to begin with a period of apparently normal development although there is mounting evidence that individuals with RTT show behavioural peculiarities and abnormalities during their infancy. Their spontaneous general movements are abnormal from birth onwards. Normal cooing vocalisation and canonical babbling (if at all required) are interspersed with abnormalities such as proto-vowel and proto-consonant alternations produced on ingressive airstream, breathy voice characteristics, and pressed or high-pitched vocalisations. The gestural repertoire is limited. Certain developmental motor and speech-language milestones are not at all acquired or show a significant delay. Besides abnormal blinking, repetitive and/or long lasting tongue protrusion, and bizarre smiling, there are already the first body and/or hand stereotypies during the first year of life. We are currently on a promising way to define a specific set of behavioural biomarkers pinpointing RTT. PMID:27514944

  16. Clinical relevance of different biomarkers in imported plasmodium falciparum malaria in adults: a case control study

    OpenAIRE

    Stauga, Sabine; Hahn, Andreas; Brattig, Norbert W.; Fischer-Herr, Johanna; Baldus, Stephan; Burchard, Gerd D; Cramer, Jakob P.

    2013-01-01

    Background For rapid initiation of anti-malarial treatment and prevention of complications, early diagnosis and risk stratification is important in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Routine laboratory values do not correlate well with disease severity. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic and prognostic value of several biomarkers related to inflammation; endothelial and cardiac dysfunction; coagulation, and haemolysis in imported P. falciparum malaria. Methods In ...

  17. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers in malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoni-Rugiu E

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eric Santoni-Rugiu, Morten Andersen, Morten Grauslund Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, a highly lethal cancer strictly related to asbestos exposure, is usually characterized by delayed diagnosis, resistance to current therapies, and dismal prognosis. MPM is difficult to distinguish histologically from nonmalignant reactive mesothelial proliferations (RMPs as there are no clinically validated immunohistochemical markers yet and the main diagnostic criterion remains deep invasion into the pleura and underlying fat tissue, which is often not appreciable in small pleural biopsies. In this regard, microRNAs (miRNAs, given their size and stability, are particularly attractive biomarkers in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens for routine pathology. Moreover, circulating miRNAs appear to be promising biomarkers for early detection and monitoring of patients with MPM. Here, we review the studies mostly performed by miRNA arrays and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded or frozen tissue samples, MPM cell lines, and blood/plasma/serum samples that have highlighted the potential of miRNAs as biomarkers in MPM. Certain studies have pointed to the ability of miRNAs to distinguish the different histological MPM subtypes or separate MPM from lung adenocarcinoma, and other investigations have revealed that miRNAs can aid in differentiating MPM from RMP or have prognostic value in predicting the patient outcome. Mechanistic aspects of the involvement of miRNAs in mesothelioma genesis and possible use of miRNAs as future therapeutic targets in MPM are also emphasized. Finally, limitations of the data currently obtained due to the drawbacks of reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, heterogeneity of MPM tissue samples, and

  18. Clinical Biomarkers for Hypoxia Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Courter, Don

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia or a reduction of the tissue oxygen tension is a key microenvironmental factor for tumor progression and treatment resistance in solid tumors. Because hypoxic tumor cells have been demonstrated to be more resistant to ionizing radiation, hypoxia has been a focus of laboratory and clinical research in radiation therapy for many decades. It is believed that proper detection of hypoxic regions would guide treatment options and ultimately improve tumor response. To date, most clinic...

  19. Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Saxton Transportation Operations Laboratory (Saxton Laboratory) is a state-of-the-art facility for conducting transportation operations research. The laboratory...

  20. Biomarkers and infection in the emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausfater, P

    2014-04-01

    The emergency unit is one of the main places for acute medical care and therefore, has a pivotal role in determining a diagnosis of bacterial infection and initiating antibiotic therapy. There is an unquestionable and growing interest for infection biomarkers because of the polymorphism of septic state presentations in the emergency unit and the lack of accuracy of available biological tools. The C Reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, not of infection. CRP is highly sensitive but lacks specificity. Moreover, there are few interventional studies evaluating its true added diagnostic value in the emergency unit, therefore preventing using CRP as a biomarker of infection. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) dosage is more specific for the diagnosis of bacterial infection. PCT levels do not increase or only slightly in non-bacterial inflammatory syndromes. PCT also provides prognostic information and risk stratification assessment in the emergency unit. Moreover, many authors of interventional studies have validated the contribution of PCT in decision taking for antibiotic therapy when suspecting low respiratory tract infection. It is currently the first-line biomarker of infection in the emergency unit. Other biomarkers such as presepsin (sCD14) may be contributive for the diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:24556451

  1. Biomarkers in the Management of Difficult Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Florence; Sophie, Demarche; Renaud, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Difficult asthma is a heterogeneous disease of the airways including various types of bronchial inflammation and various degrees of airway remodeling. Therapeutic response of severe asthmatics can be predicted by the use of biomarkers of Type2-high or Type2-low inflammation. Based on sputum cell analysis, four inflammatory phenotypes have been described. As induced sputum is timeconsuming and expensive technique, surrogate biomarkers are useful in clinical practice. Eosinophilic phenotype is likely to reflect ongoing adaptive immunity in response to allergen. Several biomarkers of eosinophilic asthma are easily available in clinical practice (blood eosinophils, serum IgE, exhaled nitric oxyde, serum periostin). Neutrophilic asthma is thought to reflect innate immune system activation in response to pollutants or infectious agents while paucigranulocytic asthma is thought to be not inflammatory and characterized by smooth muscle dysfunction. We currently lack of user-friendly biomarkers of neutrophilic asthma and airway remodeling. In this review, we summarize the biomarkers available for the management of difficult asthma. PMID:26467509

  2. Use of Obesity Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Pischon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD, yet, the underlying mechanisms are only poorly understood. The adipose tissue produces a variety of hormones and cytokines and thereby actively participates in a network of biomarkers that may be relevant for the development of CVD. Such obesity biomarkers have a great potential to better characterize the obesity phenotype that may be relevant for the risk of CVD beyond anthropometric parameters. They may be used to support mechanistic studies, to help identify individuals at risk for CVD, and to evaluate the effect of preventive measures. The present article discusses the role of some of the most promising obesity biomarkers in cardiovascular epidemiology, including inflammatory markers, adiponectin, resistin, and fetuin-A. Importantly, some of these markers have been related to cardiovascular risk even after accounting for anthropometric parameters. Further, the potential ability to manipulate blood levels of some of these biomarkers through medication, diet and lifestyle make them attractive markers for cardiovascular risk. However, many open questions remain – especially with regard to the causal role of the factors as well as with regard to the extent of improvement in CVD prediction by these markers – before measurement of these biomarkers may be recommended on a public health level.

  3. Incorporating Biomarkers in Studies of Chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Carol J; Kimler, Bruce F

    2016-01-01

    Despite Food and Drug Administration approval of tamoxifen and raloxifene for breast cancer risk reduction and endorsement by multiple agencies, uptake of these drugs for primary prevention in the United States is only 4% for risk eligible women likely to benefit from their use. Side effects coupled with incomplete efficacy and lack of a survival advantage are the likely reasons. This disappointing uptake, after the considerable effort and expense of large Phase III cancer incidence trials required for approval, suggests that a new paradigm is required. Current prevention research is focused on (1) refining risk prediction, (2) exploring behavioral and natural product interventions, and (3) utilizing novel translational trial designs for efficacy. Risk biomarkers will play a central role in refining risk estimates from traditional models and selecting cohorts for prevention trials. Modifiable risk markers called surrogate endpoint or response biomarkers will continue to be used in Phase I and II prevention trials to determine optimal dose or exposure and likely effectiveness from an intervention. The majority of Phase II trials will continue to assess benign breast tissue for response and mechanism of action biomarkers. Co-trials are those in which human and animal cohorts receive the same effective dose and the same tissue biomarkers are assessed for modulation due to the intervention, but then additional animals are allowed to progress to cancer development. These collaborations linking biomarker modulation and cancer prevention may obviate the need for cancer incidence trials for non-prescription interventions. PMID:26987531

  4. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing. PMID:26762498

  5. Biomarkers for neonatal sepsis: recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mally P

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pradeep Mally,1 Jie Xu,2 Karen D Hendricks-Muñoz2 1Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Abstract: As a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality, neonatal sepsis remains a significant global health challenge. Despite recent advances in the management of neonatal sepsis, including use of more potent antibiotics, timely identification continues to be a frequent and challenging problem in the management of the newborn or high-risk neonate in the neonatal intensive care unit. Lack of specific early objective diagnostic evaluations or specific signs and symptoms, especially in the preterm infant, impedes early identification. However, emerging technologies linked with enhanced understanding of the immature and developing neonatal immune system responses to early infection provide an opportunity to develop critically needed biomarkers to improve early identification in this high-risk population. This review will focus on the field of neonatal sepsis biomarker development, identifying current promising biomarkers that have been investigated and widely utilized, as well as provide insight into recent advances and the rapidly evolving technologies that are being exploited in biomarker development to improve diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis in neonatal sepsis. Keywords: biomarker, cytokines, neonatal sepsis, recent developments, morbidity, mortality, neonates

  6. Virtual Laboratories

    CERN Document Server

    Hut, P

    2006-01-01

    At the frontier of most areas in science, computer simulations play a central role. The traditional division of natural science into experimental and theoretical investigations is now completely outdated. Instead, theory, simulation, and experimentation form three equally essential aspects, each with its own unique flavor and challenges. Yet, education in computational science is still lagging far behind, and the number of text books in this area is minuscule compared to the many text books on theoretical and experimental science. As a result, many researchers still carry out simulations in a haphazard way, without properly setting up the computational equivalent of a well equipped laboratory. The art of creating such a virtual laboratory, while providing proper extensibility and documentation, is still in its infancy. A new approach is described here, Open Knowledge, as an extension of the notion of Open Source software. Besides open source code, manuals, and primers, an open knowledge project provides simul...

  7. Sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandner MA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael A Grandner,1,2 Megan R Sands-Lincoln,3 Victoria M Pak,2,4 Sheila N Garland1,5 1Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program, Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 2Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 3Center for Evidence Based Medicine, Elsevier Inc, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Division of Sleep Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA; 5Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, PA, USA Abstract: Habitual sleep duration has been associated with cardiometabolic disease, via several mechanistic pathways, but few have been thoroughly explored. One hypothesis is that short and/or long sleep duration is associated with a proinflammatory state, which could increase risk for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. This hypothesis has been largely explored in the context of experimental sleep deprivation studies which have attempted to demonstrate changes in proinflammatory markers following acute sleep loss in the laboratory. Despite the controlled environment available in these studies, samples tend to lack generalization to the population at large and acute sleep deprivation may not be a perfect analog for short sleep. To address these limitations, population based studies have explored associations between proinflammatory markers and habitual sleep duration. This review summarizes what is known from experimental and cross-sectional studies about the association between sleep duration, cardiovascular disease, and proinflammatory biomarkers. First, the association between sleep duration with both morbidity and mortality, with a focus on cardiovascular disease, is reviewed. Then, a brief review of the potential role of proinflammatory markers in cardiovascular disease is presented. The majority of this review details specific findings related to specific

  8. Laboratory investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our task is to design mined-repository systems that will adequately secure high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 yr and that will be mechanically stable for 50 to 100-yr periods of retrievability during which mistakes could be corrected and a valuable source of energy could be reclaimed, should national policy on the reprocessing of spent fuel ever change. The only credible path for the escape of radionuclides from the repository to the biosphere is through ground-water, and in hard rock, bulk permeability is largely governed by natural and artificial fracture systems. Catastrophic failure of an excavation in hard rock is likely to occur at the weakest links - the discontinuities in the rock mass that is perturbed first by mining and then by radiogenic heating. The laboratory can contribute precise measurements of the pertinent thermomechanical, hydrological and chemical properties and improve our understanding of the fundamental processes through careful experiments under well controlled conditions that simulate the prototype environment. Thus laboratory investigations are necessary, but they are not sufficient, for conventional sample sizes are small relative to natural defects like joints - i.e., the rock mass is not a continuum - and test durations are short compared to those that predictive modeling must take into account. Laboratory investigators can contribute substantially more useful data if they are provided facilities for testing large specimens(say one cubic meter) and for creep testing of all candidate host rocks. Even so, extrapolations of laboratory data to the field in neither space nor time are valid without the firm theoretical foundations yet to be built. Meanwhile in-situ measurements of structure-sensitive physical properties and access to direct observations of rock-mass character will be absolutely necessary

  9. Culham Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains summaries of work carried out under the following headings: fusion research experiments; U.K. contribution to the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; contract research; external relations; staff, finance and services. Appendices cover main characteristics of Culham fusion experiments, staff, extra-mural projects supported by Culham Laboratory, and a list of papers written by Culham staff. (U.K.)

  10. ALTERATIONS IN BRAIN PROTEIN KINASE C ISOFORMS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENTAL EXPOSURE TO POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYL MIXTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PCBs have been shown to alter several neurochemical end-points and are implicated in the etiology of some neurological diseases. Recent in vivo studies from our laboratory indicated that developmental exposure to a commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254, caused perturbations in cal...

  11. Developmental Gene Regulation and Mechanisms of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The Marine Biological Laboratory and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have established a cooperative agreement with the formation of a Center for Advanced Studies 'in the Space Life Sciences (CASSLS) at the MBL. This Center serves as an interface between NASA and the basic science community, addressing issues of mutual interest. The Center for Advanced Studies 'in the Space Life Sciences provides a forum for scientists to think and discuss, often for the first time, the role that gravity and aspects of spaceflight may play 'in fundamental cellular and physiologic processes. In addition the Center will sponsor discussions on evolutionary biology. These interactions will inform the community of research opportunities that are of interest to NASA. This workshop is one of a series of symposia, workshops and seminars that will be held at the MBL to advise NASA on a wide variety of topics in the life sciences, including cell biology, developmental biology, mg evolutionary biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, plant biology and systems biology.

  12. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G; Zarkovic, Neven;

    2015-01-01

    acids. RECENT ADVANCES: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. CRITICAL ISSUES: The literature is very heterogeneous...... using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. FUTURE DIRECTIONS: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers...... still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others...

  13. Do We Need Biomarkers for Disc Degeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E. Gruber

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Disc degeneration plays a major role in this country's medical, social and economic structure. The life-time prevalence of low back pain, which has disc degeneration as its cause, is about 80% in the general population. It is a primary cause of disability and estimated costs related to low back disorders exceed $100 billion per year in the U.S. alone. Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important as indicators of the presence of disease, and in evaluating outcomes during clinical treatment. Cell-based biologic therapies which are currently being developed to treat disc degeneration are going to be most efficacious when applied to the early stages of disc disease. In this article we ask: 1 Whether there are existing biomarkers which could play a role in detecting early stages of disc degeneration, and 2 Highlight exciting potentials in future biomarker screening for disc degeneration.

  14. DETECTION OF CANCER BIOMARKERS WITH NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of cancer biomarkers with high precision is critically important for cancer therapy. A variety of sensors based on different nanostructured materials have attracted intensive research interest due to their potential for highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer biomarkers. This review covers the use of a variety of nanostructured materials, including carbon nanotubes, silicon nanowires, gold nanoparticles and quantum dots, in the fabrication of sensors. Emphases are placed on how the detection systems work and what detection limits can be achieved. Some assays described in this review outperform established methods for cancer biomarker detection. It is highly promising that these sensors would soon move into commercial-scale production and find routine use in hospitals.

  15. Using Aptamers for Cancer Biomarker Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Min Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-stranded synthetic DNA- or RNA-based oligonucleotides that fold into various shapes to bind to a specific target, which includes proteins, metals, and molecules. Aptamers have high affinity and high specificity that are comparable to that of antibodies. They are obtained using iterative method, called (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment SELEX and cell-based SELEX (cell-SELEX. Aptamers can be paired with recent advances in nanotechnology, microarray, microfluidics, and other technologies for applications in clinical medicine. One particular area that aptamers can shed a light on is biomarker discovery. Biomarkers are important in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In this paper, we will describe ways in which aptamers can be used to discover biomarkers for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  16. Developmental modes and developmental mechanisms can channel brain evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine J Charvet

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Anseriform birds (ducks and geese as well as parrots and songbirds have evolved a disproportionately enlarged telencephalon compared with many other birds. However, parrots and songbirds differ from anseriform birds in their mode of development. Whereas ducks and geese are precocial (e.g., hatchlings feed on their own, parrots and songbirds are altricial (e.g., hatchlings are fed by their parents. We here consider how developmental modes may limit and facilitate specific changes in the mechanisms of brain development. We suggest that altriciality facilitates the evolution of telencephalic expansion by delaying telencephalic neurogenesis. We further hypothesize that delays in telencephalic neurogenesis generate delays in telencephalic maturation, which in turn foster neural adaptations that facilitate learning. Specifically, we propose that delaying telencephalic neurogenesis was a prerequisite for the evolution of neural circuits that allow parrots and songbirds to produce learned vocalizations. Overall, we argue that developmental modes have influenced how some lineages of birds increased the size of their telencephalon and that this, in turn, has influenced subsequent changes in brain circuits and behavior.

  17. Biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease therapeutic trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Harald; Wilcock, Gordon; Andrieu, Sandrine; Aisen, Paul; Blennow, Kaj; Broich, K; Carrillo, Maria; Fox, Nick C; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Isaac, Maria; Lovestone, Simon; Nordberg, Agneta; Prvulovic, David; Sampaio, Christina; Scheltens, Philip; Weiner, Michael; Winblad, Bengt; Coley, Nicola; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-12-01

    The development of disease-modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease requires innovative trials with large numbers of subjects and long observation periods. The use of blood, cerebrospinal fluid or neuroimaging biomarkers is critical for the demonstration of disease-modifying therapy effects on the brain. Suitable biomarkers are those which reflect the progression of AD related molecular mechanisms and neuropathology, including amyloidogenic processing and aggregation, hyperphosphorylation, accumulation of tau and neurofibrillary tangles, progressive functional, metabolic and structural decline, leading to neurodegeneration, loss of brain tissue and cognitive symptoms. Biomarkers should be used throughout clinical trial phases I-III of AD drug development. They can be used to enhance inclusion and exclusion criteria, or as baseline predictors to increase the statistical power of trials. Validated and qualified biomarkers may be used as outcome measures to detect treatment effects in pivotal clinical trials. Finally, biomarkers can be used to identify adverse effects. Questions regarding which biomarkers should be used in clinical trials, and how, are currently far from resolved. The Oxford Task Force continues and expands the work of our previous international expert task forces on disease-modifying trials and on endpoints for Alzheimer's disease clinical trials. The aim of this initiative was to bring together a selected number of key international opinion leaders and experts from academia, regulatory agencies and industry to condense the current knowledge and state of the art regarding the best use of biological markers in Alzheimer's disease therapy trials and to propose practical recommendations for the planning of future AD trials. PMID:21130138

  18. Music cognition: a developmental perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalinski, Stephanie M; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2012-10-01

    Although music is universal, there is a great deal of cultural variability in music structures. Nevertheless, some aspects of music processing generalize across cultures, whereas others rely heavily on the listening environment. Here, we discuss the development of musical knowledge, focusing on four themes: (a) capabilities that are present early in development; (b) culture-general and culture-specific aspects of pitch and rhythm processing; (c) age-related changes in pitch perception; and (d) developmental changes in how listeners perceive emotion in music. PMID:22811391

  19. Stable Feature Selection for Biomarker Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    He, Zengyou

    2010-01-01

    Feature selection techniques have been used as the workhorse in biomarker discovery applications for a long time. Surprisingly, the stability of feature selection with respect to sampling variations has long been under-considered. It is only until recently that this issue has received more and more attention. In this article, we review existing stable feature selection methods for biomarker discovery using a generic hierarchal framework. We have two objectives: (1) providing an overview on this new yet fast growing topic for a convenient reference; (2) categorizing existing methods under an expandable framework for future research and development.

  20. Specific language impairment as systemic developmental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Parisse, Christophe; Maillart, Christelle

    2009-01-01

    Specific Language Impairment (SLI) is a disorder characterised by slow, abnormal language development.Most children with this disorder do not present any other cognitive or neurological deficits. Thereare many different pathological developmental profiles and switches from one profile to another oftenoccur. An alternative would be to consider SLI as a generic name covering three developmental languagedisorders: developmental verbal dyspraxia, linguistic dysphasia, and pragmatic language impai...

  1. Psychotherapy with people with developmental disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Zafošnik

    2011-01-01

    People with developmental disabilities can experience any psychological abnormalitiy and psychiatric illness as do people without developmental disabilities. Due to different diagnostic criteria, assessment procedures and instruments, we lack definite prevalence rates for people with developmental disabilities, also suffering from mental health problems, eventhough most studies place the rate at 20 to 40%. One of the possible treatment alternatives for augmenting psychological well-being is p...

  2. Early Intervention in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Developmental disabilities consist of conditions that delay or impair the physical, cognitive, and/or psychological development of children. If not intervened at the earliest, these disabilities will cause significant negative impact on multiple domains of functioning such as learning, language, self-care and capacity for independent living. Common developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. About one fourth...

  3. ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARSENITE INDUCTION OF HEME OXYGENASE AS A BIOMARKER Useful biomarkers of arsenic effects in both experimental animals and humans are needed. Arsenate and arsenite are good inducers of rat hepatic and renal heme oxygenase (HO); monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsi...

  4. Association between Pulmonary Function and Sputum Biomarkers in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole; Aitken, Moira L.; Accurso, Frank J.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Konstan, Michael W.; Burns, Jane L.; Sagel, Scott D.; Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Sputum biomarkers of infection and inflammation are noninvasive measures that enable quantification of the complex pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Validation of these biomarkers as correlates of disease severity is a key step for their application.

