WorldWideScience

Sample records for biological wastes

  1. Biological denitrification of nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriched uranium wastes are purified in the Y-12 Plant, and the uranium product is recycled. One purification method involves dissolving the waste in nitric acid followed by solvent extraction to recover uranium. The process generates nitrate waste solutions which must be discarded. For many years, these wastes were stored in unlined ponds. In 1976 a recycle process was installed, and about half of the wastes were recovered and reused. A biological process (stirred tank) was installed, and the remaining nitrate wastes were biologically decomposed to produce nitrogen gas. Some additional nitrate wastes, generated in other parts of the plant, continued to be placed in the open ponds which must now be decommissioned. In 1983 an in-situ biological process was developed and tested whereby the open ponds were successfully biologically treated. This paper describes the results of the stirred tank and the in-situ pond treatment processes used in the plant to decompose nitrate ions

  2. Biological treatment of hazardous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, G.A.; Filippi, L.J. de [eds.

    1998-12-01

    This reference book is intended for individuals interested in or involved with the treatment of hazardous wastes using biological/biochemical processes. Composed of 13 chapters, it covers a wide variety of topics ranging from engineering design to hydrogeologic factors. The first four chapters are devoted to a description of several different types of bioreactors. Chapter 5 discusses the biofiltration of volatile organic compounds. Chapters 6 through 9 discuss specific biological, biochemical, physical, and engineering factors that affect bioremediation of hazardous wastes. Chapter 10 is a very good discussion of successful bioremediation of pentachlorophenol contamination under laboratory and field conditions, and excellent references are provided. The next chapter discusses the natural biodegradation of PCB-contaminated sediments in the Hudson River in New York state. Chapter 12 takes an excellent look at the bioremediation capability of anaerobic organisms. The final chapter discusses composting of hazardous waste.

  3. BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION OF WASTE WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. N. Lakshmi Devi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification has been studied extensively as a result of its significance within the biological process and at intervals the necessity for treatment of waste water. In the last decade, the treatment of high ammonical concentration effluents has become a matter of nice interest. Many effluents will contain some hundred milligrams of nitrogen per liter (supernatants from anaerobic digestion, lechates from municipal water, etc. may have specific treatment before utilization them to the plant recycling process. Sometimes this reaction is applied by maintaining robust ammonical concentrations which have the role of inhibiting the nitrite – oxidizing population responsible for the reaction of nitrites into nitrates (final stage of nitrification. However the nitrification methods served as a very important basis for the development of today understands and mathematical models for several waste treatment processes (activated sludge process using biofilm reactors and self – purification in rivers. Often nitrogen removal from sea wastewater is problematic due to the low rate of bacteria concerned. Immobilization is an economical technique to retain slow growing organisms in continuous flow reactors. Immobilized cells can be classified into “naturally” attached cells (biofilms and “artificially” immobilized cells. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification within the step feeding biological nitrogen removal method were investigated below different inflowing substrate and aeration flow rates. The experimental results showed that there was additionally linear relationship between simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and DO concentration below the conditions of low and high aeration rate.

  4. Biological denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies leading to the design of the Oak Ridge Y-12 plant biological denitrification system are briefly described. The system uses a flow-through stirred-bed reactor. Methanol and lime-neutralized acetic acid were evaluated as C sources. The acetic acid was selected because the calcium carbonate generated in the process is needed for neutralization of the acid wastes. Excess organic will be used to ensure maximum amount of nitrate destroyed. The system will generate solids in the form of calcium carbonate, aluminum hydroxide, and organic carbon and N2 and CO2 gases. (JSR)

  5. Biological removal of nitrogen from waste water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dombrowski, T.; Lompe, D.; Wiesmann, U.

    1989-02-01

    The biological treatment of waste water with both a high organic (2500 mg/l DOC) and high ammonia concentration (600 mg/l NH/sub 4//sup +/-N) was investigated. The first step consists of a two step anaerobic cascade of fixed bed loop reactors with polyurethan foam particles as support material for bacterica. The aerobic treatment occurs in two aerated stirred tanks with sedimentation tanks and two separate sludge recycle systems each for heterotrophic and autotrophic biomass resulting in a degradation of organic compounds (first tank) and nitrification (second tank). Finally the nitrate is reduced by biological denitrification. By optimization the total hydraulic retention time could be reduced to 7 hr. Nitrification is the most sensitive step and can be on-line controlled by measurement of oxygen consumption.

  6. Process for the biological purification of waste water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1992-01-01

    Process for the biological purification of waste water by the activated sludge method, the waste water being mixed with recirculated sludge and being subjected to an anaerobic treatment, before the waste water thus treated is alternately subjected to anoxic and aerobic treatments and the waste...... water thus treated is led into a clarification zone for settling sludge, which sludge is recirculated in order to be mixed with the crude waste water. As a result, a simultaneous reduction of the content both of nitrogen and phosphorus of the waste water is achieved....

  7. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF SPIRIT PRODUCTION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Kayshev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A content of biologically active compounds (BAC with signified pharmacological activity in distillers grains was proved. It is prospective for applications of these grains as a raw material resource of pharmaceuticals. A composition of BAC distillers grains received from wheat, corn, barley, millet at different spirit enterprises which use hydro fermentative grain processing. Considering polydispersity of distillers grains they were separated on solid and liquid phases preliminary. Physical and chemical characteristics of distillers grains' liquid base were identified. Elementary composition of distillers grains is signified by active accumulation of biogenic elements (phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, calcium, sodium, iron and low content of heavy metals. The solid phase of distillers grains accumulates carbon, hydrogen and nitrogen in high concentration. The liquid phase of distillers grains contains: proteins and amino acids (20-46%, reducing sugars (5,6%-17,5%, galacturonides (0,8-1,4%, ascorbic acid (6,2-11,4 mg%. The solid base of distillers grains contains: galacturonides (3,4-5,3%, fatty oil (8,4-11,1% with predomination of essential fatty acids, proteins and amino acids (2,1-2,5%, flavonoids (0,4-0,9%, tocopherols (3,4-7,7 mg%. A method of complex processing of distillers grains based on application of membrane filtering of liquid phase and liquid extraction by inorganic and organic solvents of solid phase, which allows almost full extraction of the sum of biologically active compounds (BAC from liquid phase (Biobardin BM and solid phase (Biobardin UL. Biobardin BM comprises the following elements: proteins and amino acids (41-69%, reducing sugars (3,5-15,6%, fatty oil (0,2-0,3%, flavonoids (0,2-0,7%, ascorbic acid (17-37 mg%. Biobardin UL includes: oligouronids (16,4-19,5%, proteins and amino acids (11-21%, fatty oil (3,2-4,9% which includes essential acids; flavonoids (0,6-1,5%, tocopherols (6,6-10,2 mg%, carotinoids (0,13-0,21 mg

  8. Container for transport and for storage of biologically damaging waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A container is described for the transport and storage of biologically damaging, particularly radioactive waste, in which it is possible to fill the inside of the container with gas without using complicated shut-off devices. (orig./PW)

  9. Biological intrusion of low-level-waste trench covers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term integrity of low-level waste shallow land burial sites is dependent on the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that modify the waste containment system. Past research on low-level waste shallow land burial methods has emphasized physical (i.e., water infiltration, soil erosion) and chemical (radionuclide leaching) processes that can cause waste site failure and subsequent radionuclide transport. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the need to consider biological processes as being potentially important in reducing the integrity of waste burial site cover treatments. Plants and animals not only can transport radionuclides to the ground surface via root systems and soil excavated from the cover profile by animal burrowing activities, but they modify physical and chemical processes within the cover profile by changing the water infiltration rates, soil erosion rates and chemical composition of the soil. One approach to limiting biological intrusion through the waste cover is to apply a barrier within the profile to limit root and animal penetration with depth. Experiments in the Los Alamos Experimental Engineered Test Facility were initiated to develop and evaluate biological barriers that are effective in minimizing intrusion into waste trenches. The experiments that are described employ four different candidate barrier materials of geologic origin. Experimental variables that will be evaluated, in addition to barrier type, are barrier depth and soil overburden depth. The rate of biological intrusion through the various barrier materials is being evaluated through the use of activatable stable tracers

  10. Environment. Biological processing of wastes; Environnement. Traitement biologique des dechets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourdon, R. [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees, INSA, Lab. d' Analyse Environnementale des Procedes et des Systemes Industriels, 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    2001-01-01

    The main principle of the biological processing is the utilization of microbial activities by a control stimulation in order to decrease the wastes harmful effects, or by an energetic valorization. This paper deals with the solid wastes or the sludges. After a short presentation of the concerned wastes, their metabolism and their consequences, the author details two treatments: the composting (aerobic) and the methanization (anaerobic). The last part is devoted to the alcoholic fermentation and the industrial wastes (non agricultural) processing. (A.L.B.)

  11. Process engineering in biological aerobic waste-water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilescu, M.; Macoveanu, M. [Technical Univ. Gh. Asachi, Iasi (Romania). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    1999-11-01

    A non-comprehensive review of several technical developments in the field of aerobic biological waste-water treatment engineering is carried out, considering the active role the engineers have to play in this field. This paper brings together conventional and advanced problems in the field of aerobic biological waste-water treatment. Such an overview of biological waste-water treatment also precedes comments on some important aspects concerning the microorganisms responsible for waste-water treatment as well as consideration of the application of fundamentals and kinetics to the analysis of the biological processes used most commonly for aerobic biological waste-water treatment. A survey of the development of the biological activated-sludge process and some modifications are given. Some problems implied in the conventional activated-sludge waste-water treatment are analyzed, considering conventional processes and bioreactor models (the continuous stirred-tank reactor model and the plug-flow reactor models of the activated-sludge process) as well as aerated lagoons. Further, modifications of the activated-sludge process are presented. These include additional details on the bioreactor progress and applications, with emphasis on aspects concerning airlift bioreactors and their variants, deep-shaft bioreactors and reciprocating jet bioreactors which are considered as the third generation of bioreactors owing to their important advantages in design, operation and performance in waste-water treatment. Sequencing-batch reactors and aerobic digestion processes, including conventional aerobic digestion, high-purity oxygen digestion, thermophilic aerobic digestion and cryophylic aerobic digestion are also reviewed. Finally, some aspects regarding the operational factors that are involved in the selection of the reactor type are included. (orig.)

  12. Composting of Waste from Poultry Breeding – Biological Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinkowski, T. A.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was primarily to determine the course of biological composition changes of wastes during composting. Here presented are the results of the bacteriological, mycological and parasitological composition analyses of composts consisting of: goose and broiler excrements from ecological farms, remainders of goose intestines from slaughterhouses, goose feather waste collected on the sieves of the farm wastewater treatment plants, as well as sewage sludge from slaughterhous...

  13. Biomethanation potential of biological and other wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, J. C.; Sousa, D.Z.; Pereira, M. A.; Stams, A.J.M.; Alves, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic technology has been traditionally applied for the treatment of carbon rich wastewater and organic residues. Anaerobic processes can be fully integrated in the biobased economy concept for resource recovery. After a brief introduction about applications of anaerobic processes to industrial wastewater treatment, agriculture feedstock and organic fraction of municipal solid waste, the position of anaerobic processes in biorefinery concepts is presented. Integration of anaerobic digesti...

  14. Biological denitrification of high nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological denitrification of solutions of nitrate salts and weak solutions of nitric acid used in the purification of uranium at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is briefly discussed. Advantages of this system over others are mentioned. Techniques and accumulated experience are covered

  15. Shear strength characteristics of mechanically biologically treated (MBT) waste

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando, V.I. Sudarshana C.K.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) is the generic name for a group of processes which have been used to reduce the biodegradable content of municipal solid waste (MSW) in order to aid compliance with the Landfill Directive. As a result of mechanical biological treatment, MSW is converted to a material which has different properties to its parent material, including changes to its mechanical properties. The aims of this research were to identify: • The shear strength characteristics...

  16. BIOLOGICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES OF SPIRIT PRODUCTION WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Kayshev; N. S. Kaysheva

    2014-01-01

    A content of biologically active compounds (BAC) with signified pharmacological activity in distillers grains was proved. It is prospective for applications of these grains as a raw material resource of pharmaceuticals. A composition of BAC distillers grains received from wheat, corn, barley, millet at different spirit enterprises which use hydro fermentative grain processing. Considering polydispersity of distillers grains they were separated on solid and liquid phases preliminary. Physical ...

  17. Biological denitrification of nitrate waste solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on careful laboratory and pilot-plant work, the Y-12 Plant of the Nuclear Division of Union Carbide has designs to construct and operate a three-phase plant to eliminate nitrate as a potential pollutant of ground water. A still is being installed to distill and recover free nitric acid from condensates and raffinate for recycle in production operations. A crystallizer is in the process of being purchased and installed to recover and recycle Al(NO3)3.9H2O. The 25,000-gallon (95 m3) modified water-softening tanks with associated stirring equipment, plumbing, pumps and controls have been purchased. Either one or both of these vessels will be utilized as biological denitrifiers dependent upon the quantity of nitrate requiring disposal at any given time. One denitrifier may be utilized to maintain a standby working colony or culture of bacteria and simultaneously achieve an even lower nitrate concentration in the effluent stream than the present 40 to 100 mg/dm3 of solution. (U.S.)

  18. Historical waste - biological shield and documentation during decommissioning - 59056

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Inventory records of isotopes in radioactive waste are important as documentation with respect to governmental control, final disposal and public transparency. We present a simple, practical and cost-effective method for characterization of a part of the radioactive waste from decommissioning of a research reactor: The biological shielding. The method uses documentation from the decommissioning and from the construction drawings and blueprints of the reactor as well as measurements based on samples from the facility. The data presented is from a 5 MW experimental light water nuclear reactor (DR-2) shutdown in 1975 and decommissioned in 2008. The method incorporates an activity distribution in the biological shield. The distribution is based on measurements of samples from across the shielding and coupled with the distance to the center of the reactor core. The exact origin of each waste item is determined from pictures from the decommissioning and from old blueprints and construction drawings of the reactor. The uncertainty and usefulness of the method is related directly to different factors such as: The amount of samples obtained and the position of these with respect to the origin of the waste, the accuracy of the documentation of the decommissioning, the size of the waste items

  19. Biological Aspects of Disposal of Radioactive Wastes in Marine Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disposal of radioactive wastes in marine waters allows for an accumulation of radioactivity by marine life. Such an accumulation by seafood organisms might affect their utilization or availability. Laboratory studies of accumulation of important radionuclides present in different wastes by marine plankton, benthic invertebrates and various species of marine fish and of the biological effects of accumulated radioactivity on these forms are being conducted at Beaufort, North Carolina, as a co-operative activity of the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Bureau of Commercial Fisheries. These investigations help provide essential information for the formulation of waste disposal practices and the safe operation of nuclear-powered ships in coastal waters. They are useful also in the development of monitoring programmes designed to detect and evaluate hazards from accidental pollution of inshore waters. (author)

  20. Brown coal coke in biological waste water cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological sewage plants working by the activated sludge process are often confronted by the following problems: the formation of expanded bubbles, lack of decomposition performance, unstable operation and insufficient excess sludge dewatering. In the former East Germany, there is also the problem of too little nitrificaion/denitrification, caused by obsolete plant. The use of brown coal coke guarantees efficient cleaning of waste water. (orig.)

  1. Biological treatment of cokery waste water. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a biotechnological process for the treatment of cokery waste water a two stage bioreactor system of each 800 l volume was designed, built up and proven for its efficiency by treating process water of two different origins. A third type of cokery waste water was treated in a lab scale bioreactor. The bacterial culture used for the process consists of a basic population for the degradation of phenol and cresols. Additionally several special strains isolated for their ability to degrade polymethylated phenols, quinoline and thiocyanate were supplemented to obtain an effective mineralization of these compounds. The successful integration of these bacterial specialists could be confirmed by detection of the respective metabolic activities (e.g. pathway-specific enzyme) in the activated sludge. -In addition to chemical analyses of the waste waters before and after biological treatment a toxicological method based on bacterial bio-luminescence inhibition was applied to characterize the clean up. - The results obtained for the DMT-process reveal that independently from the constitution of the waste water a hydraulic retention time of 6 hours for phenol degradation and 12 hours for thiocyanate degradation is necessary. So thiocyanate degradation is the rate limiting step in the process. The degree of DOC removal resulted in 80 to 90%. The degradation capacities vary from 0,3 to 2,7 kg DOC/m3 d depending on the type of waste water used for the treatment. In each case biological treatment of the waste water led to a strong reduction of water toxicity. - A feasibility study, based on the results obtained from pilot plant operation, revealed specific costs of 3 DM per kg DOC removal for a commercial plant with a capacity of 10 m3/h. (orig.). 13 refs., 13 tabs., 58 figs

  2. Waste rock revegetation: Evaluation of nutrient and biological amendments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meikle, T.W.; Lu, S.; Barta, J.P.

    1999-07-01

    Lack of salvaged topsoil for the reclamation of historical waste rock piles is a common problem in the arid Great Basin region. Utilization of amended waste rock as a growth media could reduce further disturbance resulting from topsoil harvest, minimize hauling costs, and potentially allow for the use of a higher quality material for plant growth. Getchell Gold Corporation initiated a study in 1995 to determine the suitability of waste rock substrates to support plant growth following application of nutrient and biological amendments. Three nutrient amendments and a biological seed treatment were evaluation for use in establishing vegetative cover on three distinct waste rock substrates. Completely randomized blocks were placed on the three substrates. Treatments included organic fertilizers (Biosol and Gro-Power), a mineral fertilizer (16-20-0), and Azospirillum bacterial inoculant, plus controls. The seed mix consisted of Agropyron riparium, Agropyron spicatum, Elymus cinereus, Poa secunda, and Sitanion hystrix. Canopy and ground cover were monitored for three growing seasons. Conclusions from the study are: (1) two of the three substrates supported plant growth following amendment with organic fertilizers; (2) organic fertilizers increased cover substantially over the mineral fertilizer; and (3) Azospirillum had no effect on canopy cover.

  3. Biological toxicity evaluation of Hanford Site waste grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid wastes containing radioactive, hazardous, and regulated chemicals have been generated throughout the 50 years of operation of the Hanford Site of the US Department of Energy near Richland, Washington. These wastes are currently stored onsite in single- and double-shell carbon steel tanks. To effectively handle and treat these wastes, their degree of toxicity must be determined. The disposal of the low-level radioactive liquid portion of the wastes involves mixing the wastes with pozzolanic blends to form grout. Potential environmental hazards posed by grouts are largely unknown. Biological evaluation of grout toxicity is needed to provide information on the potential risks of animal and plant exposure to the grouts. The fish, rat, and Microtox toxicity tests described herein indicate that the grouts formed from Formulations I and 2 are nonhazardous and nondangerous. Using the Microtox solid-phase protocol, both soluble and insoluble organic and inorganic toxicants in the grouts can be detected. This protocol may be used for rapid screening of environmental pollutants and toxicants

  4. Biological treatment of chicken feather waste for improved biogas production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gergely Forgács; Saeid Alinezhad; Amir Mirabdollah; Elisabeth Feuk-Lagerstedt; Ilona Sárvári Horwáth

    2011-01-01

    A two-stage system was developed which combines the biological degradation of keratin-rich waste with the production of biogas.Chicken feather waste was treated biologically with a recombinant Bacillus megaterium strain showing keratinase activity prior to biogas production.Chopped,autoclaved chicken feathers (4%,W/V) were completely degraded,resulting in a yellowish fermentation broth with a level of 0.51 mg/mL soluble proteins after 8 days of cultivation of the recombinant strain.During the subsequent anaerobic batch digestion experiments,methane production of 0.35 Nm3/kg dry feathers (i.e.,0.4 Nm3/kg volatile solids of feathers),corresponding to 80% of the theoretical value on proteins,was achieved from the feather hydrolyzates,independently of the prehydrolysis time period of 1,2 or 8 days.Cultivation with a native keratinase producing strain,Bacillus licheniformis resulted in only 0.25 mg/mL soluble proteins in the feather hydrolyzate,which then was digested achieving a maximum accumulated methane production of 0.31 Nm3/kg dry feathers.Feather hydrolyzates treated with the wild type B.megaterium produced 0.21 Nm3 CH4/kg dry feathers as maximum yield.

  5. Fluid extraction-biological degradation of organic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Fluid Extraction-Biological Degradation (FEBD) Process extracts hydrocarbon contaminants from soil and then biologically degrades the pollutants in aerobic bioreactors. The FEBD process has the potential to be an environmentally benign means of safely and economically degrading pollutants by overcoming bioavailability limitations of the pollutants in soil. The process consists of three stages; extraction, separation, and biodegradation. Contaminants are first removed from the soil by solubilization in supercritical carbondioxide in an above-ground extraction vessel. The hydrocarbon contaminants are then collected in a separation solvent, and clean CO2 is recycled to the extraction stage. Separation solvent containing the organic wastes is sent to the biodegradation stage where the wastes are converted to CO2, water, and biomass. All stages of the FEBD process have been successfully demonstrated. The extraction stage of the FEBD process relies on the unique properties of supercritical fluids (SCF) to remove organic contaminants from soil. An SCF is a compound at conditions exceeding its critical temperature and pressure. Fluids in the supercritical range have viscosities and diffusivities between liquids and gases with densities close to those of liquids. Supercritical fluids have the solution characteristics of liquids with better mass transfer capabilities. Extraction and separation are easily controlled because changes in the pressure (density) of an SCF can be used to change the solvation ability of the fluid

  6. [Biological, chemical, and radiation factors in the classification of medical waste].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, N V; Korotkova, G I; Orlov, A Iu; Kadyrov, D E

    2011-01-01

    The current classification of medical waste does not consider the sanitary-and-chemical hazard of epidemiologically dangerous and extremely dangerous medical waste (classes B and C). According to the results of the studies performed, the authors propose the improved classification of medical waste, which makes it possible to take into account not only infectious, radiation, and toxicological, but also sanitary-and-chemical hazards (toxicity, carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, and biological activity) of medical waste. PMID:21901883

  7. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area

  8. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  9. Greenhouse gas emissions from mechanical and biological waste treatment of municipal waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, J; Cuhls, C

    2003-06-01

    The mechanical and biological waste treatment (MBT) is an increasingly important technology for the treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) before landfilling. This process includes composting of the material with intensive aeration in order to minimize the organic fraction that may induce methane and leachate emissions after landfilling. The exhaust air is treated by biofilters to remove odorous and volatile organic compounds. The emission of direct and indirect greenhouse gases, namely methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), ammonia (NH3), nitric (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) was studied in four existing treatment plants. All gases except NO were emitted from the composting material. The emission factors were 12 to 185 kg ton(-1) substrate for CO2, 6-12 x 10(3) g ton(-1) substrate for CH4, 1.44 to 378 g ton(-1) substrate for N2O and 18-1150 g ton(-1) for NH3. In general, emission factors increased with increasing treatment time. The biofilters had no net effect on CH4, but removed 13-89% of the NH3. For CO2 the biofilters were a small, for N2O a major and for NO the exclusive source. Approximately 26% of the NH3-N that was removed in the biofilter was transformed into N2O when NH3 was the exclusive nitrogen source. Assuming that all municipal waste was treated by MBT, the emissions would account for 0.3 to 5% of the N2O and for 0.1 to 3% of the CH4 emissions in Germany, respectively. Optimising aeration and removing NH3 before the exhaust gas enters the biofilter could lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:12868530

  10. Importance of biological systems in industrial waste treatment potential application to the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revis, Nathaniel; Holdsworth, George

    1990-01-01

    In addition to having applications for waste management issues on planet Earth, microbial systems have application in reducing waste volumes aboard spacecraft. A candidate for such an application is the space station. Many of the planned experiments generate aqueous waste. To recycle air and water the contaminants from previous experiments must be removed before the air and water can be used for other experiments. This can be achieved using microorganisms in a bioreactor. Potential bioreactors (inorganics, organics, and etchants) are discussed. Current technologies that may be applied to waste treatment are described. Examples of how biological systems may be used in treating waste on the space station.

  11. Recycling of waste bread as culture media for efficient biological treatment of wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of recycling of waste bread as culture media for efficient biological treatment of wastewater were investigated. In order to get the highest growth of microorganism for increased contaminants' removal efficiency of the system, different compositions of waste bread and skim milk with and without adding Powdered Activated Carbon (PAC) were tested. Mixed waste bread compositions with added PAC showed relatively higher number of microorganisms than the compositions without added PAC. A composition of 40% mixed waste bread and 60% skim milk produced highest number of microorganisms with subsequent increased contaminants' removal efficiency of the system. 'Contrast' alone showed lower contaminants' removal efficiency than mixed bread compositions. Use of waste bread in the composition of skim milk reduced cost of using foreign source of nutrients in biological treatment of wastewater and also facilitated waste bread management through recycling. (author)

  12. Modelling of environmental impacts from biological treatment of organic municipal waste in EASEWASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Boldrin, Alessio; Neidel, Trine Lund; Damgaard, Anders; Bhander, Gurbakhash S.; Møller, Jacob; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    The waste-LCA model EASEWASTE quantifies potential environmental effects from biological treatment of organic waste, based on mass and energy flows, emissions to air, water, soil and groundwater as well as effects from upstream and downstream processes. Default technologies for composting, anaerobic digestion and combinations hereof are available in the model, but the user can change all key parameters in the biological treatment module so that specific local plants and processes can be model...

  13. Thermochemical Pretreatments of Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste from a Mechanical-Biological Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos José Alvarez-Gallego; Luis Alberto Fdez-Güelfo; María de los Angeles Romero Aguilar; Luis Isidoro Romero García

    2015-01-01

    The organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) usually contains high lignocellulosic and fatty fractions. These fractions are well-known to be a hard biodegradable substrate for biological treatments and its presence involves limitations on the performance of anaerobic processes. To avoid this, thermochemical pretreatments have been applied on the OFMSW coming from a full-scale mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant, in order to pre-hydrolyze the waste and improve the organic matt...

  14. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user.

  15. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user

  16. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, and radionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    OpenAIRE

    Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been propo...

  17. Biodegradation of chlorinated and unsaturated hydrocarbons in relation to biological waste-gas treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    The original goal of the research described in this thesis was to develop a biological process for the removal of vinyl chloride from waste gases. The gaseous and carcinogenic vinyl chloride is used to produce the plastic polyvinyl chloride (PVC). During this production process waste gases containin

  18. CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF LEACHATES FROM COAL SOLID WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of the chemical and mineralogical characterization of coal solid wastes. The wastes included three Lurgi gasification ashes, mineral residues from the SRC-1 and H-Coal liquefaction processes, two chars, two coal-cleaning residues, and a fly-ash-and-water-...

  19. Development of biological treatment of high concentration sodium nitrate waste liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An electrolytic reduction, chemical reduction, and biological reduction have been picked up as a method of nitrate liquid waste treatment system exhausted from the reprocessing process. As a result of comparing them, it was shown that the biological treatment was the most excellent method in safety and the economy. (author)

  20. Water-immiscible solvents for the biological treatment of waste gases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesario, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    In conventional biological systems for the treatment of waste gases, contaminants are transferred directly to the aqueous phase and then converted by the micro-organisms. When poorly water-soluble pollutants are to be removed, biological degradation is often limited by the slow transport from the ga

  1. Exploitation of biological wastes for the production of value-added products under solid-state fermentation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Couto, Susana

    2008-07-01

    Biological wastes contain several reusable substances of high value such as soluble sugars and fibre. Direct disposal of such wastes to soil or landfill causes serious environmental problems. Thus, the development of potential value-added processes for these wastes is highly attractive. These biological wastes can be used as support-substrates in solid-state fermentation (SSF) to produce industrially relevant metabolites with great economical advantage. In addition, it is an environmentally friendly method of waste management. This paper reviews the reutilization of biological wastes for the production of value-added products using the SSF technique. PMID:18543242

  2. Biological considerations in nuclear decommissioning, and radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of natural processes such as microbial action in waste management has recently been recognised. Although it is often difficult to predict the effects because the interactive processes are complex, human intervention can optimize the process. This paper highlights some of the fundamental stages in the management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes where particular uncertainties exist and which might benefit from controlled microbial intervention. The areas considered are the use of biodegradable surfactants for cleaning surfaces before disposal, microbial adsorption and concentration of intermediate-level wastes from solution, microbial transformation of intermediate-level wastes organic fractions, enhancement of radionuclide transfer to the atmosphere, enhancement of transfer into vadose zone and ground water and the microbial treatment of any oily residues. (UK)

  3. Whole process reclamation and utilization of wastes produced in the biological fermentation industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Ling-jun; LI Da-peng; MA Fang; Chein-chi Chang; XU Shan-wen; QIU Shan

    2008-01-01

    Wastes yielded in the vintage process and the biological fermentation of itaconic acid and sodium gluconate of a winery in Shandong,such as grain stillage,melon lees,cornstarch protein residues,itaconic acid mother liquid,itaconic acid mycelium and sodium gluconate mycelium,were studied.Hish-activity biological protein feed,foliar fertilizer and irrigation fertilizer were generated from these wastes by applying biological/microbial technologies.Meanwhile,a whole set of technological pathways Was put forward.As a result,the optimal economical and social benefits can be obtained with low natural resource consumption and environmental costs by converting wastes into useful matters.In conclusion,through the utilization of limited resources in the whole process of reclamation and utilization of wastes,the harmony promotion Can be achieved between the economic system and the natural ecosystem.

  4. Modelling of environmental impacts from biological treatment of organic municipal waste in EASEWASTE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldrin, Alessio; Neidel, Trine Lund; Damgaard, Anders;

    2011-01-01

    The waste-LCA model EASEWASTE quantifies potential environmental effects from biological treatment of organic waste, based on mass and energy flows, emissions to air, water, soil and groundwater as well as effects from upstream and downstream processes. Default technologies for composting......, anaerobic digestion and combinations hereof are available in the model, but the user can change all key parameters in the biological treatment module so that specific local plants and processes can be modelled. EASEWASTE is one of the newest waste LCA models and the biological treatment module was built...... partly on features of earlier waste-LCA models, but offers additional facilities, more flexibility, transparency and user-friendliness. The paper presents the main features of the module and provides some examples illustrating the capability of the model in environmentally assessing and discriminating...

  5. Biological processes for advancing lignocellulosic waste biorefinery by advocating circular economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Rossana; Faraco, Vincenza

    2016-09-01

    The actualization of a circular economy through the use of lignocellulosic wastes as renewable resources can lead to reduce the dependence from fossil-based resources and contribute to a sustainable waste management. The integrated biorefineries, exploiting the overall lignocellulosic waste components to generate fuels, chemicals and energy, are the pillar of the circular economy. The biological treatment is receiving great attention for the biorefinery development since it is considered an eco-friendly alternative to the physico-chemical strategies to increase the biobased product recovery from wastes and improve saccharification and fermentation yields. This paper reviews the last advances in the biological treatments aimed at upgrading lignocellulosic wastes, implementing the biorefinery concept and advocating circular economy. PMID:27131870

  6. Characterization of compost-like outputs from mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Sally M; Bateson, Thomas; Gronow, Jan R; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2010-06-01

    Throughout the world, most municipal solid waste consists of biodegradable components. The most abundant biological component is cellulose, followed by hemicellulose and lignin. Recycling of these components is important for the carbon cycle. In an attempt to reduce the environmental impacts of biodegradable wastes, mechanical biological treatments (MBTs) are being used as a waste management process in many countries. MBT plants attempt to mechanically separate the biodegradable and nonbiodegradable components. The nonbiodegradable components are then sent for reprocessing or landfilled, whereas the biodegradable components are reduced in biological content through composting or anaerobic digestion, leaving a compost-like output (CLO). The further use of these partially degraded residues is uncertain, and in many cases it is likely that they will be landfilled. The implications of this for the future of landfill management are causing some concern because there is little evidence that the long-term emissions tail will be reduced. In this study, the CLOs from four different biological treatment processes were characterized for physical contamination through visual inspection and for biological content using a sequential digestion analysis. The results indicate that the composition of the incoming waste, dependent on the way the waste was collected/segregated, was the factor that influenced biological content most, with length of treatment process the second most important. PMID:20564995

  7. The energy efficiency of the treatment of biological waste in waste incinerators. Energetic balancing; Die Energieeffizienz der Bioabfallbehandlung in Abfallverbrennungsanlagen. Energetische Bilanzierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohl, Martin; Bernhardt, Daniel [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik; Beckmann, Michael [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Professur fuer Verbrennung, Waerme- und Stoffuebertragung

    2013-03-01

    Usually, waste incinerators are laid out for a certain bandwidth of heating values. The relation between performance, heating value and mass flow of the waste is reflected by the furnace performance chart. The authors of this contribution report on the energy efficiency of the treatment of biological waste in waste incinerators. By means of an exemplary balancing of the waste incineration with different amounts of biological waste it is shown that any generally valid degrees of efficiency can be specified for a comparison and evaluation of different procedures. A detailed investigation on the basis of the regulation VDI 340 for example is necessary.

  8. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, and radionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been proposed as a potentially safer alternative to incineration for the treatment of hazardous organic mixed wastes, since biological treatment would not release volatile radioisotopes and the residual low-level radioactive waste would no longer be restricted from land disposal. Prior studies have shown that toxicity associated with acetonitrile is a significant limiting factor for the application of biotreatment to mixed wastes and excessive dilution was required to avoid inhibition of biological treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that a novel reactor configuration, where the concentrated toxic waste is drip-fed into a complete-mix bioreactor containing a pre-concentrated active microbial population, can be used to treat a surrogate acetonitrile mixed waste stream without excessive dilution. Using a drip-feed bioreactor, we were able to treat a 90,000 mg/L acetonitrile solution to less than 0.1 mg/L final concentration using a dilution factor of only 3.4. It was determined that the acetonitrile degradation reaction was inhibited at a pH above 7.2 and that the reactor could be modeled using conventional kinetic and mass balance approaches. Using a drip-feed reactor configuration addresses a major limiting factor (toxic inhibition) for the biological treatment of toxic, hazardous, or radioactive mixed wastes and suggests that drip-feed bioreactors could be used to treat other concentrated toxic waste streams, such as chemical warfare materiel

  9. Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, andradionuclide mixed wastes without dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

    2004-06-15

    Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been proposed as a potentially safer alternative to incineration for the treatment of hazardous organic mixed wastes, since biological treatment would not release volatile radioisotopes and the residual low-level radioactive waste would no longer be restricted from land disposal. Prior studies have shown that toxicity associated with acetonitrile is a significant limiting factor for the application of biotreatment to mixed wastes and excessive dilution was required to avoid inhibition of biological treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that a novel reactor configuration, where the concentrated toxic waste is drip-fed into a complete-mix bioreactor containing a pre-concentrated active microbial population, can be used to treat a surrogate acetonitrile mixed waste stream without excessive dilution. Using a drip-feed bioreactor, we were able to treat a 90,000 mg/L acetonitrile solution to less than 0.1 mg/L final concentration using a dilution factor of only 3.4. It was determined that the acetonitrile degradation reaction was inhibited at a pH above 7.2 and that the reactor could be modeled using conventional kinetic and mass balance approaches. Using a drip-feed reactor configuration addresses a major limiting factor (toxic inhibition) for the biological treatment of toxic, hazardous, or radioactive mixed wastes and suggests that drip-feed bioreactors could be used to treat other concentrated toxic waste streams, such as chemical warfare materiel.

  10. Mini-review of the geotechnical parameters of municipal solid waste: Mechanical and biological pre-treated versus raw untreated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The most viable option for biostabilisation of old sanitary landfills, filled with raw municipal solid waste, is the so-called bioreactor landfill. Even today, bioreactor landfills are viable options in many economically developing countries. However, in order to reduce the biodegradable component of landfilled waste, mechanical and biological treatment has become a widely accepted waste treatment technology, especially in more prosperous countries. Given that mechanical and biological treatment alters the geotechnical properties of raw waste material, the design of sanitary landfills which accepts mechanically and biologically treated waste, should be carried out with a distinct set of geotechnical parameters. However, under the assumption that 'waste is waste', some design engineers might be tempted to use geotechnical parameters of untreated raw municipal solid waste and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste interchangeably. Therefore, to provide guidelines for use and to provide an aggregated source of this information, this mini-review provides comparisons of geotechnical parameters of mechanical and biological pre-treated waste and raw untreated waste at various decomposition stages. This comparison reveals reasonable correlations between the hydraulic conductivity values of untreated and mechanical and biological pre-treated municipal solid waste. It is recognised that particle size might have a significant influence on the hydraulic conductivity of both municipal solid waste types. However, the compression ratios and shear strengths of untreated and pre-treated municipal solid waste do not show such strong correlations. Furthermore, another emerging topic that requires appropriate attention is the recovery of resources that are embedded in old landfills. Therefore, the presented results provide a valuable tool for engineers designing landfills for mechanical and biological pre-treated waste or bioreactor landfills for untreated raw

  11. Biological denitrification of high sodium nitrate bearing actual reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High nitrate bearing alkaline waste solution of reprocessing plant origin was decontaminated by adopting an ion exchange followed by a chemical treatment based process. The resulting effluent was then subjected to nitrate removal by biodenitrification. A flow through bioreactor provided with stainless steel modules as support for biomass growth was setup and the biomass in reactor was acclimatized to a NaNO3 solution of concentration level comparable to actual effluents. The bioreactor was used for denitrification of the actual effluent in continuous mode and complete denitrification of the actual reprocessing waste solution containing 17,500 ppm of nitrate has been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  12. 10. Biogas conference Dresden. Anaerobic treatment of biological wastes. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biogas conference in Dresden will be held for the tenth time and is still the only conference in Germany, which focuses on the production of biogas solely from waste. This year, the implementation of paragraph 11 of the Recycling and Waste Management Act and the amendment of the Renewable Energies Act (EEG) in 2014, the chances of the waste management biogas technology will be spotlighted here. The efficiency and wise use of the end products of the biogas production - the biogas and fermentation residues are equally critical for the success of biogas technology as the emission reduction of biogas plants. In this context, the biogas technology will also be dependent in the future on legal requirements and funding instruments such as the EEG. For the technical implementation, the development of reliable system concepts with specific sinking biogas and electricity supply costs and with greater flexibility in terms of launching needs-based biogas and electricity production. The contributions in this paper discuss possible solutions and implementations from the perspective of politics, associations, research and practice. Innovative topics will be discussed, which will be decisive for the future of biogas production from organic wastes.

  13. Apparatus and method for biological purification of waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucido, John A.; Keenan, Daniel; Premuzic, Eugene T.; Lin, Mow S.; Shelenkova, Ludmila

    1998-11-24

    An apparatus is disclosed for containing a microorganism culture in an active exponential growth and delivering a supply of microorganisms to an environment containing wastes for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of the wastes. The apparatus comprises a bioreactor and an operably connected controller. The bioreactor has a bioreactor chamber for containing a supply of microorganisms, a second chamber for containing a supply of water and inorganic nutrients, and a third chamber for containing a supply of organic nutrients. The bioreactor is operably connected to the controller in which a first pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the second chamber and third chamber, and a second pump is operably connected in fluid communication between the bioreactor chamber and the environment containing wastes to be biodegraded. The controller further includes a timer and regulator operably connected to the first and second pumps to effectively maintain the microorganisms in exponential growth in the bioreactor chamber and to deliver microorganisms to an environment to be treated. Also, disclosed is a method for bio-augmenting the biodegradation of wastes.

  14. Mechanical–biological treatment: Performance and potentials. An LCA of 8 MBT plants including waste characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montejo, Cristina; Tonini, Davide; Márquez, María del Carmen;

    2013-01-01

    In the endeavour of avoiding presence of biodegradable waste in landfills and increasing recycling, mechanical–biological treatment (MBT) plants have seen a significant increase in number and capacity in the last two decades. The aim of these plants is separating and stabilizing the quickly...... biodegradable fraction of the waste as well as recovering recyclables from mixed waste streams. In this study the environmental performance of eight MBT-based waste management scenarios in Spain was assessed by means of life cycle assessment. The focus was on the technical and environmental performance of the...... MBT plants. These widely differed in type of biological treatment and recovery efficiencies. The results indicated that the performance is strongly connected with energy and materials recovery efficiency. The recommendation for upgrading and/or commissioning of future plants is to optimize materials...

  15. Toxicity evaluation of leachate of solid waste after biological and photocatalitical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ronaldo Teixeira Pelegrini; José Euclides Stipp Paterniani; Núbia Natália de Brito Pelegrini; Simoni Micheti Geraldo; Juliana Graciani Carniato

    2007-01-01

    The final disposition of urban solid wastes is a practice that still causes serious environmental impacts generating several pollutant subproducts, such as the landfill leachate. The toxicity tests are used in the pollution control with the scope of finding the permissive concentrations of a chemical agent for the development survival of particular alive organisms. This work aims the toxicity evaluation study in leachate samples of in natura solid wastes, after biological treatment through sl...

