WorldWideScience

Sample records for biology systematic study

  1. Insects as vectors: systematics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-04-01

    Among the many complex relationships between insects and microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, some have resulted in the establishment of biological systems within which the insects act as a biological vector for infectious agents. It is therefore advisable to understand the identity and biology of these vectors in depth, in order to define procedures for epidemiological surveillance and anti-vector control. The following are successively reviewed in this article: Anoplura (lice), Siphonaptera (fleas), Heteroptera (bugs: Cimicidae, Triatoma, Belostomatidae), Psychodidae (sandflies), Simuliidae (black flies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Tabanidae (horseflies) and Muscidae (tsetse flies, stable flies and pupipara). The authors provide a rapid overview of the morphology, systematics, development cycle and bio-ecology of each of these groups of vectors. Finally, their medical and veterinary importance is briefly reviewed.

  2. Insects as vectors: systematics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-04-01

    Among the many complex relationships between insects and microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, some have resulted in the establishment of biological systems within which the insects act as a biological vector for infectious agents. It is therefore advisable to understand the identity and biology of these vectors in depth, in order to define procedures for epidemiological surveillance and anti-vector control. The following are successively reviewed in this article: Anoplura (lice), Siphonaptera (fleas), Heteroptera (bugs: Cimicidae, Triatoma, Belostomatidae), Psychodidae (sandflies), Simuliidae (black flies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Tabanidae (horseflies) and Muscidae (tsetse flies, stable flies and pupipara). The authors provide a rapid overview of the morphology, systematics, development cycle and bio-ecology of each of these groups of vectors. Finally, their medical and veterinary importance is briefly reviewed. PMID:26470450

  3. A Systematic Study on Tooth Enamel Microstructures of Lambdopsalis bulla (Multituberculate, Mammalia--Implications for Multituberculate Biology and Phylogeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Mao

    Full Text Available Tooth enamel microstructure is a reliable and widely used indicator of dietary interpretations and data for phylogenetic reconstruction, if all levels of variability are investigated. It is usually difficult to have a thorough examination at all levels of enamel structures for any mammals, especially for the early mammals, which are commonly represented by sparse specimens. Because of the random preservation of specimens, enamel microstructures from different teeth in various species are often compared. There are few examples that convincingly show intraspecific variation of tooth enamel microstructure in full dentition of a species, including multituberculates. Here we present a systematic survey of tooth enamel microstructures of Lambdopsalis bulla, a taeniolabidoid multituberculate from the Late Paleocene Nomogen Formation, Inner Mongolia. We examined enamel structures at all hierarchical levels. The samples are treated differently in section orientations and acid preparation and examined using different imaging methods. The results show that, except for preparation artifacts, the crystallites, enamel types, Schmelzmuster and dentition types of Lambdopsalis are relatively consistent in all permanent teeth, but the prism type, including the prism shape, size and density, may vary in different portions of a single tooth or among different teeth of an individual animal. The most common Schmelzmuster of the permanent teeth in Lambdopsalis is a combination of radial enamel in the inner and middle layers, aprismatic enamel in the outer layer, and irregular decussations in tooth crown area with great curvature. The prism seam is another comparably stable characteristic that may be a useful feature for multituberculate taxonomy. The systematic documentation of enamel structures in Lambdopsalis may be generalized for the enamel microstructure study, and thus for taxonomy and phylogenetic reconstruction, of multituberculates and even informative for

  4. Physical activity and biological maturation: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Denise Araújo Bacil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the association between physical activity (PA and biological maturation in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCE: We performed a systematic review in April 2013 in the electronic databases of PubMed/MEDLINE, SportDiscus, Web of Science and LILACS without time restrictions. A total of 628 potentially relevant articles were identified and 10 met the inclusion criteria for this review: cross-sectional or longitudinal studies, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, with schoolchildren aged 9-15 years old of both genders. DATA SYNTHESIS: Despite the heterogeneity of the studies, there was an inverse association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increased biological and chronological age in both genders. Boys tend to be more physically active than girls; however, when controlling for biological age, the gender differences disappear. The association between PA and timing of maturation varies between the genders. Variation in the timing of biological maturation affects the tracking of PA in early adolescent girls. This review suggests that mediators (BMI, depression, low self-esteem, and concerns about body weight can explain the association between PA and biological maturation. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between PA and biological maturation. PA decreases with increasing biological age with no differences between genders. As for the timing of biological maturation, this association varies between genders.

  5. Happiness & Health: The Biological Factors- Systematic Review Article.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Dfarhud

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Happiness underlying factors are considerable from two dimensions: endogenic factors (biological, cognitive, personality and ethical sub-factors and exogenic factors (behavioral, socialcultural, economical, geographical, life events and aesthetics sub-factors. Among all endogenic factors, biological sub-factors are the significant predictors of happiness. Existence of significant differences in temperament and happiness of infants is an indicator of biological influences. Therefore, this study aimed to consider biological factors that underlie happiness. At the first, all of the biological factors in relation with happiness were searched from following websites: PubMed, Wiley& Sons, Science direct (1990-2014. Then, the articles divided into five sub-groups (genetic, brain and neurotransmitters, endocrinology and hormones, physical health, morphology and physical attractiveness. Finally, a systematic review performed based on existing information. Results of studies on genetic factors indicated an average effectiveness of genetic about 35 -50 percent on happiness. In spite of difficulties in finding special genes, several genes distributed to emotion and mood. Neuroscience studies showed that some part of brain (e.g. amygdala, hipocamp and limbic system and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, norepinefrine and endorphin play a role in control of happiness. A few studies pointed to the role of cortisol and adrenaline (adrenal gland and oxitocin (pituitary gland in controlling happiness. Physical health and typology also concluded in most related studies to have a significant role in happiness. Therefore, according to previous research, it can be said that biological and health factors are critical in underlying happiness and its role in happiness is undeniable.

  6. Happiness & Health: The Biological Factors- Systematic Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dfarhud, Dariush; Malmir, Maryam; Khanahmadi, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Happiness underlying factors are considerable from two dimensions: endogenic factors (biological, cognitive, personality and ethical sub-factors) and exogenic factors (behavioral, socialcultural, economical, geographical, life events and aesthetics sub-factors). Among all endogenic factors, biological sub-factors are the significant predictors of happiness. Existence of significant differences in temperament and happiness of infants is an indicator of biological influences. Therefore, this study aimed to consider biological factors that underlie happiness. At the first, all of the biological factors in relation with happiness were searched from following websites: PubMed, Wiley& Sons, Science direct (1990-2014). Then, the articles divided into five sub-groups (genetic, brain and neurotransmitters, endocrinology and hormones, physical health, morphology and physical attractiveness). Finally, a systematic review performed based on existing information. Results of studies on genetic factors indicated an average effectiveness of genetic about 35 -50 percent on happiness. In spite of difficulties in finding special genes, several genes distributed to emotion and mood. Neuroscience studies showed that some part of brain (e.g. amygdala, hipocamp and limbic system) and neurotransmitters (e.g. dopamine, serotonin, norepinefrine and endorphin) play a role in control of happiness. A few studies pointed to the role of cortisol and adrenaline (adrenal gland) and oxitocin (pituitary gland) in controlling happiness. Physical health and typology also concluded in most related studies to have a significant role in happiness. Therefore, according to previous research, it can be said that biological and health factors are critical in underlying happiness and its role in happiness is undeniable. PMID:26060713

  7. Biologic agents for anterior cruciate ligament healing: A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Matteo, Berardo; Loibl, Markus; Andriolo, Luca; Filardo, Giuseppe; Zellner, Johannes; Koch, Matthias; Angele, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIM To systematically review the currently available literature concerning the application of biologic agents such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and stem cells to promote anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) healing. METHODS A systematic review of the literature was performed on the use of biologic agents (i.e., PRP or stem cells) to favor ACL healing during reconstruction or repair. The following inclusion criteria for relevant articles were used: Clinical reports of any level of evidence, written in English language, on the use of PRP or stem cells during ACL reconstruction/repair. Exclusion criteria were articles written in other languages, reviews, or studies analyzing other applications of PRP/stem cells in knee surgery not related to promoting ACL healing. RESULTS The database search identified 394 records that were screened. A total of 23 studies were included in the final analysis: In one paper stem cells were applied for ACL healing, in one paper there was a concomitant application of PRP and stem cells, whereas in the remaining 21 papers PRP was used. Based on the ACL injury pattern, two papers investigated biologic agents in ACL partial tears whereas 21 papers in ACL reconstruction. Looking at the quality of the available literature, 17 out of 21 studies dealing with ACL reconstruction were randomized controlled trials. Both studies on ACL repair were case series. CONCLUSION There is a paucity of clinical trials investigating the role of stem cells in promoting ACL healing both in case of partial and complete tears. The role of PRP is still controversial and the only advantage emerging from the literature is related to a better graft maturation over time, without documenting beneficial effects in terms of clinical outcome, bone-graft integration and prevention of bony tunnel enlargement. PMID:27672573

  8. Biologic Mesh Reconstruction of the Pelvic Floor after Extralevator Abdominoperineal Excision: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Nasra N Alam; Narang, Sunil K.; Köckerling, Ferdinand; Ian R Daniels; Neil J Smart

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evidence for the use of biologic mesh in the reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extralevator abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (ELAPE). Methods A systematic search of PubMed was conducted using the search terms: “ELAPE,” “extralevator abdominoperineal excision of rectum,” or “extralevator abdominoperineal resection.” The search yielded 17 studies. Results Biologic mesh was used in perineal reco...

  9. Systematic Functional Annotation and Visualization of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryshnikova, Anastasia

    2016-06-22

    Large-scale biological networks represent relationships between genes, but our understanding of how networks are functionally organized is limited. Here, I describe spatial analysis of functional enrichment (SAFE), a systematic method for annotating biological networks and examining their functional organization. SAFE visualizes the network in 2D space and measures the continuous distribution of functional enrichment across local neighborhoods, producing a list of the associated functions and a map of their relative positioning. I applied SAFE to annotate the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genetic interaction similarity network and protein-protein interaction network with gene ontology terms. SAFE annotations of the genetic network matched manually derived annotations, while taking less than 1% of the time, and proved robust to noise and sensitive to biological signal. Integration of genetic interaction and chemical genomics data using SAFE revealed a link between vesicle-mediate transport and resistance to the anti-cancer drug bortezomib. These results demonstrate the utility of SAFE for examining biological networks and understanding their functional organization. PMID:27237738

  10. Beyond the Biology: A Systematic Investigation of Noncontent Instructor Talk in an Introductory Biology Course

    OpenAIRE

    Seidel, Shannon B.; Reggi, Amanda L.; Schinske, Jeffrey N.; Burrus, Laura W.; Tanner, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors create classroom environments that have the potential to impact learning by affecting student motivation, resistance, and self-efficacy. However, despite the critical importance of the learning environment in increasing conceptual understanding, little research has investigated what instructors say and do to create learning environments in college biology classrooms. We systematically investigated the language used by instructors that does not directly relate to course content and...

  11. Report on the research conducted under the funding of the Sloan foundation postdoctoral fellowship in Computational Molecular Biology [Systematic study of protein-protein complexes] Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheinerman, Felix

    2001-06-01

    A central question in molecular biology is what structural features are common at protein-protein interfaces and what energetic factors define the affinity and specificity of protein-protein association. Analysis of structural and mutational data on protein-protein interfaces revealed that protein-protein interfaces of different functional classes contain many more energetically important charged and polar residues than was previously thought. Since, in the context of protein folding studies, polar interactions are believed to destabilize the folded proteins, this observation raised the question as to the forces that determine the stability of protein complexes. To investigate this issue in detail, the authors developed a number of partitioning schemes that allowed them to investigate the role of selected residues, ion pairs, and networks of polar interactions in protein-protein association. The methods developed were applied to the analysis of four different protein-protein interfaces: the ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar, the human growth hormone and its receptor, subtype N9 influenze virus neuraminidase and NC41 antibody, and the Ras Binding Domain of kinase cRaf and a Ras homologue Rap1A. The calculations revealed a surprising variability in how polar interactions affect the stability of different complexes. The finding that positions of charged and polar residues on protein-protein interfaces are optimized with respect to electrostatic interactions suggests that this property can be employed for the discrimination between native conformations and trial complexes generated by a docking algorithm. Analysis indicated the presence of SH2 domains in Janus family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases.

  12. The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Don A; Banks, Sam C; Barton, Philip S; Ikin, Karen; Lentini, Pia; Lindenmayer, David B; Smith, Annabel L; Berry, Laurence E; Burns, Emma L; Edworthy, Amanda; Evans, Maldwyn J; Gibson, Rebecca; Heinsohn, Rob; Howland, Brett; Kay, Geoff; Munro, Nicola; Scheele, Ben C; Stirnemann, Ingrid; Stojanovic, Dejan; Sweaney, Nici; Villaseñor, Nélida R; Westgate, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning) and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i) questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii) methods used to study dispersal; (iii) the quality of dispersal data; (iv) extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v) likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i) improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii) understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii) define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting management

  13. The trajectory of dispersal research in conservation biology. Systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don A Driscoll

    Full Text Available Dispersal knowledge is essential for conservation management, and demand is growing. But are we accumulating dispersal knowledge at a pace that can meet the demand? To answer this question we tested for changes in dispersal data collection and use over time. Our systematic review of 655 conservation-related publications compared five topics: climate change, habitat restoration, population viability analysis, land planning (systematic conservation planning and invasive species. We analysed temporal changes in the: (i questions asked by dispersal-related research; (ii methods used to study dispersal; (iii the quality of dispersal data; (iv extent that dispersal knowledge is lacking, and; (v likely consequences of limited dispersal knowledge. Research questions have changed little over time; the same problems examined in the 1990s are still being addressed. The most common methods used to study dispersal were occupancy data, expert opinion and modelling, which often provided indirect, low quality information about dispersal. Although use of genetics for estimating dispersal has increased, new ecological and genetic methods for measuring dispersal are not yet widely adopted. Almost half of the papers identified knowledge gaps related to dispersal. Limited dispersal knowledge often made it impossible to discover ecological processes or compromised conservation outcomes. The quality of dispersal data used in climate change research has increased since the 1990s. In comparison, restoration ecology inadequately addresses large-scale process, whilst the gap between knowledge accumulation and growth in applications may be increasing in land planning. To overcome apparent stagnation in collection and use of dispersal knowledge, researchers need to: (i improve the quality of available data using new approaches; (ii understand the complementarities of different methods and; (iii define the value of different kinds of dispersal information for supporting

  14. Off-Label Biologic Regimens in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review of Efficacy and Safety of Dose Escalation, Reduction, and Interrupted Biologic Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A. Brezinski; Armstrong, April W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: While off-label dosing of biologic treatments may be necessary in selected psoriasis patients, no systematic review exists to date that synthesizes the efficacy and safety of these off-label dosing regimens. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of off-label dosing regimens (dose escalation, dose reduction, and interrupted treatment) with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, and alefacept for psoriasis treatment. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SE...

  15. The Cost-Effectiveness of Biologics for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensuu, Jaana T.; Huoponen, Saara; Aaltonen, Kalle J.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Nordström, Dan; Blom, Marja

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Economic evaluations provide information to aid the optimal utilization of limited healthcare resources. Costs of biologics for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are remarkably high, which makes these agents an important target for economic evaluations. This systematic review aims to identify existing studies examining the cost-effectiveness of biologics for RA, assess their quality and report their results systematically. Methods A literature search covering Medline, Scopus, Cochrane library, ACP Journal club and Web of Science was performed in March 2013. The cost-utility analyses (CUAs) of one or more available biological drugs for the treatment of RA in adults were included. Two independent investigators systematically collected information and assessed the quality of the studies. To enable the comparison of the results, all costs were converted to 2013 euro. Results Of the 4890 references found in the literature search, 41 CUAs were included in the current systematic review. While considering only direct costs, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) ranged from 39,000 to 1 273,000 €/quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained in comparison to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs) in cDMARD naïve patients. Among patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs, biologics were associated with ICERs ranging from 12,000 to 708,000 €/QALY. Rituximab was found to be the most cost-effective alternative compared to other biologics among the patients with an insufficient response to TNFi. Conclusions When 35,000 €/QALY is considered as a threshold for the ICER, TNFis do not seem to be cost-effective among cDMARD naïve patients and patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs. With thresholds of 50,000 to 100,000 €/QALY biologics might be cost-effective among patients with an inadequate response to cDMARDs. Standardization of multiattribute utility instruments

  16. The cost-effectiveness of biologics for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana T Joensuu

    Full Text Available Economic evaluations provide information to aid the optimal utilization of limited healthcare resources. Costs of biologics for Rheumatoid arthritis (RA are remarkably high, which makes these agents an important target for economic evaluations. This systematic review aims to identify existing studies examining the cost-effectiveness of biologics for RA, assess their quality and report their results systematically.A literature search covering Medline, Scopus, Cochrane library, ACP Journal club and Web of Science was performed in March 2013. The cost-utility analyses (CUAs of one or more available biological drugs for the treatment of RA in adults were included. Two independent investigators systematically collected information and assessed the quality of the studies. To enable the comparison of the results, all costs were converted to 2013 euro.Of the 4890 references found in the literature search, 41 CUAs were included in the current systematic review. While considering only direct costs, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi ranged from 39,000 to 1,273,000 €/quality adjusted life year (QALY gained in comparison to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (cDMARDs in cDMARD naïve patients. Among patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs, biologics were associated with ICERs ranging from 12,000 to 708,000 €/QALY. Rituximab was found to be the most cost-effective alternative compared to other biologics among the patients with an insufficient response to TNFi.When 35,000 €/QALY is considered as a threshold for the ICER, TNFis do not seem to be cost-effective among cDMARD naïve patients and patients with an insufficient response to cDMARDs. With thresholds of 50,000 to 100,000 €/QALY biologics might be cost-effective among patients with an inadequate response to cDMARDs. Standardization of multiattribute utility instruments and a validated standard conversion method

  17. Biologic mesh reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extralevator abdominoperineal excision; a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasra N Alam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe aim of this review is to provide an overview of the evidence for the use of biologic mesh in the reconstruction of the pelvic floor after extralevator abdominoperineal excision of the rectum (ELAPE.MethodsA systematic search of PubMed was conducted using the search terms ‘ELAPE’, ‘extralevator abdominoperineal excision of rectum’ or ‘extralevator abdominoperineal resection’. The search yielded 17 studies.ResultsBiologic mesh was used in perineal reconstruction in 463 cases. There were 41 perineal hernias reported but rates were not consistently reported in all studies. The most common complications were perineal wound infection (n = 93, perineal sinus and fistulae (n = 26 and perineal haematoma or seroma (n = 11. There were very few comparative studies, with only one RCT identified that compared patients undergoing ELAPE with perineal reconstruction using a biological mesh, with patients undergoing a conventional abdominoperineal excision of the rectum with no mesh. There was no significant difference in perineal hernia rates or perineal wound infections between the groups. Other comparative studies comparing the use of biologic mesh with techniques such as the use of myocutaneous flaps were of low quality.ConclusionsBiologic mesh-assisted perineal reconstruction is a promising technique to improve wound healing and has comparable complications rates to other techniques. However, there is not enough evidence to support its use in all patients who have undergone ELAPE. Results from high-quality prospective RCTs and national/international collaborative audits are required.

  18. Biological Effects of Medicinal Plants on Induced Periodontitis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Moara e Silva Conceição; di Lenardo, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the advances in the study of medicinal plants and their biologic effects on periodontitis in animal models. Study Design. A systematic search was conducted by three independent researchers, who screened articles published up to March/2016, to identify the studies that contained sufficient and clear information on the association of the medicinal plants and periodontitis in murine models. The searches were performed using PubMed, Cochrane, and Science Direct databases. Results. After a critical analysis of titles and abstracts, 30 studies were finally eligible for analysis. The studies presented a great diversity of the experiment designed regarding the methods of induced periodontitis and the evaluation of the medicinal plants efficacy. None of the studies described the possible toxic effects associated with the administration of the plant material to animals and whether they could prevent damage to organs caused by systemic effect of induced periodontitis. Gel-based formulations containing plant substances are seen as an interesting strategy to treat periodontitis. Conclusions. In this systematic review, the state-of-the-art knowledge on the medicinal plants and the induced periodontitis was critically evaluated and discussed from the experiment designed to the possible clinical application. PMID:27738432

  19. Prognostic cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhuis, Maartje G; Eijsink, Jasper J H; Roossink, Frank; de Graeff, Pauline; Pras, Elisabeth; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; de Bock, Geertruida H; van der Zee, Ate G J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the prognostic and predictive significance of cell biological markers in cervical cancer patients primarily treated with (chemo)radiation. A PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane literature search was performed. Studies describing a relation between a cell b

  20. Peroxisystem: harnessing systems cell biology to study peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldiner, Maya; Zalckvar, Einat

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, high-throughput experimentation with quantitative analysis and modelling of cells, recently dubbed systems cell biology, has been harnessed to study the organisation and dynamics of simple biological systems. Here, we suggest that the peroxisome, a fascinating dynamic organelle, can be used as a good candidate for studying a complete biological system. We discuss several aspects of peroxisomes that can be studied using high-throughput systematic approaches and be integrated into a predictive model. Such approaches can be used in the future to study and understand how a more complex biological system, like a cell and maybe even ultimately a whole organism, works.

  1. Case Studies in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeakes, Samuel J.

    1989-01-01

    A case study writing exercise used in a course on parasitology was found to be a powerful learning experience for students because it involved discipline-based technical writing and terminology, brought the students in as evaluators, applied current learning, caused interaction among all students, and simulated real professional activities. (MSE)

  2. Engineering Bacteria to Search for Specific Concentrations of Molecules by a Systematic Synthetic Biology Design Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria navigate environments full of various chemicals to seek favorable places for survival by controlling the flagella’s rotation using a complicated signal transduction pathway. By influencing the pathway, bacteria can be engineered to search for specific molecules, which has great potential for application to biomedicine and bioremediation. In this study, genetic circuits were constructed to make bacteria search for a specific molecule at particular concentrations in their environment through a synthetic biology method. In addition, by replacing the “brake component” in the synthetic circuit with some specific sensitivities, the bacteria can be engineered to locate areas containing specific concentrations of the molecule. Measured by the swarm assay qualitatively and microfluidic techniques quantitatively, the characteristics of each “brake component” were identified and represented by a mathematical model. Furthermore, we established another mathematical model to anticipate the characteristics of the “brake component”. Based on this model, an abundant component library can be established to provide adequate component selection for different searching conditions without identifying all components individually. Finally, a systematic design procedure was proposed. Following this systematic procedure, one can design a genetic circuit for bacteria to rapidly search for and locate different concentrations of particular molecules by selecting the most adequate “brake component” in the library. Moreover, following simple procedures, one can also establish an exclusive component library suitable for other cultivated environments, promoter systems, or bacterial strains. PMID:27096615

  3. Sino-Dutch joint center for systematic chemical biology opens in Dalian

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The inaugural ceremony for the Sino-Dutch Joint Research Center for Systematic Chemical Biology was held during the "Chinese-Dutch Workshop on Personalized Medicine and Preventive Diagnostics" convened on 10 July at the CAS Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP).

  4. ScaleNet: a literature-based model of scale insect biology and systematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Morales, Mayrolin; Denno, Barbara D; Miller, Douglass R; Miller, Gary L; Ben-Dov, Yair; Hardy, Nate B

    2016-01-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are small herbivorous insects found on all continents except Antarctica. They are extremely invasive, and many species are serious agricultural pests. They are also emerging models for studies of the evolution of genetic systems, endosymbiosis and plant-insect interactions. ScaleNet was launched in 1995 to provide insect identifiers, pest managers, insect systematists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists efficient access to information about scale insect biological diversity. It provides comprehensive information on scale insects taken directly from the primary literature. Currently, it draws from 23,477 articles and describes the systematics and biology of 8194 valid species. For 20 years, ScaleNet ran on the same software platform. That platform is no longer viable. Here, we present a new, open-source implementation of ScaleNet. We have normalized the data model, begun the process of correcting invalid data, upgraded the user interface, and added online administrative tools. These improvements make ScaleNet easier to use and maintain and make the ScaleNet data more accurate and extendable. Database URL: http://scalenet.info.

  5. Resilience of caregivers of people with dementia: a systematic review of biological and psychosocial determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Dias

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although caregivers of people with dementia may face difficulties, some positive feelings of caregiving may be associated with resilience.Objective: This study systematically reviewed the definitions, methodological approaches and determinant models associated with resilience among caregivers of people with dementia.Methods: Search for articles published between 2003 and 2014 in ISI, PubMed/MEDLINE, SciELO and Lilacs using the search terms resilience, caregivers and dementia.Results and conclusions: Resilience has been defined as positive adaptation to face adversity, flexibility, psychological well-being, strength, healthy life, burden, social network and satisfaction with social support. No consensus was found about the definition of resilience associated with dementia. We classified the determinant variables into biological, psychological and social models. Higher levels of resilience were associated with lower depression rates and greater physical health. Other biological factors associated with higher levels of resilience were older age, African-American ethnicity and female sex. Lower burden, stress, neuroticism and perceived control were the main psychological factors associated with resilience. Social support was a moderating factor of resilience, and different types of support seemed to relieve the physical and mental overload caused by stress.

  6. The promise of biological markers for treatment response in first-episode psychosis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Jamain, Stéphane; Tamouza, Ryad; Arango, Celso; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang; Glenthøj, Birte; Leweke, Markus; Lewis, Shôn; McGuire, Phillip; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Sommer, Iris E; Winter-van Rossum, Inge; Kapur, Shitij; Kahn, René S; Rujescu, Dan; Leboyer, Marion

    2015-05-01

    Successful treatment of first-episode psychosis is one of the major factors that impacts long-term prognosis. Currently, there are no satisfactory biological markers (biomarkers) to predict which patients with a first-episode psychosis will respond to which treatment. In addition, a non-negligible rate of patients does not respond to any treatment or may develop side effects that affect adherence to the treatments as well as negatively impact physical health. Thus, there clearly is a pressing need for defining biomarkers that may be helpful to predict response to treatment and sensitivity to side effects in first-episode psychosis. The present systematic review provides (1) trials that assessed biological markers associated with antipsychotic response or side effects in first-episode psychosis and (2) potential biomarkers associated with biological disturbances that may guide the choice of conventional treatments or the prescription of innovative treatments. Trials including first-episode psychoses are few in number. Most of the available data focused on pharmacogenetics markers with so far only preliminary results. To date, these studies yielded-beside markers for metabolism of antipsychotics-no or only a few biomarkers for response or side effects, none of which have been implemented in daily clinical practice. Other biomarkers exploring immunoinflammatory, oxidative, and hormonal disturbances emerged as biomarkers of first-episode psychoses in the last decades, and some of them have been associated with treatment response. In addition to pharmacogenetics, further efforts should focus on the association of emergent biomarkers with conventional treatments or with innovative therapies efficacy, where some preliminary data suggest promising results. PMID:25759473

  7. Systematic hardness studies on lithium niobate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K G Subhadra; K Kishan Rao; D B Sirdeshmukh

    2000-04-01

    In view of discrepancies in the available information on the hardness of lithium niobate, a systematic study of the hardness has been carried out. Measurements have been made on two pure lithium niobate crystals with different growth origins, and a Fe-doped sample. The problem of load variation of hardness is examined in detail. The true hardness of LiNbO3 is found to be 630 ± 30 kg/mm2. The Fe-doped crystal has a larger hardness of 750 ± 50 kg/mm2.

  8. Systematic study of shell gaps in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Qiuhong; Wang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    The nucleon separation energies and shell gaps in nuclei over the whole nuclear chart are systematically studied with eight global nuclear mass models. For unmeasured neutron-rich and super-heavy regions, the uncertainty of the predictions from these different mass models is still large. The latest version (WS4) of the Weizs\\"acker-Skyrme mass formula, in which the isospin dependence of model parameters is introduced into the macroscopic-microscopic approach inspired by the Skyrme energy-density functional, is found to be the most accurate one in the descriptions of nuclear masses, separation energies and shell gaps. Based on the predicted shell gaps in nuclei, the possible magic numbers in super-heavy nuclei region are investigated. In addition to the shell closures at $N=184, Z=114$, the sub-shell closures at around $N=178, Z=120$ could also play a role for the stability of super-heavy nuclei.

  9. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1949-11-16

    This paper discusses procedures for research on biological effects of radiation, using mouse tissue: activation trace analysis including methods and proceedures for handling samples before during and after irradiation; methods and procedures for ion exchange study; method of separation and recovery of copper, iron, zinc, cobalt, pubidium and cesium. Also included are studies of trace elements with radioactive isotopes: the distribution of cobalt 60, zinc 65, and copper 64 in the cytoplasm and nuclei of normal mice and those with tumors. 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. [Bibliometry of biological systematics in Latin America during the twentieth century in three global databases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michán, Layla; Llorente-Bousquets, Jorge

    2010-06-01

    We present a review of the biological systematic research in Latin America during the twentieth century, applying a bibliometric analysis to the information contained in international databases with the largest number of biological records: Biosis (since 1969), CAB (since 1910) and Science Citation Index (since 1900), to recognize certain patterns and trends regarding the document production. We obtained 19079 documents and 1387 journals for Biosis, 14326 and 2537 for CAB, 3257 and 1636 for SCI. Of the documents, 54.6% related to new species, 15.3% dealt with morphology, 14.9% keys, 12.5% descriptions, 10.6% cases of synonymies, 6% new genera, 4.9% new geographical records, 23.6% geographical distribution, 4.2% redescriptions, and 3.6% with new nomenclatural combinations. The regions mentioned were South America with 11.9%, Central America with 4% and America (all) with 2.56%. Nineteen Latin American countries appear, whereas outside this region we found the United States of America with 12.6% of representation and Canada with 3%. Animals (65.6%) were the most studied taxa, which was 1.7 times higher than what was published for plants (37%), 11 times higher than fungi (6%) and nearly 30 times higher than microorganisms (2.3%). Out of the 155 journals that produced 66% of the papers, 76.5% were better represented in Biosis, 21.4% in CAB and 2% in SCI. Twenty-nine journals published 33% of the articles, the maximum number of records obtained was 69% for Biosis, CAB 24% and 6.9% for SCI, three (10.3%) are in biology, 11 (37.9%) in botany, 13 (44.8%) zoology, and two (6.9%) paleontology; eight of these journals (27.5%) were published in Latin America and twenty were indexed in the Science Citation Index. In the last two years more journals of the region that publish on taxonomy have been indexed, but their impact factor is still low. However, the impact factor of a number of Latin American journals that published biodiversity increased with time. Countries that are

  11. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D2) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABAA receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D2) and the ion-channel type (GABAA). (J.P.N.)

  12. Off-label biologic regimens in psoriasis: a systematic review of efficacy and safety of dose escalation, reduction, and interrupted biologic therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Brezinski

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: While off-label dosing of biologic treatments may be necessary in selected psoriasis patients, no systematic review exists to date that synthesizes the efficacy and safety of these off-label dosing regimens. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of off-label dosing regimens (dose escalation, dose reduction, and interrupted treatment with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, and alefacept for psoriasis treatment. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: We searched OVID Medline from January 1, 1990 through August 1, 2011 for prospective clinical trials that studied biologic therapy for psoriasis treatment in adults. Individual articles were screened for studies that examined escalated, reduced, or interrupted therapy with etanercept, adalimumab, infliximab, ustekinumab, or alefacept. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 23 articles with 12,617 patients matched the inclusion and exclusion criteria for the systematic review. Data were examined for primary and secondary efficacy outcomes and adverse events including infections, malignancies, cardiovascular events, and anti-drug antibodies. The preponderance of data suggests that continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent was necessary for maintenance of disease control. Among non-responders, dose escalation with etanercept, adalimumab, ustekinumab, and alefacept typically resulted in greater efficacy than standard dosing. Dose reduction with etanercept and alefacept resulted in reduced efficacy. Withdrawal of the examined biologics led to an increase in disease activity; efficacy from retreatment did not result in equivalent initial response rates for most biologics. Safety data on off-label dosing regimens are limited. CONCLUSION: Dose escalation in non-responders generally resulted in increased efficacy in the examined biologics used to treat moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Continuous treatment with anti-TNF agents and anti-IL12/23 agent

  13. Assessing the effectiveness of synthetic and biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in psoriatic arthritis – a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley GH

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gabrielle H Kingsley, David L Scott Rheumatology Unit, Kings College London, London, UK Background: Psoriatic arthritis is an inflammatory arthritis the primary manifestations of which are locomotor and skin disease. Although a number of guidelines have been published citing strategies for reducing disease progression, the evidence base for disease-modifying agents is unclear. This forms the focus of this systematic review. Methods: The systematic review was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 checklist. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs that looked at the impact of interventions with disease-modifying agents, either synthetic drugs or biologics on musculoskeletal outcomes, notably American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. Results were analyzed using Review Manager 5.1.6 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK. Whilst our primary focus was on published trials, we also looked at new trials presented in abstract form in 2013–2014 that were not yet published to avoid omitting important and up-to-date information on developing treatments. Results: Our in-depth analysis included 28 trials overall enrolling 5,177 patients published between the 1980s and now as well as limited analysis of some studies in abstract form as described earlier. The most frequently available locomotor outcome measure was the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders. The risk ratio for achieving an American College of Rheumatology 20 percent responders response was positive in favor of treatment (risk ratio 2.30; 95% confidence interval 1.78–2.96; however, there was evidence of considerable heterogeneity between trials. Overall randomized controlled trials of established synthetic disease-modifying agents were largely negative (methotrexate, ciclosporin and sulfasalazine though leflunomide showed a small positive effect. A new synthetic agent, apremilast, did show a

  14. Spectroscopic study of biologically active glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumera, M.; Wacławska, I.; Mozgawa, W.; Sitarz, M.

    2005-06-01

    It is known that the chemical activity phenomenon is characteristic for some inorganic glasses and they are able to participate in biological processes of living organisms (plants, animals and human bodies). An example here is the selective removal of silicate-phosphate glass components under the influence of biological solutions, which has been applied in designing glasses acting as ecological fertilizers of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants. The structure of model silicate-phosphate glasses containing the different amounts of the glass network formers, i.e. Ca 2+ and Mg 2+, as a binding components were studied. These elements besides other are indispensable of the normal growth of plants. In order to establish the function and position occupied by the particular components in the glass structure, the glasses were examined by FTIR spectroscopy (with spectra decomposition) and XRD methods. It has been found that the increasing amount of MgO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes systematically from a structure of the cristobalite type to a structure corresponding to forsterite type. Whilst the increasing content of CaO in the structure of silicate-phosphate glasses causes the formation of domains the structure of which changes from a structure typical for cristobalite through one similar to the structure of calcium orthophosphate, to a structure corresponding to calcium silicates. The changing character of domains structure is the reason of different chemical activity of glasses.

  15. A systematic literature review on reviews and meta-analyses of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Müller, Christine; Lunde, Anita; Johannessen, Helle

    2010-01-01

    for the improvement of quality of life. Breast cancer was the most common single type of cancer reviewed (8 reviews), all focused on the relief of side effects, primarily by supplements containing soy/plant hormones. The use of these supplements should be discouraged due to a risk for progression of breast cancer......Purpose To provide an overview and evaluate the evidence of biologically based CAM-practices for cancer patients. Methods Pubmed, Social Science Citation Index, AMED and the Cochrane library were systematically searched for reviews on effects of biologically based CAM-practices, including herbal...... remedies, vitamins and other dietary supplements, for cancer or cancer related symptoms published 2000-2008. All studies were assessed according to the SIGN hierarchy of evidence. Results A total of 78 reviews/meta-analyses were identified. Of these, 32 were evaluated as high-quality, whereas 46 had low...

  16. Flipped Angles and Phases: A Systematic Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, J.; Lopez, J; Nanopoulos, D.; Olive, K.

    1993-01-01

    We discuss systematically the fermion mass and mixing matrices in a generic \\linebreak field-theoretical flipped $SU(5)$ model, with particular applications to neutrino and baryon number-changing physics. We demonstrate that the different quark flavour branching ratios in proton decay are related to the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angles, whereas the lepton flavour branching ratios are undetermined. The light neutrino mixing angles observable via oscillation effects are related to the heavy con...

  17. Biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders in chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases: systematic literature review and analysis of a monocentric cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piga, Matteo; Chessa, Elisabetta; Ibba, Valentina; Mura, Valentina; Floris, Alberto; Cauli, Alberto; Mathieu, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    The use of biologic drugs has been linked with the paradoxical development of systemic and organ specific autoimmune processes. The aim of this study was to describe the features of biologics-induced autoimmune renal disorders (AIRD) through a systematic review and a cohort study of 707 adult patients affected with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Ankylosing Spondylitis (SA) and Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). The literature search identified 2687 articles of which 21 were considered relevant for the present study, accounting for 26 case reports. The cohort analysis retrieved 3 cases. According to clinical manifestations and kidney histology the identified AIRD cases were classified as: a) glomerulonephritis associated with systemic vasculitis (GNSV), b) glomerulonephritis in lupus-like syndrome (GNLS), c) isolated autoimmune renal disorders (IARD). Twenty-two out of 29 cases with AIRD were reported in patients affected by RA, 5 in AS and 2 in PsA. The biologic drug most frequently associated with development of AIRD was Etanercept (15 cases, 51.7%), followed by Adalimumab (9 cases, 31.0%) and Infliximab (3 cases, 10.3%) while Tocilizumab and Abatacept were reported in 1 case (3.4%) for each. Thirteen out of 29 (44.8%) cases were classified as affected by IARD, 12 (41.3%) as GNSV and 4 (13.9%) as GNLS. Worse prognosis was associated with GNSV and lack of biologic withdrawal. Although rare, AIRD may be life-threatening and may lead to renal failure and death. If AIRD occurs, biologic drugs must be stopped and patient should be treated according to clinical manifestations and kidney biopsy findings.

  18. Systematic pharmacognostical study on Panax drugs and Curcuma drugs : Phylogenetic analysis, molecular authentication and quality evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Katsuko; Zhu, Shu; Sasaki, Yohei

    2004-01-01

    We proposed pharmacognostical studies in the prime of molecular biology, citing the systematic studies of Panax drugs and Curcuma drugs. Each study was composed of three approaches, phylogenetic analysis of plants based on nuclear 18S rRNA and chloroplast trnK gene sequences, molecular authentication of herbal drugs, and quality evaluation on bioactive chemical constituents or pharmacological effect. Parsimony analysis of the combined trnK-18S rRNA gene sequence data yielded a well-resolved p...

  19. Religiousness and Mental Health: Systematic Review Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdAleati, Naziha S; Mohd Zaharim, Norzarina; Mydin, Yasmin Othman

    2016-12-01

    Many people use religious beliefs and practices to cope with stressful life events and derive peace of mind and purpose in life. The goal of this paper was to systematically review the recent psychological literature to assess the role of religion in mental health outcomes. A comprehensive literature search was conducted using medical and psychological databases on the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Seventy-four articles in the English and Arabic languages published between January 2000 and March 2012 were chosen. Despite the controversial relationship between religion and psychiatry, psychology, and medical care, there has been an increasing interest in the role which spirituality and religion play in mental health. The findings of past research showed that religion could play an important role in many situations, as religious convictions and rules influence the believer's life and health care. Most of the past literature in this area reported that there is a significant connection between religious beliefs and practices and mental health. PMID:27654836

  20. Contributions of plant molecular systematics to studies of molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, E D; Soltis, P S

    2000-01-01

    Dobzhansky stated that nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution. A close corollary, and the central theme of this paper, is that everything makes a lot more sense in the light of phylogeny. Systematics is in the midst of a renaissance, heralded by the widespread application of new analytical approaches and the introduction of molecular techniques. Molecular phylogenetic analyses are now commonplace, and they have provided unparalleled insights into relationships at all levels of plant phylogeny. At deep levels, molecular studies have revealed that charophyte green algae are the closest relatives of the land plants and suggested that liverworts are sister to all other extant land plants. Other studies have suggested that lycopods are sister to all other vascular plants and clarified relationships among the ferns. The impact of molecular phylogenetics on the angiosperms has been particularly dramatic--some of the largest phylogenetic analyses yet conducted have involved the angiosperms. Inferences from three genes (rbcL, atpB, 18S rDNA) agree in the major features of angiosperm phylogeny and have resulted in a reclassification of the angiosperms. This ordinal-level reclassification is perhaps the most dramatic and important change in higher-level angiosperm taxonomy in the past 200 years. At lower taxonomic levels, phylogenetic analyses have revealed the closest relatives of many crops and 'model organisms' for studies of molecular genetics, concomitantly pointing to possible relatives for use in comparative studies and plant breeding. Furthermore, phylogenetic information has contributed to new perspectives on the evolution of polyploid genomes. The phylogenetic trees now available at all levels of the taxonomic hierarchy for angiosperms and other green plants should play a pivotal role in comparative studies in diverse fields from ecology to molecular evolution and comparative genetics.

  1. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  2. A systematic screen of FDA-approved drugs for inhibitors of biological threat agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter B Madrid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The rapid development of effective medical countermeasures against potential biological threat agents is vital. Repurposing existing drugs that may have unanticipated activities as potential countermeasures is one way to meet this important goal, since currently approved drugs already have well-established safety and pharmacokinetic profiles in patients, as well as manufacturing and distribution networks. Therefore, approved drugs could rapidly be made available for a new indication in an emergency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A large systematic effort to determine whether existing drugs can be used against high containment bacterial and viral pathogens is described. We assembled and screened 1012 FDA-approved drugs for off-label broad-spectrum efficacy against Bacillus anthracis; Francisella tularensis; Coxiella burnetii; and Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa fever viruses using in vitro cell culture assays. We found a variety of hits against two or more of these biological threat pathogens, which were validated in secondary assays. As expected, antibiotic compounds were highly active against bacterial agents, but we did not identify any non-antibiotic compounds with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. Lomefloxacin and erythromycin were found to be the most potent compounds in vivo protecting mice against Bacillus anthracis challenge. While multiple virus-specific inhibitors were identified, the most noteworthy antiviral compound identified was chloroquine, which disrupted entry and replication of two or more viruses in vitro and protected mice against Ebola virus challenge in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The feasibility of repurposing existing drugs to face novel threats is demonstrated and this represents the first effort to apply this approach to high containment bacteria and viruses.

  3. Gamification in Education: A Systematic Mapping Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicheva, Darina; Dichev, Christo; Agre, Gennady; Angelova, Galia

    2015-01-01

    While gamification is gaining ground in business, marketing, corporate management, and wellness initiatives, its application in education is still an emerging trend. This article presents a study of the published empirical research on the application of gamification to education. The study is limited to papers that discuss explicitly the effects…

  4. Occupational exposure and biological evaluation of lead in Iranian workers-a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Sayehmiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lead exposure is considered as a global health problem. The irreparable harmful effects of this heavy metal on human have been proven in various studies. Comparing to general population, workers in related industries are more exposed to lead. Several studies have investigated lead occupational exposure and its biological evaluation in Iran; however there is no overall estimate. Thus, the present study was conducted to determine the occupational exposure to lead and its biological evaluation in Iranian workers, using systematic review and meta-analysis. Material and Method: This study was carried out based on information obtained from databases including Magiran, Iranmedex, SID, Medlib, Trials Register, Scopus, Pubmed, Science Direct, Cochran, Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Springer, Online Library Wiley, and Google Scholar from 1991 to 2016, using standard key words. All of the reviewed papers which met the inclusion criteria have been evaluated. Data combination was performed according to Random Effects Model using Stata software version 11.1. Result: In the 34 qualified studies, the mean blood lead level (BLL concentration in Iranian workers was estimated 42.8µg/dl (95% CI: 35.15-50.49. The minimum and maximum BLL were belonged to west (28.348µg/dl and center (45.928µg/dl regions of Iran, respectively. Considering different occupations, the lowest mean value was reported in textile industry workers (12.3 µg/dl, while the highest value was for zinc-lead mine workers (72.6 µg/dl. Mean breathing air lead level of Iranian workers reported in 4 studies was estimated 0.23 mg/m3 (95% CI: 0.14-0.33. Conclusion: According to the high concentration of BLL and breathing air, it is recommended to increase protective measures and frequent screening. Scheduled clinical and paraclinical examination should also be performed for workers.

  5. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Carlos Bernedo Alcazar

    Full Text Available The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses.The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique.The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research.Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups.The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies.

  6. Electrochemical Cathodic Polarization, a Simplified Method That Can Modified and Increase the Biological Activity of Titanium Surfaces: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The cathodic polarization seems to be an electrochemical method capable of modifying and coat biomolecules on titanium surfaces, improving the surface activity and promoting better biological responses. Objective The aim of the systematic review is to assess the scientific literature to evaluate the cellular response produced by treatment of titanium surfaces by applying the cathodic polarization technique. Data, Sources, and Selection The literature search was performed in several databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Science Direct, Scielo and EBSCO Host, until June 2016, with no limits used. Eligibility criteria were used and quality assessment was performed following slightly modified ARRIVE and SYRCLE guidelines for cellular studies and animal research. Results Thirteen studies accomplished the inclusion criteria and were considered in the review. The quality of reporting studies in animal models was low and for the in vitro studies it was high. The in vitro and in vivo results reported that the use of cathodic polarization promoted hydride surfaces, effective deposition, and adhesion of the coated biomolecules. In the experimental groups that used the electrochemical method, cellular viability, proliferation, adhesion, differentiation, or bone growth were better or comparable with the control groups. Conclusions The use of the cathodic polarization method to modify titanium surfaces seems to be an interesting method that could produce active layers and consequently enhance cellular response, in vitro and in vivo animal model studies. PMID:27441840

  7. Studying cell biology in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists. PMID:26564861

  8. Studying cell biology in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Angel; Lechler, Terry

    2015-11-15

    Advances in cell biology have often been driven by studies in diverse organisms and cell types. Although there are technical reasons for why different cell types are used, there are also important physiological reasons. For example, ultrastructural studies of vesicle transport were aided by the use of professional secretory cell types. The use of tissues/primary cells has the advantage not only of using cells that are adapted to the use of certain cell biological machinery, but also of highlighting the physiological roles of this machinery. Here we discuss advantages of the skin as a model system. We discuss both advances in cell biology that used the skin as a driving force and future prospects for use of the skin to understand basic cell biology. A unique combination of characteristics and tools makes the skin a useful in vivo model system for many cell biologists.

  9. Study of systematic errors in the luminosity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental systematic error in the barrel region was estimated to be 0.44 %. This value is derived considering the systematic uncertainties from the dominant sources but does not include uncertainties which are being studied. In the end cap region, the study of shower behavior and clustering effect is under way in order to determine the angular resolution at the low angle edge of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter. We also expect that the systematic error in this region will be less than 1 %. The technical precision of theoretical uncertainty is better than 0.1 % comparing the Tobimatsu-Shimizu program and BABAMC modified by ALEPH. To estimate the physical uncertainty we will use the ALIBABA [9] which includes O(α2) QED correction in leading-log approximation. (J.P.N.)

  10. Study of systematic errors in the luminosity measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arima, Tatsumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Applied Physics

    1993-04-01

    The experimental systematic error in the barrel region was estimated to be 0.44 %. This value is derived considering the systematic uncertainties from the dominant sources but does not include uncertainties which are being studied. In the end cap region, the study of shower behavior and clustering effect is under way in order to determine the angular resolution at the low angle edge of the Liquid Argon Calorimeter. We also expect that the systematic error in this region will be less than 1 %. The technical precision of theoretical uncertainty is better than 0.1 % comparing the Tobimatsu-Shimizu program and BABAMC modified by ALEPH. To estimate the physical uncertainty we will use the ALIBABA [9] which includes O({alpha}{sup 2}) QED correction in leading-log approximation. (J.P.N.).

  11. Photonic engineering for biological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei

    My dissertation focuses on designing and developing prototypes of optical tools in the laboratory that can facilitate practical medical therapies. More specifically, this dissertation examines two novel biophotonic techniques: (1) a frequency multiplexed confocal microscope with the potential to provide rational therapy of congestive heart failure (CHF), and (2) the "optical comb" with the potential to improve results of retina reattachment surgery and accelerate post surgical recovery. Next, I will discuss the background, design and initial experimental results of each study individually. Part I: The Frequency Multiplexed Confocal Microscope. To overcome the limitations of existing confocal microscope technology, this dissertation proposes a non-scanning, real-time, high resolution technique (a multi-point frequency multiplexed confocal microscope) to measure 3-D intracellular calcium ion concentration in a living cardiac myocyte. This method can be also applied to measure the intracellular sodium ion concentration, or other ions in which high quantum-yield fluorescent probes are available. The novelty of the proposed research lies in the introduction of carrier frequency multiplexing techniques which can differentiate fluorescence emitted at different spatial locations in cardiac myocyte by their modulated frequency. It therefore opens the possibility to visualize the transient dynamics of intracellular dynamics at multiple locations in cells simultaneously, which will shine a new light on our understanding of CHF. The procedure for frequency multiplexing proposed is described below. Multiple incident laser beams are focused onto different locations in an isolated rat cardiac myocyte with each beam modulated at a different carrier frequency. The fluorescence emission at each location therefore bears the same modulated frequency as the stimulation laser beam. Each fluorescence signal is sent to the photo multiplier tube (PMT) after being spatially filtered by a

  12. Systematic study of α half-lives of superheavy nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different descriptions of the α-decay process, namely, the shell model rate theory and phenomenological description are emphasized to investigate the α-decay properties of superheavy nuclei (SHN). These descriptions are shortly presented and illustrated by their results. Special attention is given to the shell structure and resonance scattering effects due to which they exist and decay. A first systematics of α-decay properties of SHN was per- formed by studying the half-life vs. energy correlations in terms of atomic number and mass number. Such a systematics shows that the transitions between even-even nuclei are favored, while all other transitions with odd nucleons are prohibited. The accuracy of experimental and calculated α-half-lives is illustrated by the systematics of these results. (authors)

  13. Parent Implementation of RECALL: A Systematic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalon, Kelly; Hanline, Mary Frances; Davis, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    This systematic case study utilized a repeated acquisition design to investigate the impact of a caregiver-implemented RECALL (Reading to Engage Children with Autism in Language and Learning) on the correct, unprompted responses of a young child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). RECALL is an adapted shared reading intervention that includes a…

  14. 分子生物学技术在昆虫系统学上的应用%Molecular Biological Techniques Applied in Insect Systematics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄帅; 胡红英

    2006-01-01

    介绍了广泛用于昆虫分类学当中的几种分子生物学技术,包括核酸序列分析技术,RFLP技术,PCR技术和DNA指纹技术等,以及这些技术在线粒体DNA和核糖体DNA等分子标记上的应用.现代生物技术应用于昆虫系统学的研究将会有很好的前景.%Molecular biology plays a very important role in entomotaxomomy, and a new area of entomological science forming as molecular biological techniques are applied in insect systematics. Since its commencement in 1980's, much important progress has been made and many excellent results have been achieved especially in recent years. This paper introduces many kinds of modern biological technology being widely used in study of entomotaxonomy, including nucleic acid sequence analysis, RFLP, PCR, DNAfp, etc. Their applications in some molecular markers, such as mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and ribosomal DNA (rDNA), and their combined dataset can be effective to applied in taxonomy and identification of species. This view showed that the insect molecular systematic combined with many kinds of modern biological technology will be one of the most important subjects in the near future.

  15. Toxicity Studies on "840 Biologic Pesticide"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    [Objective] "840 Biologic Pesticide" is a very effective biologic pesticide. It consists of Abamectin and celastrus angulatus. Toxicity study was aimed to provide scientific toxicological basis. [Methods] The acute toxicity test,Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were done. [Results] The acute toxicity of single dose of "840 Biologic Pesticide" showed that acute oral LD50 for female and male rats are 4 300 and 4 280 mg/kg,and for female and male mice are 2 330 and 5 110 mg/kg,respectively. The dermal LD50 was >2 000 mg/kg for female and male rats. The mutagenesis studies indicated that Ames test,micronucleus test and testicle chromosome aberration test were negative. [Conclusion] Tested pesticidc belongs to low toticity grade.

  16. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  17. Systematic analysis of head-to-head gene organization: evolutionary conservation and potential biological relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Li

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Several "head-to-head" (or "bidirectional" gene pairs have been studied in individual experiments, but genome-wide analysis of this gene organization, especially in terms of transcriptional correlation and functional association, is still insufficient. We conducted a systematic investigation of head-to-head gene organization focusing on structural features, evolutionary conservation, expression correlation and functional association. Of the present 1,262, 1,071, and 491 head-to-head pairs identified in human, mouse, and rat genomes, respectively, pairs with 1- to 400-base pair distance between transcription start sites form the majority (62.36%, 64.15%, and 55.19% for human, mouse, and rat,respectively of each dataset, and the largest group is always the one with a transcription start site distance of 101 to 200 base pairs. The phylogenetic analysis among Fugu, chicken, and human indicates a negative selection on the separation of head-to-head genes across vertebrate evolution, and thus the ancestral existence of this gene organization. The expression analysis shows that most of the human head-to-head genes are significantly correlated,and the correlation could be positive, negative, or alternative depending on the experimental conditions. Finally, head to-head genes statistically tend to perform similar functions, and gene pairs associated with the significant cofunctions seem to have stronger expression correlations. The findings indicate that the head-to-head gene organization is ancient and conserved, which subjects functionally related genes to correlated transcriptional regulation and thus provides an exquisite mechanism of transcriptional regulation based on gene organization. These results have significantly expanded the knowledge about head-to-head gene organization. Supplementary materials for this study are available at http://www.scbit.org/h2h.

  18. Systematic Study of Electron Localization in an Amorphous Semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Biswas, Parthapratim; Ordejon, Pablo; Drabold, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure of gap and band tail states in amorphous silicon. Starting with two 216-atom models of amorphous silicon with defect concentration close to the experiments, we systematically study the dependence of electron localization on basis set, density functional and spin polarization using the first principles density functional code Siesta. We briefly compare three different schemes for characterizing localization: information entropy, inverse participation rat...

  19. Systematic Review of Breast Cancer Biology in Developing Countries (Part 2): Asian Subcontinent and South East Asia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhikoo, Riyaz, E-mail: riyazbhikoo@gmail.com; Srinivasa, Sanket; Yu, Tzu-Chieh [Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand); Moss, David [Department of Surgery, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand); Hill, Andrew G [Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand)

    2011-05-13

    There has been no systematic appraisal of ethnicity-based variations in breast cancer (BC) biology amongst women from developing countries. A qualitative systematic review was conducted of breast cancer size, stage, grade, histological type, extra-mammary involvement, hormone receptor status as well as patient demographics. This review includes patients from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. BC in these regions present at an earlier age with large aggressive tumours. Distant metastases are frequently present at the time of diagnosis. African women have a higher frequency of triple negative tumours. Over half of Middle Eastern women have lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Despite experiencing a lower incidence compared to the Ashkenazi Jewish population, Palestinian women have poorer five-year survival outcomes. The majority of women from Mexico and South America have stage two or three disease whilst over sixty percent of women from Eastern Europe have either stage one or stage two disease. The biological characteristics of BC in the Caribbean cannot be fully assessed due to a paucity of data from the region. BC amongst the developing world is characterised by an early peak age of onset with aggressive biological characteristics. Strategies that improve breast cancer awareness, address amenable risk factors and improve early detection are essential.

  20. Systematic Review of Breast Cancer Biology in Developing Countries (Part 2: Asian Subcontinent and South East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hill

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been no systematic appraisal of ethnicity-based variations in breast cancer (BC biology amongst women from developing countries. A qualitative systematic review was conducted of breast cancer size, stage, grade, histological type, extra-mammary involvement, hormone receptor status as well as patient demographics. This review includes patients from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. BC in these regions present at an earlier age with large aggressive tumours. Distant metastases are frequently present at the time of diagnosis. African women have a higher frequency of triple negative tumours. Over half of Middle Eastern women have lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Despite experiencing a lower incidence compared to the Ashkenazi Jewish population, Palestinian women have poorer five-year survival outcomes. The majority of women from Mexico and South America have stage two or three disease whilst over sixty percent of women from Eastern Europe have either stage one or stage two disease. The biological characteristics of BC in the Caribbean cannot be fully assessed due to a paucity of data from the region. BC amongst the developing world is characterised by an early peak age of onset with aggressive biological characteristics. Strategies that improve breast cancer awareness, address amenable risk factors and improve early detection are essential.

  1. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the influence of biological implant surface coatings on periimplant bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Gregor; Jauernik, Johanna; Bierbaum, Susanne; Bigler, Martin; Grätz, Klaus W; Rücker, Martin; Stadlinger, Bernd

    2016-11-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the influence of biological implant surface coatings on periimplant bone formation in comparison to an uncoated titanium reference surface in experimental large animal models. The analysis was structured according to the PRISMA criteriae. Of the1077 studies, 30 studies met the inclusion criteriae. Nineteen studies examined the bone implant contact (BIC) and were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, the mean increase in BIC for the test surfaces compared to the reference surfaces was 3.7 percentage points (pp) (95% CI -3.9-11.2, p = 0.339). Analyzing the increase in BIC for specific coated surfaces in comparison to uncoated reference surfaces, inorganic surface coatings showed a significant mean increase in BIC of 14.7 pp (95% CI 10.6-18.9, p < 0.01), extracellular matrix (ECM) surface coatings showed an increase of 10.0 pp (95% CI 4.4-15.6, p < 0.001), and peptide coatings showed a statistical trend with 7.1 pp BIC increase (95% CI -0.8-15.0, p = 0.08). In this review, no statistically significant difference could be found for growth factor surface coatings (observed difference -3.3 pp, 95% CI -16.5-9.9, p = 0.6). All analyses are exploratory in nature. The results show a statistically significant effect of inorganic and ECM coatings on periimplant bone formation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2898-2910, 2016.