  5. Recent Advances on Lipid Biomarkers in Marine Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-lin

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent advances of marine biomarker. Biomarkers of marine microorganisms are also included. It is important to the origin of marine biological and the monitor and evaluation of marine environment.

  6. Biomarkers of ambient air pollution and lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demetriou, Christiana A; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Loft, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    these studies, causality assessment can benefit from biomarker research. In the present systematic review, we assess the contribution of intermediate biomarkers in epidemiological studies, to ascertain whether their measurement reinforces causal reasoning. We have reviewed 524 papers which described the...

  7. Strategies, models and biomarkers in experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrords, Joost; Pereira, Isabel Veloso Alves; Maes, Michaël; Yanguas, Sara Crespo; Colle, Isabelle; Van Den Bossche, Bert; Da silva, Tereza Cristina; Oliveira, Cláudia P; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Cogliati, Bruno; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of liver diseases, including simple steatosis, steatohepatitis, liver fibrosis and cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is currently the most dominant chronic liver disease in Western countries due to the fact that hepatic steatosis is associated with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, metabolic syndrome and drug-induced injury. A variety of chemicals, mainly drugs, and diets is known to cause hepatic steatosis in humans and rodents. Experimental non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models rely on the application of a diet or the administration of drugs to laboratory animals or the exposure of hepatic cell lines to these drugs. More recently, genetically modified rodents or zebrafish have been introduced as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease models. Considerable interest now lies in the discovery and development of novel non-invasive biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, with specific focus on hepatic steatosis. Experimental diagnostic biomarkers of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, such as (epi)genetic parameters and ‘-omics’-based read-outs are still in their infancy, but show great promise. . In this paper, the array of tools and models for the study of liver steatosis is discussed. Furthermore, the current state-of-art regarding experimental biomarkers such as epigenetic, genetic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabonomic biomarkers will be reviewed. PMID:26073454

  8. Serum biomarkers in patients with relapsing eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Dejaco

    Full Text Available Previous studies suggest a role for eotaxin-3, TARC/CCL17 and IgG4 in newly-diagnosed patients with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA, Churg-Strauss with highly active disease. The role of these biomarkers in relapsing disease is unclear.Serum levels of TARC/CCL17, eotaxin-3, IgG4, and IgG4/IgG ratio were determined in serum samples from a longitudinal cohort of patients with EGPA (105 visits of 25 patients. Epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data were available for all visits.At the first visit, 80% of patients were using glucocorticoids and 68% additional immunosuppressive drugs. Disease flares were seen at 18 visits. The median BVAS and BVAS/WG scores at time of relapse were 4 and 2, respectively. None of the biomarkers tested were useful to discriminate between active disease and remission. Patients treated with prednisone had lower eotaxin-3 and eosinophil levels compared to patients not taking glucocorticoids irrespective of disease activity. Use of immunosuppressive agents was not associated with biomarker levels.Serum levels of TARC/CCL17, eotaxin-3, IgG4, and IgG4/IgG ratio do not clearly differentiate active and inactive disease in established EGPA. Defining biomarkers in EGPA remains a challenge especially during times of glucocorticoid use.

  9. Non-traditional electrode materials for detection of biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Barek, Jiří; Moreira, Josino C.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, new electrochemical methods suitable for detection of various types of biomarkers (biomarkers of exposition, tumor biomarkers, and biomarkers of medical treatment) are briefly reviewed. Attention is paid to the use of non-traditional electrode materials (various forms of amalgam electrodes, boron doped diamond film electrodes, carbon paste and carbon film electrodes, etc.) for voltammetric (batch analysis) and amperometric (flowing systems) detection of above mentio...

  10. Number development and developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Aster, Michael G; Shalev, Ruth S

    2007-11-01

    There is a growing consensus that the neuropsychological underpinnings of developmental dyscalculia (DD) are a genetically determined disorder of 'number sense', a term denoting the ability to represent and manipulate numerical magnitude nonverbally on an internal number line. However, this spatially-oriented number line develops during elementary school and requires additional cognitive components including working memory and number symbolization (language). Thus, there may be children with familial-genetic DD with deficits limited to number sense and others with DD and comorbidities such as language delay, dyslexia, or attention-deficit-hyperactivity disorder. This duality is supported by epidemiological data indicating that two-thirds of children with DD have comorbid conditions while one-third have pure DD. Clinically, they differ according to their profile of arithmetic difficulties. fMRI studies indicate that parietal areas (important for number functions), and frontal regions (dominant for executive working memory and attention functions), are under-activated in children with DD. A four-step developmental model that allows prediction of different pathways for DD is presented. The core-system representation of numerical magnitude (cardinality; step 1) provides the meaning of 'number', a precondition to acquiring linguistic (step 2), and Arabic (step 3) number symbols, while a growing working memory enables neuroplastic development of an expanding mental number line during school years (step 4). Therapeutic and educational interventions can be drawn from this model. PMID:17979867

  11. Auditory learning: a developmental method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yilu; Weng, Juyang; Hwang, Wey-Shiuan

    2005-05-01

    Motivated by the human autonomous development process from infancy to adulthood, we have built a robot that develops its cognitive and behavioral skills through real-time interactions with the environment. We call such a robot a developmental robot. In this paper, we present the theory and the architecture to implement a developmental robot and discuss the related techniques that address an array of challenging technical issues. As an application, experimental results on a real robot, self-organizing, autonomous, incremental learner (SAIL), are presented with emphasis on its audition perception and audition-related action generation. In particular, the SAIL robot conducts the auditory learning from unsegmented and unlabeled speech streams without any prior knowledge about the auditory signals, such as the designated language or the phoneme models. Neither available before learning starts are the actions that the robot is expected to perform. SAIL learns the auditory commands and the desired actions from physical contacts with the environment including the trainers. PMID:15940990

  12. Urinary Biomarkers in the Assessment of Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Petrica, Ligia; Timar, Romulus; Velciov, Silvia; Ionita, Ioana; Kaycsa, Adriana; Timar, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a frequent and severe complication of diabetes mellitus (DM). Its diagnosis in incipient stages may allow prompt interventions and an improved prognosis. Towards this aim, biomarkers for detecting early DN can be used. Microalbuminuria has been proven a remarkably useful biomarker, being used for diagnosis of DN, for assessing its associated condition—mainly cardiovascular ones—and for monitoring its progression. New researches are pointing that some of these biomarkers (i.e., glomerular, tubular, inflammation markers, and biomarkers of oxidative stress) precede albuminuria in some patients. However, their usefulness is widely debated in the literature and has not yet led to the validation of a new “gold standard” biomarker for the early diagnosis of DN. Currently, microalbuminuria is an important biomarker for both glomerular and tubular injury. Other glomerular biomarkers (transferrin and ceruloplasmin) are under evaluation. Tubular biomarkers in DN seem to be of a paramount importance in the early diagnosis of DN since tubular lesions occur early. Additionally, biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, podocyte biomarkers, and vascular biomarkers have been employed for assessing early DN. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the current biomarkers used for the diagnosis of early DN.

  13. Biomarkers for predicting complete debulking in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten Lindberg; Ottesen, Bent; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Nedergaard, Lotte; Engelholm, Svend-Aage; Antonsen, Sofie Leisby; Lydolph, Magnus; Høgdall, Claus

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We aimed to construct and validate a model based on biomarkers to predict complete primary debulking surgery for ovarian cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study consisted of three parts: Part I: Biomarker data obtained from mass spectrometry, baseline data and, surgical outcome were.......64. CONCLUSION: Our validated model based on biomarkers was unable to predict surgical outcome for patients with ovarian cancer....

  14. SERUM BIOMARKERS OF AGING IN THE BROWN NORWAY RAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum biomarkers to identify susceptibility to disease in aged humans are well researched. On the other hand, our understanding of biomarkers in animal models of aging is limited. Hence, we applied a commercially available panel of 58 serum analytes to screen for possible biomark...

  15. Making developmental biology relevant to undergraduates in an era of economic rationalism in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Brian; Nurcombe, Victor

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the road map we followed at our university to accommodate three main factors: financial pressure within the university system; desire to enhance the learning experience of undergraduates; and motivation to increase the prominence of the discipline of developmental biology in our university. We engineered a novel, multi-year undergraduate developmental biology program which was "student-oriented," ensuring that students were continually exposed to the underlying principles and philosophy of this discipline throughout their undergraduate career. Among its key features are introductory lectures in core courses in the first year, which emphasize the relevance of developmental biology to tissue engineering, reproductive medicine, therapeutic approaches in medicine, agriculture and aquaculture. State-of-the-art animated computer graphics and images of high visual impact are also used. In addition, students are streamed into the developmental biology track in the second year, using courses like human embryology and courses shared with cell biology, which include practicals based on modern experimental approaches. Finally, fully dedicated third-year courses in developmental biology are undertaken in conjunction with stand-alone practical courses where students experiencefirst-hand work in a research laboratory. Our philosophy is a "cradle-to-grave" approach to the education of undergraduates so as to prepare highly motivated, enthusiastic and well-educated developmental biologists for entry into graduate programs and ultimately post-doctoral research. PMID:12705657

  16. Biomarkers of necrotising soft tissue infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Simonsen, Ulf; Garred, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mortality and amputation rates are still high in patients with necrotising soft tissue infections (NSTIs). It would be ideal to have a set of biomarkers that enables the clinician to identify high-risk patients with NSTI on admission. The objectives of this study are to evaluate...

  17. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopci, Egesta; Chiti, Arturo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Nuclear Medicine Department, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Franzese, Ciro; Navarria, Pierina; Scorsetti, Marta [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiosurgery and Radiotherapy, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Grimaldi, Marco [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Radiology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Simonelli, Matteo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Medical Oncology, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Bello, Lorenzo [Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Neurosurgery, Rozzano, MI (Italy)

    2015-04-01

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  18. Blood Biomarkers for Evaluation of Perinatal Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Ernest M.; Burd, Irina; Everett, Allen D.; Northington, Frances J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products, and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the “liquid brain biopsy.” A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment. PMID:27468268

  19. Hypermethylated DNA, a Biomarker for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Ladefoged; Krarup, Henrik Bygum; Sunesen, Kåre Gotschalck;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: In colorectal cancer (CRC), improved methods for early detection are essential for increasing survival. Hypermethylated DNA in blood or stool has been proposed as a biomarker for CRC. In recent years, biochemical methods have improved, and several hypermethylated genes that are sensitive and...

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarker candidates for parkinsonian disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RaduConstantinescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD and atypical parkinsonian disorders, such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in atypical parkinsonian disorders compared with PD and healthy controls. The new "omics" techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives.

  1. Identification of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer (PCa was the second most common type of cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The great challenge for physicians is being able to accurately predict PCa prognosis and treatment response in order to reduce PCa-speciic mortality while avoiding overtreatment by identifying of when to intervene, and in which patients. CONTENT: Currently, PCa prognosis and treatment decision of PCa involved digital rectal examination, Prostate-Speciic Antigens (PSA, and subsequent biopsies for histopathological staging, known as Gleason score. However, each procedure has its shortcomings. Efforts to find a better clinically meaningful and non-invasive biomarkers still developed involving proteins, circulating tumor cells, nucleic acids, and the ‘omics' approaches. SUMMARY: Biomarkers for PCa will most likely be an assay employing multiple biomarkers in combination using protein and gene microarrays, containing markers that are differentially expressed in PCa. KEYWORDS: prostate cancer, PSA, biomarkers, nomograms, miRNA, proteomic, genomic, metabolomic.

  2. Imaging biomarkers in primary brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are getting used to referring to instrumentally detectable biological features in medical language as ''imaging biomarkers''. These two terms combined reflect the evolution of medical imaging during recent decades, and conceptually comprise the principle of noninvasive detection of internal processes that can become targets for supplementary therapeutic strategies. These targets in oncology include those biological pathways that are associated with several tumour features including independence from growth and growth-inhibitory signals, avoidance of apoptosis and immune system control, unlimited potential for replication, self-sufficiency in vascular supply and neoangiogenesis, acquired tissue invasiveness and metastatic diffusion. Concerning brain tumours, there have been major improvements in neurosurgical techniques and radiotherapy planning, and developments of novel target drugs, thus increasing the need for reproducible, noninvasive, quantitative imaging biomarkers. However, in this context, conventional radiological criteria may be inappropriate to determine the best therapeutic option and subsequently to assess response to therapy. Integration of molecular imaging for the evaluation of brain tumours has for this reason become necessary, and an important role in this setting is played by imaging biomarkers in PET and MRI. In the current review, we describe most relevant techniques and biomarkers used for imaging primary brain tumours in clinical practice, and discuss potential future developments from the experimental context. (orig.)

  3. Biomarkers: A potential prognostic tool for silicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Jai Krishna; Agarwal, Deepa

    2012-09-01

    Long-term exposure to respirable dust containing silica leads to pneumoconiosis/silicosis. The disease is irreversible and incurable, and only preventive steps such as job rotation, use of personal protective equipment, etc., remain solutions to the problem. Under such a situation, early diagnosis or prediction may become very useful to control the disease. Biomarkers are biological parameters in blood serum that change their values with deposition of dust in the lung and onset of lung fibrosis. Since these biomarkers can help us to diagnose and in the prognosis of the disease before it is actually diagnosed by the conventional X-ray technique and lung function test used for diagnosis of silicosis. The present paper describes the various types of available biomarkers, their application and usefulness. The paper also suggests that further study of the behavior/level of these biomarkers on a specific subject with time may provide more useful information of a confirmatory nature for prevention of dust-linked diseases. PMID:23776317

  4. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, J.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Payne, G.S.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T{sub 1} relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. (orig.)

  5. A momentary biomarker for depressive mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyuk; Nakamura, Toru; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2016-12-01

    Many biomarkers from genetic, neuroimaging, and biological/biochemical measures have been recently developed in order to make a shift toward the objective evaluation of psychiatric disorders. However, they have so far been less successful in capturing dynamical changes or transitions in pathological states, such as those occurring during the course of clinical treatments or pathogenic processes of disorders. A momentary biomarker is now required for objective monitoring of such dynamical changes. The development of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) allows the assessment of dynamical aspects of diurnal/daily clinical conditions and subjective symptoms. Furthermore, a variety of validation studies on momentary symptoms assessed by EMA using behavioral/physiological/biochemical measures have demonstrated the possibility of evaluating momentary symptoms from such external objective measures. In this review, we introduce physical activity as a candidate biobehavioral biomarker for psychiatric disorders. We also mention its potential as a momentary biomarker for depressive mood. Finally, we address the continuous monitoring of the pathogenic processes and pathological states of depressive disorders based on physical activity, as well as its application in pharmacological animal studies. PMID:26979449

  6. Dissociable brain biomarkers of fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Erick J; Larsen, Ryan J; Nikolaidis, Aki; Ward, Nathan; Hillman, Charles H; Cohen, Neal J; Kramer, Arthur F; Barbey, Aron K

    2016-08-15

    Cognitive neuroscience has long sought to understand the biological foundations of human intelligence. Decades of research have revealed that general intelligence is correlated with two brain-based biomarkers: the concentration of the brain biochemical N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and total brain volume measured using structural MR imaging (MRI). However, the relative contribution of these biomarkers in predicting performance on core facets of human intelligence remains to be well characterized. In the present study, we sought to elucidate the role of NAA and brain volume in predicting fluid intelligence (Gf). Three canonical tests of Gf (BOMAT, Number Series, and Letter Sets) and three working memory tasks (Reading, Rotation, and Symmetry span tasks) were administered to a large sample of healthy adults (n=211). We conducted exploratory factor analysis to investigate the factor structure underlying Gf independent from working memory and observed two Gf components (verbal/spatial and quantitative reasoning) and one working memory component. Our findings revealed a dissociation between two brain biomarkers of Gf (controlling for age and sex): NAA concentration correlated with verbal/spatial reasoning, whereas brain volume correlated with quantitative reasoning and working memory. A follow-up analysis revealed that this pattern of findings is observed for males and females when analyzed separately. Our results provide novel evidence that distinct brain biomarkers are associated with specific facets of human intelligence, demonstrating that NAA and brain volume are independent predictors of verbal/spatial and quantitative facets of Gf. PMID:27184204

  7. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  8. Novel biomarkers for pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Anjum; Ruffenach, Gregoire; Mahajan, Aman; Eghbali, Mansoureh; Umar, Soban

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a deadly disease characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressures leading to right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. The confirmatory gold standard test is the invasive right heart catheterization. The disease course is monitored by pulmonary artery systolic pressure measurement via transthoracic echocardiography. A simple non-invasive test to frequently monitor the patients is much needed. Search for a novel biomarker that can be detected by a simple test is ongoing and many different options are being studied. Here we review some of the new and unique pre-clinical options for potential pulmonary hypertension biomarkers. These biomarkers can be broadly categorized based on their association with endothelial cell dysfunction, inflammation, epigenetics, cardiac function, oxidative stress, metabolism,extracellular matrix, and volatile compounds in exhaled breath condensate. A biomarker that can be detected in blood, urine or breath condensate and correlates with disease severity, progression and response to therapy may result in significant cost reduction and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27439993

  9. Biomarkers of drug-induced vascular injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In pre-clinical safety studies, drug-induced vascular injury is an issue of concern because there are no obvious diagnostic markers for pre-clinical or clinical monitoring and there is an intellectual gap in our understanding of the pathogenesis of this lesion. While vasodilatation and increased shear stress appear to play a role, the exact mechanism(s) of injury to the primary targets, smooth muscle and endothelial cells are unknown. However, evaluation of novel markers for potential clinical monitoring with a mechanistic underpinning would add value in risk assessment and management. This mini review focuses on the progress to identify diagnostic markers of drug-induced vascular injury. Von Willebrand factor (vWF), released upon perturbation of endothelial cells, is transiently increased in plasma prior to morphological evidence of damage in dogs or rats treated with vascular toxicants. Therefore, vWF might be a predictive biomarker of vascular injury. However, vWF is not an appropriate biomarker of lesion progression or severity since levels return to baseline values when there is morphological evidence of injury. A potential mechanistically linked biomarker of vascular injury is caveolin-1. Expression of this protein, localized primarily to smooth muscle and endothelial cells, decreases with the onset of vascular damage. Since vascular injury involves multiple mediators and cell types, evaluation of a panel rather than a single biomarker may be more useful in monitoring early and severe progressive vascular injury

  10. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I.; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K.

    2016-02-09

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  11. Biomarkers: A potential prognostic tool for silicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Krishna Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-term exposure to respirable dust containing silica leads to pneumoconiosis/silicosis. The disease is irreversible and incurable, and only preventive steps such as job rotation, use of personal protective equipment, etc., remain solutions to the problem. Under such a situation, early diagnosis or prediction may become very useful to control the disease. Biomarkers are biological parameters in blood serum that change their values with deposition of dust in the lung and onset of lung fibrosis. Since these biomarkers can help us to diagnose and in the prognosis of the disease before it is actually diagnosed by the conventional X-ray technique and lung function test used for diagnosis of silicosis. The present paper describes the various types of available biomarkers, their application and usefulness. The paper also suggests that further study of the behavior/level of these biomarkers on a specific subject with time may provide more useful information of a confirmatory nature for prevention of dust-linked diseases.

  12. Biomarkers in kidney and heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maisel, Alan S.; Katz, Nevin; Hillege, Hans L.; Shaw, Andrew; Zanco, Pierluigi; Bellomo, Rinaldo; Anand, Inder; Anker, Stefan D.; Aspromonte, Nadia; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Berl, Tomas; Bobek, Ilona; Cruz, Dinna N.; Daliento, Luciano; Davenport, Andrew; Haapio, Mikko; House, Andrew A.; Mankad, Sunil; McCullough, Peter; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Palazzuoli, Alberto; Ponikowski, Piotr; Ronco, Federico; Sheinfeld, Geoff; Soni, Sachin; Vescovo, Giorgio; Zamperetti, Nereo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    There is much symptomatic similarity between acute kidney disease and acute heart disease. Both may present with shortness of breath and chest discomfort, and thus it is not surprising that biomarkers of acute myocardial and renal disease often coexist in many physicians' diagnostic work-up schedule

  13. Biomarkers and surrogate endpoints in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, Erum A

    2016-03-01

    Kidney disease and its related comorbidities impose a large public health burden. Despite this, the number of clinical trials in nephrology lags behind many other fields. An important factor contributing to the relatively slow pace of nephrology trials is that existing clinical endpoints have significant limitations. "Hard" endpoints for chronic kidney disease, such as progression to end-stage renal disease, may not be reached for decades. Traditional biomarkers, such as serum creatinine in acute kidney injury, may lack sensitivity and predictive value. Finding new biomarkers to serve as surrogate endpoints is therefore an important priority in kidney disease research and may help to accelerate nephrology clinical trials. In this paper, I first review key concepts related to the selection of clinical trial endpoints and discuss statistical and regulatory considerations related to the evaluation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints. This is followed by a discussion of the challenges and opportunities in developing novel biomarkers and surrogate endpoints in three major areas of nephrology research: acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. PMID:25980469

  14. Cocktail effects on biomarker responses in fish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of today's greatest challenges in environmental toxicology is to understand effects of mixture toxicity, commonly referred to as cocktail effects, in humans and in wildlife. Biomarker responses in fish are routinely used to assess exposure of anthropogenic chemicals in the aquatic environment. However, little is known about how cocktail effects affect these biomarker responses. For this reason, there is an obvious risk for misinterpretation of biomarker-data and this can have profound negative effects on stakeholder's decisions and actions, as well as on legislations and remediation-plans initiated in order to reduce exposure to certain chemicals. Besides, chemical safety-levels are traditionally based on experiences from lab-studies with single chemicals, which is unfortunate as a chemical can be more toxic when it is mixed with other chemicals, because of the cocktail effect. This review focuses on pharmacokinetic interactions between different classes of pollutants on detoxification mechanisms and how that affects two commonly used biomarkers in the aquatic environment: (1) induction of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP1A) that is mediated via activation of the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), used to assess exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons; (2) induction of vitellogenin (VTG) that is mediated via activation of the estrogen receptor (ER), used to assess exposure to estrogenic chemicals. These responses can be either directly or indirectly affected by the presence of other classes of pollutants as a result of cocktail effects. For example, chemicals that inhibit the function of key metabolic enzymes and transporter pumps that are involved in elimination of AhR- and ER agonists, can result in bioaccumulation of aromatic hydrocarbons and estrogenic chemicals resulting in increased biomarker responses. This cocktail effect can lead to overestimation of the actual exposure pressure. On the contrary, induction of expression of key metabolic enzymes and transporter

  15. Chiral Biomarkers and Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Homochirality of the biomolecules (D-sugars of DNA and RNA and L-amino acids of proteins) is a fundamental property of all life on Earth. Abiotic mechanisms yield racemic mixtures (D/L=1) of chiral molecules and after the death of an organism, the enantiopure chiral biomolecules slowly racemize. Several independent investigators have now established that the amino acids present in CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites have a moderate to strong excess of the L-enantiomer. Stable isotope data have established that these amino acids are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain many other strong chemical biomarkers including purines and pyrimidines (nitrogen heterocycles of nucleic acids); pristine and phytane (components of the chlorophyll pigment) and morphological biomarkers (microfossils of filamentous cyanobacteria). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis reveals that nitrogen is below the detectability level in most of the meteorite filaments as well as in Cambrian Trilobites and filaments of 2.7 Gya Archaean cyanobacteria from Karelia. The deficiency of nitrogen in the filaments and the total absence of sugars, of twelve of the life-critical protein amino acids, and two of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA provide clear and convincing evidence that these filaments are not modern biological contaminants. This paper reviews the chiral, chemical biomarkers morphological biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites. This paper reviews chiral and morphological biomarkers and discusses the missing nitrogen, sugars, protein amino acids, and nucleobases as ?bio-discriminators? that exclude modern biological contaminants as a possible explanation for the permineralized cyanobacterial filaments found in the meteorites.