  16. On-site assessment of methods to measure gaseous emissions from biological treatment of waste

    OpenAIRE

    Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Auvinet, N.; Mallard, Pascal; Bour, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Landfilling of biodegradable waste must decrease to fulfil the Council Directive 99/31/EC on landfills, in order to reduce the emission of gaseous and liquid pollutants during the landfill lifetime. Therefore, pre-treatment of the organic fraction of municipal waste prior to landfilling is being developed in several countries. In France, the organic fraction is either separated and treated through selective collection of biowaste, or through mechanical sorting in the plant followed by biologi...

  17. Does biological treatment of 'residual waste' replace incineration. Ersetzt die biologische Restmuellbehandlung die Verbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braungart, M.; Engelfried, J.; Andre, B. (EPEA-Umweltinstitut, Hamburg (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Because of their unspecificity, thermal and biological methods for treatment of ''residual waste'' are bound to have harmful effects on the environment. Consequently, the classification of waste according to organic or inorganic components as currently practised by the waste industry cannot solve the waste problem. Categorizing goods according to defined properties as consumer goods, commodities, and products not for sale leads from a waste oriented to a product oriented management system with specific solutions. (BBR).

  18. Water-immiscible solvents for the biological treatment of waste gases.

    OpenAIRE

    Cesario, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    In conventional biological systems for the treatment of waste gases, contaminants are transferred directly to the aqueous phase and then converted by the micro-organisms. When poorly water-soluble pollutants are to be removed, biological degradation is often limited by the slow transport from the gas to the aqueous phase. This transport limitation can be circumvented by contacting the gas directly with an intermediate water-immiscible organic solvent with a high affinity for these contaminant...

  19. Estimating biogas production of biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Barbara; Confalonieri, Roberto; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Adani, Fabrizio

    2010-02-01

    In this work, a respirometric approach, i.e., Dynamic Respiration Index (DRI), was used to predict the anaerobic biogas potential (ABP), studying 46 waste samples coming directly from MBT full-scale plants. A significant linear regression model was obtained by a jackknife approach: ABP=(34.4+/-2.5)+(0.109+/-0.003).DRI. The comparison of the model of this work with those of the previous works using a different respirometric approach (Sapromat-AT(4)), allowed obtaining similar results and carrying out direct comparison of different limits to accept treated waste in landfill, proposed in the literature. The results indicated that on an average, MBT treatment allowed 56% of ABP reduction after 4weeks of treatment, and 79% reduction after 12weeks of treatment. The obtainment of another regression model allowed transforming Sapromat-AT(4) limit in DRI units, and achieving a description of the kinetics of DRI and the corresponding ABP reductions vs. MBT treatment-time. PMID:19783431

  20. Hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: Biological uptake and metabolism studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, J.; Apblett, A.; Ensley, H. [and others

    1996-05-02

    The projects discussed in this article include the following: the uptake, accumulation, metabolism, toxicity and physiological effects of various environmentally-important contaminants, inorganic and organic, in several wetland species that are interrelated through food webs; and investigation of the potential for developing and linking chemical and biological methods of remediation so as to encapsulate bioaccummulated ions in stable wasteforms such as ceramics and/or zeolites. 24 refs.

  1. Biological upgrading of wastes from the pulp and paper industry

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Susana; Alves, Luís Manuel; Gírio, Francisco M.; Santos, J. A. L.; Roseiro, J. Carlos

    2009-01-01

    A process for biological upgrading of recycled paper sludge (RPS) was developed based on the enzymatic hydrolysis of major sludge components (cellulose and xylan) with commercial enzymes and fermentation of the resulting sugars into ethanol or lactic acid with adequate microbial strains. The process was implemented performing both steps sequentially (SHF) or simultaneously (SSF). Cellulosic and hemicellulosic fractions of RPS were completely converted by enzymatic hydrolysis (using Celluclast...

  2. Short mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste allows landfill impact reduction saving waste energy content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Barbara; Salati, Silvia; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Carrera, Alberto; Tambone, Fulvia; Adani, Fabrizio

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of full scale MBT process (28 d) in removing inhibition condition for successive biogas (ABP) production in landfill and in reducing total waste impact. For this purpose the organic fraction of MSW was treated in a full-scale MBT plant and successively incubated vs. untreated waste, in simulated landfills for one year. Results showed that untreated landfilled-waste gave a total ABP reduction that was null. On the contrary MBT process reduced ABP of 44%, but successive incubation for one year in landfill gave a total ABP reduction of 86%. This ABP reduction corresponded to a MBT process of 22 weeks length, according to the predictive regression developed for ABP reduction vs. MBT-time. Therefore short MBT allowed reducing landfill impact, preserving energy content (ABP) to be produced successively by bioreactor technology since pre-treatment avoided process inhibition because of partial waste biostabilization. PMID:23792663

  3. Chemical and biological extraction of metals present in E waste: A hybrid technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Hybrid methodology for E waste management. ► Efficient extraction of metals. ► Trace metal extraction is possible. - Abstract: Management of metal pollution associated with E-waste is widespread across the globe. Currently used techniques for the extraction of metals from E-waste by using either chemical or biological leaching have their own limitations. Chemical leaching is much rapid and efficient but has its own environmental consequences, even the future prospects of associated nanoremediation are also uncertain. Biological leaching on the other hand is comparatively a cost effective technique but at the same moment it is time consuming and the complete recovery of the metal, alone by biological leaching is not possible in most of the cases. The current review addresses the individual issues related to chemical and biological extraction techniques and proposes a hybrid-methodology which incorporates both, along with safer chemicals and compatible microbes for better and efficient extraction of metals from the E-waste.

  4. Biological treatment of waste gas containing volatile hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A biological system to treat volatile hydrocarbon-contaminated gases generated during in situ bioventing and air sparging of subsurfaces contaminated with gasoline was field-tested. The system consisted of an air/water separator, a trickling filter, and a biofilter in series. During the field test, extensive monitoring was carried out to evaluate system performance, including the measurement of physical, chemical, biochemical, and microbiological parameters. Degradation and mineralization of volatile hydrocarbons such as benzene and toluene were demonstrated by gene probing and mineralization assays. Data collected showed an average removal of 90% of the BTX (benzene, toluene, and xylenes) and 72% for total hydrocarbons

  5. Methods for genetic optimization of biocatalysts for biofuel production from dairy waste through synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasotti, Lorenzo; Zucca, Susanna; Casanova, Michela; Politi, Nicolo; Massaiu, Ilaria; Mazzini, Giuliano; Micoli, Giuseppina; Calvio, Cinzia; Cusella De Angelis, Maria Gabriella; Magni, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Whey is an abundant by-product of cheese production process and it is considered a special waste due to its high nutritional load and hypertrophic potential. Technologies for whey valorization are available. They can convert such waste into high-value products, like whey proteins. However, the remaining liquid (called permeate) is still considered as a polluting waste due to its high lactose concentration. The alcoholic fermentation of lactose into ethanol will simultaneously achieve two important goals: safe disposal of a pollutant waste and green energy production. This methodology paper illustrates the workflow carried out to design and realize an optimized microorganism that can efficiently perform the lactose-to-ethanol conversion, engineered via synthetic biology experimental and computational approaches. PMID:26736421

  6. Biodrying for mechanical-biological treatment of wastes: a review of process science and engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velis, C A; Longhurst, P J; Drew, G H; Smith, R; Pollard, S J T

    2009-06-01

    Biodrying is a variation of aerobic decomposition, used within mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants to dry and partially stabilise residual municipal waste. Biodrying MBT plants can produce a high quality solid recovered fuel (SRF), high in biomass content. Here, process objectives, operating principles, reactor designs, parameters for process monitoring and control, and their effect on biodried output quality are critically examined. Within the biodrying reactors, waste is dried by air convection, the necessary heat provided by exothermic decomposition of the readily decomposable waste fraction. Biodrying is distinct from composting in attempting to dry and preserve most of biomass content of the waste matrix, rather than fully stabilise it. Commercial process cycles are completed within 7-15 days, with mostly H(2)O((g)) and CO(2) loses of ca. 25-30% w/w, leading to moisture contents of MBT process operators, regulators and end-users of SRF. PMID:19216072

  7. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for...... recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different...... background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different...

  8. Corrosion at biological waste treatment plants; Korrosion bei biologischen Abfallbehandlungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fricke, Klaus; Thiel, Timo; Bahr, Tobias [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Lehrstuhl Abfall- und Ressourcenwirtschaft; Ketelsen, Ketel [iba GmbH, Hannover (Germany); Wallmann, Rainer [Fachhochschule Goettingen (Germany). Fachgebiet Nachhaltige Energie- und Umwelttechnik; Turk, Thomas [Poeyry Environment GmbH, Witzenhausen (Germany). Abt. IGW

    2009-11-15

    Biological processes are used for the utilisation of bio- and greenwaste as well as for MBT. Solids, gases/vapors both wastewater and process water of aerobic and anaerobic decomposition include substances with corrosive effects. Components and aggregates coming in contact with these media are affected. Especially the different metalic materials tend to corrode. The most damage was observed in closed rotting halls. Regenerative thermic oxidation facilities are also massively concerned. MBT are affected more intensively by corrosions than bio- and greenwaste facilities. The consequence of such corrosion damage is an increased maintenance and rehabilitation expenses, shortened of lifespan as well as affection of the process with the corresponding effects on the overhead and processing capacities. In the article, corrosion processes are described, measures for corrosion protection are diverted and the compelling necessary research and development requirement is formulated. (orig.)

  9. Life Cycle Assessment of mechanical biological pre-treatment of Municipal Solid Waste: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylot, Antoine; Vaxelaire, Stéphane; Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Auvinet, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    The environmental performance of mechanical biological pre-treatment (MBT) of Municipal Solid Waste is quantified using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), considering one of the 57 French plants currently in operation as a case study. The inventory is mostly based on plant-specific data, extrapolated from on-site measurements regarding mechanical and biological operations (including anaerobic digestion and composting of digestate). The combined treatment of 46,929 tonnes of residual Municipal Solid Waste and 12,158 tonnes of source-sorted biowaste (as treated in 2010 at the plant) generates 24,550 tonnes CO2-eq as an impact on climate change, 69,943kg SO2-eq on terrestrial acidification and 19,929kg NMVOC-eq on photochemical oxidant formation, in a life-cycle perspective. On the contrary MBT induces environmental benefits in terms of fossil resource depletion, human toxicity (carcinogenic) and ecotoxicity. The results firstly highlight the relatively large contribution of some pollutants, such as CH4, emitted at the plant and yet sometimes neglected in the LCA of waste MBT. Moreover this study identifies 4 plant-specific operation conditions which drive the environmental impact potentials induced by MBT: the conditions of degradation of the fermentable fraction, the collection of gaseous flows emitted from biological operations, the abatement of collected pollutants and NOx emissions from biogas combustion. Finally the results underline the relatively large influence of the operations downstream the plant (in particular residuals incineration) on the environmental performance of waste MBT. PMID:25708404

  10. Organic fraction of municipal solid waste from mechanical selection: biological stabilization and recovery options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Alessandra; Russo, Lara; Farina, Anna; Belgiorno, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Although current trends address towards prevention strategies, the organic fraction of municipal solid waste is greatly produced, especially in high-income contexts. Its recovery-oriented collection is a common practice, but a relevant portion of the biodegradable waste is not source selected. Mechanical and biological treatments (MBT) are the most common option to sort and stabilize the biodegradable matter ending in residual waste stream. Following the changes of the framework around waste management, this paper aimed at analyzing the quality of the mechanically selected organic waste produced in MBT plants, in order to discuss its recovery options. The material performance was obtained by its composition as well as by its main chemical and physical parameters; biological stability was also assessed by both aerobic and anaerobic methods. On this basis, the effectiveness of an aerobic biostabilization process was assessed at pilot scale. After 21 days of treatment, results proved that the biomass had reached an acceptable biostabilization level, with a potential Dynamic Respirometric Index (DRIP) value lower than the limit required for its use as daily or final landfill cover material. However, the final stabilization level was seen to be influenced by scaling factors and the 21 days of treatment turned to be not so adequate when applied in the existing full-scale facility. PMID:26377969

  11. Mechanical-biological waste conditioning with controlled venting - the Meisenheim mechanical-biological waste conditioning plant; Mechanisch-biologische Restabfallbehandlung nach dem Kaminzugverfahren - MBRA Meisenheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangen, H.O. [Abfallwirtschaftsbetrieb Landkreis Bad Kreuznach, Bad Kreuznach (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The decision of the rural district of Bad Kreuznach to propose creating facilities for mechanical-biological waste conditioning at the new northern Meisenheim landfill was consistent and correct. It will ensure that the material deposited at this new, state-of-the-art landfill is organically `lean` and can be deposited with a high density. Preliminary sifting of the material prior to depositing safeguards that no improper components are inadvertently included. Three years of operation warrant the statement that waste components that cannot be appropriately biologically conditioned should be eliminated prior to rotting. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Entscheidung des Landkreises Bad Kreuznach, der neu eingerichteten Norddeponie Meisenheim eine MBRA vorzuschlaten, war auf jeden Fall konsequent und richtig. Es ist damit sicher gestellt, dass in diesem neuen nach dem Stand der Technik eingerichteten Deponiebereich von Anfang an ein Material eingelagert wird, das `organisch abgemagert` ist und mit hoher Einbaudichte eingebaut werden kann. Die Sichtung des gesamten Deponie-Inputs in der Vorsortierhalle gibt ein Stueck Sicherheit, dass keine nicht zugelassenen Stoffe verdeckt dem Ablagerungsbereich der Deponie zugefuehrt werden. Nach mehr als 3 Jahren Betriebszeit kann festgestellt werden, dass biologisch nicht sinnvoll behandelbare Abfallbestandteile vor dem Rotteprozess abgetrennt werden sollten. (orig.)

  12. Chemical and biological studies on producing high quality biscuits with irradiated tomato wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present investigation has been carried out to produce high quality biscuits for treatment of some special diseases. In this study, the total tomato processing wastes were used as new source of protein in which the most predominate elements were found to be phosphorus, potassium and magnesium. Phenyl alanine was found to be the first limiting amino acid, while lysine was the second limiting amino acid. It was found to contain about 30.66% fiber and 28.1% protein. The total tomato processing wastes remain unutilized and they not only add to the disposal problem, but also aggravate environmental pollution. Tomato wastes were irradiated in two doses (1.5 and 2.5 KGy) for preservation. Biscuits were made with supplementation of 5, 10 and 15% tomato wastes. All samples of biscuits were examined for chemical composition and organoleptic evaluation. Biological assay was carried out on rats fed biscuits containing 15% irradiated and non-irradiated tomato wastes. The weight gain, serum cholesterol and triglycerides were determined. Internal organs were also followed. The results obtained showed that 15% tomato wastes biscuit had the highest content of lysine, isoleucine and fiber (6.36, 2.72 and 24.80, respectively) and also scored a good grade. Weight gain, cholesterol and triglycerides were reduced comparable to control and there was no effect of irradiation on the rats internal organs

  13. Biological and physical oceanographic sensitivity analyses for subseabed disposal of high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents an investigation and sensitivity analysis of two segments of the MARINRAD system model - the physical oceanographic and biological transport of radionuclides. MARINRAD is a systems model developed by The Analytic Sciences Corporation to assess the consequences of releasing radioactive wastes into the ocean. The section on physical oceanography covers release rates, partition coefficients (sorption within the water column), and ocean transport parameters. The biological transport section investigates the relative importance of various pathways, concentration factors, and the contribution to the overall dose from the bioaccumulation of radionuclides in a deep-water aquatic food chain

  14. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and the associated occupational hygiene in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special feature of waste management in Finland has been the emphasis on the source separation of kitchen biowaste (catering waste); more than two-thirds of the Finnish population participates in this separation. Source-separated biowaste is usually treated by composting. The biowaste of about 5% of the population is handled by mechanical-biological treatment. A waste treatment plant at Mustasaari is the only plant in Finland using digestion for kitchen biowaste. For the protection of their employees, the plant owners commissioned a study on environmental factors and occupational hygiene in the plant area. During 1998-2000 the concentrations of dust, microbes and endotoxins and noise levels were investigated to identify possible problems at the plant. Three different work areas were investigated: the pre-processing and crushing hall, the bioreactor hall and the drying hall. Employees were asked about work-related health problems. Some problems with occupational hygiene were identified: concentrations of microbes and endotoxins may increase to levels harmful to health during waste crushing and in the bioreactor hall. Because employees complained of symptoms such as dry cough and rash or itching appearing once or twice a month, it is advisable to use respirator masks (class P3) during dusty working phases. The noise level in the drying hall exceeded the Finnish threshold value of 85 dBA. Qualitatively harmful factors for the health of employees are similar in all closed waste treatment plants in Finland. Quantitatively, however, the situation at the Mustasaari treatment plant is better than at some Finnish dry waste treatment plants. Therefore is reasonable to conclude that mechanical sorting, which produces a dry waste fraction for combustion and a biowaste fraction for anaerobic treatment, is in terms of occupational hygiene better for employees than combined aerobic treatment and dry waste treatment

  15. Gamma irradiation induced disintegration of waste activated sludge for biological hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yanan; Wang, Jianlong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, gamma irradiation was applied for the disintegration and dissolution of waste activated sludge produced during the biological wastewater treatment, and the solubilized sludge was used as substrate for bio-hydrogen production. The experimental results showed that the solubilization of waste activated sludge was 53.7% at 20 kGy and pH=12, and the SCOD, polysaccharides, protein, TN and TP contents in the irradiated sludge solutions was 3789.6 mg/L, 268.3 mg/L, 1881.5 mg/L, 132.3 mg/L and 80.4 mg/L, respectively. The irradiated sludge was used for fermentative hydrogen production, and the hydrogen yield was 10.5±0.7 mL/g SCODconsumed. It can be concluded that the irradiated waste activated sludge could be used as a low-cost substrate for fermentative hydrogen production.

  16. Solid recovered fuel production through the mechanical-biological treatment of wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Velis, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the production of solid recovered fuel (SRF) from municipal solid waste using mechanical biological treatment (MBT) plants. It describes the first in-depth analysis of a UK MBT plant and addresses the fundamental research question: are MBT plants and their unit operations optimised to produce high quality SRF in the UK? A critical review of the process science and engineering of MBT provides timely insights into the quality management and standa...

  17. Degradation of Refractory Organic Compounds in Aqueous Wastes employing a combination of biological and chemical treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Chindris, Anuta

    2011-01-01

    In this study the removal of refractory organic compounds (ROCs) in Aqueous Wastes (AW) employing a combination of biological and chemical treatment were investigated at Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Cagliari, Italy and Department of Engineering, Oxford University, UK. The main objectives were to stimulate and optimise the degradation of ROCs with efficient removal of them in AW. This project is divided in two sections, a theoreti...

  18. Intended process water management concept for the mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste

    OpenAIRE

    D. Weichgrebe; S. Maerker; T. Böning; H. Stegemann

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating operational experience in both aerobic and anaerobic mechanical biological waste treatment (MBT) makes it increasingly obvious that controlled water management would substantially reduce the cost of MBT and also enhance resource recovery of the organic and inorganic fraction. The MBT plant at Gescher, Germany, is used as an example in order to determine the quantity and composition of process water and leachates from intensive and subsequent rotting, pressing water from anaerobic...

  19. Biodrying for mechanical-biological treatment of wastes: A review of process science and engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Velis, C.A.; Longhurst, Philip J.; Drew, Gillian H; Smith, Richard; Pollard, Simon J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Biodrying is a variation of aerobic decomposition, used within mechanical–biological treatment (MBT) plants to dry and partially stabilise residual municipal waste. Biodrying MBT plants can produce a high quality solid recovered fuel (SRF), high in biomass content. Here, process objectives, operating principles, reactor designs, parameters for process monitoring and control, and their effect on biodried output quality are critically examined. Within the biodrying reactors, w...

  20. Removal of dichloromethane from waste gases in a biological trickling filter. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diks, R.M.M.

    1992-04-03

    Biological waste gas purification systems, especially biofilters, are increasingly applied in different branches of industry, not only for the elimination of odorous, easily biodegradable compounds, but also for the removal of toxic xenobiotics from waste gases. Although successful in most cases, a biofilter cannot be applied if large amounts of acidifying or inhibiting compounds accumulate in the filter material during the microbial degradation of the contaminants present in the waste gas. The thesis describes the development of a biological trickling filter, in which the above-mentioned problems can be easily dealt with. In this reactor the waste gas is forced to rise through a bed of inert packing material, on which a suitable microbial flora is immobilized. By the recirculation of a water phase through this system, acids produced are continuously removed from the filter bed and hence microbial activity is maintained. The flowing liquid phase also allows for the continuous neutralization and control of the optimal physiological conditions, i.e. temperature, pH and concentration of inhibiting compounds.

  1. Mechanical-biological treatment: performance and potentials. An LCA of 8 MBT plants including waste characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejo, Cristina; Tonini, Davide; Márquez, María del Carmen; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-10-15

    In the endeavour of avoiding presence of biodegradable waste in landfills and increasing recycling, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants have seen a significant increase in number and capacity in the last two decades. The aim of these plants is separating and stabilizing the quickly biodegradable fraction of the waste as well as recovering recyclables from mixed waste streams. In this study the environmental performance of eight MBT-based waste management scenarios in Spain was assessed by means of life cycle assessment. The focus was on the technical and environmental performance of the MBT plants. These widely differed in type of biological treatment and recovery efficiencies. The results indicated that the performance is strongly connected with energy and materials recovery efficiency. The recommendation for upgrading and/or commissioning of future plants is to optimize materials recovery through increased automation of the selection and to prioritize biogas-electricity production from the organic fraction over direct composting. The optimal strategy for refuse derived fuel (RDF) management depends upon the environmental compartment to be prioritized and the type of marginal electricity source in the system. It was estimated that, overall, up to ca. 180-190 kt CO2-eq. y(-1) may be saved by optimizing the MBT plants under assessment. PMID:23850761

  2. Development of methods for treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive waste in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incineration of biological radioactive waste was performed in a facility manufactured in the Czech Republic for combustion of burnable, radioactive and non-radioactive residues. The equipment has shown an adequate capability for combustion of biological waste. Basic technical parameters of the incinerator SP-603 can guarantee combustion of majority of wastes from different radionuclide users in the country. To ensure proper further handling with the resulting ash, three conditioning options were studied, the bituminization process, incorporation into cement, and embedding of ash into a mixture of bituminous and cementitious materials. Mechanical properties of the conditioned ash were in good compliance with those published elsewhere. Bituminized ash exhibits lowest leachibility, followed by the ash conditioned by means of the mixed process. Potential abnormal operation conditions were evaluated and their consequences assessed. The evaluation encompassed sensitivity analysis of the consequences potentially affecting the operating staff, nearby population and the environment. Cost estimate was carried out using a national approach for the calculation. From the results it can be seen that there are no large differences between the conditioning and disposal of wastes resulting from different conditioning processes. (author). 16 refs, 4 figs, 15 tabs

  3. Investigations on mechanical biological treatment of waste in South America: Towards more sustainable MSW management strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents an analysis on the suitability of mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste in South America, based on two previous experimental investigations carried out in two different countries. The first experiment was performed for determining the mass and volume reduction of MSW in the province of Concepcion (Chile). The implemented bench-scale process consisted of a manual classification and separation stage, followed by an in-vessel biological degradation process. The second experiment consisted of a full-scale experiment performed in the city of Estrela (Brazil), where the existing municipal waste management facility was adapted to enhance the materials sorting and separation. Expressed in wet weight composition, 85.5% of the material input in the first experiment was separated for biological degradation. After 27 days of processing, 60% of the initial mass was reduced through degradation and water evaporation. The final fraction destined for landfilling equals 59% of the total input mass, corresponding to about 50% of the initial volume. In the second experiment, the fraction destined to landfill reaches 46.6% of the total input waste mass, whilst also significantly reducing the total volume to be disposed. These results, and the possible recovery of material streams suitable for recycling or for preparing solid recovered fuels, are the main advantages of the studied process

  4. Behavior of selected organic pollutants in municipal waste during the mechanical-biological progress of composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Municipal waste was investigated during the mechanical-biological process of composting. Waste from Burgenland is treated mechanically and biologically to reduce organic matter in the material and to keep gas building potential low before deposition. Samples were taken and analyzed during a period of 80 days. The parameters: temperature, dry-weight, glow loss, ammonium, nitrate and phenolic substances were measured to follow the composting process. It was found that the process was almost finished after a period of 40 days in which the material was breathed intensively. The content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and polychlorinated phenols decreased slightly. It was not clear whether this was due to microbiological activity or blowing-out effects. Polychlorinated biphenyls were found to be stable during composting. The concentrations were considered as high. Hepta- and octachlorinated dibenzodioxines were formed during the first 10 days. The increase of octachlorinated dibenzodioxin was threefold. Other dioxines and furanes remained unchanged. Finally it was found out that mechanical-biological waste treatment is insufficient in order to reduce organic pollutants effectively. (author)

  5. Biological denitrification of high-nitrates wastes generated in the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological denitrification appears to be one of the most effective methods to remove nitrates from wastewater streams (Christenson and Harremoes, 1975). However, most of the research and development work has been centered on removal of nitrates from sewage or agricultural drainage waters, nitrate nitrogen concentration usually less than 50 g/m3. Work was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 1974 to test the use of biological nitrification in the removal of high concentrations of nitrate (in excess of 1.0 kg NO3-N/m3) from uranium purification waste streams. Since then, a full-scale treatment facility, a stirred reactor, has been installed at the Y-12 plant; and a pilot-plant, using a fluidized bed, has been proposed at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The objective of this manuscript is to present some applied microbiological research relating to possible constraints in biologically denitrifying certain waste streams in the nuclear industry and comparing the effectiveness of denitrification of these waste streams in three bench scale reactors, (1) a continuous flow-stirred reactor, (2) stirred bed rector, and (3) a fluidized bed reactor

  6. In search of a reliable technique for the determination of the biological stability of the organic matter in the mechanical-biological treated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, Raquel; d'Imporzano, Giuliana; Ponsá, Sergio; Gea, Teresa; Artola, Adriana; Vázquez, Felícitas; Sánchez, Antoni; Adani, Fabrizio

    2009-03-15

    The biological stability determines the extent to which readily biodegradable organic matter has decomposed. In this work, a massive estimation of indices suitable for the measurement of biological stability of the organic matter content in solid waste samples has been carried out. Samples from different stages in a mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant treating municipal solid wastes (MSW) were selected as examples of different stages of organic matter stability in waste biological treatment. Aerobic indices based on respiration techniques properly reflected the process of organic matter biodegradation. Static and dynamic respirometry showed similar values in terms of aerobic biological activity (expressed as oxygen uptake rate, OUR), whereas cumulative oxygen consumption was a reliable method to express the biological stability of organic matter in solid samples. Methods based on OUR and cumulative oxygen consumption were positively correlated. Anaerobic methods based on biogas production (BP) tests also reflected well the degree of biological stability, although significant differences were found in solid and liquid BP assays. A significant correlation was found between cumulative oxygen consumption and ultimate biogas production. The results obtained in this study can be a basis for the quantitative measurement of the efficiency in the stabilization of organic matter in waste treatment plants, including MBT plants, anaerobic digestion of MSW and composting plants. PMID:18606494

  7. STUDY ON APPLICATION OF AERATION BIOLOGICAL FLUID TANK TECHNOLGY IN NH4+—N WASTE WATER TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENYi; LUJian-guo

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces an application of "Aeration biological fluid tank"technology (ABFT) for the treatment of waste water containing NH4+-N and high concentrated chemicals.Highlights were focused on the effects of dissolved oxygen,pH,temperature and retention time on waste water bilogical treatment in order to find out a new approach in treatment of waste time on containing high concentrated NH4+-N.

  8. Biological conversion of anglesite (PbSO4) and lead waste from spent car batteries to galena (PbS).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijma, J.; Hoop, de K.; Bosma, W.; Dijkman, H.

    2002-01-01

    Lead paste, a solid mixture containing PbSO4, PbO2, PbO/Pb(OH)2 precipitate, and elemental Pb, is one of the main waste fractions from spent car batteries. Biological sulfidation represents a new process for recovery of lead from this waste. In this process the lead salts in lead paste are converted

  9. Biological re-cultivation of industrial technological waste banks after steel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovska, Maria; Zhiyanski, Miglena; Bech, Jaume

    2010-05-01

    The problem of re-cultivation of disturbed lands, after the creation of waste banks, is very important and of great scientific interest. The studies on the effectiveness of biological re-cultivation are focused mainly on activities and techniques for the acceleration of soil formation processes as. The relationship between substrate and plants is also studied, in order to create modern biotechnologies and contributes to the remediation of the re-cultivated lands within the territorial system. In this work we have studied three parts of an industrial waste bank named "The 7th of September" located in the green system of Sofia - Pernik agglomeration in Bulgaria. It consists of technological wastes produced by the steel industry. Its area of 20 dca is of special local importance. The aim of this study was to propose an appropriate technology for the biological re-cultivation, which could take place after all production activities had ceased. To achieve this aim a detailed study on the characteristics of climatic elements was carried out focusing on precipitation - limiting factor for future afforestation of waste banks. Analyses on hydro-physical and chemical parameters of substrates were undertaken in order to elaborate recommendations for their improvement and utility in biological re-cultivation. Here we present the characteristics of the vegetation which existed before the production activities and the approaches for choice of tree species in afforestation with different schemes and methods applied. On the basis of this study we were able to establish that the hydrological properties of substrates are quite similar to those of natural soils in the region. The variations obtained for some soil substrate layers were not significant. In relation to this we also outlined the quantity of organic matter and nutrient elements in waste banks as determining parameters for further biological re-cultivation. The studied site is located in the lower forest zone of the country

  10. Vermicomposting as an advanced biological treatment for industrial waste from the leather industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Ramom R; Bontempi, Rhaissa M; Mendonça, Giovane; Galetti, Gustavo; Rezende, Maria Olímpia O

    2016-01-01

    The leather industry (tanneries) generates high amounts of toxic wastes, including solid and liquid effluents that are rich in organic matter and mineral content. Vermicomposting was studied as an alternative method of treating the wastes from tanneries. Vermicompost was produced from the following tannery residues: tanned chips of wet-blue leather, sludge from a liquid residue treatment station, and a mixture of both. Five hundred earthworms (Eisenia fetida) were added to each barrel. During the following 135 days the following parameters were evaluated: pH, total organic carbon (TOC), organic matter (OM), cation exchange capacity (CEC), C:N ratio, and chromium content as Cr (III) and Cr (VI). The results for pH, TOC and OM contents showed decreases in their values during the composting process, whereas values for CEC and total nitrogen rose, indicating that the vermicompost reached maturity. For chromium, at 135 days, all values of Cr (VI) were below the detectable level. Therefore, the Cr (VI) content had probably been biologically transformed into Cr (III), confirming the use of this technique as an advanced biological treatment. The study reinforces the idea that vermicomposting could be introduced as an effective technology for the treatment of industrial tannery waste and the production of agricultural inputs. PMID:26828795

  11. Biological Production of Methane from Lunar Mission Solid Waste: An Initial Feasibility Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Richard; Garland, Jay; Janine, Captain

    A preliminary assessment was made of the potential for biological production of methane from solid waste generated during an early planetary base mission to the moon. This analysis includes: 1) estimation of the amount of biodegradable solid waste generated, 2) background on the potential biodegradability of plastics given their significance in solid wastes, and 3) calculation of potential methane production from the estimate of biodegradable waste. The completed analysis will also include the feasibility of biological methane production costs associated with the biological processing of the solid waste. NASA workshops and Advanced Life Support documentation have estimated the projected amount of solid wastes generated for specific space missions. From one workshop, waste estimates were made for a 180 day transit mission to Mars. The amount of plastic packaging material was not specified, but our visual examination of trash returned from stocktickerSTS missions indicated a large percentage would be plastic film. This plastic, which is not biodegradable, would amount to 1.526 kgdw crew-1 d-1 or 6.10 kgdw d-1 for a crew of 4. Over a mission of 10 days this would amount to 61 kgdw of plastics and for an 180 day lunar surface habitation it would be nearly 1100 kgdw . Approx. 24 % of this waste estimate would be biodegradable (human fecal waste, food waste, and paper), but if plastic packaging was replaced with biodegradable plastic, then 91% would be biodegradable. Plastics are man-made long chain polymeric molecules, and can be divided into two main groups; thermoplastics and thermoset plastics. Thermoplastics comprise over 90% of total plastic use in the placecountry-regionUnited States and are derived from polymerization of olefins via breakage of the double bond and subsequent formation of additional carbon to carbon bonds. The resulting sole-carbon chain polymers are highly resistant to biodegradation and hydrolytic cleavage. Common thermoplastics include low

  12. Biochemical identification and biological origin of key odor components in livestock waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, R I; Stroot, P G; Varel, V H

    1998-05-01

    Animal production results in conversion of feeds into valuable products such as meat, milk, eggs, and wool as well as into unavoidable and less desirable waste products. Intensification of animal numbers and increasing urbanization has resulted in considerable attention to odorous gases produced from animal wastes. It is clear that animal manure was, and still is, a valuable resource. However, it may be a major obstacle to future development of the animal industry if its impact on the environment is not properly controlled. Poor odor prevention and control from animal wastes is related to a lack of knowledge of the fundamental nature of odor and its production by farm animals. Odor, like noise, is a nuisance or disturbance and there is no universally accepted definition of an objectionable odor. Thus, regulation and control of odors in the environment is difficult because of the technical difficulties of defining odor limits and their measurement and evaluation. A variety of direct (sensory) and indirect (analytical instruments) methods for measuring odor intensity and determination of individual or key odor components are discussed. The biological origins of the four principal classes of odor compounds, namely branched- and straight-chain VFA, ammonia and volatile amines, indoles and phenols, and the volatile sulfur-containing compounds, are reviewed. Because more than 50% of N from animals is excreted as urea, one strategy to conserve N in waste is to inhibit the urease enzyme that converts urea to ammonia. Laboratory studies to evaluate di- and triamide compounds to control urea hydrolysis in slurries of cattle and swine wastes are presented. Finally, a brief overview of various intervention strategies is provided. Multiple combinations of nutritional management, housing systems, treatment options as well as storage and disposal of animal wastes will be required to reduce environmental pollution and provide for long-term sustainable growth. PMID:9621939

  13. Nutrient release, recovery and removal from waste sludge of a biological nutrient removal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Zheng, Shu-Jian; Pei, Li-Ying; Ke, Li; Peng, Dang-Cong; Xia, Si-Qing

    2014-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of nutrients from waste sludge results in nitrogen and phosphorus overloading in wastewater treatment plants when supernatant is returned to the inlet. A controlled release, recovery and removal of nutrient from the waste sludge of a Biological Nutrient Removal system (BNR) are investigated. Results showed that the supernatant was of high mineral salt, high electrical conductivity and poor biodegradability, in addition to high nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations after the waste sludge was hydrolysed through sodium dodecyl sulphate addition. Subsequently, over 91.8% of phosphorus and 10.5% of nitrogen in the supernatants were extracted by the crystallization method under the conditions of 9.5 pH and 400 rpm. The precipitate was mainly struvite according to X-ray diffraction and morphological examination. A multistage anoxic-oxic Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor (MBBR) was then adopted to remove the residual carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the supernatant. The MBBR exhibited good performance in simultaneously removing carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus under a short aeration time, which accounted for 31.25% of a cycle. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis demonstrated that nitrifiers presented mainly in floc, although higher extracellular polymeric substance content, especially DNA, appeared in the biofilm. Thus, a combination of hydrolysis and precipitation, followed by the MBBR, can complete the nutrient release from the waste sludge of a BNR system, recovers nutrients from the hydrolysed liquor and removes nutrients from leftovers effectively. PMID:25176308

  14. Biological technologies for the removal of sulfur containing compounds from waste streams: bioreactors and microbial characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Jian; Liu, Junxin

    2015-10-01

    Waste gases containing sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, thioethers, and mercaptan, produced and emitted from industrial processes, wastewater treatment, and landfill waste may cause undesirable issues in adjacent areas and contribute to atmospheric pollution. Their control has been an area of concern and research for many years. As alternative to conventional physicochemical air pollution control technologies, biological treatment processes which can transform sulfur compounds to harmless products by microbial activity, have gained in popularity due to their efficiency, cost-effectiveness and environmental acceptability. This paper provides an overview of the current biological techniques used for the treatment of air streams contaminated with sulfur compounds as well as the advances made in the past year. The discussion focuses on bioreactor configuration and design, mechanism of operation, insights into the overall biological treatment process, and the characterization of the microbial species present in bioreactors, their populations and their interactions with the environment. Some bioreactor case studies are also introduced. Finally, the perspectives on future research and development needs in this research area were also highlighted. PMID:26250546

  15. Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, L.S.; Hessler, R.R.; Jackson, D.W.; Marietta, M.G.; Smith, K.L. Jr.; Talbert, D.M.; Yayanos, A.A.

    1980-05-01

    The primary goal of the US Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing possible ecosystem effects of radionuclides as well as possible health effects to man from radionuclides which may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure; benthic community metabolism; the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers; the faunal composition of midwater nekton; rates of microbial processes; and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms which may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore, a multi-compartment foodweb model is being developed which considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact on the ocean environment and on man of potential releases of radionuclides.

  16. Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the US Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing possible ecosystem effects of radionuclides as well as possible health effects to man from radionuclides which may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure; benthic community metabolism; the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers; the faunal composition of midwater nekton; rates of microbial processes; and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms which may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore, a multi-compartment foodweb model is being developed which considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact on the ocean environment and on man of potential releases of radionuclides

  17. Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the U.S. Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear wastes in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing the effects of potential releases of radionuclides on the ecosystem, as well as the possible health effects fo man frin the radionuclides that may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure, benthic community metabolism, the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers, the faunal composition of midwater nekton, rates of microbial processes, and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms that may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore a multicompartment foodweb model is being developed that considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact of potential releases of radionuclides on the ocean environment and on man

  18. Biological ramifications of the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal of the US Subseabed Disposal Program (SDP) is to assess the technical and environmental feasibility of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in deep-sea sediments. The subseabed biology program is charged with assessing possible ecosystem effects of radionuclides as well as possible health effects to man from radionuclides which may be released in the deep sea and transported to the ocean surface. Current biological investigations are attempting to determine benthic community structure; benthic community metabolism; the biology of deep-sea mobile scavengers; the faunal composition of midwater nekton; rates of microbial processes, and the radiation sensitivity of deep-sea organisms. Existing models of the dispersal of radionuclides in the deep sea have not considered many of the possible biological mechanisms which may influence the movement of radionuclides. Therefore, a multi-compartment foodweb model is being developed which considers both biological and physical influences on radionuclide transport. This model will allow parametric studies to be made of the impact on the ocean environment and on man of potential releases of radionuclides

  19. Shear strength characteristics of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT-MSW) from Bangalore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar Babu, G.L., E-mail: gls@civil.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Lakshmikanthan, P., E-mail: lakshmikanthancp@gmail.com [Centre for Sustainable Technologies (CST), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Santhosh, L.G., E-mail: lgsanthu2006@gmail.com [Centre for Sustainable Technologies (CST), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Shear strength properties of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste. • Effect of unit weight and particle size on the shear strength of waste. • Effect of particle size on the strength properties. • Stiffness ratio and the strength ratio of MSW. - Abstract: Strength and stiffness properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) are important in landfill design. This paper presents the results of comprehensive testing of shear strength properties of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT-MSW) in laboratory. Changes in shear strength of MSW as a function of unit weight and particle size were investigated by performing laboratory studies on the MSW collected from Mavallipura landfill site in Bangalore. Direct shear tests, small scale and large scale consolidated undrained and drained triaxial tests were conducted on reconstituted compost reject MSW samples. The triaxial test results showed that the MSW samples exhibited a strain-hardening behaviour and the strength of MSW increased with increase in unit weight. Consolidated drained tests showed that the mobilized shear strength of the MSW increased by 40% for a unit weight increase from 7.3 kN/m{sup 3} to 10.3 kN/m{sup 3} at 20% strain levels. The mobilized cohesion and friction angle ranged from 5 to 9 kPa and 8° to 33° corresponding to a strain level of 20%. The consolidated undrained tests exhibited reduced friction angle values compared to the consolidated drained tests. The friction angle increased with increase in the unit weight from 8° to 55° in the consolidated undrained tests. Minor variations were found in the cohesion values. Relationships for strength and stiffness of MSW in terms of strength and stiffness ratios are developed and discussed. The stiffness ratio and the strength ratio of MSW were found to be 10 and 0.43.