  2. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. RESULTS: Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  3. Systematics of mosquito disease vectors (Diptera, Culicidae): impact of molecular biology and cladistic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munstermann, L E; Conn, J E

    1997-01-01

    The field of medical entomology, by nature of its association with problems of human health, has been conservative in its application of molecular and computer technologies to systematic research. Recently, however, these methods have opened new interpretations for systematics of disease vectors. Medically important insects, particularly mosquitoes, are among those more thoroughly described by conventional taxonomy, and thereby provide a secure framework for testing congruencies with molecular data. In turn, molecular investigations have provided a stimulus to vector systematics in the discovery and delineation of cryptic species complexes, as well as providing new perspectives on relationships at higher taxonomic divisions. In this review, examples involving cladistic analysis, cytogenetics--in situ hybridization, isoenzymes, DNA sequencing, and restriction fragment polymorphism are drawn from the following taxa: Aedes communis; Aedes (Ochlerotatus) group G; Aedes (Stegomyia) species including A. aegypti, A. albopictus, and A. scutellaris group; Anopheles albitarsis, Anopheles dirus, Anopheles gambiae, Anopheles nuneztovari, Anopheles pseudopunctipennis, and Anopheles punctulatus groups; Culex pipiens and the Culex subgenus Melanoconion; and the tribe Sabethini.

  4. Biological stability in drinking water distribution systems: A novel approach for systematic microbial water quality monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prest, E.I.E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Challenges to achieve biological stability in drinking water distribution systems Drinking water is distributed from the treatment facility to consumers through extended man-made piping systems. The World Health Organization drinking water guidelines (2006) stated that “Water entering the distribut

  5. Erroneous host identification frustrates systematics and delays implementation of biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin, F.; Roversi, P.F.; Lenteren, van J.C.

    2012-01-01

    Misidentifications of pests and their natural enemies and misinterpretations of pest-natural enemy associations have led to the failure of a number of biological control projects. In addition to misidentification, more complicated kinds of errors, such as mistakes in establishing host records of par

  6. Evaluation of biological properties and clinical effectiveness of Aloe vera: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radha, Maharjan H; Laxmipriya, Nampoothiri P

    2015-01-01

    Aloe vera ( lú huì) is well known for its considerable medicinal properties. This plant is one of the richest natural sources of health for human beings coming. The chemistry of the plant has revealed the presence of more than 200 different biologically active substances. Many biological properties associated with Aloe species are contributed by inner gel of the leaves. Most research has been centralized on the biological activities of the various species of Aloe, which include antibacterial and antimicrobial activities of the nonvolatile constituents of the leaf gel. Aloe species are widely distributed in the African and the eastern European continents, and are spread almost throughout the world. The genus Aloe has more than 400 species but few, such as A. vera, Aloe ferox, and Aloe arborescens, are globally used for trade. A. vera has various medicinal properties such as antitumor, antiarthritic, antirheumatoid, anticancer, and antidiabetic properties. In addition, A. vera has also been promoted for constipation, gastrointestinal disorders, and for immune system deficiencies. However, not much convincing information is available on properties of the gel. The present review focuses on the detailed composition of Aloe gel, its various phytocomponents having various biological properties that help to improve health and prevent disease conditions. PMID:26151005

  7. Molecular approaches to trematode systematics: 'best practice' and implications for future study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Cutmore, Scott C; Miller, Terrence L; Nolan, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    To date, morphological analysis has been the cornerstone to trematode systematics. However, since the late-1980s we have seen an increased integration of genetic data to overcome problems encountered when morphological data are considered in isolation. Here, we provide advice regarding the 'best molecular practice' for trematode taxonomy and systematic studies, in an attempt to help unify the field and provide a solid foundation to underpin future work. Emphasis is placed on defining the study goals and recommendations are made regarding sample preservation, extraction methods, and the submission of molecular vouchers. We advocate generating sequence data from all parasite species/host species/geographic location combinations and stress the importance of selecting two independently evolving loci (one ribosomal and one mitochondrial marker). We recommend that loci should be chosen to provide genetic variation suitable to address the question at hand and for which sufficient 'useful' comparative sequence data already exist. Quality control of the molecular data via using proof-reading Taq polymerase, sequencing PCR amplicons using both forward and reverse primers, ensuring that a minimum of 85% overlap exists when constructing consensus sequences, and checking electropherograms by eye is stressed. We advise that all genetic results are best interpreted using a holistic biological approach, which considers morphology, host identity, collection locality, and ecology. Finally, we consider what advances next-generation sequencing holds for trematode taxonomy and systematics. PMID:26898592

  8. Molecular approaches to trematode systematics: 'best practice' and implications for future study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Costa, Isabel; Cutmore, Scott C; Miller, Terrence L; Nolan, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    To date, morphological analysis has been the cornerstone to trematode systematics. However, since the late-1980s we have seen an increased integration of genetic data to overcome problems encountered when morphological data are considered in isolation. Here, we provide advice regarding the 'best molecular practice' for trematode taxonomy and systematic studies, in an attempt to help unify the field and provide a solid foundation to underpin future work. Emphasis is placed on defining the study goals and recommendations are made regarding sample preservation, extraction methods, and the submission of molecular vouchers. We advocate generating sequence data from all parasite species/host species/geographic location combinations and stress the importance of selecting two independently evolving loci (one ribosomal and one mitochondrial marker). We recommend that loci should be chosen to provide genetic variation suitable to address the question at hand and for which sufficient 'useful' comparative sequence data already exist. Quality control of the molecular data via using proof-reading Taq polymerase, sequencing PCR amplicons using both forward and reverse primers, ensuring that a minimum of 85% overlap exists when constructing consensus sequences, and checking electropherograms by eye is stressed. We advise that all genetic results are best interpreted using a holistic biological approach, which considers morphology, host identity, collection locality, and ecology. Finally, we consider what advances next-generation sequencing holds for trematode taxonomy and systematics.

  9. Systematics and evolutionary biology: uneasy bedfellows? Sistemática y biología evolutiva: ¿compañeros incómodos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey H. Schwartz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The history of systematics and evolutionary biology demonstrates how greatly the "modern evolutionary synthesis" instrumentally prevented, rather than facilitated, the intellectual growth and maturity of the diversity of evolutionary disciplines. In truth, the claim of the synthesis being synthetic is essentially without basis, indeed a myth. Instead, the "synthesis" had precisely the opposite effect: namely, squelching the arena of debate, disagreement, and diverse theorizing that had characterized the preceding decades. Although each of the 3 primary architects of the synthesis - Dobzhansky, Mayr, and Simpson - had his own agenda, they were united around the theme of population genetics and population thinking. When applied to systematics, especially by Mayr, the result can now be seen as confused at best. Perhaps this review will provoke a revival of earlier years of intellectual curiosity and fervor, and rekindle interest in systematic method and theory.La historia de la sistemática y de la biología evolutiva muestra el papel que tuvo la "síntesis evolutiva moderna" para impedir, en lugar de favorecer, el crecimiento intelectual y la maduración de la diversidad de disciplinas evolucionistas. En efecto, la pretensión de la "síntesis" de ser sintética carece de bases, y por ende, resulta un mito. En su lugar, la "síntesis" tuvo precisamente el efecto opuesto: suprimir escenarios de debate, acuerdos, y cancelar el desarrollo mismo de las teorías que caracterizaron las décadas precedentes. Aunque cada uno de los 3 estudiosos responsables de formular la síntesis -Dobzhansky, Mayr y Simpson- tenía su propia agenda, coincidían en torno al tema de la genética de poblaciones y el pensamiento poblacional. Sin embargo, el resultado del debate respecto a la sistemática, especialmente abordado por Mayr, es actualmente confuso en el mejor de los casos. Quizás esta revisión provoque un resurgimiento en el fervor y la curiosidad intelectual

  10. Experimental models to study cholangiocyte biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela S. Tietz; Xian-Ming Chen; Ai-Yu Gong; Robert C. Huebert; Anatoliy Masyuk; Tatyana Masyuk; Patrick L. Splinter; Nicholas F. LaRusso

    2002-01-01

    Cholangiocytes-the epithelial cells which line the bileducts-are increasingly recognized as importanttransporting epithelia actively involved in the absorptionand secretion of water, ions, and solutes. Thisrecognition is due in part to the recent development ofnew experimental models. New biologic concepts haveemerged including the identification and topography ofreceptors and flux proteins on the apical and/orbasolateral membrane which are involved in the molecularmechanisms of ductal bile secretion. Individually isolatedand/or perfused bile duct units from livers of rats andmice serve as new, physiologically relevant in vitromodels to study cholangiocyte transport. Biliary treedimensions and novel insights into anatomic remodeling ofproliferating bile ducts have emerged from three-dimensional reconstruction using CT scanning andsophisticated software. Moreover, new pathologicconcepts have arisen regarding the interaction ofcholangiocytes with pathogens such as Cryptosporidiumparvum. These concepts and associated methodologiesmay provide the framework to develop new therapies for the cholangiopathies, a group of important hepatobiliarydiseases in which cholangiocytes are the target cell.Tietz PS, Chen XM, Gong AY, Huebert RC, Masyuk A, MasyukT, Splinter PL, LaRusso NF. Experimental models to studycoholangiocyte biology.

  11. Non-biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) improve pain in inflammatory arthritis (IA): a systematic literature review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiman, Amanda J; Pope, Janet E; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Li, Lihua; Barnabe, Cheryl; Kalache, Fares; Kung, Tabitha; Bessette, Louis; Flanagan, Cathy; Haraoui, Boulos; Hochman, Jacqueline; Leclercq, Sharon; Mosher, Dianne; Thorne, Carter; Bykerk, Vivian

    2013-05-01

    Evidence supports early use of non-biologic DMARDs to prevent irreversible damage in inflammatory arthritides, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), and possibly ankylosing spondylitis (AS). However, there is a paucity of data exploring their effects on pain as a primary outcome in these conditions. This systematic literature review investigated the effect of non-biologic DMARDs on pain levels in IA and examined whether disease duration impacted efficacy. We searched Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, abstracts from the 2008 to 2010 American College of Rheumatology annual congresses, and citation lists of retrieved publications. Only randomized, double-blind controlled trials were analyzed. Quality was assessed with the Risk of Bias tool. Descriptive statistics were used in meta-analysis. 9,860 articles were identified, with 33 eligible for inclusion: 8 in AS, 6 in PsA, 9 in early RA (ERA), and 10 in established RA. In ERA and established RA, all studies of DMARDs (monotherapy and combination therapies) consistently revealed statistically significant reductions in pain except three oral gold studies. In AS, sulfasalazine studies showed significant pain reduction, whereas use of other DMARDs did not. In PsA, 5 of 6 studies reported VAS-pain improvement. From the studies included, we were unable to assess the influence of disease duration on pain outcomes in these rheumatic conditions. DMARDs improve pain in early and established RA. Sulfasalazine may improve pain in AS and PsA. Further study is needed to assess the relationship between disease duration and DMARD efficacy in reducing pain in these conditions.

  12. Structural Studies of Biological Solids Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution structure and dynamics of biological molecules are important in understanding their function. While studies have been successful in solving the structures of water-soluble biomolecules, it has been proven difficult to determine the structures of membrane proteins and fibril systems. Recent studies have shown that solid-state NMR is a promising technique and could be highly valuable in studying such non-crystalline and non-soluble biosystems. I will present strategies to study the structures of such challenging systems and also about the applications of solid-state NMR to study the modes of membrane-peptide interactions for a better assessment of the prospects of antimicrobial peptides as substitutes to antibiotics in the control of human disease. Our studies on the mechanism of membrane disruption by LL-37 (a human antimicrobial peptide), analogs of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptide magainin2 extracted from the skin of the African frog Xenopus Laevis, and pardaxin will be presented. Solid-state NMR experiments were used to determine the secondary structure, dynamics and topology of these peptides in lipid bilayers. Similarities and difference in the cell-lysing mechanism, and their dependence on the membrane composition, of these peptides will be discussed. Atomic-level resolution NMR structures of amyloidogenic proteins revealing the misfolding pathway and early intermediates that play key roles in amyloid toxicity will also be presented.

  13. Systematic study of survival probability of excited superheavy nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The stability of excited superheavy nuclei (SHN) with 100 Z 134 against neutron emission and fission is investigated by using a statistical model. In particular, a systematic study of the survival probability against fission in the 1n-channel of these SHN is made. The present calculations consistently take the neutron separation energies and shell correction energies from the calculated results of the finite range droplet model which predicts an island of stability of SHN around Z = 115 and N = 179. It turns out that this island of stability persists for excited SHN in the sense that the calculated survival probabilities in the 1n-channel of excited SHN at the optimal excitation energy are maximized around Z = 115 and N = 179. This indicates that the survival probability in the 1n-channel is mainly determined by the nuclear shell effects.

  14. Systematic study of source mask optimization and verification flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Yu; Latypov, Azat; Chua, Gek Soon; Zou, Yi

    2012-06-01

    Source mask optimization (SMO) emerged as powerful resolution enhancement technique (RET) for advanced technology nodes. However, there is a plethora of flow and verification metrics in the field, confounding the end user of the technique. Systemic study of different flows and the possible unification thereof is missing. This contribution is intended to reveal the pros and cons of different SMO approaches and verification metrics, understand the commonality and difference, and provide a generic guideline for RET selection via SMO. The paper discusses 3 different type of variations commonly arise in SMO, namely pattern preparation & selection, availability of relevant OPC recipe for freeform source and finally the metrics used in source verification. Several pattern selection algorithms are compared and advantages of systematic pattern selection algorithms are discussed. In the absence of a full resist model for SMO, alternative SMO flow without full resist model is reviewed. Preferred verification flow with quality metrics of DOF and MEEF is examined.

  15. Systematic Review of Measles and Rubella Serology Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kimberly M; Odahowski, Cassie L

    2016-07-01

    Serological tests provide information about individual immunity from historical infection or immunization. Cross-sectional serological studies provide data about the age- and sex-specific immunity levels for individuals in the studied population, and these data can provide a point of comparison for the results of transmission models. In the context of developing an integrated model for measles and rubella transmission, we reviewed the existing measles and rubella literature to identify the results of national serological studies that provided cross-sectional estimates of population immunity at the time of data collection. We systematically searched PubMed, the Science Citation Index, and references we identified from relevant articles published in English. We extracted serological data for comparison to transmission model outputs. For rubella, serological studies of women of child-bearing age provide information about the potential risks of infants born with congenital rubella syndrome. Serological studies also document the loss of maternal antibodies, which occurs at different rates for the different viruses and according to the nature of the induced immunity (i.e., infection or vaccine). The serological evidence remains limited for some areas, with studies from developed countries representing a disproportionate part of the evidence. The collection and review of serological evidence can help program managers identify immunity gaps in the population, which may help them better understand the characteristics of individuals within their populations who may participate in transmission and manage risks. PMID:26077609

  16. Pharmacogenomics Bias - Systematic distortion of study results by genetic heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zietemann, Vera

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decision analyses of drug treatments in chronic diseases require modeling the progression of disease and treatment response beyond the time horizon of clinical or epidemiological studies. In many such models, progression and drug effect have been applied uniformly to all patients; heterogeneity in progression, including pharmacogenomic effects, has been ignored. Objective: We sought to systematically evaluate the existence, direction and relative magnitude of a pharmacogenomics bias (PGX-Bias resulting from failure to adjust for genetic heterogeneity in both treatment response (HT and heterogeneity in progression of disease (HP in decision-analytic studies based on clinical study data. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in electronic databases for studies regarding the effect of genetic heterogeneity on the validity of study results. Included studies have been summarized in evidence tables. In the case of lacking evidence from published studies we sought to perform our own simulation considering both HT and HP. We constructed two simple Markov models with three basic health states (early-stage disease, late-stage disease, dead, one adjusting and the other not adjusting for genetic heterogeneity. Adjustment was done by creating different disease states for presence (G+ and absence (G- of a dichotomous genetic factor. We compared the life expectancy gains attributable to treatment resulting from both models and defined pharmacogenomics bias as percent deviation of treatment-related life expectancy gains in the unadjusted model from those in the adjusted model. We calculated the bias as a function of underlying model parameters to create generic results. We then applied our model to lipid-lowering therapy with pravastatin in patients with coronary atherosclerosis, incorporating the influence of two TaqIB polymorphism variants (B1 and B2 on progression and drug efficacy as reported in the DNA substudy of the REGRESS

  17. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  18. Biological Indicators in Studies of Earthquake Precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorin, A. Ya.; Deshcherevskii, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    Time series of data on variations in the electric activity (EA) of four species of weakly electric fish Gnathonemus leopoldianus and moving activity (MA) of two cat-fishes Hoplosternum thoracatum and two groups of Columbian cockroaches Blaberus craniifer were analyzed. The observations were carried out in the Garm region of Tajikistan within the frameworks of the experiments aimed at searching for earthquake precursors. An automatic recording system continuously recorded EA and DA over a period of several years. Hourly means EA and MA values were processed. Approximately 100 different parameters were calculated on the basis of six initial EA and MA time series, which characterize different variations in the EA and DA structure: amplitude of the signal and fluctuations of activity, parameters of diurnal rhythms, correlated changes in the activity of various biological indicators, and others. A detailed analysis of the statistical structure of the total array of parametric time series obtained in the experiment showed that the behavior of all animals shows a strong temporal variability. All calculated parameters are unstable and subject to frequent changes. A comparison of the data obtained with seismicity allow us to make the following conclusions: (1) The structure of variations in the studied parameters is represented by flicker noise or even a more complex process with permanent changes in its characteristics. Significant statistics are required to prove the cause-and-effect relationship of the specific features of such time series with seismicity. (2) The calculation of the reconstruction statistics in the EA and MA series structure demonstrated an increase in their frequency in the last hours or a few days before the earthquake if the hypocenter distance is comparable to the source size. Sufficiently dramatic anomalies in the behavior of catfishes and cockroaches (changes in the amplitude of activity variation, distortions of diurnal rhythms, increase in the

  19. A systematic review of publications studies on medical tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoud, Ferdosi; Alireza, Jabbari; Mahmoud, Keyvanara; Zahra, Agharahimi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Medical tourism for any study area is complex. Materials and Methods: Using full articles from other databases, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), Science Direct, Emerald, Oxford, Magiran, and Scientific Information Database (SID), to examine systematically published articles about medical tourism in the interval 2000-2011 paid. Articles were obtained using descriptive statistics and content analysis categories were analyzed. Results: Among the 28 articles reviewed, 11 cases were a kind of research articles, three cases were case studies in Mexico, India, Hungary, Germany, and Iran, and 14 were case studies, review documents and data were passed. The main topics of study included the definition of medical tourism, medical tourists’ motivation and development of medical tourism, ethical issues in medical tourism, and impact on health and medical tourism marketing. Conclusion: The findings indicate the definition of medical tourism in various articles, and medical tourists are motivated. However, most studies indicate the benefits of medical tourism in developing countries and more developed countries reflect the consequences of medical tourism. PMID:24251287

  20. Systematic review, network meta-analysis and economic evaluation of biological therapy for the management of active psoriatic arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cawson, Matthew Richard; Mitchell, Stephen Andrew; Knight, Chris; Wildey, Henry; Spurden, Dean; Bird, Alex; Orme, Michelle Elaine

    2014-01-01

    Background An updated economic evaluation was conducted to compare the cost-effectiveness of the four tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors adalimumab, etanercept, golimumab and infliximab in active, progressive psoriatic arthritis (PsA) where response to standard treatment has been inadequate. Methods A systematic review was conducted to identify relevant, recently published studies and the new trial data were synthesised, via a Bayesian network meta-analysis (NMA), to estimate the relat...

  1. Systematic study of actinide and pre-actinide fission modes

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade-II, E; Deppman, A; Bernal-Castillo, J L; Balabekyan, A R; Demekhina, N A; Adam, J; Garcia, F; Guzmán, F

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present new experimental data on mass distribution of fission fragments from $^{241}$Am proton-induced fission at $660$ MeV measured at the LNR Phasotron (JINR). The systematic analysis of several measured fragment mass distributions from different fission reactions available in the literature is also presented. The proton-induced fission of $^{241}$Am, $^{237}$Np and $^{238}$U at 26.5, 62.9 and 660 MeV was studied. The proton-induced fission of $^{232}$Th was studied at 26.5, 62.9 and 190 MeV. The fission of $^{208}$Pb also by a proton was investigated at 190, 500 and 1000 MeV. The fission of $^{197}$Au was studied for 190 and 800 MeV protons. Bremsstrahlung reactions with maximum photon energies of 50 and 3500 MeV were studied for $^{232}$Th and $^{238}$U. The framework of the Random Neck Rupture Model was applied in the analysis. The roles of the neutron excess and of the so called fissility parameter were also investigated.

  2. Magnetospheric Line Radiation: A systematic study using DEMETER spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, F.; Santolik, O.; Parrot, M.; Berthelier, J.-J.

    We present results of a systematic survey of Magnetospheric Line Radiation MLR observed since the beginning of the DEMETER mission DEMETER is a French micro-satellite launched in June 2004 altitude of orbit about 700 km designed to study electromagnetic phenomena connected with seismic or man-made activity An automatic identification procedure of possible MLR events has been developed and used in order to obtain a statistically significant data set We show that there are two principally different classes of events 1 events with the spacing of 50 100 or 60 120 Hz so-called Power Line Harmonic Radiation PLHR 2 events with other spacing While the first class of events originates from power systems on the Earth s surface and the frequency spacing well corresponds to the fundamental frequency of the radiating power system the second class is most probably generated in a completely natural way All the events are thoroughly analyzed using both statistical tens of cases have been found and case-study approach especially for low frequencies when all the six components of electromagnetic field are measured

  3. A Systematic Spectroscopic Study of Four Apollo Lunar Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongcheng Ling; Alian Wang; Bradley L Jolliff

    2011-01-01

    A systematic spectroscopic study including Raman,Mid-IR,NIR,and VIS-NIR,is used to investigate four endmember lunar soils.Apollo soils (<45 μm) 14163,15271,67511,and 71501 were selected as endmembers to study,based on their soil chemistry,maturity against space weathering,and the sampling locations.These endmembers include an anorthositic highlands soil (67511),a low-Ti basaltic soil (15271),a high-Ti basaltic soil (71501),and a mafic,KREEPy,impact-melt-rich soil (14163).We used a laser Raman point-counting procedure to derive mineral modes of the soils and the compositional distributions of major mineral phases,which in turn reflect characteristics of the main source materials for these soils.The Mid-lR,NIR,and VIS-NIR spectroscopic properties also yield distinct information on mineralogy,geochemistry,and maturity among the four soils.Knowledge of the mineralogy resulting from the Raman point-counting procedure corresponds well with bulk mineralogy and soil properties based on Mid-IR,NIR,and VIS-NIR spectroscopy.The future synergistic application of these spectroscopy methods on the Moon will provide a linkage between the results from in situ surface exploration and those from orbital remote- sensing observations.

  4. Conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic studies: didactic guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vet Henrica CW

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although guidelines for critical appraisal of diagnostic research and meta-analyses have already been published, these may be difficult to understand for clinical researchers or do not provide enough detailed information. Methods Development of guidelines based on a systematic review of the evidence in reports of systematic searches of the literature for diagnostic research, of methodological criteria to evaluate diagnostic research, of methods for statistical pooling of data on diagnostic accuracy, and of methods for exploring heterogeneity. Results Guidelines for conducting diagnostic systematic reviews are presented in a stepwise fashion and are followed by comments providing further information. Examples are given using the results of two systematic reviews on the accuracy of the urine dipstick in the diagnosis of urinary tract infections, and on the accuracy of the straight-leg-raising test in the diagnosis of intervertebral disc hernia.

  5. Electroconvulsive therapy during pregnancy: a systematic review of case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiknes, Kari Ann; Cooke, Mary Jennifer; Jarosch-von Schweder, Lindy; Harboe, Ingrid; Høie, Bjørg

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to explore practice, use, and risk of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in pregnancy. A systematic search was undertaken in the databases Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, SveMed and CINAHL (EBSCO). Only primary data-based studies reporting ECT undertaken during pregnancy were included. Two reviewers independently checked study titles and abstracts according to inclusion criteria and extracted detailed use, practice, and adverse effects data from full text retrieved articles. Studies and extracted data were sorted according to before and after year 1970, due to changes in ECT administration over time. A total of 67 case reports were included and studies from all continents represented. Altogether, 169 pregnant women were identified, treated during pregnancy with a mean number of 9.4 ECTs, at mean age of 29 years. Most women received ECT during the 2nd trimester and many were Para I. Main diagnostic indication in years 1970 to 2013 was Depression/Bipolar disorder (including psychotic depression). Missing data on fetus/child was 12 %. ECT parameter report was often sparse. Both bilateral and unilateral electrode placement was used and thiopental was the main anesthetic agent. Adverse events such as fetal heart rate reduction, uterine contractions, and premature labor (born between 29 and 37 gestation weeks) were reported for nearly one third (29 %). The overall child mortality rate was 7.1 %. Lethal outcomes for the fetus and/or baby had diverse associations. ECT during pregnancy is advised considered only as last resort treatment under very stringent diagnostic and clinical indications. Updated international guidelines are urgently needed. PMID:24271084

  6. Molecular Systematic Studies on Chinese Mandarina Silkworm (Bombyx mandarina M. ) and Domestic Silkworm (Bombyx mori L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Cheng; YU Hong-shi; XIANG Zhong-huai

    2002-01-01

    Molecular systematic studies on mandarina silkworm (Bombyx mandarina M. ) in 11 regions in China and 25 representative strains of domestic silkworm (Bombyx mori L. ) were conducted using molecular biology techniques. Results obtained from the analysis of DNA polymorphism and clustering of all the silkworm samples provide new evidence for the view that the domestic silkworm originated from the Chinese mandarina silkworm. On the basis of literature reviewing, a new hypothesis on the origin of the domestic silkworm was put forward. It was thought that the domestic silkworm was most probably domesticated from the Chinese mandarina silkworm of different ecotypes including monovoltinism, bivoitinism and multivoitinism; and that the domestic silkworm had the genetic background of monovoltinism, bivoltinism and multivoltinism at the very beginning of the domestication. The current strains of the domestic silkworm of different voltinism are the evolutionary results of thousands of years of rearing and artificial selections.

  7. Preventing childhood scalds within the home: Overview of systematic reviews and a systematic review of primary studies

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Kun; Wynn, Persephone M.; Miller, Philip; Hindmarch, Paul; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Young, Ben; Hayes, Mike; Kendrick, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To synthesise and evaluate the evidence of the effectiveness of interventions to prevent scalds in children. Methods: An overview of systematic reviews (SR) and a SR of primary studies were performed evaluating interventions to prevent scalds in children. A comprehensive literature search was conducted covering various resources up to October 2012. Experimental and controlled observational studies reporting scald injuries, safety practices and safety equipment use were included....

  8. Systematic study of plasma and serum proteins in the pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work has been carried out in the framework of the determination of the physiological constants of a normal pig. The aim was to study the serum and plasma proteins of this animal species, the ultimate object being to discover whether the qualitative and quantitative changes in these proteins can make a significant contribution to the establishment of a biological dosimetry for irradiated pigs. The serum and plasma from a normal pig were analyzed first by various simple electrophoretic methods and then by immuno-electrophoresis. As a result of the particular characteristics of pig serum we have gradually been led to make numerous modifications to the techniques used for human serums or for those of small laboratory animals. Much careful work and patience were required in order to obtain reproducible results. (authors)

  9. ScaleNet: A literature-based model of scale insect biology and systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are small herbivorous insects found in all continents except Antarctica. They are extremely invasive, and many species are serious agricultural pests. They are also emerging models for studies of the evolution of genetic systems, endosymbiosis, and plant-insect i...

  10. ScaleNet: a literature-based model of scale insect biology and systematics

    OpenAIRE

    García Morales, Mayrolin; Denno, Barbara D.; Miller, Douglass R.; Miller, Gary L.; Ben-Dov, Yair; Hardy, Nate B.

    2016-01-01

    Scale insects (Hemiptera: Coccoidea) are small herbivorous insects found on all continents except Antarctica. They are extremely invasive, and many species are serious agricultural pests. They are also emerging models for studies of the evolution of genetic systems, endosymbiosis and plant-insect interactions. ScaleNet was launched in 1995 to provide insect identifiers, pest managers, insect systematists, evolutionary biologists and ecologists efficient access to information about scale insec...

  11. Study of Myelin Basic Protein Associated with Pediatric Systematic Epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Sida; He Xin; Yang Yiyu; Zhu Huihua; He Dansha; Deng Weiyi

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the quantitative myelin basic protein (MBP) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum in pediatric systematic epilepsy (SEP), study the relation between SEP and MBP, and the possibility predicating'the injury of myelin and blood-brain barrier (BBB) from pediatric SEP. Background: While tactors induced destroy of cerebral and Myelin, MBP was released out into CSF to increase its concentration. On the other hand, the BBB was involved to make serum MBP increased. The related studies had confirmed these viewpoints above. The test for quantitative MBP was recognized as the specific biochemical index, which diagnose if there is or not organic injury of cerebral and myelin. There was few reports about the studies of quantitative MBP in CSF and serum of EP, not mention to those published in domestic pediatric academia. Methods: 47 cases were studied during one month after the SEP attack, whose MBP in serum were quantitatively and 31 inside in CSF were also tested by easy MBP-ELISA method; the quantitative MBP in serum of 30 control cases and 10 in CSF were tested, too. Results: MBP values in CSF and serum of SEP pediatric patients were 2.95±0.61 ng/ml and 3.17±0.53 ng/ml; whereas 1.41 ±0.19 ng/ml and 1.30±0.04 ng/ml in control group. Both mean valves of MBP in CSF and serum in study group were significantly higher than control group (either P< 0.01). Discussion: In general, electrophysiological evidences supported the issue that epileptic episode was originated from abnormal electrical activities of nervous cells. Pathological studies revealed degeneration and necrosis of nerve existed in temporal epileptic focus, where there was morphological change of myelin. This study showed MBP values in CSF and serum of SEEP, during one month after attack, increased significantly; suggested there was changed component of MBP, while SEP could not be controled. Those above indicated the destroy of myelin, increasing of BBB permeability that induced its

  12. Systematic studies of small scintillators for new sampling calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E P Jacosalem; S Iba; N Nakajima; H Ono; A L C Sanchez; A M Bacala; H Miyata; GLD Calorimeter Group

    2007-12-01

    A new sampling calorimeter using very thin scintillators and the multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC) has been proposed to produce better position resolution for the international linear collider (ILC) experiment. As part of this R & D study, small plastic scintillators of different sizes, thickness and wrapping reflectors are systematically studied. The scintillation light due to beta rays from a collimated 90Sr source are collected from the scintillator by wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber and converted into electrical signals at the PMT. The wrapped scintillator that gives the best light yield is determined by comparing the measured pulse height of each 10 × 40 × 2 mm strip scintillator covered with 3M reflective mirror film, teflon, white paint, black tape, gold, aluminum and white paint+teflon. The pulse height dependence on position, length and thickness of the 3M reflective mirror film and teflon wrapped scintillators are measured. Results show that the 3M radiant mirror film-wrapped scintillator has the greatest light yield with an average of 9.2 photoelectrons. It is observed that light yield slightly increases with scintillator length, but increases to about 100% when WLS fiber diameter is increased from 1.0 mm to 1.6 mm. The position dependence measurement along the strip scintillator showed the uniformity of light transmission from the sensor to the PMT. A dip across the strip is observed which is 40% of the maximum pulse height. The block type scintillator pulse height, on the other hand, is found to be almost proportional to scintillator thickness.

  13. Systematic study of shallow junction formation on germanium substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellings, Geert; Rosseel, Erik; Clarysse, Trudo;

    2011-01-01

    Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co-implanti......Published results on Ge junctions are benchmarked systematically using RS–XJ plots. The electrical activation level required to meet the ITRS targets is calculated. Additionally, new results are presented on shallow furnace-annealed B junctions and shallow laser-annealed As junctions. Co...

  14. 15N in biological nitrogen fixation studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography with 298 references on the use of the stable nitrogen isotope 15N in the research on the biological fixation of dinitrogen is presented. The literature pertaining to this bibliography covers the period from 1975 to the middle of 1985. (author)

  15. Conducting systematic reviews of diagnostic studies: didactic guidelines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devillé, W.L.; Buntinx, F.; Bouter, L.M.; Montori, V.M.; Vet, H.C.W. de; Windt, D.A.W.M. van der; Bezemer, P.D.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Although guidelines for critical appraisal of diagnostic research and meta-analyses have already been published, these may be difficult to understand for clinical researchers or do not provide enough detailed information. Methods: Development of guidelines based on a systematic review of

  16. Chemical approaches to studying stem cell biology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenlin Li; Kai Jiang; Wanguo Wei; Yan Shi; Sheng Ding

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells,including both pluripotent stem cells and multipotent somatic stem cells,hold great potential for interrogating the mechanisms of tissue development,homeostasis and pathology,and for treating numerous devastating diseases.Establishment of in vitro platforms to faithfully maintain and precisely manipulate stem cell fates is essential to understand the basic mechanisms of stem cell biology,and to translate stem cells into regenerative medicine.Chemical approaches have recently provided a number of small molecules that can be used to control cell selfrenewal,lineage differentiation,reprogramming and regeneration.These chemical modulators have been proven to be versatile tools for probing stem cell biology and manipulating cell fates toward desired outcomes.Ultimately,this strategy is promising to be a new frontier for drug development aimed at endogenous stem cell modulation.

  17. Response Rates in Studies of Couples Coping With Cancer : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagan, Meirav; Hagedoorn, Mariet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Recruiting couples for psychological studies can be challenging. This brief report is the first to examine the average couples' response rate and to systematically review the quality of reporting of couples' response rate in studies of couples coping with cancer. Method: A systematic revi

  18. Systematic study of Optical Feshbach Resonances in an ideal gas

    OpenAIRE

    Blatt, S.; Nicholson, T. L.; Bloom, B. J.; Williams, J.R.; J. W. Thomsen; P.S. Julienne; Ye, J.(Physics Department, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX, United States of America)

    2011-01-01

    Using a narrow intercombination line in alkaline earth atoms to mitigate large inelastic losses, we explore the Optical Feshbach Resonance (OFR) effect in an ultracold gas of bosonic $^{88}$Sr. A systematic measurement of three resonances allows precise determinations of the OFR strength and scaling law, in agreement with coupled-channels theory. Resonant enhancement of the complex scattering length leads to thermalization mediated by elastic and inelastic collisions in an otherwise ideal gas...

  19. Systematic study of the thermal diffusion in associated mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakov, P.; Wiegand, S.

    2008-01-01

    We performed systematic temperature and concentration dependent measurements of the Soret coefficient in different associated binary mixtures of water, deuterated water, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), methanol, ethanol, acetone, methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and propionaldehyde using the so-called thermal diffusion forced Rayleigh scattering method. For some of the associating binary mixtures such as ethanol/water, acetone/water, and DMSO/water, the concentration xw+/- at which the Soret coef...

  20. New advances in pollination biology and the studies in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Pollination biology is the study of the various biological features in relation to the event of pollen transfer. It is one of the central concerns of plant reproductive ecology and evolutionary biology. In this paper, we attempt to introduce the main advances and some new interests in pollination biology and make a brief review of the research work that has been done in China in recent years. We also give some insights into the study that we intend to carry out in this field in the future.

  1. PENGEMBANGAN BAHAN AJAR BIOLOGI SEL PADA PROGRAM STUDI PENDIDIKAN BIOLOGI UIN ALAUDDIN MAKASSAR

    OpenAIRE

    Muriati, St

    2015-01-01

    Learning in UIN Alauddin is still limited knowledge to students, while, one mission to improve the quality of educators Biology in terms of belief, moral and scientific attitudes have not been implemented. This is caused by a lack of learning resources that connects Biology Science and its relation to scientific Qur'an. Cell Biology as subjects that reveal about the phenomenon of the smallest unit of life, it can be studied with scientific Qur'an. Therefore, it is necessary to develop teachin...

  2. ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 15 March). ALOUD biological: Adult Learning Open University Determinants study - Association of biological determinants with study success in formal lifelong learners. Presentation given at the plenary meeting of Learning & Cognitio

  3. Performance of systematic and non-systematic ('opportunistic') screening mammography: a comparative study from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihrmann, Kristine; Jensen, Allan; Olsen, Anne Helene;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Evaluation and comparison of the performance of organized and opportunistic screening mammography. METHODS: Women attending screening mammography in Denmark in 2000. The study included 37,072 women attending organized screening. Among these, 320 women were diagnosed with breast cancer...

  4. A Systematic Study of the Relationship between RRDB and FRDB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shumei Tang; Qiusheng An

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, based on rough set theory and relational database, the relationship between rough relational database (RRDB) and fuzzy relational database (FRDB) is analyzed systematically from functional dependency, normal form and Armstrong axiom. The results show that both fuzzy functional dependency and rough functional dependency are the generalizations of classical functional dependency. Fuzzy normal form is the expansion of classical normal form while rough normal form is an independent system. RRDB and FRDB obey Armstrong axiom to some extent from the point of view of inference rule.

  5. Methotrexate monotherapy and methotrexate combination therapy with traditional and biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis: abridged Cochrane systematic review and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazlewood, Glen S; Barnabe, Cheryl; Tomlinson, George; Marshall, Deborah; Devoe, Dan; Bombardier, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare methotrexate based disease modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD) treatments for rheumatoid arthritis in patients naive to or with an inadequate response to methotrexate. Design Systematic review and Bayesian random effects network meta-analysis of trials assessing methotrexate used alone or in combination with other conventional synthetic DMARDs, biologic drugs, or tofacitinib in adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Data sources Trials were identified from Medline, Em...

  6. Molecular imaging with radionuclides, a powerful technique for studying biological processes in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisbani, E.; Cusanno, F.; Garibaldi, F.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.

    2007-02-01

    Our team is carrying on a systematic study devoted to the design of a SPECT detector with submillimeter resolution and adequate sensitivity (1 cps/kBq). Such system will be used for functional imaging of biological processes at molecular level in small animal. The system requirements have been defined by two relevant applications: study of atherosclerotic plaques characterization and stem cells diffusion and homing. In order to minimize costs and implementation time, the gamma detector will be based—as much as possible—on conventional components: scintillator crystal and position sensitive PhotoMultipliers read by individual channel electronics. A coded aperture collimator should be adapted to maximize the efficiency. The optimal selection of the detector components is investigated by systematic use of Monte-Carlo simulations (and laboratory validation tests); and finally preliminary results are presented and discussed here.

  7. Microbubble generation by piezotransducer for biological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Alkhazal, M.; Cho, M.; Xiao, S.

    2015-12-01

    Bubbles induced by blast waves or shocks are speculated to be the major cause of damages in biological cells in mild traumatic brain injuries. Microbubble collapse was found to induce noticeable cell detachment from the cell substrate, changes in focal adhesion and biomechanics. To better understand the bubble mechanism, we would like to construct a system, which allows us to clearly differentiate the impact of bubbles from that of shocks. Such a generator needs to be low profile in order to place under a microscope. A piezoelectric transducer system was designed to meet the need. The system uses either a flat or a spherical focusing piezoelectric transducer to produce microbubbles in a cuvette loaded with cell-culture medium. The transducer is placed on the side of the cuvette with its axis lining horizontally. A cover slip is placed on the top of the cuvette. The impact of the waves to the cells is minimized as the cover slip is parallel to the direction of the wave. Only bubbles from the medium reach the cover slip and interact with cells. The effect of bubbles therefore can be separated that of pressure waves. The bubbles collected on a cover slip range in size from 100 μm to 10 μm in radius, but the dominant size is 20-30 μm.

  8. Systematic meta-analyses of gene-specific genetic association studies in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiang; Wei, Dong; Zhang, Yaoguang; Chen, Xin; Yang, Fan; Yang, Ze; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Jianye

    2016-01-01

    In the past twenty-five years, over 700 case-control association studies on the risk of prostate cancer have been published worldwide, but their results were largely inconsistent. To facilitate following and explaining these findings, we performed a systematic meta-analysis using allelic contrasts for gene-specific SNVs from at least three independent population-based case-control studies, which were published in the field of prostate cancer between August 1, 1990 and August 1, 2015. Across 66 meta-analyses, a total of 20 genetic variants involving 584,100 subjects in 19 different genes (KLK3, IGFBP3, ESR1, SOD2, CAT, CYP1B1, VDR, RFX6, HNF1B, SRD5A2, FGFR4, LEP, HOXB13, FAS, FOXP4, SLC22A3, LMTK2, EHBP1 and MSMB) exhibited significant association with prostate cancer. The average summary OR was 1.33 (ranging from: 1.016–3.788) for risk alleles and 0.838 (ranging from: 0.757–0.896) for protective alleles. Of these positive variants, FOXP4 rs1983891, LMTK2 rs6465657 and RFX6 rs339331 had not been previously meta-analyzed. Further analyses with sufficient power design and investigations of the potential biological roles of these genetic variants in prostate cancer should be conducted. PMID:26967244

  9. Biological - Elwha River Dam Removal Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This study examines the ecosystem response of the Elwha River to the removal of the Elwha River dams. We will measure the following attributes of ecosystem...

  10. A systematic study of multiple minerals precipitation modelling in wastewater treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazadi Mbamba, Christian; Tait, Stephan; Flores-Alsina, Xavier;

    2015-01-01

    wastewater treatment models. The present study systematically tested a semi-mechanistic modelling approach, using various experimental platforms with multiple minerals precipitation. Experiments included dynamic titration with addition of sodium hydroxide to synthetic wastewater, and aeration...

  11. Systematic studies of tannin–formaldehyde aerogels: preparation and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelation of tannin–formaldehyde (TF) solutions was systematically investigated by changing pH and concentration of TF resin in water. In this way we constructed the TF phase diagram, from which chemical hydrogels could be described, and also synthesized thermoreversible tannin-based hydrogels. Conditions of non-gelation were also determined. Hydrogels were dried in supercritical CO2, leading to a broad range of TF aerogels. The latter were investigated for volume shrinkage, total porosity, micro-, meso- and macropore volumes, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area, microscopic texture, mechanical and thermal properties. All these properties are discussed in relation to each other, leading to an accurate and self-consistent description of these bioresource-based highly porous materials. The conditions for obtaining the highest BET surface area or mesopore volume were determined and explained in relation to the preparation conditions. The highest BET surface area, 880 m2 g−1, is remarkably high for organic aerogels derived from a natural resource. (paper)

  12. A study on the systematization of commodity classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tae, Jae Woong; Shin, Dong Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    International community is trying to prevent the spread of WMD (Weapons of Mass Destruction), especially nuclear weapons. These efforts result in the declaration of UNSC Resolution 1540 in 2004, which made export controls the international norms for all nations in the world. Korea enacted Foreign Trade Act in 1989 to adhere to the export control standards worldwide. Export control system in Korea consists of commodity classification system and export license system. The commodity classification system is used to identify strategic commodity. The Export License system is used to verify that exports have met the conditions required by the international export control system. NSG guidelines, the NSG handbook and Public Notice on Trade of Strategic Items are used to classify items and technology However, some items or technology in NSG guidelines should be especially designed or prepared (EDP). It is difficult to determine which items or technology is strategic commodity because EDP criteria are qualitative. NSG or participant states don't provide clear criteria to classify items and technology but recommend establishing standards autonomously. Hence the result of deliberation on the same items and technology may be different by reviewer's experience, knowledge and governmental policy. It causes confusion of reviewers and export companies In this research, commodity classification systematization by EDP criteria's clarification was performed to increase consistency and efficiency.

  13. A study on the systematization of commodity classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International community is trying to prevent the spread of WMD (Weapons of Mass Destruction), especially nuclear weapons. These efforts result in the declaration of UNSC Resolution 1540 in 2004, which made export controls the international norms for all nations in the world. Korea enacted Foreign Trade Act in 1989 to adhere to the export control standards worldwide. Export control system in Korea consists of commodity classification system and export license system. The commodity classification system is used to identify strategic commodity. The Export License system is used to verify that exports have met the conditions required by the international export control system. NSG guidelines, the NSG handbook and Public Notice on Trade of Strategic Items are used to classify items and technology However, some items or technology in NSG guidelines should be especially designed or prepared (EDP). It is difficult to determine which items or technology is strategic commodity because EDP criteria are qualitative. NSG or participant states don't provide clear criteria to classify items and technology but recommend establishing standards autonomously. Hence the result of deliberation on the same items and technology may be different by reviewer's experience, knowledge and governmental policy. It causes confusion of reviewers and export companies In this research, commodity classification systematization by EDP criteria's clarification was performed to increase consistency and efficiency

  14. Systematic studies of tannin-formaldehyde aerogels: preparation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Labat, Gisele; Szczurek, Andrzej; Fierro, Vanessa; Pizzi, Antonio; Celzard, Alain

    2013-02-01

    Gelation of tannin-formaldehyde (TF) solutions was systematically investigated by changing pH and concentration of TF resin in water. In this way we constructed the TF phase diagram, from which chemical hydrogels could be described, and also synthesized thermoreversible tannin-based hydrogels. Conditions of non-gelation were also determined. Hydrogels were dried in supercritical CO2, leading to a broad range of TF aerogels. The latter were investigated for volume shrinkage, total porosity, micro-, meso- and macropore volumes, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, microscopic texture, mechanical and thermal properties. All these properties are discussed in relation to each other, leading to an accurate and self-consistent description of these bioresource-based highly porous materials. The conditions for obtaining the highest BET surface area or mesopore volume were determined and explained in relation to the preparation conditions. The highest BET surface area, 880 m2 g-1, is remarkably high for organic aerogels derived from a natural resource.

  15. In Vivo Models to Study Chemokine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, F A; Boff, D; Teixeira, M M

    2016-01-01

    Chemokines are essential mediators of leukocyte movement in vivo. In vitro assays of leukocyte migration cannot mimic the complex interactions with other cell types and matrix needed for cells to extravasate and migrate into tissues. Therefore, in vivo strategies to study the effects and potential relevance of chemokines for the migration of particular leukocyte subsets are necessary. Here, we describe methods to study the effects and endogenous role of chemokine in mice. Advantages and pitfalls of particular models are discussed and we focus on description in model's joint and pleural cavity inflammation and the effects and relevance of CXCR2 and CCR2 ligands on cell migration.

  16. [Experimental studies on possible biological effects of ultrasonic diagnosis: ultrastructural analysis of rat embryo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, A; Lagalla, R; De Maria, M; Valentino, B; Laconi, A

    1985-01-01

    Within the limits of a systematic research on the biological effects of the ultrasounds, the authors refer on their personal experience on rat's embrions treated, for 120 seconds, with a ultrasonic beam having the common characteristics used in diagnostic investigations. The ultra-structural studies on the hepatic parenchyma substantially confirm the previous results obtained in the adult cavy, exposed for the same period of time, i.e. a diffuse cytoplasmic vacuolization and an unstable mitochondrial damage. Various suggestions are advanced on the particular sensibility that the mitocondria show because of the ultrasonic action. The authors explain the limits of their experimentation in this specific sector of the scientific research. PMID:3909243

  17. Nanometallomics: an emerging field studying the biological effects of metal-related nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Feng; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2014-02-01

    Metallomics, focusing on the global and systematic understanding of the metal uptake, trafficking, role and excretion in biological systems, has attracted more and more attention. Metal-related nanomaterials, including metallic and metal-containing nanomaterials, have unique properties compared to their micro-scaled counterparts and therefore require special attention. The small size effect, surface effect, and quantum size effect directly influence the physicochemical properties of nanostructured materials and their fate and behavior in biota. However, to our knowledge, the metallomics itself did not touch this special category of materials yet. Therefore, the term "nanometallomics" is proposed and the systematic study on the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion (ADME) behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in biological systems and their interactions with genes, proteins and other biomolecules will be reviewed. The ADME behavior of metal-related nanomaterials in the biological systems is influenced by their physicochemical properties, the exposure route, and the microenvironment of the deposition site. Nanomaterials may not only interact directly or indirectly with genes, proteins and other molecules to cause DNA damage, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and cytotoxicity, but also stimulate the immune responses, circumvent tumor resistance and inhibit tumor metastasis. Nanometallomics needs to be integrated with other omics sciences, such as genomics, proteomics and metabolomics, to explore the biomedical data and obtain the overall knowledge of underlying mechanisms, and therefore to improve the application performance and to reduce the potential risk of metal-related nanomaterials.

  18. Socio-structural influences on the work participation of refugees: an exploratory systematic mixed studies review

    OpenAIRE

    Mpofu, Elias; Stevens, Carol; Biggs, Herbert C.; Johnson, Ebonee T.

    2012-01-01

    This systematic mixed studies review aimed at synthesizing evidence from studies related to the influences on the work participation of people with refugee status (PWRS). The review focused on the role of proximal socio-structural barriers on work participation by PWRS while foregrounding related distal, intermediate, proximal, and meta-systemic influences. For the systematic search of the literature, we focused on databases that addressed work, well-being, and social policy in refugee popula...

  19. Developing a library of authenticated Traditional Chinese Medicinal (TCM) plants for systematic biological evaluation — Rationale, methods and preliminary results from a Sino-American collaboration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, David M.; Harris, Eric S.J.; Littlefield, Bruce A.; Cao, Shugeng; Craycroft, Jane A.; Scholten, Robert; Bayliss, Peter; Fu, Yanling; Wang, Wenquan; Qiao, Yanjiang; Zhao, Zhongzhen; Chen, Hubiao; Liu, Yong; Kaptchuk, Ted; Hahn, William C.; Wang, Xiaoxing; Roberts, Thomas; Shamu, Caroline E.; Clardy, Jon

    2011-01-01

    While the popularity of and expenditures for herbal therapies (aka “ethnomedicines”) have increased globally in recent years, their efficacy, safety, mechanisms of action, potential as novel therapeutic agents, cost-effectiveness, or lack thereof, remain poorly defined and controversial. Moreover, published clinical trials evaluating the efficacy of herbal therapies have rightfully been criticized, post hoc, for their lack of quality assurance and reproducibility of study materials, as well as a lack of demonstration of plausible mechanisms and dosing effects. In short, clinical botanical investigations have suffered from the lack of a cohesive research strategy which draws on the expertise of all relevant specialties. With this as background, US and Chinese co-investigators with expertise in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), botany, chemistry and drug discovery, have jointly established a prototype library consisting of 202 authenticated medicinal plant and fungal species that collectively represent the therapeutic content of the majority of all commonly prescribed TCM herbal prescriptions. Currently housed at Harvard University, the library consists of duplicate or triplicate kilogram quantities of each authenticated and processed species, as well as “detanninized” extracts and sub-fractions of each mother extract. Each species has been collected at 2–3 sites, each separated geographically by hundreds of miles, with precise GPS documentation, and authenticated visually and chemically prior to testing for heavy metals and/or pesticides contamination. An explicit decision process has been developed whereby samples with the least contamination were selected to undergo ethanol extraction and HPLC sub-fractionation in preparation for high throughput screening across a broad array of biological targets including cancer biology targets. As envisioned, the subfractions in this artisan collection of authenticated medicinal plants will be tested for biological

  20. Systematic Review of Breast Cancer Biology in Developing Countries (Part 1): Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhikoo, Riyaz, E-mail: riyazbhikoo@gmail.com; Srinivasa, Sanket; Yu, Tzu-Chieh [Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand); Moss, David [Department of Surgery, Middlemore Hospital, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand); Hill, Andrew G [Department of Surgery, South Auckland Clinical School, University of Auckland, Auckland 1640 (New Zealand)

    2011-05-13

    There has been no systematic appraisal of ethnicity-based variations in breast cancer (BC) biology amongst women from developing countries. A qualitative systematic review was conducted of breast cancer size, stage, grade, histological type, extra-mammary involvement, hormone receptor status as well as patient demographics. This review includes patients from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. BC in these regions present at an earlier age with large aggressive tumours. Distant metastases are frequently present at the time of diagnosis. African women have a higher frequency of triple negative tumours. Over half of Middle Eastern women have lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Despite experiencing a lower incidence compared to the Ashkenazi Jewish population, Palestinian women have poorer five-year survival outcomes. The majority of women from Mexico and South America have stage two or three disease whilst over sixty percent of women from Eastern Europe have either stage one or stage two disease. The biological characteristics of BC in the Caribbean cannot be fully assessed due to a paucity of data from the region. BC amongst the developing world is characterised by an early peak age of onset with aggressive biological characteristics. Strategies that improve breast cancer awareness, address amenable risk factors and improve early detection are essential.

  1. Systematic Review of Breast Cancer Biology in Developing Countries (Part 1: Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Hill

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been no systematic appraisal of ethnicity-based variations in breast cancer (BC biology amongst women from developing countries. A qualitative systematic review was conducted of breast cancer size, stage, grade, histological type, extra-mammary involvement, hormone receptor status as well as patient demographics. This review includes patients from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. BC in these regions present at an earlier age with large aggressive tumours. Distant metastases are frequently present at the time of diagnosis. African women have a higher frequency of triple negative tumours. Over half of Middle Eastern women have lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Despite experiencing a lower incidence compared to the Ashkenazi Jewish population, Palestinian women have poorer five-year survival outcomes. The majority of women from Mexico and South America have stage two or three disease whilst over sixty percent of women from Eastern Europe have either stage one or stage two disease. The biological characteristics of BC in the Caribbean cannot be fully assessed due to a paucity of data from the region. BC amongst the developing world is characterised by an early peak age of onset with aggressive biological characteristics. Strategies that improve breast cancer awareness, address amenable risk factors and improve early detection are essential.

  2. Systematic Review of Breast Cancer Biology in Developing Countries (Part 1): Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been no systematic appraisal of ethnicity-based variations in breast cancer (BC) biology amongst women from developing countries. A qualitative systematic review was conducted of breast cancer size, stage, grade, histological type, extra-mammary involvement, hormone receptor status as well as patient demographics. This review includes patients from Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, Mexico, the Caribbean and South America. BC in these regions present at an earlier age with large aggressive tumours. Distant metastases are frequently present at the time of diagnosis. African women have a higher frequency of triple negative tumours. Over half of Middle Eastern women have lymph node involvement at the time of diagnosis. Despite experiencing a lower incidence compared to the Ashkenazi Jewish population, Palestinian women have poorer five-year survival outcomes. The majority of women from Mexico and South America have stage two or three disease whilst over sixty percent of women from Eastern Europe have either stage one or stage two disease. The biological characteristics of BC in the Caribbean cannot be fully assessed due to a paucity of data from the region. BC amongst the developing world is characterised by an early peak age of onset with aggressive biological characteristics. Strategies that improve breast cancer awareness, address amenable risk factors and improve early detection are essential

  3. Systematic metabolite annotation and identification in complex biological extracts : combining robust mass spectrometry fragmentation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, van der J.J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the chemical content of organisms, organs, tissues, and cells is needed to fully characterize complex biological systems. The high chemical variety of compounds present in biological systems is illustrated by the presence of a large variety of compounds, ranging from apolar lip

  4. Selective reporting bias of harm outcomes within studies: findings from a cohort of systematic reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Pooja; Loke, Yoon K; Gamble, Carrol; Altman, Douglas G; Williamson, Paula R

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent and nature of selective non-reporting of harm outcomes in clinical studies that were eligible for inclusion in a cohort of systematic reviews. Design Cohort study of systematic reviews from two databases. Setting Outcome reporting bias in trials for harm outcomes (ORBIT II) in systematic reviews from the Cochrane Library and a separate cohort of systematic reviews of adverse events. Participants 92 systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials and non-randomised studies published in the Cochrane Library between issue 9, 2012 and issue 2, 2013 (Cochrane cohort) and 230 systematic reviews published between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2011 in other publications, synthesising data on harm outcomes (adverse event cohort). Methods A 13 point classification system for missing outcome data on harm was developed and applied to the studies. Results 86% (79/92) of reviews in the Cochrane cohort did not include full data from the main harm outcome of interest of each review for all of the eligible studies included within that review; 76% (173/230) for the adverse event cohort. Overall, the single primary harm outcome was inadequately reported in 76% (705/931) of the studies included in the 92 reviews from the Cochrane cohort and not reported in 47% (4159/8837) of the 230 reviews in the adverse event cohort. In a sample of primary studies not reporting on the single primary harm outcome in the review, scrutiny of the study publication revealed that outcome reporting bias was suspected in nearly two thirds (63%, 248/393). Conclusions The number of reviews suspected of outcome reporting bias as a result of missing or partially reported harm related outcomes from at least one eligible study is high. The declaration of important harms and the quality of the reporting of harm outcomes must be improved in both primary studies and systematic reviews. PMID:25416499

  5. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Se Hyeuk; Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Bun Y.;

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored...... thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid...... structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-atocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid...