  16. An update on biomarkers in axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajzlerová, Klára; Grobelná, Kristýna; Pavelka, Karel; Šenolt, Ladislav; Filková, Mária

    2016-06-01

    Axial spondyloarthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease with the onset at a young age, and, if undiagnosed and untreated, it may result in permanent damage and lifelong disability. Rates of early diagnosis have improved, due in particular to the addition of magnetic resonance imaging into the diagnostic armamentaria; however, it is costly, not widely available, and requires experienced readers to interpret the findings. In addition to clinical measures and imaging techniques, biomarkers that will be described in this review may represent useful tools for diagnosis, monitoring disease activity and outcomes as well as therapeutic responses. Currently, HLA-B27 remains the best genetic biomarker for making a diagnosis, while CRP currently appears to be the best circulating measure for assessing disease activity, predicting structural progression and therapeutic response. Interestingly, key molecules in the pathogenesis of the disease and essential therapeutic targets, such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-23, show only limited association with disease characteristics or disease progression. Some genetic biomarkers and particularly anti-CD74 antibodies, may become a promising tool for the early diagnosis of axSpA. Further biomarkers, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-3, calprotectin (S100A8/9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), C-terminal telopeptide of type II collagen (CTX-II) or dickkopf-1 (DKK-1), are not sufficient to reflect disease activity, but may predict spinal structural progression. In addition, recent data have shown that monitoring calprotectin might represent a valuable biomarker of therapeutic response. However, all of these results need to be confirmed in large cohort studies prior to use in daily clinical practice. PMID:26851549

  17. Biomarkers: how detect life on mineral matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Teresa; Brucato, John Robert; Pucci, Amaranta; Baratta, Giuseppe; Branciamore, Sergio

    2012-07-01

    Life Marker Chip (LMC) is a bioanalytical instrument on board of the ESA Exomars mission to detect specific organic molecules that may be associated with life on Mars. Observation of possible biomarkers is critical for the understanding of prebiotic evolution and to detect signature of past and/or present life on other extraterrestrial body. Biomarkers usually are associated with mineral matrix, so it is necessary to investigate the nature of the interaction of organic molecules with minerals. Our approach is to combine physical-chemical analisys (adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics, surface area measurement, etc.) with FTIR and Raman spectroscopy in order to clarify the kind of interaction at molecular level between biomarkers and minerals. In particular we focus our attention on nucleobases that are the precursor of genetic material (DNA, RNA) with several minerals (MgO, forsterite, TiO2, hydroxylapatite, olivine) that mimic extraterrestrial materials. A second objective was to investigate the desorption processes in order to optimize the experimental procedure for the detection of biomarkers in the contest of LMC. In this study we have evaluated the effect of several parameters such as sonication and temperature on the extraction efficiency. Moreover because the desorption process strongly depends on the chemical nature of organics and minerals and on their own interaction, we have also evaluated the capability of different solvent mixtures (water, methanol, etc.) with different polarity and the use of surfactant (Tween 80) to extract previously adsorbed biomolecules. The results obtained could contribute to improve the biomarker extraction procedure in the LMC experiment.

  18. Mining of hospital laboratory information systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Jensen, Peter Bjødstrup; Werge, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    of hospital laboratory data as a source of information, we analyzed enzymatic plasma creatinine as a model analyte in two large pediatric hospital samples. Methods: Plasma creatinine measurements from 9700 children aged 0-18 years were obtained from hospital laboratory databases and partitioned into high...... in creatinine levels at different time points after birth and around the early teens, which challenges the establishment and usefulness of reference intervals in those age groups. Conclusions: The study documents that hospital laboratory data may inform on the developmental aspects of creatinine, on periods......Abstract Background: The knowledge of physiological fluctuation and variation of even commonly used biochemical quantities in extreme age groups and during development is sparse. This challenges the clinical interpretation and utility of laboratory tests in these age groups. To explore the utility...

  19. Cross-Modal Binding in Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Manon W.; Branigan, Holly P.; Parra, Mario A.; Logie, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to learn visual-phonological associations is a unique predictor of word reading, and individuals with developmental dyslexia show impaired ability in learning these associations. In this study, we compared developmentally dyslexic and nondyslexic adults on their ability to form cross-modal associations (or "bindings") based…

  20. Working Memory in Children with Developmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Rajendran, Gnanathusharan; Archibald, Lisa M. D.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to directly compare working memory skills across students with different developmental disorders to investigate whether the uniqueness of their diagnosis would impact memory skills. The authors report findings confirming differential memory profiles on the basis of the following developmental disorders: Specific…

  1. Issues Surrounding Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, David; Kirby, Amanda; Dunford, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Like other developmental disorders such as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, specific language impairment and dyslexia, there is no shortage of debate surrounding the condition of Developmental Coordination Disorder. The present article takes a global view of many of these debatable issues, starting with definition and terminology, moving…

  2. A developmental model of number representation

    OpenAIRE

    Kucian, K; Kaufmann, L.

    2009-01-01

    We delineate a developmental model of number representations. Notably, developmental dyscalculia (DD) is rarely associated with an all-or-none deficit in numerosity processing as would be expected if assuming abstract number representations. Finally, we suggest that the “generalist genes” view might be a plausible – though thus far speculative – explanatory framework for our model of how number representations develop.

  3. Essential Role of Culture in Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joan G.

    2005-01-01

    This chapter argues for the essential role of culture in forming the basic constructs and theories of developmental psychology. The case is made for the need to overcome the cultural insularity of core developmental concepts and methods in order to create a psychology that is more truly universal.

  4. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH) Page ( 1 ) The hip is a “ball-and-socket” joint. In a normal hip, the ball at the ... American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. .org Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip cont. • Family history of DDH (parents or siblings) • ...

  5. Developmental Dyspraxia: Is It a Unitary Function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, A. Jean; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A group of 182 children (ages four through nine) with known or suspected sensory integrative dysfunction were assessed using tests and clinical observations to examine developmental dyspraxia. The study did not justify the existence of either a unitary function or different types of developmental dyspraxia. (Author/CH)

  6. Specific Developmental Disorders of Scholastic Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Beena Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Several factors contribute to scholastic backwardness in children. Causes include specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills, low intelligence, chronic illnesses, family dysfunction, social problems, attention deficits, and emotional disorders. Children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills experience significant impairment in the acquisition of reading, writing and mathematical skills. If not remedied at the earliest, these children are at risk of developing s...

  7. Psychological Resources of Adults with Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockiewicz, Marta; Bogdanowicz, Katarzyna M.; Bogdanowicz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe specific psychological resources of adults with developmental dyslexia and compare them with psychological resources of adults without developmental dyslexia. Potential differences were analyzed in visual-spatial, creative, and motivational abilities. No evidence was found for either creative, or visuospatial…

  8. A Taxometric Investigation of Developmental Dyslexia Subtypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Beth A.; Wolf, Maryanne; Lovett, Maureen W.

    2012-01-01

    Long-standing issues with the conceptualization, identification and subtyping of developmental dyslexia persist. This study takes an alternative approach to examine the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia using taxometric classification techniques. These methods were used with a large sample of 671 children ages 6-8 who were diagnosed with…

  9. Progress and unresolved issues in developmental psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Sergeant; P.J.M. Prins

    1997-01-01

    (from the chapter) Discusses the definition of abnormality, the association between disorders, role of age, maturation and developmental processes in the manifestation, recognition, and assessment of developmental psychopathology in children using the life-span approach. Questions of how the predict

  10. Delaying Developmental Mathematics: The Characteristics and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marianne; Kuennen, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates which students delay taking a required developmental mathematics course and the impact of delay on student performance in introductory microeconomics. Analysis of a sample of 1462 students at a large Midwestern university revealed that, although developmental-level mathematics students did not reach the same level of…

  11. Conducting Informal Developmental Assessments of Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Craig P.; Sobjak-Gibson, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    In terms of assessing a child's developmental abilities, what age group first comes to mind? Often, early childhood educators begin thinking about developmental assessments when children are between the ages of 3 and 5. However, they need to be cognizant of the fact that child development begins from the moment a child is born. It is, therefore,…

  12. 29 CFR 1952.311 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.311 Section 1952.311 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Hawaii § 1952.311 Developmental...

  13. 29 CFR 1952.321 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.321 Section 1952.321 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Indiana § 1952.321 Developmental...

  14. 29 CFR 1952.91 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.91 Section 1952.91 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... schedule. The South Carolina plan is developmental. The following is the schedule of the...

  15. 29 CFR 1952.273 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.273 Section 1952.273 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Vermont § 1952.273 Developmental...

  16. 29 CFR 1952.341 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.341 Section 1952.341 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Wyoming § 1952.341 Developmental...

  17. 29 CFR 1952.291 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.291 Section 1952.291 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Nevada § 1952.291 Developmental...

  18. 29 CFR 1952.241 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exceptions to be no broader than those contained in 29 CFR part 1903); (4) Clarification of the appropriate... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.241 Section 1952.241 Labor... (CONTINUED) APPROVED STATE PLANS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS Alaska § 1952.241 Developmental...

  19. 29 CFR 1952.151 - Developmental schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Developmental schedule. 1952.151 Section 1952.151 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... schedule. The North Carolina Plan is developmental. The following is the schedule of the...

  20. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  1. Handicaps and Developmental Disabilities. Matrix No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prensky, Arthur L.

    This paper summarizes the recent advances achieved by research in the area of developmental disabilities, and discusses directions for future research in this area. Approximately 8 to 10 per cent of the pediatric population suffers from one or more developmental disabilities. The most common of these are learning disabilities, which include some…

  2. Utility of propidium monoazide viability assay as a biomarker for a tuberculosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Miotto, Paolo; Pimkina, Edita; Balabanova, Yanina; Kontsevaya, Irina; Ignatyeva, Olga; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Skenders, Girts; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Kovalyov, Alexander; Sadykhova, Anna; Simak, Tatiana; Kritsky, Andrey; Mironova, Svetlana; Tikhonova, Olesya; Dubrovskaya, Yulia; Rodionova, Yulia; Cirillo, Daniela; Drobniewski, Francis

    2015-03-01

    Reliable laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), including laboratory biomarkers of cure, remains a challenge. In our study we evaluated the performance of a Propidium Monoazide (PMA) assay for the detection of viable TB bacilli in sputum specimens during anti-TB chemotherapy and its potential use as a TB biomarker. The study was conducted at three centres on 1937 sputum specimens from 310 adult bacteriologically confirmed pulmonary TB patients obtained before commencing anti-TB treatment and at regular intervals afterwards. Performance of the PMA assay was assessed using various readout assays with bacteriology culture results and time to positivity on liquid media used as reference standards. Treatment of sputum with N-acetyl-cysteine was found to be fully compatible with the PMA assay. Good sensitivity and specificity (97.5% and 70.7-80.0%) for detection of live TB bacilli was achieved using the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF test as a readout assay. Tentative Ct and ΔCt thresholds for the Xpert(®) MTB/RIF system were proposed. Good correlation (r = 0.61) between Ct values and time to positivity of TB cultures on liquid media was demonstrated. The PMA method has potential in monitoring bacterial load in sputum specimens and so may have a role as a biomarker of cure in TB treatment. PMID:25534168

  3. Developmental systems biology flourishing on new technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Organism development is a systems level process. It has benefited greatly from the recent technological advances in the field of systems biology. DNA microarray, phenome, interactome and transcriptome mapping, the new generation of deep sequencing technologies,and faster and better computational and modeling approaches have opened new frontiers for both systems biologists and developmental biologists to reexamine the old developmental biology questions, such as pattern formation, and to tackle new problems, such as stem cell reprogramming. As showcased in the International Developmental Systems Biology Symposium organized by Chinese Academy of Sciences, developmental systems biology is flourishing in many perspectives, from the evolution of developmental systems, to the underlying genetic and molecular pathways and networks, to the genomic, epigenomic and noncoding levels, to the computational analysis and modeling. We believe that the field will continue to reap rewards into the future with these new approaches.

  4. Developmental systems biology flourishing on new technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing-Dong J; Liu, Yi; Xue, Huiling; Xia, Kai; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Shanshan; Chen, Zhang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zheng; Jin, Chunyu; Xian, Bo; Li, Jing; Hou, Lei; Han, Yixing; Niu, Chaoqun; Alcon, Timothy C

    2008-10-01

    Organism development is a systems level process. It has benefited greatly from the recent technological advances in the field of systems biology. DNA microarray, phenome, interactome and transcriptome mapping, the new generation of deep sequencing technologies, and faster and better computational and modeling approaches have opened new frontiers for both systems biologists and developmental biologists to reexamine the old developmental biology questions, such as pattern formation, and to tackle new problems, such as stem cell reprogramming. As showcased in the International Developmental Systems Biology Symposium organized by Chinese Academy of Sciences, developmental systems biology is flourishing in many perspectives, from the evolution of developmental systems, to the underlying genetic and molecular pathways and networks, to the genomic, epigenomic and noncoding levels, to the computational analysis and modeling. We believe that the field will continue to reap rewards into the future with these new approaches. PMID:18937914

  5. Early Intervention in Children with Developmental Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental disabilities consist of conditions that delay or impair the physical, cognitive, and/or psychological development of children. If not intervened at the earliest, these disabilities will cause significant negative impact on multiple domains of functioning such as learning, language, self-care and capacity for independent living. Common developmental disabilities include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay and cerebral palsy. About one fourth of young children in developing countries are at risk for or have developmental delay or disabilities. Inadequate stimulation has significant negative impact on physical, socioemotional and cognitive development of children. Hence early scientific intervention programs are necessary in the management of children at risk for developmental delay.

  6. Complementary and alternative medicine in developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kelly A; Patel, Dilip R

    2005-11-01

    Developmental disabilities (DD) are defined as a diverse group of severe chronic conditions due to mental and/or physical impairments. Individuals with developmental disabilities have difficulty with major life activities including language, mobility, and learning. Developmental disabilities can begin anytime during development--from prenatal up to 22 years of age, and the disability usually lasts throughout a person's lifetime. Autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are common conditions falling within the definition of developmental disabilities. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is becoming increasingly utilized in the general population for treatment of everything from the common cold to complex and chronic medical conditions. This article reviews the prevalence of different types of CAM used for various developmental disabilities. PMID:16391450

  7. Developmental hip dysplasia in adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukašinović Zoran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors define adolescence and developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH. Special attention is paid to pathological findings characteristic of DDH in adolescence (unrecognized and untreated DDH; treated DDH, but non-terminated treatment; DDH diagnosed with delay, inadequately treated, with complications. The authors emphasise that DDH treatment has to be successfully terminated well before the adolescence; possibilities are explained on management modes at the time of adolescence, and possible persons guilty for the persistence of later hip problems are indicated. Based on the authors' experience and having in mind all surgical possibilities for the treatment (pelvic osteotomies, femoral osteotomies, trochanteroplasties, leg length equalization procedures the authors propose treatment protocols. The intention is to provide better treatment results and to prevent secondary hip arthrosis. Furthermore, how to improve the struggle against DDH is suggested.

  8. Developmental pathways of motor dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleven, Gale A; Bellinger, Seanceray A

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence has revealed unique patterns of behavioral development after prenatal insult similar to those outlined in studies of adult metabolic dysfunction after prenatal malnutrition. The hallmark features of this Developmental Pathway include a prenatal insult to the nervous system (environmental or genetic) followed by a period of Silent Vulnerability, where no or few functional deficits are observed, and finally emergence of later dysfunction. Possible mechanisms leading to later dysfunction from prenatal insult may include secondary or cascade effects due to the timing of prenatal insults relative to later developing structures in the brain. Methods best employed to study the mechanisms of these pathways are microgenetic and longitudinal designs that include behavioral assessment during the prenatal period of development, and animal models such as the guinea pig. PMID:25864561

  9. South Africa's "Developmental State" Distraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Bond

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea that the South African ruling elite has the political will to establish a “developmental state” project early in the 21st century is popular, but is not borne out by evidence thus far. Patrick Bond reviews new information about the neoliberal project’s failures, which range from macroeconomics to microdevelopment to pro-corporate megaprojects, and which are accompanied by a tokenistic welfare policy not designed to provide sufficient sustenance or entitlements to the society. The critique by the independent left might be revised in the event that the trade unions and communist influences within the ruling Alliance strengthen, but there is a greater likelihood that the world capitalist crisis will have the opposite impact. Nevertheless, widespread grassroots protests and impressive campaigning by civil society keep alive the hope for a post-capitalist, post-nationalist politics, as bandaiding South African capitalism runs into trouble.

  10. DEVELOPMENTAL COORDINATION DISORDER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh MIRAFKHAMI

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveIn this article, a motor skill disorder called developmental coordination disorder (DCD, that is usually first diagnosed during childhood, is explained and discussed. In the year 1987, DCD was formally recognized as a distinct disorder in children by the American Psychiatric Association  (APA. DCD is a generalized term for the children who have some degrees of impairment in the development of motor coordination and therefore have difficulties with physical skills which significantly interfere with their academic achievements and /or performing everyday activities. As they develop, other age-related tasks are also below average. Because these impairment & conditions are often associated with emotional distress, they can seriously interfere with the person's everyday life and social relationships. Reviews indicate that most of the training rocedures have only a limited effect on the development of general coordination, and that they have no effect at all on academic progress.This includes approaches based on assumed underlying deficiencies such as sensory integration deficits and kinesthetic functioning deficits, as well as the more traditional perceptual - motor training. One new approach is Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP, based on problem - solving strategies and guided discovery of the child and task specific strategies. The aim of this article was to inform, promote and disseminate more information about some difficulties in applying the diagnostic criteria for DCD. Also, a brief review of the researches on the intervention methods is presented.Keywords: Developmental coordination disorder, Motor skills disorder, Childhood disorder, Intervention methods

  11. Circulating Biomarkers in Advanced Colorectal Cancer Patients Randomly Assigned to Three Bevacizumab-Based Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia Martinetti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The need to identify biomarkers for bevacizumab-based treatment in advanced colorectal cancer is imperative. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of circulating VEGF, PDGF, SDF-1, osteopontin and CEA in patients randomly assigned to three bevacizumab-based regimens. Plasma samples from 50 patients treated at a single Institution were analysed using the multiplex assay BioPlex™ 2200 (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc, Berkeley, CA, USA at baseline, before first three cycles and subsequently every three cycles until disease progression. Prognostic analyses of baseline values were performed using multivariable Cox models, including disease extension >10 cm or ≤10 cm (measured as the sum of the diameters for all target lesions as adjustment factor. The association between progression-free and overall survival and biomarkers modulation during treatment was studied using multivariable Cox models, which included summary statistics synthesizing during-treatment modulation together with disease extension. The biomarkers significantly associated with disease extension were baseline CEA (p = 0.012 and SDF-1 (p = 0.030. High values of VEGF and SDF-1 tended to be associated with worse prognosis, especially in terms of overall survival. The negative prognostic trend was more marked for baseline CEA as compared to other biomarkers; increasing values during treatment was significantly related to worse prognosis independently of disease extension (p = 0.007 and 0.016 for progression-free and overall survival, respectively. VEGF is related to bevacizumab pharmacodynamics and is associated to other angiogenic cytokines; some of the proposed biomarkers such as SDF-1 and CEA should be further validated for prognosis assessment and monitoring of bevacizumab-based treatment of advanced colorectal cancer.