  20. Shear strength characteristics of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT-MSW) from Bangalore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Shear strength properties of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste. • Effect of unit weight and particle size on the shear strength of waste. • Effect of particle size on the strength properties. • Stiffness ratio and the strength ratio of MSW. - Abstract: Strength and stiffness properties of municipal solid waste (MSW) are important in landfill design. This paper presents the results of comprehensive testing of shear strength properties of mechanically biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT-MSW) in laboratory. Changes in shear strength of MSW as a function of unit weight and particle size were investigated by performing laboratory studies on the MSW collected from Mavallipura landfill site in Bangalore. Direct shear tests, small scale and large scale consolidated undrained and drained triaxial tests were conducted on reconstituted compost reject MSW samples. The triaxial test results showed that the MSW samples exhibited a strain-hardening behaviour and the strength of MSW increased with increase in unit weight. Consolidated drained tests showed that the mobilized shear strength of the MSW increased by 40% for a unit weight increase from 7.3 kN/m3 to 10.3 kN/m3 at 20% strain levels. The mobilized cohesion and friction angle ranged from 5 to 9 kPa and 8° to 33° corresponding to a strain level of 20%. The consolidated undrained tests exhibited reduced friction angle values compared to the consolidated drained tests. The friction angle increased with increase in the unit weight from 8° to 55° in the consolidated undrained tests. Minor variations were found in the cohesion values. Relationships for strength and stiffness of MSW in terms of strength and stiffness ratios are developed and discussed. The stiffness ratio and the strength ratio of MSW were found to be 10 and 0.43

  1. Composting of biological waste. Processes and utilisation; Bioabfallkompostierung. Verfahren und Verwertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronauer, A.; Claassen, N.; Ebertseder, T.; Fischer, P.; Gutser, R.; Helm, M.; Popp, L.; Schoen, H.

    1997-12-31

    The project investigated environmentally compatible concepts for procesing and utilisation of biological waste by means of composting and spreading on agricultural and gardening plots. The project comprised three parts: Composting techniques, applications of compost in agriculture and gardening, and applications in landscaping. This volume comprises all three reports. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Die umweltschonende Aufbereitung und Verwertung von Bioabfall durch Kompostierung und Rueckfuehrung auf landwirtschaftliche und gaertnerische Flaechen wurde untersucht. Dieses Projekt war dreigeteilt in die Bereiche der Kompostierung selbst, der Anwendung des Komposts in der Landwirtschaft und seiner Anwendung im Gartenbau sowie im Garten- und Landschaftsbau (GaLa-Bau). Die vorliegende Schrift enthaelt die genannten drei Teilberichte. (orig./SR)

  2. Chemical and biological toxicity assessment of simulated Hanford site low-level waste grouts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defining the potential damage to the biosphere associated with exposure to low-level waste grouting operations at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, is difficult and controversial. Combined chemical and biological assessment of grout toxicity is needed to provide information on the potential risks of animal and plant exposure to the grouts. This paper will identify and predict the chemical components of the grout that will have the greatest potential of causing deleterious effects on fish and wildlife indigenous to the Hanford Site. This paper will also determine whether the current grout technology is adequate in controlling toxicant and pollutant releases for regulatory compliance

  3. Biological intrusion barriers for large-volume waste-disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    intrusion of plants and animals into shallow land burial sites with subsequent mobilization of toxic and radiotoxic materials has occured. Based on recent pathway modeling studies, such intrusions can contribute to the dose received by man. This paper describes past work on developing biological intrusion barrier systems for application to large volume waste site stabilization. State-of-the-art concepts employing rock and chemical barriers are discussed relative to long term serviceability and cost of application. The interaction of bio-intrusion barrier systems with other processes affecting trench cover stability are discussed to ensure that trench cover designs minimize the potential dose to man. 3 figures, 6 tables

  4. Preliminary degradation process study of infectious biological waste in a 5 k W thermal plasma equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is a preliminary study of infectious biological waste degradation process by thermal plasma and was made in Thermal Plasma Applications Laboratory of Environmental Studies Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). Infectious biological waste degradation process is realized by using samples such polyethylene, cotton, glass, etc., but the present study scope is to analyze polyethylene degradation process with mass and energy balances involved. Degradation method is realized as follow: a polyethylene sample is put in an appropriated crucible localized inside a pyrolysis reactor chamber, the plasma jet is projected to the sample, by the pyrolysis phenomena the sample is degraded into its constitutive particles: carbon and hydrogen. Air was utilized as a recombination gas in order to obtain the higher percent of CO2 if amount of O2 is greater in the recombination gas, the CO generation is reduced. The effluent gases of exhaust pyrolysis reactor through are passed through a heat exchanger to get cooled gases, the temperature water used is 15 Centigrade degrees. Finally the gases was tried into absorption tower with water as an absorbent fluid. Thermal plasma degradation process is a very promising technology, but is necessary to develop engineering process area to avail all advantages of thermal plasma. (Author)

  5. Thermochemical Pretreatments of Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste from a Mechanical-Biological Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José Alvarez-Gallego

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW usually contains high lignocellulosic and fatty fractions. These fractions are well-known to be a hard biodegradable substrate for biological treatments and its presence involves limitations on the performance of anaerobic processes. To avoid this, thermochemical pretreatments have been applied on the OFMSW coming from a full-scale mechanical-biological treatment (MBT plant, in order to pre-hydrolyze the waste and improve the organic matter solubilisation. To study the solubilisation yield, the increments of soluble organic matter have been measured in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD, total volatile fatty acids (TVFA and acidogenic substrate as carbon (ASC. The process variables analyzed were temperature, pressure and NaOH dosage. The levels of work for each variable were three: 160–180–200 °C, 3.5–5.0–6.5 bar and 2–3–4 g NaOH/L. In addition, the pretreatment time was also modified among 15 and 120 min. The best conditions for organic matter solubilisation were 160 °C, 3 g NaOH/L, 6.5 bar and 30 min, with yields in terms of DOC, sCOD, TVFA and ASC of 176%, 123%, 119% and 178% respectively. Thus, predictably the application of this pretreatment in these optimum conditions could improve the H2 production during the subsequent Dark Fermentation process.

  6. Thermochemical pretreatments of organic fraction of municipal solid waste from a mechanical-biological treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos José; Fdez-Güelfo, Luis Alberto; de los Ángeles Romero Aguilar, María; Romero García, Luis Isidoro

    2015-01-01

    The organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) usually contains high lignocellulosic and fatty fractions. These fractions are well-known to be a hard biodegradable substrate for biological treatments and its presence involves limitations on the performance of anaerobic processes. To avoid this, thermochemical pretreatments have been applied on the OFMSW coming from a full-scale mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plant, in order to pre-hydrolyze the waste and improve the organic matter solubilisation. To study the solubilisation yield, the increments of soluble organic matter have been measured in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD), total volatile fatty acids (TVFA) and acidogenic substrate as carbon (ASC). The process variables analyzed were temperature, pressure and NaOH dosage. The levels of work for each variable were three: 160-180-200 °C, 3.5-5.0-6.5 bar and 2-3-4 g NaOH/L. In addition, the pretreatment time was also modified among 15 and 120 min. The best conditions for organic matter solubilisation were 160 °C, 3 g NaOH/L, 6.5 bar and 30 min, with yields in terms of DOC, sCOD, TVFA and ASC of 176%, 123%, 119% and 178% respectively. Thus, predictably the application of this pretreatment in these optimum conditions could improve the H2 production during the subsequent Dark Fermentation process. PMID:25671816

  7. Biological monitoring of organic substances in workers of a hazardous waste incinerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agramunt, C.; Domingo, J.L.; Bocio, A.; Nadal, M. [Lab. of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Reus (Spain); Muller, L. [SGS GmbH, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2004-09-15

    In recent years, incineration has been one of the most frequently used technologies for hazardous waste treatment. However, health risks and the potential environmental impact of hazardous waste incinerators (HWI) are still issues of major concern. The reason is the association of stack emissions of semivolatile and volatile compounds from HWI with their potential adverse health effects. Some compounds of special interest are polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs). In relation to this, HWI workers can be potentially exposed to PCDD/Fs, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other pollutants with a well-known toxicity. Since 1999, the only HWI in Spain has been operating in Constanti (Tarragona, Catalonia). It has a burning furnace that operates at a temperature of 1100 C and can burn 30,000 tons of hazardous waste per year. The purpose of the present survey was to determine after four years of regular operations in the facility, the concentrations in blood and urine of the HWI workers of a number of organic substances directly related with HWI and to which workers could be exposed. Human biological monitoring evaluates the degree of internal exposure to a defined environmental or occupational pollutant of individuals or population groups. The results of the current study have been compared with the baseline levels.

  8. Toxicity evaluation of leachate of solid waste after biological and photocatalitical treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Teixeira Pelegrini

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The final disposition of urban solid wastes is a practice that still causes serious environmental impacts generating several pollutant subproducts, such as the landfill leachate. The toxicity tests are used in the pollution control with the scope of finding the permissive concentrations of a chemical agent for the development survival of particular alive organisms. This work aims the toxicity evaluation study in leachate samples of in natura solid wastes, after biological treatment through slow filtration and after heterogeneous photocatalitical treatment using TiO2/UV. The ecotoxicological evaluation was executed through accute and chronical toxicity tests using as test organisms: Daphnias similis e Eruca sativa (arugula. On average, the in natura, filtered and photocatalized leachate dilution that kills or inhibits around 50% (EC50 of the Daphnias similes is 6%, 7% and 6% respectively. On average of non observable effect concentration (NOEC of in natura, filtered and photocatalized leachate for arugula is 2%, 1% and 4% respectively; and on average of observable effect concentration (OEC is 5%, 3% and 6% respectively. The toxicity tests showed a great usage in the monitoring and management of waste leachate so that presenting the high toxicity of this effluent for aquatic environment.

  9. Suppressive composts from organic wastes as agents of biological control of fusariosis in Tatartan Republic (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumerova, Raushaniya; Galitskaya, Polina; Beru, Franchesca; Selivanovskaya, Svetlana

    2015-04-01

    Plant diseases are one of the seriously limiting factors of agriculture efficiency around the world. Diseases caused by fungi are the major threat to plants. Crop protection in modern agriculture heavily depends on chemical fungicides. Disadvantages of chemical pesticides soon became apparent as damage to the environment and a hazard to human health. In this regard use of biopesticides becomes an attractive alternative method of plant protection. For biological control of fungal plant diseases, separate bacterial or fungal strains as well as their communities can be used. Biopreparations must consist of microbes that are typical for local climate and soil conditions and therefore are able to survive in environments for a long time. Another option of plant pests' biological control is implementation of suppressive composts made of agricultural or other organic wastes. These composts can not only prevent the development of plant diseases, but also improve the soil fertility. The objective of this work was estimation of potential of composts and strains isolated from these composts as means for biological control of fusariosis that is one of the most widespread plant soil born disease. The composts were made up of the commonly produced agricultural wastes produced in Tatarstan Republic (Russia). Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici was used as a model phytopathogen. Ten types of organic waste (Goat manure (GM), Chicken dung (CD), Chicken dung with straw addition (CS), Rabbit dung (RD), Cow manure (CM), Rerotting pork manure (RPM), Fresh pork manure (FPM), Pork manure with sawdust and straw (PMS), the remains of plants and leaves (PL), the vegetable waste (VW) were sampled in the big farms situated in Tatarstan Republic which is one of the main agricultural regions of Russia. The initial wastes were composted for 150 days. Further, the following characteristics of the composts were assessed: pH, electro conductivity, TOC, DOC, Ntot. On petri dishes with meat

  10. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimpan, Ciprian, E-mail: cic@kbm.sdu.dk; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste.} • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJ{sub primary}/100 MJ{sub input} {sub waste}, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat

  11. Volume and activity reduction by biological treatment and ultrafiltration of laundry effluent waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan Rosenberger; Bernhard Christ [RWE NUKEM GmbH (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    An innovative patented treatment process (BIBRA) combining biological treatment and a separator centrifuge was developed in the Gundremmingen NPP starting in 1995. To date this process has been successfully implemented in the German NPP of Gundremmingen, Kahl, Brunsbuettel, Stade, Isar 1 and Neckarwestheim. This new process has not only significantly reduced the TOC content in the effluent and waste volumes (6,600 m{sup 3} result in only 160 kg final waste) of BWR and PWR but at the same time has increased the decontamination factor to 20 and more. The cost savings experienced within the plant are more than 125000 euros/a. These savings do not account the additional substantial savings on handling, disposal containers, transportation, interim storage and final disposal. In order to advance the biological treatment of radioactive wastes it is therefore required to find an alternative separation mechanism without loosing the advantages of discharging the inactive salts. An engineering review of possible separation processes that could help to remove these residual activity was conducted. It determined that crossflow filtration and in particular micro-filtration or ultrafiltration were the most promising technologies to further improve the separation efficiency. Ultrafiltration is able to remove bacteria, proteins and similar while allowing dissolved materials such ad salts to pass. Drawback for crossflow filtration systems is that they can experience significant problems with fouling (blocking) of the membranes from suspended solids (TSS) which typically requires the introduction of aggressive chemicals and that all these systems generate an effluent concentrate of typically 2% to 10 % of their throughput. In case of e.g. 6600 m{sup 3}/a waste generation a volume between 120 and 600 m{sup 3}/a concentrate would require additional treatment and conditioning. Almost at the same time as the biological treatment process was developed in Germany, RWE NUKEM matured

  12. Treatment of waste metalworking fluid by a hybrid ozone-biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadevan, Sheeja; Graham, Nigel J; Thompson, Ian P

    2013-01-15

    In metal machining processes, the regulation of heat generation and lubrication at the contact point are achieved by application of a fluid referred to as metalworking fluid (MWF). MWFs inevitably become operationally exhausted with age and intensive use, which leads to compromised properties, thereby necessitating their safe disposal. Disposal of this waste through a biological route is an increasingly attractive option, since it is effective with relatively low energy demands. However, successful biological treatment is challenging since MWFs are chemically complex, and include biocides specifically to retard microbial deterioration whilst the fluids are operational. In this study remediation of the recalcitrant component of a semi-synthetic MWF by a novel hybrid ozone-bacteriological treatment, was investigated. The hybrid treatment proved to be effective and reduced the chemical oxygen demand by 72% (26.9% and 44.9% reduction after ozonation and biological oxidation respectively). Furthermore, a near-complete degradation of three non-biodegradable compounds (viz. benzotriazole, monoethanolamine, triethanolamine), commonly added as biocides and corrosion inhibitors in MWF formulations, under ozonation was observed. PMID:23274939

  13. Production and quality assurance of solid recovered fuels using Mechanical- Biological Treatment (MBT) of waste: a comprehensive assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Velis, C.A.; Longhurst, Philip J.; Drew, Gillian H; Smith, Richard; Pollard, Simon J. T.

    2010-01-01

    The move from disposal-led waste management to resource management demands an ability to map flows of the properties of waste. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of how mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants, and the unit processes that comprise them, perform in relation to management of material flows, while transforming inputs into output fractions. Focus is placed on the properties relating to the quality of MBT-derived fuels. Quality management initiatives for...

  14. Intended process water management concept for the mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Weichgrebe; S. Maerker; T. Boning; H. Stegemann

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating operational experience in both aerobic and anaerobic mechanical biological waste treatment (MBT) makes it increasingly obvious that controlled water management would substantially reduce the cost of MBT and also enhance resource recovery of the organic and inorganic fraction. The MBT plant at Gescher, Germany, is used as an example in order to determine the quantity and composition of process water and leachates from intensive and subsequent rotting, pressing water from anaerobic digestion and scrubber water from acid exhaust air treatment, and hence prepare an MBT water balance. The potential of, requirements for and limits to internal process water reuse as well as the possibilities of resource recovery from scrubber water are also examined. Finally, an assimilated process water management concept with the purpose of an extensive reduction of wastewater quantity and freshwater demand is presented.

  15. Intended process water management concept for the mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Weichgrebe

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating operational experience in both aerobic and anaerobic mechanical biological waste treatment (MBT makes it increasingly obvious that controlled water management would substantially reduce the cost of MBT and also enhance resource recovery of the organic and inorganic fraction. The MBT plant at Gescher, Germany, is used as an example in order to determine the quantity and composition of process water and leachates from intensive and subsequent rotting, pressing water from anaerobic digestion and scrubber water from acid exhaust air treatment, and hence prepare an MBT water balance. The potential of, requirements for and limits to internal process water reuse as well as the possibilities of resource recovery from scrubber water are also examined. Finally, an assimilated process water management concept with the purpose of an extensive reduction of wastewater quantity and freshwater demand is presented.

  16. Composting of biological waste. Processes and utilisation. Summary report; Bioabfallkompostierung. Verfahren und Verwertung. Kurzfassung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronauer, A.; Claassen, N.; Ebertseder, T.; Fischer, P.; Gutser, R.; Helm, M.; Popp, L.; Schoen, H.

    1997-12-31

    The project investigated environmentally compatible concepts for processing and utilisation of biological waste by means of composting and spreading on agriculataural and gardening plots. The project comprised three parts: Composting techniques, applications of compost in agriculture and gardening, and applications in landscaping. This volume comprises the summaries of the three part-projects. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Die umweltschonende Aufbereitung und Verwertung von Bioabfall durch Kompostierung und Rueckfuehrung auf landwirtschaftliche und gaertnerische Flaechen wurde untersucht. Dieses Projekt war dreigeteilt in die Bereiche der Kompostierung selbst, der Anwendung des Komposts in der Landwirtschaft und seiner Anwendung im Gartenbau sowie im Garten- und Landschaftsbau (GaLa-Bau). Die vorliegende Schrift enthaelt die Zusammenfassung der genannten drei Teilberichte. (orig./SR)

  17. Geochemical and biological research at the NEA dumpsite for low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geochemical and biological study of the sea floor at the NEA dumpsite for low-level radioactive waste is reported. The sea bottom has rather steep hillsides. Slumps are usual phenomena and could be triggered by the dumping operations. The sediment is described in terms of its mineralogical and elemental composition. The variation in CaCO3 content accounts for most of the variation in the elemental composition and cation exchange capacity. The present depth of the lysocline is shown to be about 4700 m. A description is given of the early diagenetic processes: (1) Mineralization of organic material, (2) Cation exchange, (3) Change in redox conditions and (4) Carbonate dissolution and recrystallization; and discussed in terms of their effects on the redistribution and transport of trace elements and radionuclides within the sediment and between sediment and overlying water. (orig.)

  18. Water regime of mechanical-biological pretreated waste materials under fast-growing trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüth, Björn; Lennartz, Bernd; Kahle, Petra

    2007-10-01

    In this study mechanical-biological pre-treated waste material (MBP) was tested for suitability to serve as an alternative surface layer in combination with fast-growing and water-consumptive trees for final covers at landfill sites. The aim was to quantify evapotranspiration and seepage losses by numerical model simulations for two sites in Germany. In addition, the leaf area index (LAI) of six tree species over the growing season as the driving parameter for transpiration calculations was determined experimentally. The maximum LAI varied between 3.8 and 6.1 m2 m(-2) for poplar and willow clones, respectively. The evapotranspiration calculations revealed that the use of MBP waste material for re-cultivation enhanced evapotranspiration by 40 mm year(-1) (10%) over an 11 year calculation period compared to a standard mineral soil. Between 82% (for LAI(max) = 3.8) and 87% (for LAI(max) = 6.1) of the average annual precipitation (506 mm) could be retained from the surface layer assuming eastern German climate conditions, compared with a retention efficiency between 79 and 82% for a mineral soil. Although a MBP layer in conjunction with water-consumptive trees can reduce vertical water losses as compared to mineral substrates, the effect is not sufficient to meet legal regulations. PMID:17985666

  19. Modelling of biogas extraction at an Italian landfill accepting mechanically and biologically treated municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, Paolo S; Orsi, Sirio; Gentili, Emiliano; Carlo, Meoni

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents the results of the modelling of the biogas extraction in a full-scale Italian landfill by the USEPA LandGEM model and the Andreottola-Cossu approach. The landfill chosen for this research ('Il Fossetto' plant, Monsummano Terme, Italy) had accepted mixed municipal raw waste for about 15 years. In the year 2003 a mechanical biological treatment (MBT) was implemented and starting from the end of the year 2006, the recirculation in the landfill of the concentrated leachate coming from the internal membrane leachate treatment plant was put into practice. The USEPA LandGEM model and the Andreottola-Cossu approach were chosen since they require only input data routinely acquired during landfill management (waste amount and composition) and allow a simplified calibration, therefore they are potentially useful for practical purposes such as landfill gas management. The results given by the models are compared with measured data and analysed in order to verify the impact of MBT on biogas production; moreover, the possible effects of the recirculation of the concentrated leachate are discussed. The results clearly show how both models can adequately fit measured data even after MBT implementation. Model performance was significantly reduced for the period after the beginning of recirculation of concentrated leachate when the probable inhibition of methane production, due to the competition between methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria, significantly influenced the biogas production and composition. PMID:21930528

  20. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical–biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Compared systems achieve primary energy savings between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinputwaste. • Savings magnitude is foremost determined by chosen primary energy and materials production. • Energy consumption and process losses can be upset by increased technology efficiency. • Material recovery accounts for significant shares of primary energy savings. • Direct waste-to-energy is highly efficient if cogeneration (CHP) is possible. - Abstract: Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical–biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinputwaste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3–9.5%, 1–18% and 1–8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system

  1. Energy implications of mechanical and mechanical-biological treatment compared to direct waste-to-energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik

    2013-07-01

    Primary energy savings potential is used to compare five residual municipal solid waste treatment systems, including configurations with mechanical (MT) and mechanical-biological (MBT) pre-treatment, which produce waste-derived fuels (RDF and SRF), biogas and/or recover additional materials for recycling, alongside a system based on conventional mass burn waste-to-energy and ash treatment. To examine the magnitude of potential savings we consider two energy efficiency levels (state-of-the-art and best available technology), the inclusion/exclusion of heat recovery (CHP vs. PP) and three different background end-use energy production systems (coal condensing electricity and natural gas heat, Nordic electricity mix and natural gas heat, and coal CHP energy quality allocation). The systems achieved net primary energy savings in a range between 34 and 140 MJprimary/100 MJinput waste, in the different scenario settings. The energy footprint of transportation needs, pre-treatment and reprocessing of recyclable materials was 3-9.5%, 1-18% and 1-8% respectively, relative to total energy savings. Mass combustion WtE achieved the highest savings in scenarios with CHP production, nonetheless, MBT-based systems had similarly high performance if SRF streams were co-combusted with coal. When RDF and SRF was only used in dedicated WtE plants, MBT-based systems totalled lower savings due to inherent system losses and additional energy costs. In scenarios without heat recovery, the biodrying MBS-based system achieved the highest savings, on the condition of SRF co-combustion. As a sensitivity scenario, alternative utilisation of SRF in cement kilns was modelled. It supported similar or higher net savings for all pre-treatment systems compared to mass combustion WtE, except when WtE CHP was possible in the first two background energy scenarios. Recovery of plastics for recycling before energy recovery increased net energy savings in most scenario variations, over those of full

  2. Mechanical-biological waste treatment and anaerobic processes. 59. information meeting, Neuwied, October 1999; Mechanisch-biologische Restabfallbehandlung und Anaerobverfahren. 59. Informationsgespraech in Neuwied im Oktober 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hangen, H.O.; Euler, H.; Leonhardt, H.W. [comps.

    1999-10-01

    This proceedings volume discusses the specifications for and cost of mechanical-biological waste treatment, the optimisation of economic efficiency and pollutant emissons, the combination of mechanical-biological and thermal waste treatment processes, the value of mechanical-biological waste treatment, waste management concepts, process engineering and practical experience, and the eco-balance of the process. [German] Themen dieses Proceedingsbandes sind: Anforderungen und Kosten der mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlung; Optimierung der Wirtschaftlichkeit und Emissionssituation; Kombination von mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Muellbehandlung; Bewertung der mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlung, Abfallwirtschaftskonzepte, Verfahrenstechnik und Betriebserfahrungen; Oekobilanz. (SR)

  3. Rotating biological contractor treatment of 2-nitrophenol and 2-chlorophenol containing hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotating Biological Contactors (RBCs) have a number of advantages over other biological treatment systems. For example, they can provide high treatment efficiencies of activated sludge systems with much lower energy inputs. Organic shock loads are handled well because large biomass is present. No bulking, foaming, or floating of sludge occurs and sludge has good settleability and dewaterability. Another advantage of RBC systems is the minimal labor requirement for operation and maintenance. Even though RBC systems have these advantages, their acceptance was slow mainly due to operational problems with the earlier units (such as shaft failures) and the lack of considerable design and operation data. A review of literature shows that there is only limited information available on the wastewater treatment with RBCs. Recently, there has been considerable contributions to the knowledge on RBC technology. However, information on the treatment of organic hazardous wastes using RBCs is still very limited. This paper reports that a considerable number of studies on the biological treatment of organic hazardous compounds was sponsored by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). For example, an EPA sponsored study examined the effect of such compounds on the performance of activated sludge process. Bench-scale continuous-flow and batch units were used. Influent was settled municipal wastewater to which toxic compounds were added. In batch operations, 2-chlorophenol and pentachlorophenol caused an increase in the effluent Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) at an influent concentration of 5 mg/L. No adverse effect of 2-nitrophenol on the batch system was reports. 2-Chlorophenol was one of the compounds that upset the performance of continuous-flow activated sludge units, yielding higher than normal levels of effluent suspended solids

  4. Biological short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production from waste-activated sludge affected by surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Su; Chen, Yinguang; Zhou, Qi; Gu, Guowei

    2007-07-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), the preferred carbon sources for biological nutrient removal, are the important intermediate products in sludge anaerobic fermentation. Sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) is a widespread used surfactant, which can be easily found in waste-activated sludge (WAS). In this investigation, the effect of SDBS on SCFAs production from WAS was investigated, and the potential of using fermentative SCFAs to promote enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) was tested. Results showed that the total SCFAs production increased significantly in the presence of SDBS at room temperature. At fermentation time of 6 days, the maximum SCFAs was 2599.1mg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/L in the presence of SDBS 0.02g/g, whereas it was only 339.1mg (COD)/L in the absence of SDBS. The SCFAs produced in the case of SDBS 0.02g/g and fermentation time 6 days consisted of acetic acid (27.1%), propionic acid (22.8%), iso-valeric acid (20.1%), iso-butyric acid (11.9%), n-butyric acid (10.4%) and n-valeric acid (7.7%). It was found that during sludge anaerobic fermentation, the solubilization of sludge particulate organic-carbon and hydrolysis of solubilized substrate as well as acidification of hydrolyzed products were all increased in the presence of SDBS, while the methane formation was decreased, the SCFAs production was therefore remarkably improved. Further investigation showed that the production of SCFAs enhanced by SDBS was caused mainly by biological effects, rather than by chemical effects and SDBS decomposition. With the fermentative SCFAs as the main carbon source, the EBPR maintained high phosphorus removal efficiency ( approximately 97%). PMID:17499838

  5. Application of various statistical methods to evaluate thermo-analytical data of mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resource recovery and stabilization of waste organic matter before landfilling are crucial issues in waste management. These requirements are closely related to efficient separation of recyclables and well operated biological processes. Adequate analytical methods are a prerequisite to verify the realization of these purposes. A large data pool of mechanically-biologically treated (MBT) municipal solid waste originating from different Austrian treatment plants was investigated using simultaneous thermal analysis that comprises thermogravimetry/mass spectrometry (TG/MS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Biodegradation of MBT-waste is paralleled by decreasing enthalpies. Referring to organic matter enthalpy increases with progressing stabilization. Evaluation of thermal data was supported by multivariate data analysis. The efficiency of the biological pretreatment of municipal solid waste (MSW) compared to untreated MSW in landfills was verified by principal component analysis (PCA) of heat flow (DSC) profiles. Divergent input materials were identified by means of heat flow profiles and discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Prediction models for the calorific value and the TOC (total organic carbon) based on DSC-profiles and partial least squares regression (PLS-R) resulted in a good correlation (R2 = 0.94 in both cases). The root mean square errors of crossvalidation were 413 J g-1 and 1.5% referring to dry matter, respectively. Respiration activity (RA4) was reflected by thermal analyses. The correlation was based on mass spectra of volatile combustion products and DSC-profiles. The correlation resulted in a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.87 and 0.82 respectively. Thermal analysis in association with multivariate statistical methods has proven to be a reliable method to verify efficient separation of the plastic fraction, stabilization by biological treatment and waste material composition.

  6. Biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the cluster investigators is to develop a dynamic model for the evaluation of the biological fate, transport, and ecotoxicity from multiple chemical contamination of the Mississippi River Basin. To develop this environmental model, FY 93-94 most of cluster investigators focused on Devil's Swamp Site (DSS), a cypress swamp which lies just Northwest of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, adjacent to the Mississippi River. The DSS which includes a man-made lake has contaminated sediment, water and biota. The DSS receives flood water from the Mississippi River during high flow periods and the Baton Rouge Bayou drains through the DSS. The DSS receives toxic substances and hazardous waste from a wide variety of surrounding industrial operations including an abandoned hazardous waste disposal facility. In addition, some investigators studied Bayou Trepangnier. This research cluster will continue studying Devil Swamp. The large number of investigators in this cluster resulted from incorporating related research proposals based on reviewer recommendations. The specific aims of the cluster for the first year were to conduct a physical, chemical, ecological survey and baseline toxicological characterization of the DSS from existing databases maintained by State and federal agencies, field studies (assessment) of sediment, air, water and biota, and laboratory screening studios. This assessment will provide critical information and focus for the next two years in-depth studies of critical transport and fate processes, ecotoxicity, biomarkers of effect, and uptake, metabolism and distribution of toxicants. The primary significant outcome of the cluster researchers will be the development of an ecological risk assessment model combining biotic and physical/chemical variables for DSS with a projection of model reliability and accuracy for use at other typical Mississippi River Basin sites

  7. Assessment of the effectiveness of an industrial unit of mechanical-biological treatment of municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayard, R., E-mail: remy.bayard@insa-lyon.fr [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d' Ingenierie Environnementale LGCIE, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France); Araujo Morais, J. de; Ducom, G.; Achour, F.; Rouez, M.; Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d' Ingenierie Environnementale LGCIE, 20 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-03-15

    An assessment of the French municipal solid waste (MSW) mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) unit of Mende was performed in terms of mass reduction, biogas emissions reduction and biostability of the biologically treated waste. The MBT unit consists of mechanical sorting operations, an aerobic rotating bioreactor, forced-aeration process in open-air tunnels (stabilization), ripening platforms and a sanitary landfill site for waste disposal in separated cells. On the overall plant, results showed a dry matter reduction of 18.9% and an oxidative organic matter reduction of 39.0%. A 46.2% biogas production decrease could also be observed. Concerning the biotreatment steps, high reductions were observed: 88.1% decrease of biogas potential and 57.7% decrease of oxidative organic matter content. Nevertheless, the usually considered stabilization indices (biogas potential, respirometric index) remained higher than recommended by the German or Austrian regulation for landfilling. Mass balance performed on each step of the treatment line showed that several stages needed improvement (especially mechanical sorting operations) as several waste fractions containing potentially biodegradable matter were landfilled with very few or no biological treatment.

  8. Assessment of the effectiveness of an industrial unit of mechanical-biological treatment of municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the French municipal solid waste (MSW) mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) unit of Mende was performed in terms of mass reduction, biogas emissions reduction and biostability of the biologically treated waste. The MBT unit consists of mechanical sorting operations, an aerobic rotating bioreactor, forced-aeration process in open-air tunnels (stabilization), ripening platforms and a sanitary landfill site for waste disposal in separated cells. On the overall plant, results showed a dry matter reduction of 18.9% and an oxidative organic matter reduction of 39.0%. A 46.2% biogas production decrease could also be observed. Concerning the biotreatment steps, high reductions were observed: 88.1% decrease of biogas potential and 57.7% decrease of oxidative organic matter content. Nevertheless, the usually considered stabilization indices (biogas potential, respirometric index) remained higher than recommended by the German or Austrian regulation for landfilling. Mass balance performed on each step of the treatment line showed that several stages needed improvement (especially mechanical sorting operations) as several waste fractions containing potentially biodegradable matter were landfilled with very few or no biological treatment.

  9. Stabilization of organic matter and nitrogen immobilization during mechanical-biological treatment and landfilling of residual municipal solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthesis of humic substances and nitrogen immobilization during mechanical-biological treatment of waste and the behavior of biologically stabilized waste under anaerobic landfill conditions were investigated. Samples were taken from a large-scale treatment plant. Anaerobic conditions were simulated in lab scale test cells. Humic substances were analyzed photometrically and gravimetrically. The nitrogen immobilization was investigated by sequential leaching tests and by analyzing the non acid hydrolyzable nitrogen. Humic acids were mainly synthesized during the beginning of the intensive rotting phase. Later on in the process no significant changes occurred. The humic acid content rose up to 6,8 % DS org. It correlated well with the stability parameters respiration activity and accumulated gas production. In the coarse of the treatment the nitrogen load emitted during the consecutive leaching tests dropped from 50 % down to less than 20 % total nitrogen. The non acid hydrolyzable nitrogen rose from 17 up to 42 % Kjeldahl nitrogen content. Nevertheless the mechanical-biological treatment is not significantly shortening the aftercare period of a landfill concerning liquid nitrogen emissions. The reduced nitrogen emission potential is released more slowly. When reactive waste material was exposed to anaerobic conditions, humic and fulvic acids were synthesized up to the point when intensive gas production started and then were remineralized. Stabilized waste materials after treatment of various intensity behaved differently under anaerobic conditions. Steady and decreasing humic acid contents were observed. (author)

  10. Assessment of the effectiveness of an industrial unit of mechanical-biological treatment of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, R; Morais, J de Araújo; Ducom, G; Achour, F; Rouez, M; Gourdon, R

    2010-03-15

    An assessment of the French municipal solid waste (MSW) mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) unit of Mende was performed in terms of mass reduction, biogas emissions reduction and biostability of the biologically treated waste. The MBT unit consists of mechanical sorting operations, an aerobic rotating bioreactor, forced-aeration process in open-air tunnels (stabilization), ripening platforms and a sanitary landfill site for waste disposal in separated cells. On the overall plant, results showed a dry matter reduction of 18.9% and an oxidative organic matter reduction of 39.0%. A 46.2% biogas production decrease could also be observed. Concerning the biotreatment steps, high reductions were observed: 88.1% decrease of biogas potential and 57.7% decrease of oxidative organic matter content. Nevertheless, the usually considered stabilization indices (biogas potential, respirometric index) remained higher than recommended by the German or Austrian regulation for landfilling. Mass balance performed on each step of the treatment line showed that several stages needed improvement (especially mechanical sorting operations) as several waste fractions containing potentially biodegradable matter were landfilled with very few or no biological treatment. PMID:19913357

  11. Integrative Approach for Producing Hydrogen and Polyhydroxyalkanoate from Mixed Wastes of Biological Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kalia, Vipin C

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an integrative approach to produce biohydrogen (H2) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) from the wastes of biological origin was investigated. A defined set of mixed cultures was used for hydrolysis and the hydrolysates were used to produce H2. The effluent from H2 production stage was used for PHA production. Under batch culture, a maximum of 62 l H2/kg of pure potato peels (Total solid, TS 2 %, w/v) and 54 l H2/kg of mixed biowastes (MBW1) was recorded. Using effluent from the H2 production stage of biowaste mixture (MBW1), Bacillus cereus EGU43 could produce 195 mg PHA/l and 15.6 % (w/w). Further, supplementation of GM-2 medium (0.1×) and glucose (0.5 %) in H2 production stage effluents, resulted in significant improvements of up to 11 and 41.7 % of PHA contents, respectively. An improvement of 3.9- and 17-fold in PHA yields as compared to with and without integrative H2 production from the MBW1 has been recorded. This integrative approach seems to be a suitable process to improve the yields of H2 and PHA by mixing biowastes. PMID:27407293

  12. Microwave-assisted chemical oxidation of biological waste sludge: simultaneous micropollutant degradation and sludge solubilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin Oncu, Nalan; Akmehmet Balcioglu, Isil

    2013-10-01

    Microwave-assisted hydrogen peroxide (MW/H2O2) treatment and microwave-assisted persulfate (MW/S2O8(2-)) treatment of biological waste sludge were compared in terms of simultaneous antibiotic degradation and sludge solubilization. A 2(3) full factorial design was utilized to evaluate the influences of temperature, oxidant dose, and holding time on the efficiency of these processes. Although both MW/H2O2 and MW/S2O8(2-) yielded ≥97% antibiotic degradation with 1.2g H2O2 and 0.87 g S2O8(2-) per gram total solids, respectively, at 160 °C in 15 min, MW/S2O8(2-) was found to be more promising for efficient sludge treatment at a lower temperature and a lower oxidant dosage, as it allows more effective activation of persulfate to produce the SO4(-) radical. Relative to MW/H2O2, MW/S2O8(2-) gives 48% more overall metal solubilization, twofold higher improvement in dewaterability, and the oxidation of solubilized ammonia to nitrate in a shorter treatment period. PMID:23928124

  13. Report of biological investigations at the Los Medanos Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area of New Mexico during FY 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, T.L.; Neuhauser, S. (eds.)

    1980-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is considering the construction of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, NM. This location is approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, NM. Biological studies during FY 1978 were concentrated within a 5-mi radius of drill hole ERDA 9. Additional study areas have been established at other sites in the vicinity, e.g., the Gnome site, the salt lakes and several stations along the Pecos River southward from Carlsbad, NM, to the dam at Red Bluff Reservoir in Texas. The precise locations of all study areas are presented and their biology discussed.

  14. Report of biological investigations at the Los Medanos Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) area of New Mexico during FY 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is considering the construction of a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Eddy County, NM. This location is approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, NM. Biological studies during FY 1978 were concentrated within a 5-mi radius of drill hole ERDA 9. Additional study areas have been established at other sites in the vicinity, e.g., the Gnome site, the salt lakes and several stations along the Pecos River southward from Carlsbad, NM, to the dam at Red Bluff Reservoir in Texas. The precise locations of all study areas are presented and their biology discussed

  15. Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation

  16. A novel approach for phosphorus recovery and no wasted sludge in enhanced biological phosphorus removal process with external COD addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Cheng-Wang; Ma, Yun-Jie; Zhang, Fang; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J

    2014-01-01

    In enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, phosphorus (P) in wastewater is removed via wasted sludge without actual recovery. A novel approach to realize phosphorus recovery with special external chemical oxygen demand (COD) addition in EBPR process was proposed. During the new operating approach period, it was found that (1) no phosphorus was detected in the effluent; (2) with an external addition of 10 % of influent COD amount, 79 % phosphorus in the wastewater influent was recovered; (3) without wasted sludge, the MLVSS concentration in the system increased from 2,010 to 3,400 mg/L and kept stable after day 11 during 24-day operating period. This demonstrates that the novel approach is feasible to realize phosphorus recovery with no wasted sludge discharge in EBPR process. Furthermore, this approach decouples P removal and sludge age, which may enhance the application of membrane bioreactor for P removal. PMID:24122666

  17. Intensification of ammonia removal from waste water in biologically active zeolitic ion exchange columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Azel; Weatherley, Laurence R

    2015-09-01

    The use of nitrification filters for the removal of ammonium ion from waste-water is an established technology deployed extensively in municipal water treatment, in industrial water treatment and in applications such as fish farming. The process involves the development of immobilized bacterial films on a solid packing support, which is designed to provide a suitable host for the film, and allow supply of oxygen to promote aerobic action. Removal of ammonia and nitrite is increasingly necessary to meet drinking water and discharge standards being applied in the US, Europe and other places. Ion-exchange techniques are also effective for removal of ammonia (as the ammonium ion) from waste water and have the advantage of fast start-up times compared to biological filtration which in some cases may take several weeks to be fully operational. Here we explore the performance of ion exchange columns in which nitrifying bacteria are cultivated, with the goal of a "combined" process involving simultaneous ion-exchange and nitrification, intensified by in-situ aeration with a novel membrane module. There were three experimental goals. Firstly, ion exchange zeolites were characterized and prepared for comparative column breakthrough studies for ammonia removal. Secondly effective in-situ aeration for promotion of nitrifying bacterial growth was studied using a number of different membranes including polyethersulfone (PES), polypropylene (PP), nylon, and polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE). Thirdly the breakthrough performance of ion exchange columns filled with zeolite in the presence of aeration and in the presence of nitrifying bacteria was determined to establish the influence of biomass, and aeration upon breakthrough during ammonium ion uptake. The methodology adopted included screening of two types of the naturally occuring zeolite clinoptilolite for effective ammonia removal in continuous ion-exchange columns. Next, the performance of fixed beds of clinoptilolite in the

  18. EVALUATING THE ECOLOGICAL RESILIENT DRIVEN PERFORMANCE OF A TROPICAL WASTE STABILIZATION POND SYSTEM USING ECOLOGICAL SIGNATURE OF BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    OpenAIRE

    Susmita Lahiri Ganguly; Dipanwita Sarkar Paria; B. B. Jana

    2015-01-01

    Using ecological signature of biological integrity as a measure of performance, the reclamation efficiency of waste stabilization ponds was evaluated over a period of four years in a tropical sewage treatment plant – cum fish culture consisting of two anaerobic, two facultative and four maturation ponds located serially across the sewage effluent gradient. The four maturation ponds were used for batch culture of fish. Samples of surface and bottom water as well as surface sediment were collec...