  6. Eurythmy Therapy in clinical studies: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majorek Magdalena

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to overview the current literature on eurythmy therapy (EYT which is an integral part of Anthroposophic Medicine. EYT can be described as a movement therapy in which speech movements are transposed into exercises which address the patient's capability to soul expression and strengthen his salutogenetic resources. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline for case-control studies, cohort studies and randomised controlled trials on the treatment effects of EYT in a clinical setting. In a second search we included journal databases from Karger, Kluwer, Springer, Thieme, and Merkurstab archive. Results We found 8 citations which met the inclusion criterion: 4 publications referring to a prospective cohort study without control group (the AMOS study, and 4 articles referring to 2 explorative pre-post studies without control group, 1 prospective, non-randomized comparative study, and 1 descriptive study with a control group. The methodological quality of studies ranged in from poor to good, and in sample size from 5 to 898 patients. In most studies, EYT was used as an add-on, not as a mono-therapy. The studies described positive treatment effects with clinically relevant effect sizes in most cases. Conclusion Indications, study designs and the usage of additional treatments within the identified studies were quite heterogeneous. Despite of this, EYT can be regarded as a potentially relevant add-on in a therapeutic concept, although its specific relevance remains to be clarified. Well performed controlled studies on this unique treatment are highly recommended.

  7. The Current Status of Usability Studies of Information Technologies in China: A Systematic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Lei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To systematically review and analyze the current status and characteristics of usability studies in China in the field of information technology in general and in the field of healthcare in particular. Methods. We performed a quantitative literature analysis in three major Chinese academic databases and one English language database using Chinese search terms equivalent to the concept of usability. Results. Six hundred forty-seven publications were selected for analysis. We found that in China the literature on usability in the field of information technology began in 1994 and increased thereafter. The usability definitions from ISO 9241-11:1998 and Nielsen (1993 have been widely recognized and cited. Authors who have published several publications are rare. Fourteen journals have a publishing rate over 1%. Only nine publications about HIT were identified. Discussions. China’s usability research started relatively late. There is a lack of organized research teams and dedicated usability journals. High-impact theoretical studies are scarce. On the application side, no original and systematic research frameworks have been developed. The understanding and definition of usability is not well synchronized with international norms. Besides, usability research in HIT is rare. Conclusions. More human and material resources need to be invested in China’s usability research, particularly in HIT.

  8. Directing experimental biology: a case study in mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Hibbs

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational approaches have promised to organize collections of functional genomics data into testable predictions of gene and protein involvement in biological processes and pathways. However, few such predictions have been experimentally validated on a large scale, leaving many bioinformatic methods unproven and underutilized in the biology community. Further, it remains unclear what biological concerns should be taken into account when using computational methods to drive real-world experimental efforts. To investigate these concerns and to establish the utility of computational predictions of gene function, we experimentally tested hundreds of predictions generated from an ensemble of three complementary methods for the process of mitochondrial organization and biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The biological data with respect to the mitochondria are presented in a companion manuscript published in PLoS Genetics (doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000407. Here we analyze and explore the results of this study that are broadly applicable for computationalists applying gene function prediction techniques, including a new experimental comparison with 48 genes representing the genomic background. Our study leads to several conclusions that are important to consider when driving laboratory investigations using computational prediction approaches. While most genes in yeast are already known to participate in at least one biological process, we confirm that genes with known functions can still be strong candidates for annotation of additional gene functions. We find that different analysis techniques and different underlying data can both greatly affect the types of functional predictions produced by computational methods. This diversity allows an ensemble of techniques to substantially broaden the biological scope and breadth of predictions. We also find that performing prediction and validation steps iteratively allows us to more completely

  9. Disorganized Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses: Time to Systematize the Conduct and Publication of These Study Overviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Riaz, Haris; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The number of meta-analyses published annually has increased more than 20-fold between 1994 (n = 386) and 2014 (n = 8203). In examining how much of this increase in meta-analysis publication has genuinely represented novel contributions to clinical medicine and public health, it became clear that there was an abundance of redundant and disorganized meta-analyses, creating confusion and generating considerable debate. Ironically, meta-analyses, which should prevent redundant research, have become a victim of it. Recently, 17 meta-analyses were published based on the results of only 3 randomized controlled trials that studied the role of transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for prevention of cryptogenic stroke. In our search of the published literature, we identified at least 10 topics that were the subject of 10 meta-analyses. In the context of overlapping meta-analyses, one questions what needs to be done to put this "runaway train" back on track. In this review we examine the practice of redundant meta-analyses and the reasons for its disturbing "popularity." The registration of systematic reviews should be mandatory in prospective registries, such as PROSPERO, and the PRISMA checklist should be updated to incorporate new evidence and mandate the reference of previously published reviews and rationale for any new study. PMID:26522792

  10. Disorganized Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses: Time to Systematize the Conduct and Publication of These Study Overviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Riaz, Haris; Goldberg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    The number of meta-analyses published annually has increased more than 20-fold between 1994 (n = 386) and 2014 (n = 8203). In examining how much of this increase in meta-analysis publication has genuinely represented novel contributions to clinical medicine and public health, it became clear that there was an abundance of redundant and disorganized meta-analyses, creating confusion and generating considerable debate. Ironically, meta-analyses, which should prevent redundant research, have become a victim of it. Recently, 17 meta-analyses were published based on the results of only 3 randomized controlled trials that studied the role of transcatheter closure of patent foramen ovale for prevention of cryptogenic stroke. In our search of the published literature, we identified at least 10 topics that were the subject of 10 meta-analyses. In the context of overlapping meta-analyses, one questions what needs to be done to put this "runaway train" back on track. In this review we examine the practice of redundant meta-analyses and the reasons for its disturbing "popularity." The registration of systematic reviews should be mandatory in prospective registries, such as PROSPERO, and the PRISMA checklist should be updated to incorporate new evidence and mandate the reference of previously published reviews and rationale for any new study.

  11. Eurythmy Therapy in clinical studies: a systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Majorek Magdalena; Ostermann Thomas; Büssing Arndt; Matthiessen Peter F

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background We aimed to overview the current literature on eurythmy therapy (EYT) which is an integral part of Anthroposophic Medicine. EYT can be described as a movement therapy in which speech movements are transposed into exercises which address the patient's capability to soul expression and strengthen his salutogenetic resources. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline for case-control studies, cohort studies and ran...

  12. A systematic review of methods for studying consumer health YouTube videos, with implications for systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Margaret; Cumber, Jordi; Li, Claudia; Pound, Catherine M; Fuller, Ann; Harrison, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Background. YouTube is an increasingly important medium for consumer health information - with content provided by healthcare professionals, government and non-government organizations, industry, and consumers themselves. It is a rapidly developing area of study for healthcare researchers. We examine the methods used in reviews of YouTube consumer health videos to identify trends and best practices. Methods and Materials. Published reviews of consumer-oriented health-related YouTube videos were identified through PubMed. Data extracted from these studies included type of journal, topic, characteristics of the search, methods of review including number of reviewers and method to achieve consensus between reviewers, inclusion and exclusion criteria, characteristics of the videos reported, ethical oversight, and follow-up. Results. Thirty-three studies were identified. Most were recent and published in specialty journals. Typically, these included more than 100 videos, and were examined by multiple reviewers. Most studies described characteristics of the videos, number of views, and sometime characteristics of the viewers. Accuracy of portrayal of the health issue under consideration was a common focus. Conclusion. Optimal transparency and reproducibility of studies of YouTube health-related videos can be achieved by following guidance designed for systematic review reporting, with attention to several elements specific to the video medium. Particularly when seeking to replicate consumer viewing behavior, investigators should consider the method used to select search terms, and use a snowballing rather than a sequential screening approach. Discontinuation protocols for online screening of relevance ranked search results is an area identified for further development.

  13. Psychological and biological foundations of time preference : evidence from a day reconstruction study with biological tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Michael; Delaney, Liam; Harmon, Colm

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the relationship between the economic concept of time preference and relevant concepts from psychology and biology. Using novel data from a time diary study conducted in Ireland that combined detailed psychometric testing with medical testing and real-time bio-tracking, we examine the distribution of a number of psychometric measures linked to the economic concept of time preferences and test the extent to which these measures form coherent clusters and the degree to whic...

  14. Quality Assessment of Studies Published in Open Access and Subscription Journals: Results of a Systematic Evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pastorino

    Full Text Available Along with the proliferation of Open Access (OA publishing, the interest for comparing the scientific quality of studies published in OA journals versus subscription journals has also increased. With our study we aimed to compare the methodological quality and the quality of reporting of primary epidemiological studies and systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in OA and non-OA journals.In order to identify the studies to appraise, we listed all OA and non-OA journals which published in 2013 at least one primary epidemiologic study (case-control or cohort study design, and at least one systematic review or meta-analysis in the field of oncology. For the appraisal, we picked up the first studies published in 2013 with case-control or cohort study design from OA journals (Group A; n = 12, and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group B; n = 26; the first systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in 2013 from OA journals (Group C; n = 15, and in the same time period from non-OA journals (Group D; n = 32. We evaluated the methodological quality of studies by assessing the compliance of case-control and cohort studies to Newcastle and Ottawa Scale (NOS scale, and the compliance of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR scale. The quality of reporting was assessed considering the adherence of case-control and cohort studies to STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology (STROBE checklist, and the adherence of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA checklist.Among case-control and cohort studies published in OA and non-OA journals, we did not observe significant differences in the median value of NOS score (Group A: 7 (IQR 7-8 versus Group B: 8 (7-9; p = 0.5 and in the adherence to STROBE checklist (Group A, 75% versus Group B, 80%; p = 0.1. The results did not change after

  15. Genetic association studies of methamphetamine use disorders: A systematic review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousman, Chad A; Glatt, Stephen J; Everall, Ian P; Tsuang, Ming T

    2009-12-01

    Efforts to understand the biological processes that increase susceptibility to methamphetamine (METH) use disorders (i.e., abuse, dependence, and psychosis) have uncovered several putative genotypic variants. However, to date a synthesis of this information has not been conducted. Thus, systematic searches of the current literature were undertaken for genetic-association studies of METH use disorders. Each gene's chromosomal location, function, and examined polymorphic markers were extracted. Frequencies, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for risk alleles, as well as sample size and power, were calculated. We uncovered 38 studies examining 39 genes, of which 18 were found to have a significant genotypic, allelic, and/or haplotypic association with METH use disorders. Three genes (COMT, DRD4, and GABRA1) were associated with METH abuse, nine (ARRB2, BDNF, CYP2D6, GLYT1, GSTM1, GSTP1, PDYN, PICK1, and SLC22A3) with METH dependence, two (AKT1 and GABRG2) with METH abuse/dependence, and four (DTNBP1, OPRM1, SNCA, and SOD2) with METH psychosis. Limitations related to phenotypic classification, statistical power, and potential publication bias in the current literature were noted. Similar to other behavioral, psychiatric, and substance use disorders, the genetic epidemiology of METH use disorders is complex and likely polygenic. National and international collaborative efforts are needed to increase the availability of large population-based samples and improve upon the power to detect genetic associations of small magnitude. Further, replication of the findings reviewed here along with further development of more rigorous methodologies and reporting protocols will aid in delineating the complex genetic epidemiology of METH use disorders. PMID:19219857

  16. Systematic study of Grodzins product rule (GPR) with P - factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of shape phase transition of atomic nuclei has been an ongoing and active issue in study of nuclear structure for over decades. The understanding of p-n interaction for the evolution of structure in atomic nuclei plays a major role. The first discussion regarding the p-n interaction was given by Goldhaber and Shalit. Grodzins demonstrated a close relationship between the energy of first excited state E(2-1+) and transition probabilities from the first 2+states of even-even nuclei

  17. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  18. Rules: A Systematic Study. (Janua Linguarum Series Minor 96.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Joan Safran

    Rules in this study are limited to linguistic entities which are said to have truth value, to be followable and prescriptive, to have been adopted and remain in force until unadopted, and to be conditional. The concern is with the nominal referential use of rules rather than their verbal use. The book is divided into four sections. The first…

  19. The Systematic Study of the Organotransition Metal Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriedo, Gabino A.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is an extension of the conventional method for studying the organometallic chemistry of transition metals that may be useful to show how the various existing types of low-valence complexes can be constructed. This method allows students to design new types of complexes that may still be nonexistent. (CW)

  20. A Systematic Study on Scaling Law of Spiral Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShufengBAI; QiOUYANG

    1999-01-01

    The study of spiral waves in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction has generated fruitful results since the invention of the open spatial reactor.However,some theories are only unsubstantiated and need additional verifications.Our experimental results give a new scaling law of simple and quasi-periodic spiral waves,providing corroborations for some theories and challenge some others.

  1. A Preliminary Study of the Microbial Resources and Their Biological Activities of the East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Lu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available East China Sea is one of the four sea areas in China, which possesses peculiar ecological environment and many kinds of living creatures, especially the microorganisms. We established the East China Sea microorganism library (during 2006–2010 for the first time, which stored about 30000 strains that covered most kinds of the species. In this paper, 395 pure strains of East China Sea microorganism library which belong to 33 different genera were mainly introduced. Sulfitobacter, Halomonas, Bacillus, Pseudoalteromonas, and Idiomarina were the most dominant species. On the large-scale biological activity screening of the 395 strains, 100 strains possess different biological activities based on different screening models, of which 11.4% strains have antibacterial activities, 15.9% have cytotoxicity activities, and 6.1% have antioxidation activities. Besides, the secondary metabolites of 6 strains with strong biological activities were studied systematically; diketopiperazines and macrocyclic lactones are the active secondary metabolites. The species and the biological activity of microorganisms diversity, the abundant structure type of the secondary metabolites, and their bioactivities all indicate that East China Sea is a potent marine microorganisms-derived developing resource for drug discovery.

  2. Vertical Test Reuse for Embedded Systems: A Systematic Mapping Study

    OpenAIRE

    Flemström, Daniel; Sundmark, Daniel; Afzal, Wasif

    2015-01-01

    Abstract —Vertical test reuse refers to the the reuse of test cases or other test artifacts over different integration levels in the software or system engineering process. Vertical test reuse has previously been proposed for reducing test effort and improving test effectiveness, particularly for embedded system development. The goal of this study is to provide an overview of the state of the art in the field of vertical test reuse for e...

  3. Advances in the study of the systematics of Actinidia Lindley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwei LI; Jianqiang LI; Djaja Djendoel SOEJARTO

    2009-01-01

    Actinidia (Actinidiaceae) is of economic importance for its edible fruits.Traditional taxonomy divided the genus into four sections,Leiocarpae Dunn,Maculatae Dunn,Strigosae Li,and Stellatae Li.However,phylogenetic studies based on morphology and molecular markers have posed challenges to the four-section scheme.It appears that the natural classification of the genus points to the existence of two groups,one comprising Leiocarpae,and the other Maculatae,Strigosae,and Stellatae.Single- or low-copy genes would probably be useful in untangling the perplexity andthe reticulate evolution of the genus.However,any phylogenetic studies must be firmly based on sound taxonomy and identification.Population sampling throughout the distribution range of the taxa should be carried out in order to study the variation pattern of the morphology and,ultimately,to clarify the confusion existing in some taxa.A combination of morphometrics and molecular data is highly desirable for resolving the uncertainty in Actinidia taxonomy.

  4. The Use and Reporting of the Cross-Over Study Design in Clinical Trials and Systematic Reviews: A Systematic Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambleton, Ian; Dwan, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Background Systematic reviews of treatment interventions in stable or chronic conditions often require the synthesis of clinical trials with a cross-over design. Previous work has indicated that methodology for analysing cross-over data is inadequate in trial reports and in systematic reviews assessing trials with this design. Objective We assessed systematic review methodology for synthesising cross-over trials among Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group reviews published to July 2015, and assessed the quality of reporting among the cross-over trials included in these reviews. Methodology We performed data extraction of methodology and reporting in reviews, trials identified and trials included within reviews. Principal Findings We reviewed a total of 142 Cochrane systematic reviews including 53 reviews which synthesised evidence from 218 cross-over trials. Thirty-three (63%) Cochrane reviews described a clear and appropriate method for the inclusion of cross-over data, and of these 19 (56%) used the same method to analyse results. 145 cross-over trials were described narratively or treated as parallel trials in reviews but in 30 (21%) of these trials data existed in the trial reports to account for the cross-over design. At the trial level, the analysis and presentation of results were often inappropriate or unclear, with only 69 (32%) trials presenting results that could be included in meta-analysis. Conclusions Despite development of accessible, technical guidance and training for Cochrane systematic reviewers, statistical analysis and reporting of cross-over data is inadequate at both the systematic review and the trial level. Plain language and practical guidance for the inclusion of cross-over data in meta-analysis would benefit systematic reviewers, who come from a wide range of health specialties. Minimum reporting standards for cross-over trials are needed. PMID:27409076

  5. The Use and Reporting of the Cross-Over Study Design in Clinical Trials and Systematic Reviews: A Systematic Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jane Nolan

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews of treatment interventions in stable or chronic conditions often require the synthesis of clinical trials with a cross-over design. Previous work has indicated that methodology for analysing cross-over data is inadequate in trial reports and in systematic reviews assessing trials with this design.We assessed systematic review methodology for synthesising cross-over trials among Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group reviews published to July 2015, and assessed the quality of reporting among the cross-over trials included in these reviews.We performed data extraction of methodology and reporting in reviews, trials identified and trials included within reviews.We reviewed a total of 142 Cochrane systematic reviews including 53 reviews which synthesised evidence from 218 cross-over trials. Thirty-three (63% Cochrane reviews described a clear and appropriate method for the inclusion of cross-over data, and of these 19 (56% used the same method to analyse results. 145 cross-over trials were described narratively or treated as parallel trials in reviews but in 30 (21% of these trials data existed in the trial reports to account for the cross-over design. At the trial level, the analysis and presentation of results were often inappropriate or unclear, with only 69 (32% trials presenting results that could be included in meta-analysis.Despite development of accessible, technical guidance and training for Cochrane systematic reviewers, statistical analysis and reporting of cross-over data is inadequate at both the systematic review and the trial level. Plain language and practical guidance for the inclusion of cross-over data in meta-analysis would benefit systematic reviewers, who come from a wide range of health specialties. Minimum reporting standards for cross-over trials are needed.

  6. Systematic study on the preparation of BSA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galisteo-González, F; Molina-Bolívar, J A

    2014-11-01

    Albumins, in the form of nanoparticles, are increasingly used as drug carriers in the medical field, and the size effect of these nanomaterials is of major importance since it may affect their bioavailability and the in vivo behaviour after intravenous injection. This research provides a comprehensive study on the preparation of BSA nanoparticles, based on a simple coacervation method, with suitable size, size distribution, and surface charge for drug-delivery applications. Numerous experimental variables were examined in order to characterize their impact on nanoparticle size, distribution, electrophoretic mobility, and yield. Particle size was controlled by adjusting self-assembly phenomena of the protein molecules, which was affected by preparation conditions including BSA content, pH, and ionic strength (a parameter that strongly influences nanoparticle formation but surprisingly has not been previously studied in detail). Small particles with a narrow size distribution were obtained under experimental conditions where the repulsion between BSA molecules was high, i.e. at pH values far from the isoelectric point of the protein and low salt concentration. Changes in temperature, volume, and rate of addition of the dehydrating agent (ethanol) also affect nanoparticle characteristics, as they influence the nucleation rate and particle growth. The effect of these experimental conditions on the quantity of protein still dissolved in the aqueous phase after desolvation (i.e. the yield of BSA nanoparticles) was also studied. Nanoparticles surface charge was modulated with the extension of cross-linking. Finally, long-term colloidal stability of samples was evaluated after 2 months of storage.

  7. A systematic study of binaural reproduction systems through loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacouture Parodi, Yesenia

    This Ph.D. thesis presents an investigation of the acoustical and psycho-acoustical characteristics of binaural reproduction systems through loudspeakers. The study was mainly focused on the characteristics of closely spaced loudspeakers – known as stereo-dipoles – when placed at different positi......, on pair behind and one pair above the listener. Experimental results show that a reduction of front-back confusions is obtained with the proposed system. Yet, coloration differences between loudspeaker pairs result in a degradation of the localization performance....

  8. Systematic study of infrared energy corrections in truncated oscillator spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arzhanov, Alexander; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We study the convergence properties of nuclear binding energies and two-neutron separation energies obtained with self-consistent mean-field calculations based on the Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov (HFB) method with Gogny-type effective interactions. Owing to lack of convergence in a truncated working basis, we employ and benchmark one of the recently proposed infrared energy correction techniques to extrapolate our results to the limit of an infinite model space. We also discuss its applicability to global calculations of nuclear masses.

  9. Disagreement in primary study selection between systematic reviews on negative pressure wound therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauerland Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary study selection between systematic reviews is inconsistent, and reviews on the same topic may reach different conclusions. Our main objective was to compare systematic reviews on negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT regarding their agreement in primary study selection. Methods This retrospective analysis was conducted within the framework of a systematic review (a full review and a subsequent rapid report on NPWT prepared by the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG. For the IQWiG review and rapid report, 4 bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, and CINAHL were searched to identify systematic reviews and primary studies on NPWT versus conventional wound therapy in patients with acute or chronic wounds. All databases were searched from inception to December 2006. For the present analysis, reviews on NPWT were classified as eligible systematic reviews if multiple sources were systematically searched and the search strategy was documented. To ensure comparability between reviews, only reviews published in or after December 2004 and only studies published before June 2004 were considered. Eligible reviews were compared in respect of the methodology applied and the selection of primary studies. Results A total of 5 systematic reviews (including the IQWiG review and 16 primary studies were analysed. The reviews included between 4 and 13 primary studies published before June 2004. Two reviews considered only randomised controlled trials (RCTs. Three reviews considered both RCTs and non-RCTs. The overall agreement in study selection between reviews was 96% for RCTs (24 of 25 options and 57% for non-RCTs (12 of 21 options. Due to considerable disagreement in the citation and selection of non-RCTs, we contacted the review authors for clarification (this was not initially planned; all authors or institutions responded. According to published information and the additional

  10. Sleep and multisystem biological risk: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith E Carroll

    Full Text Available Short sleep and poor sleep quality are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and mortality. This study examines the contribution of sleep duration and sleep quality on a multisystem biological risk index that is known to be associated with morbidity and mortality.Analyses include a population-based sample from the Midlife Development in the United States survey recruited to the Biomarker substudy. A total of 1,023 participants aged 54.5 years (SD = 11.8, 56% female and 77.6% white, were included in the analyses. A multisystem biological risk index was derived from 22 biomarkers capturing cardiovascular, immune, lipid-metabolic, glucose-metabolic, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal systems. Self-reported average sleep duration was categorized as short (5 sleep.Linear mixed effect models adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, BMI, and health status were performed. As compared to normal sleepers, multisystem biological risk in both short (B(SE = .38(.15, p<.01 and long sleepers (B(SE = .28(.11, p<.01 were elevated. Poor quality sleep alone was associated with elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE = .15(.06, p = .01, but was not significant after adjustment for health status. All short sleepers reported poor sleep quality. However in the long sleepers, only those who reported poor sleep quality exhibited elevated multisystem biological risk (B(SE = .93(.3, p = .002.Self-reported poor sleep quality with either short or long sleep duration is associated with dysregulation in physiological set points across regulatory systems, leading to elevated multisystem biological risk. Physicians should inquire about sleep health in the assessment of lifestyle factors related to disease risk, with evidence that healthy sleep is associated with lower multisystem biological risk.

  11. Systematic studies of Niv transitions of astrophysical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E1, M2, M1, and E2 rates of transitions between n=2 levels of Niv have been calculated using the two independent codes CIV3 and MCHF. Convergence of each of the approaches has been studied and comparisons made as the complexity of the calculations increases to include valence, core-valence and core-core correlation. The agreement between the two methods is sufficiently good to allow us to set quite narrow uncertainty bars. For the 1S endash 1P0 resonance line, our recommended f-value is 0.609 with an estimated uncertainty of 0.002, while our recommended A-value for the 1S0 endash 3P01 intercombination line is 580 s-1 with an estimated uncertainty of 10 s-1. copyright 1995 The American Astronomical Society

  12. Systematic Study of the Boundary Composition in Poisson Boltzmann Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kar, P; Hansmann, U H E; Hoefinger, S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a three-stage procedure to analyze the dependence of Poisson Boltzmann calculations on the shape, size and geometry of the boundary between solute and solvent. Our study is carried out within the boundary element formalism, but our results are also of interest to finite difference techniques of Poisson Boltzmann calculations. At first, we identify the critical size of the geometrical elements for discretizing the boundary, and thus the necessary resolution required to establish numerical convergence. In the following two steps we perform reference calculations on a set of dipeptides in different conformations using the Polarizable Continuum Model and a high-level Density Functional as well as a high-quality basis set. Afterwards, we propose a mechanism for defining appropriate boundary geometries. Finally, we compare the classic Poisson Boltzmann description with the Quantum Chemical description, and aim at finding appropriate fitting parameters to get a close match to the reference data. Surprisi...

  13. Systematic analytical characterization of new psychoactive substances: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo Vicente, Joana; Chassaigne, Hubert; Holland, Margaret V; Reniero, Fabiano; Kolář, Kamil; Tirendi, Salvatore; Vandecasteele, Ine; Vinckier, Inge; Guillou, Claude

    2016-08-01

    New psychoactive substances (NPS) are synthesized compounds that are not usually covered by European and/or international laws. With a slight alteration in the chemical structure of existing illegal substances registered in the European Union (EU), these NPS circumvent existing controls and are thus referred to as "legal highs". They are becoming increasingly available and can easily be purchased through both the internet and other means (smart shops). Thus, it is essential that the identification of NPS keeps up with this rapidly evolving market. In this case study, the Belgian Customs authorities apprehended a parcel, originating from China, containing two samples, declared as being "white pigments". For routine identification, the Belgian Customs Laboratory first analysed both samples by gas-chromatography mass-spectrometry and Fourier-Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The information obtained by these techniques is essential and can give an indication of the chemical structure of an unknown substance but not the complete identification of its structure. To bridge this gap, scientific and technical support is ensured by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) to the European Commission Directorate General for Taxation and Customs Unions (DG TAXUD) and the Customs Laboratory European Network (CLEN) through an Administrative Arrangement for fast recognition of NPS and identification of unknown chemicals. The samples were sent to the JRC for a complete characterization using advanced techniques and chemoinformatic tools. The aim of this study was also to encourage the development of a science-based policy driven approach on NPS. These samples were fully characterized and identified as 5F-AMB and PX-3 using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution tandem mass-spectrometry (HR-MS/MS) and Raman spectroscopy. A chemoinformatic platform was used to manage, unify analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments, and combine it with chemical and

  14. Stable isotope methods in biological and ecological studies of arthropods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hood-Nowotny, R.C.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    This is an eclectic review and analysis of contemporary and promising stable isotope methodologies to study the biology and ecology of arthropods. It is augmented with literature from other disciplines, indicative of the potential for knowledge transfer. It is demonstrated that stable isotopes can b

  15. Vitamin D biology and heart failure : Clinical and experimental studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meems, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, vitamin D biology has been studied more extensively than ever before.. The use of vitamin D supplements is common, and so is determination of plasma vitamin D status. Besides its role in bone homeostasis, vitamin D is thought to be an important player in the development and treat

  16. Considerations for clinical pharmacology studies for biologics in emerging markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damle, Bharat; White, Robert; Wang, Huifen Faye

    2015-03-01

    Registration of innovative biologics in Emerging Markets (EMs) poses many opportunities and challenges. The BRIC-MT countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, Mexico, and Turkey) that are the fastest growing markets and regulators in these countries have imposed certain requirements, including the need for local clinical studies, for registration of biologics. The regulatory landscape in these countries is rapidly evolving, which necessitates an up-to-date understanding of such requirements. There is growing evidence which suggests that race, after accounting for body weight differences, may not influence the pharmacokinetics of biologics to the same extent that it does for small molecules. Thus, the requirements for clinical pharmacology trials in EMs are driven mainly by regulatory needs set forth by local Ministry of Health. In addition to the clinical Phase I to III studies done in the global program that supports registration in large geographies, countries such as China require local single and multiple dose Phase I studies. Participating in global studies with clinical sites within their country may be sufficient for some markets, while other regulators may be satisfied with a Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product. This paper discusses the current requirements for registration of innovative biologics in key EMs. PMID:25707959

  17. Learning Experiences of University Biology Faculty: A Qualitative Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusch, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this article incorporates qualitative research through in-depth, individual, structured interviews with 12 biology faculty from two Midwestern universities to explore perceptions about how they have learned to teach and how they work to improve their skills.

  18. Systems Biology Approaches to Epidemiological Studies of Complex Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hongzhe

    2013-01-01

    Systems biology approaches to epidemiological studies of complex diseases include collection of genetic, genomic, epigenomic and metagenomic data in large-scale epidemiological studies of complex phenotypes. Designs and analyses of such studies raise many statistical challenges. This paper reviews some issues related to integrative analysis of such high dimensional and inter-related data sets and outline some possible solutions. I focus my review on integrative approaches for genome-wide gene...

  19. Systematic study of particle quenching in organic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the different factors that affect measurements by organic scintillators, the majority of attention has been focused on those related to the scintillator (i.e., ionization, chemical, color and optical quenching), and less attention has been paid to the loss of energy before the particle (i.e., alpha or beta) arrives at the scintillator (i.e., particle quenching). This study evaluates the effect of particle quenching in different scintillation methods (i.e., using two plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm1 and PSm2), liquid scintillator and gel scintillator) by measuring solutions that contain increasing concentrations of NaCl, BaCl2 and glycerin. The results show the importance of particle quenching in PSm measurements because detection efficiency decreases with increasing concentrations of the quenching component, although the spectrum position and external standard parameter remain constant. The results have shown evidence of particle quenching, although at a lower magnitude, in the liquid scintillation or gel scintillation measurements. Moreover, the use of two PSm with different diameters and salty compound that alters the equilibrium of the liquid and gel emulsions also exemplified the importance of the transmission of optical photons through different scintillation media (i.e., optical quenching). Improvement and deterioration of the optical conditions on the scintillation media is manifested as a movement of the spectrum to higher and lower energies, respectively. The results obtained with PSm were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation.

  20. Clinical studies of fiber-reinforced resin-bonded fixed partial dentures: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heumen, C.C.M. van; Kreulen, C.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    In the past decade, follow-up studies on fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FRC FPDs) have been described. Combining the results of these studies to draw conclusions about the effectiveness of FRC FPDs is challenging. The objective of this systematic review was to obtain survival rat

  1. A systematic study of missing via mechanism and its solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Wei; Wu, Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Missing via has been a very annoying defect in semiconductor manufacture especially to foundry. Its solution can be rather attractive in yield improvement for relatively mature technology since each percentage point improvement will mean significant profit margin enhancement. However, the root cause for the missing via defect is not easy find since many factors, such as, defocus, material re-deposition, and inadequate developing can lead to missing via defects. Therefore, being able to know the exact cause for each defect type is the key to the solution of the problem. In this paper, we will present the analysis methodology used in our company. In the experiments, we have observed three types of missing vias. The first type consists of large areas, usually circular, of missing patterns, which are primarily located near wafer edge. The second type consists of isolated sites with single partially opened vias or completely unopened vias. The third type consists of relatively small circular areas, within which the entire via pattern is missing. We have first tried the optimization of the developing recipe and found that the first type missing via can be largely removed through the tuning of the rinse process, which improves the cleaning efficiency of the developing residue. However, this method does not remove the missing via of the second type, or the third type. For the second type missing via, we have found that it is related to local defocus caused by topographical distribution. To resolve the third type missing via defects, we have performed extensive experiments with different types of developer nozzles and different types of photomasks and the result is that we have not found any distinct dependence of the defect density to either the nozzle and mask types. Besides, we have also studied the defect density from three resists with different resolution capability and we found a correlation between the defect density and the resist resolution. It seems that, in

  2. A Network-Based Systematic Study for the Mechanism of the Treatment of Zhengs Related to Cough Variant Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has shown significant efficacy in the treatment of cough variant asthma (CVA, a special type of asthma. However, there is shortage of explanations for relevant mechanism of treatment. As Zhengs differentiation is a critical concept in TCM, it is necessary to explain the mechanism of treatment of Zhengs. Based on TCM clinical cases, this study illustrated the mechanism of the treatment of three remarkably relevant Zhengs for CVA: “FengXieFanFei,” “FeiQiShiXuan”, and “QiDaoLuanJi.” To achieve this goal, five steps were carried out: (1 determining feature Zhengs and corresponding key herbs of CVA by analyses of clinical cases; (2 finding out potential targets of the key herbs and clustering them based on their functional annotations; (3 constructing an ingredient-herb network and an ingredient network; (4 identifying modules of the ingredient network; (5 illustrating the mechanism of the treatment by further mining the latent biological implications within each module. The systematic study reveals that the treatment of “FengXieFanFei,” “FeiQiShiXuan,” and “QiDaoLuanJi” has effects on the regulation of multiple bioprocesses by herbs containing different ingredients with functions of steroid metabolism regulation, airway inflammation, and ion conduction and transportation. This network-based systematic study will be a good way to boost the scientific understanding of mechanism of the treatment of Zhengs.

  3. Increased Biological Effective Dose of Radiation Correlates with Prolonged Survival of Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucheng Zhu

    Full Text Available Thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is a critical component of the treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC. However, the optimal radiation dose/fractionation remains elusive. This study reviewed current evidence and explored the dose-response relationship in patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with radiochemotherapy.A quantitative analysis was performed through a systematic search of PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. The correlations between the biological effective dose (BED and median overall survival (mOS, median progression-free survival (mPFS, 1-, 3-, and 5-year overall survival (OS as well as local relapse (LR were evaluated.In all, 2389 patients in 19 trials were included in this study. Among these 19 trials, seven were conducted in Europe, eight were conducted in Asia and four were conducted in the United States. The 19 trials that were included consisted of 29 arms with 24 concurrent and 5 sequential TRT arms. For all included studies, the results showed that a higher BED prolonged the mOS (R2 = 0.198, p<0.001 and the mPFS (R2 = 0.045, p<0.001. The results also showed that increased BED improved the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS. A 10-Gy increment added a 6.3%, a 5.1% and a 3.7% benefit for the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS, respectively. Additionally, BED was negatively correlated with LR (R2 = 0.09, p<0.001. A subgroup analysis of concurrent TRT showed that a high BED prolonged the mOS (p<0.001 and the mPFS (p<0.001, improved the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS (p<0.001 and decreased the rate of LR (p<0.001.This study showed that an increased BED was associated with improved OS, PFS and decreased LR in patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy, which indicates that the strategy of radiation dose escalation over a limited time frame is worth exploring in a prospective clinical trial.

  4. Empirical Evidence of Study Design Biases in Randomized Trials: Systematic Review of Meta-Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J.; Higgins, Julian P. T.; Clayton, Gemma; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn; Savović, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Objective To synthesise evidence on the average bias and heterogeneity associated with reported methodological features of randomized trials. Design Systematic review of meta-epidemiological studies. Methods We retrieved eligible studies included in a recent AHRQ-EPC review on this topic (latest search September 2012), and searched Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBASE for studies indexed from Jan 2012-May 2015. Data were extracted by one author and verified by another. We combined estimates of average bias (e.g. ratio of odds ratios (ROR) or difference in standardised mean differences (dSMD)) in meta-analyses using the random-effects model. Analyses were stratified by type of outcome (“mortality” versus “other objective” versus “subjective”). Direction of effect was standardised so that ROR assessors (ROR 0.64, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.96; 1 study) and lack of/unclear double blinding (ROR 0.77, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.93; 1 study). The influence of other characteristics (e.g. unblinded trial personnel, attrition) is unclear. Conclusions Certain characteristics of randomized trials may exaggerate intervention effect estimates. The average bias appears to be greatest in trials of subjective outcomes. More research on several characteristics, particularly attrition and selective reporting, is needed. PMID:27398997

  5. Application of Evidence-based Medicine and Systems Biology Mediated by Translational Medicine in TCM Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Xiangwen; Zhang Jinwen; Yang Qinhe; Yan Haizhen; Zhang Yupei; Liu Yizhen; Xu Yongjian; Wang Hong; Lin Chunmei

    2013-01-01

    The core of translational medicine means that the effective relationship between science researchers of basic medicine and clinical doctors makes basic medicine research transform into diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases to compensate for the wide gap between basic and clinical application. Translational medicine was introduced into traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) study, and evidence-based medicine capable of improving the accuracy and reliability of TCM clinical research transforming into basic research and systems biology capable of enhancing the systematicness and integrality of basic research to make it transform into clinical application better were as major technical support, hence, the application of evidence-based medicine and systems biology mediated by translational medicine in TCM will have far-reaching signiifcance for the development of TCM modernization. In this article, the application of evidence-based medicine and systems biology mediated by translational medicine in TCM study is illustrated in terms of TCM in the prevention and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its clinical and basic bidirectional transformation, literature mining, translational medicine platform and team building.

  6. Pharmacoeconomic burden in the treatment of psoriatic arthritis: from systematic reviews to real clinical practice studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The economic assessment of treatment options in a chronic and severe disease like Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) is crucial to estimate the burden of costs. In particular, the impact of new costly medications such as biologic agents have been studied to figure this important aspect of a multifaceted disease. In a previous observational, longitudinal multicentre cost evaluation study, the results showed that biologic agents are cost-effective. This study was obtained from the real clinical practice...

  7. Stem cell transplantation in traumatic spinal cord injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Antonic

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a devastating condition that causes substantial morbidity and mortality and for which no treatments are available. Stem cells offer some promise in the restoration of neurological function. We used systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression to study the impact of stem cell biology and experimental design on motor and sensory outcomes following stem cell treatments in animal models of SCI. One hundred and fifty-six publications using 45 different stem cell preparations met our prespecified inclusion criteria. Only one publication used autologous stem cells. Overall, allogeneic stem cell treatment appears to improve both motor (effect size, 27.2%; 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 25.0%-29.4%; 312 comparisons in 5,628 animals and sensory (effect size, 26.3%; 95% CI, 7.9%-44.7%; 23 comparisons in 473 animals outcome. For sensory outcome, most heterogeneity between experiments was accounted for by facets of stem cell biology. Differentiation before implantation and intravenous route of delivery favoured better outcome. Stem cell implantation did not appear to improve sensory outcome in female animals and appeared to be enhanced by isoflurane anaesthesia. Biological plausibility was supported by the presence of a dose-response relationship. For motor outcome, facets of stem cell biology had little detectable effect. Instead most heterogeneity could be explained by the experimental modelling and the outcome measure used. The location of injury, method of injury induction, and presence of immunosuppression all had an impact. Reporting of measures to reduce bias was higher than has been seen in other neuroscience domains but were still suboptimal. Motor outcomes studies that did not report the blinded assessment of outcome gave inflated estimates of efficacy. Extensive recent preclinical literature suggests that stem-cell-based therapies may offer promise, however the impact of compromised internal validity and

  8. Suicide Survivors' Mental Health and Grief Reactions: A Systematic Review of Controlled Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveen, Carl-Aksel; Walby, Fredrik A.

    2008-01-01

    There has been a debate over several decades whether suicide survivors experience more severe mental health consequences and grief reactions than those who have been bereaved through other causes of death. This is the first systematic review of suicide survivors' reactions compared with survivors after other modes of death. Studies were identified…

  9. Towards mesoporous Keggin-type polyoxometalates –systematic study on organic template removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunkenbein, T.; Kamperman, M.M.G.; Schieder, M.; With, S.; Li, Z.; Sai, H.; Forster, S.; Wiesner, U.; Breu, J.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present systematic studies on the removal of the polymer template from inverse hexagonally ordered poly(butadiene-block-2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)–phosphomolybdic acid (H3PMo12O40) nanocomposites. Highly ordered mesophases are obtained via an evaporation-induced self-assembly proces

  10. Systematic study of shell-model effective interaction in sd shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spin-tensor decomposition method has been used to analyze the shell model effective interactions in sd shell systematically. Almost all the interactions have been studied, including the microscopic interactions and phenomenological ones. It can be noticed that the discrepancies between the central forces of microscopic interactions with the ones of empirical interactions are remarkable. (authors)

  11. A systematic review of studies measuring health-related quality of life of general injury populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Polinder (Suzanne); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Belt (Eefje); R.A. Lyons (Ronan); V. Erasmus (Vicky); J. Lund (Johan); E.F. van Beeck (Ed)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. It is important to obtain greater insight into health-related quality of life (HRQL) of injury patients in order to document people's pathways to recovery and to quantify the impact of injury on population health over time. We performed a systematic review of studies measurin

  12. A systematic review of prospective studies on attention problems and academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.C. Polderman; D.I. Boomsma; M. Bartels; F.C. Verhulst; A.C. Huizink

    2010-01-01

    Objective:  Our aim was to provide an overview of prospective studies that have addressed the association between attention problems (AP, i.e. symptoms of hyperactivity and inattentiveness) and academic achievement (AA). Method:  We conducted a systematic search in the literature. Normal population

  13. Systematic reviews incorporating evidence from nonrandomized study designs: reasons for caution when estimating health effects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeves, B.C.; Binsbergen, J.J. van; Weel, C. van

    2005-01-01

    Systematic reviews that include nonrandomized studies (NRS) face a number of logistical challenges. However, the greatest threat to the validity of such reviews arises from the differing susceptibility of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and NRS to selection bias. Groups compared in NRS are unlik

  14. Asthma and rhinitis in cleaning workers: a systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folletti, I.; Zock, J.P.; Moscato, G.; Siracusa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article presents a systematic review of epidemiological studies linking cleaning work and risk of asthma and rhinitis. Methods: Published reports were identified from PubMed covering the years from 1976 through June 30, 2012. In total, we identified 24 papers for inclusion in the rev

  15. Integrating Enterprise Resource Planning (SAP) in the Accounting Curriculum: A Systematic Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Yvette; Abedin, Babak; Vatanasakdakul, Savanid; Erfani, Seyedezahra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software package SAP was integrated into the curriculum of an accounting information systems (AIS) course in an Australian university. Furthermore, the paper provides a systematic literature review of articles published between 1990 and 2013 to understand how ERP systems were…

  16. A systematic review of prospective studies on attention problems and academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polderman, T.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bartels, M.; Verhulst, F.C.; Huizink, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to provide an overview of prospective studies that have addressed the association between attention problems (AP, i.e. symptoms of hyperactivity and inattentiveness) and academic achievement (AA). Method: We conducted a systematic search in the literature. Normal population st

  17. Adolescents' Perspectives on the Barriers and Facilitators of Physical Activity: A Systematic Review of Qualitative Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, João; Marques, Adilson; Sarmento, Hugo; Carreiro da Costa, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    This article examined qualitative studies of adolescents' perspectives about the facilitators and barriers of physical activity, published from 2007 to 2014. A systematic review of "Web of Science", "EBSCO", "Psychinfo" and "ERIC" databases was performed according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic…

  18. Progress in using systematic reviews of animal studies to improve translational research

    OpenAIRE

    C R Hooijmans; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2013-01-01

    Carlijn Hooijmans and colleagues discuss developments that might improve the quality and translation of animal research, focusing on the importance of systematic reviews, the role of an international register of animal studies, and cooperation across the scientific community. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary

  19. Radiolabelled substrates for studying biological effects of trace contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A programme of coordinated isotopic tracer-aided investigations of the biological side-effects of foreign chemical residues in food and agriculture, initiated in 1973, was reviewed. The current status of representative investigations from the point of view of techniques and priorities was assessed. Such investigations involved radioactive substrates for studying DNA injury and its repair; 14C-labelled acetylcholine as substrate for measuring enzyme inhibition due to the presence of, or exposure to, anticholinesteratic contaminants; radioactive substrates as indication of side-effects in non-target organisms and of their comparative susceptibilities; radioactive substrates as indicators of persistence or biodegradability of trace contaminants of soil or water; and labelled pools for studying the biological side-effects of trace contaminants. Priorities were identified

  20. Generation of structurally novel short carotenoids and study of their biological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se H; Kim, Moon S; Lee, Bun Y; Lee, Pyung C

    2016-01-01

    Recent research interest in phytochemicals has consistently driven the efforts in the metabolic engineering field toward microbial production of various carotenoids. In spite of systematic studies, the possibility of using C30 carotenoids as biologically functional compounds has not been explored thus far. Here, we generated 13 novel structures of C30 carotenoids and one C35 carotenoid, including acyclic, monocyclic, and bicyclic structures, through directed evolution and combinatorial biosynthesis, in Escherichia coli. Measurement of radical scavenging activity of various C30 carotenoid structures revealed that acyclic C30 carotenoids showed higher radical scavenging activity than did DL-α-tocopherol. We could assume high potential biological activity of the novel structures of C30 carotenoids as well, based on the neuronal differentiation activity observed for the monocyclic C30 carotenoid 4,4'-diapotorulene on rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Our results demonstrate that a series of structurally novel carotenoids possessing biologically beneficial properties can be synthesized in E. coli. PMID:26902326

  1. Marine Sponges and Symbionts: Chemical and Biological Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Eric W.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis concerns two quite different types of research that are separated into distinct sections of the thesis, but which seek to answer the same question using diametrically opposite approaches. The first part (Chapters 1-8) covers research leading to novel, bioactive compounds in marine sponges, while the second (Chapters 9-10) involves molecular biological studies of symbiosis between microbes and sponges. Although these topics seem at first glance completely separate, they are in real...

  2. Physicochemical and biological treatability study of textile dye wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Gorgone, Christine Ann

    1995-01-01

    The textile industry discharges a highly colored wastewater characterized by high organic levels. Industrial wastewater with these characteristics can be harmful to receiving streams and municipal plants, and must be treated prior to discharge. In this project, a yam dyeing facility was studied that uses biological treatment followed by chemical coagulation to treat their highly colored wastewater prior to discharging to the local river. Occasionally, color, organic, and metal ...

  3. On the biological effects of cosmic rays: Epidemiological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforto, A. M.; Signorini, C.

    1991-04-01

    The determination of the biological effects of cosmic rays and other natural radiation to resolve the more general problem of the consequences on human health, from the basis of ionizing radiation, is addressed. Difficulties relating to an epmidemiological study are outlined and results are discussed particularly concerning their inconsistency. In particular, high and low doses are discussed, referencing the Hiroshima bomb, the HBRA (High Background Radiation Area), and the CA (Control Area). High and low regions are discussed for the case of cancer.

  4. What Are the Health Benefits of Active Travel? A Systematic Review of Trials and Cohort Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lucinda E Saunders; Green, Judith M.; Petticrew, Mark P.; Rebecca Steinbach; Helen Roberts

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Increasing active travel (primarily walking and cycling) has been widely advocated for reducing obesity levels and achieving other population health benefits. However, the strength of evidence underpinning this strategy is unclear. This study aimed to assess the evidence that active travel has significant health benefits. METHODS The study design was a systematic review of (i) non-randomised and randomised controlled trials, and (ii) prospective observational studies examining...

  5. Asthma and rhinitis in cleaning workers: a systematic review of epidemiological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Folletti, I.; Zock, J. P.; Moscato, G; Siracusa, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article presents a systematic review of epidemiological studies linking cleaning work and risk of asthma and rhinitis. Methods: Published reports were identified from PubMed covering the years from 1976 through June 30, 2012. In total, we identified 24 papers for inclusion in the review. The quality of studies was evaluated using the Strengthening of the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist of 22 items for cross-sectional, cohort and ...

  6. [Biological Age as a Method for Systematic Assessment of Ontogenetic Changes in the State of an Organism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dontsov, V I; Krut'ko, V N

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a common feature of living and nonliving systems as a disturbance of the structure of the system accumulating with age. The only cause of aging of a living system, which is capable of renewal, is the insufficiency of renewal. The latter manifests itself as two global mechanisms of aging: the genetically determined nonrenewal of a number of structures that can only die with age (stochastic aging) and the regulatory reduction in the rate of self-renewal of living structures. The regulatory reduction in cellular self-renewal (cell growth and division) is most important. At the same chronological age, the degree of aging of the organism in general, as well as individual organs, cells, and systems of the organism, may be different, reflecting the concept of biological age (BA)--an indicator of the level of development, changes, or deterioration of a structure or function of an element of the organism, a functional system, or the organism as a whole. It is expressed in units oftime by relating the values of biomarkers defining the processes of aging with the standard average statistical dependences of changes in these biomarkers with the chronological age. The concept of BA is directly related to the concept of viability of the organism, which is determined by the sum (integral) of viabilities of its parts (in practice, the residual functional resource). For quantitative characterization of aging in general, the index of integrated biological age is used. To give a detailed characterization, the partial biological ages are used, which reflect the aging of different systems of the organism, as well as a number of indices reflecting its functional and psychological possibilities. The contribution of pathological processes to BA is also taken into account. In addition, the amount of retained adaptive reserves in the physical and nervous and mental aspects, the risk factors, and the factors of longevity should be determined. For this purpose, it is necessary to take

  7. Biological dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in hematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes cytokinetic blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree celsius has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=c+ α D+β D2 where. Y is the number micronuclei per cell and D the dose. the curve is compared with those produced elsewhere

  8. Biological studies of post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, Roger K; Rasmusson, Ann M; Koenen, Karestan C; Shin, Lisa M; Orr, Scott P; Gilbertson, Mark W; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel

    2012-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the only major mental disorder for which a cause is considered to be known: that is, an event that involves threat to the physical integrity of oneself or others and induces a response of intense fear, helplessness or horror. Although PTSD is still largely regarded as a psychological phenomenon, over the past three decades the growth of the biological PTSD literature has been explosive, and thousands of references now exist. Ultimately, the impact of an environmental event, such as a psychological trauma, must be understood at organic, cellular and molecular levels. This Review attempts to present the current state of this understanding on the basis of psychophysiological, structural and functional neuroimaging, and endocrinological, genetic and molecular biological studies in humans and in animal models. PMID:23047775

  9. Study of nanoscale structural biology using advanced particle beam microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boseman, Adam J.

    This work investigates developmental and structural biology at the nanoscale using current advancements in particle beam microscopy. Typically the examination of micro- and nanoscale features is performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in order to decrease surface charging, and increase resolution, an obscuring conductive layer is applied to the sample surface. As magnification increases, this layer begins to limit the ability to identify nanoscale surface structures. A new technology, Helium Ion Microscopy (HIM), is used to examine uncoated surface structures on the cuticle of wild type and mutant fruit flies. Corneal nanostructures observed with HIM are further investigated by FIB/SEM to provide detailed three dimensional information about internal events occurring during early structural development. These techniques are also used to reconstruct a mosquito germarium in order to characterize unknown events in early oogenesis. Findings from these studies, and many more like them, will soon unravel many of the mysteries surrounding the world of developmental biology.

  10. Biological Dosimetry of X-rays by micronuclei study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry consists of estimating absorbed doses for people exposed to radiation by mean biological methods. Several indicators used are based in haematological, biochemical an cytogenetics data, although nowadays without doubt, the cytogenetic method is considered to be the most reliable, in this case, the study of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes citokinetics blocked can be related to absorbed dose through an experimental calibration curve. An experimental dose-response curve, using micronuclei assay for X-rays at 250 kVp, 43,79 rads/min and temperature 37 degree centigree has been produced. Experimental data is fitted to model Y=C+ αD+BD''2 where Y is the number of micronuclei per cell and D the dose. The curve is compared with those produced elsewhere. (Author) 24 refs

  11. The International Endometriosis Evaluation Program (IEEP Study) – A Systematic Study for Physicians, Researchers and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghaus, S.; Fehm, T.; Fasching, P. A.; Blum, S.; Renner, S. K.; Baier, F.; Brodkorb, T.; Fahlbusch, C.; Findeklee, S.; Häberle, L.; Heusinger, K.; Hildebrandt, T.; Lermann, J.; Strahl, O.; Tchartchian, G.; Bojahr, B.; Porn, A.; Fleisch, M.; Reicke, S.; Füger, T.; Hartung, C.-P.; Hackl, J.; Beckmann, M. W.; Renner, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease characterized by a range of different presentations. It is usually diagnosed when patients present with pain and/or infertility, but it has also been diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. Because of the different diagnostic approaches and diverse therapies, time to diagnosis can vary considerably and the definitive diagnosis may be delayed, with some cases not being diagnosed for several years. Endometriosis patients have many unmet needs. A systematic registration and follow-up of endometriosis patients could be useful to obtain an insight into the course of the disease. The validation of biomarkers could contribute to the development of diagnostic and predictive tests which could help select patients for surgical assessment earlier and offer better predictions about patients who might benefit from medical, surgical or other interventions. The aim is also to obtain a better understanding of the etiology, pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Material and Methods: To do this, an online multicenter documentation system was introduced to facilitate the establishment of a prospective multicenter case-control study, the IEEP (International Endometriosis Evaluation Program) study. We report here on the first 696 patients with endometriosis included in the program between June 2013 and June 2015. Results: A documentation system was created, and the structure and course of the study were mapped out with regard to data collection and the collection of biomaterials. Conclusion: The documentation system permits the history and clinical data of patients with endometriosis to be recorded. The IEEP combines this information with biomaterials and uses it for scientific studies. The recorded data can also be used to evaluate clinical quality control measures such as the certification parameters used by the EEL (European Endometriosis League) to assess certified endometriosis centers. PMID:27582581

  12. The International Endometriosis Evaluation Program (IEEP Study) – A Systematic Study for Physicians, Researchers and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghaus, S.; Fehm, T.; Fasching, P. A.; Blum, S.; Renner, S. K.; Baier, F.; Brodkorb, T.; Fahlbusch, C.; Findeklee, S.; Häberle, L.; Heusinger, K.; Hildebrandt, T.; Lermann, J.; Strahl, O.; Tchartchian, G.; Bojahr, B.; Porn, A.; Fleisch, M.; Reicke, S.; Füger, T.; Hartung, C.-P.; Hackl, J.; Beckmann, M. W.; Renner, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Endometriosis is a heterogeneous disease characterized by a range of different presentations. It is usually diagnosed when patients present with pain and/or infertility, but it has also been diagnosed in asymptomatic patients. Because of the different diagnostic approaches and diverse therapies, time to diagnosis can vary considerably and the definitive diagnosis may be delayed, with some cases not being diagnosed for several years. Endometriosis patients have many unmet needs. A systematic registration and follow-up of endometriosis patients could be useful to obtain an insight into the course of the disease. The validation of biomarkers could contribute to the development of diagnostic and predictive tests which could help select patients for surgical assessment earlier and offer better predictions about patients who might benefit from medical, surgical or other interventions. The aim is also to obtain a better understanding of the etiology, pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Material and Methods: To do this, an online multicenter documentation system was introduced to facilitate the establishment of a prospective multicenter case-control study, the IEEP (International Endometriosis Evaluation Program) study. We report here on the first 696 patients with endometriosis included in the program between June 2013 and June 2015. Results: A documentation system was created, and the structure and course of the study were mapped out with regard to data collection and the collection of biomaterials. Conclusion: The documentation system permits the history and clinical data of patients with endometriosis to be recorded. The IEEP combines this information with biomaterials and uses it for scientific studies. The recorded data can also be used to evaluate clinical quality control measures such as the certification parameters used by the EEL (European Endometriosis League) to assess certified endometriosis centers.

  13. Motivation for physical activity and exercise in severe mental illness: A systematic review of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farholm, Anders; Sørensen, Marit

    2016-06-01

    There has been increasing interest for research on motivation for physical activity (PA) and exercise among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The aim of this systematic review is to summarize findings from all intervention studies on PA or exercise that either include empirical data on motivational constructs or apply motivational techniques/theories in their intervention. Systematic searches of seven databases were conducted from database inception to February 2015. Studies were eligible if they: (i) included participants with SMI, (ii) had PA as part of the intervention, and (iii) reported empirical data on motivational constructs related to PA or incorporated motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Of the 79 studies that met the inclusion criteria only one had motivation for PA as its main outcome. Nine additional interventions reported empirical data on motivational constructs. Altogether these studies yielded mixed results with respect to change in motivational constructs. Only one of those examined the association between motivation and PA, but found none. Sixty-four studies reported using motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Motivational interviewing and goal-setting were the most popular techniques. Due to the exploratory nature of most of these studies, findings from intervention studies do not so far give very clear directions for motivational work with the patients. There is an urgent need for a more systematic theory based approach when developing strategies that target to increase engagement in PA among people with SMI. PMID:26916699

  14. Motivation for physical activity and exercise in severe mental illness: A systematic review of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farholm, Anders; Sørensen, Marit

    2016-06-01

    There has been increasing interest for research on motivation for physical activity (PA) and exercise among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The aim of this systematic review is to summarize findings from all intervention studies on PA or exercise that either include empirical data on motivational constructs or apply motivational techniques/theories in their intervention. Systematic searches of seven databases were conducted from database inception to February 2015. Studies were eligible if they: (i) included participants with SMI, (ii) had PA as part of the intervention, and (iii) reported empirical data on motivational constructs related to PA or incorporated motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Of the 79 studies that met the inclusion criteria only one had motivation for PA as its main outcome. Nine additional interventions reported empirical data on motivational constructs. Altogether these studies yielded mixed results with respect to change in motivational constructs. Only one of those examined the association between motivation and PA, but found none. Sixty-four studies reported using motivational techniques/theory in their intervention. Motivational interviewing and goal-setting were the most popular techniques. Due to the exploratory nature of most of these studies, findings from intervention studies do not so far give very clear directions for motivational work with the patients. There is an urgent need for a more systematic theory based approach when developing strategies that target to increase engagement in PA among people with SMI.