  12. Effect of mussel reproductive status on biomarker responses to PAHs: Implications for large-scale monitoring programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Carmen; Albentosa, Marina; Campillo, Juan A; Viñas, Lucía; Franco, Angeles; Bellas, Juan

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers are useful tools to assess biological effects of pollutants and have been extensively used in monitoring programs to determine ecosystem health. In these programs, a wide range of environmental conditions are covered and sometimes, obtained data are difficult to interpret because of natural variables are affecting biomarker responses. Among these variables, musseĺs reproductive status has been considered one of the most changing variables between sites in a monitoring survey. Thus, the main aim of this work was to identify the effect that mussel reproductive status has on biomarker responses. For that purpose, mussels sampled at two periods in the reproductive cycle (reproductive and resting stages) were conditioned to the same laboratory conditions and exposed to fluoranthene (FLU) for three weeks. Studied biomarkers covering a wide range of organism responses were included: bioaccumulation, physiological rates (clearance rate -CR-, absorption efficiency -AE-, respiration rate -RR- and their integration in the scope for growth -SFG-), antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide-dismutase -SOD-, catalase -CAT-, glutathione reductase -GR-, glutathione peroxidase -GPx-, glutathione-S-tranferase -GST-) and biochemical damage responses (lipid membrane peroxidation -LPO-). The results obtained evidenced that the levels of the biomarkers studied (RR, SOD, CAT and GPx) were higher at reproductive than at resting stage. On the other hand, the effect of toxicant was observed in SFG, CAT and GPx but this effect was only detected during the resting period. Moreover, there was a deterioration of mussel gonadal tissue with FLU exposure during reproductive stage. FLU accumulation in mussel tissues was also dependent of the reproductive status with higher internal concentrations during resting than reproductive period. In conclusion, there was a strong effect of reproductive status on studied biomarkers which seems to mask the effect of FLU at reproductive stage. The

  13. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  14. FOOTWEAR PERFORMANCE LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory provides biomechanical and physical analyses for both military and commercial footwear. The laboratory contains equipment that is integral to the us...

  15. Bio Engineering Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry and biology laboratories The Bio Engineering Laboratory (BeL) is theonly full spectrum biotechnology capability within the Department...

  16. Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — PNNL's Physical Sciences Laboratory (PSL) houses 22 research laboratories for conducting a wide-range of research including catalyst formulation, chemical analysis,...

  17. Use of biomarkers to assess the effects of oil pollution on echinoderms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, L.; McKenzie, D. [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Oban (United Kingdom)

    1995-12-31

    A major source of oil pollution in the North Sea arises from oil production activities. Drill cuttings are a waste product of drilling operations and often contain oil-based drilling muds. Echinoderms are important members of marine communities, often cornerstone species, and tend lo be sensitive to various types of pollution. The response of Amphiura spp. to drill cuttings was examined under laboratory conditions, semi-natural conditions (mesocosms) and in the field. Sublethal stress was monitored using a suite of biomarkers including destabilization of lysosomes, induction of detoxification enzymes (MFO) and changes in tissue loading of symbiotic sub-cuticular bacteria (SCB). When exposed to drill cuttings there was a decrease in lysosome integrity and a decline in SCB loading. Preliminary studies did not detect inducement of MFO enzymes. The potential use of echinoderm biomarkers to detect pollution is discussed.

  18. Plant metabolomics: from holistic data to relevant biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfender, Jean-Luc; Rudaz, Serge; Choi, Young Hae; Kim, Hye Kyong

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomics is playing an increasingly important role in plant science. It aims at the comprehensive analysis of the plant metabolome which consists both of primary and secondary metabolites. The goal of metabolomics is ultimately to identify and quantify this wide array of small molecules in biological samples. This new science is included in several systems biology approaches and is based primarily on the unbiased acquisition of mass spectrometric (MS) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data from carefully selected samples. This approach provides the most ''functional'' information of the 'omics' technologies of a given organism since metabolites are the end products of the cellular regulatory processes. The application of state-of-the-art data mining, that includes various untargeted and targeted multivariate data analysis methods, to the vast amount of data generated by this data-driven approach leads to sample classification and the identification of relevant biomarkers. The biological areas that have been successfully studied by this holistic approach include global metabolite composition assessment, mutant and phenotype characterisation, taxonomy, developmental processes, stress response, interaction with the environment, quality control assessment, lead finding and mode of action of botanicals. This review summarises the main MS- and NMR-based approaches that are used to perform these studies and discusses the potential and current limitations of the various methods. The intent is not to provide an exhaustive overview of the field, which has grown considerably over the past decade, but to summarise the main strategies that are used and to discuss the potential and limitations of the different approaches as well as future trends. PMID:23210790

  19. Inconvenient truth: cancer biomarker development by using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Tadashi

    2014-05-01

    A biomarker is a crucial tool for measuring the progress of disease and the effects of treatment for better clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic biomarkers are required in various clinical settings. The proteome, a functional translation of the genome, is considered a rich source of biomarkers; therefore, sizable time and funding have been spent in proteomics to develop biomarkers. Although significant progress has been made in technologies toward comprehensive protein expression profiling, and many biomarker candidates published, none of the reported biomarkers have proven to be beneficial for cancer patients. The present deceleration in biomarker research can be attributed to technical limitations. Additional efforts are required to further technical progress; however, there are many examples demonstrating that problems in biomarker research are not so much with the technology but in the study design. In the study of biomarkers for early diagnosis, candidates are screened and validated by comparing cases and controls of similar sample size, and the low prevalence of disease is often ignored. Although it is reasonable to take advantage of multiple rather than single biomarkers when studying diverse disease mechanisms, the annotation of individual components of reported multiple biomarkers does not often explain the variety of molecular events underlying the clinical observations. In tissue biomarker studies, the heterogeneity of disease tissues and pathological observations are often not considered, and tissues are homogenized as a whole for protein extraction. In addition to the challenge of technical limitations, the fundamental aspects of biomarker development in a disease study need to be addressed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:23896458

  20. Laboratory markers in ulcerative colitis: Current insights and future advances

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michele; Cioffi; Antonella; De; Rosa; Rosalba; Serao; Ilaria; Picone; Maria; Teresa; Vietri

    2015-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis(UC)and Crohn’s disease(CD)are the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD)in man.Despite some common features,these forms can be distinguished by different genetic predisposition,risk factors and clinical,endoscopic and histological characteristics.The aetiology of both CD and UC remains unknown,but several evidences suggest that CD and perhaps UC are due to an excessive immuneresponse directed against normal constituents of the intestinal bacterial flora.Tests sometimes invasive are routine for the diagnosis and care of patients with IBD.Diagnosis of UC is based on clinical symptoms combined with radiological and endoscopic investigations.The employment of non-invasive biomarkers is needed.These biomarkers have the potential to avoid invasive diagnostic tests that may result in discomfort and potential complications.The ability to determine the type,severity,prognosis and response to therapy of UC,using biomarkers has long been a goal of clinical researchers.We describe the biomarkers assessed in UC,with special reference to acute-phase proteins and serologic markers and thereafter,we describe the new biological markers and the biological markers could be developed in the future:(1)serum markers of acute phase response:The laboratory tests most used to measure the acute-phase proteins in clinical practice are the serum concentration of C-reactive protein and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate.Other biomarkers of inflammation in UC include platelet count,leukocyte count,and serum albumin and serum orosomucoid concentrations;(2)serologic markers/antibodies:In the last decades serological and immunologic biomarkers have been studied extensively in immunology and have been used in clinical practice to detect specific pathologies.In UC,the presence of these antibodies can aid as surrogate markers for the aberrant host immune response;and(3)future biomarkers:The development of biomarkers in UC will be very important in the future.The progress

  1. Emerging concepts in biomarker discovery; The US-Japan workshop on immunological molecular markers in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivoltini Licia

    2009-06-01

    were recognized that might be added to the list of known entities applicable in immunotherapy trials. The need for a systematic approach to biomarker discovery that takes advantage of powerful high-throughput technologies was recognized; it was clear from the current state of the science that immunotherapy is still in a discovery phase and only a few of the current biomarkers warrant extensive validation. It was, finally, clear that, while current technologies have almost limitless potential, inadequate study design, limited standardization and cross-validation among laboratories and suboptimal comparability of data remain major road blocks. The institution of an interactive consortium for high throughput molecular monitoring of clinical trials with voluntary participation might provide cost-effective solutions.

  2. Chasing the effects of Pre-analytical Confounders - a Multicentre Study on CSF-AD biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joao Leitao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Core cerebrospinal fluid (CSF biomarkers-Aβ42, Tau and pTau–have been recently incorporated in the revised criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, their widespread clinical application lacks standardization. Pre-analytical sample handling and storage play an important role in the reliable measurement of these biomarkers across laboratories. In this study, we aim to surpass the efforts from previous studies, by employing a multicentre approach to assess the impact of less studied CSF pre-analytical confounders in AD-biomarkers quantification. Four different centres participated in this study and followed the same established protocol. CSF samples were analysed for three biomarkers (Aβ42, Tau and pTau and tested for different spinning conditions (temperature: Room temperature (RT vs. 4oC; speed: 500g vs. 2000g vs. 3000g, storage volume variations (25%, 50% and 75% of tube total volume as well as freezing-thaw cycles (up to 5 cyles. The influence of sample routine parameters, inter-centre variability and relative value of each biomarker (reported as normal/abnormal, was analysed. Centrifugation conditions did not influence biomarkers levels, except for samples with a high CSF total protein content, where either non centrifugation or centrifugation at RT, compared to 4ºC, led to higher Aβ42 levels. Reducing CSF storage volume from 75% to 50% of total tube capacity, decreased Aβ42 concentration (within analytical CV of the assay, whereas no change in Tau or pTau was observed. Moreover, the concentration of Tau and pTau appears to be stable up to 5 freeze-thaw cycles, whereas Aβ42 levels decrease if CSF is freeze-thawed more than 3 times. This systematic study reinforces the need for CSF centrifugation at 4ºC prior to storage and highlights the influence of storage conditions in Aβ42 levels. This study contributes to the establishment of harmonized standard operating procedures that will help reducing inter-lab variability of CSF

  3. An Integrated Protein Chemistry Laboratory: Chlorophyll and Chlorophyllase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkus, Kiani A. J.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2008-01-01

    Chlorophyll, the most abundant pigment in nature, is degraded during normal plant growth, when leaves change color, and at specific developmental stages. Chlorophyllase catalyzes the first chemical reaction in this process, that is, the hydrolysis of chlorophyll into chlorophyllide. Here, we describe a series of laboratory sessions designed to…

  4. Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This developmental effort clearly shows that a Road Transportable Analytical Laboratory System is a worthwhile and achievable goal. The RTAL is designed to fully analyze (radioanalytes, and organic and inorganic chemical analytes) 20 samples per day at the highest levels of quality assurance and quality control. It dramatically reduces the turnaround time for environmental sample analysis from 45 days (at a central commercial laboratory) to 1 day. At the same time each RTAL system will save the DOE over $12 million per year in sample analysis costs compared to the costs at a central commercial laboratory. If RTAL systems were used at the eight largest DOE facilities (at Hanford, Savannah River, Fernald, Oak Ridge, Idaho, Rocky Flats, Los Alamos, and the Nevada Test Site), the annual savings would be $96,589,000. The DOE's internal study of sample analysis needs projects 130,000 environmental samples requiring analysis in FY 1994, clearly supporting the need for the RTAL system. The cost and time savings achievable with the RTAL system will accelerate and improve the efficiency of cleanup and remediation operations throughout the DOE complex

  5. Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Biomarker Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagi, Cedo M., E-mail: cedo.bagi@pfizer.com; Andresen, Catharine J. [Global Science & Technology, PGRD, Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2010-07-07

    The overwhelming need to improve preclinical models in oncology has stimulated research efforts to refine and validate robust orthotopic models that closely mimic the disease population and therefore have the potential to better predict clinical outcome with novel therapies. Sophisticated technologies including bioluminescence, contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been added to existing serum- and histology-based biomarkers to assist with patient selection and the design of clinical trials. The rationale for the use of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, implementation of xenograft and orthotopic animal models and utilization of available biomarkers have been discussed, providing guidelines to facilitate preclinical research for the development of treatments for HCC patients.

  6. Biomarkers for Lupus Nephritis: A Critical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chiu Mok

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney disease is one of the most serious manifestations of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Despite the improvement in the medical care of SLE in the past two decades, the prognosis of lupus nephritis remains unsatisfactory. Besides exploring more effective but less toxic treatment modalities that will further improve the remission rate, early detection and treatment of renal activity may spare patients from intensive immunosuppressive therapies and reduce renal damage. Conventional clinical parameters such as creatinine clearance, proteinuria, urine sediments, anti-dsDNA, and complement levels are not sensitive or specific enough for detecting ongoing disease activity in the lupus kidneys and early relapse of nephritis. Thus, novel biomarkers are necessary to enhance the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of lupus renal disease, prognostic stratification, monitoring of treatment response, and detection of early renal flares. This paper reviews promising biomarkers that have recently been evaluated in longitudinal studies of lupus nephritis.

  7. Biomarker Records Associated with Mass Extinction Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Jessica H.; Grice, Kliti

    2016-06-01

    The history of life on Earth is punctuated by a series of mass extinction episodes that vary widely in their magnitude, duration, and cause. Biomarkers are a powerful tool for the reconstruction of historical environmental conditions and can therefore provide insights into the cause and responses to ancient extinction events. In examining the five largest mass extinctions in the geological record, investigators have used biomarkers to elucidate key processes such as eutrophy, euxinia, ocean acidification, changes in hydrological balance, and changes in atmospheric CO2. By using these molecular fossils to understand how Earth and its ecosystems have responded to unusual environmental activity during these extinctions, models can be made to predict how Earth will respond to future changes in its climate.

  8. HCC Biomarkers in China and Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina M. Santella

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    A number of different types of biomarkers have been used to understand the etiology and progression of hepatocellular cancer (HCC. Perhaps the most well known are the serum/ plasma markers of HBV or HCV infection. These markers include analysis of viral DNA or proteins or antibodies produced against the viral proteins. HBV surface antigen (HBsAg is most frequently used to determine chronic infection with high or low viral replication, while HBeAg is a measure of chronic infection with high viral replication. Analysis of antibodies includes measurement of anti-HBV core antigen, anti-HBV e antigen and anti-HBsAg. The response to immunization can be monitored by analysis of anti-HBsAg. The other major classes of biomarkers used in studies of HCC are biomarkers of exposure to environmental, lifestyle or dietary carcinogens, biomarkers of oxidative stress and early biologic response. In addition, studies of genetic susceptibility have studied polymorphisms in a number of pathways and their role in HCC risk. The biomarkers of exposure include the measurement of carcinogens in urine and carcinogen-DNA and protein adducts. Examples are measurement of aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites, and DNA and protein adducts.

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress include urinary isoprostanes and 8-oxodeoxyguanosine and oxidized plasma proteins. Most of these assays are immunologic although the use of high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC as well as gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS have been utilized. In nested case-control studies, many of these markers are associated with elevated risk. For example, elevated aflatoxin and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-albumin adducts, aflatoxin metabolites in urine and urinary isoprostanes were observed in baseline samples from

  9. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, M J

    2012-02-01

    Aberrant hypermethylation of promoter regions in specific genes is a key event in the formation and progression of cancer. In at least some situations, these aberrant alterations occur early in the formation of malignancy and appear to be tumour specific. Multiple reports have suggested that measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene methylation need to be standardised, simplified and evaluated in external quality assurance programmes. It is concluded that methylated genes have the potential to provide a new generation of cancer biomarkers.

  10. Microparticles as Potential Biomarkers of Cardiovascular Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    França, Carolina Nunes, E-mail: carolufscar24@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Universidade de Santo Amaro - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil); Izar, Maria Cristina de Oliveira; Amaral, Jônatas Bussador do; Tegani, Daniela Melo; Fonseca, Francisco Antonio Helfenstein [Universidade Federal de São Paulo - UNIFESP - UNISA, SP, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-02-15

    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is a choice of great relevance because of its impact on health. Some biomarkers, such as microparticles derived from different cell populations, have been considered useful in the assessment of cardiovascular disease. Microparticles are released by the membrane structures of different cell types upon activation or apoptosis, and are present in the plasma of healthy individuals (in levels considered physiological) and in patients with different pathologies. Many studies have suggested an association between microparticles and different pathological conditions, mainly the relationship with the development of cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, the effects of different lipid-lowering therapies have been described in regard to measurement of microparticles. The studies are still controversial regarding the levels of microparticles that can be considered pathological. In addition, the methodologies used still vary, suggesting the need for standardization of the different protocols applied, aiming at using microparticles as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  11. Models of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Biomarker Strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overwhelming need to improve preclinical models in oncology has stimulated research efforts to refine and validate robust orthotopic models that closely mimic the disease population and therefore have the potential to better predict clinical outcome with novel therapies. Sophisticated technologies including bioluminescence, contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging, positron emission tomography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been added to existing serum- and histology-based biomarkers to assist with patient selection and the design of clinical trials. The rationale for the use of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, implementation of xenograft and orthotopic animal models and utilization of available biomarkers have been discussed, providing guidelines to facilitate preclinical research for the development of treatments for HCC patients

  12. Proximity Ligation Assays for Disease Biomarkers Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nong, Rachel Yuan

    2011-01-01

    One of the pressing needs in the field of disease biomarker discovery is new technologies that could allow high performance protein analysis in different types of clinical material, such as blood and solid tissues. This thesis includes four approaches that address important limitations of current technologies, thus enabling highly sensitive, specific and parallel protein measurements. Paper I describes a method for sensitive singleplex protein detection in complex biological samples, namely s...

  13. Network-based drugs and biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Linding, Rune

    2010-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of protein signalling networks governs cell decision processes and the formation of tissue boundaries. Complex diseases such as cancer and diabetes are diseases of such networks. Therefore approaches that can give insight into how these networks change during disease pr...... associated technologies. We then focus on the multivariate nature of cellular networks and how this has implications for biomarker and drug discovery using cancer metastasis as an example....

  14. Kadar Asam Urat Serum sebagai Biomarker Preeklamsi

    OpenAIRE

    Neli Sumanti; Noormartany; Muhammad Alamsyah; Tiene Rostini

    2013-01-01

    Preeclampsia remains a health problem that becomes one of the causes of maternal deaths besides bleeding and infection. The etiology and pathogenesis of preeclampsia are unclear. Increased serum uric acid levels is seen simultaneously with the increase of blood pressure and occurred before the onset of proteinuria. Therefore, the uric acid can be used as a biomarker. The aim of this study was to analyze the serum uric acid levels between normal and preeclampsia pregnancies. The study was cond...

  15. Biomarkers of Mercury Exposure in the Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Nathália Santos Serrão de Castro; Marcelo de Oliveira Lima

    2014-01-01

    Mercury exposure in the Amazon has been studied since the 1980s decade and the assessment of human mercury exposure in the Amazon is difficult given that the natural occurrence of this metal is high and the concentration of mercury in biological samples of this population exceeds the standardized value of normality established by WHO. Few studies have focused on the discovery of mercury biomarkers in the region's population. In this way, some studies have used genetics as well as immunologica...

  16. Fibrosis biomarkers in workers exposed to MWCNTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatkhutdinova, Liliya M; Khaliullin, Timur O; Vasil'yeva, Olga L; Zalyalov, Ramil R; Mustafin, Ilshat G; Kisin, Elena R; Birch, M Eileen; Yanamala, Naveena; Shvedova, Anna A

    2016-05-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with their unique physico-chemical properties offer numerous technological advantages and are projected to drive the next generation of manufacturing growth. As MWCNT have already found utility in different industries including construction, engineering, energy production, space exploration and biomedicine, large quantities of MWCNT may reach the environment and inadvertently lead to human exposure. This necessitates the urgent assessment of their potential health effects in humans. The current study was carried out at NanotechCenter Ltd. Enterprise (Tambov, Russia) where large-scale manufacturing of MWCNT along with relatively high occupational exposure levels was reported. The goal of this small cross-sectional study was to evaluate potential biomarkers during occupational exposure to MWCNT. All air samples were collected at the workplaces from both specific areas and personal breathing zones using filter-based devices to quantitate elemental carbon and perform particle analysis by TEM. Biological fluids of nasal lavage, induced sputum and blood serum were obtained from MWCNT-exposed and non-exposed workers for assessment of inflammatory and fibrotic markers. It was found that exposure to MWCNTs caused significant increase in IL-1β, IL6, TNF-α, inflammatory cytokines and KL-6, a serological biomarker for interstitial lung disease in collected sputum samples. Moreover, the level of TGF-β1 was increased in serum obtained from young exposed workers. Overall, the results from this study revealed accumulation of inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers in biofluids of workers manufacturing MWCNTs. Therefore, the biomarkers analyzed should be considered for the assessment of health effects of occupational exposure to MWCNT in cross-sectional epidemiological studies. PMID:26902652

  17. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  18. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C Chadha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prostate-specific antigen (PSA is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP. However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective: The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods: Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8, Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1 were obtained from four groups of men: (1 Controls (2 with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx (3 with clinically localized CaP and (4 with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results: TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93 and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97 were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP. The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997. The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992 and PSA (AUC = 0.963 levels. Conclusions: The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted.

  19. Novel Biomarkers for Cardio-renal Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sul Ra; Jeong, Kyung Hwan

    2012-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome (CRS) is a frequent and life-threatening syndrome. It is a disorder of the heart and kidneys in which acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other organ. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is strongly associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients with CRS. Early detection of renal dysfunction is not possible using the traditional marker, serum creatinine, and therefore efforts to explore possible biomarkers for ear...