  19. Methane oxidation in a boreal climate in an experimental landfill cover composed from mechanically-biologically treated waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einola, J-K M; Sormunen, K M; Rintala, J A

    2008-12-15

    The present study evaluated microbial methane (CH4) oxidation in a boreally located outdoor landfill lysimeter (volume 112 m3, height 3.9 m) filled with mechanically-biologically treated waste (MBT residual) and containing a cover layer made from the same MBT residual. The calculations based on gas emission and pore gas measurements showed that, between April and October 2005, a significant proportion (> 96%) of the methane produced (landfill covers in field conditions in a boreal climate. PMID:18823644

  20. Modelling of the kinetics of municipal solid waste composting in full-scale mechanical-biological treatment plants

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, Marco Henrique de Carvalho

    2009-01-01

    This work focused on the study of the kinetics of municipal solid waste composting in four full-scale mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) plants. We investigated how well the existent plants in Portugal were being operated, and estimated their performance at optimum operation. To achieve this, volatile solids (VS) content and several environmental conditions, namely temperature (T), moisture content (MC), oxygen concentration ([O2]), and free air space (FAS), were monitored throughout th...

  1. Thermochemical pre- and biological co-treatments to improve hydrolysis and methane production from poultry wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, J.C.; Barbosa, S. G.; Alves, M. M.; Sousa, D.Z.

    2011-01-01

    Poultry industry wastes, namely feathers and poultry litter, are an interesting source of substrate for biogas production. The aim of this work was to assess the biomethane potential of raw poultry wastes, as well as the possibility of enhancing this potential by favouring the hydrolysis of cellulolytic and proteinaceous material in the wastes by using bioaugmentation and thermochemical pre-treatments. Biomethane production from poultry litter and chicken feathers was assessed in batch ass...

  2. Influence of mechanical-biological waste pre-treatment methods on the gas formation in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to minimise emissions and environmental impacts, only pre-treated waste should be disposed of. For the last six years, a series of continuous experiments has been conducted at the Institute WAR, TU Darmstadt, in order to determine the emissions from pre-treated waste. Different kinds of pre-treated waste were incubated in several reactors and various data, including production and composition of the gas and the leachate, were collected. In this paper, the interim results of gas production and the gas composition from different types of waste after a running time of six years are presented and discussed

  3. Wine wastes as carbon source for biological treatment of acid mine drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, M C; Santos, E S; Barros, R J; Pires, C; Martins, M

    2009-05-01

    Possible use of wine wastes containing ethanol as carbon and energy source for sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) growth and activity in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) is studied for the first time. The experiments were performed using anaerobic down-flow packed bed reactors in semi-continuous systems. The performance of two bioreactors fed with wine wastes or ethanol as carbon sources is compared in terms of sulphate reduction, metals removal and neutralization. The results show that efficient neutralization and high sulphate removal (>90%) were attained with the use of wine wastes as substrate allowing the production of effluents with concentrations below the required local legislation for irrigation waters. This is only possible provided that the AMD and wine wastes are contacted with calcite tailing, a waste material that neutralizes and provides buffer capacity to the medium. The removal of metals using wine wastes as carbon source was 61-91% for Fe and 97% for both Zn and Cu. The lower removal of iron, when wine waste is used instead of ethanol, may be due to the presence of iron-chelating compounds in the waste, which prevent the formation of iron sulphide, and partial unavailability of sulphide because of re-oxidation to elemental sulphur. However, that did not affect significantly the quality of the effluent for irrigation. This work demonstrates that wine wastes are a potential alternative to traditional SRB substrates. This finding has direct implication to sustainable operation of SRB bioreactors for AMD treatment. PMID:19201010

  4. Treatment of biological waste and residues V. Biological - mechanical - thermal processes; Bio- und Restabfallbehandlung V. Biologisch - mechanisch - thermisch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiemer, K.; Kern, M. (eds.); Weber-Wied, R. (comp.)

    2001-07-01

    From 2005, the TA Siedlungsabfall (Waste Management Regulation) will come into force, and European legislation will overrule national legislation. Dumping of untreated waste in landfills will be prohibited, i.e. incinerators for thermal waste treatment must be constructed. In view of the rigid specifications for emissions and residues and the demand for Europe-wide invitations for tender, time is running short. The book outlines the options for action of the German states and of some applicant states for EC membership. The German government already issued an Ordinance for Power Generation from Biomass. Independent of this, also secondary fuels are gaining ground, and several contributions of the conference discussed quality assurance and utilization of secondary fuels. Composting and sewage sludge utilization are further current issues. Air pollution, soil and groundwater protection, job security and energy potential are gone into, and an outline of the current situation of waste management is attempted. [German] Die aktuelle abfallwirtschaftliche Situation wird in besonderem Masse gepraegt durch das nahende Jahr 2005 sowie die zunehmende Abhaengigkeit nationalstaatlicher Handlungsspielraeume von den Vorgaben europaeischer Rahmenrichtlinien. Hierbei wird der Handlungsdruck spuerbar, spaetestens ab dem Jahr 2005 der TA Siedlungsabfall Rechnung tragen zu muessen. Die verbleibenden Zeitraeume sind daher eng bemessen, beruecksichtigt man insbesondere die langen Genehmigungs- und Errichtungszeitraeume fuer thermische Behandlungsanlagen. Vor dem Hintergrund der europaweiten Ausschreibungspflicht wird die gegenwaertige technische Diskussion zur MBA sehr stark durch die nunmehr von der Bundesregierung konkretisierten Emissions- und Ablagerungsanforderungen gepraegt. Der vorliegende Band soll aufzeigen, welche Handlungsspielraeume sich hierbei aus Sicht der verschiedenen Bundeslaender ergeben. Ein Blick ueber die Grenzen hinaus zu einigen zukuenftigen EU

  5. Effect of cobalt supplementation and fractionation on the biological response in the biomethanization of Olive Mill Solid Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Ibieta, F; Serrano, A; Jeison, D; Borja, R; Fermoso, F G

    2016-07-01

    Due to the low trace metals concentration in the Olive Mill Solid Waste (OMSW), a proposed strategy to improve its biomethanization is the supplementation of key metals to enhance the microorganism activity. Among essential trace metals, cobalt has been reported to have a crucial role in anaerobic degradation. This study evaluates the effect of cobalt supplementation to OMSW, focusing on the connection between fractionation of cobalt in the system and the biological response. The highest biological responses was found in a range from 0.018 to 0.035mg/L of dissolved cobalt (0.24-0.65mg total cobalt/L), reaching improvements up to 23% and 30% in the methane production rate and the methane yield coefficient, respectively. It was found that the dissolved cobalt fraction is more accurately related with the biological response than the total cobalt. The total cobalt is distorted by the contribution of dissolved and non-dissolved inert fractions. PMID:26998798

  6. Effects of various pretreatments on biological sulfate reduction with waste activated sludge as electron donor and waste activated sludge diminution under biosulfidogenic condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current study focused on the influences of various pretreatments, including alkaline, ultrasonic and thermal pretreatments on biological sulfate reduction with waste activated sludge (WAS) as sole electron donor. Our results showed that thermal and ultrasonic pretreatments increased the sulfate reduction percentage by 14.8% and 7.1%, respectively, compared with experiment with raw WAS, while alkaline pretreatment decreased the sulfate reduction percentage by 46%. By analyzing the WAS structure, particle size distribution, organic component, and enzyme activity after different pretreatments, we studied the effects of these pretreatments on WAS as well as on the mechanisms of how biological sulfate reduction was affected. The reduction of WAS and variation of WAS structure in the process of sulfate reduction were investigated. Our results showed that biosulfidogenesis was an efficient method of diminishing WAS, and various pretreatments could enhance the reduction efficiency of volatile solid in the WAS.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF THE CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL MODIFICATION OF THE YEAST WASTE FROM BEER MANUFACTURING TO PRODUCE ADHESIVE COMPOSITIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Davud Kadimaliev,; Vladimir Telyatnik,; Victor Revin,; Alexander Parshin,; Surhay Allahverdi,; Gokhan Gunduz; Elena Kezina,; Nejla Asık

    2012-01-01

    During the production of beer large amounts of yeast waste are generated. This paper considers the possible making of environmentally friendly adhesive compositions from such wastes. Chemical treatment of yeast wastes increases their adhesive characteristics. Chemical cross-linking with glutaric aldehyde and biological cross-linking by enzyme transglutaminase improves the moisture resistance of the adhesive compositions. In terms of their physical and mechanical parameters they are not inferi...

  8. Environmental and socio-economic analysis of treatment of biological waste; Miljoe- och samhaellsekonomisk analys av behandling av biologiskt avfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljungkvist, Hanna

    2008-01-15

    Biogas is a renewable fuel that can be extracted from anaerobic digestion of many different substrates, for example biological household waste. An alternative handling of the waste is to mix it with other wastes and incinerate it in a combined heat and power (CHP) plant. This study uses life cycle assessment to investigate which type of waste handling that is better from an environmental point of view, anaerobic digestion with biogas production or incineration. The results are based on a case study of a biogas production plant owned by the company Ragn-Sells in Vaenersborg. The alternative is incineration at a CHP plant in Gothenburg. Three different weighting methods were used, which produced different results on the detailed level. Overall however, the alternative with digestion and biogas production had significantly lower potential environmental impact than incineration according to all three methods. An economic valuation of the biogas production potential showed that the biggest societal savings would result from using all the produced biogas in heavy vehicles or to replace fuel oil for heating. However, since biogas is a high quality fuel it should be used as transportation fuel rather than for heating. By digestion and biogas production many potential services are gained from the organic waste. Waste volumes are reduced, emissions from the transport sector are reduced, local air quality is improved and valuable nutrients are returned to farmland through the organic fertilizer produced. The infrastructure and knowledge built up around the biogas system is also very valuable as a bridge to future gas based transport systems

  9. Biological test methods for the ecotoxicological characterization of wastes. Final report; Biologische Testerverfahren zur oekotoxikologischen Charakterisierung von Abfaellen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Roland [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung, Berlin (Germany); Donnevert, Gerhild [Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (Germany). FB MNI; Roembke, Joerg [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Floersheim am Main (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The ecotoxicological characterization of waste is part of their assessment as hazardous or non-hazardous according to the European Waste List. Despite its transfer into national law in the waste list ordnance 2001 no methodological recommendations have been provided to cover the hazard criterion (H14 ''ecotoxicity'') which was taken over from the legislation on dangerous substances. Based on the recommendations of CEN guideline 14735 (2005), an international ring test was organised by BAM, FH Giessen-Friedberg and ECT GmbH. In total, 67 laboratories from 15 countries participated in the ring test. It was performed with three representative waste types: an ash from an incineration plant mainly contaminated with heavy metals, a soil containing high concentrations of organic contaminants (PAHs) and a preserved wood waste contaminated with copper and other heavy metals. Samples were prepared by BAM (e.g. inter alia dried, sieved and homogenised) and distributed. Parallel to the biological testing the eluates and solid samples were chemically characterized. The basic test battery used in the ring test consisted of three aquatic (Algae test, Daphnia acute test and Microtox test) and three terrestrial (earthworm acute and plant test with two species (oat, rape)) tests. In addition, data were submitted for ten additional tests (five aquatic (including a genotoxicity test) and five terrestrial ones). Almost all tests were performed according to ISO guidelines, providing EC50 values as measurement of toxicity. Data evaluation was done following recent recommendations made by ISO (2002) and Environment Canada (2005). Besides a high number of reference test data, 634 data sets were produced in the basic test battery and 204 data sets in the additional tests. Only few data sets were not acceptable (e.g. due to lack of reference data) and even less results were identified as statistical or biological outliers. For example, in the case of the basic test

  10. Synthesis of Biomass and Utilization of Plant Wastes in a Physical Model of a Biological Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirov, A. A.; Ushakova, S. A.; Manukovsky, N. S.; Lisovsky, G. M.; Kudenko, Yu A.; Kovalev, V. S.; Gribovksaya, I. V.; Tirranen, L. S.; Zolotukkhin, I. G.; Gros, J. B.; Lasseur, Ch.

    Biological life support systems (LSS) with highly closed intrasystem mass ex change mass ex change hold much promise for long-term human life support at planetary stations (Moon, Mars, etc.). The paper considers problems of biosynthesis of higher plants' biomass and "biological incineration" of plant wastes in a working physical model of biological LSS. The plant wastes are "biologically incinerated" in a special heterotroph block involving Californian worms, mushrooms and straw. The block processes plant wastes (straw, haulms) to produce soil-like substrate (SLS) on which plants (wheat, radish) are grown. Gas ex change in such a system consists of respiratory gas ex change of SLS and photosynthesis and respiration of plants. Specifics of gas ex change dynamics of high plants -SLS complex has been considered. Relationship between such a gas ex change and photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) and age of plants has been established. SLS fertility has been shown to depend on its thickness and phase of maturity. The biogenic elements (potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen) in Liebig minimum have been found to include nitrogen which is the first to impair plants' growth in disruption of the process conditions. The SLS microflora has been found to have different kinds of ammonifying and denitrifying bacteria which is indicative of intensive transformation of nitrogen-containing compounds. The number of physiological groups of microorganisms in SLS was, on the whole, steady. As a result, organic substances -products of ex change of plants and microorganisms were not accumulated in the medium, but mineralized and assimilated by the biocenosis. Experiments showed that the developed model of a man-made ecosystem realized complete utilization of plant wastes and involved them into the intrasystem turnover. In multiple recycle of the mat ter (more than 5 cycles) under the irradiance intensity of 150 W/m2 PAR and the SLS mass (dry weight) of 17.7 -19.9 kg/m2 average total harvest of

  11. Landfill gas generation after mechanical biological treatment of municipal solid waste. Estimation of gas generation rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannis, G De; Muntoni, A; Cappai, G; Milia, S

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of residual municipal solid waste (RMSW) was investigated with respect to landfill gas generation. Mechanically treated RMSW was sampled at a full-scale plant and aerobically stabilized for 8 and 15 weeks. Anaerobic tests were performed on the aerobically treated waste (MBTW) in order to estimate the gas generation rate constants (k,y(-1)), the potential gas generation capacity (L(o), Nl/kg) and the amount of gasifiable organic carbon. Experimental results show how MBT allowed for a reduction of the non-methanogenic phase and of the landfill gas generation potential by, respectively, 67% and 83% (8 weeks treatment), 82% and 91% (15 weeks treatment), compared to the raw waste. The amount of gasified organic carbon after 8 weeks and 15 weeks of treatment was equal to 11.01+/-1.25kgC/t(MBTW) and 4.54+/-0.87kgC/t(MBTW), respectively, that is 81% and 93% less than the amount gasified from the raw waste. The values of gas generation rate constants obtained for MBTW anaerobic degradation (0.0347-0.0803y(-1)) resemble those usually reported for the slowly and moderately degradable fractions of raw MSW. Simulations performed using a prediction model support the hypothesis that due to the low production rate, gas production from MBTW landfills is well-suited to a passive management strategy. PMID:18954969

  12. Improvement of chemical and biological characteristics of gossan mine wastes following application of amendments and growth of Cistus ladanifer L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Erika; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Macías, Felipe; de Varennes, Amarilis

    2013-04-01

    Cistus ladanifer is considered a good option for phytostabilization of mine wastes, composed of several materials, but its growth is very slow due to substrata conditions (acidic pH, low fertility and water availability, high total concentrations of hazardous elements). To enhance the growth of C. ladanifer with application of organic/inorganic amendments can be a strategy to speed up remediation. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of different rates of amendments and C. ladanifer growth on the improvement of chemical and biological characteristics of gossan wastes. Composite samples of mining wastes (gossan+host rocks) were collected at the São Domingos mine. Amendments used were mixtures (30, 75, 150 Mg/ha) of rockwool, agriculture wastes and wastes from liquor distillation obtained from fruits of Arbutus unedo. Four treatments (n=6 replicates) were carried out (control and three amended treatments) under controlled conditions in a greenhouse. After one month of incubation at 70% of water holding capacity, C. ladanifer was sown in half of the pots from each treatment (n=3), and the other three pots remained in the same conditions without plant. Chemical and biological characteristics of the wastes (with/without plants) were analysed after incubation and fifteen months. Gossan wastes had great total concentrations of several elements (g/kg; Al: 24.8, As: 3.03, Cu: 0.23, Pb; 9.21) whereas in an extracting solution (diluted solution of organic acids) these were small (0.5 units), fertility (Corganic, Pextractable, Ntotal) and dehydrogenase activity of mine wastes, principally with the rate of 150 Mg/ha, even after one month of incubation and after the plants be sown. In both sampling periods (beginning/end of the experiment), Kextractable concentrations increased only with the high application rates (control and 30 Mg/ha treatment: 1.02-1.88 mg/kg; other amended treatments: 2.13-3.55 mg/kg). At the end of the experiment, the presence of the plant increased

  13. Biologic

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, L H

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we explore the boundary between biology and the study of formal systems (logic). In the end, we arrive at a summary formalism, a chapter in "boundary mathematics" where there are not only containers but also extainers ><, entities open to interaction and distinguishing the space that they are not. The boundary algebra of containers and extainers is to biologic what boolean algebra is to classical logic. We show how this formalism encompasses significant parts of the logic of DNA replication, the Dirac formalism for quantum mechanics, formalisms for protein folding and the basic structure of the Temperley Lieb algebra at the foundations of topological invariants of knots and links.

  14. Handling, treatment, conditioning and storage of biological radioactive wastes. Technical manual for the management of low and intermediate level wastes generated at small nuclear research centres and by radioisotope users in medicine, research and industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological materials that contain radioactive isotopes have many important applications. During the production and use of these materials, waste will inevitably arise which must be managed with particular care due to their potential biological as well as radiological hazards. This report deals with wastes that arise outside the nuclear fuel cycle and is directed primarily to countries without nuclear power programmes. It is intended to provide guidance to Member States in the handling, treatment and conditioning of biological radioactive materials. The objective of radioactive waste management is to handle, pretreat, treat, condition, store, transport and dispose of radioactive waste in a manner that protects human health and the environment without imposing undue burdens on future generations. 31 refs, 15 figs, 3 tabs

  15. Problem of waste effluents in wood industry - the possibilities of biological treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Muck, Tadeja

    2015-01-01

    Wood industry does not pollute waters to a great extend, nevertheless we must be aware that the problem still exists. Waste effluents in wood industry contain very high portion of dangerous and toxic substance - formaldehyde. That is why it is inevitably vital to start with detailed analysis of waste effluents and with studies of possibilities of decontamination. Statistical analysis are showing that wood industry are not well aware of the fact how quickly the ecological balance can be destro...

  16. Biological treatment of solid wastes from the tobacco industry for enzyme production

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Ana Iolanda; Curbelo, C.; Alvarez, G. M.; A.A. Vicente; Teixeira, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at the production of enzymes using solid wastes from the tobacco industry, the solid fermentation kinetics of Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus terreus using waste of dark tobacco and Virginia tobacco as substrate were characterized. The efficiency of the fermentation process was evaluated by determining the enzymatic activity of the three enzymes that constitute the cellulose enzymatic system (CMCase, PFase and Xylanase). The results obtained led to the establishment of...

  17. Long-term biological monitoring of environmental quality around a solid waste landfill assessed with lichens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diversity of epiphytic lichens and the accumulation of selected trace elements in the lichen Flavoparmelia caperata L. (Hale) were used as indicators of pollution around a landfill in central Italy along 14 years of waste management. Lichens revealed an increased deposition for some elements (i.e., Cd, Cr, Fe and Ni) and a decrease of the lichen diversity at sites facing the landfill after an enlargement of the dumping area. However, the results allowed to exclude a significant increase in heavy metal depositions in the surrounding area and suggested that successful waste management may be associated with environmental quality. It is concluded that lichen monitoring might provide essential information to enhance the implementation of ecological impact assessment, supporting industrial regulatory procedures, also when waste management is concerned. - Highlights: ► Lichens were used as bioindicators at a landfill along 14 years of waste management. ► Metal deposition and low lichen diversity were found only close to the landfill. ► Lichen monitoring can assist in waste management regulatory decision. - The results of lichen monitoring can contribute to decision making process concerning waste management.

  18. Systems analysis of mechanical biological waste treatment plants in Germany; Systemtechnische Analyse der mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlungsanlagen in Deutschland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, S. [Thome-Kozmiensky Ingenieure, Nietwerder (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The present article starts with a presentation of the state of the art of mechanical biological waste treatment in Germany. This is followed by a description of the various process concepts, the technical configurations they use and the output fractions they produce and where they end up. The final part is dedicated to a comparison, based on selected example plants, of the mass balances and secondary fuel yields of the individual process concepts in cases where high-grade secondary fuels are produced, e.g. for use in power plants and cement works.

  19. Feasibility of disposal of high-level radioactive waste into the seabed. Volume 6: Deep-sea biology, biological processes and radiobiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the options suggested for disposal of high-level radioactive waste resulting from the generation of nuclear power is burial beneath the deep ocean floor in geologically stable sediment formations which have no economic value. The 8-volume series provides an assessment of the technical feasibility and radiological safety of this disposal concept based on the results obtained by ten years of co-operation and information exchange among the Member countries participating in the NEA Seabed Working Group. This report summarizes the biological description of selected sites, the means by which radionuclides could result in human exposure via seafood pathways, and the doses likely to be received by, and effects on, the deep-sea fauna

  20. Combining mechanical-biological residual waste treatment plants with grate firing; Kombination MBA mit Rostfeuerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleck, E. [ABB Umwelttechnik GmbH, Butzbach (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    The promulgation of the Technical Code on Household Waste obliges the local authorities responsible for waste disposal to review existing and prepare new waste management plans. Given the present state of the art the Code`s limit value for loss due to burning of 5% makes thermal treatment of the residual waste practically compulsory. In preparation of these developments and in order to lower costs in general and be able respond flexibly to customer demands ABB is currently undertaking great efforts to provide thermal residual waste treatment plants with a modular design. [Deutsch] Mit Veroeffentlichung der TASi wurden die entsorgungspflichtigen Gebietskoerperschaften gezwungen, bereits vorhandene Abfall-Wirtschaftsplaene zu ueberarbeiten bzw. neue zu erstellen. Technisch laeuft nach derzeitigem Wissensstand der in der TASi vorgegebene maximale Gluehverlust von 5% darauf hinaus, dass eine thermische Behandlung des Restabfalls zwingend vorgegeben ist. Um hierfuer geruestet zu sein, aber auch um generell Kosten zu senken unf flexibel auf Kundenwuensche eingehen zu koennen, unternimmt ABB grosse Abstrengungen, den Aufbau von Anlagen zur thermischen Restabfallbehandlung modular zu gestalten. (orig./SR)

  1. Design improvement for reduction of decommissioning waste of PWR primary biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most operating nuclear power plants were constructed with no attention to the amount of decommissioning waste. Consequently, a large portion of the primary concrete shield wall is irradiated by neutrons escaping from the reactor core to produce high concentration of activation products. These radioactive waste comprises of around 30% of the decommissioning waste. Under the circumstance that the rad waste disposal cost is continuously increasing, reduction of decommissioning waste becomes an important issue. In this study, a design improvement was attempted to reduce activation of the primary shield wall by placing a water-filled neutron shield tank between the reactor pressure vessel and the primary shield wall. Procedure for calculating the amount of activated radionuclides remaining at different cooling times were developed by MCNP-ORIGEN coupled calculations. Particular attention was paid to correction of activation cross sections since the ORIGEN code was designed for use in calculation of isotope generation and depletion in the operating reactor core where temperature is high, while temperature of the shield wall is low. The established procedure was applied to the 1500MWe APR+ model to evaluated the effectiveness of the neutron shield tank. Distributions of activation products for many different thickness of the neutron shield tank were calculated and an effective thickness was selected. Finally, by comparing the resulting activity distributions with the exemption criteria for radioactive waste, the expected cost reduction was assessed. The model applied in this study, however, is limited to preliminary design in terms of neutronics and does not take account any engineering problems which may be caused by installation of the shield tank. Practical engineering needs further detailed design analysis including cooling and cleaning of the shield water and other related engineering issues

  2. Development of software for management of radioactive waste in biological research and clinical assistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of software which facilitates the automation of this process by mean of the Safety Analysis Report generating a data base allowing the statistic analysis and elaboration of radioactive wastes inventory. The software was developed in PHP language and the information is stored in a data base generated in Oracle and organized in different tables which allows to calculate the storage time of waste and to register the specificities of radioisotopes, cadastral data of the professionals which handle that radioisotope and also the characteristics of handling laboratories. That tool collaborates for a effective control on the use of radioisotopes in research laboratories and assistance areas as well

  3. Application of Chemically Modified and Unmodified Waste Biological Sorbents in Treatment of Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    John Kanayochukwu Nduka

    2012-01-01

    Protein wastes (feathers, goat hair) and cellulosic wastes (corn cob, coconut husks) were collected and washed with detergent solution, thoroughly rinsed and sun dried for 2 days before drying in an oven, and then ground. One-half of ground material was carbonized at a maximum temperature of 500°C after mixing with H2SO4. The carbonized parts were pulverized; both carbonized and uncarbonized sorbents were sieved into two particle sizes of 325 and 625 μm using mechanical sieve. Sorbents of a g...

  4. EVALUATING THE ECOLOGICAL RESILIENT DRIVEN PERFORMANCE OF A TROPICAL WASTE STABILIZATION POND SYSTEM USING ECOLOGICAL SIGNATURE OF BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Lahiri Ganguly

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Using ecological signature of biological integrity as a measure of performance, the reclamation efficiency of waste stabilization ponds was evaluated over a period of four years in a tropical sewage treatment plant – cum fish culture consisting of two anaerobic, two facultative and four maturation ponds located serially across the sewage effluent gradient. The four maturation ponds were used for batch culture of fish. Samples of surface and bottom water as well as surface sediment were collected twice a month from different ponds of the system and examined for some nutrient cycling bacteria, primary production, chlorophyll content of micro-algae, phytoplankton, zooplankton abundance, fish growth and water quality parameters. Computation of ecological signature using aerobic mineralization index for heterotrophic and ammonifying bacteria revealed steady increase across the sewage effluent gradient. The heterotrophic and ammonifying bacterial populations appeared to have a direct function with the concentrations of chemical oxygen demand of water. The sum of total scores for different optimal conditions for fish growth increased as a function of the distance from the source of effluent implying that ecological resilience of the waste stabilization ponds has been accomplished by the sedimentation, chelation, and biological functional attributes mediated through redundancy of different subsystems, self- purification capacity of the system as a whole.

  5. 14C and 210Pb in NE Atlantic sediments: evidence of biological reworking in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scavenging by the seabed and sediments in the deep ocean may have a significant effect on the removal of artificial radionuclides released in radioactive waste disposal operations. Biological activity in the upper layers of the sediment column will enhance the rate of removal for those particle-reactive radionuclides with a short half-life relative to the turnover time of the upper mixed layer. For longer-lived radionuclides the rate of sediment accumulation will determine the ultimate rate of removal. The rate of sediment accumulation and extent of biological mixing of a deep-sea sediment from three areas of the NE Atlantic Ocean have been investigated using 14C and 210Pb data. For 14C, box cores from the Iberia Abyssal Plain, Madeira Abyssal Plain and from the NEA low-level radioactive waste dumpsite yielded sedimentation rates in the range 0.8 to 2.2 cm ky-1 over the upper 16-25 cm. Continuous particle mixing appears to be taking place to a depth of 4 to 6 cm below the present sediment-water interface. Closely spaced vertical sampling of core 161-2 for 210Pb allowed a biodiffusion coefficient (Dsub(B)) to be calculated (4 x 10-9 cm2s-1). (author)

  6. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal - results of experiences in three large waste water treatment plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within a scientific project especially the operation of four real-size sewage treatment plants with different processes of enhanced biological phosphorus removal is investigated under the aspect of efficiency, stability, practicability and costs of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Three plants and first results are explained and compared as well with one another as with data, which are generally regarded as favourable conditions for the enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Between the plants there are significant differences in the degree of P-elimination mainly due to different characteristics of the wastewater. An important influence on P-effluent concentrations may be exacted by P-resolution in the final clarifier. (orig.)

  7. Exploitation of biological wastes for the production of value-added hydrolases by Streptomyces sp. MSWC1 isolated from municipal solid waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokni-Tlili, Sonia; Ben Abdelmalek, Imen; Jedidi, Naceur; Belghith, Hafedh; Gargouri, Ali; Abdennaceur, Hassen; Marzouki, Mohamed Nejib

    2010-09-01

    Actinomycetes with the ability to degrade natural polysaccharides were isolated during a screening programme from soil, farmyard manure and municipal solid waste compost. One of the most potent isolates was identified as Streptomyces sp. MSWC1 using morphological and biochemical properties along with 16S rDNA partial sequence analysis. The highest enzyme production by Streptomyces was observed for the xylanase and chitinase activity on different carbon sources with an optimum of 12,100 IU ml(-1) and 110 IU ml(-1) at 3 days' culture on 1% of xylan and chitin, respectively. To meet the demand of industry, low-cost medium is required for the production of hydrolases by Streptomyces sp. Strain MSWC1 grown on manure, compost, and a natural carbon source was used to evaluate the re-utilisation of biological wastes for the production of value-added products. Despite the presence of a high amount of toxic heavy metals in the compost, Streptomyces produced interesting enzymes that have been biochemically characterized. PMID:20022900

  8. Chemical and biological changes during composting of different organic wastes and assessment of compost maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sneh; Dhull, S K; Kapoor, K K

    2005-09-01

    Changes in organic C, total N, C:N ratio, activities of cellulase, xylanase and protease, and microbial population were determined during composting of different organic wastes such as mixture of sugarcane trash and cattle dung, press mud, poultry waste and water hyacinth biomass. There were losses of N in poultry waste and water hyacinth with the effect an initial increase in C:N ratio was observed which decreased later on due to decomposition. The activities of cellulase, xylanase and protease were maximum between 30 and 60 days of composting in various wastes. Similar trend was observed with respect to mesophilic bacterial and fungal population. Various quality parameters like C:N ratio, water soluble C (WSC), CO(2) evolution and level of humic substances were compared after 90 day composting. There was statistically significant correlation between C:N ratio and CO(2) evolution, WSC and humic substances. Significant correlation between CO(2) evolved and level of humic substances was also observed. The study shows that no single parameter can be taken as an index of compost maturity. However, C:N ratio and CO(2) evolved from finished compost can be taken as the most reliable indices of compost maturity. PMID:15978991

  9. Technical guide management of waste materials with radioactive contents in biological research centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide presented offers significant improvements in the management procedures of waste materials with radioactive contents, in addition to unifying modes of action on radioactive facilities for research and teaching. The guide has been developed within the activities of the SEPR in collaboration with ENRESA. (Author)

  10. Biological compost stability influences odor molecules production measured by electronic nose during food-waste high-rate composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composting is a technique that is used to convert organic waste into agriculturally useful products. Composting is an aerobic, solid-state biological process, which typically can be divided into two phases, a high-rate composting phase and a curing phase. High-rate composting plays an important role during the composting process, owing to the high microbial activity occurring during this phase. It requires an accurate plant design to prevent the formation of anaerobic conditions and odors. The formation of anaerobic conditions mainly depends on the rate of O2 consumption needed to degrade the substrate, i.e., the biological stability of the substrate. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the biological activity, measured by the dynamic respiration index (DRI) and the odor molecules production, measured by an electronic nose (EN) during two food-waste high-rate composting processes. Although the O2 concentration in the biomass free air space (FAS) was kept optimal (O2 > 140 ml l-1, v/v) during composting, strong anaerobic conditions developed. This was indicated by the high levels of sulfur compounds, methane, and hydrogen in the outlet air stream. Both the high level of O2 consumption, needed to degrade the high-degradable water-soluble organic matter and the low water O2 solubility, caused by high temperature reached in this stage (up to 60 deg. C), led to the anaerobic conditions observed in the biofilm-particle level. The application of the partial least square (PLS) analysis demonstrated a good regression between the DRI and the odor molecules produced that was detected by the EN (R2 = 0.991; R2CV = 0.990), signifying the usefulness of the DRI as a parameter to estimate the potential production of odor molecules of the biomass

  11. Mechanical-biological waste treatment with thermal processing of partial fractions; Mechanisch-biologische Restabfallbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    Technologies for mechanical-biological treatment of waste in the Land of Hessen were compared including thermal processes like combustion and gasification. The new and more rigid limiting values specified in the Technical Guide for Municipal Waste Treatment (Technische Anleitung Siedlungsabfall - TASI) get a special mention. [Deutsch] Verschiedene Technologien der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung im Raum Hessen wurden unter Einbezug thermischer Verfahren (Verbrennung, Vergasung) miteinander verglichen. Dabei wurden besonders auf die verschaerften Grenzwerte der Technischen Anleitung Siedlungsabfall (TASI) eingegangen. (ABI)

  12. Biologically-Induced Micropitting of Alloy 22, a Candidate Nuclear Waste Packaging Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of potential microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) on candidate packaging materials for nuclear waste containment are being assessed. Coupons of Alloy 22, the outer barrier candidate for waste packaging, were exposed to a simulated, saturated repository environment (or microcosm) consisting of crushed rock (tuff) from the Yucca Mountain repository site and a continual flow of simulated groundwater for periods up to five years at room temperature and 30 C. Coupons were incubated with YM tuff under both sterile and non-sterile conditions. Surfacial analysis by scanning electron microscopy of the biotically-incubated coupons show development of both submicron-sized pinholes and pores; these features were not present on either sterile or untreated control coupons. Room temperature, biotically-incubated coupons show a wide distribution of pores covering the coupon surface, while coupons incubated at 30 C show the pores restricted to polishing ridges

  13. A biological process effective for the conversion of CO-containing industrial waste gas to acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Wan; Bae, Seung Seob; Lee, Jin Woo; Lee, Sung-Mok; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kang, Sung Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Acetogens have often been observed to be inhibited by CO above an inhibition threshold concentration. In this study, a two-stage culture consisting of carboxydotrophic archaea and homoacetogenic bacteria is found to be effective in converting industrial waste gas derived from a steel mill process. In the first stage, Thermococcus onnurineus could grow on the Linz-Donawitz converter gas (LDG) containing ca. 56% CO as a sole energy source, converting the CO into H2 and CO2. Then, in the second stage, Thermoanaerobacter kivui could grow on the off-gas from the first stage culture, consuming the H2 and CO in the off-gas completely and producing acetate as a main product. T. kivui alone could not grow on the LDG gas. This work represents the first demonstration of acetate production using steel mill waste gas by a two-stage culture of carboxydotrophic hydrogenogenic microbes and homoacetogenic bacteria. PMID:27106591

  14. The Treatment of Low Level Radioactive Liquid Waste Containing Detergent by Biological Activated Sludge Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment of low level radioactive liquid waste containing persil detergent from laundry operation of contaminated clothes by activated sludge process has been done, for alternative process replacing the existing treatment by evaporation. The detergent concentration in water solution from laundry operation is 14.96 g/l. After rinsing operation of clothes and mixing of laundry water solution with another liquid waste, the waste water solution contains about ≤ 1.496 g/l of detergent and 10-3 Ci/m3 of Cs-137 activity. The simulation waste having equivalent activity of Cs-137 10-3 Ci/m3, detergent content (X) 1.496, 0.748, 0.374, 0.187, 0.1496 and 0.094 g/l on BOD value respectively 186, 115, 71, 48, 19, and 16 ppm was processed by activated sludge in reactor of 18.6 l capacity on ambient temperature. It is used Super Growth Bacteria (SGB) 102 and SGB 104, nitrogen and phosphor nutrition, and aeration. The result show that bacteria of SGB 102 and SGB 104 were able to degrade the persil detergent for attaining standard quality of water release category B in which BOD values 6 ppm. It was need 30 hours for X ≤ 0.187 g/l, 50 hours for 0.187 < X ≤ 0.374 g/l, 75 hours for 0.374 < X ≤ 0.748, and 100 hours for 0.748 < X ≤ 1.496 g/l. On the initial period the bacteria of SGB 104 interact most quickly to degrade the detergent comparing SGB 102. Biochemical oxidation process decontaminate the solution on the decontamination factor of 350, Cs-137 be concentrate in sludge by complexing with the bacteria wall until the activity of solution be become very low. (author)

  15. Spatial distribution of odorous compounds in an enclosed waste mechanical biological treatment plant

    OpenAIRE

    FANG, Jingjing; Lü, Fan; Zhang, Hua; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations and species profiles of gaseous pollutants emitted from a municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant were investigated to identify the major odorous substances. Three methods were used to measure different gaseous pollutants in this study, including gas-chromatography with mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection/pulsed flame photometric detection (GC - MS /FID/PFPD) preceded by cold trap concentration, GC-FID preceded by sorbent concentration, and high-performance liq...

  16. Application of Chemically Modified and Unmodified Waste Biological Sorbents in Treatment of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kanayochukwu Nduka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein wastes (feathers, goat hair and cellulosic wastes (corn cob, coconut husks were collected and washed with detergent solution, thoroughly rinsed and sun dried for 2 days before drying in an oven, and then ground. One-half of ground material was carbonized at a maximum temperature of 500°C after mixing with H2SO4. The carbonized parts were pulverized; both carbonized and uncarbonized sorbents were sieved into two particle sizes of 325 and 625 μm using mechanical sieve. Sorbents of a given particle size were packed into glass column.Then, textile wastewater that had its physicochemical parameters previously determined was eluted into each glass column and a contact time of 60 and 120 mins was allowed before analysis. Results showed 48.15–99.98 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 34.67–99.93 percentage reduction of NO3−, EC, Cl−, BOD, COD, DO, TSS, and TDS, 52.83–97.95 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+ and 34.59–94.87 percentage reduction of Pb2+, Ni2+, Cr3+ and Mn2+. Carbonization, small particle, size and longer contact time enhanced the sorption capabilities of the sorbents. These show that protein and cellulosic wastes can be used to detoxify wastewater.

  17. Biological nutrients removal from the supernatant originating from the anaerobic digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamis, S; Katsou, E; Di Fabio, S; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F

    2014-09-01

    This study critically evaluates the biological processes and techniques applied to remove nitrogen and phosphorus from the anaerobic supernatant produced from the treatment of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and from its co-digestion with other biodegradable organic waste (BOW) streams. The wide application of anaerobic digestion for the treatment of several organic waste streams results in the production of high quantities of anaerobic effluents. Such effluents are characterized by high nutrient content, because organic and particulate nitrogen and phosphorus are hydrolyzed in the anaerobic digestion process. Consequently, adequate post-treatment is required in order to comply with the existing land application and discharge legislation in the European Union countries. This may include physicochemical and biological processes, with the latter being more advantageous due to their lower cost. Nitrogen removal is accomplished through the conventional nitrification/denitrification, nitritation/denitritation and the complete autotrophic nitrogen removal process; the latter is accomplished by nitritation coupled with the anoxic ammonium oxidation process. As anaerobic digestion effluents are characterized by low COD/TKN ratio, conventional denitrification/nitrification is not an attractive option; short-cut nitrogen removal processes are more promising. Both suspended and attached growth processes have been employed to treat the anaerobic supernatant. Specifically, the sequencing batch reactor, the membrane bioreactor, the conventional activated sludge and the moving bed biofilm reactor processes have been investigated. Physicochemical phosphorus removal via struvite precipitation has been extensively examined. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal from the anaerobic supernatant can take place through the sequencing anaerobic/aerobic process. More recently, denitrifying phosphorus removal via nitrite or nitrate has been explored. The removal of

  18. Monitoring the activated sludge biological process in a waste water treatment plant; Control de proceso biologico por fangos activados de una EDAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, E.

    1996-08-01

    As well as monitoring the physicochemical parameters in waste water treatment plants, it is also necessary to keep track of the biological process. Respirometry is the technique that most closely follows the biological purification process and is therefore the most appropriate one to use in monitoring it. The different concepts concerning the respiration rate-basic, exogenous, total, maximum, specific and nitrification are defined for continuous and batch applications. definitions are also given of the main technologic and analytical parameters in ordinary use. Finally, the principles on which respirometry is based and its practical applications in waste water treatment plants are described.