  15. Studies about space radiation promote new fields in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astronauts are constantly exposed to space radiation of various types of energy with a low dose-rate during long-term stays in space. Therefore, it is important to determine correctly the biological effects of space radiation on human health. Studies about biological the effects at a low dose and a low dose-rate include various aspects of microbeams, bystander effects, radioadaptive responses and hormesis which are important fields in radiation biology. In addition, space radiations contain high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. In particular, neutrons may cause reverse effectiveness at a low dose-rate in comparison to ionizing radiation. We are also interested in p53-centered signal transduction pathways involved in the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis induced by space radiations. We must also study whether the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of space radiation is affected by microgravity which is another typical component in space. To confirm this, we must prepare centrifuge systems in an International Space Station (ISS). In addition, we must prepare many types of equipment for space experiments in an ISS, because we cannot use conventional equipment from our laboratories. Furthermore, the research for space radiation might give us valuable information about the birth and evolution of life on the Earth. We can also realize the importance of preventing the ozone layer from depletion by the use of exposure equipment to sunlight in an ISS. For these reasons, we desire to educate space researchers of the next generation based on the consideration of the preservation of the Earth from research about space radiation. (author)

  16. Systematic analysis of compositional order of proteins reveals new characteristics of biological functions and a universal correlate of macroevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erez Persi

    Full Text Available We present a novel analysis of compositional order (CO based on the occurrence of Frequent amino-acid Triplets (FTs that appear much more than random in protein sequences. The method captures all types of proteomic compositional order including single amino-acid runs, tandem repeats, periodic structure of motifs and otherwise low complexity amino-acid regions. We introduce new order measures, distinguishing between 'regularity', 'periodicity' and 'vocabulary', to quantify these phenomena and to facilitate the identification of evolutionary effects. Detailed analysis of representative species across the tree-of-life demonstrates that CO proteins exhibit numerous functional enrichments, including a wide repertoire of particular patterns of dependencies on regularity and periodicity. Comparison between human and mouse proteomes further reveals the interplay of CO with evolutionary trends, such as faster substitution rate in mouse leading to decrease of periodicity, while innovation along the human lineage leads to larger regularity. Large-scale analysis of 94 proteomes leads to systematic ordering of all major taxonomic groups according to FT-vocabulary size. This is measured by the count of Different Frequent Triplets (DFT in proteomes. The latter provides a clear hierarchical delineation of vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, fungi and prokaryotes, with thermophiles showing the lowest level of FT-vocabulary. Among eukaryotes, this ordering correlates with phylogenetic proximity. Interestingly, in all kingdoms CO accumulation in the proteome has universal characteristics. We suggest that CO is a genomic-information correlate of both macroevolution and various protein functions. The results indicate a mechanism of genomic 'innovation' at the peptide level, involved in protein elongation, shaped in a universal manner by mutational and selective forces.

  17. Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluation Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Koffi Alouki; Hélène Delisle; Clara Bermúdez-Tamayo; Mira Johri

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize key findings of economic evaluations of lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in high-risk subjects. Methods. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed original studies published since January 2009 in English, French, and Spanish. Eligible studies were identified through relevant databases including PubMed, Medline, National Health Services Economic Evaluation, CINHAL, EconLit, Web of sciences, EMBASE, and the Latin America...

  18. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael G. dos Santos; Osório, Flávia L.; José Alexandre S. Crippa; Hallak, Jaime E. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline). Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies ...

  19. Study on the biological characteristics of Homalotglus flaminus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Homalotglus flaminus (Dalman) is an important natural enemy of the Chilocorus kuwanae. Its biological characteristic, life history, the action style on hosts were studied at Hongqi Forest Farm, Daqing City, Heilongjiang Province from June 1998 to October 2000, in order to control H. flaminus and raise the control ability of Chilocorus kuwanae to Quadraspidiotus gigas pest. The observed results indicated that H. flaminus has two generation one year in study area, the pupating span is 12.7 d, life span of females and males is 17.6 d and 10.8 d respectively, egg span is 10 d, and the sex ratio of females to males is 1:3.

  20. Algebraic Systems Biology: A Case Study for the Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elizabeth; Harrington, Heather A; Rosen, Zvi; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state analysis of dynamical systems for biological networks gives rise to algebraic varieties in high-dimensional spaces whose study is of interest in their own right. We demonstrate this for the shuttle model of the Wnt signaling pathway. Here, the variety is described by a polynomial system in 19 unknowns and 36 parameters. It has degree 9 over the parameter space. This case study explores multistationarity, model comparison, dynamics within regions of the state space, identifiability, and parameter estimation, from a geometric point of view. We employ current methods from computational algebraic geometry, polyhedral geometry, and combinatorics.

  1. Caenorhabditis elegans - A model system for space biology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas E.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in studies spanning aspects of development, aging, and radiobiology is reviewed. These topics are interrelated via cellular and DNA repair processes especially in the context of oxidative stress and free-radical metabolism. The relevance of these research topics to problems in space biology is discussed and properties of the space environment are outlined. Exposure to the space-flight environment can induce rapid changes in living systems that are similar to changes occurring during aging; manipulation of these environmental parameters may represent an experimental strategy for studies of development and senescence. The current and future opportunities for such space-flight experimentation are presented.

  2. Algebraic Systems Biology: A Case Study for the Wnt Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Elizabeth; Harrington, Heather A; Rosen, Zvi; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state analysis of dynamical systems for biological networks gives rise to algebraic varieties in high-dimensional spaces whose study is of interest in their own right. We demonstrate this for the shuttle model of the Wnt signaling pathway. Here, the variety is described by a polynomial system in 19 unknowns and 36 parameters. It has degree 9 over the parameter space. This case study explores multistationarity, model comparison, dynamics within regions of the state space, identifiability, and parameter estimation, from a geometric point of view. We employ current methods from computational algebraic geometry, polyhedral geometry, and combinatorics. PMID:26645985

  3. Student Perception of Relevance of Biology Content to Everyday Life: A Study in Higher Education Biology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is…

  4. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone (φ/ψ) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined 13Ca, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of α-helical and β-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly β-sheet.

  5. Novel nuclear magnetic resonance techniques for studying biological molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laws, David D.

    2000-06-01

    Over the fifty-five year history of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), considerable progress has been made in the development of techniques for studying the structure, function, and dynamics of biological molecules. The majority of this research has involved the development of multi-dimensional NMR experiments for studying molecules in solution, although in recent years a number of groups have begun to explore NMR methods for studying biological systems in the solid-state. Despite this new effort, a need still exists for the development of techniques that improve sensitivity, maximize information, and take advantage of all the NMR interactions available in biological molecules. In this dissertation, a variety of novel NMR techniques for studying biomolecules are discussed. A method for determining backbone ({phi}/{psi}) dihedral angles by comparing experimentally determined {sup 13}C{sub a}, chemical-shift anisotropies with theoretical calculations is presented, along with a brief description of the theory behind chemical-shift computation in proteins and peptides. The utility of the Spin-Polarization Induced Nuclear Overhauser Effect (SPINOE) to selectively enhance NMR signals in solution is examined in a variety of systems, as are methods for extracting structural information from cross-relaxation rates that can be measured in SPINOE experiments. Techniques for the production of supercritical and liquid laser-polarized xenon are discussed, as well as the prospects for using optically pumped xenon as a polarizing solvent. In addition, a detailed study of the structure of PrP 89-143 is presented. PrP 89-143 is a 54 residue fragment of the prion proteins which, upon mutation and aggregation, can induce prion diseases in transgenic mice. Whereas the structure of the wild-type PrP 89-143 is a generally unstructured mixture of {alpha}-helical and {beta}-sheet conformers in the solid state, the aggregates formed from the PrP 89-143 mutants appear to be mostly {beta}-sheet.

  6. Biological studies of the US Subseabed Disposal Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) of the US is assessing the feasibility of emplacing high level radioactive wastes (HLW) within deep-sea sediments and is developing the means for assessing the feasibility of the disposal practices of other nations. This paper discusses the role and status of biological research in the SDP. Studies of the disposal methods and of the conceived barriers (canister, waste form and sediment) suggest that biological knowledge will be principally needed to address the impact of accidental releases of radionuclides. Current experimental work is focusing on the deep-sea ecosystem to determine: (1) the structure of benthic communities, including their microbial component; (2) the faunal composition of deep midwater nekton; (3) the biology of deep-sea amphipods; (4) benthic community metabolism; (5) the rates of bacterial processes; (6) the metabolism of deep-sea animals, and (7) the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. A multicompartment model is being developed to assess quantitatively the impact (on the environment and on man) of releases of radionuclides into the sea

  7. Biological conversion of synthesis gas. Topical report: Bioreactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, R.; Klasson, K.T.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of the proposed research is to develop a technically and economically feasible process for biologically producing H{sub 2} from synthesis gas while, at the same time, removing harmful sulfur gas compounds. Six major tasks are being studied: culture development, where the best cultures are selected and conditions optimized for simultaneous hydrogen production and sulfur gas removal; mass transfer and kinetic studies in which equations necessary for process design are developed; bioreactor design studies, where the cultures chosen in Task 1 are utilized in continuous reaction vessels to demonstrate process feasibility and define operating conditions; evaluation of biological synthesis gas conversion under limiting conditions in preparation for industrial demonstration studies; process scale-up where laboratory data are scaled to larger-size units in preparation for process demonstration in a pilot-scale unit; and economic evaluation, where process simulations are used to project process economics and identify high cost areas during sensitivity analyses. The purpose of this report is to present results from bioreactor studies involving H{sub 2} production by water gas shift and H{sub 2}S removal to produce elemental sulfur. Many of the results for H{sub 2} production by Rhodospirillum rubrum have been presented during earlier contracts. Thus, this report concentrates mainly on H{sub 2}S conversion to elemental sulfur by R. rubrum.

  8. Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijselaers, Jérôme; De Groot, Renate; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Gijselaers, H. J. M., De Groot, R. H. M., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 7 November). Adult Learning Open University Determinants study (ALOUD): Biological lifestyle factors associated with study success. Poster presentation at the International ICO Fall School, Girona, Spain.

  9. Study of possible systematics in the L*X - Ta* correlation of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, M G; Capozziello, S; Ostrowski, M; Willingale, R

    2011-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic sources in the universe and among the farthest known astrophysical sources. These features make them appealing candidates as standard candles for cosmological applications so that studying the physical mechanisms for the origin of the emission and correlations among their observable properties is an interesting task. We consider here the luminosity L*X - break time Ta* (hereafter LT) correlation and investigate whether there are systematics induced by selection effects or redshift dependent calibra- tion. We perform this analysis both for the full sample of 77 GRBs with known redshift and for the subsample of GRBs having canonical X-ray light curves, hereafter called U0095 sample. We do not find any systematic bias thus con- firming the existence of physical GRB subclasses revealed by tight correlations of their afterglow properties. Furthermore, we study the possibility of applying the LT correlation as a redshift estimator both for the full distribution and for...

  10. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews o...

  11. Studies on the morphology and systematics of scale insects. No. 12

    OpenAIRE

    Bullington, Stephen W.; Kosztarab, Michael; Baer, Ronald G.

    1985-01-01

    I. Revision of the family Kermesidae (Homoptera) in the nearctic region based on adult and third instar females / by Stephen W. Bullington and Michael Kosztarab. II. A morphological and systematic study of the first and second instars of the family Kermesidae in the nearctic region (Homoptera: Coccoidea) / by Ronald G. Baer and Michael Kosztarab. Part of a 16-volume set. Volumes 1-11 were published in the Research Division bulletin (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Res...

  12. A step-by-step guide to systematically identify all relevant animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Leenaars, Marlies; Hooijmans, Carlijn R.; van Veggel, Nieky; ter Riet, Gerben; Leeflang, Mariska; Hooft, Lotty; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Tillema, Alice; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2012-01-01

    Before starting a new animal experiment, thorough analysis of previously performed experiments is essential from a scientific as well as from an ethical point of view. The method that is most suitable to carry out such a thorough analysis of the literature is a systematic review (SR). An essential first step in an SR is to search and find all potentially relevant studies. It is important to include all available evidence in an SR to minimize bias and reduce hampered interpretation of experime...

  13. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  14. Aplanatic two-mirror telescopes; a systematic study. 3: the schwarzschild-couder configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1975-04-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Schwarzschild-Couder type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. The classic Schwarzschild and Couder designs were studied in detail. It was found that those types of telescopes, in contrast to the Gregorian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2402 (1974)] and the Cassegrainian [Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] configuration, suffered severely from higher order aberration. PMID:20135010

  15. The relationship between physical activity and low back pain outcomes: a systematic review of observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    Hendrick, Paul; Milosavljevic, S.; Hale, L; Hurley, D. A.; McDonough, S; Ryan, B; Baxter, G. D.

    2010-01-01

    Although clinical guidelines advocate exercise and activity in the management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP), the link between levels of physical activity and outcomes is unclear. This systematic review investigated the relationships between free living activity levels after onset of low back pain (LBP) and measures of pain, and disability in patients with NSLBP. Cohort and cross-sectional studies were located using OVID, CINAHL, Medline, AMED, Embase, Biomed, PubMed-National Library o...

  16. Applications of constructive developmental theory to the studies of leadership development : a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Florio, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this dissertation is to present three main outcomes of the systematic review undertaken: - A synthesis of extant literature on leadership development from the angle of constructive developmental theory. - A review of the two approaches in constructive developmental theory most widely used in conjunction with studies of leadership development. - An integrative framework of the process and context of leadership development from the constructive devel...

  17. Healthy urban environments for children and young people: A systematic review of intervention studies

    OpenAIRE

    Audrey, Suzanne; Batista-Ferrer, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    This systematic review collates, and presents as a narrative synthesis, evidence from interventions which included changes to the urban environment and reported at least one health behaviour or outcome for children and young people. Following a comprehensive search of six databases, 33 primary studies relating to 27 urban environment interventions were included. The majority of interventions related to active travel. Others included park and playground renovations, road traffic safety, and mu...

  18. A modular open platform for systematic functional studies under physiological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Mulholland, Christopher B.; Smets, Martha; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Leidescher, Susanne; Markaki, Yolanda; Hofweber, Mario; Qin, Weihua; Manzo, Massimiliano; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Thanisch, Katharina; Bauer, Christina; Rombaut, Pascaline; Herzog, Franz; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Bultmann, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Any profound comprehension of gene function requires detailed information about the subcellular localization, molecular interactions and spatio-temporal dynamics of gene products. We developed a multifunctional integrase (MIN) tag for rapid and versatile genome engineering that serves not only as a genetic entry site for the Bxb1 integrase but also as a novel epitope tag for standardized detection and precipitation. For the systematic study of epigenetic factors, including Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt...

  19. A Systematic Spectroscopic X-Ray Study of Stellar Coronae with XMM-Newton: Early Results

    OpenAIRE

    Guedel, M.; Audard, M.; K. W. Smith; Sres, A.; Escoda, C.; Wehrli, R.; Guinan, E. F.; Ribas, I.; Beasley, A. J.; Mewe, R.; Raassen, A.J.J.; Behar, E; Magee, H.

    2001-01-01

    We have been conducting a comprehensive survey of stellar coronae with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometers during the commissioning, calibration, verification, and guaranteed time phases of the mission, accompanied by simultaneous observations with the EPIC cameras and, for several targets, with the radio VLA and/or the VLBA. The principal aim of this project is threefold: i) To understand stellar coronal structure and composition by studying systematics in the coronae of stars wi...

  20. Functionalised isocoumarins as antifungal compounds: Synthesis and biological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simic, Milena; Paunovic, Nikola; Boric, Ivan; Randjelovic, Jelena; Vojnovic, Sandra; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Pekmezovic, Marina; Savic, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    A series of novel 3-substituted isocoumarins was prepared via Pd-catalysed coupling processes and screened in vitro for antifungal activity against Candida species. The study revealed antifungal potential of isocoumarins possessing the azole substituents, which, in some cases, showed biological properties equal to those of clinically used voriconazole. Selected compounds were also screened against voriconazole resistant Candida krusei 6258 and a clinical isolate Candida parapsilosis CA-27. Although the activity against these targets needs to be improved further, the results emphasise additional potential of this new class of antifungal compounds. PMID:26586600

  1. Integrative biological studies of anti-tumour agents

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    3, 11-difluoro-6, 8, 13-trimethyl-8H- quino [4, 3, 2-kl] acridinium methosulfate (RHPS4) is a member of a series of pentacyclic acridines developed at the University of Nottingham, which bind to, and stabilise the structure of G-quadruplex DNA and inhibit the action of telomerase at sub-micromolar concentrations in the cell free TRAP assay and limit cancer cell growth therefore leading to the conclusion that RHPS4 has potential anti-tumour activity. Previous biological studies, however, have...

  2. The genetic and environmental influences on childhood obesity: a systematic review of twin and adoption studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, K; Rokholm, B; Kaprio, J;

    2010-01-01

    In this systematic review, we aimed to collect together all previous twin and adoption studies on childhood and adolescent obesity up to the age of 18 years. Using several sources, we identified nine twin and five adoption studies; all of these studies had used relative weight as an indicator of...... substantial effect in mid-childhood, but this effect disappeared at adolescence. Adoption studies supported the role of family environment in childhood obesity as correlations were found between adoptees and adoptive parents; however, correlations were substantially stronger between parents and their...

  3. Development of Plant Model to Study Biological Effects of Nanodilutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delinick (Delinikou A.N.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum as a model plant has been used extensively in fundamental research in different biological sciences. In vivo and in vitro pea models were used, as well, to study stress factors. Applying environment friendly technologies for overcoming biotic/abiotic stress increases its importance for sustainable agriculture. In this respect studies in the field of nanotechnology can contribute to solve some problems and to understanding of phenomena or practices that still lack methodology or specific instrumentation for scientific explanations. The interest to such studies was provoked by attempting an explanation on the potentization process and its therapeutic effect, and also by the possibility to apply similar approach in sustainable agriculture. The objectives of the experiments were to examine if potentized nanodilutions (PNDs have effects on different stages of seed development of pea aiming at the development of a plant model. Copper was chosen as stress factor as its excess is toxic and affects seed development. The experiments show for the first time that potentized nanodilutions (PNDs of metallic copprer have biological effects on pea seed development which are similar to the effect of copper (water solutions of CuSO4. The results, also, show that PNDs can stimulate response for overcoming the stress applied to seeds.

  4. [Study on action mechanism of Danhong injection based on computational system biology approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yan-ni; Wei, Xiao-hua; Xiao, Pin

    2015-02-01

    Danhong injection is a compound preparation of traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius, and has been widely applied in treating coronary heart diseases and ischemic encephalopathy in clinic. Despite the complexity of its chemical compounds and the diversity of targets, especially in system biology, there have not a report for its action mechanism as a whole regulatory biological network. In this study, protein data of S. miltiorrhiza and C. tinctorius were searched in TCMGeneDIT database and agilent literature search (ALS) system to establish the multi-component protein network of S. miltiorrhiza, C. tinctorius and Danhong injection. Besides, the protein interaction network was built based on the protein-protein interaction in Genecards, BIND, BioGRID, IntAct, MINT and other databases. According to the findings, 10 compounds of S. miltiorrhiza and 14 compounds of C. tinctorius were correlated with proteins. The 24 common compounds had interactions with 81 proteins, and formed a protein interaction network with 60 none-isolated nodes. The Cluster ONE module was applied to make an enrichment analysis on the protein interaction network and extract one sub-network with significant difference P <0.05. The sub-network contains 23 key proteins, which involved five signaling pathways, namely Nod-like receptor signaling pathway, epithelial cell signaling in helicobacter pylori infection, Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, RIG-I-like receptor signaling pathway and neurotrophin signaling pathway through KEGG signaling pathway mapping. In this study, the computational system biology approach was adopted to preliminarily explain the molecular mechanism of main compounds of Danhong injection in preventing and treating diseases and provide reference for systematic studies on traditional Chinese medicine compounds. PMID:26084184

  5. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Castaneda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To systematically review the use of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF in observational studies. Methods: This study is a systematic review of articles that use the ICF in observational studies. We took into account the observational design papers available in databases such as PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO, published in English and Portuguese from January 2001 to June 2011. We excluded those in which the samples did not comprise individuals, those about children and adolescents, and qualitative methodology articles. After reading the abstracts of 265 identified articles, 65 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 18 were excluded. The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology adapted Checklist, with 15 items needed for observational studies, was applied to the 47 remaining articles. Any paper that met 12 of these criteria was included in this systematic review. Results: 29 articles were reviewed. Regarding the ICF application methodology, the checklist was used in 31% of the articles, the core set in 31% and the ICF categories in 31%. In the remaining 7%, it was not possible to define the applied methodology. In most papers (41%, qualifiers were used in their original format. As far as the area of knowledge is concerned, most of the studies were related to Rheumatology (24% and Orthopedics (21%. Regarding the study design, 83% of the articles used cross-sectional studies. Conclusion: Results indicate a wide scientific production related to ICF over the past 10 years. Different areas of knowledge are involved in the debate on the improvement of information on morbidity. However, there are only a few quantitative epidemiological studies involving the use of ICF. Future studies are needed to improve data related to functioning and disability.

  6. Numerical study of the systematic error in Monte Carlo schemes for semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muscato, Orazio [Univ. degli Studi di Catania (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica e Informatica; Di Stefano, Vincenza [Univ. degli Studi di Messina (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica; Wagner, Wolfgang [Weierstrass-Institut fuer Angewandte Analysis und Stochastik (WIAS) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The paper studies the convergence behavior of Monte Carlo schemes for semiconductors. A detailed analysis of the systematic error with respect to numerical parameters is performed. Different sources of systematic error are pointed out and illustrated in a spatially one-dimensional test case. The error with respect to the number of simulation particles occurs during the calculation of the internal electric field. The time step error, which is related to the splitting of transport and electric field calculations, vanishes sufficiently fast. The error due to the approximation of the trajectories of particles depends on the ODE solver used in the algorithm. It is negligible compared to the other sources of time step error, when a second order Runge-Kutta solver is used. The error related to the approximate scattering mechanism is the most significant source of error with respect to the time step. (orig.)

  7. Studies of systematic limitations in the EDM searches at storage rings

    CERN Document Server

    Saleev, Artem; Rathmann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Searches of the electric dipole moment (EDM) at a pure magnetic ring, like COSY, encounter strong background coming from magnetic dipole moment (MDM). The most troubling issue is the MDM spin rotation in the so-called imperfection, radial and longitudinal, B-fields. To study the systematic effects of the imperfection fields at COSY we proposed the original method which makes use of the two static solenoids acting as artificial imperfections. Perturbation of the spin tune caused by the spin kicks in the solenoids probes the systematic effect of cumulative spin rotation in the imperfection fields all over the ring. The spin tune is one of the most precise quantities measured presently at COSY at $10^{-10}$ level. The method has been successfully tested in September 2014 run at COSY, unravelling strength of spin kicks in the ring's imperfection fields at the level of $10^{-3} rad$.

  8. Studies of Systematic Limitations in the EDM Searches at Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleev, Artem; Nikolaev, Nikolai; Rathmann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Searches of the electric dipole moment (EDM) at a pure magnetic ring, like COSY, encounter strong background coming from magnetic dipole moment (MDM). The most troubling issue is the MDM spin rotation in the so-called imperfection, radial and longitudinal, B-fields. To study the systematic effects of the imperfection fields at COSY we proposed the original method which makes use of the two static solenoids acting as artificial imperfections. Perturbation of the spin tune caused by the spin kicks in the solenoids probes the systematic effect of cumulative spin rotation in the imperfection fields all over the ring. The spin tune is one of the most precise quantities measured presently at COSY at 10‑10 level. The method has been successfully tested in September 2014 run at COSY, unravelling strength of spin kicks in the ring’s imperfection fields at the level of 10‑3rad.

  9. Student perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life: A study in higher education biology courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himschoot, Agnes Rose

    The purpose of this mixed method case study was to examine the effects of methods of instruction on students' perception of relevance in higher education non-biology majors' courses. Nearly ninety percent of all students in a liberal arts college are required to take a general biology course. It is proposed that for many of those students, this is the last science course they will take for life. General biology courses are suspected of discouraging student interest in biology with large enrollment, didactic instruction, covering a huge amount of content in one semester, and are charged with promoting student disengagement with biology by the end of the course. Previous research has been aimed at increasing student motivation and interest in biology as measured by surveys and test results. Various methods of instruction have been tested and show evidence of improved learning gains. This study focused on students' perception of relevance of biology content to everyday life and the methods of instruction that increase it. A quantitative survey was administered to assess perception of relevance pre and post instruction over three topics typically taught in a general biology course. A second quantitative survey of student experiences during instruction was administered to identify methods of instruction used in the course lecture and lab. While perception of relevance dropped in the study, qualitative focus groups provided insight into the surprising results by identifying topics that are more relevant than the ones chosen for the study, conveying the affects of the instructor's personal and instructional skills on student engagement, explanation of how active engagement during instruction promotes understanding of relevance, the roll of laboratory in promoting students' understanding of relevance as well as identifying external factors that affect student engagement. The study also investigated the extent to which gender affected changes in students' perception of

  10. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies

  11. Why Should We Study Experience More Systematically: Neurophenomenology and Modern Cognitive Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Strle

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the article I will defend the view that cognitive science needs to use first- and second-person methods more systematically, as part of everyday research practice, if it wants to understand the human mind in its full scope. Neurophenomenological programme proposed by Varela as a remedy for the hard problem of consciousness (i.e. the problem of experience does not solve it on the ontological level. Nevertheless, it represents a good starting point of how to tackle the phenomenon of experience in a more systematic, methodologically sound way. On the other hand, Varela’s criterion of phenomenological reduction as a necessary condition for systematic investigation of experience is too strong. Regardless of that and some other problems that research of experience faces (e.g. the problem of training, the question of what kind of participants we want to study, it is becoming clear that investigating experience seriously – from first- and second-person perspective – is a necessary step cognitive science must take. This holds especially when researching phenomena that involve consciousness and/or where differentiation between conscious and unconscious processing is crucial. Furthermore, gathering experiential data is essential for interpreting experimental results gained purely by quantitative methods – especially when we are implicitly or explicitly referring to experience in our conclusions and interpretations. To support these claims some examples from the broader area of decision making will be given (the effect of deliberation-without-attention, cognitive reflection test.

  12. Chemical Biology Studies on Molecular Diversity of Annonaceous Acetogenins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Zhu-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins, isolated from the Annonaceae plants, have been attracting worldwide attention in recent years due to their biological activities, especially as growth inhibitors of certain tumor ceils [ 1 ]. They have been shown to function by blocking complex I in mitochondria [2] as well as ubiquinone-linked NADPH oxidase in the cells of specific tumor cell lines, including some multidrug-resistant ones [3]. These features make these acetogenins excellent leads for the new antitumor agents. In our previous work, the compounds 1a to 1d (Figure 1), which relies on structure simplification while maintaining all essential functionalities of the acetogenins, was in vitro tested against several human solid tumor cell lines and showed interesting cell selectivity [4]. All four analogues show remarkable activity against the HCT-8 and HT-29 cell lines, while compound 1c was found the best [4bi. In order to further investigate the effects of key structural features, a convergent parallel fragments assembly strategy was developed [4e]. In addition, the biological relevancies of typical annonaceous acetogenin mimetics were also studied [4f].

  13. The influence of two reciprocating single-file and two rotary-file systems on the apical extrusion of debris and its biological relationship with symptomatic apical periodontitis. A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Bucheli, J; Castellanos, F; Vasquez, N; Ulate, E; Munoz, H R

    2016-03-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the influence of the number of files (full-sequence rotary-file versus reciprocating single-file systems) used during root canal preparation on the apical extrusion of debris and its biological relationship with the occurrence of symptomatic apical periodontitis. An extensive literature research was carried out in the Medline, ISI Web of Science and Cochrane databases, for relevant articles with the keyword search strategy. Based on inclusion and exclusion criteria, two reviewers independently rated the quality of each study determining the level of evidence of the articles selected. The primary outcome for the meta-analysis was determined by the amount of debris extruded into the periapical tissue during root canal preparation with multiple- or single-file systems in four laboratory studies. Analysis of in vivo release of neuropeptides (SP and CGRP) after root canal preparation with single- or multiple-file systems was also carried out. Amongst the 128 articles initially found, 113 were excluded for being nonrelevant or not fulfilling the selection criteria. Another four articles were excluded after methodology evaluation. Finally, nine laboratory studies and two in vivo studies were included in the systematic review. Four of the laboratory studies were further included for meta-analysis that revealed greater debris extrusion after the use of single-file techniques when compared to multiple-file systems. Analysis of in vivo neuropeptide expression in the periodontal ligament suggests that the design of the instrument is more important than the number of files used. Both rotary and reciprocating single-file systems generate apical extrusion of debris in laboratory studies, or expression of neuropeptides in vivo. Available evidence is limited, but supports the fact that this inflammatory reaction is not influenced by the number of files but the type of movement and the instrument design.

  14. Cyberbullying: a systematic review of research, its prevalence and assessment issues in Spanish studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Zych

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on cyberbullying started at the beginning of the 21st century and the number of studies on the topic is increasing very rapidly. Nevertheless, the criteria used to define the phenomenon and evaluation strategies are still under debate. Therefore, it is still difficult to compare the findings among the studies or to describe their prevalence in different geographic areas or time points. Thus, the current systematic review has been conducted with the objective of describing the studies on the phenomenon in Spain taking into account its different definitions and evaluation strategies in relation to its prevalence. After conducting systematic searches and applying the inclusion criteria, 29 articles reporting the results of 21 different studies were included. It was found that the number of studies on the topic in Spain is growing and that most of the definitions include the criteria of repetition, intention, and power imbalance. It was also found that timeframes and cut-off points varied greatly among the studies. All the studies used self-reports with one-item or multi-item instruments. The prevalence also varied depending on the evaluation strategies and when assessed with multi-item instruments it was about twice as high as when assessed with one-item instruments. It is suggested that specific instruments should be chosen depending on the research questions posed in each investigation and that it could be useful to unify the criteria for further advancement of the field.

  15. Risk Factors Associated With Salmonella in Laying Hen Farms: Systematic Review of Observational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denagamage, Thomas; Jayarao, Bhushan; Patterson, Paul; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2015-06-01

    Salmonella contamination of laying hen flocks and shell eggs is associated with various management and environmental factors. Foodborne outbreaks of human salmonellosis have been traced back to consumption of Salmonella-contaminated shell eggs. In the present study, a systematic literature review was conducted to identify and provide an evidence-based overview of potential risk factors of Salmonella contamination of laying hens, layer premises, and shell eggs. This systematic literature search was conducted using AGRICOLA, CAB Abstracts, and PubMed databases. Observational studies that identified risk factors for Salmonella contamination of layer flocks and shell eggs were selected, and best evidence was synthesized to summarize the results. Altogether, 13 cross-sectional studies and four longitudinal studies published in English were included in the review. Evidence scores were assigned based on the study design and quality of the study to grade the evidence level. The strength of association of a risk factor was determined according to the odds ratios. In this systematic review, the presence of previous Salmonella infection, absence of cleaning and disinfection, presence of rodents, induced molting, larger flock size (>30,000 hens), multiage management, cage housing systems, in-line egg processing, rearing pullets on the floor, pests with access to feed prior to movement to the feed trough, visitors allowed in the layer houses, and trucks near farms and air inlets were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of laying hen premises, whereas high level of manure contamination, middle and late phase of production, high degree of egg-handling equipment contamination, flock size of >30,000, and egg production rate of >96% were identified as the risk factors associated with Salmonella contamination of shell eggs. These risk factors demonstrated strong to moderate evidence of association with Salmonella contamination of laying hens and

  16. The genetic and environmental influences on childhood obesity: a systematic review of twin and adoption studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silventoinen, K; Rokholm, B; Kaprio, J;

    2010-01-01

    a substantial effect in mid-childhood, but this effect disappeared at adolescence. Adoption studies supported the role of family environment in childhood obesity as correlations were found between adoptees and adoptive parents; however, correlations were substantially stronger between parents......In this systematic review, we aimed to collect together all previous twin and adoption studies on childhood and adolescent obesity up to the age of 18 years. Using several sources, we identified nine twin and five adoption studies; all of these studies had used relative weight as an indicator...... of obesity. Except the two twin studies from the Korean population, all studies represented Caucasian populations. In a meta-analysis of these twin studies, we found that genetic factors had a strong effect on the variation of body mass index (BMI) at all ages. The common environmental factors showed...

  17. Animal models of prenatal immune challenge and their contribution to the study of schizophrenia: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Macêdo, D.S.; D.P. Araújo; L.R.L. Sampaio; Vasconcelos, S.M.M.; Sales, P.M.G.; Sousa, F.C.F.; J.E. Hallak; Crippa, J.A.; A.F. Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal immune challenge (PIC) in pregnant rodents produces offspring with abnormalities in behavior, histology, and gene expression that are reminiscent of schizophrenia and autism. Based on this, the goal of this article was to review the main contributions of PIC models, especially the one using the viral-mimetic particle polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly-I:C), to the understanding of the etiology, biological basis and treatment of schizophrenia. This systematic review consist...

  18. Selection of representative emerging micropollutants for drinking water treatment studies: a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Micropollutants remain of concern in drinking water, and there is a broad interest in the ability of different treatment processes to remove these compounds. To gain a better understanding of treatment effectiveness for structurally diverse compounds and to be cost effective, it is necessary to select a small set of representative micropollutants for experimental studies. Unlike other approaches to-date, in this research micropollutants were systematically selected based solely on their physico-chemical and structural properties that are important in individual water treatment processes. This was accomplished by linking underlying principles of treatment processes such as coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration to compound characteristics and corresponding molecular descriptors. A systematic statistical approach not commonly used in water treatment was then applied to a compound pool of 182 micropollutants (identified from the literature) and their relevant calculated molecular descriptors. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the information residing in this large dataset. D-optimal onion design was then applied to the PCA results to select structurally representative compounds that could be used in experimental treatment studies. To demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of this selection approach, two sets of 22 representative micropollutants are presented. Compounds in the first set are representative when studying a range of water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration), whereas the second set shows representative compounds for ozonation and advanced oxidation studies. Overall, selected micropollutants in both lists are structurally diverse, have wide-ranging physico-chemical properties and cover a large spectrum of applications. The systematic compound selection approach presented here can also be adjusted to fit

  19. A Study on the Systematization of Classification Process for NSG Trigger List Items

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seunghyo; Tae, Jaewoong; Shin, Donghoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control/Nuclear Export Control Div., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    In 1978, Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was established to prevent nuclear items from being used for nuclear weapons. NSG drew up the NSG Guidelines (INFCIRC/254) that regulates export control items(so-called NSG trigger list items) and procedures. NSG recommends its member countries to reflect these guidelines on their export control systems and fulfill their obligations. Korea has carried out export controls on nuclear items by reflecting NSG Guidelines on Notice on Trade of Strategic Item of Foreign Trade Act since joining NSG in 1995. Nuclear export control starts with Classification that determines whether export items can be used for strategic items (goods and technologies that can be exclusively used for the manufacture, development and use of WMD). The standard of Classification is based on the NSG Guidelines. However, due to the qualitative characteristics of the Guidelines, there take place lots of difficulties in the Classification. Thus this study aims to suggest the systematic Classification process. Recently, the number of Classification requests is rapidly increasing due to the UAE commercial nuclear power plants and the Jordan reactors export. It is required to provide a more systematic Classification standard and process in order to provide an efficient and consistent Classification. Thus, this study analyzed limitations of EDP which causes difficulties in the process of classification due to its qualitative characteristics. Besides, it established systematic Classification process by quantitatively analyzing EDP. Consequently, it is expected that the results of this study will be used for as actual Classification. It still remains to establish a criterion of detailed information, which is one of the most important in the Classification for technology. Therefore, a further study will be conducted to establish a criterion of detailed information by analyzing Classification cases through the text mining techniques.

  20. A Study on the Systematization of Classification Process for NSG Trigger List Items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) was established to prevent nuclear items from being used for nuclear weapons. NSG drew up the NSG Guidelines (INFCIRC/254) that regulates export control items(so-called NSG trigger list items) and procedures. NSG recommends its member countries to reflect these guidelines on their export control systems and fulfill their obligations. Korea has carried out export controls on nuclear items by reflecting NSG Guidelines on Notice on Trade of Strategic Item of Foreign Trade Act since joining NSG in 1995. Nuclear export control starts with Classification that determines whether export items can be used for strategic items (goods and technologies that can be exclusively used for the manufacture, development and use of WMD). The standard of Classification is based on the NSG Guidelines. However, due to the qualitative characteristics of the Guidelines, there take place lots of difficulties in the Classification. Thus this study aims to suggest the systematic Classification process. Recently, the number of Classification requests is rapidly increasing due to the UAE commercial nuclear power plants and the Jordan reactors export. It is required to provide a more systematic Classification standard and process in order to provide an efficient and consistent Classification. Thus, this study analyzed limitations of EDP which causes difficulties in the process of classification due to its qualitative characteristics. Besides, it established systematic Classification process by quantitatively analyzing EDP. Consequently, it is expected that the results of this study will be used for as actual Classification. It still remains to establish a criterion of detailed information, which is one of the most important in the Classification for technology. Therefore, a further study will be conducted to establish a criterion of detailed information by analyzing Classification cases through the text mining techniques

  1. Selection of representative emerging micropollutants for drinking water treatment studies: a systematic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaohui; Peldszus, Sigrid

    2012-01-01

    Micropollutants remain of concern in drinking water, and there is a broad interest in the ability of different treatment processes to remove these compounds. To gain a better understanding of treatment effectiveness for structurally diverse compounds and to be cost effective, it is necessary to select a small set of representative micropollutants for experimental studies. Unlike other approaches to-date, in this research micropollutants were systematically selected based solely on their physico-chemical and structural properties that are important in individual water treatment processes. This was accomplished by linking underlying principles of treatment processes such as coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration to compound characteristics and corresponding molecular descriptors. A systematic statistical approach not commonly used in water treatment was then applied to a compound pool of 182 micropollutants (identified from the literature) and their relevant calculated molecular descriptors. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to summarize the information residing in this large dataset. D-optimal onion design was then applied to the PCA results to select structurally representative compounds that could be used in experimental treatment studies. To demonstrate the applicability and flexibility of this selection approach, two sets of 22 representative micropollutants are presented. Compounds in the first set are representative when studying a range of water treatment processes (coagulation/flocculation, oxidation, activated carbon adsorption, and membrane filtration), whereas the second set shows representative compounds for ozonation and advanced oxidation studies. Overall, selected micropollutants in both lists are structurally diverse, have wide-ranging physico-chemical properties and cover a large spectrum of applications. The systematic compound selection approach presented here can also be adjusted to fit

  2. Epistemological Syncretism in a Biology Classroom: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, William D.; Park, Soonhye

    2011-02-01

    In teaching science, the beliefs of teachers may come into conflict and inhibit the implementation of reformed teaching practice. An experienced biology teacher, Mr. Hobbs, was found to have two different sets of epistemological beliefs while his classroom practice was predominantly teacher-centered. A case study was then performed in order to investigate the underlying issues that contributed to his classroom practice. Data sources included preliminary and follow-up interviews and classroom observations. Data analysis indicated that factors that prevented the epistemological conflict from reaching a resolution included Mr. Hobbs' beliefs about learning, contextual teaching factors, personal experiences as a student, and views of the nature of science. The findings from this case indicate that science teachers possess complex belief systems that are not immediately obvious to either the teacher or science teacher educators, and science teacher educators need to address teacher beliefs when they encourage teachers to implement reformed teaching practices.

  3. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes.

  4. Simulation of Interval Censored Data in Medical and Biological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Kaveh; Arasan, Jayanthi

    This research looks at the simulation of interval censored data when the survivor function of the survival time is known and attendance probability of the subjects for follow-ups can take any number between 0 to 1. Interval censored data often arise in the medical and biological follow-up studies where the event of interest occurs somewhere between two known times. Regardless of the methods used to analyze these types of data, simulation of interval censored data is an important and challenging step toward model building and prediction of survival time. The simulation itself is rather tedious and very computer intensive due to the interval monitoring of subjects at prescheduled times and subject's incomplete attendance to follow-ups. In this paper the simulated data by the proposed method were assessed using the bias, standard error and root mean square error (RMSE) of the parameter estimates where the survival time T is assumed to follow the Gompertz distribution function.

  5. Current studies on physiological functions and biological production of lactosucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wanmeng; Chen, Qiuming; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Tao; Jiang, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Lactosucrose (O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-(1,4)-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-(1,2)-β-D-fructofuranoside) is a trisaccharide formed from lactose and sucrose by enzymatic transglycosylation. This rare trisaccharide is a kind of indigestible carbohydrate, has good prebiotic effect, and promotes intestinal mineral absorption. It has been used as a functional ingredient in a range of food products which are approved as foods for specified health uses in Japan. Using lactose and sucrose as substrates, lactosucrose can be produced through transfructosylation by β-fructofuranosidase from Arthrobacter sp. K-1 or a range of levansucrases, or through transgalactosylation by β-galactosidase from Bacillus circulans. This article presented a review of recent studies on the physiological functions of lactosucrose and the biological production from lactose and sucrose by different enzymes. PMID:23828605

  6. Biochemical studies on certain biologically active nitrogenous compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain biologically active nitrogenous compounds such as alkaloids are widely distributed in many wild and medicinal plants such as peganum harmala L. (Phycophyllaceae). However, less literature cited on the natural compounds was extracted from the aerial parts of this plant; therefore this study was conducted on harmal leaves using several solvents. Data indicated that methanol extract was the inhibitoriest effect against some pathogenic bacteria, particularly Streptococcus pyogenus. Chromatographic separation illustrated that presence of four compounds; the most active one was the third compound (3). Elementary analysis (C, H, N) revealed that the primary chemical structure of the active antibacterial compound (C3) was: C17 H21 N3 O7 S with molecular weight 411. Spectroscopic analysis proved that coninical structure was = 1- thioformyl, 8?- D glucoperanoside- Bis- 2, 3 dihydroisopyridino pyrrol. This new compound is represented as a noval ?- carboline alkaloid compound

  7. Systematic reverse engineering of network topologies: a case study of resettable bistable cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Debasish; Dougherty, Edward; Mukhopadhyay, Abhishek; Carbo, Adria; Yao, Guang; Xing, Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    A focused theme in systems biology is to uncover design principles of biological networks, that is, how specific network structures yield specific systems properties. For this purpose, we have previously developed a reverse engineering procedure to identify network topologies with high likelihood in generating desired systems properties. Our method searches the continuous parameter space of an assembly of network topologies, without enumerating individual network topologies separately as traditionally done in other reverse engineering procedures. Here we tested this CPSS (continuous parameter space search) method on a previously studied problem: the resettable bistability of an Rb-E2F gene network in regulating the quiescence-to-proliferation transition of mammalian cells. From a simplified Rb-E2F gene network, we identified network topologies responsible for generating resettable bistability. The CPSS-identified topologies are consistent with those reported in the previous study based on individual topology search (ITS), demonstrating the effectiveness of the CPSS approach. Since the CPSS and ITS searches are based on different mathematical formulations and different algorithms, the consistency of the results also helps cross-validate both approaches. A unique advantage of the CPSS approach lies in its applicability to biological networks with large numbers of nodes. To aid the application of the CPSS approach to the study of other biological systems, we have developed a computer package that is available in Information S1.

  8. Methodological developments in searching for studies for systematic reviews: past, present and future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Carol; Glanville, Julie; Wieland, L Susan; Coles, Bernadette; Weightman, Alison L

    2013-01-01

    The Cochrane Collaboration was established in 1993, following the opening of the UK Cochrane Centre in 1992, at a time when searching for studies for inclusion in systematic reviews was not well-developed. Review authors largely conducted their own searches or depended on medical librarians, who often possessed limited awareness and experience of systematic reviews. Guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches was limited. When work began to identify reports of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for inclusion in Cochrane Reviews in 1992, there were only approximately 20,000 reports indexed as RCTs in MEDLINE and none indexed as RCTs in Embase. No search filters had been developed with the aim of identifying all RCTs in MEDLINE or other major databases. This presented The Cochrane Collaboration with a considerable challenge in identifying relevant studies.Over time, the number of studies indexed as RCTs in the major databases has grown considerably and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) has become the best single source of published controlled trials, with approximately 700,000 records, including records identified by the Collaboration from Embase and MEDLINE. Search filters for various study types, including systematic reviews and the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategies for RCTs, have been developed. There have been considerable advances in the evidence base for methodological aspects of information retrieval. The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions now provides detailed guidance on the conduct and reporting of searches. Initiatives across The Cochrane Collaboration to improve the quality inter alia of information retrieval include: the recently introduced Methodological Expectations for Cochrane Intervention Reviews (MECIR) programme, which stipulates 'mandatory' and 'highly desirable' standards for various aspects of review conduct and reporting including searching, the development of Standard Training

  9. Assessment of participation bias in cohort studies: systematic review and meta-regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Henrique Almeida da Silva Junior

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proportion of non-participation in cohort studies, if associated with both the exposure and the probability of occurrence of the event, can introduce bias in the estimates of interest. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of participation and its characteristics in longitudinal studies. A systematic review (MEDLINE, Scopus and Web of Science for articles describing the proportion of participation in the baseline of cohort studies was performed. Among the 2,964 initially identified, 50 were selected. The average proportion of participation was 64.7%. Using a meta-regression model with mixed effects, only age, year of baseline contact and study region (borderline were associated with participation. Considering the decrease in participation in recent years, and the cost of cohort studies, it is essential to gather information to assess the potential for non-participation, before committing resources. Finally, journals should require the presentation of this information in the papers.

  10. Exploring the factors influencing the cloud computing adoption: a systematic study on cloud migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Rashmi; Sahoo, Gadadhar; Mehfuz, Shabana

    2015-01-01

    Today, most of the organizations trust on their age old legacy applications, to support their business-critical systems. However, there are several critical concerns, as maintainability and scalability issues, associated with the legacy system. In this background, cloud services offer a more agile and cost effective platform, to support business applications and IT infrastructure. As the adoption of cloud services has been increasing recently and so has been the academic research in cloud migration. However, there is a genuine need of secondary study to further strengthen this research. The primary objective of this paper is to scientifically and systematically identify, categorize and compare the existing research work in the area of legacy to cloud migration. The paper has also endeavored to consolidate the research on Security issues, which is prime factor hindering the adoption of cloud through classifying the studies on secure cloud migration. SLR (Systematic Literature Review) of thirty selected papers, published from 2009 to 2014 was conducted to properly understand the nuances of the security framework. To categorize the selected studies, authors have proposed a conceptual model for cloud migration which has resulted in a resource base of existing solutions for cloud migration. This study concludes that cloud migration research is in seminal stage but simultaneously it is also evolving and maturing, with increasing participation from academics and industry alike. The paper also identifies the need for a secure migration model, which can fortify organization's trust into cloud migration and facilitate necessary tool support to automate the migration process.

  11. White matter alterations in anorexia nervosa: A systematic review of diffusion tensor imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Monzon, Beatriz; Hay, Phillipa; Foroughi, Nasim; Touyz, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify findings concerning white matter (WM) fibre microstructural alterations in anorexia nervosa (AN). METHODS: A systematic electronic search was undertaken in several databases up to April 2015. The search strategy aimed to locate all studies published in English or Spanish that included participants with AN and which investigated WM using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Trials were assessed for quality assessment according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses checklist and a published quality index guideline. RESULTS: A total of 6 studies met the inclusion criteria, four of people in the acute state of the illness, one included both recovered and unwell participants, and one included people who had recovered. Participants were female with ages ranging from 14 to 29 years. All studies but one measured a range of psychopathological features. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity were the main DTI correlates reported. Alterations were reported in a range of WM structures of the limbic system, most often of the fornix and cingulum as well as the fronto-occipital fibre tracts, i.e., regions associated with anxiety, body image and cognitive function. Subtle abnormalities also appeared to persist after recovery. CONCLUSION: This diversity likely reflects the symptom complexity of AN. However, there were few studies, they applied different methodologies, and all were cross-sectional. PMID:27014606

  12. A Systematic Chandra study of Sgr A$^{\\star}$: I. X-ray flare detection

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Qiang; Wang, Q. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Daily X-ray flaring represents an enigmatic phenomenon of Sgr A$^{\\star}$ --- the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy. We report initial results from a systematic X-ray study of this phenomenon, based on extensive {\\it Chandra} observations obtained from 1999 to 2012, totaling about 4.5 Ms. We detect flares, using a combination of the maximum likelihood and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, which allow for a direct accounting for the pile-up effect in the modeling of the flare...

  13. The systematic study of deeply bound kaonic nuclei with antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dote, Akinobu; Akaishi, Yoshinori [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Horiuchi, Hisashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Yamazaki, Toshimitsu [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Wako, Saitama (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We have investigated systematically kaonic nuclei which are ppnK{sup -}, pppK{sup -}, pppnK{sup -} and {sup 6}BeK{sup -}. In the present study we have improved the framework of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) so that we can treat K{sup -} - K-bar{sup 0} mixing and perform not only angular-momentum projection but also isospin projection. As a result of our calculation with a new framework of AMD, all kaonic nuclei we calculated are deeply bound by about 100 MeV. We found interesting structures in pppK{sup -} and {sup 6}BeK{sup -}. (author)

  14. Systematic study of finite-size effects in quantum Monte Carlo calculations of real metallic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azadi, Sam, E-mail: s.azadi@imperial.ac.uk; Foulkes, W. M. C. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-14

    We present a systematic and comprehensive study of finite-size effects in diffusion quantum Monte Carlo calculations of metals. Several previously introduced schemes for correcting finite-size errors are compared for accuracy and efficiency, and practical improvements are introduced. In particular, we test a simple but efficient method of finite-size correction based on an accurate combination of twist averaging and density functional theory. Our diffusion quantum Monte Carlo results for lithium and aluminum, as examples of metallic systems, demonstrate excellent agreement between all of the approaches considered.

  15. A systematic approach for designing a HBM Pilot Study for Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Kerstin; Seiwert, Margarete; Casteleyn, Ludwine;

    2014-01-01

    The objective of COPHES (Consortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale) was to develop a harmonised approach to conduct human biomonitoring on a European scale. COPHES developed a systematic approach for designing and conducting a pilot study for an EU-wide cross-sectional human...... via inhabitant registries or schools as an alternative option. Measures suitable to increase the response rate should be applied. Preferably, the families should be visited at home and interviewed face-to-face. Various quality control measures to guarantee a good fieldwork performance were recommended...

  16. Possibility of Systematic Study of Supernova Explosions by Nuclear Imaging Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Mizumura, Yoshitaka; Takada, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    An all-sky monitor with nuclear imaging spectroscopy is a promising tool for the systematic study of supernova explosions. In particular, progenitor scenarios of type-Ia supernovae, which are not yet well understood, can be resolved using light curves in the nuclear gamma-ray band. Here we report an expected result of an all-sky monitor with imaging spectroscopy using electron-tracking Compton camera, which will enable us to observe nuclear gamma-ray lines from type-Ia supernovae.

  17. Summary of diamino pyrazoles derived and study their biological activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work involves the synthesis of new heterocyclic structures diamino pyrazoles derivatives that are present in many natural products and products of pharmacological and therapeutic interests and study their biological activities. In order to develop a radiotracer interest and use in diagnostic nuclear medicine, we are interested to synthesis a pyrazole derivative with the precursor [Re(CO)5Br] and studying the antibacterial and antifungal activity of 3.5-diamino pyrazole and even thioamide complex rhenium. The objectives of our workout: 1/ Synthesis of molecules 3,5-diamino pyrazole and thioamide. 2/ Synthesis of 3,5-diamino pyrazole-rhenium complex. 3/ The in vitro study: Bacteriological Tests (Study of antibacterial and antifungal activity of 3,5-diamino pyrazole and thioamide). The first part of this work concerns the chemical synthesis of molecules such as: thioamide, Amp z1 Ampz2 and then we had synthesized the complex 3,5-diamino pyrazole-rhenium. Similarly we determined the physicochemical characteristics of the compounds synthesized by CLHP, CCM and RMN (1H, 13C). The second part is devoted to the study in vitro of biological activities of the synthesized molecules and complex 3,5 diaminopyrazole-rhenium with concentration 1 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL. The results allow us to say that the thioamide and Ampz2 have antibacterial activity against S. enterica and Ampz2 has low activity against S. aureus and P. aeruginossa. Other pyrazole derivatives have no significant antibacterial and antifungal activity. The results also show that the synthesized compounds of concentration 2 mg/mL in relation to the inhibition zones of amoxicillin and DMSO: 1/ Escherichia coli, there is antibacterial activity for thioamide, and the Amp z1-Re Ampz2 compound. 2/ Staphylococcus aureus, the complex Ampz 1-Re and the thioamide have significant antibacterial activity. 3/ Salmonella, we observe that the thioamide molecules, Ampz2 and Amp z1-Re have significant antibacterial activity while

  18. Cigarette smoking and risk of gestational diabetes: a systematic review of observational studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belizán José M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gestational diabetes is a prevalent disease associated with adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Smoking as been associated with glucose intolerance during pregnancy in some but not all studies. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review all epidemiological evidence to examine the association between cigarette smoking during pregnancy and risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods We conducted a systematic review of articles published up to 2007, using PubMed, Embase, LILACS e CINAHL to identify the articles. Because this review focuses on studies of smoking during pregnancy, we excluded studies evaluating smoking outside pregnancy. Two investigators independently abstracted information on participant's characteristics, assessment of exposure and outcome, and estimates for the association under study. We evaluated the studies for publication bias and performed heterogeneity analyses. We also assessed the effect of each study individually through sensitivity analysis. Results We found and critically reviewed 32 studies, of which 12 met the criteria for inclusion in the review. Most of the studies provided only unadjusted measurements. Combining the results of the individual studies, we obtained a crude odds ratio of 1.03 (99% CI 0.85–1.25. Only 4 studies presented adjusted measurements of association, and no association was found when these alone were analyzed (OR 0.95; 99% CI 0.85–1.07. Subgroup analysis could not be done due to small sample size. Conclusion The number of studies is small, with major heterogeneity in research design and findings. Taken together, current data do not support an association between cigarette smoking during pregnancy and the risk of gestational diabetes.

  19. A case study of two exemplary biology teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treagust, David F.

    Research has indicated that most science classrooms are not intellectually demanding and place little emphasis on small group discussions and laboratory activities. However, successful science programs and competent science teaching that can provide models for other science teachers do exist. This study sought to document the teaching practices of two exemplary biology teachers of grades 11 and 12 by means of an interpretive research methodology. Both teachers had a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of the content they were to teach and had a range of teaching strategies that could be used without a great deal of thought. Their expectations for student performance were high, consistent, and firm. Students were expected to complete a high level of academic work in discussions, in problem work, and in laboratory activities, and were encouraged to take responsibility for their own learning. A distinctive feature of these biology classes was the high level of managerial efficiency, where lessons were busy occasions for both teacher and students; students had little opportunity for off-task behavior. Both teachers actively monitored the behavior of both high- and low-ability students by moving around the room and speaking with individuals, while still maintaining control of the entire class. By manipulating questioning and the social environment, both teachers encouraged students to engage in work, gave effective praise to the whole class and to individuals, encouraged student input by referring to it, helped students to effectively use their time, and gave marks for completion of set work. Compared to research with less-successful teachers, these teaching behaviors contributed to exemplary practice.

  20. A systematic approach for the assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors linked to biological stability of drinking water in distribution systems

    KAUST Repository

    Prest, E. I.

    2016-01-06

    A systematic approach is presented for the assessment of (i) bacterial growth-controlling factors in drinking water and (ii) the impact of distribution conditions on the extent of bacterial growth in full-scale distribution systems. The approach combines (i) quantification of changes in autochthonous bacterial cell concentrations in full-scale distribution systems with (ii) laboratoryscale batch bacterial growth potential tests of drinking water samples under defined conditions. The growth potential tests were done by direct incubation of water samples, without modification of the original bacterial flora, and with flow cytometric quantification of bacterial growth. This method was shown to be reproducible (ca. 4% relative standard deviation) and sensitive (detection of bacterial growth down to 5 μg L-1 of added assimilable organic carbon). The principle of step-wise assessment of bacterial growth-controlling factors was demonstrated on bottled water, shown to be primarily carbon limited at 133 (±18) × 103 cells mL-1 and secondarily limited by inorganic nutrients at 5,500 (±1,700) × 103 cells mL-1. Analysis of the effluent of a Dutch full-scale drinking water treatment plant showed (1) bacterial growth inhibition as a result of end-point chlorination, (2) organic carbon limitation at 192 (±72) × 103 cells mL-1 and (3) inorganic nutrient limitation at 375 (±31) × 103 cells mL-1. Significantly lower net bacterial growth was measured in the corresponding full-scale distribution system (176 (±25) × 103 cells mL-1) than in the laboratory-scale growth potential test of the same water (294 (±35) × 103 cells mL-1), highlighting the influence of distribution on bacterial growth. The systematic approach described herein provides quantitative information on the effect of drinking water properties and distribution system conditions on biological stability, which can assist water utilities in decision-making on treatment or distribution system improvements to

  1. A systematic review of studies measuring health-related quality of life of general injury populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erasmus Vicki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important to obtain greater insight into health-related quality of life (HRQL of injury patients in order to document people's pathways to recovery and to quantify the impact of injury on population health over time. We performed a systematic review of studies measuring HRQL in general injury populations with a generic health state measure to summarize existing knowledge. Methods Injury studies (1995-2009 were identified with main inclusion criteria being the use of a generic health status measure and not being restricted to one specific type of injury. Articles were collated by study design, HRQL instrument used, timing of assessment(s, predictive variables and ability to detect change over time. Results Forty one studies met inclusion criteria, using 24 different generic HRQL and functional status measures (most used were SF-36, FIM, GOS, EQ-5D. The majority of the studies used a longitudinal design, but with different lengths and timings of follow-up (mostly 6, 12, and 24 months. Different generic health measures were able to discriminate between the health status of subgroups and picked up changes in health status between discharge and 12 month follow-up. Most studies reported high prevalences of health problems within the first year after injury. The twelve studies that reported HRQL utility scores showed considerable but incomplete recovery in the first year after discharge. Conclusion This systematic review demonstrates large variation in use of HRQL instruments, study populations, and assessment time points used in studies measuring HRQL of general injury populations. This variability impedes comparison of HRQL summary scores between studies and prevented formal meta-analyses aiming to quantify and improve precision of the impact of injury on population health over time.