  20. Biomarkers as Proxies for Life and Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.

    2006-05-01

    Biomarkers are organic molecules that can be used to trace specific types of organisms or biological processes in contemporary ecosystems, ancient sediments and, potentially, beyond the Earth. Biomarkers offer a means to evaluate Earth's biosphere from its earliest development to the modern day. Hydrocarbons, which are the remains of lipids that once resided in the membranes of ancestral organisms, carry chemical and isotopic clues about the nature of early ecosystems. The hydrocarbon remains of fatty acids, sterols, bacterial triterpenoids and pigments are very recalcitrant substances and can be found in rocks as old as 2.8 billion years. These molecules tell us that the three domains, archaea, bacteria and eukarya that comprise all extant life appeared quite early in Earth's history as did the oxygen-producing photosynthesis that oxidized our atmosphere and made it possible for animal life to evolve and increase in complexity. Pigment-derived biomarkers are especially useful for evaluating paleo-environmental conditions. They occur in rocks from the Archean to the present day and can be especially diagnostic for euxinic conditions. The greatest known mass extinction event occurred at the end of the Permian period and extinguished about 70% of the animals and plants that existed at that time. Much controversy surrounds its cause with many different scenarios having been proposed. An international collaboration has enabled biomarker profiles to be obtained from Permian- Triassic boundary sections in China, Australia, Canada, Tibet and Greenland. These data suggest that euxinic conditions prevailed widely in the oceans for an extended period from the Late Permian and that sulfide toxicity may have been a major factor in the demise of both plant and animal life.

  1. Evidence from Biomarkers and Surrogate Endpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Feigin, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The use of physiological, anatomical, and other biological tests is commonplace in the practice of medicine. In neurology, objectively measured tests termed biomarkers (BMs) are playing an increasing role in diagnosis and management of disease, both in clinical practice and in experimental therapeutics. This article will discuss the various applications of BMs to the assessment of therapies for neurological diseases and will use examples from neurological diseases to elucidate the st...

  2. Do We Need Biomarkers for Disc Degeneration?

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, Helen E.; Edward N. Hanley, Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Disc degeneration plays a major role in this country's medical, social and economic structure. The life-time prevalence of low back pain, which has disc degeneration as its cause, is about 80% in the general population. It is a primary cause of disability and estimated costs related to low back disorders exceed $100 billion per year in the U.S. alone. Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important as indicators of the presence of disease, and in evaluating outcomes during clinical treatment. ...

  3. Mitochondrial DNA as a Cancer Biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Jakupciak, John P.; Wang, Wendy; Markowitz, Maura E; Ally, Delphine; Coble, Michael; Srivastava, Sudhir; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E.; Sidransky, David; O’Connell, Catherine D.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a national effort to identify biomarkers for the early detection of cancer, we developed a rapid and high-throughput sequencing protocol for the detection of sequence variants in mitochondrial DNA. Here, we describe the development and implementation of this protocol for clinical samples. Heteroplasmic and homoplasmic sequence variants occur in the mitochondrial genome in patient tumors. We identified these changes by sequencing mitochondrial DNA obtained from tumors and blood from...

  4. Ovarian cancer biomarkers as diagnostic triage tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan SM

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sara M Jordan, Robert E BristowDivision of Gynecologic Oncology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA, USAAbstract: Ovarian cancer survival improves with accurate surgical staging, maximal tumor removal, and appropriate adjuvant chemotherapy. Therefore, survival is higher among patients managed by a gynecologic oncologist trained in these surgical techniques. Unfortunately, identifying patients preoperatively for referral to a gynecologic oncologist is often challenging, given that there are no definitive noninvasive diagnostic tests to triage patients with an adnexal mass to a surgical subspecialist. Inaccurate preoperative diagnosis of an adnexal mass frequently results in either unnecessary surgery for a benign mass or inadequate surgical staging for a malignant mass, with a subsequent negative effect on overall survival. Several recent tests have been investigated to improve the preoperative diagnosis of women presenting with adnexal masses. Cancer antigen 125 is the most commonly used serum marker for screening and monitoring of ovarian cancer, but is elevated in many benign conditions and falsely normal in 50% of early-stage epithelial ovarian cancers. The relatively low sensitivity and specificity of CA125 has driven researchers to identify new biomarkers and algorithms to assist with triaging adnexal masses. A promising new biomarker, human epididymis protein 4, has been developed to monitor for recurrence of ovarian cancer. Three algorithms have also been developed, ie, risk of malignancy index, risk of ovarian malignancy algorithm, and OVA-1, which is the first diagnostic algorithm that combines multiple biomarkers for the purpose of triaging adnexal masses to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.Keywords: ovarian cancer, biomarkers, CA125, RMI, ROMA, HE4, OVA-1

  5. Sleep electroencephalography as a biomarker in depression

    OpenAIRE

    Steiger, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Axel Steiger, Marcel Pawlowski, Mayumi Kimura Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany Abstract: The sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) provides biomarkers of depression, which may help with diagnosis, prediction of therapy response, and prognosis in the treatment of depression. In patients with depression, characteristic sleep EEG changes include impaired sleep continuity, disinhibition of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep, and impaired non-REM sleep. Most antidepressants suppress REM...

  6. Bayesian methods for proteomic biomarker development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Hernández

    2015-12-01

    In this review we provide an introduction to Bayesian inference and demonstrate some of the advantages of using a Bayesian framework. We summarize how Bayesian methods have been used previously in proteomics and other areas of bioinformatics. Finally, we describe some popular and emerging Bayesian models from the statistical literature and provide a worked tutorial including code snippets to show how these methods may be applied for the evaluation of proteomic biomarkers.

  7. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-01-01

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or wher...

  8. Biomarkers for early detection of sickle nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sundaram, Nambirajan; Bennett, Michael; Wilhelm, Jamie; Kim, Mi-Ok; Atweh, George; Devarajan, Prasad; Malik, Punam

    2011-01-01

    Renal complications affect nearly 30–50% of adults with sickle cell anemia (SCA), causing significant morbidity and mortality. Standard renal function tests like serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate become abnormal in this disease only when renal damage has become extensive and largely irreversible. Moreover, not all patients develop sickle nephropathy (SN). Therefore, noninvasive biomarkers that predict early onset of SN are necessary. We performed a cross-sectional analysis for n...

  9. Specific Developmental Disorders of Scholastic Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beena Johnson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Several factors contribute to scholastic backwardness in children. Causes include specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills, low intelligence, chronic illnesses, family dysfunction, social problems, attention deficits, and emotional disorders. Children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills experience significant impairment in the acquisition of reading, writing and mathematical skills. If not remedied at the earliest, these children are at risk of developing severe stress related disorders. There is high comorbidity of behaviour disorders and emotional disorders in these children. Hence early intensive remedial education is essential in the management of children with specific developmental disorders of scholastic skills.

  10. Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario eRiverol

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly, and it is characterized by progressive impairment in multiple cognitive domains of sufficient severity to interfere with individuals’ daily living activities. Historically, the diagnosis of AD has been based on the identification of a clinical syndrome, and accuracy studies of the current clinical criteria conducted in referral clinics have shown high sensitivity for AD. However, the identification of the disease is still not perfect, and there is growing evidence that the use of biomarkers will increase our ability to better indentify the underlying biology of AD, especially in its early stages. These biomarkers will improve the detection of the patients suitable for research studies and drug trials, and they will contribute to a better management of the disease in the clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the most studied biomarkers in AD: cerebrospinal fluid proteins, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, functional neuroimaging techniques, and amyloid imaging.

  11. Biomarkers for cardiac cachexia: reality or utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Telma; Vitorino, Rui; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita

    2014-09-25

    Cardiac cachexia is a serious complication of chronic heart failure, characterized by significant weight loss and body wasting. Chronic heart failure-related muscle wasting results from a chronic imbalance in the activation of anabolic or catabolic pathways, caused by a series of immunological, metabolic, and neurohormonal processes. In spite of the high morbidity and mortality associated to this condition, there is no universally accepted definition or specific biomarkers for cardiac cachexia, which makes its diagnosis and treatment difficult. Several hormonal, inflammatory and oxidative stress molecules have been proposed as serological markers of prognosis in cardiac cachexia but with doubtful success. As individual biomarkers may have limited sensitivity and specificity, multimarker strategies involving mediators of the biological processes modulated by cardiac cachexia will strongly contribute for the diagnosis and management of the disease, as well as for the establishment of new therapeutic targets. An integrated analysis of the biomarkers proposed so far for cardiac cachexia is made in the present review, highlighting the biological processes to which they are related. PMID:24978823

  12. Biomarkers and Pharmacogenetics in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunhai Xu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate identification and validation of biomarkers as well as pharmacogenetics are important in formulating patient-oriented, individualized chemotherapy or biological therapy in cancer patients. These markers can be especially valuable in pancreatic cancer, where high mortality and complex disease biology are frequently encountered. Recently, several advances have been made to further our knowledge in this specific area of pancreatic cancer. In the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO Annual Meeting, researchers have presented several interesting results in biomarkers development: the identifications of 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that is associated with positive efficacy of gemcitabine (Abstract #4022; the introduction of circulating tumor cells as a prognostic markers in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Abstract #e14657; the re-affirmation of plasma cytidine deaminase (CDA as a positive predictive markers for gemcitabine efficacy, as well as the postulations that CDA*3 as a potential genotype marker to predict gemcitabine responses (Abstract #e14645; and finally the retrospective tumor tissues analysis in the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Internistische Onkologie (AIO trial in an attempt for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR pathway biomarker identifications (Abstract #4047

  13. The importance of biomarkers in neonatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussap, M; Noto, A; Cibecchini, F; Fanos, V

    2013-02-01

    Despite a 35% decline in the mortality rate for infants aged years over the past two decades, every year nearly 40% of all deaths in this age group occur in the neonatal period, defined as the first 28 days of life. New knowledge on molecular and biochemical pathways in neonatal diseases will lead to the discovery of new candidate biomarkers potentially useful in clinical practice. In the era of personalized medicine, biomarkers may play a strategic role in accelerating the decline in neonatal mortality by assessing the risk of developing neonatal diseases, by implementing tailored therapeutic treatment, and by predicting the clinical outcome. However, there is an urgent need to reduce the gap in translating newly acquired knowledge from bench to bedside. Traditional and candidate biomarkers for neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis will be discussed in this review, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), serum amyloid A (SAA), soluble form of CD14 subtype presepsin (sCD14-ST), lipolysaccharide binding protein (LBP), angiopoietins (Ang)-1 and -2, soluble form of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1), soluble form of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), platelet-activating factor (PAF) and calprotectin. New frontiers in managing critically ill newborns may be opened by metabolomics, a diagnostic tool based on the recognition of metabolites contained in biological fluids. Metabolomics represents the passage from a descriptive science to a predictive science, having the potential to translate benchtop research to real clinical benefits. PMID:23164809

  14. A photoacoustic immunoassay for biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfei; Cao, Mingfeng; McClelland, John F; Shao, Zengyi; Lu, Meng

    2016-11-15

    Challenges in protein biomarker analysis include insufficient sensitivity for detecting low-abundance biomarkers, poor measurement reproducibility, and the high costs and large footprints of detection systems. To address these issues, a new detection modality was developed for analyzing protein biomarkers based on the plasmon-enhanced photoacoustic (PA) effect. The detection modality employed a heterogeneous immunoassay scheme and used gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as the signal reporter. Due to their localized plasmon resonance, AuNPs can strongly interact with intensity-modulated laser excitation and generate strong PA signals, which are subsequently sensed and quantified using a microphone. As an example, the performance of the PA immunoassay was evaluated by detecting the human interleukin 8 chemokine. The PA immunoassay provided approximately 143× lower limit of detection (LOD) than observed with the gold standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay - a decrease from 23pg/mL to 0.16pg/mL. In addition to the significant performance improvement in terms of the LOD, the PA immunoassay also offers advantages in terms of compatibility with low-cost instruments and the long-term stability of assay results. PMID:27183276

  15. Validation of soluble amyloid-β precursor protein assays as diagnostic CSF biomarkers for neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Waalwijk van Doorn, Linda J C; Koel-Simmelink, Marleen J; Haußmann, Ute; Klafki, Hans; Struyfs, Hanne; Linning, Philipp; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; Twaalfhoven, Harry; Kuiperij, H Bea; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Scheltens, Philip; Verbeek, Marcel M; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Wiltfang, Jens; Teunissen, Charlotte E

    2016-04-01

    Analytical validation of a biomarker assay is essential before implementation in clinical practice can occur. In this study, we analytically validated the performance of assays detecting soluble amyloid-β precursor protein (sAPP) α and β in CSF in two laboratories according to previously standard operating procedures serving this goal. sAPPα and sAPPβ ELISA assays from two vendors (IBL-international, Meso Scale Diagnostics) were validated. The performance parameters included precision, sensitivity, dilutional linearity, recovery, and parallelism. Inter-laboratory variation, biomarker comparison (sAPPα vs. sAPPβ) and clinical performance was determined in three laboratories using 60 samples of patients with subjective memory complaints, Alzheimer's disease, or frontotemporal dementia. All performance parameters of the assays were similar between labs and within predefined acceptance criteria. The only exceptions were minor out-of-range results for recovery at low concentrations and, despite being within predefined acceptance criteria, non-comparability of the results for evaluation of the dilutional linearity and hook-effect. Based on the inter-laboratory correlation between Lab #1 and Lab #2, the IBL-international assays were more robust (sAPPα: r(2) = 0.92, sAPPβ: r(2) = 0.94) than the Meso Scale Diagnostics (MSD) assay (sAPPα: r(2) = 0.70, sAPPβ: r(2) = 0.80). Specificity of assays was confirmed using assay-specific peptide competitors. Clinical validation showed consistent results across the clinical groups in the different laboratories for all assays. The validated sAPP assays appear to be of sufficient technical quality and perform well. Moreover, the study shows that the newly developed standard operating procedures provide highly useful tools for the validation of new biomarker assays. A recommendation was made for renewed instructions to evaluate the dilutional linearity and hook-effect. We analytically validated the performance of assays

  16. Translation of neurological biomarkers to clinically relevant platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ronald L; Robinson, Gillian; Muller, Uwe; Wang, Kevin K W

    2009-01-01

    Like proteomics more generally, neuroproteomics has recently been linked to the discovery of biochemical markers of central nervous system (CNS) injury and disease. Although neuroproteomics has enjoyed considerable success in discovery of candidate biomarkers, there are a number of challenges facing investigators interested in developing clinically useful platforms to assess biomarkers for damage to the CNS. These challenges include intrinsic physiological complications such as the blood-brain barrier. Effective translation of biomarkers to clinical practice also requires development of entirely novel pathways and product development strategies. Drawing from lessons learned from applications of biomarkers to traumatic brain injury, this study outlines major elements of such a pathway. As with other indications, biomarkers can have three major areas of application: (1) drug development; (2) diagnosis and prognosis; (3) patient management. Translation of CNS biomarkers to practical clinical platforms raises a number of integrated elements. Biomarker discovery and initial selection needs to be integrated at the earliest stages with components that will allow systematic prioritization and triage of biomarker candidates. A number of important criteria need to be considered in selecting clinical biomarker candidates. Development of proof of concept assays and their optimization and validation represent an often overlooked feature of biomarker translational research. Initial assay optimization should confirm that assays can detect biomarkers in relevant clinical samples. Since access to human clinical samples is critical to identification of biomarkers relevant to injury and disease as well as for assay development, design of human clinical validation studies is an important component of translational biomarker research platforms. Although these clinical studies share much in common with clinical trials for assessment of drug therapeutic efficacy, there are a number of

  17. Emerging from the fog: hypotheses and paradigms in developmental biology--the Society for Developmental Biology 2005 Annual Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Barolo, Scott; Bilder, David; Montgomery, Mary; Sinha, Neelima

    2006-01-15

    The Society for Developmental Biology 64th annual meeting took place by the beautiful San Francisco Bay from July 27th to August 1st, 2005. Organized under the leadership of Judith Kimble (SDB President, U. Wisconsin-Madison), the meeting attracted over one thousand developmental biologists from all over the world. They gathered to present data, exchange ideas and enjoy basking in the warm sun on the piers. Strong themes emerged from the diverse subjects discussed at the meeting, demonstrating exciting trends towards the unifying goal of understanding the progression from a single cell to an adult organism. Cell and Tissue Polarity was a recurring topic at the meeting. Questions like "is there polarity", "how is it achieved" and "how is it linked to stem cell maintenance" were discussed. Post-transcriptional regulation involving protein degradation and microRNA (miRNA) modulation of gene expression was featured in the context of transition between meiosis to mitosis and asymmetries in the embryo. It is apparent that Evolutionary Developmental Biology, once a major driving influence in the early days of the field, continues to enjoy a renaissance as researchers familiar with traditional model organisms are increasingly attracted to the field and as modern genetic and molecular approaches are applied to an increasingly varied assortment of organisms. The attention is beginning to pay off as laboratories are starting to generate significant results shedding light into how developmental programs are altered to generate morphological diversity. In the Satellite Symposium on Plant Development held on July 27th, 2005, the overriding theme was on the identity and maintenance of Stem Cells in Plants. Finally, researchers working on diverse organisms have shown a strong effort to address Developmental Coordination: on the subcellular, cellular and tissue levels. Advanced imaging techniques are combined with traditional genetic methods to scrutinize and compare dynamic

  18. Serum Osteopontin as a Novel Biomarker for Muscle Regeneration in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuraoka, Mutsuki; Kimura, En; Nagata, Tetsuya; Okada, Takashi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Tachimori, Hisateru; Yonemoto, Naohiro; Imamura, Michihiro; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2016-05-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X-linked muscle disorder. We have already reported that osteopontin (OPN), an inflammatory cytokine and myogenic factor, is expressed in the early dystrophic phase in canine X-linked muscular dystrophy in Japan, a dystrophic dog model. To further explore the possibility of OPN as a new biomarker for disease activity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, we monitored serum OPN levels in dystrophic and wild-type dogs at different ages and compared the levels to other serum markers, such as serum creatine kinase, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1. Serum OPN levels in the dystrophic dogs were significantly elevated compared with those in wild-type dogs before and 1 hour after a cesarean section birth and at the age of 3 months. The serum OPN level was significantly correlated with the phenotypic severity of dystrophic dogs at the period corresponding to the onset of muscle weakness, whereas other serum markers including creatine kinase were not. Immunohistologically, OPN was up-regulated in infiltrating macrophages and developmental myosin heavy chain-positive regenerating muscle fibers in the dystrophic dogs, whereas serum OPN was highly elevated. OPN expression was also observed during the synergic muscle regeneration process induced by cardiotoxin injection. In conclusion, OPN is a promising biomarker for muscle regeneration in dystrophic dogs and can be applicable to boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. PMID:26963343

  19. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  20. Executive Functions in Developmental Dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eVarvara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at investigating different aspects of Executive Functions (EF in children with Developmental Dyslexia (DD.A neuropsychological battery tapping verbal fluency, spoonerism, attention, verbal shifting, short-term and working memory was used to assess 60 children with DD and 65 with typical reading abilities.Compared to their controls, children with DD showed deficits in several EF domains such as verbal categorical and phonological fluency, visual-spatial and auditory attention, spoonerism, verbal and visual short-term memory, and verbal working memory. Moreover, exploring predictive relationships between EF measures and reading, we found that spoonerism abilities better explained word and non-word reading deficits. Although to a lesser extent, auditory and visual-spatial attention also explained the increased percentage of variance related to reading deficit.EF deficits found in DD are interpreted as an expression of a deficient functioning of the Central Executive System and are discussed in the context of the recent temporal sampling theory.

  1. Developmental effects of prenatal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is the result of a symposium which was organised jointly by the WHO and the department for nuclear biology of the Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung (Society for Radiation- and Environmental Research) Neuherberg; the Institut fuer Strahlenhygiene (Institute for Radiation Hygiene) of the Federal Board of Health (Bundesgesundheitsamt), Neuherberg and the working group ''Radiation Biology'' in the ''Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft'' and took place in Neuherberg near Munich from the 26.-28. November 1980. Subjects dealt with the lectures were: Developmental disturbances caused by prenatal exposure to either external radiation or incorporation of radionuclides in the organism of the mother. Based on the prenatal radiation effects already known new experiences and new knowledge were reported on and show new consequences on peri- and postnatal development. Radiation effects of incorporated radionuclides include also questions of the biokinetics of radioactive substances at present the emphasis lies on diaplacental penetration. Questions of synergetic effects of radiation and diaplacentally penetrating chemical substances were discussed on the symposium as well. These subjects were also extensively dealt with in a panel discussion. (orig./MG)

  2. DEVELOPMENTAL COORDINATION DISORDER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh MIRAFKHAMI

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveIn this article, a motor skill disorder called developmental coordination disorder (DCD, that is usually first diagnosed during childhood, is explained and discussed. In the year 1987, DCD was formally recognized as a distinct disorder in children by the American Psychiatric Association (APA. DCD is a generalized term for the children who have some degrees of impairment in the development of motor coordination and therefore have difficulties with physical skills which significantly interfere with their academic achievements and /or performing everyday activities. As they develop, other age-related tasks are also below average. Because these impairment & conditions are often associated with emotional distress, they can seriously interfere with the person's everyday life and social relationships. Reviews indicate that most of the training rocedures have only a limited effect on the development of general coordination, and that they have no effect at all on academic progress.This includes approaches based on assumed underlying deficiencies such as sensory integration deficits and kinesthetic functioning deficits, as well as the more traditional perceptual - motor training. One new approach is Cognitive Orientation to daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP, based on problem - solving strategies and guided discovery of the child and task specific strategies. The aim of this article was to inform, promote and disseminate more information about some difficulties in applying the diagnostic criteria for DCD. Also, a brief review of the researches on the intervention methods is presented.