  19. OPTIMIZATION OF THE CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL MODIFICATION OF THE YEAST WASTE FROM BEER MANUFACTURING TO PRODUCE ADHESIVE COMPOSITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davud Kadimaliev,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During the production of beer large amounts of yeast waste are generated. This paper considers the possible making of environmentally friendly adhesive compositions from such wastes. Chemical treatment of yeast wastes increases their adhesive characteristics. Chemical cross-linking with glutaric aldehyde and biological cross-linking by enzyme transglutaminase improves the moisture resistance of the adhesive compositions. In terms of their physical and mechanical parameters they are not inferior to glues of natural origin and can be used for bonding paper, cardboard, and wood. The bonding strength of paper was 421.8 N / m, and that of wood was 27.8 MPa.

  20. A systems study of the waste management system in Gothenburg. Part of the project: Thermal and biological waste treatment in a systems perspective; Systemstudie Avfall i Goeteborg. Delprojekt i Termisk och biologisk avfallsbehandling i ett systemperspektiv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisaillon, Mattias; Sundberg, Johan; Haraldsson, Maarten; Norrman Eriksson, Ola

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of the project A system study of waste management in Gothenburg is to evaluate new waste treatment options for municipal and industrial waste from a system perspective. The project has been carried out as a part of the project Thermal and biological waste treatment in a systems perspective - WR21. The focus is set to the waste and district heating system in Gothenburg. The project has been running for 2,5 years with an active group consisting of persons from Renova, Kretsloppskontoret, Goeteborg Energi, Gryaab and Profu. The work on development of models and of methods of handling strategic questions within the field has gone back and forth within the group. This report focuses on presenting the final results from the project, which means that the process in which we've excluded several treatment options and scenarios are only briefly described

  1. Coupled Biological-Geomechanical-Geochemical Effects of the Disturbed Rock Zone on the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, S. C.; Herrick, C. G.; Lee, M. Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located at a depth of 655 m in bedded salt in southeastern New Mexico and is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as a deep underground disposal facility for transuranic (TRU) waste. The WIPP must comply with the EPA's environmental regulations that require a probabilistic risk analysis of releases of radionuclides due to inadvertent human intrusion into the repository at some time during the 10,000-year regulatory period. Sandia National Laboratories conducts performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP using a system of computer codes representing the evolution of underground repository and emplaced TRU waste in order to demonstrate compliance. One of the important features modeled in a PA is the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) surrounding the emplacement rooms in the repository. The extent and permeability of DRZ play a significant role in the potential radionuclide release scenarios. We evaluated the phenomena occurring in the repository that affect the DRZ and their potential effects on the extent and permeability of the DRZ. Furthermore, we examined the DRZ's role in determining the performance of the repository. Pressure in the completely sealed repository will be increased by creep closure of the salt and degradation of TRU waste contents by microbial activity in the repository. An increased pressure in the repository will reduce the extent and permeability of the DRZ. The reduced DRZ extent and permeability will decrease the amount of brine that is available to interact with the waste. Furthermore, the potential for radionuclide release from the repository is dependent on the amount of brine that enters the repository. As a result of these coupled biological-geomechanical-geochemical phenomena, the extent and permeability of the DRZ has a significant impact on the potential radionuclide releases from the repository and, in turn, the repository performance. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by Sandia

  2. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-02-11

    The radiometric methods, alpha (alpha)-, beta (beta)-, gamma (gamma)-spectrometry, and mass spectrometric methods, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, accelerator mass spectrometry, thermal ionization mass spectrometry, resonance ionization mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and glow discharge mass spectrometry are reviewed for the determination of radionuclides. These methods are critically compared for the determination of long-lived radionuclides important for radiation protection, decommissioning of nuclear facilities, repository of nuclear waste, tracer application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include (3)H, (14)C, (36)Cl, (41)Ca, (59,63)Ni, (89,90)Sr, (99)Tc, (129)I, (135,137)Cs, (210)Pb, (226,228)Ra, (237)Np, (241)Am, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection/sequential injection) for separation of radionuclides and automated determination of radionuclides is also discussed. PMID:18215644

  3. Assessment of biological effects resulting from large scale applications of coal power plant wastes in building technology in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evaluation is performed of the radiation-induced biological effects on the population of Poland with the use of coal power plant wastes for the production of building materials. The assessments of the risks indicated that the use of these materials increased the risk of death from neoplasms and genetic diseases. In the considered period, 1951-2010, the number of leukemias are expected to increase more than twice, the number of malignant neoplasms nearly three times and the number of lung cancers nearly five times. In the same period, only a relatively small increase of about 13% should be observed in the serious genetic defects from the same cause. Comparison of the somatic effects of the excess indoor irradiation with the death rate of neoplasms from all causes revealed the relatively high contribution of the indoor irradiation in the overall incidence of neoplasms. (UK)

  4. Optimization of the extraction of polysaccharides from tobacco waste and their biological activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yanqiu; Gao, Yuzhen; Wang, Weifeng; Cheng, Yuyuan; Lu, Ping; Ma, Cong; Zhang, Yuehua

    2016-10-01

    A response surface methodology was used to optimize the parameters for extracting the polysaccharides from tobacco waste (TWPs) using hot water. The extraction process, carried out under the following optimized parameters: an extraction temperature of 90°C, a ratio of water to raw material of 54, and an extraction time of 115min, allowed an experimental yield of 28.32±1.78%. The chemical composition analysis showed that TWPs were composed of mannose, rhamnose, glucuronic acid, galacturonic acid, glucose, galactose and arabinose with the following molecular ratio: 1.00:2.69:1.29:2.29:5.23:6.90:3.92. The molecular weights of its four major fractions were 0.558, 1.015, 16.286, and 151.194kDa. Bioactivity experiments showed that TWPs not only decreased the reactive oxygen species level in salt-stressed tomato seedlings, but also possessed significant antioxidant activities in vitro. Antioxidant activity in vivo further showed that TWPs could significantly increase the activities of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT), and decrease the level of malondialodehyde (MDA). In addition, according to the acute toxicity test, TWPs did not cause behavioral changes or any death of mice. This study provides an effective method to utilize tobacco waste resources. PMID:27211300

  5. Determination of MBT-waste reactivity - An infrared spectroscopic and multivariate statistical approach to identify and avoid failures of biological tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, K; Smidt, E; Binner, E; Schwanninger, M; Tintner, J; Lechner, P

    2010-04-01

    The Austrian Landfill Ordinance provides limit values regarding the reactivity for the disposal of mechanically biologically treated (MBT) waste before landfilling. The potential reactivity determined by biological tests according to the Austrian Standards (OENORM S 2027 1-2) can be underestimated if the microbial community is affected by environmental conditions. New analytical tools have been developed as an alternative to error-prone and time-consuming biological tests. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in association with Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS-R) was used to predict the reactivity parameters respiration activity (RA(4)) and gas generation sum (GS(21)) as well as to detect errors resulting from inhibiting effects on biological tests. For this purpose 250 MBT-waste samples from different Austrian MBT-plants were investigated using FT-IR spectroscopy in the mid (MIR) and near infrared (NIR) area and biological tests. Spectroscopic results were compared with those from biological tests. Arising problems caused by interferences of RA(4) and GS(21) are discussed. It is shown that FT-IR spectroscopy predicts RA(4) and GS(21) reliably to assess stability of MBT-waste materials and to detect errors. PMID:19854633

  6. Mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste as a support medium for microbial methane oxidation to mitigate landfill greenhouse emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einola, Juha-Kalle M; Karhu, A Elina; Rintala, Jukka A

    2008-01-01

    The residual fraction of mechanically-biologically treated municipal solid waste (MBT residual) was studied in the laboratory to evaluate its suitability and environmental compatibility as a support medium in methane (CH(4)) oxidative biocovers for the mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. Two MBT residuals with 5 and 12 months total (aerobic) biological stabilisation times were used in the study. MBT residual appeared to be a favourable medium for CH(4) oxidation as indicated by its area-based CH(4) oxidation rates (12.2-82.3 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) at 2-25 degrees C; determined in CH(4)-sparged columns). The CH(4) oxidation potential (determined in batch assays) of the MBT residuals increased during the 124 d column experiment, from solid (L/S) ratio of 10:1, suggest a potential for leachate pollutant emissions which should be considered in plans to utilise MBT residual. In conclusion, the laboratory experiments suggest that MBT residual can be utilised as a support medium for CH(4) oxidation, even at low temperatures, to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions from landfills. PMID:17360174

  7. Cannon shredding of municipal solid waste for the preparation of biological feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J.

    1981-04-01

    Explosive decompression as a method of size reduction of materials found in municipal solid waste (MSW) was studied and preliminary data related to the handling and wet separation of exploded material was gathered. Steam was emphasized as the source of pressure. Municipal refuse was placed in an 8-ft long, 10.75-in. ID steel cannon which was sealed and pressurized. After an appropriate time, the cannon muzzle closure was opened and the test material expelled from the cannon through a constrictive orifice, resulting in explosive decompression. Flash evaporation of pressurized saturated water, expansion of steam, and the strong turbulence at the cannon muzzle accomplished size reduction. Hydraulic processing is shown to be an effective technique for separating heavy and light fractions.

  8. Biological Hydrogen Production from Corn-Syrup Waste Using a Novel System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nakhla

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The reported patent-pending system comprises a novel biohydrogen reactor with a gravity settler for decoupling of SRT from HRT. The biohydrogenator was operated for 100 days at 37 °C, hydraulic retention time 8 h and solids retention time ranging from 2.2–2.5 days. The feed was a corn-syrup waste generated as a byproduct from an industrial facility for bioethanol production located in southwestern Ontario, Canada. The system was initially started up with a synthetic feed containing glucose at concentration of 8 g/L and other essential inorganics. Anaerobicaly-digested sludge from the St. Mary’s wastewater treatment plant (St. Mary, Ontario, Canada was used as the seed, and was heat treated at 70 °C for 30 min to inhibit methanogens. After 10 days, when the hydrogen production was steady, the corn-syrup waste was introduced to the system. Glucose was the main constituent in the corn-syrup; its concentration was varied over a period of 90 days from 8 to 25 g/L. The change in glucose concentration was used to study the impact of variable organic loading on the stability of hydrogen production in the biohydrogenator. Hydrogen production rate increased from 10 L H2/L·d to 34 L H2/L·d with the increase of organic loading rate (OLR from 26 to 81 gCOD/L·d, while a maximum hydrogen yield of 430 mL H2/gCOD was achieved in the system with an overall average of 385 mL H2/gCOD.

  9. Behaviour at landfills of waste having undergone mechanic-biological and thermal conditioning; Deponieverhalten mechanisch-biologisch und thermisch behandelten Restabfalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danhamer, H.; Dach, J.; Jager, J. [Institut WAR, Darmstadt (Germany). FG Abfalltechnik

    1998-12-31

    The work studies, in landfill test reactors, water, gas and heat transport as well as gas and leachate formation in waste having undergone mechanical-biological and thermal conditioning. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wurde der Wasser-, Gas- und Waermetransport, sowie die Gasbildung- und Sickerwasserbelastung mechanisch-biologisch und thermisch vorbehandelter Abfaelle in Deponieversuchsreaktoren untersucht. (orig.)

  10. Utilization of liquid human wastes and introduction into the material cycling in biological life-support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, N. P.>; Ushakova, S. A.; Gribovskaya, I. V.; Kudenko, U. A.

    The possibilities of step-by-step utilization of liquid human wastes in biological life-support systems on long-functioning space stations have been considered in this work. Utilization involves "wet" urine incineration with hydrogen peroxide at normal pressure and 90 - 95°C temperature, urease-enzymic decomposition of urine and biological desalination in the higher plant link. The soybean flour was used as a source of urease. Growing soya plants as a component of the higher plant link would give a steady source of urease to the system. To decompose urea (9-15g) contained in 1l of incinerated urine we used 0.5 - 1 g of soy flour. The duration of hydrolysis of daily urea excreted by a human is 70 - 95 hours. It is supposed that ammonia excreted in the reaction of urea decomposition will be processed by nitrifying bacteria. The concentration of total nitrogen in urine after urea hydrolysis and removal of ammonia formed during the reaction constituted 0.6 - 1.2 g/l. Further biological desalination was carried out in the higher plant link, for that the edible salt-accumulating halophytes Salicornia europaea were used. To grow this plant under the aqueous culture conditions, the urine was additionally mineralized at 180 °C after incineration and decomposition of urea. The process of additional mineralization was related to the necessity of removal of organic materials and nitrogen residues, which higher concentration under the aqueous culture conditions has negative effect on plants. The volume of the nutrient solution for growing 6 plants of Salicornia europaea was 1.5 l (daily norm of urine excreted by human), the planting area was 0.032 m2. By the end of vegetation the productivity and mineral composition of Salicornia europaea plants were analyzed. The productivity of plants grown on liquid human wastes (the experiment) practically was not different from the productivity of plants grown on the mineral solution with sodium chloride (checkout). In experimental

  11. Microbial degradation of trichloroethylene in the rhizosphere: Potential application to biological remediation of waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility that vegetation may be used to actively promote microbial restoration of chemically contaminated soils was tested by using rhizosphere and nonvegetated soils collected from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated field site. Biomass determinations, disappearance of TCE from the headspace of spiked soil slurries, and mineralization of [14C]TCE to 14CO2 all showed that microbial activity is greater in rhizosphere soils and that TCE degradation occurs faster in the rhizosphere than in the edaphosphere. Thus, vegetation may be an important variable in the biological restoration of surface and near-surface soils

  12. STUDY ON APPLICATION OF AERATION BIOLOGICAL FLUID TANK TECHNOLGY IN NH+4-N WASTE WATER TREATMENT%曝气生物流化池(ABFT)技术在含氨氮污水治理的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈怡; 卢建国

    2003-01-01

    This paper introduces an application of "Aeration biological fluid tank" technology (ABFT) for the treatment of waste water containing NH+4-N and high concentrated organic chemicals. Highlights were focused on the effects of dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature and retention time on waste water biological treatment in order to find out a new approach in treatment of waste water containing high concentrated NH+4-N.

  13. Investigation of the effect of culture type on biological hydrogen production from sugar industry wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bio-hydrogen generation potential of sugar industry wastes was investigated. In the first part of the study, acidogenic anaerobic culture was enriched from the mixed anaerobic culture (MAC) through acidification of glucose. In the second part of the study, glucose acclimated acidogenic seed was used, along with the indigenous microorganisms, MAC, 2-bromoethanesulfonate treated MAC and heat treated MAC. Two different COD levels (4.5 and 30 g/L COD) were investigated for each culture type. Reactors with initial COD concentration of 4.5 g/L had higher H2 yields (20.3-87.7 mL H2/g COD) than the reactors with initial COD concentration of 30 g/L (0.9-16.6 mL H2/g COD). The 2-bromoethanesulfonate and heat treatment of MAC inhibited the methanogenic activity, but did not increase the H2 production yield. The maximum H2 production (87.7 mL H2/g COD) and minimum methanogenic activity were observed in the unseeded reactor with 4.5 g/L of initial COD.

  14. The cultivation of Rhizobial cells in sewage sludge and waste for the production of biological fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study on the growth of Rhizobium japonicum THA-7 in carriers: Peat Sludge, Filter press cake from sugar industry and the mixer compone nts of Sludge and Filter press cake. These carriers were sterilized by Gamm a radiation at 55 Kilograys. Then rhizobium suspension which grew to late log phase in Mannitol Yeast Extract broth were transfer to carriers. The initial rhizobial cells were 107 cfu at 50 percent moisture content. The maximum growth (109 cfu) was found after incubation at 30oC for 17 days in all carriers. The rhizobial cells were stored in carriers at 4o- 5oC for 120 days. The amount of cells in all carriers were detected at 108 cfu. Maximum survival rate was in the mixture of sludge and filter press cake at the ratio of 1 : 3. Therefore, It should be used as biological fertilizer better than other carriers

  15. Halomonas desiderata as a bacterial model to predict the possible biological nitrate reduction in concrete cells of nuclear waste disposals

    OpenAIRE

    Alquier, Marjorie; Kassim, Caroline; Bertron, Alexandra; Sablayrolles, Caroline; Rafrafi, Yan; Albrecht, Achim; Erable, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    After closure of a waste disposal cell in a repository for radioactive waste, resaturation is likely to cause the release of soluble species contained in cement and bituminous matrices, such as ionic species (nitrates, sulfates, calcium and alkaline ions, etc.), organic matter (mainly organic acids), or gases (from steel containers and reinforced concrete structures as well as from radiolysis within the waste packages). However, in the presence of nitrates in the near-field of waste, the wast...

  16. Material flow management by combining mechanic-biological and thermal waste processing; Stoffstrommanagement durch Kombination von mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Abfallbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahlten, M.J. [Joma Umwelt-Beratungsgesellschaft mbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    1998-10-01

    The aim of modern, sustainable waste management must be to conceive flexible waste management concepts which safeguard economy and the optimized use of realized investments even if the waste volumes accruing do not tally with projections. A prerequisite of cost-optimized, environmentally compatible and sustainable waste management in accordance with the requirements of the technical code on municipal waste (TASi) is the integration of the thermal processing of waste and its harnessing as an energy source. A way of realizing such flexible and cost-efficient concepts is by combining mechanic, and mechanic-biological, conditioning of waste with a topped thermal processing plant harnessing its energy potential. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Zielsetzung moderner, nachhaltiger Abfallwirtschaft muss es sein, flexible abfallwirtschaftliche Konzepte zu realisieren, die bei unsicheren Restabfallmengen neben der Wirtschaftlichkeit der Konzeption insbesondere auch eine optimierte Auslastung der realisierten Anlagen (der getaetigten Investitionen) erlaubt. Voraussetzung fuer eine kostenoptimierte, umweltvertraegliche und nachhaltige Abfallwirtschaft, die die Vorgaben der TASi beruecksichtigt, ist die Einbindung von thermischer Behandlung und energetischer Verwertung. Ein moeglicher Weg, derartige, flexible und auch kostenvertraegliche Konzepte zu realisieren, ist die Kombination aus mechanischer und mechanisch-biologischer Vorbehandlung der verbleibenden Restabfaelle mit einer nachgeschalteten thermischen/energetischen Nutzung der vorbehandelten Abfaelle. (orig./SR)

  17. Feasible way of Human Solid and Liquid Wastes' Inclusion Into Intersystem Mass Exchange of Biological-Technical Life Support Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Kudenko, Yurii; Griboskaya, Illiada; Gros, Jean-Bernard; Lasseur, Christophe

    The basic objective arising at use of mineralized human solid and liquid wastes serving as the source of mineral elements for plants cultivation in biological-technical life support systems appears to be NaCl presence in them. The given work is aimed at feasibility study of mineralized human metabolites' utilization for nutrient solutions' preparation for their further employment at a long-term cultivation of uneven-aged wheat and Salicornia europaea L. cenosis in a conveyer regime. Human solid and liquid wastes were mineralized by the "wet incineration" method developed by Yu. Kudenko. On their base the solutions were prepared which were used for cultivation of 5-aged wheat conveyer with the time step-interval of 14 days. Wheat was cultivated by hydroponics method on expanded clay aggregate. For partial demineralization of nutrient solution every two weeks after regular wheat harvesting 12 L of solution was withdrawn from the wheat irrigation tank and used for Salicornia europaea cultivation by the water culture method in a conveyer regime. The Salicornia europaea conveyer was represented by 2 ages with the time step-interval of 14 days. Resulting from repeating withdrawal of the solution used for wheat cultivation, sodium concentration in the wheat irrigation solution did not exceed 400 mg/l, and mineral elements contained in the taken solution were used for Salicornia europaea cultivation. The experiment lasted 7 months. Total wheat biomass productivity averaged 30.1 g*m-2*day-1 at harvest index equal to 36.8The work was carried out under support of SB RAS grant 132 and INTAS 05-1000008-8010

  18. Aerobic biological pretreatment of municipal solid waste with a high content of putrescibles: effect on landfill emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerassimidou, Spyridoula; Evangelou, Alexandros; Komilis, Dimitrios

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of aerobic biological pretreatment on the emissions of municipal solid waste (MSW) with a high content of putrescibles after landfilling. For this purpose, the organic fraction of MSW was simulated by a mixture of food waste and office paper at a 2.4:1 wet weight ratio. MSW was first pretreated aerobically for three different time periods (8, 45 and 90 days) resulting in organic matter reductions equal to 15%, 45% and 81% respectively. MSW were then placed in 160-L air-tight anaerobic bioreactors. The control anaerobic bioreactors contained untreated MSW. Anaerobic experiments lasted from 300 to 550 days. Results showed that the biogas production from untreated MSW was 372 NL dry kg(-1) (average of two replications) after 530 days. The MSW that was pretreated aerobically for 45 days and 90 days yielded 130 and 62 NL dry kg(-1) of biogas after 310 days and 230 days respectively. However, the 8-day (very short-term) pretreatment period led to an increase of the biogas yield (550 NL dry kg(-1) after 340 days) compared with that of raw refuse. All three runs with aerobically pretreated MSW reached the steady methanogenic phase faster than raw MSW. Leachate emissions were significantly lower in the aerobically-pretreated MSWthan the untreated ones. The leachate ammonium concentrations had an increasing trend in all anaerobic reactors and reached a plateau of between 2 and 3.5 g L(-1) at the end of the process. PMID:23771878

  19. Transmutation of stable isotopes and deactivation of radioactive waste in growing biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The phenomena of isotope transmutation in growing microbiological cultures were investigated. ► Transmutation in microbiological associations is 20 times more effective than in pure cultures. ► Transmutation of radioactive nuclei to stable isotopes in such associations was investigated. ► The most accelerated rate of Cs137 to stable Ba138 isotope transmutation was 310 days. ► “Microbiological deactivation” may be used for deactivation of Chernobyl and Fukushima areas. - Abstract: The report presents the results of qualifying examinations of stable and radioactive isotopes transmutation processes in growing microbiological cultures. It is shown that transmutation of stable isotopes during the process of growth of microbiological cultures, at optimal conditions in microbiological associations, is 20 times more effective than the same transmutation process in the form of “one-line” (pure) microbiological cultures. In the work, the process of direct, controlled decontamination of highly active intermediate lifetime and long-lived reactor isotopes (reactor waste) through the process of growing microbiological associations has been studied. In the control experiment (flask with active water but without microbiological associations), the “usual” law of nuclear decay applies, and the life-time of Cs137 isotope was about 30 years. The most rapidly increasing decay rate, which occurred with a lifetime τ* ≈ 310 days (involving an increase in rate, and decrease in lifetime by a factor of 35 times) was observed in the presence of Ca salt in closed flask with active water contained Cs137 solution and optimal microbiological association

  20. Biologic overview for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project study area includes five major vegetation associations characteristic of the transition between the northern extent of the Mojave Desert and the southern extent of the Great Basin Desert. A total of 32 species of reptiles, 66 species of birds, and 46 species of mammals are known to occur within these associations elsewhere on the Nevada Test Site. Ten species of plants, and the mule deer, wild horse, feral burro, and desert tortoise were defined as possible sensitive species because they are protected by federal and state regulations, or are being considered for such protection. The major agricultural resources of southern Nye County included 737,000 acres of public grazing land managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and 9500 acres of irrigated crop land located in the Beatty/Oasis valleys, the Amargosa Valley, and Ash Meadows. Range lands are of poor quality. Alfalfa and cotton are the major crops along with small amounts of grains, Sudan grass, turf, fruits, and melons. The largest impacts to known ecosystems are expected to result from: extensive disturbances associated with construction of roads, seismic lines, drilling pads, and surface facilities; storage and leaching of mined spoils; disposal of water; off-road vehicle travel; and, over several hundred years, elevated soil temperatures. Significant impacts to off-site areas such as Ash Meadows are anticipated if new residential developments are built there to accommodate an increased work force. Several species of concern and their essential habitats are located at Ash Meadows. Available literature contained sufficient baseline information to assess potential impacts of the proposed project on an area-wide basis. It was inadequate to support analysis of potential impacts on specific locations selected for site characterization studies, mining an exploratory shaft, or the siting and operation of a repository

  1. THE ROLE OF PLANTS IN EXPERIMENTAL BIOLOGICAL RECLAMATION IN A BED OF FURNACE WASTE FROM COAL-BASED ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz H. Dyguś

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the model experiment, an assessment of the role of plants in the reclamation of the bed of combustion waste from coal-based power plants fertilised with compost and sewage sludge. The bed of combustion waste was stored in cylindrical containers with a diameter of 80 cm (0.5 m2 of surface and the height of 100 cm. The first stage of the experiment was carried out in 2006–2007. Then the bed was fertilised with four types of compost and sewage sludge, and then seeded with four species of grasses and white mustard. The second stage was undertaken in 2011–2013. In 2011, mixture of four species of grasses and white mustard was seeded on the same bed. It was assumed that the continuation of research in the second stage, whose results of are presented in this paper, will show a broader spectrum of vegetation changes, what will accurately track the process of biological reclamation of the bed of combustion waste. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of reclamation in the experiment, based on the percentage estimates of the coverage of species and crop yields. During the three-year (second stage experiment 78 species of self-seeding plants belonging to 19 taxa in the rank of families and 11 syntaxonomic groups were recorded. The most numerous were the families: aster family, grass family, papilionaceous family, goosefoot family and cabbage family. Among the syntaxonomic groups the dominating species belonged to the class Stellarietea mediae, Molinio-Arrhenatheretea and Artemisietea vulgaris. Among the forms of life hemicryptophyte and therophytes were the most represented. Highest total yields of plants were found in model containers with Complex compost and Radiowo compost and the model of sewage sludge. Based on the estimated models in each degree of coverage of species and crop yield, the highest reclamation efficiency was demonstrated in the models of reclamation of composts Complex and Radiowo, as well as in the model of

  2. Gaseous pollutants emitted from a mechanical biological treatment plant for municipal solid waste: odor assessment and photochemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingjing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Na; Shao, Liming; He, Pinjing

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations and chromatographic profiles of gaseous pollutants emitted from a municipal solid waste (MSW) biological treatment plant were investigated to identify the major odor substances and atmospheric photochemical reactive species (PRS). Four methods were used to measure different gaseous pollutants in this study, including colorimetric tubes, gas chromatography with mass spectrometry/flame ionization detection/pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-MS/FID/PFPD) preceded by cold trap concentration, GC-FID preceded by solid-phase microextraction (SPME), and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after derivation by 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). Seventy-five gaseous compounds belonging to nine groups (nitrogen compounds, sulfur compounds, alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, terpenes, alcohols, carbonyls, and volatile fatty acids [VFAs]) were identified. In the pre-biotreatment facility, the total concentration of the gaseous pollutants reached the maximum value on day 7 (317 ppm). During the post-biotreatment process, the total concentration of gaseous pollutants decreased from 331 ppm at the beginning to 162 ppm in the end. The group with the greatest decrease was carbonyls, from 64 to 7.4 ppm, followed by alcohols, from 40 to 4.5 ppm, which were both oxygenated compounds. The proportion of aromatics was notably high in the pre-mechanical treatment facility, accounting for 50.6% of the total, revealing the xenobiotic compounds disseminated by stirring and agitating the waste in the initial stage. The proportions of nitrogen compounds were lower in the pre- and post-mechanical treatment facilities (1.5% and 6.9%) than in the pre- and post-biotreatment facilities (11.9% and 13:8%), suggesting that their generation was closely associated with waste degradation. The major odor compounds in the facilities were acetic acid, butyric acid, valeric acid, isovaleric acid, and dimethyl sulfide. The major PRS in the facilities were aromatics, acetaldehyde

  3. Study of ecologo-biological reactions of common flax to finely dispersed metallurgical wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, O.; Gusev, A.; Skripnikova, E.; Skripnikova, M.; Krutyakov, Yu; Kudrinsky, A.; Mikhailov, I.; Senatova, S.; Chuprunov, C.; Kuznetsov, D.

    2015-11-01

    Study was carried out on the influence of metallurgic industrial sludge on morphometric and biochemical indicators as well as productivity of common flax under laboratory and field conditions. In laboratory settings negative influence on seed germinating ability and positive influence on sprouts biomass production in water medium were observed. In sand medium suppression of biological productivity under the influence of sludge together with photosynthetic system II (FS II) activity stimulation were registered. Biochemical study showed peroxidase activity decrease in laboratory, while activity of polyphenol oxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were given a mild boost under the influence of sludge. In the field trial, positive influence of sludge on flax photosynthetic apparatus was shown. Positive influence of sludge on vegetation and yield indicators was observed. The analysis of heavy metals content showed excess over maximum allowable concentration (MAC) of copper and zinc in control plants, it may point to the background soil pollution. In the plants from the trial groups receiving 0.5 and 2 ton/ha heavy metals content below the control values was registered. Application of 4 ton/ha led to the maximum content of copper and zinc in the plants among the trial groups. The analysis of soils from the test plots indicated no excess over maximum allowable concentrations of heavy metals. Thus, further study of possibilities of using metallurgic industrial sludge as a soil stimulator in flax cultivation at the application rate of 0.5 t/ha seems promising.

  4. Preliminary assessment of geologic materials to minimize biological intrusion of low-level waste trench covers and plans for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term integrity of low-level waste shallow land burial sites is dependent on the interaction of physical, chemical, and biological factors that modify the waste containment system. Past research on low-level waste shallow land burial methods has emphasized physical (i.e., water infiltration, soil erosion) and chemical (radionuclide leaching) processes that can cause radionuclide transport from a waste site. Preliminary results demonstrate that a sandy backfill material offers little resistance to root and animal intrusion through the cover profile. However, bentonite clay, cobble, and cobble-gravel combinations do reduce plant root and animal intrusion through cover profiles compared with sandy backfill soil. However, bentonite clay barrier systems appear to be degraded by plant roots through time. Desiccation of the clay barrier by invading plant roots may limit the usefulness of bentonite clay as a moisture and/or biological carrier unless due consideration is given to this interaction. Future experiments are described that further examine the effect of plant roots on clay barrier systems and that determine the effectiveness of proposed biological barriers on larger scales and under various stress conditions

  5. Combining mechanical-biological residual waste treatment plants with the carbonisation-combustion process; Kombination MBA mit dem Schwel-Brenn-Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, J.; Wiehn, G. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Bereich Energieerzeugung

    1998-09-01

    The disposal market for household waste is strongly influenced by the legal framework governing it. A further factor that makes it difficult for the authorities responsible for disposal to decide on residual waste disposal by means of thermal or mechanical-biological treatment plants is the downward pressure on disposal prices from inexpensive, underused landfills. This makes it all the more important for a future-oriented waste management to develop a both economically and ecologically optimised waste disposal concept. In this situation there is much in favour of adopting a concept consisting of a combination of mechanical, mechanical-biological, and thermal treatment which takes due account of waste disposal concepts at the regional and supraregional scale. [Deutsch] Der Entsorgungsmarkt fuer Siedlungsabfaelle wird stark durch die Entwicklung der rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen beeinflusst. Hinzu kommt, dass der Entscheidungsprozess der oeffentlichen Entsorgungstraeger zur Restabfallentsorgung mittels thermischer oder mechanisch-biologischer Anlagen durch den Druck auf die Entsorgungspreise aufgrund der kostenguenstigen, nicht ausgelasteten Deponien erschwert wird. Umso mehr muss das Ziel einer zukunftsorientierten Abfallwirtschaft sein, unter oekonomischen und oekologischen Gesichtspunkten ein optimiertes Abfallkonzept aufzubauen. Hier kann es sehr hilfreich sein, sich eines Konzeptes, bestehend aus der Kombination von mechanischer, mechanisch-biologischer und thermischer Behandlung unter Beruecksichtigung des regionalen und ueberregionalen Abfallkonzeptes zu bedienen. (orig./SR)

  6. Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG–DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

  7. Status and Development Trend of Waste Composting Biological Treatment in China%我国垃圾堆肥生物处理现状及发展趋势分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋立杰; 陈善平

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the state of stagnation even decline for municipal waste composting biological treatment in China, and decline of waste composting biological treatment capacity in the last decade, the development trend and suggestions for biological treatment of organic waste were proposed.%针对我国城市垃圾堆肥生物处理处于停滞甚至萎缩的状态,以及近10 a堆肥生物处理能力存在不增反降等问题,提出有机垃圾生物处理的发展趋势和对策建议.

  8. Emissions from mechanical and biological waste treatment - parameters, metrology and assessment; Emissionen bei der mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlung-Parameter, Messtechnik und Bewertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doedens, H.; Cuhls, C. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Institut fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft und Abfalltechnik

    1999-07-01

    This paper deals with the following topics: emissions from mechanical and biological waste treatment and their past assessment on the basis of the Clean Air Technical Code of 1986; draft of an ordinance for the execution of the German Federal Emission Control Law, submitted on 18/02/1998 (Ordinance Concerning Notifiable Plants - BImSchV); plants subject to licensing; assessment of measurements on large-scale mechanical and biological waste treatment plants on the basis of previous regulations, the Clean Air Technical Code and the BImSchV draft. [German] Themen des Artikels sind: Emissionen der MBA und deren bisherige Bewertung nach der TA Luft '86. Entwurf einer Verordnung zur Durchfuehrung des BImSchG vom 18.02.1998 (Verordnung ueber anzeigebeduerftige Anlagen-BImSchV). Genehmigungsbeduerftige Anlagen. Messverfahren zum Gesamtkohlenstoff. Bewertung von Messungen an grosstechnischen MBA anhand bisheriger Regelungen, basierend auf der TA Luft und dem BImSchV-Entwurf. (orig.)

  9. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Federica Martini; José V. Tarazona; M. Victoria Pablos

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetra...

  10. The Potential For Efficient Biological Pre-Treatment Of Exploration Based Waste Streams For Potable Water Production Using A Membrane Reactor Capable Of Simultaneous Nitrification-Denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, William; Morse, Audra; Landes, Nick

    Long term space habitation and exploration require high efficiency water recycling systems. Waste streams from space habitation contain high concentrations of both organic nitrogen and ammonium and high ratios of N to organic C compared to terrestrial wastewater. As with terrestrial systems wastewater must be highly treated to remove organic carbon, nitrogen compounds, salts, and trace constituents. In general, either some type of reverse osmosis or distillation step is required as the final treatment prior to disinfection. However, the high waste strength of the waste can seriously impact the efficiency of these post-processors. Biological pre-treatment is one process capable of significant reductions in organic carbon and nitrogen. Biological systems are self sustaining and require minimal inputs of energy or consumables. Research in our lab has been conducted to evaluate a number of micro-gravity compatible biological reactor systems. Both nitrification-denitrification coupled systems, in which oxygen consumption is reduced by using nitrate as an electron acceptor, and single reactor systems for organic removal and nitrification have been extensively investigated. Reactor types include tubular pulsed flow reactors, packed bed reactors, and membrane reactors. Recently a single vessel membrane reactor capable of simultaneous nitrification-denitrification (sNDN) has been developed and evaluated for its ability to potentially replace other proposed systems. Results to be presented include a review of past system performance and limitations with comparison to the performance of the new sNDN reactor system. Conversion efficiency, stability, and volumetric reaction rates will be discussed.

  11. The emerging role of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism as a biological target and cellular regulator of cancer-induced muscle wasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, James A; Hardee, Justin P; VanderVeen, Brandon N

    2016-06-01

    While skeletal muscle mass is an established primary outcome related to understanding cancer cachexia mechanisms, considerable gaps exist in our understanding of muscle biochemical and functional properties that have recognized roles in systemic health. Skeletal muscle quality is a classification beyond mass, and is aligned with muscle's metabolic capacity and substrate utilization flexibility. This supplies an additional role for the mitochondria in cancer-induced muscle wasting. While the historical assessment of mitochondria content and function during cancer-induced muscle loss was closely aligned with energy flux and wasting susceptibility, this understanding has expanded to link mitochondria dysfunction to cellular processes regulating myofiber wasting. The primary objective of this article is to highlight muscle mitochondria and oxidative metabolism as a biological target of cancer cachexia and also as a cellular regulator of cancer-induced muscle wasting. Initially, we examine the role of muscle metabolic phenotype and mitochondria content in cancer-induced wasting susceptibility. We then assess the evidence for cancer-induced regulation of skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, mitophagy, and oxidative stress. In addition, we discuss environments associated with cancer cachexia that can impact the regulation of skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism. The article also examines the role of cytokine-mediated regulation of mitochondria function, followed by the potential role of cancer-induced hypogonadism. Lastly, a role for decreased muscle use in cancer-induced mitochondrial dysfunction is reviewed. PMID:26593326

  12. International 7{sup th} ASA waste days. Mechanical-biological waste treatment - performance of MBT. Proceedings; Internationale 7. ASA-Abfalltage. Mechanisch-Biologische Restabfallbehandlung - Leistungsfaehigkeit der MBA. Tagungsunterlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barth, Josef; Rohring, Daniel (comps.)

    2008-07-01

    Within the International 7th ASA Waste Days at 13th to 15th February, 2008, at the Congress Center Hanover (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Climate change and resource protection (M. Stock); (2) Legal requirements for immission protection of thermal and biological waste treatment (U. Lahl); (3) MBT and requirements in Europe incl. the Integrated Pollution prevention and Control IPPC Guideline (B. Zambrzycki); (4) MBT in Italy - A case study for a successful introduction (A. Confalonieri); (5) MBT with dry digestion - Example of Pohlsche Heide aus Bassum (B. Schulte); (6) MBT with dry digestion - Example of MBT Hanover (B. Vielhaber, C. Nuelle); (7) MBT with percolation - Example of Kahlenberg (G. Person, M. Schreiber, G. Gibis); (8) MBT with tunnel and table windrows decomposition process - Example Havelland; (9) MBT with tunnel and table windrows decomposition process - Example Linkenbach (S. Kraus, T. Sterk); (10) MBS Mechanical Biological Stabilisation Process - Example Osnabrueck (C. Niehaves); (11) Complete Eco-efficient Material and Energetic Recovery of Dried Municipal Solid Wastes (M. Monzel); (12) MPS Mechanical Physical Stabilisation Process - Example Berlin (D. Michalski, A. Wendt, U. Buell); (13) Secondary Fuels - Pretreatment, Specialities, Requirements, Current Sales and Markets (S. Flamme); (14) Corrosion in Biological Waste Treatment Plants (K. Fricke, T. Thiel, T. Bahr, R. Wallmann); (15) Problems at the Operation of Plants with the RTO Exhaust Gas Treatment in the Frame of MBT Processes (O. Carlowitz, O. Neese); (16) Problems and Solutions with the Analysis and Emission Measuring According to AbfABIV and 30. BImSchV (K. Ketelsen); (17) Securing of a High Plant Availability by Self-Supporting Cleansing, Maintenance and Care Programmes - Example of MBT Plant Croebern (J. Burchert); (18) Fire Control - Conceptions, Safety Measures, Cause of Fires - Example of MBT Ennigerloh and MBT Vorketzin (M. Pahlenkemper, B

  13. Processing of liquid effluents of mechanical-biological waste treatment plants according to the limiting values set in Appendix 23 of the German Waste Water Ordinance; Aufbereitung von MBA-Abwasser entsprechend den Grenzwerten des Anhang 23 der Abwasserverordnung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, F. [INNOWA, Heuweiler (Germany); Schalk, P. [WEHRLE Umwelt GmbH, Energie und Umwelttechnik, Emmendingen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Liquid effluents of mechanical-biological waste treatment plants are similar to landfill leachates and must be purified. In Germany, this is specified in Appendix 23 of the Waste Water ordinance. More than 100 leachate purification plants are available in Europe, and established technologies should be transferred to mechanical-biological waste treatment. (orig.) [German] Die mechanisch-biologische Abfallbehandlung hat sich in Europa als ein Konzept zur Aufbereitung von Siedlungsabfaellen etabliert. Aus dem biologischen Abbau und der Entwaesserung entsteht ein vergleichsweise komplexes, hochbelastetes Abwasser, das einer Reinigung zu unterziehen ist. In seiner Zusammensetzung ist MBA-Abwasser mit bestimmten Deponiesickerwaessern vergleichbar. In Deutschland wurde fuer Abwasser aus MBA-Anlagen der Anhang 23 in der Abwasserverordnung erlassen. Deren Grenzwerte sind nahezu identisch mit den Einleitparametern aus der Reinigung von Deponiesickerwasser. Auf dem Gebiet der Deponiesickerwasserreinigung wurden bisher weit ueber 100 Anlagen in Europa errichtet. Durch den gemeinsamen Ursprung sowie der Vergleichbarkeit von gewissen Deponiesickerwaessern und Abwaessern aus MBA-Anlagen ist es naheliegend, bewaehrte Verfahren aus der Sickerwasserreinigung in Abfallbehandlungsanlagen zu transferieren. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of the thermo-treatment process to dispose of recombinant DNA waste from biological research laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Mengnan; Zheng Guanghong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Wang Lei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: celwang@yahoo.com; Xiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China); Fu Xiaohua; Le Yiquan [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Ren Daming [State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2009-01-01

    The discharge of recombinant DNA waste from biological laboratories into the eco-system may be one of the pathways resulting in horizontal gene transfer or 'gene pollution'. Heating at 100 deg. C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating recombinant DNA waste in biological research laboratories in China. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and the safety of the thermo-treatment method in the disposal of recombinant DNA waste. Quantitative PCR, plasmid transformation and electrophoresis technology were used to evaluate the decay/denaturation efficiency during the thermo-treatment process of recombinant plasmid, pET-28b. Results showed that prolonging thermo-treatment time could improve decay efficiency of the plasmid, and its decay half-life was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment at 100 deg. C. However, after 30 min of thermo-treatment some transforming activity remained. Higher ionic strength could protect recombinant plasmid from decay during the treatment process. These results indicate that thermo-treatment at 100 deg. C cannot decay and inactivate pET-28b completely. In addition, preliminary results showed that thermo-treated recombinant plasmids were not degraded completely in a short period when they were discharged into an aquatic environment. This implies that when thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the eco-system, they may have enough time to re-nature and transform, thus resulting in gene diffusion.