  2. Effectiveness of different databases in identifying studies for systematic reviews: experience from the WHO systematic review of maternal morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Tomas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure to be comprehensive can distort the results of a systematic review. Conversely, extensive searches may yield unmanageable number of citations of which only few may be relevant. Knowledge of usefulness of each source of information may help to tailor search strategies in systematic reviews. Methods We conducted a systematic review of prevalence/incidence of maternal mortality and morbidities from 1997 to 2002. The search strategy included electronic databases, hand searching, screening of reference lists, congress abstract books, contacting experts active in the field and web sites from less developed countries. We evaluated the effectiveness of each source of data and discuss limitations and implications for future research on this topic. Results Electronic databases identified 64098 different citations of which 2093 were included. Additionally 487 citations were included from other sources. MEDLINE had the highest yield identifying about 62% of the included citations. BIOSIS was the most precise with 13.2% of screened citations included. Considering electronic citations alone (2093, almost 20% were identified uniquely by MEDLINE (400, 7.4% uniquely by EMBASE (154, and 5.6% uniquely by LILACS (117. About 60% of the electronic citations included were identified by two or more databases. Conclusions This analysis confirms the need for extending the search to other sources beyond well-known electronic databases in systematic reviews of maternal mortality and morbidity prevalence/incidence. These include regional databases such as LILACS and other topic specific sources such as hand searching of relevant journals not indexed in electronic databases. Guidelines for search strategies for prevalence/incidence studies need to be developed.

  3. Interleukin gene polymorphisms and breast cancer: a case control study and systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cross SS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukins and cytokines play an important role in the pathogenesis of many solid cancers. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in cytokine genes are thought to influence the expression or function of these proteins and many have been evaluated for their role in inflammatory disease and cancer predisposition. The aim of this study was to evaluate any role of specific SNPs in the interleukin genes IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL4R, IL6 and IL10 in predisposition to breast cancer susceptibility and severity. Methods Candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in key cytokine genes were genotyped in breast cancer patients and in appropriate healthy volunteers who were similar in age, race and sex. Genotyping was performed using a high throughput allelic discrimination method. Data on clinico-pathological details and survival were collected. A systematic review of Medline English literature was done to retrieve previous studies of these polymorphisms in breast cancer. Results None of the polymorphisms studied showed any overall predisposition to breast cancer susceptibility, severity or to time to death or occurrence of distant metastases. The results of the systematic review are summarised. Conclusion Polymorphisms within key interleukin genes (IL1A, IL1B, IL1RN, IL4R, IL6 and IL10 do not appear to play a significant overall role in breast cancer susceptibility or severity.

  4. Systematic study of the uncertainties in fitting the cosmic positron data by AMS-02

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The launch of AMS-02 opens a new era for cosmic ray physics with unprecedented precision of data, which are comparable with the laboratory measurements. The high precision data allow a quantitative study on the cosmic ray physics and give strict constraints on the nature of cosmic ray sources. However, the intrinsic errors from theoretical models to interpret the data become dominant over the errors in data. In the present work we try to give a systematic study on these uncertainties to explain, as an explicit example, the first AMS-02 positron fraction data, which shows the cosmic ray positron/electron excesses together with the PAMELA, Fermi-LAT measurements. The excesses can be attributed to contributions from new positron/electron sources, like pulsars or dark matter annihilation. The precise data give strict constraints on properties of the new sources. We study the systematic uncertainties from cosmic ray propagation, solar modulation, the $pp$ interaction models, the nuclei injection spectrum and so on...

  5. Studying of ion implantation effect on the biology in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since low energy ion effect on the biology was observed, the ion implantation as a new mutagenic source has been widely used in improving crops and modifying microbes in China. The basic phenomenon of ion implantation effect on the biology and analytical results are reported, and the examples of its application and its further development are shown

  6. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, Anders Bergh; Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in getting off acid-suppressive medication and partly explain the increase in long-term use of PPI. A number of studies addressing this issue have been published recently. The authors aimed to systematically review the existing evidence of clinically relevant symptoms caused by acid rebound following PPI...

  7. Eating frequency, food intake, and weight: a systematic review of human and animal experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollie eRaynor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eating frequently during the day, or grazing, has been proposed to assist with managing food intake and weight. This systematic review assessed the effect of greater eating frequency (EF on intake and anthropometrics in human and animal experimental studies. Studies were identified through the PubMed electronic database. To be included, studies needed to be conducted in controlled settings or use methods that carefully monitored food intake, and measure food intake or anthropometrics. Studies using human or animal models of disease states (i.e., conditions influencing glucose or lipid metabolism, aside from being overweight or obese, were not included. The 25 reviewed studies (15 human and 10 animal studies contained varying study designs, EF manipulations (1 to 24 eating occasions per day, lengths of experimentation (230 min to 28 weeks, and sample sizes (3 to 56 participants/animals per condition. Studies were organized into four categories for reporting results: 1 human studies conducted in laboratory/metabolic ward settings; 2 human studies conducted in field settings; 3 animal studies with experimental periods 1 month. Out of the 13 studies reporting on consumption, 8 (61.5% found no significant effect of EF. Seventeen studies reported on anthropometrics, with 11 studies (64.7% finding no significant effect of EF. Future, adequately powered, studies should examine if other factors (i.e., disease states, physical activity, energy balance and weight status, long-term increased EF influence the relationship between increased EF and intake and/or anthropometrics.

  8. Music-based training for pediatric CI recipients: A systematic analysis of published studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, K

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of music-based training to enhance speech and language development in children with normal hearing and some forms of communication disorders, including pediatric CI users. The use of music training for CI users may initially seem incongruous given that signal processing for CIs presents a degraded version of pitch and timbre, both key elements in music. Furthermore, empirical data of systematic studies of music training, particularly in relation to transfer to speech skills are limited. This study describes the rationale for music training of CI users, describes key features of published studies of music training with CI users, and highlights some developmental and logistical issues that should be taken into account when interpreting or planning studies of music training and speech outcomes with pediatric CI recipients. PMID:27246744

  9. A systematic review of time studies to assess the impact of patient transfers on nurse workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Nicole; Duffield, Christine M; Gallagher, Robyn; Roche, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Patients in hospital are increasingly being moved between clinical units and between bedspaces; however, the impact of patient transfers and bedspace moves on nurses' workload is not known. Time studies are an established observational research method that can be used to determine the duration of time taken to perform an activity or process. This review systematically searched four databases for literature published between 2000 and 2013 for observational time study techniques and patient transfers as a nurse activity. Eleven publications from three countries were included in the review. All studies used timing techniques to explore nurse work associated with the transfer process. The review highlights the duration of time spent by nurses on certain aspects of the transfer process. However, as few studies published results from timings, the impact on nurse time is likely to be higher than indicated. Further research is recommended.

  10. Road safety effects of porous asphalt: a systematic review of evaluation studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvik, R.; Greibe, Poul

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic review of studies that have evaluated the effects on road safety of porous asphalt. Porous asphalt is widely used on motorways in Europe, mainly in order to reduce traffic noise and increase road capacity. A meta-analysis was made of six studies, containing a total...... of eighteen estimates of the effect of porous asphalt on accident rates. No clear effect on road safety of porous asphalt was found. All summary estimates of effect indicated very small changes in accident rates and very few were statistically significant at conventional levels. Studies that have evaluated...... of these changes in risk factors on accident occurrence cannot be predicted. On the whole, the research that has been reported so far regarding road safety effects of porous asphalt is inconclusive. The studies are not of high quality and the findings are inconsistent....

  11. Healthy urban environments for children and young people: A systematic review of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, Suzanne; Batista-Ferrer, Harriet

    2015-11-01

    This systematic review collates, and presents as a narrative synthesis, evidence from interventions which included changes to the urban environment and reported at least one health behaviour or outcome for children and young people. Following a comprehensive search of six databases, 33 primary studies relating to 27 urban environment interventions were included. The majority of interventions related to active travel. Others included park and playground renovations, road traffic safety, and multi-component community-based initiatives. Public health evidence for effectiveness of such interventions is often weak because study designs tend to be opportunistic, non-randomised, use subjective outcome measures, and do not incorporate follow-up of study participants. However, there is some evidence of potential health benefits to children and young people from urban environment interventions relating to road safety and active travel, with evidence of promise for a multi-component obesity prevention initiative. Future research requires more robust study designs incorporating objective outcome measures. PMID:26457624

  12. Music-Based Training for Pediatric CI Recipients: A Systematic Analysis of Published Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gfeller, Kate

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the use of music-based training to enhance speech and language development in children with normal hearing and some forms of communication disorders, including pediatric CI users. The use of music training for CI users may initially seem incongruous given that signal processing for CIs presents a degraded version of pitch and timbre, both key elements in music. Furthermore, empirical data of systematic studies of music training, particularly in relation to transfer to speech skills are limited. This study describes the rationale for music training of CI users, describes key features of published studies of music training with CI users, and highlights some developmental and logistical issues that should be taken into account when interpreting or planning studies of music training and speech outcomes with pediatric CI recipients. PMID:27246744

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of the Effectiveness of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study Special Materials Approach to Teaching Biology to the Slow Learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welford, John Mack

    Students (comparable in intelligence and ability) in slow-learning classes using either "Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) Special Materials" or some other slow-learner biology materials, were compared on the basis of scores on the "Nelson Biology Test", the "Biological Sciences; Patterns and Processes Final Examination", and two short…

  14. Instruments for Assessing Risk of Bias and Other Methodological Criteria of Published Animal Studies: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Krauth, David; Tracey J Woodruff; Bero, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Results from animal toxicology studies are critical to evaluating the potential harm from exposure to environmental chemicals or the safety of drugs prior to human testing. However, there is significant debate about how to evaluate the methodology and potential biases of the animal studies. There is no agreed-upon approach, and a systematic evaluation of current best practices is lacking. Objective: We performed a systematic review to identify and evaluate instruments for assessin...

  15. Prevalence, determinants and patterns of multimorbidity in primary care: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepció Violan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Multimorbidity is a major concern in primary care. Nevertheless, evidence of prevalence and patterns of multimorbidity, and their determinants, are scarce. The aim of this study is to systematically review studies of the prevalence, patterns and determinants of multimorbidity in primary care. METHODS: Systematic review of literature published between 1961 and 2013 and indexed in Ovid (CINAHL, PsychINFO, Medline and Embase and Web of Knowledge. Studies were selected according to eligibility criteria of addressing prevalence, determinants, and patterns of multimorbidity and using a pretested proforma in primary care. The quality and risk of bias were assessed using STROBE criteria. Two researchers assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion (Kappa= 0.86. RESULTS: We identified 39 eligible publications describing studies that included a total of 70,057,611 patients in 12 countries. The number of health conditions analysed per study ranged from 5 to 335, with multimorbidity prevalence ranging from 12.9% to 95.1%. All studies observed a significant positive association between multimorbidity and age (odds ratio [OR], 1.26 to 227.46, and lower socioeconomic status (OR, 1.20 to 1.91. Positive associations with female gender and mental disorders were also observed. The most frequent patterns of multimorbidity included osteoarthritis together with cardiovascular and/or metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Well-established determinants of multimorbidity include age, lower socioeconomic status and gender. The most prevalent conditions shape the patterns of multimorbidity. However, the limitations of the current evidence base means that further and better designed studies are needed to inform policy, research and clinical practice, with the goal of improving health-related quality of life for patients with multimorbidity. Standardization of the definition and assessment of multimorbidity is essential in order to better understand this

  16. A systematic study of site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation modulating proprotein convertase processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Goth, Christoffer K; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Brunak, Søren; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2011-11-18

    Site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is emerging as an important co-regulator of proprotein convertase (PC) processing of proteins. PC processing is crucial in regulating many fundamental biological pathways and O-glycans in or immediately adjacent to processing sites may affect recognition and function of PCs. Thus, we previously demonstrated that deficiency in site-specific O-glycosylation in a PC site of the fibroblast growth factor, FGF23, resulted in marked reduction in secretion of active unprocessed FGF23, which cause familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia. GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on serine and threonine amino acids and up to 20 distinct polypeptide GalNAc transferases catalyze the first addition of GalNAc to proteins making this step the most complex and differentially regulated steps in protein glycosylation. There is no reliable prediction model for O-glycosylation especially of isolated sites, but serine and to a lesser extent threonine residues are frequently found adjacent to PC processing sites. In the present study we used in vitro enzyme assays and ex vivo cell models to systematically address the boundaries of the region within site-specific O-glycosylation affect PC processing. The results demonstrate that O-glycans within at least ±3 residues of the RXXR furin cleavage site may affect PC processing suggesting that site-specific O-glycosylation is a major co-regulator of PC processing.

  17. Bilateral versus unilateral instrumentation in spinal surgery: Systematic review and trial sequential analysis of prospective studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Kevin; Leung, Vannessa; Scherman, Daniel B; Tan, Andrew R; Rao, Prashanth J; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar fusion surgical intervention is often followed by bilateral pedicle screw fixation. There has been increasing support for unilateral pedicle screw fixation in an attempt to reduce complications and costs. The following study assesses the efficacy and complications of bilateral versus unilateral pedicle screw fixation in open and minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion techniques. A systematic review with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines and recommendations. In comparison with existing meta-analyses, trial sequential analysis was implemented to reduce the potential for type I error. Of the 1310 citations screened, four observational studies and 13 randomised controlled trials were used comprising 574 bilateral cases and 549 unilateral cases. Statistical analysis showed no difference in fusion rates, total complications, dural tear rates, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for back pain, VAS for leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index scores, and length of stay between bilateral and unilateral instrumentation. Unilateral instrumentation was significantly shorter in duration (Plower blood volume loss (P=0.0002). These results were the same for both open and minimally invasive surgical approaches. Unilateral pedicle screw fixation appears to have similar post-operative outcomes as bilateral fixation and improved efficacy in regards to procedure duration and blood volume loss. PMID:27068653

  18. Systematic studies of positron production in heavy-ion collisions near the Coulomb barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the results obtained from systematic studies of positron creation for a series of heavy-collision systems, with united charge Zu=Z1+Z2 ranging from Zu=164 (Pb+Pb) to Zu=184 (U+U) at bombarding energies close to the Coulomb barrier, using the Orange-β-spectrometer at GSI. For each collision system studied, the dominating continuous distributions due to quasi-atomic and nuclear positron emission are determined accurately. This is essential in obtaining the characteristics of the still unexplained monoenergetic positron lines which appear in the energy range between 200 keV and 400 keV. Our results are compared with coupled-channels calculations for quasi-atomic positron creation. The latter describe quite well the global features of the measured spectra, but overestimate systematically their absolute values. From the comparison, a common normalization factor of about 0.75 can be established for the calculated spectra. In particular, the dependence on Zu of the measured emission probabilities was found to follow a power law (∝Zu19.5±1), in fair agreement with the theoretical prediction. (orig.)

  19. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PULSED SHORT WAVE TREATMENT. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogaru Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed short waves are short electromagnetic waves emitted as intermittent trains with a fixed duration, separated by free intervals of variable duration. The biological effects of pulsed short waves could be explained according to most of the authors by an activation of cellular enzymatic reactions, a stimulation of energy metabolism, a stimulation of liver function, of adrenal gland function and of the reticulocyte system, changes in cell permeability, by an increase of peripheral blood flow through the enhancement of local vascularization. This research aimed to investigate the biological effects of exposure to pulsed short waves at different doses on the adrenal glands of experimental animals, by structural and ultrastructural studies. The study included 35 animals assigned to 4 groups. Group I included 10 experimental animals exposed to radiation at a dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, group II, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, group III, 10 animals exposed to a dose of 6/600 impulses/sec, for 10 min/day, and the control group consisted of 5 unexposed animals. Structural and ultrastructural changes of adrenal glands induced by the dose of 4/400 impulses/sec, compared to the unexposed control group and the dose of 1/80 impulses/sec, include an intensification of protein synthesis processes, an enhancement of energy metabolism in providing the energy required for an increased production of hormones, an intensification of collagen fiber synthesis processes in the capsule, necessary for healing. It was demonstrated that this dose induced an intensification of hormone synthesis and secretion, a stimulation of adrenal function. At the dose of 6/600 cycles/sec, a slight diminution of hormone synthesis and secretion activity was found, which was not below the limits existing in the unexposed control group, but was comparable to group II. This dose is probably too strong for experimental animals, inducing them a state of stress. The

  20. Synthesis of potentially bioactive compounds and tools for biological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMR spectroscopy is one of the most versatile tools for studying structural parameters of organic and bioorganic compounds. It became a highly suitable method to achieve spectra simplification of macromolecules in combination with isotope labeling techniques. This technique is used to study protein structures, folding properties and mechanisms of chemical and biochemical reactions. Proteins typically feature a high molecular mass showing a high number of spin systems, being responsible for increasingly difficult to interpret NMR spectra, which is why it is essential to introduce 13C- and 15N- isotopes to obtain reasonable signal intensities. The development of a new synthetic route towards 13C-isotope labeled Phenylalanine or precursors thereof, starting from inexpensive and easily accessible labeled starting materials, is the main purpose of this work. Label sources such as [13C]-acetic acid, [13C]-formaldehyde, [13C]-allyl alcohol and [13C]-glycine will be used. The synthetic pathway will be carried out in a way where the position-selective incorporation of labeled isotopes can be performed. This important feature of the synthesis may open access towards newly designed NMR-experiments. Key steps for the tested route are ring closing metatheses as well as indium mediated reactions. The second part of this work focuses on the field of sugar chemistry, in particular on the family of deoxy sugars, components of many natural products, found in different plants, fungi and bacteria. Deoxy sugars also participate in a wide range of biological processes. Special focus is given to 3-deoxy sugars and the research of a versatile and flexible synthetic route for their preparation starting from the easily accessible D-glyceraldehyde. These sugars are found on Gram-negative bacteria where they are a key component of the lipopolysaccharides, or where they can take place in the biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids in bacteria and plants. Being able to perform this synthesis on a

  1. Biologically based epidemiological studies of electric power and cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Use of electricity is a hallmark of the industrialization process, but there has been no suspicion that electricity could increase the risk of cancer. Recently, however, a number of epidemiologic studies have suggested that electromagnetic fields (EMF) may do just that. Although few cancer experiments have been done yet, there are a number of biological effects of EMF reported in the literature that might provide bases for designing cancer experiments and epidemiologic studies. These include effects of EMF on: (a) DNA transcription and translation, (b) calcium balance in cells, and (c) pineal production of melatonin. Alterations in DNA transcription and translation could have pleiotropic effects. Disruption of calcium homeostasis has many implications including oncogene activation, promotional activity via protein kinases and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), and increasing oxidative stress. Reduction of melatonin suggests a possible increased risk of cancers of hormone-dependent tissues such as breast and prostate. The idea that a cancer-causing agent must either be an initiator or a promoter should be discarded; indeed, the phenomenologic meaning of these two terms has become confused with imputed mechanistic necessity in recent years. Agents that affect division of normal cells or of fully transformed cells can play an important role in clinical cancer development quite apart from initiation or promotion. Epidemiologic studies of EMF and cancer should attempt to take account of other products of electric power (e.g., light at night) or factors associated with occupational EMF exposure (e.g., toxic chemicals) that may increase cancer risk and therefore act as cofactors or confounders. Epidemiology and laboratory studies should act synergistically in determining if there is a problem and identifying mitigation strategies if needed. 84 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Modern Biological Technology and Progrees in Insect Taxonomy Study%现代生物技术在昆虫分类学研究中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢寿安; 袁锋; 杨忠歧; 吕淑杰

    2001-01-01

    Modern biological technology and molecular biology play a very impo rtant role in entomotaxonomy ,especially in insect molecular systematics. With the help of these new techniques, insect molecular systematics have made a great progress .This paper reports many kinds of modern biological technology being widely used in study of entomotaxonomy, including EST isozymes,RFLP, RAPD,PCR,DNAfp,nucleic acid sequence analysis,probe hybridization and mRNA differential display, etc.T his review showed that the insect molecular systematic combined with many kinds of modern biological technology wi ll be one of the most important subjects in the near future.%综述了近十多年来现代生物技术特别是分子生物学技术在昆虫分类学方面的研究进 展概况,介绍了酯酶同工酶电泳、RFLP、RAPD、PCR、核酸序列分析、探针杂交等技术及其在昆虫分类学领域的应用情况,指出昆虫分类学特别是系统学是一门综合性很强的学科,多种生物技术综合应用是目前 昆虫分子系统学的研究方向。

  3. Smokeless tobacco-associated cancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis of Indian studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Dhirendra N; Abdulkader, Rizwan Suliankatchi; Gupta, Prakash C

    2016-03-15

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has concluded that there is sufficient evidence in humans for the carcinogenicity of smokeless tobacco (SLT) for mouth, oesophagus and pancreas, based largely on Western studies. We wanted to confirm this by conducting a systematic review using Indian studies because India faces the biggest brunt of SLT-attributable health effects. A systematic search was conducted for published and unpublished studies. Two authors independently reviewed the studies and extracted data. Summary odds ratio (OR) for each cancer type was calculated using fixed and random effects model. The population attributable fraction (PAF) method was used to calculate the attributable burden of incident cases. A significant association was found for oral-5.55 (5.07, 6.07), pharyngeal-2.69 (2.28, 3.17), laryngeal-2.84 (2.18, 3.70), oesophageal-3.17 (2.76, 3.63) and stomach-1.26 (1.00, 1.60) cancers. But in random effects model, laryngeal-1.79 (0.70, 4.54) and stomach-1.31 (0.92, 1.87) cancers became non-significantly associated. Gender-wise analysis revealed that women had a higher risk (OR = 12.0 vs. 5.16) of oral but a lower risk (1.9 vs. 4.5) of oesophageal cancer compared with men. For oral cancer, studies that adjusted for smoking, alcohol and other factors reported a significantly lower OR compared with studies that adjusted for smoking only or smoking and alcohol only (3.9 vs. 8.4). The annual number of attributable cases was calculated as 49,192 (PAF = 60%) for mouth, 14,747 (51%) for pharynx, 11,825 (40%) for larynx, 14,780 (35%) for oesophagus and 3,101 (8%) for stomach. PMID:26443187

  4. Application of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology in Medicinal Plant Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG You-ping; AI Jun-mei; XIAO Pei-gen

    2010-01-01

    One important purpose to investigate medicinal plants is to understand genes and enzymes that govern the biological metabolic process to produce bioactive compounds.Genome wide high throughput technologies such as genomics,transcriptomics,proteomics and metabolomics can help reach that goal.Such technologies can produce a vast amount of data which desperately need bioinformatics and systems biology to process,manage,distribute and understand these data.By dealing with the"omics"data,bioinformatics and systems biology can also help improve the quality of traditional medicinal materials,develop new approaches for the classification and authentication of medicinal plants,identify new active compounds,and cultivate medicinal plant species that tolerate harsh environmental conditions.In this review,the application of bioinformatics and systems biology in medicinal plants is briefly introduced.

  5. Cahaba River: Biological and Water Quality Studies, Birmingham, AL,

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Excessive sedimentation and nutrient enrichment are affecting the biology of the Cahaba Riverwatershed. Deleterious effects of sediment deposition on the fish and...

  6. Men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation: a systematic review of qualitative studies 2000-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handberg, C; Nielsen, C V; Lomborg, K

    2014-03-01

    This paper aims to report on a systematic review of qualitative studies on men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation. Nine databases were systematically searched to identify qualitative papers published between 2000 and 2013. Papers were selected by pre-defined inclusion criteria and subsequently critically appraised. Key themes were extracted and synthesised. Fifteen papers were selected and represented. Four central themes were identified in the analytical process: 'changed life perspective', 'the masculinity factor', 'a desire to get back to normal' and 'the meaning of work'. Six peripheral themes were identified: 'the meaning of context', 'music', 'physical training', 'religion', 'humour' and 'the unmentionable'. The themes were synthesised into an integrative model representing men's reflections on participating in cancer rehabilitation. We conclude that existing qualitative literature offers insight into men's reflections on cancer rehabilitation and highlights the interrelationship between men's reflections on their changed life perspective, masculinity, orientation towards a normal life and getting back to work. Further research-based knowledge is needed to explore (1) the underlying causes and patterns of the men's needs, preferences and choices in rehabilitation; and (2) the health professional perspective on male cancer rehabilitation. PMID:24118299

  7. MOOCs: A Systematic Study of the Published Literature 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharindu Rekha Liyanagunawardena

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Massive open online courses (MOOCs are a recent addition to the range of online learning options. Since 2008, MOOCs have been run by a variety of public and elite universities, especially in North America. Many academics have taken interest in MOOCs recognising the potential to deliver education around the globe on an unprecedented scale; some of these academics are taking a research-oriented perspective and academic papers describing their research are starting to appear in the traditional media of peer reviewed publications. This paper presents a systematic review of the published MOOC literature (2008-2012: Forty-five peer reviewed papers are identified through journals, database searches, searching the Web, and chaining from known sources to form the base for this review. We believe this is the first effort to systematically review literature relating to MOOCs, a fairly recent but massively popular phenomenon with a global reach. The review categorises the literature into eight different areas of interest, introductory, concept, case studies, educational theory, technology, participant focussed, provider focussed, and other, while also providing quantitative analysis of publications according to publication type, year of publication, and contributors. Future research directions guided by gaps in the literature are explored.

  8. Single-Molecule Study of Proteins by Biological Nanopore Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanopore technology has been developed for detecting properties of proteins through monitoring of ionic current modulations as protein passes via a nanosize pore. As a real-time, sensitive, selective and stable technology, biological nanopores are of widespread concern. Here, we introduce the background of nanopore researches in the area of α-hemolysin (α-HL nanopores in protein conformation detections and protein–ligand interactions. Moreover, several original biological nanopores are also introduced with various features and functions.

  9. Suspensory Materials for Surgery of Blepharoptosis: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, Elena; Mipatrini, Daniele; Pacella, Fernanda; Amorelli, Giulia; Bottone, Andrea; Smaldone, Gianpaolo; Turchetti, Paolo; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background Frontalis suspension surgery is considered the procedure of choice in cases of blepharoptosis. Among all the materials used in this type of surgery, ophthalmic and plastic surgeons prefer to use autologous Fascia Lata. However, during years, other autogenous and exogenous materials have been introduced. Objectives The aim of this study was therefore that of systematically reviewing the functional results and the rate of complications of different synthetic materials, as compared to autogenous Fascia Lata. The primary objective was to determine the rates of Successful Surgeries (SSs) of these materials. The secondary objective was to assess the onset of complications. The following materials were investigated: Fascia Lata, Mersilene, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and Silicon. Data Source and Methods Following the Prisma procedure, on January 30th, 2016 we used the following electronic databases to select the studies: MEDLINE and Scopus. Results The search strategy retrieved 48 publications that met the eligibility criteria of the systematic review. All studies were non-comparative. PTFE (n = 5) showed the best rate of SSs among the materials compared (statistically significant). Surgeries performed with autogenous Fascia Lata (n = 19) had a 87% rate of success those performed with Mersilene (n = 12)had 92% and those performed with Silicon (n = 17)88%. PTFE had the best outcome, with 99% success rate. As for complications, surgeries performed with PTFE had a higher rate of suture infections (1.9%) as compared to Fascia Lata, but lower incidence for all other complications. Conclusions Although most studies were good quality cohort studies, the overall quality of this evidence should be regarded as low due to their non-comparative design. Our data suggest that PTFE seems to be the most valid alternative material for frontalis suspension surgery, with low recurrence rates and good cosmetic and functional results. PMID:27631781

  10. Where are the systematic reviews in transfusion medicine? A study of the transfusion evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorée, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon; Brunskill, Susan J; Hopewell, Sally; Hyde, Chris J; Murphy, Mike F

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion medicine has become a large and complex specialty. Although there are now systematic reviews covering many aspects of transfusion, these span a large number of clinical areas and are published across more than a hundred different medical journals, making it difficult for transfusion medicine practitioners and researchers to keep abreast of the current high-level evidence. In response to this problem, NHS Blood and Transplant's Systematic Review Initiative (SRI) has produced a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in transfusion medicine. A systematic search (to December 2009) and screening procedure were followed by the appraisal of systematic reviews according to predefined inclusion criteria. The 340 eligible systematic reviews were mapped to 10 transfusion intervention groups and 14 topic groups within clinical medicine. Trends in the systematic review literature were examined and gaps in the literature described. The spread of systematic reviews across clinical areas was found to be very uneven, with some areas underreviewed and others with multiple systematic reviews on the same topic, making the identification of the best evidence for current transfusion practice a continuing challenge. References and links to all systematic reviews included in this overview can be freely accessed via the SRI's new online database, the Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionguidelines.org). PMID:20851331

  11. The Relationship Between Depression and Metabolic Syndrome: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza; Parizad, Naser; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Context Several studies have been conducted on the relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome, which have had conflicting results. The purpose of this study was a meta-analysis of studies that have examined the relationship between these two variables. Evidence Acquisition This meta-analysis systematically reviewed the relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome. Scientific databases including IranMedex, SID, Magiran, Scopus, PubMed, Google Scholar, and Science Direct were searched and 17 articles were extracted from 2000 to 2014. Selected studies data were analyzed using meta-analysis and random effects model. Heterogeneity between the studies was examined using I2. Data were analyzed using STATA software version 12.1. Results Seventeen studies were analyzed with a sample size of 31880 people. Analysis by the type of studies showed that the relationship between the two variables in cross-sectional studies (OR = 1.51, CI 95% = 1.36 - 1.68) and cohort studies (OR = 1.6, CI 95% = 1.23 - 2.08) was significant. In general, the heterogeneity test results among the studies was not significant (P for heterogeneity = 0.08, I2 = 39.8%). Conclusions There is a relationship between depression and metabolic syndrome. PMID:27621928

  12. The van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics awarded in 2014 to Nikos C. Kyrpides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Senate of the University of Queensland is pleased to present the van Niel International Prize for Studies in Bacterial Systematics for the triennium 2011-2014 to Dr Nikos C. Kyrpides in recognition of the contributions made to the field of bacterial systematics. The award established by Professor V. B. D. Skerman of the University of Queensland honours the contribution of scholarship in the field of microbiology by Professor Cornelis Bernardus van Niel. PMID:26184666

  13. Systematic studies of bonding distances of diindenoperylene on noble metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerker, Christoph; Gerlach, Alexander; Hosokai, Takuya; Schreiber, Frank [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Tuebingen, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Niederhausen, Jens; Koch, Norbert [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Detlefs, Blanka [ESRF, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of organic semiconducting molecules with different substrates is essential for the understanding of these systems and for possible applications in organic electronic devices. Diindenoperylene (DIP) is one promising semiconductor and has been studied widely in the recent years concerning its growth and ordering behavior on different substrates as well as electronic properties. Despite these efforts the bonding distance d{sub 0} and thus the coupling to the substrate is still an unknown key parameter of DIP adsorption. Here we present a systematic study of d{sub 0} of DIP on Cu(111), Ag(111) and Au(111) surfaces, determined by the X-ray standing wave (XSW) technique. Different bonding distances for different substrates indicate a substrate dependent interaction strength. Our results are compared with the well-established bonding distances and interaction strength of PTCDA on the same noble metal surfaces. Interesting similarities as well as differences between the two molecules are discussed.

  14. The use of wearable inertial motion sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Daniel Tik-Pui; Chan, Yue-Yan

    2010-01-01

    Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  15. The Use of Wearable Inertial Motion Sensors in Human Lower Limb Biomechanics Studies: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Yan Chan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearable motion sensors consisting of accelerometers, gyroscopes and magnetic sensors are readily available nowadays. The small size and low production costs of motion sensors make them a very good tool for human motions analysis. However, data processing and accuracy of the collected data are important issues for research purposes. In this paper, we aim to review the literature related to usage of inertial sensors in human lower limb biomechanics studies. A systematic search was done in the following search engines: ISI Web of Knowledge, Medline, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Thirty nine full papers and conference abstracts with related topics were included in this review. The type of sensor involved, data collection methods, study design, validation methods and its applications were reviewed.

  16. Systematic study of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticle photoresists

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2015-03-19

    Ligand stabilized metal oxide nanoparticle resists are promising candidates for EUV lithography due to their high sensitivity for high-resolution patterning and high etching resistance. As ligand exchange is responsible for the patterning mechanism, we systematically studied the influence of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticles on their sensitivity and dissolution behavior. ZrO2 nanoparticles were protected with various aromatic ligands with electron withdrawing and electron donating groups. These nanoparticles have lower sensitivity compared to those with aliphatic ligands suggesting the structures of these ligands is more important than their pka on resist sensitivity. The influence of ligand structure was further studied by comparing the nanoparticles’ solubility for a single type ligand to mixtures of ligands. The mixture of nanoparticles showed improved pattern quality. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  17. Systematic Review and Meta-study Synthesis of Qualitative Studies Evaluating Facilitators and Barriers to Participation in Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honein-AbouHaidar, Gladys N; Kastner, Monika; Vuong, Vincent; Perrier, Laure; Daly, Corinne; Rabeneck, Linda; Straus, Sharon; Baxter, Nancy N

    2016-06-01

    Screening reduces the incidence, morbidity, and mortality of colorectal cancer, yet participation tends to be low. We undertook a systematic review and meta-study synthesis of qualitative studies to identify facilitators and barriers to colorectal cancer screening participation. We searched major bibliographic databases for records published in all languages from inception to February 2015. Included primary studies that elicited views and perceptions towards colorectal cancer screening were appraised for relevance and quality. We used a two-stage synthesis to create an interpretation of colorectal cancer screening decisions grounded in primary studies; a thematic analysis to group themes and systematically compare studies and a meta-synthesis to generate an expanded theory of colorectal cancer screening participation. Ninety-four studies were included. The decision to participate in colorectal cancer screening depended on an individual's awareness of colorectal cancer screening. Awareness affected views of cancer, attitudes towards colorectal cancer screening modalities, and motivation for screening. Factors mediating awareness included public education to address misconceptions, primary care physician efforts to recommend screening, and the influence of friends and family. Specific barriers to participation in populations with lower participation rates included language barriers, logistical challenges to attending screening tests, and cultural beliefs. This study identifies key barriers, facilitators, and mediators to colorectal cancer screening participation. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 25(6); 907-17. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197277

  18. Determinants in the uptake of the Human Papillomavirus vaccine: a systematic review based on European studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eFernández de Casadevante

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer affecting women worldwide. Since 2006, two Human Papillomavirus vaccines (HPVV have been licensed to protect women against the virus that causes cervical cancer. However, worldwide coverage remains unequal. Studies from the USA found strong evidence for differences in HPVV uptake by ethnicity and healthcare coverage. As the profile of ethnic groups and the healthcare system in the USA differ from countries in Europe where HPVV is free in most of the countries, we conducted a systematic review in order to analyze the determinants of HPVV uptake in Europe.Methods We performed a systematic Pubmed, Scopus and Science Direct search to find articles published from HPVV availability in European countries until April 2014. No age restriction was applied. We included all studies assessing factors associated with HPVV uptake. Uptake refers to either initiation and/or completion of the three dose vaccination program. Results Out of the 23 eligible studies, 14 were retrospective reviews of data, six were cross-sectional surveys and three were prospective cohort studies. Higher HPVV uptake was associated with ethnic majority populations, higher socio-economic status, regular cervical screening participation by the mother and having received previous childhood vaccinations.Conclusions Since the vaccine is offered for free in most of the European countries, the findings suggest that ethno-cultural and educational factors play an important role when it comes to HPVV uptake. Girls who were undervaccinated had also a lower uptake of standard childhood vaccines and mothers who were less likely to attend cervical cancer screening. This may indicate, that only few parents have specific concerns with HPVV, and that preventive health care should seek ways to target these vulnerable groups.

  19. Teaching Biochemestry in Biology and Microbiology in the Faculty of Biology, University of Havana, in Studies Plan D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Oscar González Bacerio

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a review of the contents traditionally studied on Biochemistry I and II courses for Biology and Microbiology careers, at the Faculty of Biology, University of Havana, is realized. This analysis was done taking into account the agreement of contents with the Knowledge and Skills Systems recognized in the current Study Plan D. From this analysis, compa-rative with the equivalent courses on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology career, a redesign of the studied contents is presented. According to this, these con-tents were displaced, when was possible and conve-nient, from the classical mammal model to the study objects of these professionals: the living world in all its diversity, for biologists, and microorganisms and viru-ses, for microbiologists. In this manner, we use on Bio-chemistry I lectures specific examples of structure-function relationship of biomolecules from models of organisms more appropriated for the two careers. Similarly, we exploit on Biochemistry II the extraordi-nary metabolic diversity that is present in different groups of living organisms, as well as we introduced the teaching of other metabolic routes, characteristic of each group or which constitute variations of classi-cal mammalian pathways. These modifications could make easier the teaching and learning of Biochemistry for biologists and microbiologists, as well as could increase the contribution of these courses to the for-mation of professionals in these domains of Biological Sciences.

  20. GIS measured environmental correlates of active school transport: A systematic review of 14 studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faulkner Guy

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging frameworks to examine active school transportation (AST commonly emphasize the built environment (BE as having an influence on travel mode decisions. Objective measures of BE attributes have been recommended for advancing knowledge about the influence of the BE on school travel mode choice. An updated systematic review on the relationships between GIS-measured BE attributes and AST is required to inform future research in this area. The objectives of this review are: i to examine and summarize the relationships between objectively measured BE features and AST in children and adolescents and ii to critically discuss GIS methodologies used in this context. Methods Six electronic databases, and websites were systematically searched, and reference lists were searched and screened to identify studies examining AST in students aged five to 18 and reporting GIS as an environmental measurement tool. Fourteen cross-sectional studies were identified. The analyses were classified in terms of density, diversity, and design and further differentiated by the measures used or environmental condition examined. Results Only distance was consistently found to be negatively associated with AST. Consistent findings of positive or negative associations were not found for land use mix, residential density, and intersection density. Potential modifiers of any relationship between these attributes and AST included age, school travel mode, route direction (e.g., to/from school, and trip-end (home or school. Methodological limitations included inconsistencies in geocoding, selection of study sites, buffer methods and the shape of zones (Modifiable Areal Unit Problem [MAUP], the quality of road and pedestrian infrastructure data, and school route estimation. Conclusions The inconsistent use of spatial concepts limits the ability to draw conclusions about the relationship between objectively measured environmental attributes and AST. Future

  1. Biology, literacy, and the African American voice: A case study of meaningful learning in the biology classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Keturah

    Under the direction of Sharon Murphy Augustine, Ph.D./Ph.D Curriculum and Instruction There was a substantial performance gap among African Americans and other ethnic groups. Additionally, African American students in a Title I school were at a significantly high risk of not meeting or exceeding on performance tests in science. Past reports have shown average gains in some subject areas, and declines in others (NCES, 2011; GADOE, 2012). Current instructional strategies and the lack of literacy within the biology classroom created a problem for African American high school students on national and state assessments. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of African American students and teachers in the context of literacy and biology through the incorporation of an interactive notebook and other literacy strategies. The data was collected three ways: field notes for a two week observation period within the biology classroom, student and teacher interviews, and student work samples. During the observations, student work collection, and interviews, I looked for the following codes: active learning, constructive learning, collaborative learning, authentic learning, and intentional learning. In the process of coding for the pre-determined codes, three more codes emerged. The three codes that emerged were organization, studying/student ownership, and student teacher relationships. Students and teachers both solidified the notion that literacy and biology worked well together. The implemented literacy strategies were something that both teachers and students appreciated in their learning of biology. Overall students and teachers perceived that the interactive notebook along Cornell notes, Thinking maps, close reads, writing, lab experiments, and group work created meaningful learning experiences within the biology classroom.

  2. Systematic reviews: a cross-sectional study of location and citation counts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Douglas

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic reviews summarize all pertinent evidence on a defined health question. They help clinical scientists to direct their research and clinicians to keep updated. Our objective was to determine the extent to which systematic reviews are clustered in a large collection of clinical journals and whether review type (narrative or systematic affects citation counts. Methods We used hand searches of 170 clinical journals in the fields of general internal medicine, primary medical care, nursing, and mental health to identify review articles (year 2000. We defined 'review' as any full text article that was bannered as a review, overview, or meta-analysis in the title or in a section heading, or that indicated in the text that the intention of the authors was to review or summarize the literature on a particular topic. We obtained citation counts for review articles in the five journals that published the most systematic reviews. Results 11% of the journals concentrated 80% of all systematic reviews. Impact factors were weakly correlated with the publication of systematic reviews (R2 = 0.075, P = 0.0035. There were more citations for systematic reviews (median 26.5, IQR 12 – 56.5 than for narrative reviews (8, 20, P Conclusions A few clinical journals published most systematic reviews. Authors cited systematic reviews more often than narrative reviews, an indirect endorsement of the 'hierarchy of evidence'.

  3. Systematic literature review to evaluate and characterize the health economics and outcomes research studies in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This systematic literature review was conducted to identify, evaluate, and characterize the variety, quality, and intent of the health economics and outcomes research studies being conducted in India. Materials and Methods: Studies published in English language between 1999 and 2012 were retrieved from Embase and PubMed databases using relevant search strategies. Two researchers independently reviewed the studies as per Cochrane methodology; information on the type of research and the outcomes were extracted. Quality of reporting was assessed for model-based health economic studies using a published 100-point Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES instrument. Results: Of 546 studies screened, 132 were included in the review. The broad study categories were cost-effectiveness analyses [(CEA 54 studies], cost analyses (19 studies, and burden of illness [(BOI 18 studies]. The outcomes evaluated were direct and indirect costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs, and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs. Direct medical costs assessed cost of medicines, monitoring costs, consultation and hospital charges, along with direct non-medical costs (travel and food for patients and care givers. Loss of productivity and loss of income of patients and care givers were identified as the components of indirect cost. Overall, 33 studies assessed the quality of life (QoL, and the WHO Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF was the most commonly used instrument. Quality assessment for modeling studies showed that most studies were of high quality [mean (range QHES score to be 75.5 (34-93]. Conclusions: This review identified various patterns of pharmacoeconomic studies and good-quality CEA studies. However, there is a need for better assessment of utilization of healthcare resources in India.

  4. Reporting of Adverse Events in Published and Unpublished Studies of Health Care Interventions: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golder, Su; Wright, Kath

    2016-01-01

    Background We performed a systematic review to assess whether we can quantify the underreporting of adverse events (AEs) in the published medical literature documenting the results of clinical trials as compared with other nonpublished sources, and whether we can measure the impact this underreporting has on systematic reviews of adverse events. Methods and Findings Studies were identified from 15 databases (including MEDLINE and Embase) and by handsearching, reference checking, internet searches, and contacting experts. The last database searches were conducted in July 2016. There were 28 methodological evaluations that met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 9 studies compared the proportion of trials reporting adverse events by publication status. The median percentage of published documents with adverse events information was 46% compared to 95% in the corresponding unpublished documents. There was a similar pattern with unmatched studies, for which 43% of published studies contained adverse events information compared to 83% of unpublished studies. A total of 11 studies compared the numbers of adverse events in matched published and unpublished documents. The percentage of adverse events that would have been missed had each analysis relied only on the published versions varied between 43% and 100%, with a median of 64%. Within these 11 studies, 24 comparisons of named adverse events such as death, suicide, or respiratory adverse events were undertaken. In 18 of the 24 comparisons, the number of named adverse events was higher in unpublished than published documents. Additionally, 2 other studies demonstrated that there are substantially more types of adverse events reported in matched unpublished than published documents. There were 20 meta-analyses that reported the odds ratios (ORs) and/or risk ratios (RRs) for adverse events with and without unpublished data. Inclusion of unpublished data increased the precision of the pooled estimates (narrower 95

  5. The systematization of practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2002-01-01

    this paper presents an approach for the systematization of practical experiences whitin Operations Research, Community work, Systems Sciences, Action Research, etc. A case study is presented: the systematization of the activities of a development center in Denmark.......this paper presents an approach for the systematization of practical experiences whitin Operations Research, Community work, Systems Sciences, Action Research, etc. A case study is presented: the systematization of the activities of a development center in Denmark....

  6. Breastfeeding, Bottle Feeding Practices and Malocclusion in the Primary Dentition: A Systematic Review of Cohort Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Hermont

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breast feeding for at least six months. However, there is no scientific evidence of the benefits of breast feeding for oral health in children under primary dentition. This study aimed to search for scientific evidence regarding the following question: is bottle feeding associated with malocclusion in the primary dentition compared to children that are breastfed? An electronic search was performed in seven databases. The systematic review included 10 cohort studies. It was not possible to conduct meta-analysis; therefore a qualitative analysis was assessed. The majority of studies evaluated feeding habits by means of questionnaires and conducted a single examination. Three studies observed that bottle feeding was significantly associated with overjet and posterior crossbite. Studies reported several cut-off times for breastfeeding (varying from 1 month up to 3 years of age and several types of malocclusion. Controlling for non-nutritive sucking habits was reported for only half of the studies and this may have led to biased results. The scientific evidence could not confirm a specific type of malocclusion associated with the feeding habits or an adequate time of breastfeeding to benefit the children against malocclusion. Further cohort studies are needed to confirm this evidence.

  7. Lifestyle Interventions to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review of Economic Evaluation Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alouki, Koffi; Delisle, Hélène; Bermúdez-Tamayo, Clara; Johri, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To summarize key findings of economic evaluations of lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in high-risk subjects. Methods. We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed original studies published since January 2009 in English, French, and Spanish. Eligible studies were identified through relevant databases including PubMed, Medline, National Health Services Economic Evaluation, CINHAL, EconLit, Web of sciences, EMBASE, and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature. Studies targeting obesity were also included. Data were extracted using a standardized method. The BMJ checklist was used to assess study quality. The heterogeneity of lifestyle interventions precluded a meta-analysis. Results. Overall, 20 studies were retained, including six focusing on obesity control. Seven were conducted within trials and 13 using modeling techniques. T2D prevention by physical activity or diet or both proved cost-effective according to accepted thresholds, except for five inconclusive studies, three on diabetes prevention and two on obesity control. Most studies exhibited limitations in reporting results, primarily with regard to generalizability and justification of selected sensitivity parameters. Conclusion. This confirms that lifestyle interventions for the primary prevention of diabetes are cost-effective. Such interventions should be further promoted as sound investment in the fight against diabetes. PMID:26885527

  8. Obesity and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review of prospective studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlei Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mounting evidence indicates that obesity may be associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC. To conduct a systematic review of prospective studies assessing the association of obesity with the risk of CRC using meta-analysis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Relevant studies were identified by a search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases before January 2012, with no restrictions. We also reviewed reference lists from retrieved articles. We included prospective studies that reported relative risk (RR estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between general obesity [measured using body mass index (BMI] or central obesity [measured using waist circumference (WC] and the risk of colorectal, colon, or rectal cancer. Approximately 9, 000, 000 participants from several countries were included in this analysis. 41 studies on general obesity and 13 studies on central obesity were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled RRs of CRC for the obese vs. normal category of BMI were 1.334 (95% CI, 1.253-1.420, and the highest vs. lowest category of WC were 1.455 (95% CI, 1.327-1.596. There was heterogeneity among studies of BMI (P<0.001 but not among studies of WC (P=0.323. CONCLUSIONS: Both of general and central obesity were positively associated with the risk of CRC in this meta-analysis.

  9. The parent–child relationship and adolescent alcohol use: a systematic review of longitudinal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visser Leenke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol use among adolescents has become a major public health problem in the past decade and has large short- and long-term consequences on their health. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an overview of longitudinal cohort studies that have analyzed the association between the parent–child relationship (PCR and change in alcohol use during adolescence. Methods A search of the literature from 1985 to July 2011 was conducted in Medline, PsycINFO, and EMBASE in order to identify longitudinal, general population studies regarding the influence of the PCR on alcohol use during adolescence. The studies were screened, and the quality of the relevant studies was assessed. A best-evidence synthesis was used to summarize the results. Results Twenty-eight relevant studies were identified. Five studies found that a negative PCR was associated with higher levels of alcohol use. Another seven papers only found this association for certain subgroups such as boys or girls, or a specific age group. The remaining sixteen studies did not find any association. Conclusions We found weak evidence for a prospective association between the PCR and adolescent alcohol use. Further research to the association of the PCR with several types of alcohol use (e.g., initiation or abuse and to the potential reversed causality of the PCR and alcohol use is required.

  10. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J.; Dimitrov, Kiril M.; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P.; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J.; Swayne, David E.; Suarez, David L.; Afonso, Claudio L.

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  11. International biological engagement programs facilitate Newcastle disease epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti J. Miller

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV cause Newcastle disease (ND, one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs (BEP between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employees and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral

  12. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Swayne, David E; Suarez, David L; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  13. International Biological Engagement Programs Facilitate Newcastle Disease Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Patti J; Dimitrov, Kiril M; Williams-Coplin, Dawn; Peterson, Melanie P; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Swayne, David E; Suarez, David L; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Infections of poultry species with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) cause Newcastle disease (ND), one of the most economically significant and devastating diseases for poultry producers worldwide. Biological engagement programs between the Southeast Poultry Research Laboratory (SEPRL) of the United States Department of Agriculture and laboratories from Russia, Pakistan, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, and Indonesia collectively have produced a better understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of the viruses responsible for ND, which is crucial for the control of the disease. The data from Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine identified possible migratory routes for birds that may carry both virulent NDV (vNDV) and NDV of low virulence into Europe. In addition, related NDV strains were isolated from wild birds in Ukraine and Nigeria, and from birds in continental USA, Alaska, Russia, and Japan, identifying wild birds as a possible mechanism of intercontinental spread of NDV of low virulence. More recently, the detection of new sub-genotypes of vNDV suggests that a new, fifth, panzootic of ND has already originated in Southeast Asia, extended to the Middle East, and is now entering into Eastern Europe. Despite expected challenges when multiple independent laboratories interact, many scientists from the collaborating countries have successfully been trained by SEPRL on molecular diagnostics, best laboratory practices, and critical biosecurity protocols, providing our partners the capacity to further train other employes and to identify locally the viruses that cause this OIE listed disease. These and other collaborations with partners in Mexico, Bulgaria, Israel, and Tanzania have allowed SEPRL scientists to engage in field studies, to elucidate more aspects of ND epidemiology in endemic countries, and to understand the challenges that the scientists and field veterinarians in these countries face on a daily basis. Finally, new viral characterization tools

  14. The wetland continuum: a conceptual framework for interpreting biological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliss, N.H., Jr.; LaBaugh, J.W.; Fredrickson, L.H.; Mushet, D.M.; Swanson, G.A.; Winter, T.C.; Rosenberry, D.O.; Nelson, R.D.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a conceptual model, the wetland continuum, which allows wetland managers, scientists, and ecologists to consider simultaneously the influence of climate and hydrologic setting on wetland biological communities. Although multidimensional, the wetland continuum is most easily represented as a two-dimensional gradient, with ground water and atmospheric water constituting the horizontal and vertical axis, respectively. By locating the position of a wetland on both axes of the continuum, the potential biological expression of the wetland can be predicted at any point in time. The model provides a framework useful in the organization and interpretation of biological data from wetlands by incorporating the dynamic changes these systems undergo as a result of normal climatic variation rather than placing them into static categories common to many wetland classification systems. While we developed this model from the literature available for depressional wetlands in the prairie pothole region of North America, we believe the concept has application to wetlands in many other geographic locations.

  15. RANDOM AND SYSTEMATIC FIELD ERRORS IN THE SNS RING: A STUDY OF THEIR EFFECTS AND COMPENSATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GARDNER,C.J.; LEE,Y.Y.; WENG,W.T.

    1998-06-22

    The Accumulator Ring for the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) [l] is to accept a 1 ms beam pulse from a 1 GeV Proton Linac at a repetition rate of 60 Hz. For each beam pulse, 10{sup 14} protons (some 1,000 turns) are to be accumulated via charge-exchange injection and then promptly extracted to an external target for the production of neutrons by spallation. At this very high intensity, stringent limits (less than two parts in 10,000 per pulse) on beam loss during accumulation must be imposed in order to keep activation of ring components at an acceptable level. To stay within the desired limit, the effects of random and systematic field errors in the ring require careful attention. This paper describes the authors studies of these effects and the magnetic corrector schemes for their compensation.

  16. Systematic Angular Study of Magnetoresistance in Permalloy Connected Kagome Artificial Spin Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsik; Le, Brian; Watts, Justin; Leighton, Chris; Samarth, Nitin; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ices are nanostructured two-dimensional arrays of ferromagnetic elements, where frustrated interactions lead to unusual collective magnetic behavior. Here we report a room-temperature magnetoresistance study of connected permalloy (Ni81Fe19) kagome artificial spin ice networks, wherein the direction of the applied in-plane magnetic field is systematically varied. We measure both the longitudinal and transverse magnetoresistance in these structures, and we find certain transport geometries of the network show strong angular sensitivity - even small variations in the applied field angle lead to dramatic changes of the magnetoresistance response. We also investigate the magnetization reversal of the networks using magnetic force microscopy (MFM), demonstrating avalanche behavior in the magnetization reversal. The magnetoresistance features are analyzed using an anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) model. Supported by the US Department of Energy. Work at the University of Minnesota was supported by Seagate Technology, NSF MRSEC, and a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme.

  17. A systematical study of neutron-rich Zr isotopes by the projected shell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the structure of neutron-rich nuclei and to validate the existing theoretical model for the exotic mass region, we study systematically strongly-deformed, neutron-rich even-even and odd-mass Zr isotopes with neutron number 61-66. With the projected shell model, the known experimental data are reproduced and some low-lying side-bands are predicted. The influence of the high-jh11/2 neutron orbital and the g9/2 proton orbital on the structure properties is investigated. For even-even isotopes, the structure of multi-quasiparticle bands is analyzed and some properties of the yrast line are described in detail. For odd-neutron isotopes, the discussion is focused on the excited single-particle configurations. Our predictions may help future experiments with identification of band structures in the very neutron-rich nuclei.

  18. Systematic study of 16O-induced fusions with the improved quantum molecular dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ning; Li, Zhuxia

    2014-01-01

    The heavy-ion fusion reactions with 16O bombarding on 62Ni, 65Cu, 74Ge, 148Nd, 180Hf, 186W, 208Pb, 238U are systematically investigated with the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model. The fusion cross sections at energies near and above the Coulomb barriers can be reasonably well reproduced by using this semi-classical microscopic transport model with the parameter sets SkP* and IQ3a. The dynamical nucleus-nucleus potentials and the influence of Fermi constraint on the fusion process are also studied simultaneously. In addition to the mean field, the Fermi constraint also plays a key role for the reliable description of fusion process and for improving the stability of fragments in heavy-ion collisions.

  19. Systematic study of doping dependence on linear magnetoresistance in p-PbTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, J. M.; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, PB 66318, São Paulo CEP 05315-970 (Brazil); Peres, M. L., E-mail: marcelos@unifei.edu.br; Castro, S. de; Soares, D. A. W. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Federal de Itajubá, Itajubá, PB 50, Minas Gerais CEP 37500-903 (Brazil); Wiedmann, S.; Zeitler, U. [Radboud University Nijmegen, Institute for Molecules and Materials, High Field Magnet Laboratory, Toernooiveld 7, 6525 ED Nijmegen (Netherlands); Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Mengui, U. A. [Laboratório Associado de Sensores e Materiais, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, São José dos Campos, PB 515, São Paulo CEP 12201-970 (Brazil)

    2014-10-20

    We report on a large linear magnetoresistance effect observed in doped p-PbTe films. While undoped p-PbTe reveals a sublinear magnetoresistance, p-PbTe films doped with BaF{sub 2} exhibit a transition to a nearly perfect linear magnetoresistance behaviour that is persistent up to 30 T. The linear magnetoresistance slope ΔR/ΔB is to a good approximation, independent of temperature. This is in agreement with the theory of Quantum Linear Magnetoresistance. We also performed magnetoresistance simulations using a classical model of linear magnetoresistance. We found that this model fails to explain the experimental data. A systematic study of the doping dependence reveals that the linear magnetoresistance response has a maximum for small BaF{sub 2} doping levels and diminishes rapidly for increasing doping levels. Exploiting the huge impact of doping on the linear magnetoresistance signal could lead to new classes of devices with giant magnetoresistance behavior.