  3. Context Matters: Support for Leader Developmental Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E; Reichard, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    Leader developers need to consider support for leader developmental readiness by examining organizational culture, job design and rewards, social support, and availability and structure of leader development programming. PMID:26895267

  4. Developmental and comparative perspectives of contagious yawning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senju, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Contagious yawning (i.e. yawning triggered by perceiving others' yawning) is a well-documented phenomenon, but the mechanism underlying it is still unclear. In this chapter, I review the current evidence about: (1) developmental studies with typically and atypically developing populations, and (2) comparative studies in non-human animals. Developmental studies have revealed that contagious yawning is disturbed in individuals with autism spectrum disorders, suggesting that contagious yawning may share a developmental basis with the capacity for theory of mind. Comparative studies have suggested that contagious yawning can be observed in non-primate species, such as domestic dogs. As dogs are known to have exceptional skills in communicating with humans, it has also been suggested that contagious yawning may be related to the capacity for social communication. These results from developmental and comparative studies are consistent with the claim that the mechanism underlying contagious yawning relates to the capacity for empathy. PMID:20357469

  5. EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROTOXICITY OF ORGANOTINS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organotins, including monomethyltin (MMT), dimethyltin (DMT), and dibutyltin (DBT), are widely used as heat stabilizers in PVC and CPVC piping, which results in their presence in drinking water supplies. Concern for developmental neurotoxic effects were raised by published findi...

  6. Developmental Norms for the Sentence Repetition Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, John A.; MacDonald, John W.

    1984-01-01

    Obtained developmental norms for the Sentence Repetition Test from children (N=1,081) ranging in age from three to 13 years. Utilized a substanially larger number of children in each age group than previous reports. (Author/LLL)

  7. Developmental Drama for Brain-Damaged Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue

    1977-01-01

    Offers recommendations for using developmental drama including: discussion of organization of the play environment, leaders, and play groups; sensory-awareness games, movement-mime projects, and story dramatizations; and video tape utilization for play evaluation. (MH)

  8. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A bibliographic database on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) with references to developmental and reproductive toxicology...

  9. New Jersey Developmental Disabilities Stakeholders' Forum

    OpenAIRE

    Janice Ballou; David Frank; Audrey McDonald; Julie Rothbard

    2003-01-01

    New Jersey has the challenging task of providing cost-effective, high-quality services to people with developmental disabilities and their families. This report presents the views of a selected group of stakeholders—advocacy groups, service providers, union employees, government agencies, and people with developmental disabilities and their families—to help plan for changes to the system. Areas discussed include resources and funding, program and service planning, and community integratio...

  10. Developmental Regimes in Africa synthesis report

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, D.; Dietz, A.J.; Golooba-Mutebi, F.; Fuady, A.H.; Henley, D; Kelsall, T.; Leliveld, A.H.M.; Donge, van, J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Many African countries have experienced sustained economic growth, but few have achieved the type of structural change, driven by rising productivity, that has transformed mass living standards in parts of Asia. In the Developmental Regimes in Africa Synthesis Report, editor David Booth examines how DRA research has shed new light on how developmental regimes might emerge and be sustained in Africa in the 21st century. He outlines a concept with defining features at three levels: policy conte...

  11. Contagious yawning: developmental and comparative perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Senju, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Contagious yawning (i.e., yawning triggered by perceiving others’ yawning) is a well-documented phenomenon, but the mechanism underlying it is still unclear. In this chapter, I review the current evidence about (a) developmental studies with typically and atypically developing population and (b) comparative studies in non-human animals. Developmental studies have revealed that contagious yawning is disturbed in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders, suggesting that contagi...

  12. The Concept of Development in Developmental Psychopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Sroufe, L. Alan

    2009-01-01

    So important is the perspective of development for understanding psychopathology that it spawned a new discipline—“developmental psychopathology”—which has seen remarkable advances since its introduction,, but has yet to completely fulfill its promise. To do this requires maintaining a thoroughgoing developmental perspective. When we take development seriously, there are implications for how we understand psychopathology, describe and conceptualize the origins and course of disorder, and inte...

  13. Developmental immunotoxicity testing of 4-methyl anisole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonk, Elisa C M; Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R; van Loveren, Henk; Piersma, Aldert H

    2015-07-01

    The developmental immunotoxicity of 4-methyl anisole (4MA) was investigated in the rat. Four study designs were used, with either premating or post-weaning onset of exposure, continued to postnatal day 50, and with or without additional oral gavage of pups from postnatal day 10 onward. Reduced litter size (benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL) 80mg/kg bw/day) was the most sensitive developmental parameter, with pup relative organ weight effects observed at similar BMDLs, in the absence of maternal toxicity. Eosinophil numbers were reduced at lower doses (BMDL 16mg/kg bw/day). KLH challenge resulted in increased IL-13 and TNF-α responses, and variably reduced IgG production (BMDL 27mg/kg bw/day). T4 levels were reduced by 11% at maximum with a BMDL of 73mg/kg bw/day. Differences between exposure cohorts were limited and were considered to be without biological significance. This study shows that 4MA induces developmental immunotoxicity at doses below those inducing developmental and general toxicity. These observations being independent of the study designs applied suggest that the post-weaning period, included in all designs, is the most relevant sensitive period for inducing 4MA mediated developmental immunotoxicity. Moreover, this study stresses the importance of including developmental immunotoxicity testing by default in regulatory toxicology. PMID:25882306

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Workshop Characterization of Pathogenicity, Virulence and Host-Pathogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, A

    2006-08-30

    The threats of bio-terrorism and newly emerging infectious diseases pose serious challenges to the national security infrastructure. Rapid detection and diagnosis of infectious disease in human populations, as well as characterizing pathogen biology, are critical for reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with such threats. One of the key challenges in managing an infectious disease outbreak, whether through natural causes or acts of overt terrorism, is detection early enough to initiate effective countermeasures. Much recent attention has been directed towards the utility of biomarkers or molecular signatures that result from the interaction of the pathogen with the host for improving our ability to diagnose and mitigate the impact of a developing infection during the time window when effective countermeasures can be instituted. Host responses may provide early signals in blood even from localized infections. Multiple innate and adaptive immune molecules, in combination with other biochemical markers, may provide disease-specific information and new targets for countermeasures. The presence of pathogen specific markers and an understanding of the molecular capabilities and adaptations of the pathogen when it interacts with its host may likewise assist in early detection and provide opportunities for targeting countermeasures. An important question that needs to be addressed is whether these molecular-based approaches will prove useful for early diagnosis, complement current methods of direct agent detection, and aid development and use of countermeasures. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will host a workshop to explore the utility of host- and pathogen-based molecular diagnostics, prioritize key research issues, and determine the critical steps needed to transition host-pathogen research to tools that can be applied towards a more effective national bio-defense strategy. The workshop will bring together leading researchers/scientists in the

  15. Neural Biomarkers for Dyslexia, ADHD, and ADD in the Auditory Cortex of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrallach, Bettina; Groß, Christine; Bernhofs, Valdis; Engelmann, Dorte; Benner, Jan; Gündert, Nadine; Blatow, Maria; Wengenroth, Martina; Seitz, Angelika; Brunner, Monika; Seither, Stefan; Parncutt, Richard; Schneider, Peter; Seither-Preisler, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and attention deficit disorder (ADD) show distinct clinical profiles that may include auditory and language-related impairments. Currently, an objective brain-based diagnosis of these developmental disorders is still unavailable. We investigated the neuro-auditory systems of dyslexic, ADHD, ADD, and age-matched control children (N = 147) using neuroimaging, magnetencephalography and psychoacoustics. All disorder subgroups exhibited an oversized left planum temporale and an abnormal interhemispheric asynchrony (10-40 ms) of the primary auditory evoked P1-response. Considering right auditory cortex morphology, bilateral P1 source waveform shapes, and auditory performance, the three disorder subgroups could be reliably differentiated with outstanding accuracies of 89-98%. We therefore for the first time provide differential biomarkers for a brain-based diagnosis of dyslexia, ADHD, and ADD. The method allowed not only allowed for clear discrimination between two subtypes of attentional disorders (ADHD and ADD), a topic controversially discussed for decades in the scientific community, but also revealed the potential for objectively identifying comorbid cases. Noteworthy, in children playing a musical instrument, after three and a half years of training the observed interhemispheric asynchronies were reduced by about 2/3, thus suggesting a strong beneficial influence of music experience on brain development. These findings might have far-reaching implications for both research and practice and enable a profound understanding of the brain-related etiology, diagnosis, and musically based therapy of common auditory-related developmental disorders and learning disabilities. PMID:27471442

  16. Neural Biomarkers for Dyslexia, ADHD, and ADD in the Auditory Cortex of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrallach, Bettina; Groß, Christine; Bernhofs, Valdis; Engelmann, Dorte; Benner, Jan; Gündert, Nadine; Blatow, Maria; Wengenroth, Martina; Seitz, Angelika; Brunner, Monika; Seither, Stefan; Parncutt, Richard; Schneider, Peter; Seither-Preisler, Annemarie

    2016-01-01

    Dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and attention deficit disorder (ADD) show distinct clinical profiles that may include auditory and language-related impairments. Currently, an objective brain-based diagnosis of these developmental disorders is still unavailable. We investigated the neuro-auditory systems of dyslexic, ADHD, ADD, and age-matched control children (N = 147) using neuroimaging, magnetencephalography and psychoacoustics. All disorder subgroups exhibited an oversized left planum temporale and an abnormal interhemispheric asynchrony (10–40 ms) of the primary auditory evoked P1-response. Considering right auditory cortex morphology, bilateral P1 source waveform shapes, and auditory performance, the three disorder subgroups could be reliably differentiated with outstanding accuracies of 89–98%. We therefore for the first time provide differential biomarkers for a brain-based diagnosis of dyslexia, ADHD, and ADD. The method allowed not only allowed for clear discrimination between two subtypes of attentional disorders (ADHD and ADD), a topic controversially discussed for decades in the scientific community, but also revealed the potential for objectively identifying comorbid cases. Noteworthy, in children playing a musical instrument, after three and a half years of training the observed interhemispheric asynchronies were reduced by about 2/3, thus suggesting a strong beneficial influence of music experience on brain development. These findings might have far-reaching implications for both research and practice and enable a profound understanding of the brain-related etiology, diagnosis, and musically based therapy of common auditory-related developmental disorders and learning disabilities. PMID:27471442

  17. Circulating Cytokines as Biomarkers of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Rajeshwara N. Achur; Freeman, Willard M.; Vrana, Kent E.

    2009-01-01

    There are currently no consistent objective biochemical markers of alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Development of reliable diagnostic biomarkers that permit accurate assessment of alcohol intake and patterns of drinking is of prime importance to treatment and research fields. Diagnostic biomarker development in other diseases has demonstrated the utility of both open, systems biology, screening for biomarkers and more rational focused efforts on specific biomolecules or families of biomolecules...

  18. Biomarkers of Type II Synthetic Pyrethroid Pesticides in Freshwater Fish

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Type II synthetic pyrethroids contain an alpha-cyano group which renders them more neurotoxic than their noncyano type I counterparts. A wide array of biomarkers have been employed to delineate the toxic responses of freshwater fish to various type II synthetic pyrethroids. These include hematological, enzymatic, cytological, genetic, omic and other types of biomarkers. This review puts together the applications of different biomarkers in freshwater fish species in response to the toxicity of...

  19. Epigenetic Biomarkers of Preterm Birth and Its Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Anna K. Knight; Smith, Alicia K.

    2016-01-01

    A biomarker is a biological measure predictive of a normal or pathogenic process or response. Biomarkers are often useful for making clinical decisions and determining treatment course. One area where such biomarkers would be particularly useful is in identifying women at risk for preterm delivery and related pregnancy complications. Neonates born preterm have significant morbidity and mortality, both in the perinatal period and throughout the life course, and identifying women at risk of del...

  20. Research status and funding trends of lung cancer biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Cui; Hong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of malignant tumors with the highest morbidity and mortality in the world. At present, research of early diagnosis, treatment, prognosis, and metastasis associated biomarkers is most active. This article reviewed the research status of lung cancer biomarkers and analyzed the funding situation in the field of lung cancer markers in recent 10 years in China and abroad, to provide a reference for the future basic and clinical translational research of lung cancer biomarkers.

  1. Alkylresorcinols as biomarkers of whole grain wheat and rye intake

    OpenAIRE

    Landberg, Rikard

    2009-01-01

    Dietary biomarkers are objective measures of food or nutrient intake and can be related to endpoints in epidemiological studies, used in the validation of dietary assessment instruments and used to check of compliance during intervention studies. Alkylresorcinols (AR), phenolic lipids present exclusively in the outer parts of wheat and rye grains, have been suggested as biomarkers of whole grain wheat and rye intake. The overall aim with this thesis was to evaluate AR as specific biomarkers o...

  2. Emerging Risk Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Diseases and Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Present review article highlights various cardiovascular risk prediction biomarkers by incorporating both traditional risk factors to be used as diagnostic markers and recent technologically generated diagnostic and therapeutic markers. This paper explains traditional biomarkers such as lipid profile, glucose, and hormone level and physiological biomarkers based on measurement of levels of important biomolecules such as serum ferritin, triglyceride to HDLp (high density lipoproteins) ratio, l...

  3. Methods and Challenges in Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Development

    OpenAIRE

    Abramson, Richard G.; Burton, Kirsteen R.; Yu, John-Paul J.; Scalzetti, Ernest M.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mendiratta-Lala, Mishal; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Ganeshan, Dhakshinamoorthy; Lenchik, Leon; Subramaniam, Rathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Academic radiology is poised to play an important role in the development and implementation of quantitative imaging (QI) tools. This manuscript, drafted by the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) Radiology Research Alliance (RRA) Quantitative Imaging Task Force, reviews current issues in QI biomarker research. We discuss motivations for advancing QI, define key terms, present a framework for QI biomarker research, and outline challenges in QI biomarker development. We conclude by de...

  4. Prognostic Value of Liver Fibrosis Biomarkers: A Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Poynard, Thierry; Ngo, Yen; Perazzo, Hugo; Munteanu, Mona; Lebray, Pascal; Moussalli, Joseph; Thabut, Dominique; Benhamou, Yves; Ratziu, Vlad

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Methods: Several serum biomarkers such as FibroTest, aspartate transaminase-platelet ratio index (APRI), FIB-4, and liver stiffness measurement by FibroScan have been validated as alternatives to biopsy for the diagnosis of fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. This paper aims to assess the 5-year prognostic values of these biomarkers. A meta-analysis combined all published prognostic studies. Baseline biopsy and APRI data were used as references. Results: Only 3 biomarker...

  5. Risk Factors and Biomarkers of Ischemic Stroke in Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwangsoo; Lee, Ji-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Stroke is common among cancer patients. However, risk factors and biomarkers of stroke in cancer patients are not well established. This study aimed to investigate risk factors and biomarkers as well as etiology of ischemic stroke in cancer patients. Methods A retrospective review was conducted in cancer patients with ischemic stroke who were admitted to a general hospital in Busan, Korea, between January 2003 and December 2012. The risk factors and biomarkers for strok...

  6. Biomarkers in the ontology for general medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceusters, Werner; Smith, Barry

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of recent work has been devoted to the topic of biomarkers as aids to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment evaluation. Basing our work on the Ontology for General Medical Science (OGMS) and on the specifications provided by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), we propose definitions for biomarkers of various types. These definitions provide a formal representation of what biomarkers are in a way that allows us to remove certain ambiguities and inconsistencies in the documentation provided by the IOM. PMID:25991121

  7. Development of new tools for genomic biomarker investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Zanda,

    2011-01-01

    During drug research and development, biomarkers are broadly used to improve the understanding of drug mechanism of action, to investigate drug efficacy and safety, to support the selection of target patient population and to optimize treatment schedule. Among different classes of biomarkers, genomic biomarkers are defined as a measurable DNA or RNA characteristics that are indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, and/or response to therapeutic or other intervention. ...

  8. Biomarkers in dementia: clinical utility and new directions

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, R. M.; Paterson, R. W.; Warren, J D; Zetterberg, H.; O'Brien, J. T.; Fox, N C; Halliday, G. M.; Schott, J M

    2014-01-01

    Imaging, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood-based biomarkers have the potential to improve the accuracy by which specific causes of dementia can be diagnosed in vivo, provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology, and may be used as inclusion criteria and outcome measures for clinical trials. While a number of imaging and CSF biomarkers are currently used for each of these purposes, this is an evolving field, with numerous potential biomarkers in varying stages of research and develop...

  9. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tufo, Stephanie N; Myers, Emily B

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of fluent speech in one's native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is "restored" via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one's peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore, the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal. PMID:24926230

  10. Phonemic restoration in developmental dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie N. Del Tufo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The comprehension of fluent speech in one’s native language requires that listeners integrate the detailed acoustic-phonetic information available in the sound signal with linguistic knowledge. This interplay is especially apparent in the phoneme restoration effect, a phenomenon in which a missing phoneme is ‘restored’ via the influence of top-down information from the lexicon and through bottom-up acoustic processing. Developmental dyslexia is a disorder characterized by an inability to read at the level of one’s peers without any clear failure due to environmental influences. In the current study we utilized the phonemic restoration illusion paradigm, to examine individual differences in phonemic restoration across a range of reading ability, from very good to dyslexic readers. Results demonstrate that restoration occurs less in those who have high scores on measures of phonological processing. Based on these results, we suggest that the processing or representation of acoustic detail may not be as reliable in poor and dyslexic readers, with the result that lexical information is more likely to override acoustic properties of the stimuli. This pattern of increased restoration could result from a failure of perceptual tuning, in which unstable representations of speech sounds result in the acceptance of non-speech sounds as speech. An additional or alternative theory is that degraded or impaired phonological processing at the speech sound level may reflect architecture that is overly plastic and consequently fails to stabilize appropriately for speech sound representations. Therefore the inability to separate speech and noise may result as a deficit in separating noise from the acoustic signal.

  11. Sparse discriminant analysis for breast cancer biomarker identification and classification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Shi; Daoqing Dai; Chaochun Liu; Hong Yan

    2009-01-01

    Biomarker identification and cancer classification are two important procedures in microarray data analysis. We propose a novel uni-fied method to carry out both tasks. We first preselect biomarker candidates by eliminating unrelated genes through the BSS/WSS ratio filter to reduce computational cost, and then use a sparse discriminant analysis method for simultaneous biomarker identification and cancer classification. Moreover, we give a mathematical justification about automatic biomarker identification. Experimental results show that the proposed method can identify key genes that have been verified in biochemical or biomedical research and classify the breast cancer type correctly.

  12. Imaging biomarkers as surrogate endpoints for drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The employment of biomarkers (including imaging biomarkers, especially PET) in drug development has gained increasing attention during recent years. This has been partly stimulated by the hope that the integration of biomarkers into drug development programmes may be a means to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the drug development process by early identification of promising drug candidates - thereby counteracting the rising costs of drug development. More importantly, however, the interest in biomarkers for drug development is the logical consequence of recent advances in biosciences and medicine which are leading to target-specific treatments in the framework of ''personalised medicine''. A considerable proportion of target-specific drugs will show effects in subgroups of patients only. Biomarkers are a means to identify potential responders, or patient subgroups at risk for specific side-effects. Biomarkers are used in early drug development in the context of translational medicine to gain information about the drug's potential in different patient groups and disease states. The information obtained at this stage is mainly important for designing subsequent clinical trials and to identify promising drug candidates. Biomarkers in later phases of clinical development may - if properly validated - serve as surrogate endpoints for clinical outcomes. Regulatory agencies in the EU and the USA have facilitated the use of biomarkers early in the development process. The validation of biomarkers as surrogate endpoints is part of FDA's ''critical path initiative''. (orig.)

  13. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. PMID:25173750

  14. Plasma proteomics to identify biomarkers – application to cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Christian Beck

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is an unmet need for new cardiovascular biomarkers. Despite this only few biomarkers for the diagnosis or screening of cardiovascular diseases have been implemented in the clinic. Thousands of proteins can be analysed in plasma by mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies. Therefore, this technology may therefore identify new biomarkers that previously have not been associated with cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we summarize the key challenges and considerations, including strategies, recent discoveries and clinical applications in cardiovascular proteomics that may lead to the discovery of novel cardiovascular biomarkers.

  15. Impact of biomarker development on drug safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug safety has always been a key aspect of drug development. Recently, the Vioxx case and several cases of serious adverse events being linked to high-profile products have increased the importance of drug safety, especially in the eyes of drug development companies and global regulatory agencies. Safety biomarkers are increasingly being seen as helping to provide the clarity, predictability, and certainty needed to gain confidence in decision making: early-stage projects can be stopped quicker, late-stage projects become less risky. Public and private organizations are investing heavily in terms of time, money and manpower on safety biomarker development. An illustrative and 'door opening' safety biomarker success story is the recent recognition of kidney safety biomarkers for pre-clinical and limited translational contexts by FDA and EMEA. This milestone achieved for kidney biomarkers and the 'know how' acquired is being transferred to other organ toxicities, namely liver, heart, vascular system. New technologies and molecular-based approaches, i.e., molecular pathology as a complement to the classical toolbox, allow promising discoveries in the safety biomarker field. This review will focus on the utility and use of safety biomarkers all along drug development, highlighting the present gaps and opportunities identified in organ toxicity monitoring. A last part will be dedicated to safety biomarker development in general, from identification to diagnostic tests, using the kidney safety biomarkers success as an illustrative example.