  15. Evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of the thermo-treatment process to dispose of recombinant DNA waste from biological research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discharge of recombinant DNA waste from biological laboratories into the eco-system may be one of the pathways resulting in horizontal gene transfer or 'gene pollution'. Heating at 100 deg. C for 5-10 min is a common method for treating recombinant DNA waste in biological research laboratories in China. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness and the safety of the thermo-treatment method in the disposal of recombinant DNA waste. Quantitative PCR, plasmid transformation and electrophoresis technology were used to evaluate the decay/denaturation efficiency during the thermo-treatment process of recombinant plasmid, pET-28b. Results showed that prolonging thermo-treatment time could improve decay efficiency of the plasmid, and its decay half-life was 2.7-4.0 min during the thermo-treatment at 100 deg. C. However, after 30 min of thermo-treatment some transforming activity remained. Higher ionic strength could protect recombinant plasmid from decay during the treatment process. These results indicate that thermo-treatment at 100 deg. C cannot decay and inactivate pET-28b completely. In addition, preliminary results showed that thermo-treated recombinant plasmids were not degraded completely in a short period when they were discharged into an aquatic environment. This implies that when thermo-treated recombinant DNAs are discharged into the eco-system, they may have enough time to re-nature and transform, thus resulting in gene diffusion

  16. Problematika formaldehida v odpadnih vodah lesne industrije: Problem of waste effluents in wood industry - the possibilities of biological treatment:

    OpenAIRE

    Muck, Tadeja

    1999-01-01

    Wood industry does not pollute waters to a great extend, nevertheless we must be aware that the problem still exists. Waste effluents in wood industry contain very high portion of dangerous and toxic substance - formaldehyde. That is why it is inevitably vital to start with detailed analysis of waste effluents and with studies of possibilities of decontamination. Statistical analysis are showing that wood industry are not well aware of the fact how quickly the ecological balance can be destro...

  17. Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-01

    Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

  18. Symbiotic treatment. A new biological technology for treating waste waters from the canning industry; Depuracion simbiotica. Una nueva tecnologia biologica para la depuracion de aguas residuales del sector de conservas vegetales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayuso Garcia, L. M.; Canova Perez, J. L.; Llorens Pascual del Riquelme, M.; Saez Mercader, J.

    2008-07-01

    Many studies show that biological processes are the most suitable for the canned food industry waste water treatment. A new biological technology that minimizes the management, operation and maintenance problems associated to the waste water treatment is proposed. The results obtained in pilot plant of a new natural technology for treating waste water are presented in this paper. This technology was applied to the treatment of canned food industry waste water and received the effluent coming from peach and pear processing. A pilot plant composed of five treatment stages with vertical distribution has been constructed. This plant treats 80 l/h and have a surface of 1 m{sup 2}. The effluent of this plant complies the requirements established in Decreto 16/1999 (BORM no.97, 29 april 1999), about discharge of industrial waste water to sewers. (Author) 10 refs.

  19. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2006-08-25

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  20. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatic Biology Fish Ponds. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-F-33, 146-F Aquatice Biology Fish Ponds waste site was an area with six small rectangular ponds and one large circular pond used to conduct tests on fish using various mixtures of river and reactor effluent water. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification and applicable confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  1. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 141-C Large Animal Barn and Biology Laboratory (Hog Barn). Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-027

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 141-C waste site is a former large animal barn and biology laboratory within the 100-F Area experimental animal farm. Strontium-90, arsenic, and multiple polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were detected within residual demolition debris at concentrations exceeding cleanup criteria. The site has been remediated by removing approximately 900 bank cubic meters of soil and debris within the former building footprint to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The results of verification sampling demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also showed that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  2. Biological treatment for sewage

    OpenAIRE

    Xintai, Wang; Luc Sanya, Eric

    2007-01-01

    The sewage treatment is by no means insignificant in our world, and for many sewage treatment plants, the biological treatment is the best choice to eliminate the nutrients and organic compounds in the waste water. Today, in most waste water treatment plants, there are two main kinds of biological waste water treatment – the active sludge method and the biofilm method. Each of these two methods have their own advantages and disadvantages. For different towns or cities, the waste water treatme...

  3. A review of biological studies sponsored by the Department of the Environment to assist feasibility studies of the disposal of heat generating radioactive waste in the deep ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report review recent biological studies on the organisms of the deep sea and takes into account the physical and chemical parameters that influence them. Particular attention is devoted to studies funded by the Department of the Environment to determine the technical feasibility of disposing of high level radioactive wastes in the deep sea. Such quantitative information that exists concerning the input and output of organic material into the abyss is given. This information is related to the diversity, growth, size, and reproductive biology of the abyssal infauna and epifauna and to the organisms within the water column above. Life processes, under the influence of high pressure are discussed and related to the uptake by and release from organisms of radiochemicals. Gaps in our present knowledge of the total ecosystem are identified and recommendations for future studies made. (author)

  4. Evaluation of combustion experiments conducted during the research and development project ``Mechanical-biological waste conditioning in combination with thermal processing of partial waste fractions``; Auswertung der Verbrennungsversuche zum Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhaben ``mechanisch-biologische Restmuellbehandlung unter Einbindung thermischer Verfahren fuer Teilfraktionen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, J.; Lohf, A.; Herr, C. [Institut WAR, Darmstadt (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The technical code on municipal waste makes specific demands on waste to be deposited at landfills which can only be met if mechanical-biological conditioning of waste as well as thermal processing of partial waste fractions are continued also in the future. But waste that has undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning presents different combustion properties from those of unconditioned waste. In this second stage of the research project, the thermal processability of waste having undergone mechanical or mechanical-biological conditioning was studied. Together with the results from the first project stage, where the throughput represented exclusively mechanically conditioned material, the results of the latter measuring campaigns comprehensively demonstrate possibilities for the thermal processing of partial waste fractions having undergone biological-mechanical conditioning, and inform on changes in plant performance. (orig.) [Deutsch] Um die in der TA-Siedlungsabfall an den abzulagernden Restmuell gestellten Deponieeingangsbedingungen zu erfuellen, muss neben einer mechanisch-biologischen Aufbereitung bei Teilfraktionen auch weiterhin eine thermische Behandlung eingeplant werden. Die Verbrennungseigenschaften von mechanisch oder mechanisch-biologisch vorbehandeltem Restmuell weichen allerdings von denen von unbehandeltem Restmuell ab. In dieser zweiten Projektphase des Forschungsvorhabens wurde eine Untersuchung bezueglich der thermischen Behandelbarkeit von mechanisch und auch biologisch vorbehandeltem Muell durchgefuehrt. Die Ergebnisse der Messkampagnen bilden zusammen mit den Ergebnissen der ersten Projektphase, in der ausschliesslich mechanisch vorbehandeltes Material durchgesetzt wurde, eine umfassende Darstellung ueber Moeglichkeiten und veraenderte Anlagenverhalten bei der thermischen Behandlung von Teilfraktionen aus der biologisch-mechanisch Vorbehandlung. (orig.)

  5. Outline of biological surveys around planned waste dumping site off Japan conducted by Tokai Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological surveys were conducted by the R/V Kaiyo-Maru during 1972 - 1974 in and around the proposed dumping site in the Northwest Pacific Basin. The sampling was made by diverse kinds of gears to collect various size spectra of various ecological group of marine fauna. Some of biological result obtained by this survey is reviewed

  6. effect of gamma irradiation and enzyme supplementation on the nutritional and biological values of tomato and pea wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the present work was carried out on tomato and pea wastes as unconventional feedstuff for broiler chicks. those wastes were added to the diets at 10% after irradiated by dose levels of 0.75 and 100 KGy and supplemented with kemzyme at (i g/kg diet). the chicks fed on the experimental diets from 2-7 week of age. during feeding period, body weight gain and feed consumption were recorded weekly . at the end of the feeding period . birds were taken randomly to evaluate the carcass characteristics and blood serum parameters . digestibility trial was done to evaluate the digestibility of diets nutrients

  7. Baseline levels of bioaerosols and volatile organic compounds around a municipal waste incinerator prior to the construction of a mechanical-biological treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilavert, Lolita; Nadal, Martí; Inza, Isabel; Figueras, María J; Domingo, José L

    2009-09-01

    New waste management programs are currently aimed at developing alternative treatment technologies such as mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) and composting plants. However, there is still a high uncertainty concerning the chemical and microbiological risks for human health, not only for workers of these facilities, but also for the population living in the neighborhood. A new MBT plant is planned to be constructed adjacently to a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). In order to evaluate its potential impact and to differentiate the impacts of MSWI from those of the MBT when the latter is operative, a pre-operational survey was initiated by determining the concentrations of 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols (total bacteria, gram-negative bacteria, fungi and Aspergillus fumigatus) in airborne samples around the MSWI. The results indicated that the current concentrations of bioaerosols (ranges: 382-3882, 18-790, 44-926, and urban and industrial zones. With the exception of total bacteria, no correlations were observed between the environmental concentrations of biological agents and the direction/distance from the facility. However, total bacteria presented significantly higher levels downwind. Moreover, a non-significant increase of VOCs was detected in sites closer to the incinerator, which means that the MSWI could have a very minor impact on the surrounding environment. PMID:19346120

  8. Biological and physicochemical methods for utilization of plant wastes and human exometabolites for increasing internal cycling and closure of life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotukhin, I. G.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Gribovskaya, I. V.

    Wheat was cultivated on soil-like substrate (SLS) produced by the action of worms and microflora from the inedible biomass of wheat. After the growth of the wheat crop, the inedible biomass was restored in SLS and exposed to decomposition ("biological" combustion) and its mineral compounds were assimilated by plants. Grain was returned to the SLS in the amount equivalent to human solid waste produced by consumption of the grain. Human wastes (urine and feces) after physicochemical processing turned into mineralized form (mineralized urine and mineralized feces) and entered the plants' nutrient solution amounts equal to average daily production. Periodically (once every 60-70 days) the nutrient solution was partly (up to 50%) desalinated by electrodialysis. Due to this NaCl concentration in the nutrient solution was sustained at a fixed level of about 0.26%. The salt concentrate obtained could be used in the human nutrition through NaCl extraction and the residuary elements were returned through the mineralized human liquid wastes into matter turnover. The control wheat cultivation was carried out on peat with use of the Knop nutrient solution. Serial cultivation of several wheat vegetations within 280 days was conducted during the experiment. Grain output varied and yield/harvest depended, in large part, upon the amount of inedible biomass returned to SLS and the speed of its decomposition. After achieving a stationary regime, (when the quantity of wheat inedible biomass utilized during vegetation in SLS is equal to the quantity of biomass introduced into SLS before vegetation) grain harvest in comparison with the control was at most 30% less, and in some cases was comparable to the control harvest values. The investigations carried out on the wheat example demonstrated in principle the possibility of long-term functioning of the LSS photosynthesizing link based on optimizations of biological and physicochemical methods of utilization of the human and plants wastes

  9. Developing biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Progress report, April 1, 1985--October 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    During the first year of this contract great efforts were made to develop methods for (1) characterizing bacteria from soil and sediment, (2) evaluating the ability of single and mixed soil bacterial isolates to, (a) bioconcentrate, (b) biodegrade and/or (c) precipitate inorganic and organic pollutants and (3) expanding current concepts for treating waste in aqueous (i.e. biological waste treatment system) and solid media (i.e. in situ soil (soil) treatment system). The development of the above methods are in the final stages of completion and we have as a result of these efforts isolated from soil (1) a mixed culture which precipitate toxic metals (i.e. mercury cadmium, lead etc.) and (2) single isolates which bioconcentrate a variety of toxic metals. Methods for screening soil bacterial isolates for their ability to concentrate, degrade and/or precipitate environmental pollutants have been developed. The development of those methods will allow the staff at ORRI to quickly screen hundreds of samples in our attempt to isolate bacteria capable of degrading, concentrating and/or precipitating inorganics and organics in aqueous and solid waste. The results of these studies are summarized below.

  10. Developing biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Progress report, April 1, 1985--October 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the first year of this contract great efforts were made to develop methods for (1) characterizing bacteria from soil and sediment, (2) evaluating the ability of single and mixed soil bacterial isolates to, (a) bioconcentrate, (b) biodegrade and/or (c) precipitate inorganic and organic pollutants and (3) expanding current concepts for treating waste in aqueous (i.e. biological waste treatment system) and solid media (i.e. in situ soil (soil) treatment system). The development of the above methods are in the final stages of completion and we have as a result of these efforts isolated from soil (1) a mixed culture which precipitate toxic metals (i.e. mercury cadmium, lead etc.) and (2) single isolates which bioconcentrate a variety of toxic metals. Methods for screening soil bacterial isolates for their ability to concentrate, degrade and/or precipitate environmental pollutants have been developed. The development of those methods will allow the staff at ORRI to quickly screen hundreds of samples in our attempt to isolate bacteria capable of degrading, concentrating and/or precipitating inorganics and organics in aqueous and solid waste. The results of these studies are summarized below

  11. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Martini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50 and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians.

  12. Are fish and standardized FETAX assays protective enough for amphibians? A case study on Xenopus laevis larvae assay with biologically active substances present in livestock wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V; Pablos, M Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC(50)) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  13. Are Fish and Standardized FETAX Assays Protective Enough for Amphibians? A Case Study on Xenopus laevis Larvae Assay with Biologically Active Substances Present in Livestock Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Federica; Tarazona, José V.; Pablos, M. Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Biologically active substances could reach the aquatic compartment when livestock wastes are considered for recycling. Recently, the standardized FETAX assay has been questioned, and some researchers have considered that the risk assessment performed on fish could not be protective enough to cover amphibians. In the present study a Xenopus laevis acute assay was developed in order to compare the sensitivity of larvae relative to fish or FETAX assays; veterinary medicines (ivermectin, oxytetracycline, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and trimethoprim) and essential metals (zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium) that may be found in livestock wastes were used for the larvae exposure. Lethal (LC50) and sublethal effects were estimated. Available data in both, fish and FETAX studies, were in general more protective than values found out in the current study, but not in all cases. Moreover, the presence of nonlethal effects, caused by ivermectin, zinc, and copper, suggested that several physiological mechanisms could be affected. Thus, this kind of effects should be deeply investigated. The results obtained in the present study could expand the information about micropollutants from livestock wastes on amphibians. PMID:22629159

  14. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal - results of experiences in three large waste water treatment plants. Biologische Phosphatelimination - Betriebserfahrungen an drei Grossanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, P. (Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen, FG Siedlungswasserwirtschaft, Kassel Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany)); Telgmann, U. (Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen, FG Siedlungswasserwirtschaft, Kassel Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany)); Memmen, K. (Fachbereich Bauingenieurwesen, FG Siedlungswasserwirtschaft, Kassel Univ. (Gesamthochschule) (Germany))

    1994-09-01

    Within a scientific project especially the operation of four real-size sewage treatment plants with different processes of enhanced biological phosphorus removal is investigated under the aspect of efficiency, stability, practicability and costs of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Three plants and first results are explained and compared as well with one another as with data, which are generally regarded as favourable conditions for the enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Between the plants there are significant differences in the degree of P-elimination mainly due to different characteristics of the wastewater. An important influence on P-effluent concentrations may be exacted by P-resolution in the final clarifier. (orig.)

  15. Novel, energy-optimized membrane design for biological waste water treatment systems; Ein neuentwickeltes Niedrig-Energie-Membransystem fuer Membran-Biologien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebbecke, S. [Preussag Wassertechnik GmbH, Bremen (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    In industrial waste water treatment, circular movement of waste water, scarcity of space for erecting waste water treatment plants, and economy are factors of eminent importance, calling for innovative, efficient process techniques. Up to now, separation of activated sludge from cleaned waste water has been done almost exclusively by means of sedimentation. But because of the slight difference in density between water and biomass, large final sedimentation tanks are indispensable, and attainable biomass concentrations in an activated sludge tank (or bioreactor) are low (3-4g/l). Given that cleaning performance is directly proportional to biomass concentration, achieving higher biomass concentrations spells substantially enhanced efficiency per unit of space of biological systems, thus saving reaction volume. For this task, membrane techniques are suitable, which, contrary to sedimentation, permit random-selection, operationally stable retention and concentration of biomass with a definitely smaller space requirement. (orig.) [German] Bei der industriellen Abwasserbehandlung stehen die Kreislauffuehrung des Abwassers, beengte Platzverhaeltnisse fuer die Errichtung von Abwasserbehandlungsanlagen und die Wirtschaftlichkeit im Vordergrund, so dass dort innovative, effiziente Verfahrenstechniken gefragt sind. Zur Abtrennung des Belebtschlammes vom gereinigten Abwasser wird bisher fast ausschliesslich die Sedimentation eingesetzt. Der geringe Dichteunterschied zwischen Wasser und Biomasse macht jedoch grosse Nachklaerbecken notwendig und die erreichbaren Biomassekonzentrationen im Belebungsbecken (bzw. Bioreaktor) sind gering (3-4 g/l). Da die Reinigungsleistung der Biomassekonzentration direkt proportional ist, kann mit der Einstellung hoeherer Biomassekonzentrationen die Raumumsatzleistung biologischer Systeme erheblich gesteigert und somit Reaktionsvolumen eingespart werden. Fuer diese Aufgabe koennen Membranverfahren eingesetzt werden, die im Gegensatz zur

  16. Emission model for landfills with mechanically-biologically pretreated waste, with the emphasis on modelling the gas balance; Emissionsprognosemodell fuer Deponien mit mechanisch-biologisch vorbehandelten Abfaellen - Schwerpunkt: Modellierung des Gashaushaltes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danhamer, H.

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work was to determine influence factors on processes going on in landfills with mechanically-biologically pretreated waste (MBP-landfills) in order to predict emissions. For this purpose a computer based model has been developed. The model allows to simulate the gas, water and heat balance as well as settlement processes and was called DESIM2005 (version MB). It is based on theoretical modeling approaches as well as data from lab and reactor experiments. The main focus of model application was to determine factors influencing the gas phase and the emissions of landfill gas and methane during operation and aftercare of MBP-landfills. By performing simulations the effects of changing parameters for the processes gas transport and biological degradation as well as the effects of different qualities in waste pretreatment and of varying landfill operation techniques were investigated. Possibilities for increasing the environmental sustainability of landfills containing mechanically-biologically pretreated waste were shown. (orig.)

  17. Preliminary design of a biological treatment facility for trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (the Authority) funded treatability study identified biotreatment as the best technology to reduce the hazardous constituent concentrations below discharge criteria. Ion exchange resins were shown to reduce strontium-90 and cesium-137 concentrations of a low-level radioactive waste disposal trench leachate below release limits. Based on the results of this treatability study, the Authority has funded the design of a leachate treatment system. An activated sludge bioreactor and ion exchange resin columns will be components of the treatment train. A discussion of the design and the design criteria for the treatment facility will be provided. Particular emphasis will be placed on the availability of the off-the-shelf equipment and the modifications that will be required. Other issues which will be discussed are: Tritium concentration concerns, secondary waste generation and processing, design codes, site layout and schedule

  18. Effect of ultrasound, low-temperature thermal and alkali treatments on physicochemical and biological properties of waste activated sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Hernando, María

    2015-01-01

    [eng] The development of treatment processes to reduce or reuse sewage sludge is crucial for a proper environmental management. Segregating primary from secondary sludge allows for better reuse of secondary sludge, since digested secondary sludge is better suited for agricultural application, containing about double concentration in nutrients but significantly less contaminants. However, secondary sludge (also called waste activated sludge (WAS)) is difficult to dewater compared with primary...

  19. Selected Water- and Sediment-Quality, Aquatic Biology, and Mine-Waste Data from the Ely Copper Mine Superfund Site, Vershire, VT, 1998-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argue, Denise M.; Kiah, Richard G.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Hathaway, Edward; Coles, James F.

    2008-01-01

    The data contained in this report are a compilation of selected water- and sediment-quality, aquatic biology, and mine-waste data collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site in Vershire, VT, from August 1998 through May 2007. The Ely Copper Mine Superfund site is in eastern, central Vermont (fig. 1) within the Vermont Copper Belt (Hammarstrom and others, 2001). The Ely Copper Mine site was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List in 2001. Previous investigations conducted at the site documented that the mine is contributing metals and highly acidic waters to local streams (Hammarstrom and others, 2001; Holmes and others, 2002; Piatak and others, 2003, 2004, and 2006). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the USEPA, compiled selected data from previous investigations into uniform datasets that will be used to help characterize the extent of contamination at the mine. The data may be used to determine the magnitude of biological impacts from the contamination and in the development of remediation activities. This report contains analytical data for samples collected from 98 stream locations, 6 pond locations, 21 surface-water seeps, and 29 mine-waste locations. The 98 stream locations are within 3 streams and their tributaries. Ely Brook flows directly through the Ely Copper Mine then into Schoolhouse Brook (fig. 2), which joins the Ompompanoosuc River (fig. 1). The six pond locations are along Ely Brook Tributary 2 (fig. 2). The surface-water seeps and mine-waste locations are near the headwaters of Ely Brook (fig. 2 and fig. 3). The datasets 'Site_Directory' and 'Coordinates' contain specific information about each of the sample locations including stream name, number of meters from the mouth of stream, geographic coordinates, types of samples collected (matrix of sample), and the figure on which the sample location is depicted. Data have been collected at the Ely Copper Mine Superfund site by the

  20. Biological pretreatment sewages water

    OpenAIRE

    Veselý, Václav

    2009-01-01

    Bachelor's thesis deals with waste water purification at the stage of pre-inflow of water into the biological waste water treatment plants. It is divided into two parts, a theoretical and calculation. The theoretical part deals about sewage water and the method of biological treatment. Design proposal is part of the activation tank for quantity EO.

  1. Critical comparison of radiometric and mass spectrometric methods for the determination of radionuclides in environmental, biological and nuclear waste samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Roos, Per

    2008-01-01

    application in the environmental and biological researches, these radionuclides include H-3, C-14, Cl-36, Ca-41 Ni-59,Ni-63, Sr-89,Sr-90, Tc-99, I-129, Cs-135,Cs-137, Pb-210, Ra-226,Ra-228, Np-237, Am-241, and isotopes of thorium, uranium and plutonium. The application of on-line methods (flow injection...

  2. Biological transport of radionuclides at low-level waste storage sites. Annual report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives formulated and accomplished are discussed. Capability for assay of several transuranic elements in sequence was developed at both UCLA and UCB labs. Capacity to sample vegetation under statistically meaningful circumstances was further developed by a frequency distribution study of radionuclides and stable elements in plants under reasonably uniform conditions. Reasons for a several fold-range in the concentration ratios used to predict plant uptake of transuranium elements were demonstrated and hence it will be necessary to recognize this reality in model building and in any kind of nuclear siting. The objective of developing a more accurate multiple regression model of soil parameters on the concentration ratio of five different transuranium elements in plants involved in the food chain of man was vigorously pursued and a preliminary version will soon be available. The objective of determining how much radionuclides can be mobilized by deep rooting of plants from depths in soil was put into an experimental test which is not yet completed. The relative importance of stable strontium vs calcium on radiostrontium transport and of stable Cs vs potassium on radiocesium transport under waste management conditions received preliminary study. Several waste management soils were characterized (Fayette, Fuquay, Carjo, and Puye) as preliminary steps to growing plants on those soils with spiked levels of radionuclides and with actual waste chemicals otherwise added (cooperative with LASL). Plans were developed for FY 1979 studies and activities and include field plant work at Maxey Flats, Kentucky; review and synthesis of the vast store of published information relating to models and ideas used in the decision making processes with the view to identify gaps, errors, false assumptions in that data base; and to verify and confirm old models but with parameters carefully identified and quantified

  3. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-52, 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory Soil. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-022

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 100-F-52 waste site consisted of the soil under and around the former 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory. The laboratory was used for studies of the effects of pre-reactor and post-reactor process water on fish eggs, young fish, and other small river creatures of interest. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  4. Part project 1. Methods and concepts of biological waste composting. Comparison - evaluation - recommendations; Teilbericht 1. Verfahren und Konzepte der Bioabfallkompostierung. Vergleich - Bewertung - Empfehlungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronauer, A.; Helm, M.; Schoen, H. [Bayerische Landesanstalt fuer Landtechnik der Technischen Univ. Muenchen-Weihenstephan (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Topics of this article are: composting of biological wastes; techniques, operation modes, regional concepts, engineering, hygienical, ecological, economical aspects. (SR) gardening plots. The project comprised three parts: Composting techniques, applications of compost in agriculture and gardening, and applications in landscaping. This volume comprises the summaries of the three part-projects. (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Das uebergeordnete Ziel des Weihenstephaner Verbundvorhabens bestand darin, fachliche Grundlagen und Entscheidungshilfen fuer den Bereich der Kompostierung und der Verwertung von biogenen Reststoffen, insbesondere der getrennt erfassten organischen Abfaelle aus den Haushaltungen (Bioabfall), zu schaffen. In diesem Rahmen sollen sowohl verschiedene Verfahren und Techniken der Kompostierung als auch regionale Konzepte hinsichtlich verfahrenstechnischer, hygienischer, oekologischer, oekonomischer und die Entsorgungssicherheit betreffender Aspekte untersucht und bewertet werden. (orig./SR)

  5. A biological/chemical process for reduced waste and energy consumption, Caprolactam production: Phase 1, Select microorganisms and demonstrate feasibility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St.Martin, E.J.

    1995-08-01

    A novel biological/chemical process for converting cyclohexane into caprolactam was investigated. Microorganisms in a bioreactor would be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone followed by chemical synthesis of caprolactam using ammonia. The proposed bioprocess would be more energy efficient and reduce byproducts and wastes that are generated by the current chemical process. We have been successful in isolating from natural soil and water samples two microorganisms that can utilize cyclohexane as a sole source of carbon and energy for growth. These microorganisms were shown to have the correct metabolic intermediates and enzymes to convert cyclohexane into cyclohexanol, cyclohexanone and caprolactone. Genetic techniques to create and select for caprolactone hydrolase negative-mutants are being developed. These blocked-mutants will be used to convert cyclohexane into caprolactone but, because of the block, be unable to metabolize the caprolactone further and excrete it as a final end product.

  6. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-52, 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory Soil, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-022

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-06-27

    The 100-F-52 waste site consisted of the soil under and around the former 146-FR Radioecology and Aquatic Biology Laboratory. The laboratory was used for studies of the effects of pre-reactor and post-reactor process water on fish eggs, young fish, and other small river creatures of interest. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  7. Mathematical modelling of biological processor for waste water treatment i sequencing batch reactors; Modellazione matematica di processi biologici per il trattamento delle acque reflue in reattori SBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spagni, A.; Bortone, E. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Bologna, Bologna (Italy). Sez. Depurazione e Ciclo dell' Acqua; Ratini, P. [SPES s.r.l., Fabriano, AN (Italy); Marsilli Libelli, S. [Florence Univ., Florence (Italy). Dipt. dei Sistemi e di Informatica

    2000-01-01

    The work shows a mathematical model based on the activated sludge model 2d of the IAWQ (International Association on Water Quality) for biological waste water treatment simulation. Ammonia inhibition and nitrite intermediate in the nitrification and denitrification processes have been added to the ASM2d. The modified model was calibrated and validated with experimental data of a lab scale SBR plant. The modified model is able to precisely fit experimental data. [Italian] Viene presentato un modello matematico sviluppato a partire dall'activated sludge model 2d dell'IAWQ (International Association on Water Quality) per il trattamento biologico dei reflui. Il modello viene integrato dall'introduzione delle cinetiche dell'inibizione nella nitrificazione e denitrificazione. Il modello e' stato calibrato e validato utilizzando dati sperimentali provenienti da un impianto SBR da laboratorio. Il modello e' in grado di prevedere in modo ragionevole le cinetiche degli inquinanti monitorati nella varie prove.

  8. 10. Biogas conference Dresden. Anaerobic treatment of biological wastes. Proceedings; 10. Biogastagung Dresden. Anaerobe biologische Abfallbehandlung. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornack, Christina [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Abfallwirtschaft und Altlasten; Scholwin, Frank [Institut fuer Biogas, Kreislaufwirtschaft und Energie, Weimar (Germany); Liebetrau, Jan [Deutsches Biomasseforschungszentrum (DBFZ), Leipzig (Germany); Fassauer, Burkhardt [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Keramische Technologien und Systeme (IKTS), Hermsdorf (Germany); Nelles, Michael (ed.) [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Abfall- und Stoffstromwirtschaft

    2015-07-01

    The biogas conference in Dresden will be held for the tenth time and is still the only conference in Germany, which focuses on the production of biogas solely from waste. This year, the implementation of paragraph 11 of the Recycling and Waste Management Act and the amendment of the Renewable Energies Act (EEG) in 2014, the chances of the waste management biogas technology will be spotlighted here. The efficiency and wise use of the end products of the biogas production - the biogas and fermentation residues are equally critical for the success of biogas technology as the emission reduction of biogas plants. In this context, the biogas technology will also be dependent in the future on legal requirements and funding instruments such as the EEG. For the technical implementation, the development of reliable system concepts with specific sinking biogas and electricity supply costs and with greater flexibility in terms of launching needs-based biogas and electricity production. The contributions in this paper discuss possible solutions and implementations from the perspective of politics, associations, research and practice. Innovative topics will be discussed, which will be decisive for the future of biogas production from organic wastes. [German] Die Biogastagung in Dresden findet zum zehnten Mal statt und ist nach wie vor die einzige Tagung in Deutschland, welche die Biogaserzeugung ausschliesslich aus Reststoffen thematisiert. In diesem Jahr sollen vor dem Hintergrund der Umsetzung des paragraph 11 des Kreislaufwirtschaftswirtschaftsgesetzes und der Novellierung des EEG 2014 die Chancen der abfallwirtschaftlichen Biogastechnologie beleuchtet werden. Die effiziente und sinnvolle Nutzung der Endprodukte der Biogaserzeugung - des Biogases und des Gaerrests sind ebenso entscheidend fuer den Erfolg der Biogastechnologie wie die Emissionsminderung aus Biogasanlagen. In diesem Zusammenhang wird die Biogastechnologie auch zukuenftig auf gesetzliche Vorgaben und

  9. Baseline levels of bioaerosols and volatile organic compounds around a municipal waste incinerator prior to the construction of a mechanical-biological treatment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New waste management programs are currently aimed at developing alternative treatment technologies such as mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) and composting plants. However, there is still a high uncertainty concerning the chemical and microbiological risks for human health, not only for workers of these facilities, but also for the population living in the neighborhood. A new MBT plant is planned to be constructed adjacently to a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) in Tarragona (Catalonia, Spain). In order to evaluate its potential impact and to differentiate the impacts of MSWI from those of the MBT when the latter is operative, a pre-operational survey was initiated by determining the concentrations of 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols (total bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi and Aspergillus fumigatus) in airborne samples around the MSWI. The results indicated that the current concentrations of bioaerosols (ranges: 382-3882, 18-790, 44-926, and 3 for fungi at 25 deg. C, fungi at 37 deg. C, total bacteria, and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively) and VOCs (ranging from 0.9 to 121.2 μg/m3) are very low in comparison to reported levels in indoor and outdoor air in composting and MBT plants, as well in urban and industrial zones. With the exception of total bacteria, no correlations were observed between the environmental concentrations of biological agents and the direction/distance from the facility. However, total bacteria presented significantly higher levels downwind. Moreover, a non-significant increase of VOCs was detected in sites closer to the incinerator, which means that the MSWI could have a very minor impact on the surrounding environment.

  10. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically-biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R(2)), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year(-1)) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308year(-1) and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12Nm(3)/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90kWh per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions. PMID:23910244

  11. Estimates of direct biological transport of radioactive waste in the deep sea with special reference to organic carbon budgets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations can be made for the maximum theoretical transport of pollutants such as radionuclides by movement of organisms out of a deep-sea benthic boundary layer dump site based on a presumption of a steady state organic carbon budget and estimated biological concentration factors. A calculated flux rate depends on the difference between a limiting input of organic matter and that carbon used by the biota or accumulating in the sediment. On average, the potential biological mass transport is low compared to physical transport. Exceptions to this generalization are possible in the far field after spatial gradients are obliterated or if natural mass migrations or periodic spawning concentrations occur in the near field. Biologically mediated fluxes of contaminants due to mixing of sediments by bioturbation or vertical flux due to scavenging by sinking particles are significant for movements of pollutants to and from sediments. These pathways contribute to the direct input of contaminants into food webs which may contain harvestable species. These fluxes are unimportant for mass transfers in the ocean but they determine the exposure of critical groups to contaminants

  12. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically–biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Bio-methane landfill emissions from different period (0, 4, 8, 16 weeks) MTB waste have been evaluated. • Electrical energy recoverable from landfill gas ranges from 11 to about 90 kW h/tonne. • Correlation between oxygen uptake, energy recovery and anaerobic gas production shows R2 ranging from 0.78 to 0.98. • LCA demonstrate that global impact related to gaseous emissions achieve minimum for 4 week of MBT. - Abstract: The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16 weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R2), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year−1) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308 year−1 and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12 N m3/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16 weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90 kW h per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0 weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4 weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system

  13. Mechanical Biological Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilitewski, B-; Oros, Christiane; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    The basic processes and technologies of composting and anaerobic digestion, as described in the previous chapters, are usually used for specific or source-separated organic waste flows. However, in the 1990s mechanical biological waste treatment technologies (MBT) were developed for unsorted or...... residual waste (after some recyclables removed at the source). The concept was originally to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill, but MBT technologies are today also seen as plants recovering fuel as well as material fractions. As the name suggests the technology combines mechanical treatment...... technologies (screens, sieves, magnets, etc.) with biological technologies (composting, anaerobic digestion). Two main technologies are available: Mechanical biological pretreatment (MBP), which first removes an RDF fraction and then biologically treats the remaining waste before most of it is landfilled, and...

  14. Mechanical Biological Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilitewski, B-; Oros, Christiane; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    The basic processes and technologies of composting and anaerobic digestion, as described in the previous chapters, are usually used for specific or source-separated organic waste flows. However, in the 1990s mechanical biological waste treatment technologies (MBT) were developed for unsorted or...... residual waste (after some recyclables removed at the source). The concept was originally to reduce the amount of waste going to landfill, but MBT technologies are today also seen as plants recovering fuel as well as material fractions. As the name suggests the technology combines mechanical treatment...... technologies (screens, sieves, magnets, etc.) with biological technologies (composting, anaerobic digestion). Two main technologies are available: Mechanical biological pretreatment (MBP), which first removes an RDF fraction and then biologically treats the remaining waste before most of it is landfilled, and...

  15. Assessment of biological effects resulting from large scale applications of coal power plant wastes in building technology in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the building materials commonly used in Poland contain natural radioactive elements and some contain radioactive industrial wastes. It has been shown that these building materials could induce additional annual doses to the inhabitants of the order of 0.4 mGy gamma radiation to the whole body and about 13 mSv alpha radiation to the critical tissues of the respiratory tract. On the basis of these dosimetric data and demographic and forecasting data, the number of severe genetic effects and cancer deaths caused by the additional radiation doses in dwellings were assessed for the population of Poland for the period 1951-2010. It was estimated that additional somatic effects in six consecutive decades will result in approximately 31,200 cancer deaths, including about 26,300 deaths caused by lung cancer. The expected number of severe genetic effects resulting from additional doses of ionizing radiation absorbed by parents indoors will amount to about 260 cases in the first generation and about 7500 cases in succeeding generations. (H.K.)

  16. Investigations concerning the mechanism of action of brown-coal coke particles in aerobic biological waste water treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the start of this work experience with the use of brown coal coke in the activated sludge process was lacking entirely. It therefore was necessary to carry through preliminary experiments in order to practically test the effect of Grown-coal coke. In two technical-scale experiments and a pilot test, very good results were obtained with the application of brown-coal coke to activated sludge. These, and previously published results, permitted to evolve moodel concepts of the mechanism of action of coal, especially brown coal coke, in activated sludge. According to these concepts the coal particles act as buffers and a temporary adsorbent of oxygen and waste water constituents. This in turn stimulates the colonization of the surface with microorganisms. In order to corroborate these model concepts, the - adsorption and desorption of solved oxygen to coal in a watery medium and - the effect of coal over a longer period of time were investigated. The results in essence confirm the model concepts. (UWa)

  17. Airborne microbial emissions and immissions on aerogic mechanical-biological waste treatment plants; Luftgetragene mikrobielle Emissionen und Immissionen an aeroben mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlungsanlagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luft, C.

    2002-07-01

    During biological waste treatment it is important to consider the hygienic situation. One has to take care that citizens in the neighborhood and especially the work force complain about impairments caused by microbial immissions. Therefore it is important to evaluate microbial emissions and immissions of composting plants. This dissertation looked upon this topic. Microbial and endotoxin emissions of different biological waste treatment plants were measured with diverse sampling methods. The research was done on enclosed and open variants of plants. Measurements were taken from different composting techniques and also from a plant treating the rest fraction of household waste. Depending on the technique researched different concentrations of airborne microbes could be found. The size of the plant and degree of enclosure as well as the material input all affect the amount of airborne microbial emissions. At a small open composting plant (6 500 Mg/a) only low microbial concentrations could be found at the workplace, while at the totally enclosed plant (12 000 Mg/a) high concentrations of airborne microorganisms could be observed at the workplace. Seasonal differences in microbial concentrations could not be seen when considering the agitation of outdoor piles consisting of separated household waste. In contrast, measured concentrations of endotoxins at another composting plant showed seasonal differences. Using simulations based on the models of TA-Luft and VDI 3783 it could be calculated that emissions from enclosed plants with 12 000 Mg/a input and a biofilter have a minimal influence on the neighborhood of the composting plant. (orig.) [German] Beim Umgang mit biologischen Abfaellen spielt die hygienische Situation eine wichtige Rolle. Besonders im Bereich des Arbeitsschutzes, aber auch im Hinblick auf die in der Naehe von Abfallbehandlungsanlagen wohnenden Personen, ist Sorge zu tragen, dass es nicht zu gesundheitlichen Beeintraechtigungen durch Keimimmissionen

  18. Pollutant balances and emission reduction in mechanical-biological treatment of waste; Schadstoffbilanzierung und Emissionsminderung bei der mechanisch-biologischen Abfallbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuhls, C.