  20. What are the health benefits of active travel? A systematic review of trials and cohort studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda E Saunders

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Increasing active travel (primarily walking and cycling has been widely advocated for reducing obesity levels and achieving other population health benefits. However, the strength of evidence underpinning this strategy is unclear. This study aimed to assess the evidence that active travel has significant health benefits. METHODS: The study design was a systematic review of (i non-randomised and randomised controlled trials, and (ii prospective observational studies examining either (a the effects of interventions to promote active travel or (b the association between active travel and health outcomes. Reports of studies were identified by searching 11 electronic databases, websites, reference lists and papers identified by experts in the field. Prospective observational and intervention studies measuring any health outcome of active travel in the general population were included. Studies of patient groups were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four studies from 12 countries were included, of which six were studies conducted with children. Five studies evaluated active travel interventions. Nineteen were prospective cohort studies which did not evaluate the impact of a specific intervention. No studies were identified with obesity as an outcome in adults; one of five prospective cohort studies in children found an association between obesity and active travel. Small positive effects on other health outcomes were found in five intervention studies, but these were all at risk of selection bias. Modest benefits for other health outcomes were identified in five prospective studies. There is suggestive evidence that active travel may have a positive effect on diabetes prevention, which may be an important area for future research. CONCLUSIONS: Active travel may have positive effects on health outcomes, but there is little robust evidence to date of the effectiveness of active transport interventions for reducing obesity. Future evaluations of such

  1. Arachidonic Acid and Cerebral Ischemia Risk: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Sakai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Arachidonic acid (ARA is a precursor of various lipid mediators. ARA metabolites such as thromboxane A2 cause platelet aggregation and vasoconstriction, thus may lead to atherosclerotic disease. It is unclear whether dietary ARA influences the ARA-derived lipid mediator balance and the risk for atherosclerotic diseases, such as cerebral ischemia. Considering the function of ARA in atherosclerosis, it is reasonable to focus on the atherothrombotic type of cerebral ischemia risk. However, no systematic reviews or meta-analyses have been conducted to evaluate the effect of habitual ARA exposure on cerebral ischemia risk. We aimed to systematically evaluate observational studies available on the relationship between ARA exposure and the atherothrombotic type of cerebral ischemia risk in free-living populations. Summary: The PubMed database was searched for articles registered up to June 24, 2014. We designed a PubMed search formula as follows: key words for humans AND brain ischemia AND study designs AND ARA exposure. Thirty-three articles were reviewed against predefined criteria. There were 695 bibliographies assessed from the articles that included both ARA and cerebral ischemia descriptions. Finally, we identified 11 eligible articles and categorized them according to their reporting and methodological quality. We used the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology Statement (STROBE checklist to score the reporting quality. The methodological quality was qualitatively assessed based on the following aspects: subject selection, ARA exposure assessment, outcome diagnosis, methods for controlling confounders, and statistical analysis. We did not conduct a meta-analysis due to the heterogeneity among the studies. All eligible studies measured blood ARA levels as an indicator of exposure. Our literature search did not identify any articles that evaluated dietary ARA intake and tissue ARA as assessments of

  2. A systematic study of evolved supernova remnants in the large and small Magellanic Clouds with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Tamagawa, Toru

    2016-06-01

    Identifying the origin type (i.e., Type Ia or core-collapse) of supernova remnants (SNRs) is crucial to determining the rates of supernova (SN) explosions in a galaxy, which is a key to understanding its recent chemical evolution. However, evolved SNRs in the so-called Sedov phase are dominated by the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM), making it difficult to determine their ejecta composition and thus SN type. Here we present a systematic X-ray study of nine evolved SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, DEM L238, DEM L249, 0534-69.9, 0548-70.4, B0532-71.0, B0532-67.5, 0103-72.6, 0049-73.6, and 0104-72.3, using archival data of the Suzaku satellite. Although Suzaku does not spatially resolve the SN ejecta from the swept-up ISM due to the limited angular resolution, its excellent energy resolution has enabled clear separation of emission lines in the soft X-ray band. This leads to the finding that the "spatially integrated" spectra of the evolved (˜104 yr) SNRs are still significantly contributed by emission from the ejecta at energies around 1 keV. The Fe/Ne mass ratios, determined mainly from the well-resolved Fe L-shell and Ne K-shell lines, clearly divide the observed SNRs into the Type Ia and core-collapse groups, confirming some previous typing made by Chandra observations that had utilized its extremely high angular resolution. This demonstrates that spatially integrated X-ray spectra of old SNRs can also be used to discriminate their progenitor type, which would be helpful for future systematic studies of extragalactic SNRs with ASTRO-H and beyond.

  3. A systematic review of determinants of sedentary behaviour in youth: a DEDIPAC-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stierlin, Annabel S; De Lepeleere, Sara; Cardon, Greet; Dargent-Molina, Patricia; Hoffmann, Belinda; Murphy, Marie H; Kennedy, Aileen; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Chastin, Sebastien F M; De Craemer, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Sedentary behaviour (SB) has emerged as a potential risk factor for metabolic health in youth. Knowledge on the determinants of SB in youth is necessary to inform future intervention development to reduce SB. A systematic review was conducted to identify predictors and determinants of SB in youth. Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science were searched, limiting to articles in English, published between January 2000 and May 2014. The search strategy was based on four key elements and their synonyms: (a) sedentary behaviour, (b) determinants, (c) types of sedentary behaviours, (d) types of determinants. The full protocol is available from PROSPERO (PROSPERO 2014:CRD42014009823). Cross-sectional studies were excluded. The analysis was guided by the socio-ecological model. 37 studies were selected out of 2654 identified papers from the systematic literature search. Most studies were conducted in Europe (n = 13), USA (n = 11), and Australia (n = 10). The study quality, using the Qualsyst tool, was high with a median of 82% (IQR: 74-91%). Multiple potential determinants were studied in only one or two studies. Determinants were found at the individual, interpersonal, environmental and policy level but few studies examined a comprehensive set of factors at different levels of influences. Evidence was found for age being positively associated with total SB, and weight status and baseline assessment of screen time being positively associated with screen time (at follow-up). A higher playground density and a higher availability of play and sports equipment at school were consistently related to an increased total SB, although these consistent findings come from single studies. Evidence was also reported for the presence of safe places to cross roads and lengthening morning and lunch breaks being associated with less total SB. Future interventions to decrease SB levels should especially target children with overweight or obesity and should start at a

  4. Renal Perfusion and Function during Pneumoperitoneum: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warlé, Michiel C.; Hooijmans, Carlijn R.

    2016-01-01

    Both preclinical and clinical studies indicate that raised intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) associated with pneumoperitoneum during laparoscopic surgical procedures can cause renal damage, the severity of which may be influenced by variables such as pressure level and duration. Several of these variables have been investigated in animal studies, but synthesis of all preclinical data has not been performed. This systematic review summarizes all available pre-clinical evidence on this topic, including an assessment of its quality and risk of bias. We performed meta-analysis to assess which aspects of the pneumoperitoneum determine the severity of its adverse effects. A systematic search in two databases identified 55 studies on the effect of pneumoperitoneum on renal function which met our inclusion criteria. There was high heterogeneity between the studies regarding study design, species, sex, pressure and duration of pneumoperitoneum, and type of gas used. Measures to reduce bias were poorly reported, leading to an unclear risk of bias in the majority of studies. Details on randomisation, blinding and a sample size calculation were not reported in ≥80% of the studies. Meta-analysis showed an overall increase in serum creatinine during pneumoperitoneum, and a decrease in urine output and renal blood flow. Subgroup analysis indicated that for serum creatinine, this effect differed between species. Subgroup analysis of pressure level indicated that urine output decreased as IAP level increased. No differences between types of gas were observed. Data were insufficient to reliably assess whether sex or IAP duration modulate the effect of pneumoperitoneum. Four studies assessing long-term effects indicated that serum creatinine normalized ≥24 hours after desufflation of pneumoperitoneum at 15mmHg. We conclude that harmful effects on renal function and perfusion during pneumoperitoneum appear to be robust, but evidence on long-term effects is very limited. The

  5. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Oehme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed.

  6. Study on Biological Characters of Asparagus macowanii Baker.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Asparagus macowanfi Baker, is a climbing herbaceous foliage species in genus Asparagus of Liliaceae, This paper summarized its multiple uses, morphologi- cal characteristics, biological habit, reproduction methods, management after cultiva- tion, prevention and control of pests and disease, as well as harvest and grading, with the objective to provide references for the exploitation and utilization of As- paragus macowanii Baker.

  7. Studying of Phenomenon of Biological Adaptation to Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Oleg Mosin; Ignat Ignatov; Dmitry Skladnev; Vitaly Shvets

    2014-01-01

    Biological influence of deuterium on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eucaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates (methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, chemoheterotrophic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, photo-organotrophic halobacteria Halobacterium halobium, and green micro algae Chlorella vulgaris) was investigated at the growth on media with heavy wate...

  8. Mössbauer study of some biological iron complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sikander Ali; Alimuddin; V R Reddy

    2005-12-01

    Some biological complexes containing iron are investigated experimentally at room temperature using the Mössbauer resonance. The complexes show quadrupole doublet and Kramer's degeneracy is found to exist. The electric field gradient, difference in -electron densities and quadrupole coupling constant have been calculated in each case. These parameters are used to obtain information on the surroundings of the Mössbauer atom.

  9. Do biological measures mediate the relationship between education and health: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Noreen; Turra, Cassio M; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Weir, David; Crimmins, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Despite a myriad of studies examining the relationship between socioeconomic status and health outcomes, few have assessed the extent to which biological markers of chronic disease account for social disparities in health. Studies that have examined this issue have generally been based on surveys in wealthy countries that include a small set of clinical markers of cardiovascular disease. The availability of recent data from nationally representative surveys of older adults in Costa Rica and Taiwan that collected a rich set of biomarkers comparable to those in a recent US survey permits us to explore these associations across diverse populations. Similar regression models were estimated on three data sets - the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study in Taiwan, the Costa Rican Study on Longevity and Healthy Aging, and the Health and Retirement Study in the USA - in order to assess (1) the strength of the associations between educational attainment and a broad range of biomarkers; and (2) the extent to which these biomarkers account for the relationships between education and two measures of health status (self-rated health, functional limitations) in older populations. The estimates suggest non-systematic and weak associations between education and high risk biomarker values in Taiwan and Costa Rica, in contrast to generally negative and significant associations in the US, especially among women. The results also reveal negligible or modest contributions of the biomarkers to educational disparities in the health outcomes. The findings are generally consistent with previous research suggesting stronger associations between socioeconomic status and health in wealthy countries than in middle-income countries and may reflect higher levels of social stratification in the US. With access to an increasing number of longitudinal biosocial surveys, researchers may be better able to distinguish true variations in the relationship between socioeconomic status and

  10. Systematic design of membership functions for fuzzy-logic control: A case study on one-stage partial nitritation/anammox treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2016-10-01

    A methodology is developed to systematically design the membership functions of fuzzy-logic controllers for multivariable systems. The methodology consists of a systematic derivation of the critical points of the membership functions as a function of predefined control objectives. Several constrained optimization problems corresponding to different qualitative operation states of the system are defined and solved to identify, in a consistent manner, the critical points of the membership functions for the input variables. The consistently identified critical points, together with the linguistic rules, determine the long term reachability of the control objectives by the fuzzy logic controller. The methodology is highlighted using a single-stage side-stream partial nitritation/Anammox reactor as a case study. As a result, a new fuzzy-logic controller for high and stable total nitrogen removal efficiency is designed. Rigorous simulations are carried out to evaluate and benchmark the performance of the controller. The results demonstrate that the novel control strategy is capable of rejecting the long-term influent disturbances, and can achieve a stable and high TN removal efficiency. Additionally, the controller was tested, and showed robustness, against measurement noise levels typical for wastewater sensors. A feedforward-feedback configuration using the present controller would give even better performance. In comparison, a previously developed fuzzy-logic controller using merely expert and intuitive knowledge performed worse. This proved the importance of using a systematic methodology for the derivation of the membership functions for multivariable systems. These results are promising for future applications of the controller in real full-scale plants. Furthermore, the methodology can be used as a tool to help systematically design fuzzy logic control applications for other biological processes. PMID:27390035

  11. Systematic design of membership functions for fuzzy-logic control: A case study on one-stage partial nitritation/anammox treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiocchi, Riccardo; Gernaey, Krist V; Sin, Gürkan

    2016-10-01

    A methodology is developed to systematically design the membership functions of fuzzy-logic controllers for multivariable systems. The methodology consists of a systematic derivation of the critical points of the membership functions as a function of predefined control objectives. Several constrained optimization problems corresponding to different qualitative operation states of the system are defined and solved to identify, in a consistent manner, the critical points of the membership functions for the input variables. The consistently identified critical points, together with the linguistic rules, determine the long term reachability of the control objectives by the fuzzy logic controller. The methodology is highlighted using a single-stage side-stream partial nitritation/Anammox reactor as a case study. As a result, a new fuzzy-logic controller for high and stable total nitrogen removal efficiency is designed. Rigorous simulations are carried out to evaluate and benchmark the performance of the controller. The results demonstrate that the novel control strategy is capable of rejecting the long-term influent disturbances, and can achieve a stable and high TN removal efficiency. Additionally, the controller was tested, and showed robustness, against measurement noise levels typical for wastewater sensors. A feedforward-feedback configuration using the present controller would give even better performance. In comparison, a previously developed fuzzy-logic controller using merely expert and intuitive knowledge performed worse. This proved the importance of using a systematic methodology for the derivation of the membership functions for multivariable systems. These results are promising for future applications of the controller in real full-scale plants. Furthermore, the methodology can be used as a tool to help systematically design fuzzy logic control applications for other biological processes.

  12. Eysenbach, Tuische and Diepgen’s Evaluation of Web Searching for Identifying Unpublished Studies for Systematic Reviews: An Innovative Study Which is Still Relevant Today.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Briscoe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Eysenbach, G., Tuische, J. & Diepgen, T.L. (2001. Evaluation of the usefulness of Internet searches to identify unpublished clinical trials for systematic reviews. Medical Informatics and the Internet in Medicine, 26(3, 203-218. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14639230110075459 Objective – To consider whether web searching is a useful method for identifying unpublished studies for inclusion in systematic reviews. Design – Retrospective web searches using the AltaVista search engine were conducted to identify unpublished studies – specifically, clinical trials – for systematic reviews which did not use a web search engine. Setting – The Department of Clinical Social Medicine, University of Heidelberg, Germany. Subjects – n/a Methods – Pilot testing of 11 web search engines was carried out to determine which could handle complex search queries. Pre-specified search requirements included the ability to handle Boolean and proximity operators, and truncation searching. A total of seven Cochrane systematic reviews were randomly selected from the Cochrane Library Issue 2, 1998, and their bibliographic database search strategies were adapted for the web search engine, AltaVista. Each adaptation combined search terms for the intervention, problem, and study type in the systematic review. Hints to planned, ongoing, or unpublished studies retrieved by the search engine, which were not cited in the systematic reviews, were followed up by visiting websites and contacting authors for further details when required. The authors of the systematic reviews were then contacted and asked to comment on the potential relevance of the identified studies. Main Results – Hints to 14 unpublished and potentially relevant studies, corresponding to 4 of the 7 randomly selected Cochrane systematic reviews, were identified. Out of the 14 studies, 2 were considered irrelevant to the corresponding systematic review by the systematic review authors. The

  13. Reviewing the literature, how systematic is systematic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLure, Katie; Paudyal, Vibhu; Stewart, Derek

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Professor Archibald Cochrane, after whom the Cochrane Collaboration is named, was influential in promoting evidence-based clinical practice. He called for "relevant, valid research" to underpin all aspects of healthcare. Systematic reviews of the literature are regarded as a high quality source of cumulative evidence but it is unclear how truly systematic they, or other review articles, are or 'how systematic is systematic?' Today's evidence-based review industry is a burgeoning mix of specialist terminology, collaborations and foundations, databases, portals, handbooks, tools, criteria and training courses. Aim of the review This study aims to identify uses and types of reviews, key issues in planning, conducting, reporting and critiquing reviews, and factors which limit claims to be systematic. Method A rapid review of review articles published in IJCP. Results This rapid review identified 17 review articles published in IJCP between 2010 and 2015 inclusive. It explored the use of different types of review article, the variation and widely available range of guidelines, checklists and criteria which, through systematic application, aim to promote best practice. It also identified common pitfalls in endeavouring to conduct reviews of the literature systematically. Discussion Although a limited set of IJCP reviews were identified, there is clear evidence of the variation in adoption and application of systematic methods. The burgeoning evidence industry offers the tools and guidelines required to conduct systematic reviews, and other types of review, systematically. This rapid review was limited to the database of one journal over a period of 6 years. Although this review was conducted systematically, it is not presented as a systematic review. Conclusion As a research community we have yet to fully engage with readily available guidelines and tools which would help to avoid the common pitfalls. Therefore the question remains, of not just IJCP but

  14. State of Science, “Intuition in Nursing Practice”: A Systematic Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Parkhide; Jalali, Rostam

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There were many attempts for introducing “intuition” to nursing practice, But despite the efficacy, it has been ignored as a valid way of knowing. Therefore the current study was conducted for evaluating the state of sciences to intuition in nursing practice. Materials and Methods In a systematic review study, all researches, published from 1995 to 2014, were searched in the databases of “PubMed”, using “intuition” and “nursing” keywords. The abstract of articles were read in scrutiny, then the related researches selected, thereafter the full text of them was assessed carefully. Results From searching the databases, 144 articles with “intuition and nursing” were found, 53 as original research, and 15 with inclusion criteria were selected. Most of the studies had qualitative approaches design as phenomenology (N=4), content analyses (N=2) and grounded theory (N=1), six was done for developing the instrument, and two studies have been conducted as descriptive method. Conclusion The results revealed the researches about intuition in nursing mostly were conducted with qualitative and instrument developing methodology and there is a lack of quantitative and trial studies. PMID:27042483

  15. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael G. dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline. Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies were identified, of which 21 met the established criteria. Studies in animals have shown anxiolytic and antidepressive effects of ayahuasca, harmine, and harmaline, and experimental studies in humans and mental health assessments of experienced ayahuasca consumers also suggest that ayahuasca is associated with reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. A pilot study reported rapid antidepressive effects of a single ayahuasca dose in six patients with recurrent depression. Conclusion: Considering the need for new drugs that produce fewer adverse effects and are more effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptomatology, the described effects of ayahuasca and its alkaloids should be further investigated.

  16. Association of Smokeless Tobacco with Oral Cancer - Evidence From the South Asian Studies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2016-09-01

    Smokeless tobacco (SLT) is associated with many heath hazards including oral cancer. Its use is more common in South Asian countries. The current paper aims to systematically review the South Asian studies to assess the association of SLT and oral cancer. Detailed automated literature searches of PubMed, Medline, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science from January 1980 to July 2015 were conducted using the key words "oral cancer", "oral precancer", "oral premalignant lesions", "oral squamous cell carcinoma", "smokeless tobacco", "betel quid", "areca nut", "Gutkha" in various combinations. Letters to the editor, review articles, and case-reports were excluded. Atotal of 21 studies were included. Three studies were of cohort design while the remaining were of case-control design. Nine studies reported betel quid as a risk factor for oral cancer, while fifteen studies reported data on other types of chewing tobacco. The odds ratio (OR) for betel quid and risk of oral cancer varied from 3.1 to 15.7 (11.0-22.1); and for chewable tobacco and risk of oral cancer varied from 1.2 (1.0-1.4) to 12.9 (7.5-22.3). Astrong association between different types of SLTand oral cancer was observed. Well-structured programmes should be employed in South Asian region, both in terms of educating the general public about the health hazards of SLTas well as providing cessation assistance. PMID:27671184

  17. Systematic review of the empirical evidence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Dwan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased use of meta-analysis in systematic reviews of healthcare interventions has highlighted several types of bias that can arise during the completion of a randomised controlled trial. Study publication bias has been recognised as a potential threat to the validity of meta-analysis and can make the readily available evidence unreliable for decision making. Until recently, outcome reporting bias has received less attention. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We review and summarise the evidence from a series of cohort studies that have assessed study publication bias and outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials. Sixteen studies were eligible of which only two followed the cohort all the way through from protocol approval to information regarding publication of outcomes. Eleven of the studies investigated study publication bias and five investigated outcome reporting bias. Three studies have found that statistically significant outcomes had a higher odds of being fully reported compared to non-significant outcomes (range of odds ratios: 2.2 to 4.7. In comparing trial publications to protocols, we found that 40-62% of studies had at least one primary outcome that was changed, introduced, or omitted. We decided not to undertake meta-analysis due to the differences between studies. CONCLUSIONS: Recent work provides direct empirical evidence for the existence of study publication bias and outcome reporting bias. There is strong evidence of an association between significant results and publication; studies that report positive or significant results are more likely to be published and outcomes that are statistically significant have higher odds of being fully reported. Publications have been found to be inconsistent with their protocols. Researchers need to be aware of the problems of both types of bias and efforts should be concentrated on improving the reporting of trials.

  18. Return to work of breast cancer survivors: a systematic review of intervention studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frings-Dresen MHW

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer management has improved dramatically in the past three decades and as a result, a population of working age women is breast cancer survivor. Interventions for breast cancer survivors have shown improvements in quality of life and in physical and psychological states. In contrast, efforts aimed at stimulating re-employment and return-to-work interventions for breast cancer survivors have not kept pace. The objective of this review was to study the effects and characteristics of intervention studies on breast cancer survivors in which the outcome was return to work. Methods The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (The Cochrane Library, Issue 4, 2006, Medline, Ovid, EMBASE and PsychInfo were systematically searched for studies conducted between 1970 to February 2007. Intervention studies for female breast cancer survivors that were focused on return to work were included. Results Our search strategy identified 5219 studies. Four studies out of 100 potentially relevant abstracts were selected and included 46–317 employed women who had had mastectomy, adjuvant therapy and rehabilitation, with the outcome return to work. The intervention programs focused on improvement of physical, psychological and social recovery. Although a substantial percentage (between 75% to 85% of patients included in these studies returned to work after rehabilitation, it is not clear whether this proportion would have been lower for patients without counseling or exercise, or any other interventions, as three out of four studies did not include a comparison group. Conclusion The most important finding of this review is the lack of methodologically sound intervention studies on breast cancer survivors with the outcome return to work. Using evidence from qualitative and observational studies on cancer and the good results of intervention studies on return to work programs and vocational rehabilitation, return to work interventions for breast

  19. Cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders: a systematic review of population-based, epidemiological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moylan Steven

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple studies have demonstrated that rates of smoking and nicotine dependence are increased in individuals with anxiety disorders. However, significant variability exists in the epidemiological literature exploring this relationship, including study design (cross-sectional versus prospective, the population assessed (random sample versus clinical population and diagnostic instrument utilized. Methods We undertook a systematic review of population-based observational studies that utilized recognized structured clinical diagnostic criteria (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM or International Classification of Diseases (ICD for anxiety disorder diagnosis to investigate the relationship between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence and anxiety disorders. Results In total, 47 studies met the predefined inclusion criteria, with 12 studies providing prospective information and 5 studies providing quasiprospective information. The available evidence suggests that some baseline anxiety disorders are a risk factor for initiation of smoking and nicotine dependence, although the evidence is heterogeneous and many studies did not control for the effect of comorbid substance use disorders. The identified evidence however appeared to more consistently support cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence as being a risk factor for development of some anxiety disorders (for example, panic disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, although these findings were not replicated in all studies. A number of inconsistencies in the literature were identified. Conclusions Although many studies have demonstrated increased rates of smoking and nicotine dependence in individuals with anxiety disorders, there is a limited and heterogeneous literature that has prospectively examined this relationship in population studies using validated diagnostic criteria. The most consistent evidence supports smoking and nicotine dependence as

  20. MicroRNA expression profiling studies on bronchopulmonary dysplasia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Qiu, J; Kan, Q; Zhou, X-G; Zhou, X-Y

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several years, several microRNA (miRNA) expression profiling studies have been carried out on bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in mammalian lung tissues. The most effective way to identify these important miRNAs is to systematically search for similar signatures identified in multiple independent studies. Accordingly, a meta-analysis was conducted to review published miRNA expression profiling studies that compared miRNA expression profiles between BPD lung tissues and normal lung tissues. A vote-counting strategy that considered the total number of studies and time points reporting differential expression was applied. Furthermore, cut-off criteria of statistically significant differentially expressed miRNAs as defined by the author and their predicted target genes, if available, as well as the list of up- and down-regulated miRNA features, were collected and recorded. Results of the meta-analysis revealed that four up-regulated miRNAs (miRNA-21, miRNA-34a, miRNA-431, and Let-7f) and one down-regulated miRNA (miRNA-335) were differentially expressed in BPD lung tissues compared with normal groups. In addition, eight miRNAs (miRNA-146b, miRNA-29a, miRNA-503, miRNA-411, miRNA-214, miRNA-130b, miRNA-382, and miRNA-181a-1*) were found to show differential expression not only in the process of normal lung development, but also during the progress of BPD. Finally, several meaningful target genes (such as the HPGD and NTRK genes) of common miRNAs (such as miRNA-21 and miRNA-141) were systematically predicted. These specific miRNAs may provide clues of the potential mechanisms involved in BPD. Further mechanistic and external validation studies are needed to confirm the clinical significance of these miRNAs in the development of BPD. PMID:24301780

  1. Systematic review of clinical studies related to pork intake and metabolic syndrome or its components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stettler N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas Stettler,1 Mary M Murphy,1 Leila M Barraj,1 Kimberly M Smith,2 Rexford S Ahima3 1Exponent Inc, Washington, DC, USA; 2Exponent Inc, Derby, United Kingdom; 3Translational Research Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Globally, both the incidence of type 2 diabetes and the consumption of meat, in particular pork meat, have increased, concurrently. Processed meats have been associated with an increased risk for diabetes in observational studies. Therefore, it is important to understand the possible mechanisms of this association and the impact of meats from different species. The goal of this systematic review was to assess experimental human studies of the impact of pork intake compared with other protein sources on early markers for the development of diabetes, ie, insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and the components of the metabolic syndrome. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and EMBASE and using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. Eight studies were eligible and critically reviewed. Five studies were based on a single meal or single day exposure to pork, as compared with other sources of protein. The glucose-insulin response following the pork meals did not differ compared with beef, shrimp, or mixed sources of proteins. However, compared with eggs, ham (processed meat led to a larger insulin response in nonobese subjects. Compared with whey, ham led to a smaller insulin response and a larger glucose response. These findings suggest possible mechanisms for the association between processed meat and the development of diabetes. Nonprocessed pork meats were not compared with eggs or whey. The three longer interventions (11 days to 6 months did not show a significant impact of pork on the components of the metabolic syndrome, with the exception of a possible benefit on waist circumference and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (one study each with

  2. Molecular genetic gene-environment studies using candidate genes in schizophrenia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modinos, Gemma; Iyegbe, Conrad; Prata, Diana; Rivera, Margarita; Kempton, Matthew J; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Sham, Pak C; van Os, Jim; McGuire, Philip

    2013-11-01

    The relatively high heritability of schizophrenia suggests that genetic factors play an important role in the etiology of the disorder. On the other hand, a number of environmental factors significantly influence its incidence. As few direct genetic effects have been demonstrated, and there is considerable inter-individual heterogeneity in the response to the known environmental factors, interactions between genetic and environmental factors may be important in determining whether an individual develops the disorder. To date, a considerable number of studies of gene-environment interactions (G×E) in schizophrenia have employed a hypothesis-based molecular genetic approach using candidate genes, which have led to a range of different findings. This systematic review aims to summarize the results from molecular genetic candidate studies and to review challenges and opportunities of this approach in psychosis research. Finally, we discuss the potential of future prospects, such as new studies that combine hypothesis-based molecular genetic candidate approaches with agnostic genome-wide association studies in determining schizophrenia risk.

  3. Research studies on patients' illness experience using the Narrative Medicine approach: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Chiara; Mazzocco, Ketti; Oliveri, Serena; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Objective Since its birth about 30 years ago, Narrative Medicine approach has increased in popularity in the medical context as well as in other disciplines. This paper aims to review Narrative Medicine research studies on patients' and their caregivers' illness experience. Setting and participants MEDLINE, Psycinfo, EBSCO Psychological and Behavioural Science, The Cochrane Library and CINAHL databases were searched to identify all the research studies which focused on the Narrative Medicine approach reported in the title, in the abstract and in the keywords the words ‘Narrative Medicine’ or ‘Narrative-based Medicine’. Primary and secondary outcome measures: number of participants, type of disease, race and age of participants, type of study, dependent variables, intervention methods, assessment. Results Of the 325 titles screened, we identified 10 research articles fitting the inclusion criteria. Our systematic review showed that research on Narrative Medicine has no common specific methodology: narrative in Medicine is used as an intervention protocol as well as an assessment tool. Patients' characteristics, types of disease and data analysis procedures differ among the screened studies. Conclusions Narrative Medicine research in medical practice needs to find clear and specific protocols to deepen the impact of narrative on medical practice and on patients' lives. PMID:27417197

  4. What Evidence Underlies Clinical Practice in Paediatric Surgery? A Systematic Review Assessing Choice of Study Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allin

    Full Text Available Identify every paediatric surgical article published in 1998 and every paediatric surgical article published in 2013, and determine which study designs were used and whether they were appropriate for robustly assessing interventions in surgical conditions.A systematic review was conducted according to a pre-specified protocol (CRD42014007629, using EMBASE and Medline. Non-English language studies were excluded. Studies were included if meeting population criteria and either condition or intervention criteria.Children under the age of 18, or adults who underwent intervention for a condition managed by paediatric surgeons when they were under 18 years of age.One managed by general paediatric surgeons.Used for treatment of a condition managed by general paediatric surgeons.Studies were classified according to whether the IDEAL collaboration recommended their design for assessing surgical interventions or not. Change in proportions between 1998 and 2013 was calculated.1581 paediatric surgical articles were published in 1998, and 3453 in 2013. The most commonly used design, accounting for 45% of studies in 1998 and 46.8% in 2013, was the retrospective case series. Only 1.8% of studies were RCTs in 1998, and 1.9% in 2013. Overall, in 1998, 9.8% of studies used a recommended design. In 2013, 11.9% used a recommended design (proportion increase 2.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.5% increase to 4% increase, p = 0.017.A low proportion of published paediatric surgical manuscripts utilise a design that is recommended for assessing surgical interventions. RCTs represent fewer than 1 in 50 studies. In 2013, 88.1% of studies used a less robust design, suggesting the need for a new way of approaching paediatric surgical research.

  5. Religious Identity in Iranian Society: A Systematic Review of Previous Studies (2001-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    literature on identity, evidence suggests that the role of religion in shaping individuals' and group's identity is widely ignored. However, a growing number of studies have begun to take into consideration the key role of religion (Arweck & Nesbitt 2010, King and Boyatzis 2004, Peek 2005. This article has attempted to review systematically previous research and conceptualizations on the religious identity based on national studies and surveys and academic dissertations.     Materials and Methods   As mentioned, the purpose of this study was to review the results of some influential researches in the field of religious identity. To get this purpose, one of the best known methods for reviewing previous studies, a systematic review, was applied. Systematic review deals with establishing and synthesizing of researches and evidences with focus on a specific question. This occurs through the organized, transparent, formal, clear and flexible procedures and processes. A systematic review of research is not limited to review the history and this overview and review can be used in different levels, fields and goals. During the first phase of the study, terms of "religious identity", "Islamic identity", "Iranian identity" and "religious identity" was searched at libraries and research centers and in databases such as Center for Scientific Information Database (SID, a database of Iranian journals and magazines (Magiran, Noor specialized journals database, and Science and Information Technology Institute (IrnaDoc. After reviewing the gathered documents and specifying its relationship with the object and purpose of the study, a total of 47 documents were selected. Documents based on the five major parameter were summarized and reviewed: 1-general information, 2-goals and research questions, 3-research methodology, 4-variables, 5-findings     Discussion of Results and Conclusion   Findings show that in the highest percentage (38.2% of researches, religious identity has been

  6. Visual images for skin cancer prevention: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2012-06-01

    Visual images play an important role in educating the public about skin cancer prevention. The objectives of this systematic review were to: 1) determine how visual images are evaluated in skin cancer and tanning qualitative research studies (including theoretical and methodological approaches) and 2) summarize and discuss the image-related findings of the studies with respect to cancer education and public health. Seven databases were searched (PubMed-MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, Social Sciences Full Text, ERIC, and ABI/INFORM) using multiple search terms, including MeSH terms, resulting in 5330 citations. Studies were included if they were in English, peer-reviewed, qualitative in design or methodology, dealt with skin cancer or UV exposure, used visual images, and had a focus on the public or patients (i.e., not medical professionals). Eight studies met the inclusion criteria: seven content analyses and one focus group study. Content analysis studies in this review suggest the mass media portray Caucasian men and women as unprotected from the sun and with tanned skin, and thus, may inform behaviors related to skin cancer risk. The focus group study suggests visible minorities may benefit from the incorporation of images of melanoma on ethnic skin in cancer education materials. None of the studies used visual communication theory to explicitly guide the research, nor were standardized tools used for image assessment. The lack of guiding theory and standardized assessment instruments can introduce bias in how images are selected and used in research on skin cancer education.

  7. Animal models of prenatal immune challenge and their contribution to the study of schizophrenia: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Macêdo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal immune challenge (PIC in pregnant rodents produces offspring with abnormalities in behavior, histology, and gene expression that are reminiscent of schizophrenia and autism. Based on this, the goal of this article was to review the main contributions of PIC models, especially the one using the viral-mimetic particle polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (poly-I:C, to the understanding of the etiology, biological basis and treatment of schizophrenia. This systematic review consisted of a search of available web databases (PubMed, SciELO, LILACS, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge for original studies published in the last 10 years (May 2001 to October 2011 concerning animal models of PIC, focusing on those using poly-I:C. The results showed that the PIC model with poly-I:C is able to mimic the prodrome and both the positive and negative/cognitive dimensions of schizophrenia, depending on the specific gestation time window of the immune challenge. The model resembles the neurobiology and etiology of schizophrenia and has good predictive value. In conclusion, this model is a robust tool for the identification of novel molecular targets during prenatal life, adolescence and adulthood that might contribute to the development of preventive and/or treatment strategies (targeting specific symptoms, i.e., positive or negative/cognitive for this devastating mental disorder, also presenting biosafety as compared to viral infection models. One limitation of this model is the incapacity to model the full spectrum of immune responses normally induced by viral exposure.

  8. BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PULSED SHORT WAVE TREATMENT. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Dogaru Gabriela; Crăciun Constantin

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed short waves are short electromagnetic waves emitted as intermittent trains with a fixed duration, separated by free intervals of variable duration. The biological effects of pulsed short waves could be explained according to most of the authors by an activation of cellular enzymatic reactions, a stimulation of energy metabolism, a stimulation of liver function, of adrenal gland function and of the reticulocyte system, changes in cell permeability, by an increase of peripheral blood flo...

  9. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez; Ibrain Ceballo Acosta; Carmen B. Busoch Morlán; Ángel Regueiro Gómez

    2015-01-01

    This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry) and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the...

  10. Hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: Biological uptake and metabolism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Apblett, A.; Ensley, H. [and others

    1996-05-02

    The projects discussed in this article include the following: the uptake, accumulation, metabolism, toxicity and physiological effects of various environmentally-important contaminants, inorganic and organic, in several wetland species that are interrelated through food webs; and investigation of the potential for developing and linking chemical and biological methods of remediation so as to encapsulate bioaccummulated ions in stable wasteforms such as ceramics and/or zeolites. 24 refs.

  11. Older adults' perceptions of ageing and their health and functioning: a systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmoth, Krystal; Tarrant, Mark; Abraham, Charles; Lang, Iain A

    2016-07-01

    Many older people perceive ageing negatively, describing it in terms of poor or declining health and functioning. These perceptions may be related to older adults' health. The aim of this review was to synthesise existing research on the relationship between older adults' perceptions of ageing and their health and functioning. A systematic search was conducted of five electronic databases (ASSIA, CINAHL, IBSS, MEDLINE and PsycINFO). Citations within identified reports were also searched. Observational studies were included if they included perceptions of ageing and health-related measures involving participants aged 60 years and older. Study selection, data extraction and quality appraisal were conducted using predefined criteria. Twenty-eight reports met the criteria for inclusion. Older adults' perceptions of ageing were assessed with a variety of measures. Perceptions were related to health and functioning across seven health domains: memory and cognitive performance, physical and physiological performance, medical conditions and outcomes, disability, care-seeking, self-rated health, quality of life and death. How ageing is perceived by older adults is related to their health and functioning in multiple domains. However, higher quality and longitudinal studies are needed to further investigate this relationship. PMID:26527056

  12. Systematic study of spatiotemporal dynamics of intense femtosecond laser pulses in BK-7 glass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Gopal; V Deepak; S Sivaramakrishnan

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we present a systematic study of the spatial and temporal effects of intense femtosecond laser pulses in BK-7 over a broad range of input powers, 1–1000 times the critical power for self-focusing (cr) by numerically solving the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLS). Most numerical studies have not been extended to such high powers. A clear-cut classification of spatio-temporal dynamics up to very high powers into three regimes – the group-velocity dispersion (GVD) regime, the ionization regime and the dominant plasma regime – as done here, is a significant step towards a better understanding. Further, we examine in detail the role of GVD in channel formation by comparing BK-7 to an `artificial' medium. Our investigations bring forth the important observation that diffraction plays a minimal role in the formation of multiple cones and that plasma plays a diffraction-like role at very high powers. A detailed study of the spatio-temporal dynamics in any condensed medium over this range of powers has not been reported hitherto, to the best of our knowledge. We also suggest appropriate operational powers for various applications employing BK-7 on the basis of our results.

  13. A modular open platform for systematic functional studies under physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Christopher B.; Smets, Martha; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Leidescher, Susanne; Markaki, Yolanda; Hofweber, Mario; Qin, Weihua; Manzo, Massimiliano; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Thanisch, Katharina; Bauer, Christina; Rombaut, Pascaline; Herzog, Franz; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Bultmann, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Any profound comprehension of gene function requires detailed information about the subcellular localization, molecular interactions and spatio-temporal dynamics of gene products. We developed a multifunctional integrase (MIN) tag for rapid and versatile genome engineering that serves not only as a genetic entry site for the Bxb1 integrase but also as a novel epitope tag for standardized detection and precipitation. For the systematic study of epigenetic factors, including Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Tet1, Tet2, Tet3 and Uhrf1, we generated MIN-tagged embryonic stem cell lines and created a toolbox of prefabricated modules that can be integrated via Bxb1-mediated recombination. We used these functional modules to study protein interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics as well as gene expression and specific mutations during cellular differentiation and in response to external stimuli. Our genome engineering strategy provides a versatile open platform for efficient generation of multiple isogenic cell lines to study gene function under physiological conditions. PMID:26007658

  14. Comparative study and systematic review of laparoscopic liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Qi; Leong; Iyer; Shridhar; Ganpathi; Alfred; Wei; Chieh; Kow; Krishnakumar; Madhavan; Stephen; Kin; Yong; Chang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the surgical outcomes between laparoscopic liver resection(LLR) and open liver resection(OLR) as a curative treatment in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC). METHODS: A Pub Med database search was performed systematically to identify comparative studies of LLR vs OLR for HCC from 2000 to 2014. An extensive text word search was conducted, using combinations of search headings such as "laparoscopy", "hepatectomy", and "hepatocellular carcinoma". A comparative study was also performed in our institution where we analysed surgical outcomes of 152 patients who underwent liver resection between January 2005 to December 2012, of which 42 underwent laparoscopic or hand-assisted laparoscopic resection and 110 underwent open resection. RESULTS: Analysis of our own series and a review of 17 high-quality studies showed that LLR was superior to OLR in terms of short-term outcomes, as patients in the laparoscopic arm were found to have less intraoperative blood loss, less blood transfusions, and a shorter length of hospital stay. In our own series, both LLR and OLR groups were found to have similar overall survival(OS) rates, but disease-free survival(DFS) rates were higher in the laparoscopic arm. CONCLUSION: LLR is associated with better short-term outcomes compared to OLR as a curative treatment for HCC. Long-term oncologic outcomes with regards to OS and DFS rates were found to be comparable in both groups. LLR is hence a safe and viable option for curative resection of HCC.

  15. Subject and authorship of records related to the Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) in BINABITROP, a comprehensive database about Costa Rican biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Nájera, Julián; Nielsen-Muñoz, Vanessa; Azofeifa-Mora, Ana Beatriz

    2013-06-01

    BINABITROP is a bibliographical database of more than 38000 records about the ecosystems and organisms of Costa Rica. In contrast with commercial databases, such as Web of Knowledge and Scopus, which exclude most of the scientific journals published in tropical countries, BINABITROP is a comprehensive record of knowledge on the tropical ecosystems and organisms of Costa Rica. We analyzed its contents in three sites (La Selva, Palo Verde and Las Cruces) and recorded scientific field, taxonomic group and authorship. We found that most records dealt with ecology and systematics, and that most authors published only one article in the study period (1963-2011). Most research was published in four journals: Biotropica, Revista de Biología Tropical/ International Journal of Tropical Biology and Conservation, Zootaxa and Brenesia. This may be the first study of a such a comprehensive database for any case of tropical biology literature.

  16. Systematics Study on Thermal Capture Radiation Cross Section for Fission Nuclides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO; Xi; WU; Hai-cheng; WANG; Ji-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>The research of the neutron capture radiation cross section is surveyed. The systematics of capture radiation cross section contains single energy cross section systematics, excitation function, and spectra systematics. This work gathers the experimental cross sections of actinide nuclei at the thermal energy, and evaluated data. 382 nuclei of ENDF/BⅦ.0, 398 nuclei of JENDL-4.0, 232 nuclei of CENDL-3.1, and the evaluation data of BNL are surveyed. Based on the evaluation, a set of capture cross sections for actinide nuclei at thermal energy is recommended.

  17. Interventional studies for preventing surgical site infections in sub-Saharan Africa – A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Alexander M.; Karuri, David M.; Wanyoro, Anthony K.; Macleod, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a great need for safe surgical services in sub-Saharan Africa, but a major difficulty of performing surgery in this region is the high risk of post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). Methods We aimed to systematically review which interventions had been tested in sub-Saharan Africa to reduce the risk of SSI and to synthesize their findings. We searched Medline, Embase and Global Health databases for studies published between 1995 and 2010 without language restrictions and extracted data from full-text articles. Findings We identified 24 relevant articles originating from nine countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The methodological quality of these publications was diverse, with inconsistency in definitions used for SSI, period and method of post-operative follow-up and classification of wound contamination. Although it was difficult to synthesise information between studies, there was consistent evidence that use of single-dose pre-operative antibiotic prophylaxis could reduce, sometimes dramatically, the risk of SSI. Several studies indicated that alcohol-based handrubs could provide a low-cost alternative to traditional surgical hand-washing methods. Other studies investigated the use of drains and variants of surgical technique. There were no African studies found relating to several other promising SSI prevention strategies, including use of checklists and SSI surveillance. Conclusions There is extremely limited research from sub-Saharan Africa on interventions to curb the occurrence of SSI. Although some of the existing studies are weak, several high-quality studies have been published in recent years. Standard methodological approaches to this subject are needed. PMID:22510442

  18. Use of insulin and insulin analogs and risk of cancer - systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlstad, Oystein; Starup-Linde, Jacob; Vestergaard, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    -control studies examining risk of cancer associated with insulin use in patients with diabetes. DATA SOURCES: Systematic literature search in 5 databases: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Scopus and Cochrane Library. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA (PICOS): POPULATION: diabetes patients. EXPOSURE: Users of any...

  19. Dietary supplement use and colorectal cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Winkels, R.M.; Renkema, J.M.S.; Kragt, L.; Orten-Luiten, van A.C.B.; Tigchelaar, E.F.; Chan, D.S.M.; Norat, T.; Kampman, E.

    2015-01-01

    Use of dietary supplements is rising in countries where colorectal cancer is prevalent. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies on dietary supplement use and colorectal cancer risk. We identified relevant studies in Medline, Embase and Cochrane up

  20. Functional knowledge transfer for high-accuracy prediction of under-studied biological processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Y Park

    Full Text Available A key challenge in genetics is identifying the functional roles of genes in pathways. Numerous functional genomics techniques (e.g. machine learning that predict protein function have been developed to address this question. These methods generally build from existing annotations of genes to pathways and thus are often unable to identify additional genes participating in processes that are not already well studied. Many of these processes are well studied in some organism, but not necessarily in an investigator's organism of interest. Sequence-based search methods (e.g. BLAST have been used to transfer such annotation information between organisms. We demonstrate that functional genomics can complement traditional sequence similarity to improve the transfer of gene annotations between organisms. Our method transfers annotations only when functionally appropriate as determined by genomic data and can be used with any prediction algorithm to combine transferred gene function knowledge with organism-specific high-throughput data to enable accurate function prediction. We show that diverse state-of-art machine learning algorithms leveraging functional knowledge transfer (FKT dramatically improve their accuracy in predicting gene-pathway membership, particularly for processes with little experimental knowledge in an organism. We also show that our method compares favorably to annotation transfer by sequence similarity. Next, we deploy FKT with state-of-the-art SVM classifier to predict novel genes to 11,000 biological processes across six diverse organisms and expand the coverage of accurate function predictions to processes that are often ignored because of a dearth of annotated genes in an organism. Finally, we perform in vivo experimental investigation in Danio rerio and confirm the regulatory role of our top predicted novel gene, wnt5b, in leftward cell migration during heart development. FKT is immediately applicable to many bioinformatics

  1. Systematic reviews and meta-analysis of preclinical studies: why perform them and how to appraise them critically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena, Emily S; Currie, Gillian L; McCann, Sarah K; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2014-05-01

    The use of systematic review and meta-analysis of preclinical studies has become more common, including those of studies describing the modeling of cerebrovascular diseases. Empirical evidence suggests that too many preclinical experiments lack methodological rigor, and this leads to inflated treatment effects. The aim of this review is to describe the concepts of systematic review and meta-analysis and consider how these tools may be used to provide empirical evidence to spur the field to improve the rigor of the conduct and reporting of preclinical research akin to their use in improving the conduct and reporting of randomized controlled trials in clinical research. As with other research domains, systematic reviews are subject to bias. Therefore, we have also suggested guidance for their conduct, reporting, and critical appraisal.

  2. Systematic study for DNA recovery and profiling from common IED substrates: From laboratory to casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetpeng, Sukanya; Kitpipit, Thitika; Thanakiatkrai, Phuvadol

    2015-07-01

    Improvised explosive devices (IEDs) made from household items are encountered in terrorist attacks worldwide. Assembling an IED leaves trace DNA on its components, but deflagration degrades DNA. To maximize the amount of DNA recovered, a systematic evaluation of DNA collection methods was carried out and the most efficient methods were implemented with IED casework evidence as a validation exercise. Six swab types and six moistening agents were used to collect dried buffy coat stains on four common IED substrates. The most efficient swab/moistening agent combinations were then compared with tape-lifting using three brands of adhesive tape and also with direct DNA extraction from evidence. The most efficient collection methods for different IED substrates (post-study protocol) were then implemented for IED casework and compared with the pre-study protocol using 195 pieces of IED evidence. There was no single best swab type or moistening agent. Swab type had the largest effect on DNA recovery percentages, but moistening agents, substrates, and the interactions between factors all affected DNA recovery. The most efficient swab/moistening agent combinations performed equally well when compared with the best adhesive tape and direct extraction. The post-study protocol significantly improved STR profiles obtained from IED evidence. This paper outlines a comprehensive study of DNA collection methods for trace DNA and the validation of the most efficient collection methods with IED evidence. The findings from both parts of this study emphasize the need to continuously re-evaluate standard operating protocols with empirical studies. PMID:25828367

  3. Welding, longitudinal lung function decline and chronic respiratory symptoms: a systematic review of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szram, Joanna; Schofield, Susie J; Cosgrove, Martin P; Cullinan, Paul

    2013-11-01

    While the acute respiratory risks of welding are well characterised, more chronic effects, including those on lung function, are less clear. We carried out a systematic review of published longitudinal studies of lung function decline in welders. Original cohort studies documenting two or more sequential measurements of lung function were reviewed. Meta-analysis was carried out on studies with suitable data on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). Seven studies were included; their quality (measured on the Newcastle-Ottawa scale) was good, although exposure assessment was limited and the studies showed significant heterogeneity. Five had data suitable for meta-analysis; the pooled estimate of the difference in FEV1 decline between welders and nonwelders was -9.0 mL · year(-1) (95% CI -22.5-4.5; p=0.193). The pooled estimates of difference in annual FEV1 decline between welders and referents who smoked was -13.7 mL · year(-1) (95% CI -33.6-6.3; p=0.179). For welders and referents who did not smoke the estimated difference was -3.8 mL · year(-1) (95% CI -20.2-12.6; p=0.650). Symptom prevalence data were mainly narrative; smoking appeared to have the greatest effect on symptom evolution. Collectively, available longitudinal data on decline of lung function in welders and respiratory symptoms suggest a greater effect in those who smoke, supporting a focus on smoking cessation as well as control of fume exposure in this trade. Further prospective studies are required to confirm these findings.

  4. A systematic review of observational studies on oxidative/nitrosative stress involvement in dengue pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzón, Hernando Samuel; Alvis-Guzman, Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to systematically review the published observational research related to the role of oxidative-nitrosative stress in pathogenesis of dengue. Methods: We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, The COCHRANE library, ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS via Virtual Health Library, Google Scholar) using the term: dengue, dengue virus, severe dengue, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, antioxidants, oxidants, free radicals, oxidized lipid products, lipid peroxides, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthase. Articles were selected for review by title and abstract excluding letter, review, in vivo and in vitro studies, and duplicates studies. Selected articles were reviewed for study design, original purposes, sample size, main outcomes, methods, and oxidative-nitrosative stress markers values. Results: In total, 4,331 non-duplicates articles were identified from electronic databases searches, of which 16 were eligible for full text searching. Data from the observational studies originate from Asian countries (50%; 8/16), South American countries (31.2%; 5/16), and Central America and the Caribbean countries (18.8%; 3/16). Case-control study was the type of design most common in researches reviewed. The 1997 World Health Organization (WHO) dengue case classification criteria were used in all studies included in this review. Conclusions: Based on published data found in peer-reviewed literature, oxidative and nitrosative stress are demonstrated by changes in plasma levels of nitric oxide, antioxidants, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation markers in patients with dengue infection. Additionally, elevated serum protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels appear to be associated with dengue disease severity. PMID:26600629

  5. A systematic review of observational studies on oxidative/nitrosative stress involvement in dengue pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Castro-Orozco

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Our objective was to systematically review the published observational research related to the role of oxidative-nitrosative stress in pathogenesis of dengue. Methods We searched electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, The COCHRANE library, ScienceDirect, Scopus, SciELO, LILACS via Virtual Health Library, Google Scholar using the term: dengue, dengue virus, severe dengue, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, antioxidants, oxidants, free radicals, oxidized lipid products, lipid peroxides, nitric oxide, and nitric oxide synthase. Articles were selected for review by title and abstract excluding letter, review, in vivo and in vitro studies, and duplicates studies. Selected articles were reviewed for study design, original purposes, sample size, main outcomes, methods, and oxidative-nitrosative stress markers values. Results In total, 4331 non-duplicates articles were identified from electronic databases searches, of which 17 were eligible for full text searching. Data from the observational studies originate from Asian countries (52,9%; 9/17, South American countries (29.4%; 5/17, and Central America and the Caribbean countries (17.7%; 3/17. Case-control study was the type of design most common in researches reviewed. The 1997 World Health Organization (WHO dengue case classification criteria were used in all studies included in this review. Conclusions Based on published data found in peer-reviewed literature, oxidative and nitrosative stress are demonstrated by changes in plasma levels of nitric oxide, antioxidants, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation markers in patients with dengue infection. Additionally, elevated serum protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels appear to be associated with dengue disease severity.

  6. Systematic studies of Australian stipoid grasses (Austrostipa based on micro-morphological and molecular characteristics

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    BETTY MAULIYA BUSTAM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bustam BM (2010 Systematic studies of Australian stipoid grasses (Austrostipa based on micro-morphological and molecular characteristics. Biodiversitas 11: 9-14. This research is one of many studies on stipoid grasses organized by the International Stipeae Working Group (ISWG. This research tested the subgeneric classification of Austrostipa proposed by Jacobs and Everett (1996 and tested how informative the micro morphological characters used. Data were collected from herbarium specimens of 36 species (33 species of Austrostipa, two species of Hesperostipa and one species of Anemanthele at Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney. Twenty eight micro morphological characters were used. The data were collected from both adaxial and abaxial surfaces of leaves, and from the lemma epidermis using a scanning electron microscope (SEM. ISWG provided the molecular data. Parsimony analysis and a distance method (Unweighteic Pair Group with Arithmatic Mean: UPGMA were used to analyze mico morphological and molecular data separately. Only UPGMA analysis was used to analyze the combined data. The results support the monophyly of Austrostipa. However, there is a little support for the subgeneric classification of Austrostipa proposed by Jacobs and Everett (1996, other than for the consistent recognition of Falcatae. The characters for comparisons between genera are too homoplasious at this level and do not contain enough information for analyses at subgeneric level, a problem apparently shared with the DNA sequences.

  7. [Systematic review of studies on quality of life indexed on the SciELO database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeiro, Graziela Macedo Bastos; Pedrozo, Celine Cristina Raimundo; Gomes, Maria José; Oliveira, Elizabete Regina de Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Interest in the quality of life construct has increased in the same proportion as the output of instruments to measure it. In order to analyze the scientific literature on the subject to provide a reflection on this construct in Brazil, a systematic review of the SciELO database covering the period from January 2001 to December 2006 was conducted. It was divided into 3 phases: the first involving 180 publications, the second 124, and the third 10. Of the 180 publications, 77.4% consisted of production in the last three years, with growth of 32.4% from 2001 to 2006. Of these, 124 were selected for methodological analysis in accordance with the category of the study: 79 (63.9%) instrument application articles; 25 (20.1%) translation, validation, adaptation and construction of a QOL instrument; 10 (8%) qualitative studies on QOL; 5 (4%) bibliographical review, 5 (4%) on the quality of life concept. The next stage involved the use of questionnaires and/or interview scripts in order to obtain a broader consensus on perceived quality of life from the interviewees. It was seen that there was significant scientific output in the period under scrutiny, with diversification of approaches and methodologies, highlighting the complexity of the quality of life construct.

  8. Development of a systematic studies apparatus at NC State for the Neutron Electric Dipole Moment collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K.; Golub, R.; Haase, D.; Hawari, A.; Huffman, P.; Korobkina, E.; Reid, A.; Swank, C.; Young, A. R.; Alarcon, R.; Dipert, R.; Chu, P.-H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, Y.; Bartoszek, L.; Crawford, C.; Korsch, W.

    2013-10-01

    An apparatus is being developed for use at the UCN source at the 1 MW NCSU PULSTAR reactor. The goal is to study several critical aspects of the SNS neutron EDM experiment without the electric field. Detailed studies of the interactions between the 3He and UCNs, measurements of the correlation functions determining the geometric phase systematic effect, optimization of the parameters for critical dressing, and the pseudomagnetic field caused by neutron scattering from polarized 3He will be made. Because of the extremely long turn around times, these would be almost impossible with the SNS apparatus. In this setup, polarized UCNs and 3He will be repeatedly loaded into an acrylic cell coated with deuterated TPB and polystyrene on the inner walls. Scintillation light produced in the superfluid 4He also in the cell after spin-dependent capture of UCNs on 3He will be used to measure the Larmor precession frequency difference between the two species in an external magnetic field. An overview of the experiment will be presented.

  9. A systematic study of the hybrid experiment at Mt.Chacaltaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the hybrid experiment on Mt. Chacaltaya, we can observe three different components of air showers, that is, air-shower size, burst-density and high energy families (a bundle of high energy particles). Burst-density in each block of hadron calorimeters are newly recalculated in simulations in order to compare directly to the experimental data. Energy deposits in the scintillators of the hadron calorimeters are calculated using GEANT4 for every particle, incident upon the hadron calorimeter, in the air-showers simulated using CORSIKA, and are converted into burst-density, taking into consideration the exact structure of experimental hadron calorimeter. We study correlations among three observable components in the air-showers. Correlations between air-shower size and burst-density and those between air-shower size and accompanied family energy can be explained by model calculations by adjusting primary particle composition, the former correlation is in favor of proton-primaries but the latter iron-primaries. No model can describe well observed correlations between burst-density and family energy. That is, the observed family energy accompanied by the air-showers with larger burst-density is systematically smaller than that expected in the simulated events. Effects of a fluctuation in the cross-section of hadronic interactions are studied to settle the disagreement between experimental data and simulations. (authors)

  10. Systematic Study of the Content of Phytochemicals in Fresh and Fresh-Cut Vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Alarcón-Flores

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vegetables and fruits have beneficial properties for human health, because of the presence of phytochemicals, but their concentration can fluctuate throughout the year. A systematic study of the phytochemical content in tomato, eggplant, carrot, broccoli and grape (fresh and fresh-cut has been performed at different seasons, using liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. It was observed that phenolic acids (the predominant group in carrot, eggplant and tomato were found at higher concentrations in fresh carrot than in fresh-cut carrot. However, in the case of eggplant, they were detected at a higher content in fresh-cut than in fresh samples. Regarding tomato, the differences in the content of phenolic acids between fresh and fresh-cut were lower than in other matrices, except in winter sampling, where this family was detected at the highest concentration in fresh tomato. In grape, the flavonols content (predominant group was higher in fresh grape than in fresh-cut during all samplings. The content of glucosinolates was lower in fresh-cut broccoli than in fresh samples in winter and spring sampling, although this trend changes in summer and autumn. In summary, phytochemical concentration did show significant differences during one-year monitoring, and the families of phytochemicals presented different behaviors depending on the matrix studied.