  16. Validation of biomarkers for the study of environmental carcinogens: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallo, Valentina; Khan, Aneire; Gonzales, Carlos;

    2008-01-01

    of the technique used for their identification; reproducibility improved after the correction for a laboratory factor. A high-sensitivity method is available for the measurement of 1-hydroxypyrene in urine. There is consensus on validation of biomarkers of oxidative damage DNA based on the comet...... assay and chromatographic measurement in blood while urinary measurements by chromatographic assays are well validated, and ELISA-based assays appear to lack specificity. Immunoassays for the quantification of adducts of N-nitroso compounds are useful for large epidemiological studies, given their...

  17. Effects of an oil spill in a harbor assessed using biomarkers of exposure in eelpout

    OpenAIRE

    Sturve, Joachim; Balk, Lennart; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Förlin, Lars; Carney Almroth, Bethanie

    2014-01-01

    Oil spills occur commonly, and chemical compounds originating from oil spills are widespread in the aquatic environment. In order to monitor effects of a bunker oil spill on the aquatic environment, biomarker responses were measured in eelpout (Zoarces viviparus) sampled along a gradient in Göteborg harbor where the oil spill occurred and at a reference site, 2 weeks after the oil spill. Eelpout were also exposed to the bunker oil in a laboratory study to validate field data. The results show...

  18. 1-Hydroxypyrene as a biomarker of PAH exposure in the marine polychaete Nereis diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tairova, Zhanna M; Giessing, Anders M B; Hansen, Rikke; Andersen, Ole

    2009-02-01

    The possibility of using the pyrene metabolite 1-hydroxypyrene as a biomarker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) exposure was investigated by exposure of the marine polychaete Nereis diversicolor to several PAHs in the laboratory. Animals were exposed to pyrene alone and to five different PAHs - phenanthrene, anthracene, pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[k]flouranthene. After five days of exposure the concentrations of parent PAHs and 1-hydroxypyrene were identified using three different analytical methods, high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC/F), synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (GC/MS). The SFS measurements of 1-hydroxypyrene were validated by the more sensitive method HPLC/F. The positive correlation between total PAHs and 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in the polychaete tissues observed in experiments, suggests the feasibility of 1-hydroxypyrene as a suitable biomarker for total PAH exposure assessment. Furthermore, the possibility of employment of the simple and rapid SFS method instead of HPLC/F for biomarker analysis has been confirmed by the positive and significant correlation between results achieved by these two analytical methods. PMID:19058843

  19. Conventional, molecular methods and biomarkers molecules in detection of septicemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabestani, Mohammad Reza; Rastiany, Sahar; Kazemi, Sima; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients worldwide and based on studies, 30-40% of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock results from the blood stream infections (BSIs). Identifying of the disease, performing laboratory tests, and consequently treatment are factors that required for optimum management of BSIs. In addition, applying precise and immediate identification of the etiologic agent is a prerequisite for specific antibiotic therapy of pathogen and thereby decreasing mortality rates. The diagnosis of sepsis is difficult because clinical signs of sepsis often overlap with other noninfectious cases of systemic inflammation. BSIs are usually diagnosed by performing a series of techniques such as blood cultures, polymerase chain reaction-based methods, and biomarkers of sepsis. Extremely time-consuming even to take up to several days is a major limitation of conventional methods. In addition, yielding false-negative results due to fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms and also in case of antibiotic pretreated samples are other limitations. In comparison, molecular methods are capable of examining a blood sample obtained from suspicious patient with BSI and gave the all required information to prescribing antimicrobial therapy for detected bacterial or fungal infections immediately. Because of an emergency of sepsis, new methods are being developed. In this review, we discussed about the most important sepsis diagnostic methods and numbered the advantage and disadvantage of the methods in detail. PMID:26261822

  20. Conventional, molecular methods and biomarkers molecules in detection of septicemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arabestani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients worldwide and based on studies, 30-40% of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock results from the blood stream infections (BSIs. Identifying of the disease, performing laboratory tests, and consequently treatment are factors that required for optimum management of BSIs. In addition, applying precise and immediate identification of the etiologic agent is a prerequisite for specific antibiotic therapy of pathogen and thereby decreasing mortality rates. The diagnosis of sepsis is difficult because clinical signs of sepsis often overlap with other noninfectious cases of systemic inflammation. BSIs are usually diagnosed by performing a series of techniques such as blood cultures, polymerase chain reaction-based methods, and biomarkers of sepsis. Extremely time-consuming even to take up to several days is a major limitation of conventional methods. In addition, yielding false-negative results due to fastidious and slow-growing microorganisms and also in case of antibiotic pretreated samples are other limitations. In comparison, molecular methods are capable of examining a blood sample obtained from suspicious patient with BSI and gave the all required information to prescribing antimicrobial therapy for detected bacterial or fungal infections immediately. Because of an emergency of sepsis, new methods are being developed. In this review, we discussed about the most important sepsis diagnostic methods and numbered the advantage and disadvantage of the methods in detail.

  1. Gene expression-based biomarkers for Anopheles gambiae age grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-Hui; Marinotti, Osvaldo; Zhong, Daibin; James, Anthony A; Walker, Edward; Guda, Tom; Kweka, Eliningaya J; Githure, John; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Information on population age structure of mosquitoes under natural conditions is fundamental to the understanding of vectorial capacity and crucial for assessing the impact of vector control measures on malaria transmission. Transcriptional profiling has been proposed as a method for predicting mosquito age for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, however, whether this new method is adequate for natural conditions is unknown. This study tests the applicability of transcriptional profiling for age-grading of Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa. The transcript abundance of two An. gambiae genes, AGAP009551 and AGAP011615, was measured during aging under laboratory and field conditions in three mosquito strains. Age-dependent monotonic changes in transcript levels were observed in all strains evaluated. These genes were validated as age-grading biomarkers using the mark, release and recapture (MRR) method. The MRR method determined a good correspondence between actual and predicted age, and thus demonstrated the value of age classifications derived from the transcriptional profiling of these two genes. The technique was used to establish the age structure of mosquito populations from two malaria-endemic areas in western Kenya. The population age structure determined by the transcriptional profiling method was consistent with that based on mosquito parity. This study demonstrates that the transcription profiling method based on two genes is valuable for age determination of natural mosquitoes, providing a new approach for determining a key life history trait of malaria vectors. PMID:23936017

  2. Gene expression-based biomarkers for Anopheles gambiae age grading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Information on population age structure of mosquitoes under natural conditions is fundamental to the understanding of vectorial capacity and crucial for assessing the impact of vector control measures on malaria transmission. Transcriptional profiling has been proposed as a method for predicting mosquito age for Aedes and Anopheles mosquitoes, however, whether this new method is adequate for natural conditions is unknown. This study tests the applicability of transcriptional profiling for age-grading of Anopheles gambiae, the most important malaria vector in Africa. The transcript abundance of two An. gambiae genes, AGAP009551 and AGAP011615, was measured during aging under laboratory and field conditions in three mosquito strains. Age-dependent monotonic changes in transcript levels were observed in all strains evaluated. These genes were validated as age-grading biomarkers using the mark, release and recapture (MRR method. The MRR method determined a good correspondence between actual and predicted age, and thus demonstrated the value of age classifications derived from the transcriptional profiling of these two genes. The technique was used to establish the age structure of mosquito populations from two malaria-endemic areas in western Kenya. The population age structure determined by the transcriptional profiling method was consistent with that based on mosquito parity. This study demonstrates that the transcription profiling method based on two genes is valuable for age determination of natural mosquitoes, providing a new approach for determining a key life history trait of malaria vectors.

  3. Proteomics in Cancer Biomarkers Discovery: Challenges and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M. Sallam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the introduction of recent high-throughput technologies to various fields of science and medicine, it is becoming clear that obtaining large amounts of data is no longer a problem in modern research laboratories. However, coherent study designs, optimal conditions for obtaining high-quality data, and compelling interpretation, in accordance with the evidence-based systems biology, are critical factors in ensuring the emergence of good science out of these recent technologies. This review focuses on the proteomics field and its new perspectives on cancer research. Cornerstone publications that have tremendously helped scientists and clinicians to better understand cancer pathogenesis; to discover novel diagnostic and/or prognostic biomarkers; and to suggest novel therapeutic targets will be presented. The author of this review aims at presenting some of the relevant literature data that helped as a step forward in bridging the gap between bench work results and bedside potentials. Undeniably, this review cannot include all the work that is being produced by expert research groups all over the world.

  4. Postgenomics biomarkers for rabies—the next decade of proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shraddha M; Banerjee, Shefali M; Chowdhary, Abhay S

    2015-02-01

    Rabies is one of the oldest diseases known to mankind. The pathogenic mechanisms by which rabies virus infection leads to development of neurological disease and death are still poorly understood. Analysis of rabies-infected proteomes may help identify novel biomarkers for antemortem diagnosis of the disease and target molecules for therapeutic intervention. This article offers a literature synthesis and critique of the differentially expressed proteins that have been previously reported from various in vitro/in vivo model systems and naturally infected clinical specimens. The emerging data collectively indicate that, in addition to the obvious alterations in proteins involved in synapse and neurotransmission, a majority of cytoskeletal proteins are relevant as well, providing evidence of neuronal degeneration. An interesting observation is that certain molecules, such as KPNA4, could be potential diagnostic markers for rabies. Importantly, proteomic studies with body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid provide newer insights into antemortem diagnosis. In order to develop a complete integrative biology picture, it is essential to analyze the entire CNS (region-wise) and in particular, the brain. We suggest the use of laboratory animal models over cell culture systems using a combinatorial proteomics approach, as the former is a closer match to the actual host response. While most studies have focused on the terminal stages of the disease in mice, a time-series analysis could provide deeper insights for therapy. Postgenomics technologies such as proteomics warrant more extensive applications in rabies and similar diseases impacting public health around the world. PMID:25611201

  5. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. PMID:27260108

  6. Biomarkers in Transplantation-Proteomics and Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Uwe; Klawitter, Jelena; Klawitter, Jost

    2016-04-01

    Modern multianalyte "omics" technologies allow for the identification of molecular signatures that confer significantly more information than measurement of a single parameter as typically used in current medical diagnostics. Proteomics and metabolomics bioanalytical assays capture a large set of proteins and metabolites in body fluids, cells, or tissues and, complementing genomics, assess the phenome. Proteomics and metabolomics contribute to the development of novel predictive clinical biomarkers in transplantation in 2 ways: they can be used to generate a diagnostic fingerprint or they can be used to discover individual proteins and metabolites of diagnostic potential. Much fewer metabolomics than proteomics biomarker studies in transplant patients have been reported, and, in contrast to proteomics discovery studies, new lead metabolite markers have yet to emerge. Most clinical proteomics studies have been discovery studies. Several of these studies have assessed diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Nevertheless, none of these newly discovered protein biomarkers have yet been implemented in clinical decision making in transplantation. The currently most advanced markers discovered in proteomics studies in transplant patients are the chemokines CXCL-9 and CXCL-10, which have successfully been validated in larger multicenter trials in kidney transplant patients. These chemokines can be measured using standard immunoassay platforms, which should facilitate clinical implementation. Based on the published evidence, it is reasonable to expect that these chemokine markers can help guiding and individualizing immunosuppressive regimens, may be able to predict acute and chronic T-cell-mediated and antibody-mediated rejection, and may be useful tools for risk stratification of kidney transplant patients. PMID:26418702

  7. Sputum biomarkers and the prediction of clinical outcomes in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore G Liou

    -CSF identifies patients with large acute declines in FEV(1%, possibly providing a laboratory-based objective decision-support tool for determination of an APE diagnosis. These biomarkers are potential CF reporting tools and treatment targets for slowing long-term progression and reducing short-term severity.

  8. Cardiac troponin is the most effective translational safety biomarker for myocardial injury in cardiotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an overwhelming weight of evidence that certifies cardiac troponin (cTn) as the preferred, defacto, translational, safety biomarker for myocardial injury in cardiotoxicity. As well as being the gold standard for cardiac injury in man, it has been widely used for clinical assessment and monitoring of cardiac toxicity in humans being treated for cancer. Furthermore, several dozen preclinical published studies have directly confirmed its effectiveness in laboratory animals for assessment of cardiotoxicity. It is gradually being reverse translated from human into animal use as a safety biomarker. Its use is especially merited whenever there is any safety signal indicating potential cardiotoxicity and its required inclusion as a routine biomarker in preclinical safety studies seems on the horizon. There are some considerations that are unique to use of cTn assays in animals. Lack of awareness of these has, historically, significantly inhibited the introduction of cTn as a safety biomarker in preclinical toxicology. Firstly, cross-species reactivity is usually but not always high. Secondly, there is a background of cardiac injury that needs to be controlled for, including spontaneous cardiomyopathy in Sprague Dawley rats, and inappropriate blood collection methods. Also, there are faster kinetics of clearance in rats than for humans. Also, coincident muscle injury is frequent with cardiotoxicity and requires a skeletal muscle biomarker. Because cTn assays were developed for detection of gross cardiac necrosis, such as occurs with myocardial infarct, the more sensitive assays should be used for preclinical studies. However, analytic sensitivity is higher for standard preclinical studies than for clinical diagnostic testing because of use of concurrent controls and use of batch analysis that eliminates interassay variability. No other biomarker of myocardial injury comes close to cTn in effectiveness, including CK-MB, LDH-1 and 2, myoglobin, and FABP3. In addition

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Encephalitis : CSF Biomarkers of SIV Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Kofler, Julia; Nyaundi, Julia; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Wiley, Clayton A

    2016-06-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to increased survival of HIV-infected patients but also increased prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. We previously identified YKL40 as a potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker of lentiviral central nervous system (CNS) disease in HIV-infected patients and in the macaque model of HIV encephalitis. The aim of this study was to define the specificity and sensitivity along with the predictive value of YKL40 as a biomarker of encephalitis and to assess its relationship to CSF viral load. CSF YKL40 and SIV RNA concentrations were analyzed over the course of infection in 19 SIV-infected pigtailed macaques and statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship to encephalitis. Using these relationships, CSF alterations of 31 neuroimmune markers were studied pre-infection, during acute and asymptomatic infection, at the onset of encephalitis, and at necropsy. YKL40 CSF concentrations above 1122 ng/ml were found to be a specific and sensitive biomarker for the presence of encephalitis and were highly correlated with CSF viral load. Macaques that developed encephalitis had evidence of chronic CNS immune activation during early, asymptomatic, and end stages of infection. At the onset of encephalitis, CSF demonstrated a rise of neuroimmune markers associated with macrophage recruitment, activation and interferon response. CSF YKL40 concentration and viral load are valuable biomarkers to define the onset of encephalitis. Chronic CNS immune activation precedes the development of encephalitis while some responses suggest protection from CNS lentiviral disease. PMID:27059917

  10. A Prototype Biomarker Detector Combining Biomarker Extraction and Fixed Temperature PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Patricia K; Karhade, Aditya V; Bitting, Anna L; Doyle, Andrew; Solinas, Francesca; Wright, David W; Haselton, Frederick R

    2016-08-01

    PCR is the most sensitive molecular diagnostic available for infectious diseases. The goal for low-resource settings is a simple, inexpensive instrument. Toward this goal, we previously published a self-contained sample preparation instrument that uses magnetics and prearrayed reagents in thin tubing to extract nucleic acids and perform isothermal amplification and detection of extracted biomarkers. To incorporate PCR thermal cycling, after biomarker is magnetically extracted from a patient sample, the section of tubing containing the extracted biomarker and PCR reagents is alternately positioned within two constant temperature blocks. This instrument was evaluated initially by extracting and amplifying a 140 bp fragment of the IS6110 sequence of tuberculosis from TE buffer. The mean cycle threshold for 5 × 10(6) copies of IS6110 was 25.5 ± 1.5 cycles (n = 4), which was significantly different from negative control samples (34.0 ± 2.6 cycles; n = 3). Using a more clinically relevant sample, we extracted and amplified Plasmodium falciparum DNA from malaria-infected human blood cultures. The average cycle threshold for 1% parasitemia samples was 24.7 ± 1.5 cycles (n = 3) and significantly different from negatives (31.5 ± 2.1 cycles; n = 3). This approach integrates biomarker extraction, PCR amplification, and detection in a simple, linear tubing design with potential for use as a low-resource instrument. PMID:26920577

  11. Genetic and neurological evaluation in a sample of individuals with pervasive developmental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Steiner Carlos Eduardo; Guerreiro Marilisa Mantovani; Marques-de-Faria Antonia Paula

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of analyzing which complementary tests are relevant in the diagnostic evaluation of individuals with pervasive developmental disorders, a protocol of clinical and laboratory evaluation was applied in 103 outpatients. The protocol included chromosomal analysis, screening for inborn errors of metabolism, cytogenetic and molecular study of the FRAXA, FRAXE, and FRAXF mutations, EEG, SPECT, and magnetic resonance imaging study. Eighty-four subjects concluded the complementary tests a...

  12. PITAS Generation III System Design Report: The Developmental Prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Developmental Prototype (Generation III) of the Photonuclear Inspection and Threat Assessment System (PITAS) is currently being developed for the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). PITAS is a photonuclear-based, mobile active interrogation system, providing standoff nuclear material detection capabilities. The system uses a 25 MeV linear electron accelerator (LINAC) to produce a high-energy photon beam. Both neutrons and photon detectors are included in the system design to enable detection of shielded and unshielded special nuclear materials at large standoff distances. This design report presents the current design information for the PITAS technology subsystems: the accelerator system, the detector system, the dosimetry system, and the data acquisition and control system. In general, this report is divided into chapters describing each of the four major subsystems of PITAS. The component-level descriptions of the major subsystem are detailed using a common template: component description, component image, specifications, and selection rationale

  13. Neurological and developmental approaches to poor pitch perception and production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Demorest, Steven M.; Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Iyer, Janani

    2014-01-01

    Whereas much of research in music and neuroscience is aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which the human brain facilitates music, emerging interest in the neuromusic community aims to translate basic music research into clinical and educational applications. In the present workshop, we explore the problems of poor pitch perception and production from both neurological and developmental/educational perspectives. We begin by reviewing previous and novel findings on the neural regulation of pitch perception and production. We then discuss issues in measuring singing accuracy consistently between the laboratory and educational settings. We review the Seattle Singing Accuracy Protocol—a new assessment tool that we hope can be adopted by cognitive psychologists as well as music educators—and we conclude with some suggestions that the present interdisciplinary approach might offer for future research. PMID:25773643

  14. Exosomes: the future of biomarkers in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properzi, Francesca; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Fais, Stefano

    2013-10-01

    Exosomes are nanovesicles secreted into the extracellular environment upon internal vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane. The molecular content of exosomes is a fingerprint of the releasing cell type and of its status. For this reason, and because they are released in easily accessible body fluids such as blood and urine, they represent a precious biomedical tool. A growing body of evidence suggests that exosomes may be used as biomarkers for the diagnosis and prognosis of malignant tumors. This article focuses on the exploitation of exosomes as diagnostic tools for human tumors and discusses possible applications of the same strategies to other pathologies, such as neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24044569

  15. Cardiovascular biomarkers in preeclampsia at triage

    OpenAIRE

    Wellmann, Sven; Benzing, Jörg; Fleischlin, Silvia; Morgenthaler, Nils; Fouzas, Sotirios; Bührer, Christoph A; Szinnai, Gabor; Burkhardt, Tilo; Lapaire, Olav

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: o investigate the ability of cardiovascular plasma biomarkers to identify imminent preeclampsia (PE) among pregnant women at triage. MATERIAL AND METHODS: C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (copeptin), C-terminal pro-endothelin-1 (CT-proET-1), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), and mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) were prospectively measured in pregnant women presenting at the obstetrical triage units of the University Hospitals of Basel and ...

  16. Forecasting Cytokine Storms with New Predictive Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouce, Rayne H; Heslop, Helen E

    2016-06-01

    T cells genetically modified with CD19 chimeric antigen receptors have produced impressive clinical responses in patients with refractory B-cell malignancies, but therapeutic responses are often accompanied by cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Teachey and colleagues have identified predictive biomarkers for this complication that may allow testing of earlier intervention with agents such as the IL6 receptor blocker tocilizumab to evaluate whether CRS can be ameliorated without jeopardizing clinical responses. Cancer Discov; 6(6); 579-80. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Teachey et al., p. 664. PMID:27261481

  17. Hepcidin - A novel biomarker with changing trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunava Kali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is a novel peptide hormone of hepatic origin. It has a crucial role in iron metabolism. The causative association of this peptide in anemia and iron overloading states has been well established. Current research has expanded the diagnostic implications of hepcidin in other medical conditions. Increased serum hepcidin has been reported in neoplastic diseases, inflammation, and sepsis. However, the clinical use of hepcidin as a biomarker is limited owing to nonavailability of an appropriate diagnostic test. Assays for serum and urine hepcidin estimation have been developed recently, which are likely to facilitate the use of hepcidin in research as well as in patient care in the near future.

  18. Methylated genes as new cancer biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunner, Nils; Duffy, M.J; Napieralski, R.;

    2009-01-01

    measurement of the methylation status of the promoter regions of specific genes can aid early detection of cancer, determine prognosis and predict therapy responses. Promising DNA methylation biomarkers include the use of methylated GSTP1 for aiding the early diagnosis of prostate cancer, methylated PITX2 for...... predicting outcome in lymph node-negative breast cancer patients and methylated MGMT in predicting benefit from alkylating agents in patients with glioblastomas. However, prior to clinical utilisation, these findings require validation in prospective clinical studies. Furthermore, assays for measuring gene...