    2001-07-01

    To balance the emissions of mechanical biological pretreatment (MBP) of municipal solid waste (MSW) and evaluate emission control systems four different plants were investigated. The applied technologies comprised aerobe processes with a rotting duration of 4 days to 16 weeks and one process with integrated (partial current) fermentation. The emissions of main organic substances (81 single compounds and NMVOC) were evaluated depending on either mass or environmental relevance or both. Additionally, total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), methane (CH{sub 4}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) were measured. At present the combination of a simple scrubber and biofilter is the state-of-the-art technology used for waste air purification. By using this combination the concentrations of pure gas (just odour) comply with the common regulations. However, the achieved efficiencies for non methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) are behind the expectations. In this combination of a simple scrubber and biofilter a NMVOC removal of only 50% is realistic. The main organic emission source is biogenic. That means they are formed by metabolic processes and emitted as intermediate compounds. (orig.) [German] Zur Emissionsbilanzierung wurden vier unterschiedliche mechanisch-biologische Abfallbehandlungsanlagen (MBA) untersucht. Die realisierten Verfahrenstechniken beinhalteten Aerobverfahren mit Rottezeiten zwischen 6 Tagen und 16 Wochen sowie eine zweistufige Anlage mit integrierter Teilstromvergaerung. Die Emissionsmessungen umfassten die wichtigsten 81 organischen Stoffe nach den Kriterien Mengen- und/oder Umweltrelevanz. Ergaenzt wurden die Messungen um die Summenparameter Ges.-C, Ges.-N, CH{sub 4} und NH{sub 3}. Die erforderlichen Emissionskonzentrationen nach TA Luft werden eingehalten. Ausschlaggebend hierfuer ist die Kombination aus Luftbefeuchter und Biofilter, die derzeit den Stand der Technik darstellt. Die erzielten Wirkungsgrade fuer NMVOC (Non Methane Volatile Organic

  19. Developing biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Progress report, November 1, 1984-March 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposed projects are under study to: (1) develop cost effective methods to monitor pollutant discharge from waste storage and disposal sites; (2) assess the effects of pollutant discharge on the terrestrial microbiological environment; and (3) develop microbial strains that can concentrate and/or metabolize pollutants. To achieve these goals we are isolating bacteria from various sites polluted with heavy metals, radionuclides, and/or organic compounds. We are characterizing the microbial activities of these polluted sites to provide clues to both indicators of pollution and alterations caused by the pollutants. In addition we are developing systems for the biological precipitation or transformation of pollutants or for bioconcentration, with the ultimate goal of being able to detoxify the pollutants or to reduce the volume of contaminated material significantly. To date we have isolated a variety of soil bacteria, actinomycetes, and fungi. Many of them have been identified, and experiments are under way to characterize their responses to pollutants including heavy metals and halogenated hydrocarbons. The results of these studies are summarized below. 1 fig., 6 tabs

  20. Report: Bioconversion of agriculture waste to lysine with UV mutated strain of brevibacterium flavum and its biological evaluation in broiler chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Alia; Hashmi, Abu Saeed; Masood, Faiza; Iqbal, Muhammad Aamir; Tayyab, Muhammad; Nawab, Amber; Nadeem, Asif; Sadeghi, Zahra; Mahmood, Adeel

    2015-07-01

    Lysine executes imperative structural and functional roles in body and its supplementation in diet beneficial to prevent the escalating threat of protein deficiency. The physical mutagenesis offers new fascinating avenues of research for overproduction of lysine through surplus carbohydrate containing agriculture waste especially in developing countries. The current study was aimed to investigate the potential of UV mutated strain of Brevibacterium flavum at 254 nm for lysine production. The physical and nutritional parameters were optimized and maximum lysine production was observed with molasses (4% substrate water ratio). Moreover, supplementation of culture medium with metal cations (i.e. 0.4% CaSO₄, 0.3% NaCl, 0.3% KH₂PO₄, 0.4% MgSO₄, and 0.2% (NH₄) ₂SO₄w/v) together with 0.75% v/v corn steep liquor significantly enhanced the lysine production up to 26.71 ± 0.31 g/L. Though, concentrations of urea, ammonium nitrate and yeast sludge did not exhibit any profound effect on lysine production. Biological evaluation of lysine enriched biomass in terms of weight gain and feed conversion ratio reflected non-significant difference for experimental and control (+ve) groups. Conclusively, lysine produced in the form of biomass was compatible to market lysine in its effectiveness and have potential to utilize at commercial scale. PMID:26142531

  1. Understanding radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, R.L.

    1981-12-01

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes). (ATT)

  2. Understanding radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains information on all aspects of radioactive wastes. Facts are presented about radioactive wastes simply, clearly and in an unbiased manner which makes the information readily accessible to the interested public. The contents are as follows: questions and concerns about wastes; atoms and chemistry; radioactivity; kinds of radiation; biological effects of radiation; radiation standards and protection; fission and fission products; the Manhattan Project; defense and development; uses of isotopes and radiation; classification of wastes; spent fuels from nuclear reactors; storage of spent fuel; reprocessing, recycling, and resources; uranium mill tailings; low-level wastes; transportation; methods of handling high-level nuclear wastes; project salt vault; multiple barrier approach; research on waste isolation; legal requiremnts; the national waste management program; societal aspects of radioactive wastes; perspectives; glossary; appendix A (scientific American articles); appendix B (reference material on wastes)

  3. Waste Water Disposal Design And Management IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book introduces biological waste water treatment with basic theory and activated sludge process, which includes chemical reaction engineering with reaction velocity and mass balance, an effector, characteristic of water treatment effector and biological waste water disposal such as flow pattern and tracer test. This is biological theory of steady on waste water treatment, design and management.

  4. Decommissioning of the research reactor ASTRA in Seibersdorf, Austria: Determination of exemption limits at the Barite-concrete of the neutron activated biological shield to minimize radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    was erected to give ample room for clearance measurements and procedures. It was almost complete by the end of 2003. In preparation of the intended cutting work on the upper, inactive part of the biological shield, working platforms were installed. In the pool and in the upper hot cell additional measures were taken to control the drain of the cutting fluid and to remove concrete and steel particles from the solution. Calculations had shown that in total about 36 tons of cake were to be expected, which should be more or less inactive waste. Therefore careful collection and preparations to achieve clearance were essential. High costs can be avoided by comparatively minor efforts, if essential parts of the removed materials can be cleared either directly for re-use, for re-use via building remainder-mass dumps or storage in remainder-mass-dumps. So for financial reasons, minimising the amount of materials designated for final repositories or intermediate storage facilities is a primary target. (authors)

  5. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter provides information on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the waste stored at the 616 NRDWSF. A waste analysis plan is included that describes the methodology used for determining waste types

  6. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive dangerous waste storage facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, S.M.

    1997-04-30

    This chapter provides information on the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics of the waste stored at the 616 NRDWSF. A waste analysis plan is included that describes the methodology used for determining waste types.

  7. Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals and industrial wastes as a Novel Carbon Capture and Storage Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, A. H. A.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere is attributed to rising consumption of fossil fuels around the world. The development of solutions to reduce CO2 emissions to the atmosphere is one of the most urgent needs of today's society. One of the most stable and long-term solutions for storing CO2 is via carbon mineralization, where minerals containing metal oxides of Ca or Mg are reacted with CO2 to produce thermodynamically stable Ca- and Mg-carbonates that are insoluble in water. Carbon mineralization can be carried out in-situ or ex-situ. In the case of in-situ mineralization, the degree of carbonation is thought to be limited by both mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction kinetics, and must be well understood to predict the ultimate fate of CO2 within geological reservoirs. While the kinetics of in-situ mineral trapping via carbonation is naturally slow, it can be enhanced at high temperature and high partial pressure of CO2. The addition of weak organic acids produced from food waste has also been shown to enhance mineral weathering kinetics. In the case of the ex-situ carbon mineralization, the role of these ligand-bearing organic acids can be further amplified for silicate mineral dissolution. Unfortunately, high mineral dissolution rates often lead to the formation of a silica-rich passivation layer on the surface of silicate minerals. Thus, the use of novel solvent mixture that allows chemically catalyzed removal of this passivation layer during enhanced Mg-leaching surface reaction has been proposed and demonstrated. Furthermore, an engineered biological catalyst, carbonic anhydrase, has been developed and evaluated to accelerate the hydration of CO2, which is another potentially rate-limiting step of the carbonation reaction. The development of these novel catalytic reaction schemes has significantly improved the overall efficiency and sustainability of in-situ and ex-situ mineral carbonation technologies and allowed direct

  8. Dyes Waste Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew-Teng Ong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dyes waste represent one of the problematic groups of pollutants because their presence can be easily identified by the human eye and they are not easily biodegradable. This literature review paper highlights and provides an overview of dyes waste treatments for 3 years period, from 2008–2010. The noteworthy treatment processes for dyes waste include biological treatment, catalytic oxidation, filtration, sorption process and combination treatments.

  9. Screening for ecotoxicological effects of antiepileptic drugs in biologically treated waste water originating from an epilepsy ward by Danio rerio embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Hartwig, Christoph; Muth-Köhne, Elke; Düring, Rolf-Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pharmaceuticals, like antiepileptic drugs, are found regularly in surface waters, and consequently, advanced waste water treatment technologies are discussed for substance elimination. Because antiepileptic drugs have shown to transform to more toxic substances, their behavior in these treatment processes and resulting effects on ecotoxicity should be investigated. To validate if waste water from an epilepsy ward of a neurological hospital is appropriate for these investigations, ...

  10. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-05-24

    The 116-F-15 waste site is the former location of the 108-F Radiation Crib that was located in the first floor of the 108-F Biological Laboratory. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  11. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. M. Dittmer

    2007-05-24

    The 100-F-36 waste site is the location of the former 108-F Biological Laboratory. The building was closed in 1973, decontaminated, decommissioned, and eventually demolished in 1999. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  12. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-36, 108-F Biological Laboratory, and for the 116-F-15, 108-F Radiation Crib. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-002 and 2007-003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 116-F-15 waste site is the former location of the 108-F Radiation Crib that was located in the first floor of the 108-F Biological Laboratory. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  13. Operating biological waste water treatment plants. The Cepsa oil refinery treatment plant in Gibraltar; Operacion de depuradoras biologicas de aguas residuales. La EDAR de la Refineria de Gibraltar (Cepsa)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguera Urbano, J. A.

    2005-07-01

    Treating waste waters from an oil refinery is difficult due to the high pollution load and the irregular flow and quality of the effluent. The Gibraltar treatment plant has introduced a line comprising physical, physicochemical and biological treatments. The biological treatment includes a high-load reactor with pure oxygen and a nitrification/denitrification reactor. A description is provided of the main quality parameters of the effluent and the evolution of its concentrations after each treatment stage until it reaches a sufficient quality standard for it to be returned to the natural environment and for part of it to be re-used in the refinery. Lastly, the most common problems occurring in the running of the plant are mentioned. (Author)

  14. Marine biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index

  15. Marine biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, H.V.; Webber, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses both taxonomic and ecological topics on marine biology. Full coverage of marine organisms of all five kingdoms is provided, along with interesting and thorough discussion of all major marine habitats. Organization into six major parts allows flexibility. It also provides insight into important topics such as disposal of nuclear waste at sea, the idea that life began on the ocean floor, and how whales, krill, and people interact. A full-color photo chapter reviews questions, and exercises. The contents are: an overview marine biology: fundamental concepts/investigating life in the ocean; the physical ocean, the ocean floor, the nature of water, the nature and motion of ocean water; general ecology, conditions for life in the sea, biological productivity and energy transfer; marine organisms; monera, protista, mycota and metaphyta; the smaller marine animals, the large animals marine habitats, the intertidal zone/benthos of the continental shelf, the photic zone, the deep ocean, the ocean under stress, marine pollution, appendix a: the metric system and conversion factors/ appendix b: prefixes and suffixes/ appendix c: taxonomic classification of common marine organisms, and glossary, and index.

  16. Extraction of mineral elements from inedible wastes of biological components of a life-support system and their utilization for plant nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribovskaya, I. V.; Gladchenko, I. A.; Zinenko, G. K.

    Two methods of extracting mineral elements from otherwise deadlock products of a life-support system are presented. We describe first optimum conditions for recovering elements by water extraction from dry wastes of plants, biomass ash, and solid human wastes after passing them through the catalytic furnace; and, second, we describe acid extracts of biogenous elements by 1N and 2N HNO_3 from these products. Ways to use the extracts of elements in plant nutrition are considered in order to increase the extent to which the mineral loop of a life-support system can be closed.

  17. Development of software for management of radioactive waste in biological research and clinical assistance; Desenvolvimento do software para gerenciamento de rejeitos radioativos em pesquisa biologica e assistencia clinica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maciel, Bianca; Mattos, Maria Fernanda S.S.; Medeiros, Regina B. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Diagnostico por Imagem. Nucleo de Protecao Radiologica; Franca Junior, Jose Antonio de, E-mail: fernanda@cfhr.epm.b, E-mail: rbitelli@cfhr.epm.b, E-mail: jafjunior@unifesp.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia da Informacao. Div. de Sistema de Informacao

    2011-10-26

    This paper describes the development of software which facilitates the automation of this process by mean of the Safety Analysis Report generating a data base allowing the statistic analysis and elaboration of radioactive wastes inventory. The software was developed in PHP language and the information is stored in a data base generated in Oracle and organized in different tables which allows to calculate the storage time of waste and to register the specificities of radioisotopes, cadastral data of the professionals which handle that radioisotope and also the characteristics of handling laboratories. That tool collaborates for a effective control on the use of radioisotopes in research laboratories and assistance areas as well

  18. Cleaning of process and excess water from organic waste fermentation with a combination of biological treatment stage and microfiltration; Reinigung von Prozess- und Ueberschusswaessern aus der Bioabfallvergaerung durch Kombination aus biologischer Stufe und Mikrofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buer, T.; Schumacher, J. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl und Inst. fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of an R and D project sponsored by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt, cleaning of process and excess water from organic waste fermentation plants was studied at the Institute for Siedlungswasserwirtschaft of Aachen Technical University RWTH. The focus in studying these waste waters was on the adaptation and optimization of the ZenoGem {sup trademark} process - a biological cleaning technique with an integrated microfiltration membrane. The use of this technology had the following objectives: to safeguard compliance with the limiting values for direct or indirect discharge of excess water and to reduce the heavy metal freight of circulating process water reentering the fermentation process for mashing raw organic waste. Thus the pollutant content of the fermentation residue was to be cut down. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen eines von der Deutschen Bundesstiftung Umwelt gefoerderten Forschungs- und Entwicklungsvorhabens wurde am Institut fuer Siedlungswasserwirtschaft der RWTH Aachen die Prozess- und Ueberschusswasserreinigung von Bioabfallvergaerungsanlagen untersucht. Dabei stellte die Adaption und Optimierung des ZenoGem {sup trademark} -Verfahrens - ein biologisches Reinigungsverfahren mit integrierter Mikrofiltrationsmembran - fuer diese Abwaesser den Untersuchungsschwerpunkt dar. Ziel war es, mit dieser Technologie zum einen die Grenzwerte fuer eine direkte oder indirekte Einleitung des Ueberschusswassers zu gewaehrleisten und zum anderen die zirkulierenden Prozesswaesser, die in den Vergaerungsprozess zum Anmaischen der Roh-Bioabfaelle zurueckgefuehrt werden, an Schwermetallen zu entfrachten. Hierdurch sollte eine Schadstoffreduktion im Gaerreststoff erzielt werden. (orig.)

  19. The use of ionizing radiations in the treatment of liquid and solid waste; biological and physico-chemical effects and industrial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short recycling of waste water and the use of liquid or dehydrated sludge as natural manure for agriculture, or animal supplement feed is of great economical and ecological interest. However, it requires strong disinfection. Treatment with ionizing radiation can be used as a complement to conventional methods in the treatment of liquid and solid wastes. An experiment conducted with a high-energy electron beam linear accellerator (10 MeV) is presented. Degradation of undesirable metabolites in wastes occurs at a dose of 50 krad. Undesirable seeds, present in sludge, are destroyed with a 200-krad dose. The same dose is sufficient for parasitic and bacterial disinfection (DL 90). Destruction of poliovirus (DL 90) is obtained at 400 krad. Higher doses (1000-2000 krad) produce mineralisation of toxic organic mercury or reduce some toxic chemical pollutants present in sludge and improve flocculation. Industrial study shows that waste treatment with high-energy electron beams is technically and economically feasible. The design for a treatment unit of 5 MCi cobalt-equivalent, with a capacity of 500 t/Mrad/24h is presented, with indicative cost calculation

  20. Classification plan of dangerous wastes according to Italian regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors give a classification model founded on chemical, physical and biological characteristics of the materials which constitute dangerous wastes. A particular treatment is reserved to radioactive wastes, which are to be considered dangerous wastes. 10 refs.; 1 table

  1. 利用简易MBT技术处理成都市生活垃圾实验研究%Study on Treatment of Municipal Solid Wastes Adopting Mechanical-biological Technology in Chengdu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪雯; 杨智

    2013-01-01

    成都市生活垃圾产生量日益增加,现有的处理设施越来越难以满足垃圾处理与资源利用的要求.MBT技术是实现垃圾无害化、减量化、资源化的一种垃圾综合处理技术,通过实验对成都垃圾填埋场的垃圾进行MBT处理,比较各个环节前后垃圾质量、含水率、挥发性有机质和生物稳定性等变化,可以看出MBT技术对成都市生活垃圾具有良好的处理效果.经过MBT处理,垃圾的物质干重、含水率和挥发性有机质含量均有显著下降,垃圾的生物稳定性明显增强.%In Chengdu, the municipal solid wastes production becomes more and more, but the capacity of present treatment facilities is inadequate to meet the requirements of refuse disposal and resources reuse. Mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) is a Comprehensive treatment technology to realize harmlessness, reduction and recycling. By means of experiment, the refuses from the landfill of Chengdu were treated using MBT. Comparison of the changes of quality, moisture content, volatile organic matter and biological stability of the refuses before and after every step in the experiment showed good treatment effects. Through MBT treatment, the dry weight, moisture content and volatile organic matter content of the wastes decreased significantly and the biological stability increased apparently.

  2. Ecological valuation of mechanic-biological waste treatment and waste combustion on the basis of energy balances and air pollutant balances; Oekologische Bewertung der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung und der Muellverbrennung auf Basis von Energie- und Schadgasbilanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, R.

    1999-04-01

    The work aims at an ecological valuation of air pollutant emissions and energy consumption as particularly relevant aspects of waste treatment and waste combustion plants, based on new scientific results, in order to draw up ecological budgets and make system comparisons in waste treatment. The target set is particularly effectively achieved by the following: documentation and scientific derivation of relevant boundary conditions, careful surveying and data processing for the purpose of making up an ecological budget, and objective valuation and interpretation of results. The high transparency of the methodics should be emphasized. They make the results obtained conclusive and verifiable. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Arbeit ist die oekologische Bewertung der besonders relevanten Aspekte Abluftemissionen und Energieverbrauch von MBA und MVA auf Basis aktueller Forschungsergebnisse als Grundlage fuer Oekobilanzen und Systemvergleiche zur Restabfallbehandlung. Diese Zielvorgabe wird durch die Dokumentation und wissenschaftliche Herleitung relevanter Rahmenbedingungen, sorgfaeltige Erhebung und Aufbereitung der Daten unter Gesichtspunkten der Erstellung einer Oekobilanz und letztendlich aufgrund der objektiven Bewertung und Interpretation der Ergebnisse im besonderen Masse erreicht. Besonders hervorzuheben hierbei ist die hohe Transparenz bei der methodischen Vorgehensweise. Die ermittelten Ergebnisse sind somit nachvollziehbar und ueberpruefbar. (orig.)

  3. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotating biological contactors employ aerobic fixed-film treatment to degrade either organic and/or nitrogenous (ammonia-nitrogen) constituents present in aqueous waste streams. ixed-film systems provide a surface to which the biomass can adhere. Treatment is achieved as the wast...

  4. Multiple Biological Effects of Olive Oil By-products such as Leaves, Stems, Flowers, Olive Milled Waste, Fruit Pulp, and Seeds of the Olive Plant on Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishikawa, Asuka; Ashour, Ahmed; Zhu, Qinchang; Yasuda, Midori; Ishikawa, Hiroya; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi

    2015-06-01

    As olive oil production increases, so does the amount of olive oil by-products, which can cause environmental problems. Thus, new ways to utilize the by-products are needed. In the present study, five bioactive characteristics of olive oil by-products were assessed, namely their antioxidant, anti-bacterial, anti-melanogenesis, anti-allergic, and collagen-production-promoting activities. First, the extracts of leaves (May and October), stems (May and October), flowers, olive milled waste, fruit pulp and seeds were prepared using two safe solvents, ethanol and water. According to HPLC and LC/MS analysis and Folin-Ciocalteu assay, the ethanol extracts of the leaves (May and October), stems (May and October) and flowers contained oleuropein, and the ethanol extract of the stems showed the highest total phenol content. Oleuropein may contribute to the antioxidant and anti-melanogenesis activities of the leaves, stems, and flowers. However, other active compounds or synergistic effects present in the ethanol extracts are also likely to contribute to the anti-bacterial activity of the leaves and flowers, the anti-melanogenesis activity of some parts, the anti-allergic activity of olive milled waste, and the collagen-production-promoting activity of the leaves, stems, olive milled waste and fruit pulp. This study provides evidence that the by-products of olive oil have the potential to be further developed and used in the skin care industry. PMID:25779104

  5. Biological Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Workplace Plans School Emergency Plans Main Content Biological Threats Biological agents are organisms or toxins that can ... for Disease Control and Prevention . Before a Biological Threat Unlike an explosion, a biological attack may or ...

  6. A biological method of including mineralized human liquid and solid wastes into the mass exchange of bio-technical life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakova, S. A.; Tikhomirov, A. A.; Tikhomirova, N. A.; Kudenko, Yu. A.; Litovka, Yu. A.; Anishchenko, O. V.

    2012-10-01

    The main obstacle to using mineralized human solid and liquid wastes as a source of mineral elements for plants cultivated in bio-technical life support systems (BLSS) is that they contain NaCl. The purpose of this study is to determine whether mineralized human wastes can be used to prepare the nutrient solution for long-duration conveyor cultivation of uneven-aged wheat and Salicornia europaea L. plant community. Human solid and liquid wastes were mineralized by the method of "wet incineration" developed by Yu. Kudenko. They served as a basis for preparing the solutions that were used for conveyor-type cultivation of wheat community represented by 5 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. Wheat was cultivated hydroponically on expanded clay particles. To reduce salt content of the nutrient solution, every two weeks, after wheat was harvested, 12 L of solution was removed from the wheat irrigation tank and used for Salicornia europaea cultivation in water culture in a conveyor mode. The Salicornia community was represented by 2 age groups, planted with a time interval of 14 days. As some portion of the nutrient solution used for wheat cultivation was regularly removed, sodium concentration in the wheat irrigation solution did not exceed 400 mg/L, and mineral elements contained in the removed portion were used for Salicornia cultivation. The experiment lasted 4 months. The total wheat biomass productivity averaged 30.1 g · m-2 · day-1, and the harvest index amounted to 36.8%. The average productivity of Salicornia edible biomass on a dry weight basis was 39.3 g · m-2 · day-1, and its aboveground mass contained at least 20% of NaCl. Thus, the proposed technology of cultivation of wheat and halophyte plant community enables using mineralized human wastes as a basis for preparing nutrient solutions and including NaCl in the mass exchange of the BLSS; moreover, humans are supplied with additional amounts of leafy vegetables.

  7. 城市垃圾焚烧飞灰中重金属形态及生物有效性研究%Speciation Analysis and Biological Availability of Heavy Metals in Municipal Solid Waste Incineration Ashes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裘娜

    2012-01-01

    With the centralized incineration gradually becoming the main way for the life garbage disposal of city in China, the safe disposal and utilization of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash have been concerned by the scholars. Due to the impact of various environmental factors in the course of landfill, the heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration fly ash may migrate and transform, and the speciation of heavy metals and its toxicity may also change. The paper studies the content, speciation and biological availability of the heavy metal in different particle size of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash, to providing the reference for the prediction of environmental risk of heavy mental in the course of safe landfill and resource utilization.%随着集中焚烧法逐渐成为我国城市生活垃圾处理的主要方式,焚烧飞灰的安全处置与利用也成为学者普遍关注的问题。由于在填埋过程中受到各种环境要素的影响,垃圾焚烧飞灰中的重金属有可能会发生迁移和转化,重金属形态、毒性也会随之变化。本文对不同粒径城市垃圾焚烧飞灰中重金属的总量、形态及生物有效性进行了研究,为其在安全填埋及资源化利用过程中预测重金属的环境风险提供参考。

  8. Wastes options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a description of the EEC environmental policy, some wastes families are described: bio-contaminant wastes (municipal and industrial), hospitals wastes, toxic wastes in dispersed quantities, nuclear wastes (radioactive and thermal), plastics compounds wastes, volatiles organic compounds, hydrocarbons and used solvents. Sources, quantities and treatments are given. (A.B.). refs., figs., tabs

  9. Evaluation of Green Waste Composting Possibilities

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Kliopova; Kamilė Stanevičiūtė

    2013-01-01

    In Lithuania main part of biodegradable waste (BDW) from the municipal waste (MW) stream, food waste from coffees and other catering companies are disposed of in landfills. Primary BDW sorting and / or secondary processing within the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) equipment is planned in Waste Management Plants (WMP) in all Lithuanian regions. Lithuania has old traditions of BDW management methods, as green waste (GW) composting e.g. mulching is one of the most popular, especially in r...

  10. Effects of Mine Waste Contamination on Fish and Wildlife Habitat at Multiple Levels of Biological Organization in the Methow River, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peplow, Dan; Edmonds, Robert.

    2002-06-01

    A three-year multidisciplinary study was conducted on the relationship between mine waste contamination and the effects on aquatic and terrestrial habitats in the Methow River below abandoned mines near Twisp in Okanogan County, Washington (U.S.A.). Ore deposits in the area were mined for gold, silver, copper and zinc until the early 1950's. An above-and-below-mine approach was used to study potentially impacted sites. Although the dissolved metal content of water in the Methow River was below the limits of detection, eleven chemicals of potential environmental concern were identified in the tailings, mine effluents, groundwater, streamwater and sediments (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, Se and Zn). The potential for ecosystem level impacts was reflected in the risk of contamination in the mine waste to communities and populations that are valued for their functional properties related to energy storage and nutrient cycling. Dissolved and sediment metal contamination changed the benthic insect community structure in a tributary of the Methow River below Alder Mine, and at the population level, caddisfly larval development in the Methow River was delayed. Arsenic accumulation in bear hair and Cd in fish liver suggest top predators are effected. In situ exposure of juvenile triploid trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to conditions at the downstream site resulted in reduced growth and increased mortality among exposed individuals. Histopathological studies of their tissues revealed extensive glycogen inclusions suggesting food is being converted into glycogen and stored in the liver but the glycogen is not being converted back normally into glucose for distribution to other tissues in the body. Subcellular observations revealed mitochondrial changes including a decrease in the number and increase in the size of electron-dense metrical granules, the presence of glycogen bodies in the cytoplasm, and glycogen nuclei in exposed trout hepatocytes, which are signs that

  11. Preliminary design of a biological treatment facility for trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosten, R.; Malkumus, D. [Pacific Nuclear, Inc. (United States); Sonntag, T. [New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, NY (United States); Sundquist, J. [Ecology and Environment, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) owns and manages a State-Licensed Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA) at West Valley, New York. Water has migrated into the burial trenches at the SDA and collected there, becoming contaminated with radionuclides and organic compounds. The US Environmental Protection Agency issued an order to NYSERDA to reduce the levels of water in the trenches. A treatability study of the contaminated trench water (leachate) was performed and determined the best available technology to treat the leachate and discharge the effluent. This paper describes the preliminary design of the treatment facility that incorporates the bases developed in the leachate treatability study.

  12. An assessment of biological processes close to the sea bed in a slope region and its significance to the assessment of sea bed disposal of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical profiles of planktonic and micronektonic biomass observed close to the sea bed along a transect running up the continental slope on the southern flank of the Porcupine Seabight (to the southwest of Ireland) showed that a doubling in biomass concentration occurs from 100 to 10m above the sea bed. Comparison with biomass concentrations at two deep water stations, one in the Seabight and the other in the Rockall Trough, showed that there was a consistent increase in standing crop close to the sea bed over the slope. Supplementary data were collected on the northern flank of the Seabight. Analysis of both taxonomic groups and individual species showed that some taxa were more abundant near the sea floor and extended their vertical ranges to greater depths over the slope than over deep water, other taxa were unaffected. The implications to the problem of assessing the safety of sea bed disposal of high level radioactive waste are summarised. (author)

  13. Biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdelghani, A.; Pramar, Y.; Mandal, T.

    1996-05-02

    This project assesses the levels of xenobiotics in Devils Swamp and studies their biological fate, transport, ecotoxicity, and potential toxicity to man. This article reports on the following studies: assessment of the acute toxicity of individual xenobiotics and toxicity of organic compounds hexachlorobutadience (HCB) and hexachlorobenzene (HCBD) on juvenile crayfish; determination of the biotic influence of temperature, salinity, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, and sediment composition on the migration of xenobiotics; development of a pharmacokinetics model for xenobiotic absorption and storage, distribution and excretion by fish and crayfish.

  14. Solid waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article drawn up within the framework of 'the assessment of the state of the environment in Lebanon' provides an overview of solid waste management, and assesses future wastes volume and waste disposal issues.In particular it addresses the following concerns: - Long term projections of solid waste arisings (i.e. domestic, industrial, such commercial wastes, vehicle types, construction waste, waste oils, hazardous toxic wastes and finally hospital and clinical wastes) are described. - Appropriate disposal routes, and strategies for reducing volumes for final disposal - Balance between municipal and industrial solid waste generation and disposal/treatment and - environmental impacts (aesthetics, human health, natural environment )of existing dumps, and the potential impact of government plans for construction of solid waste facilities). Possible policies for institutional reform within the waste management sector are proposed. Tables provides estimations of generation rates and distribution of wastes in different regions of Lebanon. Laws related to solid waste management are summarized

  15. Waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Knopová Policarová, Táňa

    2014-01-01

    Diploma thesis deals with waste disposal in the Czech Republic, including waste production and waste recovery. The aim of this work is to characterize and evaluate the waste production, sorting a disposal in the Czech Republic. Theoretical basis of diploma thesis are focused on basic concepts of waste management legislation, the generation of waste and how to prevent the formation or at least reduce it. The greatest attention is paid to waste disposal, in which there are presented and analyze...

  16. Management of Radioactive Wastes in Developing Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of radioactive wastes is one area of increasing interest especially in developing countries having more and more activities in the application of radioisotopes in medicine, research and industry. For a better understanding of radioactive waste management in developing countries this work will discuss the following items:Classification of countries with respect to waste management programs. Principal Radionuclides used in medicine, biological research and others and the range of radioactivity commonly used. Estimation of radioactive waste volumes and activities. Management of liquid wastes Collection. Treatment. Management of small volumes of organic liquid waste. Collection Treatment. Packaging and storage of radioactive wastes

  17. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by......Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... the scouts twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the...

  18. Residential Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Fruergaard, Thilde; Matsufuji, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Residential waste comes from residential areas with multi-family and single-family housing and includes four types of waste: household waste, garden waste, bulky waste and household hazardous waste. Typical unit generation rates, material composition, chemical composition and determining factors...... are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing residential waste is faced with the problem that many residences already divert some waste away from the official collection systems, for example performing home composting of vegetable waste and garden waste, having their bundled newspaper picked up by...... the scouts twice a year or bringing their used furniture to the flea markets organized by charity clubs. Thus, much of the data available on residential waste represents collected waste and not necessarily all generated waste. The latter can only be characterized by careful studies directly at the...

  19. Novel integrated mechanical biological chemical treatment (MBCT) systems for the production of levulinic acid from fraction of municipal solid waste: A comprehensive techno-economic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Jhuma; Ng, Kok Siew; Martinez-Hernandez, Elias

    2016-09-01

    This paper, for the first time, reports integrated conceptual MBCT/biorefinery systems for unlocking the value of organics in municipal solid waste (MSW) through the production of levulinic acid (LA by 5wt%) that increases the economic margin by 110-150%. After mechanical separation recovering recyclables, metals (iron, aluminium, copper) and refuse derived fuel (RDF), lignocelluloses from remaining MSW are extracted by supercritical-water for chemical valorisation, comprising hydrolysis in 2wt% dilute H2SO4 catalyst producing LA, furfural, formic acid (FA), via C5/C6 sugar extraction, in plug flow (210-230°C, 25bar, 12s) and continuous stirred tank (195-215°C, 14bar, 20min) reactors; char separation and LA extraction/purification by methyl isobutyl ketone solvent; acid/solvent and by-product recovery. The by-product and pulping effluents are anaerobically digested into biogas and fertiliser. Produced biogas (6.4MWh/t), RDF (5.4MWh/t), char (4.5MWh/t) are combusted, heat recovered into steam generation in boiler (efficiency: 80%); on-site heat/steam demand is met; balance of steam is expanded into electricity in steam turbines (efficiency: 35%). PMID:27085988

  20. Impact of biological treatments of bio-waste for nutrients, energy and bio-methane recovery in a life cycle perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, Francesco; Micale, Caterina; Contini, Stefano; Morettini, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Composting of the source-segregated organic fraction of municipal solid waste was compared in a life cycle perspective with conventional anaerobic digestion (AD), aimed at electricity substitution, and with AD aimed at biogas upgrading into bio-methane. Three different uses of the bio-methane were considered: injection in the natural gas grid for civil heating needs; use as fuel for high efficiency co-generation; use as fuel for vehicles. Scenarios with biogas upgrading showed quite similar impact values, generally higher than those of composting and conventional AD, for which there was a lower impact. A decisive contribution to the higher impact of the scenarios with bio-methane production was by the process for biogas upgrading. In any case the substitution of natural gas with bio-methane resulted in higher avoided impacts compared to electricity substitution by conventional AD. The uncertainty analysis confirmed the positive values for eutrophication, acidification and particulate matter. Large uncertainty was determined for global warming and photochemical ozone formation. PMID:27095293

  1. Determination of iodine 129 in industrial waste waters and in some biological samples from the Channel french shores: fucus serratus, mussels (mytilus edulis) and soles (Solea solea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine 129 was measured in the low-level wastes released from the La Hague plant between 1983 and 1986. Annual releases ranged between 100 and 200 GBq; a total amount of 660 GBq (18 Ci) was released into the sea. The measurements on iodine 129 levels in F. serratus in relation with the distance from the release point showed the large mobility of the radionuclide measurable at Gravelines (0.6 Bq.g-1 of iodine, isotopic ratio 129I/127I = 0.9.10-7) located at the boundary Chanel-North Sea. The evolution with time of 129I and 127I at the same station demonstrated an annual cycle characterized by highest levels in November-January and lowest levels in April-May; the concentration ratios were about 3: iodine 129 at Wimereux: maximum and minimum 1.75 ad 0.5 Bq.kg-1 dry weight of fucus respectively; iodine 127: maximum and minimum 997 and 268 mg.kg-1 dry weight respectively. At Herquemoulin, a station close to the release point, the annual cycle for iodine 129 was probably modified by the release intensity resulting in sudden variations of its concentration in seawater. In mussel and sole flesh, levels of 20 and 2 mBq.kg-1 fresh weight were measured respectively; such levels can be considered as quite insignificant for consumers

  2. Biological pretreatment of non-flocculated sludge augments the biogas production in the anaerobic digestion of the pretreated waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrylin, J; Kumar, S Adish; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick-Tae; Banu, J Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    High-efficiency resource recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) has been a focus of attention. The objective of this research is to develop a bio-pretreatment process for application prior to the anaerobic digestion of MSW to improve methane productivity. Bacillus licheniformis was used for pretreating MSW (non-flocculated with 0.07% citric acid), followed by anaerobic digestion. Laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in semi-continuous bioreactors, with a total volume of 5 L and working volume of 3 L. Among the nine organic loading rates (OLRs) investigated, the OLR of 0.84 kg SS m(-3) reactor day(-1) was found to be the most appropriate for economic operation of the reactor. Pretreatment of MSW prior to anaerobic digestion led to 55% and 64% increase of suspended solids (SS) and volatile solids reduction, respectively, with an improvement of 57% in biogas production. The results indicate that the pretreatment of non-flocculated sludge with Bacillus licheniformis which consumes less energy compared to other pretreatment techniques could be a cost-effective and environmentally sound method for producing methane from MSW. PMID:24350465

  3. Evaluation of the biological treatment for removal of color indigo textile industrial waste water by a microbial consortium in fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water has been one of the most affected by industrialization and the development of the textile sector. Medellin is the fashion capital of Colombia and city daily use cleaners dedicated to clothing indigo dyeing. They are major consumers of ground and drinking water. Water is used with minimal consciousness, its increased raw material and which generates high monthly costs. This study was built (RLF) fluidized bed reactor. The anthracite was used as support material for investigating the efficiency removed of the chemical oxygen demand (COD), demand biochemical oxygen (BOD) and color of simulated textile wastewater. Following studies at laboratory scale were initially made to prepare the immobilization of microorganisms in the middle of solid support and periods of start-up and operation of the pilot plant testing: bioaugmentating and bioadaptacion seed taken from textile effluent and removal of color in discontinuous reactor. The results indicated that it is possible to achieve aerobic treatment of textile waste water after obtaining an inoculum adapted to sources of carbon of surfactants, and Indigo.

  4. Optimizing biological waste water cleaning by means of modern control systems (fuzzy logic); Optimierung der biologischen Abwasserreinigung durch moderne Regelsysteme (Fuzzy-Logik)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohse, M.; Boening, T.; Hegemann, G. [Fachhochschule Muenster (Germany). Inst. fuer Abfall- und Abwasserwirtschaft e.V.

    1999-07-01

    Within the framework of a project sponsored by EUREGIO, test series with the biological activation stages of a German and a Dutch sewage treatment plant each are carried out using different process concepts for the control of oxygen supply by fuzzy logic. As the currently available results demonstrate, the developed fuzzy-logic fields of characteristic curves permit establishing a stable and, thus, little energy-consuming process with optimum oxygen supply in comparison with conventional control. (orig.) [German] Im Rahmen eines von der EUREGIO gefoerderten Forschungsprojektes werden Versuchsreihen im Bereich der biologischen Belebungsstufen einer deutschen und einer niederlaendischen Abwasserreinigungsanlage (ARA) mit unterschiedlichen Verfahrenskonzepten hinsichtlich der Regelung der Sauerstoffzufuhr mit Hilfe der Fuzzy-Logik Technik durchgefuehrt. Die bisherigen Versuchsergebnisse zeigen, dass - im Vergleich zur konventionellen Regelung - durch die entwickelten Fuzzy-Logik Kennfelder ein stabiler und damit energiearmer Prozess mit optimaler Sauerstoffzufuhr erzeugt wird. (orig.)

  5. Wastes processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farinet, J.L. (CIRAD-CA, 34 - Montpellier (France)); Copin, Y. (CEREMHER, 34 - Meze (France))

    1994-01-01

    The Transpaille procedure is used for the recovery and processing of organic wastes using methane fermentation; gas and compost are produced. The system was installed at the slaughterhouse in Thies, Senegal, in 1988-89. It consists of a 40 cubic metres horizontal cylinder. The slaughterhouse produces 480 metric tonnes of wastes per year and 35.5 cubic metres of biogas per day at a process temperature of 31 deg C. Lagooning is used for the first time as a water purification technique at a slaughterhouse in West Africa. This technique reproduces the process by which water purifies itself biologically, by accelerating and controlling the phenomenon. The procedure includes pre-processing, a decanter/digester and three lagoons. The organic matter is degraded by bacteria, producing water, carbon dioxide and mineral elements, which are then assimilated by micro-algae and macrophytes (Pistia stratiotes). The tropical climate is convenient for this processing method, which is optimum of temperatures of between 25 deg C and 35 deg C. (authors).

  6. Radiation biology for environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution problems such as the green-house effect by increase of CO2, acid rain caused by flue gases, and contamination of chemicals and pesticides in foods and water, have become serious in the world with the rapid development of industry and agriculture. To solve some of these problems, radiation treatment has being applied for the removal of the contaminants from flue gases and waste water from industrial plants. On the other hand, the contribution of radiation biology for these environmental pollution problems is not direct but it has contributed indirectly in many fields. This paper describes the contributions of radiation biology for environment in the following two topics: 1) control of insects and microorganisms, and 2) application of radiation for agricultural wastes

  7. Biological wastewater treatment in brewhouses

    OpenAIRE

    Voronov Yuriy Viktorovich; Bertsun Svetlana Petrovna

    2014-01-01

    In the article the working principles of wastewater biological treatment for food companies is reviewed, including dairies and breweries, the waters of which are highly concentrated with dissolved organic contaminants and suspended solids. An example of successful implementation is anaerobic-aerobic treatment plants. Implementation of these treatment plants can achieve the required wastewater treatment at the lowest operational expenses and low volumes of secondary waste generated. Waste wate...

  8. Conveyor Cultivation of the Halophytic Plant Salicornia europaea for the Recycling of NaCl from Human Liquid Waste in a Biological Life Support System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balnokin, Yurii; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Popova, Larissa; Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Lasseur, Christophe; Gros, Jean-Bernard

    One problem in designing bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS) is developing technolo-gies to include human liquid and solid waste in intrasystem recycling. A specific task is recycling of NaCl excreted in urine by humans. We showed recently that this could be achieved through inclusion of the salt accumulating halophyte Salicornia europaea in the autotrophic compart-ment of the BLSS (Balnokin et al., ASR, 2010, in press). A model of NaCl circulation in BLSS with inclusion of S. europaea was based on the NaCl turnover in the human -urine -nutrient solution -S. europaea -human cycle. Mineralized urine was used as a basis for preparation of a nutrient solution for the halophyte cultivation. The shoots of the halophyte cultivated in the mineralized urine and containing NaCl could to be used by the BLSS inhabitants in their diets. In this report we describe cultivation of S. europaea which allows turnover of NaCl and produces daily shoot biomass containing Na+ and Cl- in quantities approximately equal to those excreted in daily human urine. The plants were grown in water culture in a climatic chamber under controlled conditions. A solution simulating mineralized urine (SSMU) was used as a basis for preparation of a nutri-ent solution for S. europaea cultivation. For continuous biomass production, seedlings of S. europaea, germinated preliminary in moist sand, were being transferred to the nutrient solu-tion at regular intervals (every two days). Duration of the conveyor operation was 112 days. During the first 56 days, the seedlings were being planted in SSMU diluted by a factor of 1.5 (2/3 SSMU). The same solution was introduced into the growth vessels as volumes of growth medium decreased due to plant transpiration. Starting from the 56th day as conveyor operation was initiated, the plants were being harvested every two days; the solutions from the discharged vessels were mixed with the fresh SSMU and the mixture was introduced into all other growth vessels of

  9. ZERO WASTE

    OpenAIRE

    Upadhyaya, Luv

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the thesis was to develop a clear vision on better waste management system. The thesis introduced the sustainable waste management along with innovation. The aim of the research was to find out the types of waste being introduced to environment, their consequence on human beings and surroundings, best policies, principles and practices to minimize the effect of the waste to lowest. The study was based on literature. The thesis includes the introduction of types of waste, clarifi...