  11. A Systematic Study of Mid-Infrared Emission from Core-Collapse Supernovae with SPIRITS

    CERN Document Server

    Tinyanont, Samaporn; Fox, Ori D; Lau, Ryan; Smith, Nathan; Williams, Robert; Jencson, Jacob; Perley, Daniel; Dykhoff, Devin; Gehrz, Robert; Johansson, Joel; Masci, Frank; Cody, Ann Marie; Prince, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We present a systematic study of mid-infrared (mid-IR) emission from 141 nearby supernovae (SNe) observed with the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on Spitzer.These SNe reside in one of the 190 galaxies within 20 Mpc drawn from the ongoing SPIRITS program. We detect 8 Type Ia SNe and 36 core-collapse SNe. All Type I SNe become undetectable within 3 years of explosion. About 22$\\pm$11% of Type II SNe continue to be detected at late-times. Dust luminosity, temperature, and a lower liit on mass are obtained by fitting the SED using photometry with IRAC bands 1 and 2. The mass estimate does not distinguish between pre-existing and newly produced dust. We observe warm dust masses between $10^{-2}$ and $10^{-6}$ $\\rm M_{\\odot}$ and dust temperatures from 200 K to 1280 K.We present detailed case studies of two extreme Type II-P SNe: SN 2011ja and 2014bi. SN 2011ja was over-luminous ([4.5] = -15.6 mag) at 900 days post-explosion accompanied by the growing dust mass. This suggests either an episode of dust formation or an...

  12. Systematic Review of Studies of Workplace Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke and Lung Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhuo WANG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been reported that there was a close relationship between lung cancer risk and environmental tobacco smoke at workplace. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship between workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure and lung cancer risk among non-smoking subjects. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlledtrials, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI and VIP et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents on workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure and lung cancer risk. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct systematic review on the study results, the combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated as well. Results 22 reports were included into the combined analysis, which indicated that 25% lung cancer risk was increased by exposing to workplace environment tobacco smoke (OR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.13-1.39, P < 0.001. For female the increased risk was 22% (OR=1.22, 95%CI: 1.05-1.42, P=0.011. For male the increased risk was 54%, but it does not reach the statistical significance (OR=1.54, 95%CI: 0.74-3.18, P=0.247. Conclusion Workplace environmental tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor of lung cancer risk among non-smoking subjects. Especially for non-smoking women who expose to workplace environment tobacco smoke have a close relationship with lung cancer.

  13. Risk of Hypothyroidism following Hemithyroidectomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, H.; Louwerens, M.; Schoones, J.W.; Kievit, J.; Smit, J.W.A.; Dekkers, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The reported risk of hypothyroidism after hemithyroidectomy shows considerable heterogeneity in literature. Objective: The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the overall risk of hypothyroidism, both clinical and subclinical, after hemithyroidectomy. Furthermore

  14. The relationship of the local food environment with obesity: A systematic review of methods, study quality and results

    OpenAIRE

    Cobb, Laura K.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Franco, Manuel; Jones-Smith, Jessica C.; Nur, Alana; Anderson, Cheryl AM

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between local food environments and obesity and assess the quality of studies reviewed. Methods Systematic keyword searches identified studies from US and Canada that assessed the relationship of obesity to local food environments. We applied a quality metric based on design, exposure and outcome measurement, and analysis. Results We identified 71 studies representing 65 cohorts. Overall, study quality was low; 60 studies were cross-sectional. Association...

  15. Nonvisual multisensory impairment of body perception in anorexia nervosa: a systematic review of neuropsychological studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santino Gaudio

    Full Text Available Body image distortion is a central symptom of Anorexia Nervosa (AN. Even if corporeal awareness is multisensory majority of AN studies mainly investigated visual misperception. We systematically reviewed AN studies that have investigated different nonvisual sensory inputs using an integrative multisensory approach to body perception. We also discussed the findings in the light of AN neuroimaging evidence.PubMed and PsycINFO were searched until March, 2014. To be included in the review, studies were mainly required to: investigate a sample of patients with current or past AN and a control group and use tasks that directly elicited one or more nonvisual sensory domains.Thirteen studies were included. They studied a total of 223 people with current or past AN and 273 control subjects. Overall, results show impairment in tactile and proprioceptive domains of body perception in AN patients. Interoception and multisensory integration have been poorly explored directly in AN patients. A limitation of this review is the relatively small amount of literature available.Our results showed that AN patients had a multisensory impairment of body perception that goes beyond visual misperception and involves tactile and proprioceptive sensory components. Furthermore, impairment of tactile and proprioceptive components may be associated with parietal cortex alterations in AN patients. Interoception and multisensory integration have been weakly explored directly. Further research, using multisensory approaches as well as neuroimaging techniques, is needed to better define the complexity of body image distortion in AN.The review suggests an altered capacity of AN patients in processing and integration of bodily signals: body parts are experienced as dissociated from their holistic and perceptive dimensions. Specifically, it is likely that not only perception but memory, and in particular sensorimotor/proprioceptive memory, probably shapes bodily experience in

  16. Incubation Station for the Bacterial Growth Study in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rafael Duharte Rodríguez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the designing and characterization of a prototype of laboratory incubator as support of Microbiology research, in particular for the research of the bacterial growth in biological samples through optic methods (Turbidimetry and electrometric measurements of bioimpedance. It shows the results of simulation and experimentation of the design proposed for the canals of measurement of the variables: temperature and humidity, with a high linearity from the adequate selection of the corresponding sensors and the analogue components of every canal, controlled with help of a microcontroller AT89C51 (ATMEL with adequate benefi ts for this type of application.

  17. Models to Study NK Cell Biology and Possible Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Anthony E; Grossenbacher, Steven K; Aguilar, Ethan G; Murphy, William J

    2015-08-03

    Natural killer (NK) cells are large granular lymphocytes of the innate immune system, responsible for direct targeting and killing of both virally infected and transformed cells. NK cells rapidly recognize and respond to abnormal cells in the absence of prior sensitization due to their wide array of germline-encoded inhibitory and activating receptors, which differs from the receptor diversity found in B and T lymphocytes that is due to the use of recombination-activation gene (RAG) enzymes. Although NK cells have traditionally been described as natural killers that provide a first line of defense prior to the induction of adaptive immunity, a more complex view of NK cells is beginning to emerge, indicating they may also function in various immunoregulatory roles and have the capacity to shape adaptive immune responses. With the growing appreciation for the diverse functions of NK cells, and recent technological advancements that allow for a more in-depth understanding of NK cell biology, we can now begin to explore new ways to manipulate NK cells to increase their clinical utility. In this overview unit, we introduce the reader to various aspects of NK cell biology by reviewing topics ranging from NK cell diversity and function, mouse models, and the roles of NK cells in health and disease, to potential clinical applications. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Psychometric properties of assessment instruments for autism spectrum disorder: a systematic review of Brazilian studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Backes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To systematically review the scientific literature on the psychometric properties of international instruments for the assessment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD in the Brazilian population. Methods A search of bibliographic references was conducted in six electronic databases: PsycINFO, PubMed, IndexPsi, Lilacs, Capes (theses and dissertations and SciELO. The studies were selected by two independent researchers. Results The procedure identified 11 studies of the Brazilian population that encompassed six ASD assessment tools. Given the information provided, the adaptation of the M-CHAT, a screening instrument, was the best conducted. All steps of the adaptation process were described and the changes made to the final version of the instrument were presented, which was not addressed in other studies. In terms of reliability, all of the instruments that assessed internal consistency showed adequate values. In addition, the ADI-R and the CARS adaptations also satisfactorily contemplated inter-rater reliability and test-retest indices, respectively. Finally, all studies aiming to validate instruments showed evidence of validity and sensitivity, and specificity values above 0.90 were observed in the ASQ, ADI-R and ABC. Conclusion Considering both the psychometric aspects and the copyright information, the screening instrument that currently appears to be best indicated for clinical and research use is the M-CHAT. It was also noticed that there are still no specific ASD diagnostic tools available for use in Brazil. This lack of diagnostic instruments consists in a critical situation for the improvement of clinical practice and the development of research in this area.

  19. Organizational determinants of interprofessional collaboration in integrative health care: systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent C H Chung

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Inteprofessional collaboration (IPC between biomedically trained doctors (BMD and traditional, complementary and alternative medicine practitioners (TCAMP is an essential element in the development of successful integrative healthcare (IHC services. This systematic review aims to identify organizational strategies that would facilitate this process. METHODS: We searched 4 international databases for qualitative studies on the theme of BMD-TCAMP IPC, supplemented with a purposive search of 31 health services and TCAM journals. Methodological quality of included studies was assessed using published checklist. Results of each included study were synthesized using a framework approach, with reference to the Structuration Model of Collaboration. FINDINGS: Thirty-seven studies of acceptable quality were included. The main driver for developing integrative healthcare was the demand for holistic care from patients. Integration can best be led by those trained in both paradigms. Bridge-building activities, positive promotion of partnership and co-location of practices are also beneficial for creating bonding between team members. In order to empower the participation of TCAMP, the perceived power differentials need to be reduced. Also, resources should be committed to supporting team building, collaborative initiatives and greater patient access. Leadership and funding from central authorities are needed to promote the use of condition-specific referral protocols and shared electronic health records. More mature IHC programs usually formalize their evaluation process around outcomes that are recognized both by BMD and TCAMP. CONCLUSIONS: The major themes emerging from our review suggest that successful collaborative relationships between BMD and TCAMP are similar to those between other health professionals, and interventions which improve the effectiveness of joint working in other healthcare teams with may well be transferable to promote better

  20. Internet and Gaming Addiction: A Systematic Literature Review of Neuroimaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria J. Kuss

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has accumulated suggesting that excessive Internet use can lead to the development of a behavioral addiction. Internet addiction has been considered as a serious threat to mental health and the excessive use of the Internet has been linked to a variety of negative psychosocial consequences. The aim of this review is to identify all empirical studies to date that used neuroimaging techniques to shed light upon the emerging mental health problem of Internet and gaming addiction from a neuroscientific perspective. Neuroimaging studies offer an advantage over traditional survey and behavioral research because with this method, it is possible to distinguish particular brain areas that are involved in the development and maintenance of addiction. A systematic literature search was conducted, identifying 18 studies. These studies provide compelling evidence for the similarities between different types of addictions, notably substance-related addictions and Internet and gaming addiction, on a variety of levels. On the molecular level, Internet addiction is characterized by an overall reward deficiency that entails decreased dopaminergic activity. On the level of neural circuitry, Internet and gaming addiction led to neuroadaptation and structural changes that occur as a consequence of prolonged increased activity in brain areas associated with addiction. On a behavioral level, Internet and gaming addicts appear to be constricted with regards to their cognitive functioning in various domains. The paper shows that understanding the neuronal correlates associated with the development of Internet and gaming addiction will promote future research and will pave the way for the development of addiction treatment approaches.

  1. Internet and gaming addiction: a systematic literature review of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss, Daria J; Griffiths, Mark D

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, research has accumulated suggesting that excessive Internet use can lead to the development of a behavioral addiction. Internet addiction has been considered as a serious threat to mental health and the excessive use of the Internet has been linked to a variety of negative psychosocial consequences. The aim of this review is to identify all empirical studies to date that used neuroimaging techniques to shed light upon the emerging mental health problem of Internet and gaming addiction from a neuroscientific perspective. Neuroimaging studies offer an advantage over traditional survey and behavioral research because with this method, it is possible to distinguish particular brain areas that are involved in the development and maintenance of addiction. A systematic literature search was conducted, identifying 18 studies. These studies provide compelling evidence for the similarities between different types of addictions, notably substance-related addictions and Internet and gaming addiction, on a variety of levels. On the molecular level, Internet addiction is characterized by an overall reward deficiency that entails decreased dopaminergic activity. On the level of neural circuitry, Internet and gaming addiction led to neuroadaptation and structural changes that occur as a consequence of prolonged increased activity in brain areas associated with addiction. On a behavioral level, Internet and gaming addicts appear to be constricted with regards to their cognitive functioning in various domains. The paper shows that understanding the neuronal correlates associated with the development of Internet and gaming addiction will promote future research and will pave the way for the development of addiction treatment approaches. PMID:24961198

  2. Food pricing strategies, population diets, and non-communicable disease: a systematic review of simulation studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Eyles

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Food pricing strategies have been proposed to encourage healthy eating habits, which may in turn help stem global increases in non-communicable diseases. This systematic review of simulation studies investigates the estimated association between food pricing strategies and changes in food purchases or intakes (consumption (objective 1; Health and disease outcomes (objective 2, and whether there are any differences in these outcomes by socio-economic group (objective 3. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Electronic databases, Internet search engines, and bibliographies of included studies were searched for articles published in English between 1 January 1990 and 24 October 2011 for countries in the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Where ≥ 3 studies examined the same pricing strategy and consumption (purchases or intake or health outcome, results were pooled, and a mean own-price elasticity (own-PE estimated (the own-PE represents the change in demand with a 1% change in price of that good. Objective 1: pooled estimates were possible for the following: (1 taxes on carbonated soft drinks: own-PE (n  =  4 studies, -0.93 (range, -0.06, -2.43, and a modelled -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy (calorie intake for each 1% price increase (n  =  3 studies; (2 taxes on saturated fat: -0.02% (-0.01%, -0.04% reduction in energy intake from saturated fat per 1% price increase (n  =  5 studies; and (3 subsidies on fruits and vegetables: own-PE (n = 3 studies, -0.35 (-0.21, -0.77. Objectives 2 and 3: variability of food pricing strategies and outcomes prevented pooled analyses, although higher quality studies suggested unintended compensatory purchasing that could result in overall effects being counter to health. Eleven of 14 studies evaluating lower socio-economic groups estimated that food pricing strategies would be associated with pro-health outcomes. Food pricing strategies also have the potential to reduce

  3. Systematic studies of covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes via argon plasma-assisted UV grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with 1-vinylimidazole species covalently attached to their sidewalls and end caps have been prepared by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in 1-vinylimidazole monomer. This process can be greatly assisted by argon (Ar) plasma pretreatment, which generates more defect sites at the tube ends and sidewalls acting as the active sites for the subsequent UV grafting of 1-vinylimidazole molecules. The effects of total deposited energy of Ar plasma treatment, either by change of treatment time or discharge power, on the functionalization degree and structural morphology of the resulting nanotubes are systematically studied. By control of the Ar plasma treatment time within 5 min at the discharge power of 200 W, no visible chopping of the functionalized SWNTs was observed. Under this advised optimum processing condition, the functionalization degree, estimated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement, is as high as around 26 wt% 1-vinylimidazole molecules grafted onto the nanotubes. This method may be extended to other reactive vinyl monomers and offers another diverse way of covalent functionalization of SWNTs

  4. A Systematic Chandra study of Sgr A$^{\\star}$: I. X-ray flare detection

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Daily X-ray flaring represents an enigmatic phenomenon of Sgr A$^{\\star}$ --- the supermassive black hole at the center of our Galaxy. We report initial results from a systematic X-ray study of this phenomenon, based on extensive {\\it Chandra} observations obtained from 1999 to 2012, totaling about 4.5 Ms. We detect flares, using a combination of the maximum likelihood and Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods, which allow for a direct accounting for the pile-up effect in the modeling of the flare lightcurves and an optimal use of the data, as well as the measurements of flare parameters, including their uncertainties. A total of 82 flares are detected. About one third of them are relatively faint, which were not detected previously. The observation-to-observation variation of the quiescent emission has an average root-mean-square of $6\\%-14\\%$, including the Poisson statistical fluctuation of faint flares below our detection limits. We find no significant long-term variation in the quiescent emission and the flar...

  5. A lower fragmentation mass scale for clumps in high redshift galaxies: a systematic numerical study

    CERN Document Server

    Tamburello, Valentina; Shen, Sijing; Wadsley, James

    2014-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the effect of sub-grid physics, resolution and structural parameters on the fragmentation of gas-rich galaxy discs into massive star forming clumps due to gravitational instability. We use the state-of-the-art zoom-in cosmological hydrodynamical simulation ARGO (Fiacconi et al. 2015) to set up the initial conditions of our models, and then carry out 26 high resolution controlled SPH simulations of high-z galaxies. We find that when blast-wave feedback is included, the formation of long-lived, gravitationally bound clumps is difficult, requiring disc gas fractions of at least 50% and massive discs, which should have $V_{max} > 200$ km/s at $z \\sim 2$, more massive than the typical galaxies expected at those redshifts. Clumps have typical masses $\\sim 10^7 M_{\\odot}$. Clumps with mass $\\sim 10^8 M_{\\odot}$ are rare, as they require clump-clump merging and sustained mass accretion for a few orbital times, while normally clumps migrate inward and are tidally disrupted on the way o...

  6. Identification and systematical studies of the electron-capture delayed fission (ECDF) in the lead region

    CERN Multimedia

    Pauwels, D B; Lane, J

    2008-01-01

    In our recent experiment (March 2007) at the velocity filter SHIP(GSI) we observed the electron-capture delayed fission of the odd-odd isotope $^{194}$At. This is the first unambiguous identification of this phenomenon in the very neutron-deficient nuclei in the vicinity of the proton shell closure at Z=82. In addition, the total kinetic energy (TKE) for the daughter nuclide $^{194}$Po was measured, despite the fact that this isotope does not decay via spontaneous fission. Semi-empirical analysis of the electron-capture Q$_{EC}$ values and fission barriers B$_{f}$ shows that a relatively broad island of ECDF must exist in this region of the Nuclide Chart, with some of the nuclei having unusually high ECDF probabilities. Therefore, this Proposal is intended to initiate the systematic identification and study of $\\beta$-delayed fission at ISOLDE in the very neutron-deficient lead region. Our aim is to provide unique low-energy fission data (e.g. probabilities, TKE release, fission barriers and their isospin dep...

  7. Systematic study of metal-insulator-metal diodes with a native oxide

    KAUST Repository

    Donchev, E.

    2014-10-07

    © 2014 SPIE. In this paper, a systematic analysis of native oxides within a Metal-Insulator-Metal (MIM) diode is carried out, with the goal of determining their practicality for incorporation into a nanoscale Rectenna (Rectifying Antenna). The requirement of having a sub-10nm oxide scale is met by using the native oxide, which forms on most metals exposed to an oxygen containing environment. This, therefore, provides a simplified MIM fabrication process as the complex, controlled oxide deposition step is omitted. We shall present the results of an investigation into the current-voltage characteristics of various MIM combinations that incorporate a native oxide, in order to establish whether the native oxide is of sufficient quality for good diode operation. The thin native oxide layers are formed by room temperature oxidation of the first metal layer, deposited by magnetron sputtering. This is done in-situ, within the deposition chamber before depositing the second metal electrode. Using these structures, we study the established trend where the bigger the difference in metal workfunctions, the better the rectification properties of MIM structures, and hence the selection of the second metal is key to controlling the device\\'s rectifying properties. We show how leakage current paths through the non-optimised native oxide control the net current-voltage response of the MIM devices. Furthermore, we will present the so-called diode figures of merit (asymmetry, non-linearity and responsivity) for each of the best performing structures.

  8. Systematic study of the single-state dominance in 2 nu beta beta decay transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Civitarese, O

    1999-01-01

    The single-state-dominance hypothesis (SSDH) states that the decay rates of the two-neutrino double-beta decay are governed by a virtual two-step transition connecting the initial and final ground states through the first 1 sup + state, 1 sup + sub 1 , of the intermediate odd-odd nucleus, for those odd-odd nuclei where the 1 sup + sub 1 state is the ground state. To investigate the validity of the SSDH we have performed a systematical theoretical analysis of all known double-beta-decay transitions where the SSDH conditions are fulfilled. The calculations are based on the quasiparticle randon-phase approximation (QRPA) and the results have been obtained by using realistic single-particle bases and realistic interactions. We have studied the double beta sup - decays of sup 1 sup 0 sup 0 Mo, sup 1 sup 1 sup 0 Pd, sup 1 sup 1 sup 4 Cd, sup 1 sup 1 sup 6 Cd and sup 1 sup 2 sup 8 Te and the double electron-capture transitions in sup 1 sup 0 sup 6 Cd and sup 1 sup 3 sup 6 Ce. The analysis shows that the SSDH is real...

  9. The First Systematic Study of Type Ibc Supernova Multi-color Light-curves

    CERN Document Server

    Drout, Maria R; Gal-Yam, A; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Sand, D J; Moon, D -S; Arcavi, I; Green, Y

    2010-01-01

    We present detailed optical photometry for 25 Type Ibc supernovae within d~150 Mpc obtained with the robotic Palomar 60-inch telescope in 2004-2007. This study represents the first uniform, systematic, and statistical sample of multi-color SNe Ibc light-curves available to date. We correct the light-curves for host galaxy extinction using a new technique based on the photometric color evolution, namely, we show that the (V-R) color of extinction-corrected SNe Ibc at t~10 days after V-band maximum is tightly distributed, (V-R)=0.26+-0.06 mag. Using this technique, we find that SNe Ibc typically suffer from significant host galaxy extinction, E(B-V)~0.4 mag. A comparison of the extinction-corrected light-curves for SNe Ib and Ic reveals that they are statistically indistinguishable, both in luminosity and decline rate. We report peak absolute magnitudes of M_R=-17.9+-0.9 mag and M_R=-18.3+-0.6 mag for SNe Ib and Ic, respectively. Focusing on the broad-lined SNe Ic, we find that they are more luminous than the n...

  10. Cloud Regimes as a Tool for Systematic Study of Various Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Cho, Nayeong; Lee, Dongmin

    2016-01-01

    Systematic changes of clouds and precipitation are notoriously difficult to ascribe to aerosols. This presentation will showcase yet one more attempt to at least credibly detect the signal of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions. We surmise that the concept of cloud regimes (CRs) is appropriate to conduct such an investigation. Previous studies focused on what we call here dynamical CRs, and while we continue to adopt those too for our analysis, we have found that a different way of organizing cloud systems, namely via microphysical regimes is also promising. Our analysis relies on MODIS Collection 6 Level-3 data for clouds and aerosols, and TRMM-TMPA data for precipitation. The regimes are derived by applying clustering analysis on MODIS joint histograms, and once each grid cell is assigned a regime, aerosol and precipitation data can be spatiotemporally matched and composited by regime. The composites of various cloud and precipitation variables for high (upper quartile of distribution) and low (lower quartile) aerosol loadings can then be contrasted. We seek evidence of aerosol effects both in regimes with large fractions of deep ice-rich clouds, as well as regimes where low liquid phase clouds dominate. Signals can be seen, especially when the analysis is broken by land-ocean and when additional filters are applied, but there are of course caveats which will be discussed.

  11. A systematic study of electron or hole transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Simserides, Constantinos

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study of electron or hole transfer along DNA dimers, trimers and polymers is presented with a tight-binding approach at the base-pair level, using the relevant on-site energies of the base-pairs and the hopping parameters between successive base-pairs. A system of $N$ coupled differential equations is solved numerically with the eigenvalue method, allowing the temporal and spatial evolution of electrons or holes along a $N$ base-pair DNA segment to be determined. Useful physical quantities are defined and calculated including the maximum transfer percentage $p$ and the pure maximum transfer rate $\\frac{p}{T}$ for cases where a period $T$ can be defined, as well as the pure mean carrier transfer rate $k$ and the speed of charge transfer $u=kd$, where $d = N \\times$ 3.4 {\\AA} is the charge transfer distance. The inverse decay length $\\beta$ used for the exponential fit $k = k_0 \\exp(-\\beta d)$ and the exponent $\\eta$ used for the power law fit $k = k_0' N^{-\\eta}$ are computed. The electron and hol...

  12. A Systematic Study of Evolved Supernova Remnants in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Yoko; Tamagawa, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Typing the origin (i.e., Type Ia or core-collapse) of supernova remnants (SNRs) is crucial to determine the rates of supernova (SN) explosions in a galaxy, which is a key to understand its recent chemical evolution. However, evolved SNRs in the so-called Sedov phase are dominated by the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM), making it difficult to determine their ejecta composition and thus SN type. Here we present a systematic X-ray study of nine evolved SNRs in the Magellanic Clouds, DEM L238, DEM L249, 0534-69.9, 0548-70.4, B0532-71.0, B0532-67.5, 0103-72.6, 0049-73.6, and 0104-72.3, using archival data of the Suzaku satellite. Although Suzaku does not spatially resolve the SN ejecta from the swept-up ISM due to the limited angular resolution, its excellent energy resolution has enabled clear separation of emission lines in the soft X-ray band. This leads to the finding that the `spatially-integrated' spectra of the evolved (~10^4 yr) SNRs are still significantly contributed by emission from the ejecta at the...

  13. Systematic study of the d=5 Weinberg operator at one-loop order

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, Florian; Ota, Toshihiko; Winter, Walter

    2012-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of the $d=5$ Weinberg operator at the one-loop level. We identify three different categories of neutrino mass generation: (1) finite irreducible diagrams; (2) finite extensions of the usual seesaw mechanisms at one-loop and (3) divergent loop realizations of the seesaws. All radiative one-loop neutrino mass models must fall into one of these classes. Case (1) gives the leading contribution to neutrino mass naturally and a classic example of this class is the Zee model. We demonstrate that in order to prevent that a tree level contribution dominates in case (2), Majorana fermions running in the loop and an additional $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry are needed for a genuinely leading one-loop contribution. In the type-II loop extensions, the lepton number violating coupling will be generated at one loop, whereas the type-I/III extensions can be interpreted as loop-induced inverse or linear seesaw mechanisms. For the divergent diagrams in category (3), the tree level contribution cannot be ...

  14. A Systematic Review of the Recent Quality of Life Studies in Adult Extremity Sarcoma Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa H. Tang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extremity sarcoma represents a heterogeneous group of rare cancers that carries a relatively high morbidity with regards to physical function. Quality of Life (QoL as an outcome is an important consideration in this cohort. We aimed to identify the correlates of QoL in extremity sarcoma cohorts. Methods. A systematic review of the literature on extremity sarcoma in adults from five databases over the last ten years was undertaken. Results. Twelve articles were chosen and assessed for quality. Physical and social function of extremity sarcoma survivors is below that of the general population. Overall QoL scores of these patients are comparable to those of the general population. Studies that used more recently treated cohorts found that patients who had limb sparing surgery displayed superior functional outcomes over those that underwent amputations. Pain and perceiving that the cancer negatively influenced opportunities was associated with poor outcomes. Conclusion. The available literature regarding QoL in extremity sarcoma patients is heterogeneous in terms of aims and assessment tools. Results need to be interpreted in light of the improved management of extremity sarcoma in more recent patient cohorts.

  15. Geneious! Simplified genome skimming methods for phylogenetic systematic studies: A case study in Oreocarya (Boraginaceae) 1

    OpenAIRE

    Ripma, Lee A.; Simpson, Michael G.; Hasenstab-Lehman, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: As systematists grapple with how to best harness the power of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a deluge of review papers, methods, and analytical tools make choosing the right method difficult. Oreocarya (Boraginaceae), a genus of 63 species, is a good example of a group lacking both species-level resolution and genomic resources. The use of Geneious removes bioinformatic barriers and makes NGS genome skimming accessible to even the least tech-savvy systematists. • Me...

  16. Social relationships and risk of dementia : A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Jisca S.; Zuidersma, Marij; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Zuidema, Sytse; van den Heuvel, Edwin R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Smidt, Nynke

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear to what extent poor social relationships are related to the development of dementia. A comprehensive systematic literature search identified 19 longitudinal cohort studies investigating the association between various social relationship factors and incident dementia in the general pop

  17. Spinal mechanical load as a risk factor for low back pain: A systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.P. Bakker; A.P. Verhagen; E. van Trijffel; C. Lucas; B.W. Koes

    2009-01-01

    Study Design. Systematic review. Objective. To review and critically evaluate the past literature for spinal mechanical load as risk factor for low back pain (LBP). Summary of Background Data. LBP is a costly health problem worldwide, and treatments are often unsuccessful. Therefore, prevention migh

  18. Protocol for a systematic review on the extent of non-publication of research studies and associated study characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portalupi Susan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methodological research has found that non-published studies often have different results than those that are published, a phenomenon known as publication bias. When results are not published, or are published selectively based on the direction or the strength of the findings, healthcare professionals and consumers of healthcare cannot base their decision-making on the full body of current evidence. Methods As part of the OPEN project (http://www.open-project.eu we will conduct a systematic review with the following objectives: 1. To determine the proportion and/or rate of non-publication of studies by systematically reviewing methodological research projects that followed up a cohort of studies that a. received research ethics committee (REC approval, b. were registered in trial registries, or c. were presented as abstracts at conferences. 2. To assess the association of study characteristics (for example, direction and/or strength of findings with likelihood of full publication. To identify reports of relevant methodological research projects we will conduct electronic database searches, check reference lists, and contact experts. Published and unpublished projects will be included. The inclusion criteria are as follows: a. RECs: methodological research projects that examined the subsequent proportion and/or rate of publication of studies that received approval from RECs; b. Trial registries: methodological research projects that examine the subsequent proportion and/or rate of publication of studies registered in trial registries; c. Conference abstracts: methodological research projects that examine the subsequent proportion and/or rate of full publication of studies which were initially presented at conferences as abstracts. Primary outcomes: Proportion/rate of published studies; time to full publication (mean/median; cumulative publication rate by time. Secondary outcomes: Association of study characteristics with full

  19. Intimate partner violence and incident depressive symptoms and suicide attempts: a systematic review of longitudinal studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Devries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depression and suicide are responsible for a substantial burden of disease globally. Evidence suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV experience is associated with increased risk of depression, but also that people with mental disorders are at increased risk of violence. We aimed to investigate the extent to which IPV experience is associated with incident depression and suicide attempts, and vice versa, in both women and men. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies published before February 1, 2013. More than 22,000 records from 20 databases were searched for studies examining physical and/or sexual intimate partner or dating violence and symptoms of depression, diagnosed major depressive disorder, dysthymia, mild depression, or suicide attempts. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate pooled odds ratios (ORs. Sixteen studies with 36,163 participants met our inclusion criteria. All studies included female participants; four studies also included male participants. Few controlled for key potential confounders other than demographics. All but one depression study measured only depressive symptoms. For women, there was clear evidence of an association between IPV and incident depressive symptoms, with 12 of 13 studies showing a positive direction of association and 11 reaching statistical significance; pooled OR from six studies = 1.97 (95% CI 1.56-2.48, I²  =  50.4%, p(heterogeneity = 0.073. There was also evidence of an association in the reverse direction between depressive symptoms and incident IPV (pooled OR from four studies = 1.93, 95% CI 1.51-2.48, I²  =  0%, p = 0.481. IPV was also associated with incident suicide attempts. For men, evidence suggested that IPV was associated with incident depressive symptoms, but there was no clear evidence of an association between IPV and suicide attempts or depression and incident IPV

  20. Systems biology studies of Aspergilli - from sequence to science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2008-01-01

    sequence analysis, exo-metabolomics, transcriptomics and classical genetics. With a special focus on the traits making one strain a high-yield citric acid producer and the other an efficient glucoamylase producer, a surprising number of co-enhancing factors were found on multiple levels of cellular...... of citric acid. Furthermore, a detailed transcriptome profiling of all of the genes of A. niger predicted to code for extracellular enzymes was made using a new literature-based graphical tool for analysis of the degradation targets of the enzymes. In conclusion, the versatility of a systems biology...... metabolism. Transcriptome profiling coupled with metabolic modeling further allowed the charting of the genome-wide regulation of A. niger in response to ambient pH in the context of organic acid production and a plausible explanation for the evolution of the capabilities to be a high-yield producer...

  1. Study on Biological Control Of Rhizoctonia solani via Trichoderma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Strain T02-25 was selected from approximately 30 rhizosphere isolates of Trichoderma species isolated from roots of crops. Its biological activity against Rhizoctonia solani was determined for the control efficacy to pepper seedling blight caused by R. solani in the field. The assay methods were treating R. solani sclerotia by Trichoderma conidial suspension (106cfu ml-1) and scattering Thichoderma rice bran over the pepper root medium. The results showed that T02-25 was active against R. solani in both ways, and its control efficacy was 82.7% and 78.0%, respectively. In addition to comparison of the efficacy of the two application methods, the relationship of different factors in the control efficacy of Trichoderma against R. solani was discussed.

  2. A new species of Raricirrus from northern Europe, with notes on its biology and a discussion of the affinities of the genus (Polychaeta: Ctenodrilidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Mary E.; George, J. David

    1991-01-01

    Zoologi, Polychaeta, Ctenodrilidae, Raricirrus, systematics, reproductive biology, northern Europe......Zoologi, Polychaeta, Ctenodrilidae, Raricirrus, systematics, reproductive biology, northern Europe...

  3. A Comprehensive Systems Biology Approach to Studying Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Meghan; Relich, Ryan F

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an ongoing and intensifying epidemic in the Western Hemisphere. We examined the complete predicted proteomes, glycomes, and selectomes of 33 ZIKV strains representing temporally diverse members of the African lineage, the Asian lineage, and the current outbreak in the Americas. Derivation of the complete selectome is an 'omics' approach to identify distinct evolutionary pressures acting on different features of an organism. Employment of the M8 model did not show evidence of global diversifying selection acting on the ZIKV polyprotein; however, a mixed effect model of evolution showed strong evidence (P<0.05) for episodic diversifying selection acting on specific sites. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were predictably frequent across strains relative to the derived consensus sequence. None of the 9 published detection procedures utilize targets that share 100% identity across the 33 strains examined, indicating that ZIKV escape from molecular detection is predictable. The predicted O-linked glycome showed marked diversity across strains; however, the N-linked glycome was highly stable. All Asian and American strains examined were predicted to include glycosylation of E protein ASN154, a modification proposed to mediate neurotropism, whereas the modification was not predicted for African strains. SNP diversity, episodic diversifying selection, and differential glycosylation, particularly of ASN154, may have major biological implications for ZIKV disease. Taken together, the systems biology perspective of ZIKV indicates: a.) The recently emergent Asian/American N-glycotype is mediating the new and emerging neuropathogenic potential of ZIKV; and b.) further divergence at specific sites is predictable as endemnicity is established in the Americas. PMID:27584813

  4. A Comprehensive Systems Biology Approach to Studying Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relich, Ryan F.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an ongoing and intensifying epidemic in the Western Hemisphere. We examined the complete predicted proteomes, glycomes, and selectomes of 33 ZIKV strains representing temporally diverse members of the African lineage, the Asian lineage, and the current outbreak in the Americas. Derivation of the complete selectome is an ‘omics’ approach to identify distinct evolutionary pressures acting on different features of an organism. Employment of the M8 model did not show evidence of global diversifying selection acting on the ZIKV polyprotein; however, a mixed effect model of evolution showed strong evidence (P<0.05) for episodic diversifying selection acting on specific sites. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were predictably frequent across strains relative to the derived consensus sequence. None of the 9 published detection procedures utilize targets that share 100% identity across the 33 strains examined, indicating that ZIKV escape from molecular detection is predictable. The predicted O-linked glycome showed marked diversity across strains; however, the N-linked glycome was highly stable. All Asian and American strains examined were predicted to include glycosylation of E protein ASN154, a modification proposed to mediate neurotropism, whereas the modification was not predicted for African strains. SNP diversity, episodic diversifying selection, and differential glycosylation, particularly of ASN154, may have major biological implications for ZIKV disease. Taken together, the systems biology perspective of ZIKV indicates: a.) The recently emergent Asian/American N-glycotype is mediating the new and emerging neuropathogenic potential of ZIKV; and b.) further divergence at specific sites is predictable as endemnicity is established in the Americas. PMID:27584813

  5. Sample validity in biological trace element and organic nutrient research studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of the art of the biological trace element investigations is overviewed. Questions of biological validity, such as the influence of the 'status of sampling' of human subjects on the concentrations of selected elements are studied. Analytical validity problems, e.g. stability of Cd, Hg and Pb concentration in selected specimens, stability of selected organic nutrients in NBS SRMs, etc. are also discussed. Finally, it is concluded that the development of new biological reference materials should take into account the multidisciplinary demands of biological trace element investigations. (author) 20 refs.; 6 tables

  6. Risk factors for violence in psychosis: systematic review and meta-regression analysis of 110 studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Witt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous reviews on risk and protective factors for violence in psychosis have produced contrasting findings. There is therefore a need to clarify the direction and strength of association of risk and protective factors for violent outcomes in individuals with psychosis. METHOD: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis using 6 electronic databases (CINAHL, EBSCO, EMBASE, Global Health, PsycINFO, PUBMED and Google Scholar. Studies were identified that reported factors associated with violence in adults diagnosed, using DSM or ICD criteria, with schizophrenia and other psychoses. We considered non-English language studies and dissertations. Risk and protective factors were meta-analysed if reported in three or more primary studies. Meta-regression examined sources of heterogeneity. A novel meta-epidemiological approach was used to group similar risk factors into one of 10 domains. Sub-group analyses were then used to investigate whether risk domains differed for studies reporting severe violence (rather than aggression or hostility and studies based in inpatient (rather than outpatient settings. FINDINGS: There were 110 eligible studies reporting on 45,533 individuals, 8,439 (18.5% of whom were violent. A total of 39,995 (87.8% were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 209 (0.4% were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and 5,329 (11.8% were diagnosed with other psychoses. Dynamic (or modifiable risk factors included hostile behaviour, recent drug misuse, non-adherence with psychological therapies (p values<0.001, higher poor impulse control scores, recent substance misuse, recent alcohol misuse (p values<0.01, and non-adherence with medication (p value <0.05. We also examined a number of static factors, the strongest of which were criminal history factors. When restricting outcomes to severe violence, these associations did not change materially. In studies investigating inpatient violence, associations differed in strength but not

  7. Are reports of psychological stress higher in occupational studies? A systematic review across occupational and population based studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Goodwin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The general health questionnaire (GHQ is commonly used to assess symptoms of common mental disorder (CMD. Prevalence estimates for CMD caseness from UK population studies are thought to be in the range of 14-17%, and the UK occupational studies of which we are aware indicate a higher prevalence. This review will synthesise the existing research using the GHQ from both population and occupational studies and will compare the weighted prevalence estimates between them. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the prevalence of CMD, as assessed by the GHQ, in all UK occupational and population studies conducted from 1990 onwards. RESULTS: The search revealed 65 occupational papers which met the search criteria and 15 relevant papers for UK population studies. The weighted prevalence estimate for CMD across all occupational studies which used the same version and cut-off for the GHQ was 29.6% (95% confidence intervals (CIs 27.3-31.9% and for comparable population studies was significantly lower at 19.1% (95% CIs 17.3-20.8%. This difference was reduced after restricting the studies by response rate and sampling method (23.9% (95% CIs 20.5%-27.4% vs. 19.2% (95 CIs 17.1%-21.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Counter intuitively, the prevalence of CMD is higher in occupational studies, compared to population studies (which include individuals not in employment, although this difference narrowed after accounting for measures of study quality, including response rate and sampling method. This finding is inconsistent with the healthy worker effect, which would presume lower levels of psychological symptoms in individuals in employment. One explanation is that the GHQ is sensitive to contextual factors, and it seems possible that symptoms of CMD are over reported when participants know that they have been recruited to a study on the basis that they belong to a specific occupational group, as in nearly all "stress" surveys.

  8. Epidemiology and Reporting Characteristics of Systematic Reviews of Biomedical Research: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Page

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Systematic reviews (SRs can help decision makers interpret the deluge of published biomedical literature. However, a SR may be of limited use if the methods used to conduct the SR are flawed, and reporting of the SR is incomplete. To our knowledge, since 2004 there has been no cross-sectional study of the prevalence, focus, and completeness of reporting of SRs across different specialties. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a more recent cross-section of SRs.We searched MEDLINE to identify potentially eligible SRs indexed during the month of February 2014. Citations were screened using prespecified eligibility criteria. Epidemiological and reporting characteristics of a random sample of 300 SRs were extracted by one reviewer, with a 10% sample extracted in duplicate. We compared characteristics of Cochrane versus non-Cochrane reviews, and the 2014 sample of SRs versus a 2004 sample of SRs. We identified 682 SRs, suggesting that more than 8,000 SRs are being indexed in MEDLINE annually, corresponding to a 3-fold increase over the last decade. The majority of SRs addressed a therapeutic question and were conducted by authors based in China, the UK, or the US; they included a median of 15 studies involving 2,072 participants. Meta-analysis was performed in 63% of SRs, mostly using standard pairwise methods. Study risk of bias/quality assessment was performed in 70% of SRs but was rarely incorporated into the analysis (16%. Few SRs (7% searched sources of unpublished data, and the risk of publication bias was considered in less than half of SRs. Reporting quality was highly variable; at least a third of SRs did not report use of a SR protocol, eligibility criteria relating to publication status, years of coverage of the search, a full Boolean search logic for at least one database, methods for data extraction, methods for study risk of bias assessment, a primary outcome, an

  9. Investigating Lebanese Grade Seven Biology Teachers Mathematical Knowledge and Skills: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Nawal Abou; Chatila, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates Lebanese grade 7 biology teachers' mathematical knowledge and skills, by exploring how they explain a visual representation in an activity depending on the mathematical concept "Function". Twenty Lebanese in-service biology teachers participated in the study, and were interviewed about their explanation for the…

  10. Systematic study of quasifission characteristics and timescales in heavy element formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, D. J.; Williams, E.; Mohanto, G.; Simenel, C.; Dasgupta, M.; Wakhle, A.; Carter, I. P.; Cook, K. J.; Jeung, D. Y.; Luong, D. H.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Prasad, E.; Rafferty, D. C.; du Rietz, R.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-05-01

    Superheavy elements can only be created in the laboratory by the fusion of two massive nuclei. Mass-angle distributions give the most direct information on the characteristics and time scales of quasifission, the major competitor to fusion in these reactions. The systematics of 42 mass-angle distributions provide information on the global characteristics of quasifission. Deviations from the systematics reveal the major role played by the nuclear structure of the two colliding nuclei in determining the reaction outcome, and in hindering or favouring heavy element production.

  11. Healthcare professionals' intentions and behaviours: A systematic review of studies based on social cognitive theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eccles Martin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an important gap between the implications of clinical research evidence and the routine clinical practice of healthcare professionals. Because individual decisions are often central to adoption of a clinical-related behaviour, more information about the cognitive mechanisms underlying behaviours is needed to improve behaviour change interventions targeting healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to systematically review the published scientific literature about factors influencing health professionals' behaviours based on social cognitive theories. These theories refer to theories where individual cognitions/thoughts are viewed as processes intervening between observable stimuli and responses in real world situations. Methods We searched psycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CIHNAL, Index to theses, PROQUEST dissertations and theses and Current Contents for articles published in English only. We included studies that aimed to predict healthcare professionals' intentions and behaviours with a clear specification of relying on a social cognitive theory. Information on percent of explained variance (R2 was used to compute the overall frequency-weighted mean R2 to evaluate the efficacy of prediction in several contexts and according to different methodological aspects. The cognitive factors most consistently associated with prediction of healthcare professionals' intention and behaviours were documented. Results Seventy eight studies met the inclusion criteria. Among these studies, 72 provided information on the determinants of intention and 16 prospective studies provided information on the determinants of behaviour. The theory most often used as reference was the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA or its extension the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB. An overall frequency-weighted mean R2 of 0.31 was observed for the prediction of behaviour; 0.59 for the prediction of intention. A number of moderators influenced the

  12. Evaluation of Study and Patient Characteristics of Clinical Studies in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ziemssen

    Full Text Available So far, clinical studies in primary progressive MS (PPMS have failed to meet their primary efficacy endpoints. To some extent this might be attributable to the choice of assessments or to the selection of the study population.The aim of this study was to identify outcome influencing factors by analyzing the design and methods of previous randomized studies in PPMS patients without restriction to intervention or comparator.A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS and the COCHRANE Central Register of Controlled Trials (inception to February 2015. Keywords included PPMS, primary progressive multiple sclerosis and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Randomized, controlled trials of at least one year's duration were selected if they included only patients with PPMS or if they reported sufficient PPMS subgroup data. No restrictions with respect to intervention or comparator were applied. Study quality was assessed by a biometrics expert. Relevant baseline characteristics and outcomes were extracted and compared.Of 52 PPMS studies identified, four were selected. Inclusion criteria were notably different among studies with respect to both the definition of PPMS and the requirements for the presence of disability progression at enrolment. Differences between the study populations included the baseline lesion load, pretreatment status and disease duration. The rate of disease progression may also be an important factor, as all but one of the studies included a large proportion of patients with a low progression rate. In addition, the endpoints specified could not detect progression adequately.Optimal PPMS study methods involve appropriate patient selection, especially regarding the PPMS phenotype and progression rate. Functional composite endpoints might be more sensitive than single endpoints in capturing progression.

  13. Preliminary Study of Greywater Treatment through Rotating Biological Contactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Ahmed Pathan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of the greywater vary from country to country and it depends upon the cultural and social behavior of the respective country. There was a considerable need to characterize and recycle the greywater. In this regard greywater was separated from the black water and analyzed for various physiochemical parameters. Among various greywater recycling treatment technologies, RBC (Rotating Biological Contactor is more effective treatment technique in reducing COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand and organic matters from the greywater. But this technology was not applied and tested in Pakistan. There was extensive need to investigate the RBC technology for greywater recycling at small scale before applying at mass scale. To treat the greywater, a single-stage RBC simulator was designed and developed at laboratory scale. An electric motor equipped with gear box to control the rotations of the disks was mounted on the tank. The simulator was run at the rate of 1.7 rpm. The disc area of the RBC was immersed about 40% in the greywater. Water samples were collected at each HRT (Hydraulic Retention Time and analyzed for the parameters such as pH, conductivity, TDS (Total Dissolved Solids, salinity, BOD5 (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, COD and suspended solids by using standard methods. The results are encouraging with percentage removal of BOD5 and COD being 53 and 60% respectively.

  14. Studying of Phenomenon of Biological Adaptation to Heavy Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Mosin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological influence of deuterium on cells of various taxonomic groups of prokaryotic and eucaryotic microorganisms realizing methylotrophic, chemoheterotrophic, photo-organotrophic, and photosynthetic ways of assimilation of carbon substrates (methylotrophic bacteria Brevibacterium methylicum, chemoheterotrophic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, photo-organotrophic halobacteria Halobacterium halobium, and green micro algae Chlorella vulgaris was investigated at the growth on media with heavy water (2H2O. For investigated microorganisms are submitted the data on growth and adaptation on the growth media containing as sources of deuterated substrates 2H2O, [2H]methanol and hydrolisates of deutero-biomass of methylotrophic bacteria B. methylicum, obtained after multistage adaptation to 2H2O. The qualitative and quantitative composition of intra- and endocellular amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and fatty acids in conditions of adaptation to 2H2O is investigated. It is shown, that the effects observed at adaptation to 2H2O, possess a complex multifactorial character and connected to cytological, morphological and physiological changes – the magnitude of the lag- period, time of cellular generation, output of biomass, a parity ratio of synthesized amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, and also with an evolutionary level of the organization of the investigated object and the pathways of assimilation of carbon substrates as well.

  15. Extraction, characterization and biological studies of phytochemicals from Mammea suriga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahesha M. Poojary; Kanivebagilu A.Vishnumurthy; Airody Vasudeva Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    The present work involves extraction of phytochemicals from the root bark of a well-known Indian traditional medicinal plant, viz. Mammea suriga, with various solvents and evaluation of their in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities using standard methods. The phytochemical analysis indicates the presence of some interesting secondary metabolites like flavonoids, cardiac glycosides, alkaloids, saponins and tannins in the extracts. Also, the solvent extracts displayed promising anti-microbial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Cryptococcus neoformans with inhibition zone in a range of 20–33 mm. Further, results of their antioxidant screening revealed that aqueous extract (with IC50 values of 111.51±1.03 and 31.05±0.92μg/mL in total reducing power assay and DPHH radical scavenging assay, respectively) and ethanolic extract (with IC50 values of 128.00±1.01 and 33.25±0.89μg/mL in total reducing power assay and DPHH radical scavenging assay, respectively) were better antioxidants than standard ascorbic acid. Interestingly, FT-IR analysis of each extract established the presence of various biologically active functional groups in it.

  16. Applied Bayesian statistical studies in biology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    D’Amore, G; Scalfari, F

    2004-01-01

    It was written on another occasion· that "It is apparent that the scientific culture, if one means production of scientific papers, is growing exponentially, and chaotically, in almost every field of investigation". The biomedical sciences sensu lato and mathematical statistics are no exceptions. One might say then, and with good reason, that another collection of bio­ statistical papers would only add to the overflow and cause even more confusion. Nevertheless, this book may be greeted with some interest if we state that most of the papers in it are the result of a collaboration between biologists and statisticians, and partly the product of the Summer School th "Statistical Inference in Human Biology" which reaches its 10 edition in 2003 (information about the School can be obtained at the Web site http://www2. stat. unibo. itleventilSito%20scuolalindex. htm). is common experience - and not only This is rather important. Indeed, it in Italy - that encounters between statisticians and researchers are spora...

  17. Improving Cognitive Function from Children to Old Age: A Systematic Review of Recent Smart Ageing Intervention Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Nouchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cognitive functions are important for daily life at any age. One purpose of Smart Ageing is to investigate how to improve cognitive functions. This systematic review evaluates beneficial effects of the intervention on cognitive functions. Method. We conducted a systematic review of intervention studies of improvements of cognitive functions published or in press before December 2013. Because of the heterogeneity of the intervention programs, a systematic and critical review of the interventions and outcomes was conducted instead of a meta-analysis. Results. We identified nine completed and published studies, which were divided into four categories: cognitive training using video game, cognitive training using PC, cognitive training using paper and pencil, and exercise training. Review results showed that various intervention programs can improve cognitive functions such as executive functions, working memory, episodic memory, processing speed, and general cognitive ability/IQ. Conclusions. The systematic review demonstrated that some intervention programs can be effective for improving various aspects of cognitive functioning at any age. Some limitations to this review include its small sample size and heterogeneity of programs and cognitive function measures, in addition to unresolved issues such as transfer of everyday skills and effectiveness for nonhealthy people.

  18. Randomised study of systematic lymphadenectomy in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, A; Benedetti Panici, P; Dell'Anna, T; Landoni, F; Lissoni, A; Pellegrino, A; Rossi, R S; Chiari, S; Campagnutta, E; Greggi, S; Angioli, R; Manci, N; Calcagno, M; Scambia, G; Fossati, R; Floriani, I; Torri, V; Grassi, R; Mangioni, C

    2006-01-01

    No randomised trials have addressed the value of systematic aortic and pelvic lymphadenectomy (SL) in ovarian cancer macroscopically confined to the pelvis. This study was conducted to investigate the role of SL compared with lymph nodes sampling (CONTROL) in the management of early stage ovarian cancer. A total of 268 eligible patients with macroscopically intrapelvic ovarian carcinoma were randomised to SL (N=138) or CONTROL (N=130). The primary objective was to compare the proportion of patients with retroperitoneal nodal involvement between the two groups. Median operating time was longer and more patients required blood transfusions in the SL arm than the CONTROL arm (240 vs 150 min, P<0.001, and 36 vs 22%, P=0.012, respectively). More patients in the SL group had positive nodes at histologic examination than patients on CONTROL (9 vs 22%, P=0.007). Postoperative chemotherapy was delivered in 66% and 51% of patients with negative nodes on CONTROL and SL, respectively (P=0.03). At a median follow-up of 87.8 months, the adjusted risks for progression (hazard ratio [HR]=0.72, 95%CI=0.46–1.21, P=0.16) and death (HR=0.85, 95%CI=0.49–1.47, P=0.56) were lower, but not statistically significant, in the SL than the CONTROL arm. Five-year progression-free survival was 71.3 and 78.3% (difference=7.0%, 95% CI=–3.4–14.3%) and 5-year overall survival was 81.3 and 84.2% (difference=2.9%, 95% CI=−7.0–9.2%) respectively for CONTROL and SL. SL detects a higher proportion of patients with metastatic lymph nodes. This trial may have lacked power to exclude clinically important effects of SL on progression free and overall survival. PMID:16940979

  19. A systematic study of the brain base arteries in the turkey (Meleagris gallopavo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarílis Díaz de Carvalho

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty heads with neck segments of turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo were dissected for a systematic study of the arteries. The frequency of the arteries found was: Cerebral carotid artery, intercarotid anastomosis and internal ophthalmic artery (100%. Caudal branch of the cerebral carotid artery to the right (R vestigial artery (70% and developed (30% and to the left (L developed (70% and vestigial artery (30%. Ventral tectal mesencephalic artery in (70% to R and (30% to L was the direct branch of the cerebral carotid artery to L (70% and to R (30% collateral branch of the developed caudal branch. Basilar artery to L in (70% and to R (30% formed from the developed caudal branch; rostral ventral cerebellar artery present (86.7% and absent (13.3% to R and L. Caudal ventral cerebellar artery to R single (73.3%, double (23.3% and triple (3.3%; caudal ventral cerebellar artery to L single (73.3% and double (26.7%. Dorsal spinal artery branch of caudal ventral cerebellar artery to R (80% and to L (73.3%. The rostral branch of cerebral carotid artery showed as collateral branches the single caudal cerebral artery to R (100% and to L (96.7% while in (3.3% it was double. The middle cerebral artery was single to R and L (100%. Cerebroethmoidal artery to R and L (100% with its collateral branch to single rostral cerebral artery (90% to R and (86.7% to L and double (10% to R and (13.3% to L. Ethmoidal artery to R and to L (100% single. The cerebral arterial circle was rostrally and caudally opened, so that the cerebral blood supply was exclusively made by the carotid system.

  20. A systematic study of neutral and charged 3d-metal trioxides and tetraoxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Kalpataru; Gutsev, Gennady L.; Weatherford, Charles A.; Jena, Purusottam

    2011-04-01

    Using density functional theory with generalized gradient approximation, we have performed a systematic study of the structure and properties of neutral and charged trioxides (MO3) and tetraoxides (MO4) of the 3d-metal atoms. The results of our calculations revealed a number of interesting features when moving along the 3d-metal series. (1) Geometrical configurations of the lowest total energy states of neutral and charged trioxides and tetraoxides are composed of oxo and/or peroxo groups, except for CuO3- and ZnO3- which possess a superoxo group, CuO4+ and ZnO4+ which possess two superoxo groups, and CuO3+, ZnO3+, and ZnO4- which possess an ozonide group. While peroxo groups are found in the early and late transition metals, all oxygen atoms bind chemically to the metal atom in the middle of the series. (2) Attachment or detachment of an electron to/from an oxide often leads to a change in the geometry. In some cases, two dissociatively attached oxygen atoms combine and form a peroxo group or a peroxo group transforms into a superoxo group and vice versa. (3) The adiabatic electron affinity of as many as two trioxides (VO3 and CoO3) and four tetraoxides (TiO4, CrO4, MnO4, and FeO4) are larger than the electron affinity of halogen atoms. All these oxides are hence superhalogens although only VO3 and MnO4 satisfy the general superhalogen formula.

  1. Ameliorating Systematic Uncertainties in the Angular Clustering of Galaxies: A Study using SDSS-III

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ashley J; Cuesta, Antonio J; Tojeiro, Rita; Percival, Will J; Wake, David; Masters, Karen L; Nichol, Robert C; Myers, Adam D; de Simoni, Fernando; Seo, Hee Jong; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Crittenden, Robert; Blanton, Michael; Brinkmann, J; da Costa, Luiz A N; Guo, Hong; Kazin, Eyal; Maia, Marcio A G; Maraston, Claudia; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Prada, Francisco; Ramos, Beatriz; Sanchez, Ariel; Schlafly, Edward F; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Skibba, Ramin; Thomas, Daniel; Weaver, Benjamin A; White, Martin; Zehavi, Idit

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effects of potential sources of systematic error on the angular and photometric redshift, z_phot, distributions of a sample of redshift 0.4 0.5, the magnitude of the corrections we apply are greater than the statistical uncertainty in w.

  2. A step-by-step guide to systematically identify all relevant animal studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenaars, M.; Hooijmans, C.R.; Veggel, N. van; Riet, G. ter; Leeflang, M.; Hooft, L.; Wilt, G.J. van der; Tillema, A.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2012-01-01

    Before starting a new animal experiment, thorough analysis of previously performed experiments is essential from a scientific as well as from an ethical point of view. The method that is most suitable to carry out such a thorough analysis of the literature is a systematic review (SR). An essential f

  3. Systematically Identifying Relevant Research: Case Study on Child Protection Social Workers' Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Paula; Taylor, Brian J.; Campbell, Anne; McQuilkin, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Context: The development of a consolidated knowledge base for social work requires rigorous approaches to identifying relevant research. Method: The quality of 10 databases and a web search engine were appraised by systematically searching for research articles on resilience and burnout in child protection social workers. Results: Applied Social…

  4. Overweight, Obesity, and Depression A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Longitudinal Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luppino, Floriana S.; de Wit, Leonore M.; Bouvy, Paul F.; Stijnen, Theo; Cuijpers, Pim; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Zitman, Frans G.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Association between obesity and depression has repeatedly been established. For treatment and prevention purposes, it is important to acquire more insight into their longitudinal interaction. Objective: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on the longitudinal relationship betwee

  5. Virtual reality exposure therapy in anxiety disorders: a systematic review of process-and-outcome studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Meyerbröker; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become an interesting alternative for the treatment of anxiety disorders. Research has focused on the efficacy of VRET in treating anxiety disorders: phobias, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. In this systematic review, st

  6. Two Studies on the Interplay between Social Preferences and Individual Biological Features

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Pages, Santiago; Turiegano, E.