  19. Flavonoids as fruit and vegetable intake biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogholm, Kirstine Suszkiewicz

    Most validation studies show that the food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) is rather low in precision and accuracy, and there is an ongoing debate regarding the applicability of such self-reported data with regard to diet-disease relationships. However, no other method has so far been able to replace...... dietary flavonoids are described (quercetin, naringenin and hesperetin), since there was a need for improved understanding of bioavailability and metabolism of the flavonoids included in the flavonoid biomarker assay originally developed by Nielsen et al. (2000). In Paper I-II we observed a high degree of...

  20. Biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sin, Don D; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Currently, with exception of lung function tests, there are no well validated biomarkers or surrogate endpoints that can be used to establish efficacy of novel drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the lung function test is not an ideal surrogate for short-term drug...... trials because it (1) does not provide information regarding disease activity or the underlying pathologic process, (2) cannot separate the various phenotypes of COPD, (3) is not specific for COPD, and (4) is relatively unresponsive to known therapies that prolong survival. Accordingly, there are large...

  1. Biomarkers and Microbial Fossils In Antarctic Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.

    Lithobiontic microbial communities living within Antarctic rocks are an example of survival in an extremely cold and dry environment. Any unfavourable change in ex- ternal conditions can result in the death and disappearance of microscopic organisms, and this may be followed by the appearance of trace biomarkers and microbial fossils. The extinction of these microorganisms in some zones of the Ross Desert, probably provoked by the hostile environment, might be considered a good terrestrial analogue of the first stage of the disappearance of possible life on early Mars. Granite samples from maritime Antarctica (Granite Harbour) and sandstone rocks from the continental Ross Desert were collected with the aim of searching for biomarkers and microbial fossils at the microscopic level of observation. To this end, a novel in situ applica- tion of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging was com- bined with the simultaneous use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. Our findings confirm the existence of inorganic biomarkers in the form of physico- chemically bioweathered minerals within the granitic rocks. The presence of Fe-rich diagenetic minerals, such as iron hydroxide nanocrystals and biogenic clays around chasmoendolithic hyphae and bacterial cells was also observed. Others biomarkers, including inorganic deposits such as calcium oxalates and silica accumulations, are clear signs of endolithic microorganism activity. The interior of the sandstone rocks (Ross Desert, Mt. Fleming) reveal the presence of microbial fossils of algae and other endolithic microorganisms. These microbial fossils, detected for the first time within Antarctic rocks, contain well preserved and morphologically distinguishable relics of ultrastructural cytoplasm elements, such as cell walls, chloroplast membranes, and oc- casionally, pyrenoids and traces of organic matter. These structures are similar to those observed in live cells also found in Antarctic

  2. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  3. Copeptin as a serum biomarker of febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stöcklin

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of febrile seizures in children presenting after paroxysmal episodes associated with fever, is hampered by the lack of objective postictal biomarkers. The aim of our study was to investigate whether FS are associated with increased levels of serum copeptin, a robust marker of arginine vasopressin secretion.This was a prospective emergency-setting cross-sectional study of 161 children between six months and five years of age. Of these, 83 were diagnosed with febrile seizures, 69 had a febrile infection without seizures and nine had epileptic seizures not triggered by infection. Serum copeptin and prolactin levels were measured in addition to standard clinical, neurophysiological, and laboratory assessment.NCT01884766.Circulating copeptin was significantly higher in children with febrile seizures (median [interquartile range] 18.9 pmol/L [8.5-36.6] compared to febrile controls (5.6 pmol/L [4.1-9.4]; p < 0.001, with no differences between febrile and epileptic seizures (21.4 pmol/L [16.1-46.6]; p = 0.728. In a multivariable regression model, seizures were the major determinant of serum copeptin (beta 0.509; p < 0.001, independently of clinical and baseline laboratory indices. The area under the receiver operating curve for copeptin was 0.824 (95% CI 0.753-0.881, significantly higher compared to prolactin (0.667 [0.585-0.742]; p < 0.001. The diagnostic accuracy of copeptin increased with decreasing time elapsed since the convulsive event (at 120 min: 0.879 [0.806-0.932] and at <60 min: 0.975 [0.913-0.997].Circulating copeptin has high diagnostic accuracy in febrile seizures and may be a useful adjunct for accurately diagnosing postictal states in the emergency setting.

  4. Trisomy 21 and facial developmental instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbuck, John M; Cole, Theodore M; Reeves, Roger H; Richtsmeier, Joan T

    2013-05-01

    The most common live-born human aneuploidy is trisomy 21, which causes Down syndrome (DS). Dosage imbalance of genes on chromosome 21 (Hsa21) affects complex gene-regulatory interactions and alters development to produce a wide range of phenotypes, including characteristic facial dysmorphology. Little is known about how trisomy 21 alters craniofacial morphogenesis to create this characteristic appearance. Proponents of the "amplified developmental instability" hypothesis argue that trisomy 21 causes a generalized genetic imbalance that disrupts evolutionarily conserved developmental pathways by decreasing developmental homeostasis and precision throughout development. Based on this model, we test the hypothesis that DS faces exhibit increased developmental instability relative to euploid individuals. Developmental instability was assessed by a statistical analysis of fluctuating asymmetry. We compared the magnitude and patterns of fluctuating asymmetry among siblings using three-dimensional coordinate locations of 20 anatomic landmarks collected from facial surface reconstructions in four age-matched samples ranging from 4 to 12 years: (1) DS individuals (n = 55); (2) biological siblings of DS individuals (n = 55); 3) and 4) two samples of typically developing individuals (n = 55 for each sample), who are euploid siblings and age-matched to the DS individuals and their euploid siblings (samples 1 and 2). Identification in the DS sample of facial prominences exhibiting increased fluctuating asymmetry during facial morphogenesis provides evidence for increased developmental instability in DS faces. We found the highest developmental instability in facial structures derived from the mandibular prominence and lowest in facial regions derived from the frontal prominence. PMID:23505010

  5. Male-mediated developmental toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, the public has become more aware that exposure of males to certain agents can adversely affect their offspring and cause infertility and cancer. The hazards associated with exposure to ionising radiation have been recognised for nearly a century, but interest was aroused when a cluster of leukaemia cases was identified in young children living in Seascale, close to the nuclear processing plant at Sellafield in West Cumbria. There was a civil court case on behalf of two of the alleged victims of paternal irradiation at Seascale against British Nuclear Fuels. The case foundered on 'the balance of probabilities'. Nevertheless, there was support for paternal exposure from Japanese experimental X-ray studies in mice. The tumours were clearly heritable as shown by F2 transmission. Also, effects of a relatively non-toxic dose of radiation (1Gy) on cell proliferation transmitted to the embryo were manifested in the germ line of adult male mice even after two generations. In addition in humans, smoking fathers appear to give rise to tumours in the F1 generation. Using rodent models, developmental abnormalities/congenital malformations and tumours can be studied after exposure of males in an extended dominant lethal assay and congenital malformations can be determined which have similar manifestations in humans. The foetuses can also be investigated for skeletal malformations and litters can be allowed to develop to adulthood when tumours, if present, can be observed. Karyotype analysis can be performed on foetuses and adult offspring to determine if induced genetic damage can be transmitted. Using this study design, cyclophosphamide, 1,3-butadiene and urethane have been examined and each compound produced positive responses: cyclophosphamide in all endpoints examined, 1,3-butadiene in some and urethane only produced liver tumours in F1 male offspring. This suggests the endpoints are determined by independent genetic events. The results from heritable

  6. Aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meany Danni L

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the new roles for enzymes in personalized medicine builds on a rational approach to cancer biomarker discovery using enzyme-associated aberrant glycosylation. A hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation is associated with differential expressions of enzymes such as glycosyltransferase and glycosidases. The aberrant expressions of the enzymes in turn cause cancer cells to produce glycoproteins with specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures. Content In this review we provide examples of cancer biomarker discovery using aberrant glycosylation in three areas. First, changes in glycosylation machinery such as glycosyltransferases/glycosidases could be used as cancer biomarkers. Second, most of the clinically useful cancer biomarkers are glycoproteins. Discovery of specific cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures of these existing biomarkers could improve their cancer specificity, such as the discovery of AFP-L3, fucosylated glycoforms of AFP. Third, cancer-associated aberrations in glycan structures provide a compelling rationale for discovering new biomarkers using glycomic and glycoproteomic technologies. Summary As a hallmark of cancer, aberrant glycosylation allows for the rational design of biomarker discovery efforts. But more important, we need to translate these biomarkers from discovery to clinical diagnostics using good strategies, such as the lessons learned from translating the biomarkers discovered using proteomic technologies to OVA 1, the first FDA-cleared In Vitro Diagnostic Multivariate Index Assay (IVDMIA. These lessons, providing important guidance in current efforts in biomarker discovery and translation, are applicable to the discovery of aberrant glycosylation associated with enzymes as cancer biomarkers as well.

  7. Biomolecules and Biomarkers Used in Diagnosis of Alcohol Drinking and in Monitoring Therapeutic Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu M. Nanau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quantitative, measurable detection of drinking is important for the successful treatment of alcohol misuse in transplantation of patients with alcohol disorders, people living with human immunodeficiency virus that need to adhere to medication, and special occupational hazard offenders, many of whom continually deny drinking. Their initial misconduct usually leads to medical problems associated with drinking, impulsive social behavior, and drunk driving. The accurate identification of alcohol consumption via biochemical tests contributes significantly to the monitoring of drinking behavior. Methods: A systematic review of the current methods used to measure biomarkers of alcohol consumption was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar databases (2010–2015. The names of the tests have been identified. The methods and publications that correlate between the social instruments and the biochemical tests were further investigated. There is a clear need for assays standardization to ensure the use of these biochemical tests as routine biomarkers. Findings: Alcohol ingestion can be measured using a breath test. Because alcohol is rapidly eliminated from the circulation, the time for detection by this analysis is in the range of hours. Alcohol consumption can alternatively be detected by direct measurement of ethanol concentration in blood or urine. Several markers have been proposed to extend the interval and sensitivities of detection, including ethyl glucuronide and ethyl sulfate in urine, phosphatidylethanol in blood, and ethyl glucuronide and fatty acid ethyl esters in hair, among others. Moreover, there is a need to correlate the indirect biomarker carbohydrate deficient transferrin, which reflects longer lasting consumption of higher amounts of alcohol, with serum γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, another long term indirect biomarker that is routinely used and standardized in laboratory medicine.

  8. Glucose encapsulating liposome for signal amplification for quantitative detection of biomarkers with glucometer readout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuting; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-15

    A new technology was developed to quantitatively detect a broad range of disease biomarkers and proven to be portable, economical, and conveniently accessible. Measurements were performed based on releasing encapsulated glucose from antibody-tagged liposomes and subsequently detecting the released glucose using a commercial personal glucose meter (GM). The innovative aspect of this approach lies in the quantification of target biomarkers through the detection of glucose, thus expanding the applicability of the GM by broadening the range of target biomarkers instead of detecting only one analyte, glucose. Because of the bilayer membrane of liposomes, which can accommodate tens of thousands of glucose molecules, the sensitivity was greatly enhanced by using glucose encapsulating liposomes as a signal output and an amplifier. Here, the model analyte, protein 53 phosphorylated on Serine 15 (phospho-p53(15)), was captured by primary antibodies bound on magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and then recognized by reporting antibodies conjugated to glucose encapsulating liposomes. Finally, the target phospho-p53(15) was detected by lysing the bound liposomes to release the encapsulated glucose (4 × 10(5) glucose molecules per liposome), which is detected with the GM. This approach was demonstrated to be a universal technology that can be easily produced to quantify a wide variety of biomarkers in medical diagnostics, food safety, public health, and environmental monitoring. In the near future, it is expected that these sensors, in combination with a portable GM, can be used in many fields such as physicians' laboratories, hospitals and the common household. PMID:26005847

  9. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  10. Biomarkers for the evaluation of immunological properties during the shikoku walking pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, K; Umeno, A; Shichiri, M; Watanabe, H; Ishida, N; Kojima, M; Iwaki, S; Hagihara, Y; Nakamura, M; Yoshida, Y

    2015-01-01

    It is important to determine the immunological properties for the maintenance of health. We chose the Shikoku Walking Pilgrimage to assess the proper biomarkers for the evaluation of immunological properties. We examined whether the Shikoku Walking Pilgrimage could have a positive effect on the mental and physical health of walking participants by using several biomarkers proposed by our laboratory. Twelve non-randomized healthy male volunteers including 3 twice attendees walked the Shikoku Walking Pilgrimage distance of 58.9 km over 3 days. Plasma, serum, urine, and saliva were collected from the volunteers during the pilgrimage and at 1 week before and after it. Immunological biomarkers, including lipid metabolism, oxidative stress, immune function, and catecholamines, were measured. Additionally, mood state scores, alertness, autonomic nervous system activity, and body motion levels during sleep were assessed. A significant decrease was observed in the subjective tension-anxiety levels and in the concentrations of serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasma hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE), and urine adrenaline during the pilgrimage as compared to the values of these parameters before the participants embarked on the pilgrimage. The serum levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were significantly increased 1 week after the pilgrimage relative to those assessed previously. No significant differences in subjective fatigue and the flicker perception threshold were observed. These results suggest that the Shikoku Walking Pilgrimage can exert a positive effect on mental and physical health as particularly shown in the reduction of tensionanxiety and oxidative stress without the accompaniment of fatigue. HODE correlated significantly with typical immunological marker natural killer cell activity and immunoglobulin G. This suggests that there are promising biomarkers such as HODE, NK activity, BDNF, LDL-c, and IgG for assessing the immunological

  11. Developmental variations among Panagrolaimid nematodes indicate developmental system drift within a small taxonomic unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Philipp H; Nsah, Ndifon A; Grotehusmann, Henny; Kroiher, Michael; Loer, Curtis; Schierenberg, Einhard

    2014-06-01

    Comparative studies of nematode embryogenesis among different clades revealed considerable variations. However, to what extent developmental differences exist between closely related species has mostly remained nebulous. Here, we explore the correlation between phylogenetic neighborhood and developmental variation in a restricted and morphologically particularly uniform taxonomic group (Panagrolaimidae) to determine to what extent (1) morphological and developmental characters go along with molecular data and thus can serve as diagnostic tools for the definition of kinship and (2) developmental system drift (DSD; modifications of developmental patterns without corresponding morphological changes) can be found within a small taxonomic unit. Our molecular approaches firmly support subdivision of Panagrolaimid nematodes into two monophyletic groups. These can be discriminated by distinct peculiarities in early embryonic cell lineages and a mirror-image expression pattern of the gene skn-1. This suggests major changes in the logic of cell specification and the action of DSD in the studied representatives of the two neighboring nematode taxa. PMID:24849338

  12. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a NASA funded facility, delivering heavy ion beams to a target area where scientists...

  13. Lincoln Laboratory Grid

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Lincoln Laboratory Grid (LLGrid) is an interactive, on-demand parallel computing system that uses a large computing cluster to enable Laboratory researchers to...

  14. MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This document is the compiled progress reports of research funded through the Michigan State University/Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory. Fourteen reports are included, covering the molecular basis of plant/microbe symbiosis, cell wall biosynthesis and proteins, gene expression, stress responses, plant hormone biosynthesis, interactions between the nuclear and organelle genomes, sensory transduction and tropisms, intracellular sorting and trafficking, regulation of lipid metabolism, molecular basis of disease resistance and plant pathogenesis, developmental biology of Cyanobacteria, and hormonal involvement in environmental control of plant growth. 320 refs., 26 figs., 3 tabs. (MHB)

  15. Laboratory-acquired brucellosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabiansen, C.; Knudsen, J.D.; Lebech, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9......Brucellosis is a rare disease in Denmark. We describe one case of laboratory-acquired brucellosis from an index patient to a laboratory technician following exposure to an infected blood culture in a clinical microbiology laboratory Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6/9...

  16. Developmentalism: An Obscure but Pervasive Restriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Stone

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite continuing criticism of public education, experimentally demonstrated and field tested teaching methods have been ignored, rejected, and abandoned. Instead of a stable consensus regarding best teaching practices, there seems only an unending succession of innovations. A longstanding educational doctrine appears to underlie this anomalous state of affairs. Termed developmentalism, it presumes "natural" ontogenesis to be optimal and it requires experimentally demonstrated teaching practices to overcome a presumption that they interfere with an optimal developmental trajectory. It also discourages teachers and parents from asserting themselves with children. Instead of effective interventions, it seeks the preservation of a postulated natural perfection. Developmentalism's rich history is expressed in a literature extending over 400 years. Its notable exponents include Jean Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Jean Piaget; and its most recent expressions include "developmentally appropriate practice" and "constructivism." In the years during which it gained ascendance, developmentalism served as a basis for rejecting harsh and inhumane teaching methods. Today it impedes efforts to hold schools accountable for student academic achievement.

  17. Protein biomarkers of periodontitis in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John J

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the tissues that surround and support the teeth and is initiated by inappropriate and excessive immune responses to bacteria in subgingival dental plaque leading to loss of the integrity of the periodontium, compromised tooth function, and eventually tooth loss. Periodontitis is an economically important disease as it is time-consuming and expensive to treat. Periodontitis has a worldwide prevalence of 5-15% and the prevalence of severe disease in western populations has increased in recent decades. Furthermore, periodontitis is more common in smokers, in obesity, in people with diabetes, and in heart disease patients although the pathogenic processes underpinning these links are, as yet, poorly understood. Diagnosis and monitoring of periodontitis rely on traditional clinical examinations which are inadequate to predict patient susceptibility, disease activity, and response to treatment. Studies of the immunopathogenesis of periodontitis and analysis of mediators in saliva have allowed the identification of many potentially useful biomarkers. Convenient measurement of these biomarkers using chairside analytical devices could form the basis for diagnostic tests which will aid the clinician and the patient in periodontitis management; this review will summarise this field and will identify the experimental, technical, and clinical issues that remain to be addressed before such tests can be implemented. PMID:24944840

  18. Multiple system atrophy: pathogenic mechanisms and biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinger, Kurt A; Wenning, Gregor K

    2016-06-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a unique proteinopathy that differs from other α-synucleinopathies since the pathological process resulting from accumulation of aberrant α-synuclein (αSyn) involves the oligodendroglia rather than neurons, although both pathologies affect multiple parts of the brain, spinal cord, autonomic and peripheral nervous system. Both the etiology and pathogenesis of MSA are unknown, although animal models have provided insight into the basic molecular changes of this disorder. Accumulation of aberrant αSyn in oligodendroglial cells and preceded by relocation of p25α protein from myelin to oligodendroglia results in the formation of insoluble glial cytoplasmic inclusions that cause cell dysfunction and demise. These changes are associated with proteasomal, mitochondrial and lipid transport dysfunction, oxidative stress, reduced trophic transport, neuroinflammation and other noxious factors. Their complex interaction induces dysfunction of the oligodendroglial-myelin-axon-neuron complex, resulting in the system-specific pattern of neurodegeneration characterizing MSA as a synucleinopathy with oligodendroglio-neuronopathy. Propagation of modified toxic αSyn species from neurons to oligodendroglia by "prion-like" transfer and its spreading associated with neuronal pathways result in a multi-system involvement. No reliable biomarkers are currently available for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of MSA. Multidisciplinary research to elucidate the genetic and molecular background of the deleterious cycle of noxious processes, to develop reliable diagnostic biomarkers and to deliver targets for effective treatment of this hitherto incurable disorder is urgently needed. PMID:27098666

  19. Kadar Asam Urat Serum sebagai Biomarker Preeklamsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neli Sumanti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia remains a health problem that becomes one of the causes of maternal deaths besides bleeding and infection. The etiology and pathogenesis of preeclampsia are unclear. Increased serum uric acid levels is seen simultaneously with the increase of blood pressure and occurred before the onset of proteinuria. Therefore, the uric acid can be used as a biomarker. The aim of this study was to analyze the serum uric acid levels between normal and preeclampsia pregnancies. The study was conducted in Dr.Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung between March and May 2011, using cross sectional study design. Subjects were 45 inpartu normal pregnant women as control and 44 in partu pregnant women with preeclampsia accordance with inclusion and exclusion criteria. Levels of uric acid in normal pregnancy are 3,43 ±0.14 mg/dL. In this study uric acid levels resulting in cut-off levels of 4,8 mg/dL with a sensitivity value of 93%, and specificity 80%. Conclusions: uric acid levels in at term preeclampsia are higher compared with normal pregnancies. Increased levels of uric acid can be considered as one of biomarkers of preeclampsia, hence the serum uric acid levels used as serial examinations in pregnant women during antenatal care.

  20. Sarcopenia--The search for emerging biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinkovich, Alexander; Livshits, Gregory

    2015-07-01

    Sarcopenia, an age-related decline in skeletal muscle mass and function, dramatically affects the life quality of elder people. In view of increasing life expectancy, sarcopenia renders a heavy burden on the health care system. However, although there is a consensus that sarcopenia is a multifactorial syndrome, its etiology, underlying mechanisms, and even definition remain poorly delineated, thus, preventing development of a precise treatment strategy. The main aim of our review is to critically analyze potential sarcopenia biomarkers in light of the molecular mechanisms of their involvement in sarcopenia pathogenesis. Normal muscle mass and function maintenance are proposed to be dependent on the dynamic balance between the positive regulators of muscle growth such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), follistatin (FST) and irisin, and negative regulators including TGFβ, myostatin, activins A and B, and growth and differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15). We hypothesize that the shift in this balance to muscle growth inhibitors, along with increased expression of the C- terminal agrin fragment (CAF) associated with age-dependent neuromuscular junction (NMJ) dysfunction, as well as skeletal muscle-specific troponin T (sTnT), a key component of contractile machinery, is a main mechanism underlying sarcopenia pathogenesis. Thus, this review proposes and emphasizes that these molecules are the emerging sarcopenia biomarkers. PMID:25962896