    2013-01-01

    Biological features and social preferences have been studied separately as factors influencing human strategic behavior. We run two studies in order to explore the interplay between these two sets of factors. In the first study, we investigate to what extent social preferences may have some biological underpinnings. We use simple one-shot distribution experiments to attribute subjects one out of four types of social preferences: Self-interested (SI), Competitive (C), Inequality averse (IA), a...

  7. Biological Databases for Human Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Zou; Lina Ma; Jun Yu; Zhang Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project lays a foundation for systematically studying the human genome from evolutionary history to precision medicine against diseases. With the explosive growth of biological data, there is an increasing number of biological databases that have been developed in aid of human-related research. Here we present a collection of human-related biological databases and provide a mini-review by classifying them into different categories according to their data types. As human-related databases continue to grow not only in count but also in volume, challenges are ahead in big data storage, processing, exchange and curation.

  8. Outcome of Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review of Comparative Studies between Fixed and Mobile Bearings Focusing on Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Young-Bong; Gujarathi, Manan Ramesh; Oh, Kwang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to collate results of studies comparing fixed and mobile bearing unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), focusing on complications and timing for reoperations. Out of 723 results derived from PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane database search engines on bearings in arthroplasty, 10 studies comparing clinical results of fixed bearings to mobile bearings in UKA were found eligible for analysis. The reoperation rate was calculated using a novel method such as ...

  9. The appraisal of chronic stress and the development of the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Bergmann, N; Gyntelberg, F; Faber, J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of the metabolic syndrome (MES). This review gives a systematic overview of prospective cohort studies investigating chronic psychosocial stress as a risk factor for incident MES and the individual elements of MES. Thirty-nine studies were included. An association between chronic psychosocial stress and the development of MES was generally supported. Regarding the four elements of MES: i) weight gain: the prosp...

  10. ‘Relieved Working’ study: systematic development and design of an intervention to decrease occupational quartz exposure at construction worksites

    OpenAIRE

    Oude Hengel, K.M.; Deurssen, E. van; Meijster, T; Tielemans, E; Heederik, D; Pronk, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Occupational quartz exposure continues to be a serious hazard in the construction industry. Until now, evidence-based interventions aimed at reducing quartz exposure are scarce. The aim of this study was to systematically develop an intervention and to describe the study to evaluate its effectiveness. Methods/design: The intervention was developed according to the principles of the Intervention Mapping protocol, meaning that evidence from the literature was combined with informati...

  11. The effect of alcohol advertising, marketing and portrayal on drinking behaviour in young people: systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    OpenAIRE

    Foxcroft David R; Smith Lesley A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The effect of alcohol portrayals and advertising on the drinking behaviour of young people is a matter of much debate. We evaluated the relationship between exposure to alcohol advertising, marketing and portrayal on subsequent drinking behaviour in young people by systematic review of cohort (longitudinal) studies. Methods studies were identified in October 2006 by searches of electronic databases, with no date restriction, supplemented with hand searches of reference lis...

  12. Studying Plant-Rhizobium Mutualism in the Biology Classroom: Connecting the Big Ideas in Biology through Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Tomomi; Williamson, Brad

    2014-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry biology lesson, using the plant-rhizobium symbiosis as a model system. This system provides a rich environment for developing connections between the big ideas in biology as outlined in the College Board's new AP Biology Curriculum. Students gain experience with the practice of scientific investigation, from…

  13. A Long PCR–Based Approach for DNA Enrichment Prior to Next-Generation Sequencing for Systematic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Uribe-Convers

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: We present an alternative approach for molecular systematic studies that combines long PCR and next-generation sequencing. Our approach can be used to generate templates from any DNA source for next-generation sequencing. Here we test our approach by amplifying complete chloroplast genomes, and we present a set of 58 potentially universal primers for angiosperms to do so. Additionally, this approach is likely to be particularly useful for nuclear and mitochondrial regions. Methods and Results: Chloroplast genomes of 30 species across angiosperms were amplified to test our approach. Amplification success varied depending on whether PCR conditions were optimized for a given taxon. To further test our approach, some amplicons were sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000. Conclusions: Although here we tested this approach by sequencing plastomes, long PCR amplicons could be generated using DNA from any genome, expanding the possibilities of this approach for molecular systematic studies.

  14. Clinical Studies of Nonpharmacological Methods to Minimize Salivary Gland Damage after Radioiodine Therapy of Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastavrou, Evridiki; Frangos, Savvas; Tamana, Panayiota

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To systematically review clinical studies examining the effectiveness of nonpharmacological methods to prevent/minimize salivary gland damage due to radioiodine treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). Methods. Reports on relevant trials were identified by searching the PubMed, CINHAL, Cochrane, and Scopus electronic databases covering the period 01/2000–10/2015. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were prespecified. Search yielded eight studies that were reviewed by four of the present authors. Results. Nonpharmacological methods used in trials may reduce salivary gland damage induced by radioiodine. Sialogogues such as lemon candy, vitamin E, lemon juice, and lemon slice reduced such damage significantly (p DTC. However, the studies retrieved were limited in number, sample size, strength of evidence, and generalizability. More randomized controlled trials of these methods with multicenter scope and larger sample sizes will provide more systematic and reliable results allowing more definitive conclusions. PMID:27446226

  15. Systematic review of population-based studies on the impact of images on UV attitudes and behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Jennifer E; Hoffman-Goetz, Laurie

    2015-06-01

    Visual images have been shown to influence health behaviours. The effectiveness of population interventions, which use visual images to influence skin cancer prevention behaviours, has not been systematically evaluated. We, therefore, undertook a systematic review of peer-reviewed, health education and health promotion research on skin cancer and tanning to examine the outcomes of studies, which used visual images as part of their methodology. Our objective was to describe the impact of visual images on UV protection and exposure attitudes and behaviours across the studies. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Images positively impact knowledge, attitudes and behaviours related to UV exposure and UV protection. Images also influence the perceived attractiveness of untanned or tanned skin, which in turn, influences UV exposure attitudes and behaviours. Implications for future health promotion research and practice are discussed.

  16. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  17. Neutron scattering and diffraction instrument for structural study on biology in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimura, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron scattering and diffraction instruments in Japan which can be used for structural studies in biology are briefly introduced. Main specifications and general layouts of the instruments are shown.

  18. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  19. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  20. Quality appraisal in systematic reviews of public health interventions: an empirical study on the impact of choice of tool on meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Peer H.; Rehfuess, Eva A

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Systematic reviews are a cornerstone of evidence-based public health. The method of appraising the quality of different intervention and observational study designs in such reviews remains an important challenge. This article examines the applicability of selected quality appraisal tools (QATs) and the impact of choice of tool on the meta-analysis of a published systematic review. Methods The authors selected a systematic review on the effectiveness of hand washing with soap in p...

  1. Physicochemical and biological study of a renal scintigraphy agent: the DMSA - 99mTc complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis deals with the study of the dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) marked with 99mTc, a recently developed scintigraphy agent used for the kidney isotopic exploration. The author notably studied the relationships between the physicochemical properties of solutions of dimercaptosuccinic acid marked with 99mTc and the biological distribution of 99mTc in order to reach a better understanding of the biological mechanism which results in technetium fixation to the kidney

  2. Affective variables as predictors of biology achievement: A study on 11th grade students

    OpenAIRE

    Alpmen Ayten

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of the gender, self-efficacy beliefs, task value, and learning strategies to the 11th grade students’ biology achievement. A total of 1035 students from different high schools in Yenimahalle and Çankaya districts of Ankara participated in the study. The Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire [21], (MSLQ) and Biology Achievement Test (BAT) were used to collect data. Results of the the simultaneous multiple regression analysis i...

  3. A systems biology approach for the study of smoking and myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics has been proven to be a powerful tool to study complex phenotypes. It can present a snapshot of the current status of metabolism and provide a functional readout of the gene products. Complementing with other ‘omics’ techniques in systems biology studies, the integration of metabolomics with other ‘omics’, e.g. trancriptomics and epigenomics, will help to illustrate complex biological processes which are related to disease and environmental exposure. This thesis presents three...

  4. Cyanoacetamide based Barbiturates, Thiobarbiturates and their Biological Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various cyanoacetamide based Knoevenagel adducts were coupled with barbituric acid / thiobarbituric acid and triethylorthoformate via a one pot three component reaction in 2-butanol availing the desired compound in excellent yields. All the synthesized compounds (2-15) were extensively characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, Mass spectrometry and elemental analysis and were screened for antibacterial, antiurease, antioxidant, cytotoxicity and chymotrypsin inhibition studies. In case of antibacterial studies 2 was found appreciably active against the six selected strains whereas the rest of the compounds were moderately active. The urease inhibition studies revealed compound 5 and 12 as potent whereas the rest were found inactive where thiourea was used as control. Antioxidant activity results exhibited with 2 as the most active and rest of compounds showed good activity. In case of chymotrypsin inhibition studies all the synthesized compounds were found inactive with the exception of 6 which was moderately active. (author)

  5. Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program Biological Sampling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Northeast Cooperative Research Study Fleet (SF) Program partners with a subset of commercial fishermen to collect high quality, high resolution, haul by haul...

  6. Functionalization of Krebs-type polyoxometalates with N,O-chelating ligands: a systematic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artetxe, Beñat; Reinoso, Santiago; San Felices, Leire; Vitoria, Pablo; Pache, Aroa; Martín-Caballero, Jagoba; Gutiérrez-Zorrilla, Juan M

    2015-01-01

    The first organic derivatives of 3d-metal-disubstituted Krebs-type polyoxometalates have been synthesized under mild bench conditions via straightforward replacement of labile aqua ligands with N,O-chelating planar anions on either preformed or in situ-generated precursors. Nine hybrid clusters containing carboxylate derivatives of five- or six-membered aromatic N-heterocycles as antenna ligands have been obtained as pure crystalline phases and characterized by elemental and thermal analyses, infrared spectroscopy, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. They all show the general formula [{M(II)L(H2O)}2(WO2)2(B-β-XW9O33)2](n-) and can be classified as follows: 1-SbM, where L = 1H-imidazole-4-carboxylate (imc), X = Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Mn, Co, Ni, Zn; 1-TeM, where L = imc, X = Te(IV), n = 10, and M(II) = Mn, Co; 2-SbNi, where L = 1H-pyrazole-3-carboxylate (pzc), X = Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Ni; and 3-SbM, where L = pyrazine-2-carboxylate (pyzc), X =Sb(III), n = 12, and M(II) = Co, Zn. The 3d-metal-disubstituted tungstotellurate(IV) skeleton of compounds 1-TeM is unprecedented in polyoxometalate chemistry. The stability of these hybrid Krebs-type species in aqueous solution has been confirmed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy performed on the diamagnetic 1-SbZn and 3-SbZn derivatives. Our systematic study of the reactivity of disubtituted Krebs-type polyoxotungstates toward diazole-, pyridine-, and diazinecarboxylates demonstrates that organic derivatization is strongly dependent on the nature of the ligand, as follows: imc displays a "universal ligand" character, as functionalization takes place regardless of the external 3d metal and heteroatom; pzc and pyzc show selectivity toward specific 3d metals; pyridazine-3-carboxylate and pyrimidine-4-carboxylate promote partial decomposition of specific precursors, leading to [M(II)L2(H2O)2] complexes; and picolinate is inert under all conditions tested.

  7. THE FIRST SYSTEMATIC STUDY OF TYPE Ibc SUPERNOVA MULTI-BAND LIGHT CURVES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present detailed optical photometry for 25 Type Ibc supernovae (SNe Ibc) within d ≈ 150 Mpc obtained with the robotic Palomar 60 inch telescope in 2004-2007. This study represents the first uniform, systematic, and statistical sample of multi-band SNe Ibc light curves available to date. We correct the light curves for host galaxy extinction using a new technique based on the photometric color evolution, namely, we show that the (V – R) color of extinction-corrected SNe Ibc at Δt ≈ 10 days after V-band maximum is tightly distributed, ((V – R)V10) = 0.26 ± 0.06 mag. Using this technique, we find that SNe Ibc typically suffer from significant host galaxy extinction, (E(B – V)) ≈ 0.4 mag. A comparison of the extinction-corrected light curves for helium-rich (Type Ib) and helium-poor (Type Ic) SNe reveals that they are statistically indistinguishable, both in luminosity and decline rate. We report peak absolute magnitudes of (MR ) = –17.9 ± 0.9 mag and (MR ) = –18.3 ± 0.6 mag for SNe Ib and Ic, respectively. Focusing on the broad-lined (BL) SNe Ic, we find that they are more luminous than the normal SNe Ibc sample, (MR ) = –19.0 ± 1.1 mag, with a probability of only 1.6% that they are drawn from the same population of explosions. By comparing the peak absolute magnitudes of SNe Ic-BL with those inferred for local engine-driven explosions (GRB-SN 1998bw, XRF-SN 2006aj, and SN 2009bb) we find a 25% probability that relativistic SNe are drawn from the overall SNe Ic-BL population. Finally, we fit analytic models to the light curves to derive typical 56Ni masses of MNi ≈ 0.2 and 0.5 M☉ for SNe Ibc and SNe Ic-BL, respectively. With reasonable assumptions for the photospheric velocities, we further extract kinetic energy and ejecta mass values of Mej ≈ 2 M☉ and EK ≈ 1051 erg for SNe Ibc, while for SNe Ic-BL we find higher values, Mej ≈ 5 M☉ and EK ≈ 1052 erg. We discuss the implications for the progenitors of SNe Ibc and their

  8. Studying chemical reactions in biological systems with MBN Explorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Verkhovtsev, Alexey V.;

    2016-01-01

    The concept of molecular mechanics force field has been widely accepted nowadays for studying various processes in biomolecular systems. In this paper, we suggest a modification for the standard CHARMM force field that permits simulations of systems with dynamically changing molecular topologies....... for studying processes where rupture of chemical bonds plays an essential role, e.g., in irradiation- or collision-induced damage, and also in transformation and fragmentation processes involving biomolecular systems....

  9. Calcium homeostasis and low-frequency magnetic and electric field exposure: A systematic review and meta-analysis of in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbach, Lieke A; Portelli, Lucas A; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Terwel, Sofie R; Kuster, Niels; de Vries, Rob B M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2016-01-01

    Low frequency magnetic field (LF MF) exposure is recurrently suggested to have the ability to induce health effects in society. Therefore, in vitro model systems are used to investigate biological effects of exposure. LF MF induced changes of the cellular calcium homeostasis are frequently hypothesised to be the possible target, but this hypothesis is both substantiated and rejected by numerous studies in literature. Despite the large amount of data, no systematic analysis of in vitro studies has been conducted to address the strength of evidence for an association between LF MF exposure and calcium homeostasis. Our systematic review, with inclusion of 42 studies, showed evidence for an association of LF MF with internal calcium concentrations and calcium oscillation patterns. The oscillation frequency increased, while the amplitude and the percentage of oscillating cells remained constant. The intracellular calcium concentration increased (SMD 0.351, 95% CI 0.126, 0.576). Subgroup analysis revealed heterogeneous effects associated with the exposure frequency, magnetic flux density and duration. Moreover, we found support for the presence of MF-sensitive cell types. Nevertheless, some of the included studies may introduce a great risk of bias as a result of uncontrolled or not reported exposure conditions, temperature ranges and ambient fields. In addition, mathematical calculations of the parasitic induced electric fields (IEFs) disclosed their association with increased intracellular calcium. Our results demonstrate that LF MF might influence the calcium homeostasis in cells in vitro, but the risk of bias and high heterogeneity (I(2)>75%) weakens the analyses. Therefore any potential clinical implications await further investigation. PMID:26872872

  10. Protocol adaptations to conduct Systematic Literature Reviews in Software Engineering: a chronological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Sepúlveda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Systematic literature reviews (SLR have reached a considerable level of adoption in Software Engineering (SE, how-ever protocol adaptations for its implementation remain tangentially addressed. This work provides a chronological framework for the use and adaptation of the SLR protocol, including its current status. A systematic literature search was performed, reviewing a set of twelve articles being selected in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria between 2004 and 2013, using digital data sources recognized by the SE community. A chronological framework is provided that includes the current state of the protocol adaptations to conduct SLR in SE. The results indicate areas where the quantity and quality of investigations needs to be increased and the identi- fication of the main proposals providing adaptations for the protocol conducting SLR in SE.

  11. A Systematic Review of Studies Using the Brief COPE: Religious Coping in Factor Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Krägeloh, Christian U

    2011-01-01

    Religion is generally recognized as a major resource for dealing with stressful events, but its relationship with secular coping strategies continues to be debated. The present article provides a systematic review of the way in which analyses of the sub-scale turning to religion of the widely used Brief COPE [1] instrument are presented in peer-reviewed research articles, in order to investigate how the wealth of data published using this instrument can inform how religious coping relates to ...

  12. Systematic Study of Tensor Force Effect on Pseudospin Orbital Splittings in Sn Isotopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yan-zhao; YU; Guo-liang; LI; Zhen-yu; GU; Jian-zhong

    2012-01-01

    <正>The tensor force is a noncentral and nonlocal spin-spin coupling term of the nucleon-nucleon interaction whose effect on the nuclear structure has been discussed in the framework of the self-consistent mean field approaches and the shell model in the past a few years. Based on the Skyrme Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach, we systematically investigated the role of the tensor force on the

  13. Growth of nanofibers from thiophenes, thiophene-phenylenes and phenylenes: a systematic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela;

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of molecules consisting of various combinations of phenylene and thiophene groups and the subsequent vacuum growth of needle-shaped nanoaggregates on specific surfaces allows us a systematic investigation of the transition between single parallel and multiple aligned needle ('nanofi...... results in strongly polarized light emission along specific surface directions. The results are compared to those found for nanoaggregates made from less rod-like organic molecules, namely rubrene and POPOP....

  14. A Systematic Study for Smart Residential Thermostats: User Needs for the Input, Output, and Intelligence Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Luen Patrick Rau

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of “smart” residential thermostats—both in terms of wider connectivity and higher intelligence—has revealed great opportunity for energy conservation, as well as providing comfort and convenience. This paper focuses on the interaction design of such a novel system, and analyzed user requirements for input, output, and level of intelligence systematically through both in-depth interviews and a survey.

  15. A systematic review of animal models used to study nerve regeneration in tissue-engineered scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    Angius, Diana; Wang, Huan; Spinner, Robert J.; Gutierrez-Cotto, Yearim; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Research on biomaterial nerve scaffolds has been carried out for 50 years. Only three materials (collagen, polycaprolactone and polyglycollic acid) have progressed to clinical use. Pre-clinical animal models are critical for testing nerve scaffolds prior to implementation in clinical practice. We have conducted a systematic review of 416 reports in which animal models were used for evaluation of nerve regeneration into synthetic conduits. A valid animal model of nerve regeneration requires it...

  16. Endive, Chicory, and their wild relatives. A systematic and phylogenetic study of Cichorium (Asteraceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kiers, Annemieke M.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis describes a systematic and phylogenetic analysis of the genus Cichorium. Cichorium is a small genus within the Asteraceae family (tribe Lactuceae) and is well known because of its two widely cultivated species: C. endivia (endive) and C. intybus (chicory). The genus occurs in the Old World and has been introduced in temperate and semi-arid regions elsewhere. An important diagnostic character at the genus and species level is the unique structure of the pappus, which, at the same t...

  17. Systematic literature review of determinants of sedentary behaviour in older adults: a DEDIPAC study

    OpenAIRE

    Chastin, Sebastien; Buck, Christoph; Freiberger, Ellen; Murphy, Marie; Brug, Johannes; Cardon, Greet; O'Donoghue, Grainne; Pigeot, Iris; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults are the most sedentary segment of society and high sedentary time is associated with poor health and wellbeing outcomes in this population. Identifying determinants of sedentary behaviour is a necessary step to develop interventions to reduce sedentary time. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted to identify factors associated with sedentary behaviour in older adults. Pubmed, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Web of Science were searched for articles published...

  18. Exploring the Complexity of Tree Thinking Expertise in an Undergraduate Systematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Kristy L.; Pires, Chris J.; Abell, Sandra K.

    2011-01-01

    Student understanding of biological representations has not been well studied. Yet, we know that to be efficient problem solvers in evolutionary biology and systematics, college students must develop expertise in thinking with a particular type of representation, phylogenetic trees. The purpose of this study was to understand how undergraduates…

  19. Preparation and biological studies of 68Ga-DOTA-alendronate

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Fakhari; Amir Jalilian; Fariba Johari-daha; Mehdi Shafiee-Ardestani; Ali Khalaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): In line with previous research on the development of conjugated bisphosphonate ligands as new bone-avid agents, in this study, DOTA conjugated alendronate (DOTA-ALN) was synthesized and evaluated after labeling with gallium-68 (68Ga).Methods: DOTA-ALN was synthesized and characterized, followed by 68Ga-DOTA-ALN preparation, using DOTA-ALN and 68GaCl3 (pH: 4-5) at 92-95°C for 10 min. Stability tests, hydroxyapatite assay, partition coefficient calculation,biodistribution studies,...

  20. Primary care clinicians' attitudes towards point-of-care blood testing: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, CH; Howick, J; Roberts, NW; Price, CP; Heneghan, C; Plüddemann, A; Thompson, M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Point-of-care blood tests are becoming increasingly available and could replace current venipuncture and laboratory testing for many commonly used tests. However, at present very few have been implemented in most primary care settings. Understanding the attitudes of primary care clinicians towards these tests may help to identify the barriers and facilitators to their wider adoption. We aimed to systematically review qualitative studies of primary care clinicians' attitudes to poi...

  1. Prevalence of Splanchnic Vein Thrombosis in Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wenda Xu; Xingshun Qi; Jiang Chen; Chunping Su; Xiaozhong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Splanchnic vein thrombosis (SVT) may be negatively associated with the prognosis of pancreatitis. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of literatures to explore the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis. All observational studies regarding the prevalence of SVT in pancreatitis were identified via PubMed and EMBASE databases. The prevalence of SVT was pooled in the total of patients with pancreatitis. And it was also pooled in the subgroup analyses according to the stage and causes o...

  2. The development of QUADAS: a tool for the quality assessment of studies of diagnostic accuracy included in systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossuyt Patrick MM

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the era of evidence based medicine, with systematic reviews as its cornerstone, adequate quality assessment tools should be available. There is currently a lack of a systematically developed and evaluated tool for the assessment of diagnostic accuracy studies. The aim of this project was to combine empirical evidence and expert opinion in a formal consensus method to develop a tool to be used in systematic reviews to assess the quality of primary studies of diagnostic accuracy. Methods We conducted a Delphi procedure to develop the quality assessment tool by refining an initial list of items. Members of the Delphi panel were experts in the area of diagnostic research. The results of three previously conducted reviews of the diagnostic literature were used to generate a list of potential items for inclusion in the tool and to provide an evidence base upon which to develop the tool. Results A total of nine experts in the field of diagnostics took part in the Delphi procedure. The Delphi procedure consisted of four rounds, after which agreement was reached on the items to be included in the tool which we have called QUADAS. The initial list of 28 items was reduced to fourteen items in the final tool. Items included covered patient spectrum, reference standard, disease progression bias, verification bias, review bias, clinical review bias, incorporation bias, test execution, study withdrawals, and indeterminate results. The QUADAS tool is presented together with guidelines for scoring each of the items included in the tool. Conclusions This project has produced an evidence based quality assessment tool to be used in systematic reviews of diagnostic accuracy studies. Further work to determine the usability and validity of the tool continues.

  3. A systematic study on activating the employee concerns' system for the improvement of governance in utility companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to develop a systematic methodology that can externalize potential concerns of employee and evaluate the values of the concerns raised in corporations and other organizations. By implementing this methodology into corporate/organization governance regime, we can expect to improve the work environment and enhance the capability for the corporate/organization governance through enhancing internal autonomic purification compatibility. (author)

  4. Efficacy of enamel matrix derivatives (Emdogain) in treatment of replanted teeth – a systematic review based on animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, A.; Attin, T.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the current systematic review was to evaluate the efficacy of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) (Emdogain) on healing of replanted or autotransplanted permanent teeth. A review of the published literature [search term: (Emdogain OR enamel matrix derivative OR enamel matrix protein] AND [avulsion OR replantation OR autotransplantation)] was conducted by two independent investigators according to defined selection criteria. For data extraction of the identified animal studies, the...

  5. The impact of subacromial impingement syndrome on muscle activity patterns of the shoulder complex: a systematic review of electromyographic studies

    OpenAIRE

    Smith Toby O; Chester Rachel; Hooper Lee; Dixon John

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Subacromial impingement syndrome (SIS) is a commonly reported cause of shoulder pain. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to examine whether a difference in electromyographic (EMG) activity of the shoulder complex exists between people with SIS and healthy controls. Methods Medline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE, and grey literature databases were searched from their inception to November 2008. Inclusion, data extraction and trial quality were asse...

  6. A Systematic Review of Studies That Aim to Determine Which Outcomes to Measure in Clinical Trials in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Ian; Jones, Leanne; Smyth, Rosalind L; Williamson, Paula R

    2008-01-01

    Background In clinical trials the selection of appropriate outcomes is crucial to the assessment of whether one intervention is better than another. Selection of inappropriate outcomes can compromise the utility of a trial. However, the process of selecting the most suitable outcomes to include can be complex. Our aim was to systematically review studies that address the process of selecting outcomes or outcome domains to measure in clinical trials in children. Methods and Findings We searche...

  7. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  8. Synthesis labeling and biological studies of 16-131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing interest in obtaining radiopharmaceuticals for metabolic imaging of heart muscle led us to prepare 16-IODINE HEXADECANOIC ACID by tosilation of the corresponding hydroxy acid, following iodination with NaI and finally, introducing radioiodine (Na131I) by isotopic exchange reaction. The reaction products were identified by determination of melting point, elementary and spectroscopic analysis such as infra-red absortion and magnetic nuclear resonance. The radiopharmaceutical after radiochemical and other specific control procedures for injetable such as sterility and apyrogenicity, was firstly utilized in dogs: preferencial uptake by the heart, as well as by the liver was confirmed. Then, studies in patients with or without heart diseases were performed. The biodistribution of 16-131I-HEXADECANOIC ACID was carried out in Wistar rats. The scintigraphic images in animals and in humans demonstrated that 16-131-HEXADECANOIC ACID is suitable for studying viable areas as well as energetic exchange of heart muscle. (author)

  9. Biological Studies on groundwater Crustaceans in Southwest Anatolia, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Könemann, Stefan

    1997-01-01

    In 1987 a major biospeleogical expedition, ‘Speleo Nederland’, was carried out along the coastal Taurus mountains in southwest Anatolia (Turkey). ‘Speleo Nederland’ was focused on collecting the fauna of caves, wells, subterranean waterflows, and the interstices of marine gravel beaches. The special yield of stygobiont crustaceans, predominantly amphipods of the genus Bogidiella, promised to serve as an interesting case study to the colonization of inland groundwater by marine organisms. Now,...

  10. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and QSAR Studies of Newer Isoxazole Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asirvatham, Sahaya; Mahajan, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    A series of newer 3-(4'-methoxyphenyl)-5-substituted phenylisoxazoles derivatives have been synthesized by reacting hydroxylamine hydrochloride with chalcones. The chalcones were formed by reacting different aromatic aldehydes with 4-methoxyacetophenone in presence of aqueos potassium hydroxide (KOH). The purity of all the synthesized compounds was checked by recording their melting points and the retention Factors (Rf) values from thin layer chromatography. The structures of the compounds were characterized by recording their infrared (IR) spectra and confirmed by recording their nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra. The acute toxicity study was carried out on all the synthesized compounds and they were screened for their antiinflammatory activity by carrageenan induced rat paw edema method. Anti-inflammatory studies showed statistically significant activity when compared to the control, indomethacin. The two most potent compounds giving good anti-inflammatory activity were further evaluated for their antiulcer activity. The compounds were subjected to quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) studies. A close correlation between the observed and the predicted anti-inflammatory activity (Log % inhibition) for the compounds indicated the development of the best QSAR model. The synthesized compounds were found to be non-ulcerogenic as compared to the standard, aspirin. PMID:26265199

  11. Study on Flowering Biology of Taro (Colocasia esculenta (L. Schott.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADE SRI PRANA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available An observation on flowering behaviour of 20 selected taro (Colocasia esculenta (L. Schott. cultivars was conducted at the Germ Plasm Conservation Garden belonging to the Reserch Centre for Biotechnology of the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI, Cibinong, Bogor Regency. The observation included the emergence of inflorescences, the number of inflorescences in a cluster, the opening of the inflorescence, maturity of pistilate and staminate flowers, and pollinating agents that might play role in the pollination process. The study was aimed at elucidating some baseline information that might be used as a base to carry out breeding programme for future cultivar improvement. The study indicated that the 20 cultivar studied may be divided into 3 cultivar groups, namely a Cultivars which fully did not appear to flower during the periode of obeservation, which includes Lampung, Enau, Siriwa, Ketan and Bentul biru, b Cultivars that produced only a few (not more than 3 inflorescences per cluster or per individul plant. This includes cultivars : Bogor, Bentul, Kaliurang and Ketan hitam and c Cultivars that were profusedly flowering (produced a lot of inflorescences, usually 4-5 inflorescences per cluster and several clusters in an individual plant. This includes cultivars : Sutera, Semir, Lampung hitam, Boring, Burkok, Berod, Lampung hitam, Lompong, Ketune dan Kudo. The cultivar Sutera produced flower quite readily, followed by Burkok. Apart from the few inflorescences it produced, the cultivar Kaliurang also produced rather abnormal shape of inflorescence with only a few pollen grains. Taro flowers proved to be protogenic since the atipulate flowers have become receptive 1-2 days prior to anther dehiscence. Pollination was due to the role of (Dacus dorsalis.

  12. SYNTHESIS, DOCKING AND BIOLOGICAL STUDIES OF THE LINEAR TETRAPEPTIDE PWPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Himaja

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Linear Tetrapeptides L-PWPV (Pro-Trp-Pro-Val was designed and synthesized by solution phase peptide synthesis based on dock score. The molecular docking studies of the designed tetrapeptide L-PWPV was carried out using Molegro Virtual Docker software for tumor cancer protein(1OLG. The linear tetrapeptide was synthesized by coupling protected amino acids (dipeptides using EDC (ethyl-3-(N,N-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide as coupling reagent. The compounds were analyzed by FTIR, 1H NMR and MASS data and subjected to antioxidant activity using 1,1-dipheny-2-picryl-hydrazil (DPPH method and insecticidal activity using Morita et al method.

  13. Inquiry-based Science Instruction in High School Biology Courses: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Eze

    A lack of research exists about how secondary school science teachers use inquiry-based instruction to improve student learning. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore how science teachers used inquiry-based instruction to improve student learning in high school biology courses. The conceptual framework was based on Banchi and Bell's model of increasing levels of complexity for inquiry-based instruction. A multiple case study research design was conducted of biology programs at 3 high schools in an urban school district in the northeastern region of the United States. Participants included 2 biology teachers from each of the 3 high schools. Data were collected from individual interviews with biology teachers, observations of lessons in biology, and documents related to state standards, assessments, and professional development. The first level of data analysis involved coding and categorizing the interview and observation data. A content analysis was used for the documents. The second level of data analysis involved examining data across all sources and all cases for themes and discrepancies. According to study findings, biology teachers used confirmation, structure, and guided inquiry to improve student learning. However, they found open inquiry challenging and frustrating to implement because professional development about scaffolding of instruction over time was needed, and students' reading and writing skills needed to improve. This study contributes to positive social change by providing educators and researchers with a deeper understanding about how to scaffold levels of inquiry-based science instruction in order to help students become scientifically literate citizens.

  14. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Chemical and biological warfare: General studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning federally sponsored and conducted studies into chemical and biological warfare operations and planning. These studies cover areas not addressed in other parts of this series. The topics include production and storage of agents, delivery techniques, training, military and civil defense, general planning studies, psychological reactions to chemical warfare, evaluations of materials exposed to chemical agents, and studies on banning or limiting chemical warfare. Other published searches in this series on chemical warfare cover detection and warning, defoliants, protection, and biological studies, including chemistry and toxicology.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Study on biological and environmental factors for azoospermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spas Dzhoglov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The absence of sperm in the seminal fluid is known as azoospermia. This medical condition is in a direct association with male's infertility. A complete medical history, physical examination, tests of selected hormones and tests for male fertility (including sperm analysis are used for the diagnosis of azoospermia. The number of 1314 men, with fertility problems, at age between 20 and 67 years, were included in this investigation. The data obtained in the study showed that azoospermia occurred in 5.25% of the group studied. The Klinefelter syndrome was cytogenetically diagnosed in 2.9% of the male individuals. There was found that 44.3% of males with azoospermia have been smokers, 7.1% of them – addicted to drugs, 17.1% have taken different medicaments, 4.35% – have had radiation therapy, 4.35% have had a diagnosis "varicocele". The volume of the ejaculate was less than 2 ml in 37.68% of the men and more than 7 ml in 2.89% of them.

  17. Study of structural model of biological membranes by synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Cavalcanti, L P

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to study, from the structural point of view, the process of incorporation of various types of hydrophobic compounds into the lamellar phase of liposomes and multilayers of the zwitterionic phospholipid DPPC. X-ray diffraction and scattering techniques using synchrotron radiation, have been used to monitor changes of several bilayer systems. Thermotropic phase transitions as well as the order of the lamellar packing were studied in situ experiments. The behavior of the L beta' and L alpha phases was followed as a function of the water content in dispersions of DPPC multi lamellar vesicles with the addition of the alkaloid Ellipticine in several concentrations. The results showed a decrease in the temperature of the pre-transition as well as that of the main transition (P beta' ->L alpha). The decrease of the lamellar spacing as a function of temperature in the liquid crystalline phase leads to the description of the thermal compression coefficient in the L alpha phase. It wa...

  18. Preparation and Biological Study of 68Ga-DOTA-alendronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhari, Ashraf; Jalilian, Amir R.; Johari-Daha, Fariba; Shafiee-Ardestani, Mehdi; Khalaj, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): In line with previous research on the development of conjugated bisphosphonate ligands as new bone-avid agents, in this study, DOTA-conjugated alendronate (DOTA-ALN) was synthesized and evaluated after labeling with gallium-68 (68Ga). Methods: DOTA-ALN was synthesized and characterized, followed by 68Ga-DOTA-ALN preparation, using DOTA-ALN and 68GaCl3 (pH: 4-5) at 92-95° C for 10 min. Stability tests, hydroxyapatite assay, partition coefficient calculation, biodistribution studies, and imaging were performed on the developed agent in normal rats. Results: The complex was prepared with high radiochemical purity (>99% as depicted by radio thin-layer chromatography; specific activity: 310-320 GBq/mmol) after solid phase purification and was stabilized for up to 90 min with a log P value of -2.91. Maximum ligand binding (65%) was observed in the presence of 50 mg of hydroxyapatite; a major portion of the activity was excreted through the kidneys. With the exception of excretory organs, gastrointestinal tract organs, including the liver, intestine, and colon, showed significant uptake; however, the bone uptake was low (<1%) at 30 min after the injection. The data were also confirmed by sequential imaging at 30-90 min following the intravenous injection. Conclusion: The high solubility and anionic properties of the complex led to major renal excretion and low hydroxyapatite uptake; therefore, the complex failed to demonstrate bone imaging behaviors. PMID:27408898

  19. Preparation and biological studies of 68Ga-DOTA-alendronate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Fakhari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: In line with previous research on the development of conjugated bisphosphonate ligands as new bone-avid agents, in this study, DOTA conjugated alendronate (DOTA-ALN was synthesized and evaluated after labeling with gallium-68 (68Ga.Methods: DOTA-ALN was synthesized and characterized, followed by 68Ga-DOTA-ALN preparation, using DOTA-ALN and 68GaCl3 (pH: 4-5 at 92-95°C for 10 min. Stability tests, hydroxyapatite assay, partition coefficient calculation,biodistribution studies, and imaging were performed on the developed agent in normal rats.Results: The complex was prepared with high radiochemical purity (>99% as depicted by radio thin-layer chromatography; specific activity: 310-320GBq/mmol after solid phase purification and was stabilized for up to 90 min with a logP value of -2.91. Maximum ligand binding (65% was observed in the presence of 50 mg of hydroxyapatite; a major portion of the activity was excreted through the kidneys. With the exception of excretory organs, gastrointestinal tract organs, including the liver, intestine, and colon, showed significant uptake; however, the bone uptake was low (

  20. Understanding the biological concept "bird": A kindergarten case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Dilek

    The purpose of this qualitative, multiple case study of 14 students in a metropolitan public school in the Deep South was to find out, during a period of three months, what these kindergarten-aged children knew about birds, whether this knowledge represented current scientific thought, if such science instruction meaningfully affected their prior knowledge, and if so, what the factors during instruction that seemed to influence their understanding of the concept of bird were. The research was conducted in three phases; preinstruction interviews, instruction, and postinstruction interviews. The theoretical framework for this research was based on the Human Constructivism theory of learning (Mintzes, Wandersee and Novak, 1997). Instructional materials consisted of carefully chosen books (both fiction and non-fiction), guest speakers, field trips, a live bird in the classroom, students' observation journals, teacher-made classification and sorting activities, and picture-based concept maps. The findings suggest that young children's knowledge of birds was limited chiefly to birds' anatomical and morphological characteristics, with repeated references being made by the children to human characteristics. There was a positive, significant difference in young children's pre- and postinstruction scientific knowledge of birds. Although performance varied from child to child after instruction, most children were able to identify some common birds by name. Just one child resisted conceptual change. Kindergarten children's basic knowledge of bird behavior was limited to flight and eating. Although the children had more conceptual knowledge at the end, understanding still appeared to be shallow. The children did develop their skill in observing markedly. It also became evident that these kindergarten children needed more (a) experience in asking questions, (b) practice in techniques of visual representation, and (c) language development in order to be able to explain what they

  1. Biological Actions of Artemisinin: Insights from Medicinal Chemistry Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinins have become essential antimalarial drugs for increasingly widespread drug-resistant malaria strains. Although tremendous efforts have been devoted to decipher how this class of molecules works, their exact antimalarial mechanism is still an enigma. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain their actions, including alkylation of heme by carbon-centered free radicals, interference with proteins such as the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic calcium ATPase (SERCA, as well as damaging of normal mitochondrial functions. Besides artemisinins, other endoperoxides with various backbones have also been synthesized, some of which showed comparable or even higher antimalarial effects. It is noteworthy that among these artemisinin derivatives, some enantiomers displayed similar in vitro malaria killing efficacy. In this article, the proposed mechanisms of action of artemisinins are reviewed in light of medicinal chemistry findings characterized by efficacy-structure studies, with the hope of gaining more insight into how these potent drugs work.

  2. Kinetic study of biological hydrogen production by anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sangeetha, R. [Annamalai Univ., Chidambaram (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Karunanithi, T. [Annamalai Univ., Tamilnadu (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-07-01

    This study examined the kinetics of batch biohydrogen production from glucose. Clostridium pasteurianum was used to produce biohydrogen by dark anaerobic fermentation. The initial substrate concentration, initial pH and temperature were optimized for biohydrogen production. The maximum production of hydrogen under optimum conditions was found to be 5.376 l/l. The kinetic parameters were determined for the optimized medium and conditions in the batch reactor. The by product was expressed as total acidic equivalent. This presentation discussed the logistic equation that was used to model the growth of the organism and described how the kinetic parameters were calculated. The Leudeking piret kinetic model was used to express the hydrogen production and substrate use because it combines both growth associated and non associated contributions. It was concluded the production of biohydrogen can be predicted well using the logistic model for cell growth kinetics and the logistic incorporated Leudeking Piret model for product and substrate utilization kinetics.

  3. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Light scattering study of rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuthan, J.; Netz, U.; Minet, O.; Klose, Annerose D.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A.; Henniger, J.; Müller, G.

    2002-11-01

    The distribution of light scattered by finger joints is studied in the near-IR region. It is shown that variations in the optical parameters of the tissue (scattering coefficient μs, absorption coefficient μa, and anisotropy factor g) depend on the presence of the rheumatoid arthritis (RA). At the first stage, the distribution of scattered light was measured in diaphanoscopic experiments. The convolution of a Gaussian error function with the scattering phase function proved to be a good approximation of the data obtained. Then, a new method was developed for the reconstruction of distribution of optical parameters in the finger cross section. Model tests of the quality of this reconstruction method show good results.

  4. Molecular biological study on genetic stability of the genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A population cytogenetic study has been performed in 1022 healthy subjects and 547 cancer patients to determine baseline frequencies of autosomal rate fragile sites. Out of 17 rare autosomal fragile sites defined in HBM9 (1985), the following six were detected: fra(2)(q11), fra(10)(q25), fra(11)(q13), fra(11)(q23), fra(16)(q22) and fra(17)(q12). Other three new fragile sites were also detected: fra(8)(q24.1), fra(11)(q15.1) and fra(16)(p12.1). They were all distamycin A-inducible and located at the junctions of G/R-bands. The incidence of these autosomal fragile sites was 5% in both healthy subjects and cancer patients. Distamycin A-induced fragile sites may play a role in the etiology of leukemia, myeloproliferative disorders, and gynecological tumors. The present study also examined the mechanism of fragile X expression associated with fragile X syndrome in thymidine-prototrophic and auxotrophic human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. In these hybrid cells, both low and high thymidylate stresses were found to be effective in inducing fragile X expression, even in a hybrid clone that retained a fragile X chromosome as the only human chromosome. An addition of deoxycytidine completely abolished the effect of high thymidylate stress achieved by excess amounts of thymidine. It is concluded that the expression is an intrinsic property of the fragile X mutation resulting from chromosomal change in a special class of replicons with polypurine/polypyrimidine DNA sequence. (Namekawa, K)

  5. Biological studies of Oligonychus punicae (Acari: Tetranychidae) on grapevine cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Carlos; Aponte, Orlando; Morales, José; Sanabria, María E; García, Grisaly

    2008-06-01

    Life cycle, fecundity and longevity of the avocado brown mite, Oligonychus punicae (Hirst), were studied on six grapevine cultivars (Tucupita, Villanueva, Red Globe, Sirah, Sauvignon and Chenin Blanc), under laboratory conditions at 27 +/- 2 degrees C, 80 +/- 10% RH, and L12:D12 photoperiod. Mite-infested leaves were collected from vineyards, placed in paper bags and taken to the laboratory. A laboratory mite culture was established using the grape cultivar Criolla Negra as host plant. To elucidate potential effects on avocado brown mite parameters, we assessed levels of secondary metabolites, such as alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins and polyphenols, of leaves of the six grape cultivars, as well as the thickness of the adaxial cuticle-epidermis. The life cycle of O. punicae differed among cultivars with average values ranging between 8.2 days on Tucupita leaves and 9.1 days on Sirah. Relatively high fecundity was found on Tucupita leaves (2.8 eggs/female/day) during 11.4 oviposition days, while low fecundity values occurred on Sirah and Villanueva leaves, with 0.9 and 1.8 eggs/female/day during 7.9 and 6.7 days, respectively. Average longevity of O. punicae females ranged from 8.1 to 17.5 days on Sirah and Sauvignon leaves, respectively. Intrinsic rate of increase (r (m)) was highest on Sauvignon (0.292) and Tucupita (0.261), and lowest on Sirah (0.146) and Villanueva (0.135). Although significant differences in cuticle-epidermis thickness were detected among the six cultivars, it seemed not to affect mite parameters. Secondary metabolite content also varied between the cultivars. Generally, increasing flavonoid content coincided with decreasing reproductive parameters. The natural plant resistance observed in this study could be useful in the development of an integrated pest management program for mite pests in grape production. PMID:18483791

  6. The Newcastle 85+ study: biological, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with healthy ageing: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin-Ruiz Carmen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The UK, like other developed countries, is experiencing a marked change in the age structure of its population characterised by increasing life expectancy and continuing growth in the older fraction of the population. There is remarkably little up-to-date information about the health of the oldest old (over 85 years, demographically the fastest growing section of the population. There is a need, from both a policy and scientific perspective, to describe in detail the health status of this population and the factors that influence individual health trajectories. For a very large proportion of medical conditions, age is the single largest risk factor. Gaining new knowledge about why aged cells and tissues are more vulnerable to pathology is likely to catalyse radical new insights and opportunities to intervene. The aims of the Newcastle 85+ Study are to expose the spectrum of health within an inception cohort of 800 85 year-olds; to examine health trajectories and outcomes as the cohort ages and their associations with underlying biological, medical and social factors; and to advance understanding of the biological nature of ageing. Methods A cohort of 800 85 year olds from Newcastle and North Tyneside will be recruited at baseline and followed until the last participant has died. Eligible individuals will be all those who turn 85 during the year 2006 (i.e. born in 1921 and who are registered with a Newcastle or North Tyneside general practice. Participants will be visited in their current residence (own home or institution by a research nurse at baseline, 18 months and 36 months. The assessment protocol entails a detailed multi-dimensional health assessment together with review of general practice medical records. Participants will be flagged with the NHS Central Register to provide details of the date and cause of death. Discussion The Newcastle 85+ Study will address key questions about health and health-maintenance in the

  7. Social inclusion enhances biological motion processing: A functional near-infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Bolling, Danielle Z.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Kaiser, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    Humans are especially tuned to the movements of other people. Neural correlates of this social attunement have been proposed to lie in and around the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS) region, which robustly responds to biological motion in contrast to a variety of non-biological motions. This response persists even when no form information is provided, as in point-light displays (PLDs). The aim of the current study was to assess the ability of functional near-infrared spectroscop...

  8. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enggaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    and resources available. In order to incorporate evidence in clinical decisions, nursing students need to learn how to transfer knowledge in order to utilize evidence in clinical decisions. The method of systematic review can be one approach to achieve this in nursing education. Method: As an associate lecturer...... I have taken a Comprehensive Systematic Review Training course provide by Center of Clinical Guidelines in Denmark and Jonna Briggs Institute (JBI) and practice in developing a systematic review on how patients with ischemic heart disease experiences peer support. This insight and experience...... with systematic review is used to develop didactic practice end evidence based teaching in different part of the education. Findings: The poster will present how teacher’s training and experiences with systematic review contribute to the nursing education in relation to didactic, research methodology and patient...

  9. Case studies of community college non-science majors: Effects of self-regulatory interventions on biology self-efficacy and biological literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Matthew J.

    Science literacy has been at the heart of current reform efforts in science education. The focus on developing essential skills needed for individual ability to be literate in science has been at the forefront of most K--12 science curricula. Reform efforts have begun to stretch into the postsecondary arena as well, with an ever increasing dialogue regarding the need for attention to science literacy by college students, especially non-science majors. This study set out to investigate how the use of self-regulatory interventions (specifically, goal setting, concept mapping, and reflective writing) affected student biology self-efficacy and biological literacy. This study employed a qualitative research design, analyzing three case studies. Participants in the study received ten self-regulatory interventions as a set of portfolio assignments. Portfolio work was qualitatively analyzed and coded for self-efficacy, as well as evidence of biological literacy. A biology self-efficacy survey was administered pre- and post- to provide a means of self-efficacy data triangulation. Literacy data was supported via a biological literacy rubric, constructed specifically for this study. Results indicated that mastery experiences were the source of biology self-efficacy. Self-efficacy for specific tasks increased over time, and changes in self-efficacy were corroborated by the self-efficacy survey. Students were found to express biological literacy at nominal, functional, or conceptual levels depending on the specific task. This was supported by data from the biological literacy rubric scores. Final conclusions and implications for the study indicated the need for further research with more samples of students in similar and different contexts. Given the fact that the literature in this area is sparse, the results obtained here have only begun to delve into this area of research. Generalization to other biology courses or contexts outside of the one presented in this study was

  10. Biological and biochemical studies on irradiated potato tubers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation aimed to study and overcome two important diseases which attacks potato plant, using some chemical and physical treatments. The first disease was pre harvest brown rot caused by ralstonia solanacearum and the second was post harvest dry rot caused by fusarium oxysporum. The results are summarized as follows: firstly brown rot : 1- Foliar treatment of salicylic acid or calcium chloride on potato plants leads to increasing in plant height and number of potato tubers, since salicylic acid give the highest value of plant height and also calcium chloride give the highest number of potato tubers. Also, this treatment leads to insignificant decreasing in number of potato tubers infected by brown rot. 2- The bacteria ralstonia solanacearum isolated from infected tubers obtained from the project of brown rot, Ministry of agriculture, Egypt, added with irrigate water to the pots this bacteria could infect healthy potato plant and the symptoms of brown rot observed on tubers also pathogenicity test was carried out using seedling of tomato cultivar Gs plants and wilting of tomato plant observed after 10-15 days from injection with R.solanacearum. 3- Concerning D10-value determined from the relation between dose rate of gamma ray (k-rad) and log count of bacterial number it was found that the D10-value for R.solanacearum was 0.25 kGy

  11. Cell biological study in multiple myeloma among atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was undertaken to determine differences in the expression of cell surface antigens in normal plasma cells and mature myeloma cells. The subjects were 20 patients with multiple myeloma, including 5 A-bomb survivors. Seven normal persons, four with chronic tonsillitis, one with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, and two with chronic lymphadenitis served as controls. In the group of myeloma cells, 12 showed mature myeloma cells of VLA-4+/VLA-5+/MPC-1+, and the other 8 showed precursor myeloma cells of VLA-4+/VLA-5-/MPC-1-. In terms of CD56 and CD19, CD56+/CD19- were seen in 13 patients, CD56-/CD19- in 5, and CD56+/CD19+ in 2; none of the patients showed phenotype of CD56-/CD19+. In the control group, all showed VLA-4+/VLA-5+/MPC-1+/CD44+/CD56-/CD19+; phenotype of normal plasma cells was CD38++/CD56-/CD19+ alone, which was not seen in the group of mature myeloma cells. Thus, this type is considered characteristic to normal plasma cells. These findings revealed that the difference in the expression of CD56 and CD19 aids in the identification of myeloma cells from normal plasma cells. (N.K.)

  12. Biological and psychosocial effects of space travel: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsia, Robert Edward Tien Ming

    This dissertation interviewed a single astronaut to explore psychosocial issues relevant to long-duration space travel and how these issues relate to the astronaut's training. It examined the psychological impact of isolation, crew interaction, and the experience of microgravity with the goal of increasing understanding of how to foster crew survivability and positive small group interactions in space (Santy, 1994). It also focused on how to develop possible treatments for crews when they transition back to Earth from the extreme environment of space missions. The astronaut's responses agreed with the literature and the predictions for long-duration space missions except the participant reported no temporary or permanent cognitive or memory deficits due to microgravity exposure. The dissertation identified five frequently endorsed themes including communication, environmental stressors, personal strengths, un-researched problems, and other. The agreement found between the literature and astronaut's responses offer a strong foundation of questions and data that needs to be further studied before conducting research in space or long-duration space missions.

  13. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Biologically Active Lanthanide (III) Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Georgieva, I.; Rastogi, V. K.; Kiefer, W.

    2008-11-01

    The complexation ability and the binding mode of the ligand coumarin-3-carboxylic acid (HCCA) to La(III), Ce(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III) and Dy(III) lanthanide ions (Ln(III)) are elucidated at experimental and theoretical level. The complexes were characterized using elemental analysis, DTA and TGA data as well as 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectra. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic techniques as well as DFT quantum chemical calculations were used for characterization of the binding mode and the structures of lanthanide(III) complexes of HCCA. The metal—ligand binding mode is predicted through molecular modeling and energy estimation of different Ln—CCA structures using B3LYP/6-31G(d) method combined with a large quasi-relativistic effective core potential for lanthanide ion. The energies obtained predict bidentate coordination of CCA- to Ln(III) ions through the carbonylic oxygen and the carboxylic oxygen. Detailed vibrational analysis of HCCA, CCA- and Ln(III) complexes based on both calculated and experimental frequencies confirms the suggested metal—ligand binding mode. The natural bonding analysis predicts strongly ionic character of the Ln(III)-CCA bonding in the- complexes studied. With the relatively resistant tumor cell line K-562 we obtained very interesting in-vitro results which are in accordance with our previously published data concerning the activity of lanthanide(III) complexes with other coumarin derivatives.

  14. Toxin studies using an integrated biophysical and structural biology approach.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, Julie A.; Schroeder, Anne E.; Slade, Andrea Lynn; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Yip, Christopher M. (University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins, such as botulinum and tetanus, are generally thought to invade neural cells through a process of high affinity binding mediated by gangliosides, internalization via endosome formation, and subsequent membrane penetration of the catalytic domain activated by a pH drop in the endosome. This surface recognition and internalization process is still not well understood with regard to what specific membrane features the toxins target, the intermolecular interactions between bound toxins, and the molecular conformational changes that occur as a result of pH lowering. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of tetanus toxin binding and permeation through the membrane a simple yet representative model was developed that consisted of the ganglioside G{sub tlb} incorporated in a bilayer of cholesterol and DPPC (dipalmitoylphosphatidyl choline). The bilayers were stable over time yet sensitive towards the binding and activity of whole toxin. A liposome leakage study at constant pH as well as with a pH gradient, to mimic the processes of the endosome, was used to elucidate the effect of pH on the toxin's membrane binding and permeation capability. Topographic imaging of the membrane surface, via in situ tapping mode AFM, provided nanoscale characterization of the toxin's binding location and pore formation activity.

  15. The Embudito Mission: A Case Study of the Systematics of Autonomous Ground Mobile Robots; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ground mobile robots are much in the mind of defense planners at this time, being considered for a significant variety of missions with a diversity ranging from logistics supply to reconnaissance and surveillance. While there has been a very large amount of basic research funded in the last quarter century devoted to mobile robots and their supporting component technologies, little of this science base has been fully developed and deployed--notable exceptions being NASA's Mars rover and several terrestrial derivatives. The material in this paper was developed as a first exemplary step in the development of a more systematic approach to the R and D of ground mobile robots

  16. Systematic study of aplanatic two-mirror telescopes. 2: the gregorian configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1974-10-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Gregorian type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. A comparison of the results with those of the first part of this article [C. L. Wyman and D. Korsch, Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] for aplanatic Cassegrains shows that the dependence of the performance on the system parameters is more complex for the Gregorian. Plots of the image curvatures as a function of the ray height ratio are shown for several secondary magnifications and a system focal length of 1000 cm.

  17. School-based counseling using systematic feedback: a cohort study evaluating outcomes and predictors of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Mick; Stewart, Dave; Sparks, Jacqueline; Bunting, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The outcomes of school-based counseling incorporating the Partners for Change Outcome Monitoring System (PCOMS) were evaluated using a cohort design, with multilevel modeling to identify predictors of change. Participants were 288 7-11 year olds experiencing social, emotional or behavioral difficulties. The intervention was associated with significant reductions in psychological distress, with a pre-post effect size (d) of 1.49 on the primary outcome measure and 88.7% clinical improvement. Greater improvements were found for disabled children, older children, and where CBT methods were used. The findings provide support for the use of systematic feedback in therapy with children.

  18. Systematic study of aplanatic two-mirror telescopes. 2: the gregorian configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, C L; Korsch, D

    1974-10-01

    A systematic performance analysis of aplanatic Gregorian type telescopes has been carried out by means of a ray trace program. A comparison of the results with those of the first part of this article [C. L. Wyman and D. Korsch, Appl. Opt. 13, 2064 (1974)] for aplanatic Cassegrains shows that the dependence of the performance on the system parameters is more complex for the Gregorian. Plots of the image curvatures as a function of the ray height ratio are shown for several secondary magnifications and a system focal length of 1000 cm. PMID:20134696

  19. The Embudito Mission: A Case Study of the Systematics of Autonomous Ground Mobile Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EICKER,PATRICK J.

    2001-02-01

    Ground mobile robots are much in the mind of defense planners at this time, being considered for a significant variety of missions with a diversity ranging from logistics supply to reconnaissance and surveillance. While there has been a very large amount of basic research funded in the last quarter century devoted to mobile robots and their supporting component technologies, little of this science base has been fully developed and deployed--notable exceptions being NASA's Mars rover and several terrestrial derivatives. The material in this paper was developed as a first exemplary step in the development of a more systematic approach to the R and D of ground mobile robots.

  20. Using Genomics to Study Human Biology and Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, Ricard M. (Stanford University School of Medicine)

    2005-04-06

    The Human Genome Project culminated in April 2003 with the finished DNA sequence of all of the human chromosomes. This book of information, particularly in conjunction with the genome sequences of many other organisms, has already begun to revolutionize the way that biomedical scientists study our species. The identification of essentially all of our genes has provided a template upon which researchers can discover basic processes that govern cells, organs, and the whole organism, and to understand the fundamental causes of the diseases that occur when something goes wrong with a gene or a set of genes. The Genome Project has already made it possible to identify the genes that are defective in more than 1,000 rare inherited diseases, and these discoveries have helped to understand the mechanisms of the more common forms of these disorders. This understanding of primary defects in diseases - which is translated as mutations in genes that encode proteins that serve specific functions - is transforming the way that biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies identify drug targets, and a few notable cases have already had a striking impact on specific diseases. In addition, it has become clear that the differential response to drugs in human populations is heavily influenced by genes, and a whole field called pharmacogenetics has begun to identify these genetic factors. Such knowledge will allow physicians to prescribe drugs targeted to each individual, with the potential to increase efficacy and decrease side-effects. Determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and identifying the genes has been an exciting endeavor, but we are only just beginning to understand the treasures present in all of our DNA. My presentation will briefly describe the road we took to get the sequence, as well as the tools that we are developing to unlock its secrets.