  10. Krsko NPP radioactive waste characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 2005 Krsko NPP initiated the Radioactive Waste Characterization Project and commissioned its realization to the consulting company Enconet International, Zagreb. The Agency for Radwaste Management was invited to participate on the Project. The Project was successfully closed out in August 2006. The main Project goal consisted of systematization the existing and gathering the missing radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, thermal and biological information and data on radioactive waste. In a general perspective, the Project may also be considered as a part of broader scope of activities to support state efforts to find a disposal solution for radioactive waste in Slovenia. The operational low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been structured into 6 waste streams that contain evaporator concentrates and tank sludges, spent ion resins, spent filters, compressible and non-compressible waste as well as specific waste. For each of mentioned waste streams, process schemes have been developed including raw waste, treatment and conditioning technologies, waste forms, containers and waste packages. In the paper the main results of the Characterization Project will be briefly described. The results will indicate that there are 17 different types of raw waste that have been processed by applying 9 treatment/conditioning technologies. By this way 18 different waste forms have been produced and stored into 3 types of containers. Within each type of container several combinations should be distinguished. Considering all of this, there are 34 different types of waste packages altogether that are currently stored in the Solid Radwaste Storage Facility at the Krsko NPP site. Because of these findings a new identification system has been recommended and consequently the improvement of the existing database on radioactive waste has been proposed. The potential areas of further in depth characterization are indicated. In the paper a brief description on the

  11. NABS Program: (Native Americans in Biological Science).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettys, Nancy, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the four-week summer program of the Native Americans in Biological Sciences Program that engages Native American eighth- and ninth-grade students in studying the problems related to the waste water treatment plant in Cushing, Oklahoma. (MDH)

  12. An index for quantifying the aerobic reactivity of municipal solid wastes and derived waste products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglia, Barbara; Adani, Fabrizio

    2008-05-01

    The organic matter contained in municipal solid waste (MSW) and in the MSW fractions obtained by mechanical separation has strong environmental impact when the waste is used as landfill. This is partly due to the biological activity that occurs under anaerobic conditions. Negative effects on the environment include unpleasant odors, biogas, leachate and biomass self-heating. Measuring the biological reactivity of waste with the help of indicators is an important tool to prevent waste impact. The aim of this study was to develop an index capable of describing the aerobic reactivity of waste, using both biological and chemical indicators. To develop this index, 71 MSW and MSW-product samples, including biologically treated MSW and mechanically separated MSW fractions, were analyzed. Fifty of the 71 samples analyzed represented MSWs and their derived products collected from a number of Italian waste plants and sites. The remaining 21 were MSW samples collected at different times during 8 different full-scale aerobic biological processes in four treatment plants used to reduce the biological reactivity of wastes. Five of these processes used the entire (unsorted) MSW, while the remaining three used the organic fraction of the MSW obtained by mechanical pre-treatment (waste sieving). Respirometric activity (Dynamic Respiration Index, DRI) and eluates characterization (chemical oxygen demand--COD, and 5 days biological oxygen demand--BOD5) were used as indicators of waste strength, as they had previously been reported to be indirect measures of waste impact on landfill. Summarizing all studied indicators, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to develop the Putrescibility Index (Ip). The results revealed Ip index of 204+/-33 (mean+/-standard deviation) and 159+/-14 for the organic fraction of MSW and MSW untreated waste respectively, and of 106+/-16 and 101+/-22 for the corresponding biologically treated waste. PMID:18280541

  13. Biodegradability determination of municipal waste: an evaluation of methods

    OpenAIRE

    Godley, Andrew R.; Lewin, Kathy; Graham, Adele; Barker, H.; Smith, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The Environment Agency is required to monitor the diversion of biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill. Reliable methods are needed to measure the biodegradability of municipal waste, both as mixed municipal waste and as individually separated fractions. An evaluation of several methods was carried out using a variety of organic materials typically found in municipal solid waste. The assessment considered biological and non-biological methods to determine which provid...

  14. Hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dangers and problems of hazardous wastes are described in this pictorial booklet that is part of the EPA solid waste management publication series. It is shown that how the nation's hazardous wastes are managed or mismanaged is a crucial environmental issue with vast implications for public health and for the integrity of the ecological systems on which man depends. The environmental folly of dumping or burning these wastes is emphasized, along with the economic imprudence of continuing to throw away valuable resources as wastes. The public as well as industry must pay the costs of safe hazardous waste management

  15. Textile Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from textile industry, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as removing heavy metals in textile wastes, and the biodegradability of six dyes. A list of references is also presented. (HM)

  16. Waste management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun Hansen, Karsten; Jamison, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark.......The case study deals with public accountability issues connected to household waste management in the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark....

  17. Food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Arazim, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    This thesis looks into issues related to food waste and consists of a theoretical and a practical part. Theoretical part aims to provide clear and complex definition of wood waste related problems, summarize current findings in Czech and foreign sources. Introduction chapter explains important terms and legal measures related to this topic. It is followed by description of causes, implications and possibilities in food waste reduction. Main goal of practical part is analyzing food waste in Cz...

  18. Waste incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste incineration can be defined as the thermal conversion processing of solid waste by chemical oxidation. The types of wastes range from solid household waste and infectious hospital waste through to toxic solid, liquid and gaseous chemical wastes. End products include hot incineration gases, composed primarily of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water vapor and to a smaller extend of non-combustible residue (ash) and air pollutants (e. g. NOx). Energy can be recovered by heat exchange from the hot incineration gases, thus lowering fossil fuel consumption that in turn can reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Burning of solid waste can fulfil up to four distinctive objectives (Pera, 2000): 1. Volume reduction: volume reduction of about 90 %, weight reduction of about 70 %; 2. Stabilization of waste: oxidation of organic input; 3. Recovery of energy from waste; 4. Sanitization of waste: destruction of pathogens. Waste incineration is not a means to make waste disappear. It does entail emissions into air as well as water and soil. The generated solid residues are the topic of this task force. Unlike other industrial processes discussed in this platform, waste incineration is not a production process, and is therefore not generating by-products, only residues. Residues that are isolated from e. g. flue gas, are concentrated in another place and form (e. g. air pollution control residues). Hence, there are generally two groups of residues that have to be taken into consideration: residues generated in the actual incineration process and others generated in the flue gas cleaning system. Should waste incineration finally gain public acceptance, it will be necessary to find consistent regulations for both sorts of residues. In some countries waste incineration is seen as the best option for the treatment of waste, whereas in other countries it is seen very negative. (author)

  19. Nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here is made a general survey of the situation relative to radioactive wastes. The different kinds of radioactive wastes and the different way to store them are detailed. A comparative evaluation of the situation in France and in the world is made. The case of transport of radioactive wastes is tackled. (N.C.)

  20. Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's programme on radioactive waste management are: (1) to reduce the impact of the waste to the stakeholders, the public and the environment; (2) to develop a management tool allowing to identify waste problems and to optimise decommissioning strategies; (3) to perform decommissioning activities in a safe and economical way; (4) to manage waste in a safe and economical way according to legislation; (5) to develop treatment/conditioning processes to minimise risks, volumes and cost of radioactive waste. Main projects and achievements in 1999 are summarised

  1. Methods for maintaining a record of waste packages during waste processing and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During processing, radioactive waste is converted into waste packages, and then sent for storage and ultimately for disposal. A principal condition for acceptance of a waste package is its full compliance with waste acceptance criteria for disposal or storage. These criteria define the radiological, mechanical, physical, chemical and biological properties of radioactive waste that can, in principle, be changed during waste processing. To declare compliance of a waste package with waste acceptance criteria, a system for generating and maintaining records should be established to record and track all relevant information, from raw waste characteristics, through changes related to waste processing, to final checking and verification of waste package parameters. In parallel, records on processing technology and the operational parameters of technological facilities should adhere to established and approved quality assurance systems. A records system for waste management should be in place, defining the data to be collected and stored at each step of waste processing and using a reliable selection process carried over into the individual steps of the waste processing flow stream. The waste management records system must at the same time ensure selection and maintenance of all the main information, not only providing evidence of compliance of waste package parameters with waste acceptance criteria but also serving as an information source in the case of any future operations involving the stored or disposed waste. Records generated during waste processing are a constituent part of the more complex system of waste management record keeping, covering the entire life cycle of radioactive waste from generation to disposal and even the post-closure period of a disposal facility. The IAEA is systematically working on the preparation of a set of publications to assist its Member States in the development and implementation of such a system. This report covers all the principal

  2. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste at U.S. nuclear power plants is mounting at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Yet the Department of Energy (DOE) does not expect a geologic repository to be available before 2010. In response to concerns about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, GAO reviewed the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to a monitored retrievable storage facility. This paper assesses the likelihood of a monitored retrievable storage facility operating by 1990, legal implications if DOE is unable to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund from which DOE's waste program costs are paid to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, the ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives

  3. Biological hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benemann, J.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Biological hydrogen production can be accomplished by either thermochemical (gasification) conversion of woody biomass and agricultural residues or by microbiological processes that yield hydrogen gas from organic wastes or water. Biomass gasification is a well established technology; however, the synthesis gas produced, a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}, requires a shift reaction to convert the CO to H{sub 2}. Microbiological processes can carry out this reaction more efficiently than conventional catalysts, and may be more appropriate for the relatively small-scale of biomass gasification processes. Development of a microbial shift reaction may be a near-term practical application of microbial hydrogen production.

  4. Thermal treatment of organic radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organic radioactive waste which is generated in nuclear and isotope facilities (power plants, research centers and other) must be treated in order to achieve a waste form suitable for long term storage and disposal. Therefore the resulting waste treatment products should be stable under influence of temperature, time, radioactivity, chemical and biological activity. Another reason for the treatment of organic waste is the volume reduction with respect to the storage costs. For different kinds of waste, different treatment technologies have been developed and some are now used in industrial scale. The paper gives process descriptions for the treatment of solid organic radioactive waste of low beta/gamma activity and alpha-contaminated solid organic radioactive waste, and the pyrolysis of organic radioactive waste

  5. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, exercises, demonstrations, and information on a variety of biology topics including labeling systems, biological indicators of stream pollution, growth of lichens, reproductive capacity of bulbous buttercups, a straw balance to measure transpiration, interaction of fungi, osmosis, and nitrogen fixation and crop production. (DC)

  6. Impact Of Aerobic Biostabilisation And Biodrying Process Of Municipal Solid Waste On Minimisation Of Waste Deposited In Landfills

    OpenAIRE

    Dziedzic Krzysztof; Łapczyńska-Kordon Bogusława; Malinowski Mateusz; Niemiec Marcin; Sikora Jakub

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses an innovative system used for aerobic biostabilisation and biological drying of solid municipal waste. A mechanical–biological process (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment were carried out and monitored in 5 bioreactors. A two-stage biological treatment process has been used in the investigation. In the first step an undersize fraction was subjected to the biological stabilisation for a period of 14 days as a result of which there was a decrease of loss on igni...

  7. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    OpenAIRE

    K. SUNDARA KUMAR; P. SUNDARA KUMAR,; Dr.M.J.Ratnakanth Babu

    2010-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to evaluate performance efficiency of a waste water treatment plant. A sewage treatment plant operating on biological treatment method (Activated Sludge Process) with an average wastewater inflow of 23MLD bas been considered for case study. Waste water samples were collected at different stages of treatment units and analysed for the major water quality parameters, such as biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solid...

  8. Quantum Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Sergi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A critical assessment of the recent developmentsof molecular biology is presented.The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptualunderstanding of life and biological systems is defended.Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketchedand its logical circularity avoided by postulatingthe existence of underlying living processes,entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale,with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other.Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces,is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretationof quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so onas quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of includinglong-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them incondensed matter theories of biological processes.Some quantum effects in biology are reviewedand quantum mechanics is acknowledged as conceptually important to biology since withoutit most (if not all of the biological structuresand signalling processes would not even exist. Moreover, it is suggested that long-rangequantum coherent dynamics, including electron polarization,may be invoked to explain signal amplificationprocess in biological systems in general.

  9. Biology task group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accomplishments of the task group studies over the past year are reviewed. The purposes of biological investigations, in the context of subseabed disposal, are: an evaluation of the dose to man; an estimation of effects on the ecosystem; and an estimation of the influence of organisms on and as barriers to radionuclide migration. To accomplish these ends, the task group adopted the following research goals: (1) acquire more data on biological accumulation of specific radionuclides, such as those of Tc, Np, Ra, and Sr; (2) acquire more data on transfer coefficients from sediment to organism; (3) Calculate mass transfer rates, construct simple models using them, and estimate collective dose commitment; (4) Identify specific pathways or transfer routes, determine the rates of transfer, and make dose limit calculations with simple models; (5) Calculate dose rates to and estimate irradiation effects on the biota as a result of waste emplacement, by reference to background irradiation calculations. (6) Examine the effect of the biota on altering sediment/water radionuclide exchange; (7) Consider the biological data required to address different accident scenarios; (8) Continue to provide the basic biological information for all of the above, and ensure that the system analysis model is based on the most realistic and up-to-date concepts of marine biologists; and (9) Ensure by way of free exchange of information that the data used in any model are the best currently available

  10. The options for solidifying low level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the methods of solidifying low level radioactive waste. The four main types of solidification agents used are bitumen (asphalt), portland cement (with or without additives), gypsum cement and vinyl-ester resin. The following properties of wastes solidified using these agents are discussed: leach resistance; thermal stability; mechanical strength; radiation stability; resistance to chemical or biological attack; sensitivity to variations in radwaste chemistry or mixing ratio; free water in the waste form after curing. (U.K.)

  11. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    OpenAIRE

    Dau Lal Bohra; Vikas Modasiya; Chandan Kumar Bahura

    2012-01-01

    Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes). In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I), industrial waste water (group II), sewage treatment hub (group III), unorganized collected waste water (group IV) and old residential waste colle...

  12. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part of the...... industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part of...

  13. Treating waste waters from anchovy canneries for subsequent re-use by means of a combined anaerobic and anoxic-anaerobic biological process followed by physico-chemical tertiary treatment.; Tratamiento de aguas residuales de industrias conserveras de anchoas para su posterior reutilizacion, mediante un proceso biologico combinado anaerobio, anoxico-aerobio y un tratamiento terciario fisicoquimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, N.; Alonso, E.; Giron, A. M.; Amieva, J. J.; Tejero, I. [Universidad de Cantabria. Torrelavaga (Spain)

    2003-07-01

    A study was made at a pilot plant of a method of treating waste waters from anchovy canneries so that they could subsequently be re-used. This waste contains high concentrations of organic matter, ammonia nitrogen, oils and fats, and has a high degree of salinity. The first stage of the pilot plant consisted of a homogenization tank, a dissolved air flotation clarifier, a hybrid anaerobic digester (UASB+ plastic filling filter), an activated sludge aerobic reactor (which alternates aerobic and anoxic stages) and a secondary decanter. The effluent from the biological process was subjected to physicochemical treatment in a second pilot plant operating intermittent lt. The second pilot plant consisted of a granular active carbon filter, a 5 mn filter and a reverse osmosis membrane module. (Author) 8 refs.

  14. Waste indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  15. Integral Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Cubitt, Sean

    2015-01-01

    It is not only the physical digital media that pile waste upon waste in an era of built-in obsolescence driven by over-production attempting to balance the falling rate of profit. Energy used in the manufacture, employment and recycling of devices belongs to a system where waste is not merely accidental but integral to the operation of cognitive capitalism. Oil and gas, uranium and hydroelectricity all prey disproportionately on indigenous peoples, who are turned into economic externalities a...

  16. Waste Management

    OpenAIRE

    Anonymous

    2006-01-01

    The Productivity Commission’s inquiry report into ‘Waste Management’ was tabled by Government in December 2006. The Australian Government asked the Commission to identify policies that would enable Australia to address market failures and externalities associated with the generation and disposal of waste, and recommend how resource efficiencies can be optimised to improve economic, environmental and social outcomes. In the final report, the Commission maintains that waste management policy sh...

  17. Waste indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall, O.; Lassen, C.; Hansen, E. [Cowi A/S, Lyngby (Denmark)

    2003-07-01

    The Waste Indicator Project focuses on methods to evaluate the efficiency of waste management. The project proposes the use of three indicators for resource consumption, primary energy and landfill requirements, based on the life-cycle principles applied in the EDIP Project. Trial runs are made With the indicators on paper, glass packaging and aluminium, and two models are identified for mapping the Danish waste management, of which the least extensive focuses on real and potential savings. (au)

  18. Radioactive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2015-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2014. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:26420096

  19. Radioactive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudri, B S; Baawain, Mahad

    2016-10-01

    Papers reviewed herein present a general overview of radioactive waste activities around the world in 2015. These include safety assessments, decommission and decontamination of nuclear facilities, fusion facilities, transportation and management solutions for the final disposal of low and high level radioactive wastes (LLW and HLW), interim storage and final disposal options for spent fuel (SF), and tritiated wastes, with a focus on environmental impacts due to the mobility of radionuclides in water, soil and ecosystem alongwith other progress made in the management of radioactive wastes. PMID:27620100

  20. Quantum Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    A critical assessment of the recent developments of molecular biology is presented. The thesis that they do not lead to a conceptual understanding of life and biological systems is defended. Maturana and Varela's concept of autopoiesis is briefly sketched and its logical circularity avoided by postulating the existence of underlying {\\it living processes}, entailing amplification from the microscopic to the macroscopic scale, with increasing complexity in the passage from one scale to the other. Following such a line of thought, the currently accepted model of condensed matter, which is based on electrostatics and short-ranged forces, is criticized. It is suggested that the correct interpretation of quantum dispersion forces (van der Waals, hydrogen bonding, and so on) as quantum coherence effects hints at the necessity of including long-ranged forces (or mechanisms for them) in condensed matter theories of biological processes. Some quantum effects in biology are reviewed and quantum mechanics is acknowledge...

  1. Modern methods for the treatment of heavily polluted waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological processes are playing an increasingly important role alongside physical, chemical, and thermal processes in integrated process concepts for treatment of industrial waste water. The individual processes are complementary. Biological processes are particularly important in combination with membrane processes, adsorption, or oxidation in the treatment of seepage water from waste dumps. (orig.)

  2. A systems study of the future waste management system in Boraas. Part of the project: 'Thermal and biological waste treatment in a systems perspective'; Systemstudie Avfall - Boraas: En systemstudie foer den framtida avfallsbehandlingen i Boraas. Ett delprojekt inom projektet 'Termisk och biologisk avfallsbehandling i ett systemperspektiv'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisaillon, Mattias; Haraldsson, Maarten; Sundberg, Johan; Norrman Eriksson, Ola

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this project (A systems study of the future waste management system in Boraas) is to evaluate, from a systems perspective, new and improved waste treatment technologies. The study is focused on the waste management system and the district heating system of Boraas. In order to make the analysis complete, the project has also included analyses of surrounding systems that interact with Boraas waste management and district heating systems. The study evaluates the situation in 2015, i.e. a situation only a few years from today. Therefore we have chosen to perform the analysis with one external scenario and 12 development paths (divided into Analyses 1-5). The external scenario describes the development of the surrounding systems through factors that are important for the waste management and district heating systems in Boraas (e.g. electricity price, waste generation, and price of tradable emissions permits for CO{sub 2}). A development path (or local scenario) means changes of the current waste management and/or district heating systems in Boraas and consists of a set of technologies (e.g. anaerobic digestion, central separation and gasification) that are used to fulfil the demand for waste treatment and district heating. The development in the surrounding systems (described by the external scenario) cannot be influenced by the decision-makers in Boraas. The development paths describe possible changes of the waste management and district heating systems that decision-makers in Boraas can choose to implement

  3. Food waste or wasted food

    OpenAIRE

    van Graas, Maaike Helene

    2014-01-01

    In the industrialized world large amounts of food are daily disposed of. A significant share of this waste could be avoided if different choices were made by individual households. Each day, every household makes decisions to maximize their happiness while balancing restricted amounts of time and money. Thinking of the food waste issue in terms of the consumer choice problem where households can control the amount of wasted food, we can model how households can make the best decisions. I...

  4. Chemical decontamination of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive wastes are generated in a number of different kinds of facilities and arise in a wide range of concentrations of radioactive materials and in a variety of physical and chemical forms. There is also a variety of alternatives for treatment and conditioning of the wastes prior disposal. The importance of treatment of radioactive waste for protection of human and environment has long been recognized and considerable experience has gained in this field. Generally, the methods used for treatment of radioactive wastes can be classified into three type's biological, physical and chemical treatment this physical treatment it gives good result than biological treatment. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. Chemical treatment is fewer hazards and gives good result compared with biological and physical treatments. In chemical treatment there are different procedures, solvent extraction, ion exchange, electro dialysis but solvent extraction is best one because high purity can be optioned on the other hand the disadvantage that it is expensive. Beside the solvent extraction technique one can be used is ion exchange which gives reasonable result, but requires pretreatment that to avoid in closing of column by colloidal and large species. Electro dialysis technique gives quite result but less than solvent extraction and ion exchange technique the advantage is a cheep.(Author)

  5. Waste Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This contribution describes the main activities of the Waste and Disposal Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN. Achievements in 1997 in three topical areas are reported on: performance assessments, waste forms/packages and near-and far field studies

  6. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway......Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance of...... efficiencies. Overall, the waste refinery provided global warming (GW) savings comparable with efficient incineration, MBT, and bioreactor landfilling technologies. The main environmental benefits from waste refining were a potential for improved phosphorus recovery (about 85%) and increased electricity...

  7. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter present a brief overview of the current situation of siting radioactive wastes. This is followed by an overview of various psychological approaches attempting to analyse public reactions to nuclear facilities. It will be argued that public reactions to nuclear waste factilities must be seen in the context of more general attitudes toward nuclear energy. The latter are not only based upon perceptions of the health and environmental risks but are built on values, and sets of attributes which need not be similar to the representations o the experts and policy-makers. The issue of siting nuclear waste facilities is also embedded in a wider moral and political domain. This is illustrated by the importance of equity issues in siting radioactive wastes. In the last section, the implications of the present line of argument for risk communication and public participation in decisions about siting radioactive wastes will be briefly discussed. (author). 49 refs

  8. Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    Within the framework of global biogeochemical cycles and ocean productivity, there are two areas that will be of particular interest to biological oceanography in the 1990s. The first is the mapping in space time of the biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the world ocean. The second area is the coupling of biological and physical processes as it affects the distribution and growth rate of phytoplankton biomass. Certainly other areas will be of interest to biological oceanographers, but these two areas are amenable to observations from satellites. Temporal and spatial variability is a regular feature of marine ecosystems. The temporal and spatial variability of phytoplankton biomass and productivity which is ubiquitous at all time and space scales in the ocean must be characterized. Remote sensing from satellites addresses these problems with global observations of mesocale (2 to 20 days, 10 to 200 km) features over a long period of time.

  9. Biological preconcentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manginell, Ronald P.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Huber, Dale L.

    2008-09-09

    A biological preconcentrator comprises a stimulus-responsive active film on a stimulus-producing microfabricated platform. The active film can comprise a thermally switchable polymer film that can be used to selectively absorb and desorb proteins from a protein mixture. The biological microfabricated platform can comprise a thin membrane suspended on a substrate with an integral resistive heater and/or thermoelectric cooler for thermal switching of the active polymer film disposed on the membrane. The active polymer film can comprise hydrogel-like polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide) or poly(n-isopropylacrylamide), that are tethered to the membrane. The biological preconcentrator can be fabricated with semiconductor materials and technologies.

  10. BIOREMEDIATION OF SLAUGHTER HOUSE WASTE WATER BY RHODOBACTER SP. GSKRLMBKU-02

    OpenAIRE

    Kadari Rajyalaxmi; Ramchander Merugu; S.Girisham; Reddy SM

    2015-01-01

    Biological treatment of waste waters is a sustainable alternative for waste treatment to existing treatment methods. Microbial metabolism effects pH, BOD, COD, DO and concentration of suspended solids present in slaughter house waste water. Rhodobacter sp. GSKRLMBKU-02 from paper mill waste water was used in the present study to remediate slaughter house waste water. Treatment with this bacterium caused a significant decrease in some of the parameters tested for waste water. Remediation of sl...

  11. Agricultural uses of waste heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pile, R.S.; Behrends, L.L.; Burns, E.R.; Maddox, J.J.; Madewell, C.E.; Mays, D.A.; Meriwether, J.

    1977-11-16

    A major concern of the Tennessee Valley Authority is to ensure efficient use of Tennessee Valley resources in achieving optimum economic development without degrading the environment. As part of this effort, TVA is exploring many uses for waste heat. Activities to develop ways to use waste heat in agricultural production are described. Primary objectives are to: (1) identify potential agricultural uses of waste heat, (2) develop and test technologies and management criteria for more productive uses, (3) demonstrate technologies in commercial-scale production facilities, and (4) provide technical assistance for commercial application. Waste heat research and development projects under investigation or being planned by TVA independently or cooperatively include: (1) controlled environment greenhouses, (2) biological ecycling of nutrients from livestock manures, (3) soil heating and irrigation, and (4) environmental control for livestock housing. (MHR)

  12. Disposal Of Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with disposal of waste matter management of soiled waste matter in city with introduction, definition of waste matter, meaning of management of waste matter, management system of waste matter, current condition in the country, collect and transportation of waste matter disposal liquid waste matter, industrial waste matter like plastic, waste gas sludge, pulp and sulfuric acid, recycling technology of waste matter such as recycling system of Black clawson, Monroe and Rome.

  13. Waste segregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A scoping study has been undertaken to determine the state-of-the-art of waste segregation technology as applied to the management of low-level waste (LLW). Present-day waste segregation practices were surveyed through a review of the recent literature and by means of personal interviews with personnel at selected facilities. Among the nuclear establishments surveyed were Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and plants, nuclear fuel cycle plants, public and private laboratories, institutions, industrial plants, and DOE and commercially operated shallow land burial sites. These survey data were used to analyze the relationship between waste segregation practices and waste treatment/disposal processes, to assess the developmental needs for improved segregation technology, and to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with the implementation of waste segregation controls. This task was planned for completion in FY 1981. It should be noted that LLW management practices are now undergoing rapid change such that the technology and requirements for waste segregation in the near future may differ significantly from those of the present day. 8 figures

  14. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste is mounting at U.S. nuclear power plants at a rate of more than 2,000 metric tons a year. Pursuant to statute and anticipating that a geologic repository would be available in 1998, the Department of Energy (DOE) entered into disposal contracts with nuclear utilities. Now, however, DOE does not expect the repository to be ready before 2010. For this reason, DOE does not want to develop a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS) by 1998. This book is concerned about how best to store the waste until a repository is available, congressional requesters asked GAO to review the alternatives of continued storage at utilities' reactor sites or transferring waste to an MRS facility, GAO assessed the likelihood of an MRSA facility operating by 1998, legal implications if DOE is not able to take delivery of wastes in 1998, propriety of using the Nuclear Waste Fund-from which DOE's waste program costs are paid-to pay utilities for on-site storage capacity added after 1998, ability of utilities to store their waste on-site until a repository is operating, and relative costs and safety of the two storage alternatives

  15. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This extract from the House of Commons Hansard publication for Wednesday 12th July 1995 considers the current debate on the desirability or otherwise of disposing of low level radioactive waste in landfill sites. It covers wastes generated both by the nuclear industry and by medical processes in local hospitals, and the transport of such waste from source to disposal site. The questions raised lead to a debate about plans to sell off commercially desirable aspects of the nuclear electric generation industry while leaving the costs associated with decommissioning of Magnox reactors as a liability on the public purse. (UK)

  16. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The execution of the Brazilian nuclear power program involves the generation of radwastes, some of which must be isolated, for several centuries, from human activities and environment. The Materials Directory from National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) organized a project in order to collect information concerning the waste disposal practices that may fulfill national technical-social-economic conditions and to recommend them, if requested, to the competent authorities. The paper provides general information concerning the waste producers, the project organization, the regions in Brazil that should be investigated in more detail during the site selection studies, as well as the preliminary conclusion in waste management area

  17. Marine Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewees, Christopher M.; Hooper, Jon K.

    1976-01-01

    A variety of informational material for a course in marine biology or oceanology at the secondary level is presented. Among the topics discussed are: food webs and pyramids, planktonic blooms, marine life, plankton nets, food chains, phytoplankton, zooplankton, larval plankton and filter feeders. (BT)

  18. Biology Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Describes laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom activities/materials, including water relation exercise on auxin-treated artichoke tuber tissue; aerobic respiration in yeast; an improved potometer; use of mobiles in biological classification, and experiments on powdery mildews and banana polyphenol oxidase. Includes reading lists…

  19. Solid Waste Management through the Application of Thermal Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas, Konstantinos; Loizidou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    The energy utilization from waste can be achieved with the application of different thermal technologies (anaerobic digestion, a biological waste management method, can also result in energy recovery form waste). The basic operation principles that should apply to all thermal treatment facilities for municipal solid waste are: 1. Steady operation conditions. 2. Easiness for adaptation to rough changes of the composition and the quantity of feedstuff. 3. Flexibility for adaptation to the varia...

  20. Possibilities under the `Kreislaufwirtschaft- und Abfallgesetz` for the recycling or for energy generation from waste with a high calorific value having undergone mechanical-biological conditioning; Moeglichkeiten der energetischen und stofflichen Verwertung von heizwertreichen Reststoffen aus der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung im Rahmen des Kreislaufwirtschafts- und Abfallgesetzes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, J.; Fricke, K. [Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen Fricke und Turk GmbH, Witzenhausen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    This (partial) project has the following aims: to describe comprehensively the possibilities for the recycling, or generation of energy from, waste with a high calorific value having undergone mechanical-biological conditioning; further, to formulate demands regarding the quality of the separated partial fractions. This basic study takes all relevant, commercial thermal processes into account (power plants, cement works, blast furnaces, etc.). Furthermore, the question is investigated of whether the thermal waste processing plants in the area of the Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfall (SAGA) are suitable for waste utilization. An environmental compatibility statement is made, and the economic and legal boundary conditions are studied. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel des (Teil-)Forschungsvorhabens soll es sein, die Moeglichkeiten der energetischen und stofflichen Verwertung heizwertreicher Abfaelle aus der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung umfassend darzustellen und die Anforderungen an die Qualitaet der abgretrennten Teilfraktionen zu formulieren. Bei der Grundlagenermittlung sollen alle relevanten auf dem Markt angebotenen thermischen Verfahren (Kraftwerke, Zementwerke, Hochoefen usw.) mit einbezogen werden. Weiterhin sollen die im SAGA-Gebiet (Suedhessische Arbeitsgemeinschaft Abfall) vorhandenen thermsichen Anlagen auf ihre Eignung zur energetischen bzw. stofflichen Verwertung hin ueberprueft werden. Neben der Bewertung der Umweltvertraeglichkeit werden die oekonomischen und rechtlichen Rahmenbedingungen untersucht. (orig.)

  1. Methods Used in Urban Waste Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    I. OROIAN; PROOROCU M.; Antonia ODAGIU; I. BRASOVEAN

    2010-01-01

    The paper presents the main options aiming the treatment of urban waste consisting mainly of the household andthose resulting from industrial activities, acordin to the present EU legislation. The aspects of the two major types ofwaste treatment, mechanical biological treatment and incineration respectively are described. Distinction is madebetween mechanical and biological treatment of aerobic and anaerobic issues being addressed and biological dryingprocess. The result of these processes is...

  2. Kinetic study of the biological treatment in waste water treatment plant; Iniciacion a la determinacion por respirometria de medidas de control y relaciones cineticas basicas del reactor biologico de una estacion depuradora de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, J. E.

    2003-07-01

    The kinetic study of the biological treatment may help determine the speed in which the microorganisms metabolise a specific substrate and then we can obtain the necessary information to figure out the calculations for the dimensions of a biological reactor. Since the wastewater treatment should not be an exact science, a new generation of respirometry systems, based on simple methods, allow us to go through these parameters from a practical and efficient stance. To this end, in this work, we have selected the most simple calculation methods in order to create an easy and friendly background. Respirometry is the window through which we can observe active sludge life. Other systems, not based on the genuine biological activity of the sludge, no not reflect the actual state and reactions taking place in the biological reactor. For all the aforesaid reasons, the new generation of Respirometry may be considered as a fundamental tool for control, surveillance and kinetic parameter performance. (Author)

  3. A review of biological processes within oceanic water columns relevant to the assessment of the safety of disposal of waste, notably radioactive isotopes on or within the sea bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelagic biological processes and their connotations in the assessment of possible dispersal mechanisms of contaminants released on the deep oceanic seabed are reviewed. Biological gradients tend to be from the surface down so the search is for processes which run counter to these general gradients. Observed profiles of standing crop of both plankton and micronekton show that below 2000 m biological activity would have to be exceptionally dynamic to have an influence that will even approach within an order of magnitude of the dispersive effect of physical mixing. Examination of all forms of known migration mechanisms fails to reveal such dynamic activity. Nor have any critical pathways been identified within the present or foreseeable pattern of exploitation of the oceans. However, a major gap in knowledge is whether the pattern of these biological processes changes substantially in the region of continental slopes. (author)

  4. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the GAO's work on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). As is known, DOE is seeking legislation permanently withdrawing the WIPP site, located on federal land near Carlsbad, New Mexico, from public use. Because DOE wants to begin storing a limited amount of nuclear waste in WIPP for tests, action on land withdrawal, either through legislation or administrative action by the Secretary of the Interior, is necessary to authorize such storage

  5. Waste economy (waste utilization) in the CR

    OpenAIRE

    Urbanová, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    This Bachelor thesis is prepared as general overview of the Czech Republic waste economy. Waste economy is used as individual industrial segment. Bachelor thesis is focused especially on a total production of waste and communal waste, legislative restrictions connected with waste economy in Czech republic and comparison of Czech waste economy with other European Union countries and with Switzerland as well. The issue of decreasing of waste production and its safe and environmentally acceptabl...

  6. Biostabilization of municipal solid waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adani, Fabrizio; Tambone, Fulvia; Gotti, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    A mechanical-biological process for municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment was monitored for one year. Mechanical pre-treatment provided two fractions. The oversize fraction (diameter > 50 mm) (yield of 600 g kg(-1) ww) (46 Mg day(-1)) was used for refuse derived fuel production, after undergoing a mechanical refining processes, because of low moisture content (200-250 g kg(-1)) and high calorific value (2500-2800 kcal kg ww(-1)). The undersize fraction (diameter MSW organic matter. This fraction was biologically treated using an aerobic process with an organic waste fraction from separate collection (77 Mg day(-1)) and recycled stabilized material (62 Mg day(-1)) obtained from end-product sieve (diameter biogas production and fermentable volatile solids were also used as parameters to describe the potential impact of treated waste, providing further useful information. Nevertheless, all of these methods revealed analytical or interpretative limits. A complete mass balance of the biological treatment section showed that, from a net input of 107 Mg day(-1), only 250 g kg(-1) (27 Mg day(-1)) of the waste needed to be landfilled, with 750 g kg(-1) (80 Mg day(-1)) being lost as CO2 and H2O. PMID:15381229

  7. Mesoscopic biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G V Shivashankar

    2002-02-01

    In this paper we present a qualitative outlook of mesoscopic biology where the typical length scale is of the order of nanometers and the energy scales comparable to thermal energy. Novel biomolecular machines, governed by coded information at the level of DNA and proteins, operate at these length scales in biological systems. In recent years advances in technology have led to the study of some of the design principles of these machines; in particular at the level of an individual molecule. For example, the forces that operate in molecular interactions, the stochasticity involved in these interactions and their spatio-temporal dynamics are beginning to be explored. Understanding such design principles is opening new possibilities in mesoscopic physics with potential applications.

  8. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This eighth chapter presents the radioactive wastes and waste disposal; classification of radioactive wastes; basis requests of the radioactive waste management; conditions for a radioactive waste disposal; registers and inventories; transport of radioactive wastes from a facility to another and the radioactive waste management plan

  9. Biological programming

    OpenAIRE

    Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Bándi, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    Biology offers a tremendous set of concepts that are potentially very powerfully usable for the software engineer, but they have been barely exploited hitherto. In this position paper we propose a fresh attempt to create the building blocks of a programming technology that could be as successful as life. A key guiding principle is to develop and make use of unambiguous definitions of the essential features of life.

  10. Biological radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the patent description, the biological radioprotector is deuterium depleted water, DDW, produced by vacuum distillation with an isotopic content lower than natural value. It appears as such or in a mixture with natural water and carbon dioxide. It can be used for preventing and reducing the ionizing radiation effects upon humans or animal organisms, exposed therapeutically, professionally or accidentally to radiation. The most significant advantage of using DDW as biological radioprotector results from its way of administration. Indeed no one of the radioprotectors currently used today can be orally administrated, what reduces the patients' compliance to prophylactic administrations. The biological radioprotector is an unnoxious product obtained from natural water, which can be administrated as food additive instead of drinking water. Dose modification factor is according to initial estimates around 1.9, what is a remarkable feature when one takes into account that the product is toxicity-free and side effect-free and can be administrated prophylactically as a food additive. A net radioprotective action of the deuterium depletion was evidenced experimentally in laboratory animals (rats) hydrated with DDW of 30 ppm D/(D+H) concentration as compared with normally hydrated control animals. Knowing the effects of irradiation and mechanisms of the acute radiation disease as well as the effects of administration of radiomimetic chemicals upon cellular lines of fast cell division, it appears that the effects of administrating DDW result from stimulation of the immunity system. In conclusion, the biological radioprotector DDW presents the following advantages: - it is obtained from natural products without toxicity; - it is easy to be administrated as a food additive, replacing the drinking water; - besides radioprotective effects, the product has also immunostimulative and antitumoral effects

  11. Biodegradation and flushing of MBT wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A A; Richards, D J; Powrie, W

    2013-11-01

    Mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) processes are increasingly being adopted as a means of diverting biodegradable municipal waste (BMW) from landfill, for example to comply with the EU Landfill Directive. However, there is considerable uncertainty concerning the residual pollution potential of such wastes. This paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on two different MBT waste residues, carried out to investigate the remaining potential for the generation of greenhouse gases and the flushing of contaminants from these materials when landfilled. The potential for gas generation was found to be between 8% and 20% of that for raw MSW. Pretreatment of the waste reduced the potential for the release of organic carbon, ammoniacal nitrogen, and heavy metal contents into the leachate; and reduced the residual carbon remaining in the waste after final degradation from ∼320g/kg dry matter for raw MSW to between 183 and 195g/kg dry matter for the MBT wastes. PMID:23973052

  12. Evaluation of Energy Value of Waste Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of energy value of waste material is an unavoidable element of a complete national economic development strategy, and also of nature conservation strategy. The exploitation of energy from waste can be realized through direct and indirect measures, which, in every case, demand additional investment and operating costs. Only the complete evaluation of natural resources exploitation can show economic advantages of waste energy valuation. There are additional specific expenses, in relation to the Alternative option of land filling, dependent on the approach accepted and the conditions of the energy valuation of waste. These expenses range from 80 DM per tonne of waste (incineration without co-generation) to more then 300 DM per tonne of waste (for example, complex anaerobic-aerobic biological treatment with the production of bio-gas). (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs

  13. A NEW WASTE CLASSIFYING MODEL: HOW WASTE CLASSIFICATION CAN BECOME MORE OBJECTIVE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcea Stefan Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The waste management specialist must be able to identify and analyze waste generation sources and to propose proper solutions to prevent the waste generation and encurage the waste minimisation. In certain situations like implementing an integrated waste management sustem and configure the waste collection methods and capacities, practitioners can face the challenge to classify the generated waste. This will tend to be the more demanding as the literature does not provide a coherent system of criteria required for an objective waste classification process. The waste incineration will determine no doubt a different waste classification than waste composting or mechanical and biological treatment. In this case the main question is what are the proper classification criteria witch can be used to realise an objective waste classification? The article provide a short critical literature review of the existing waste classification criteria and suggests the conclusion that the literature can not provide unitary waste classification system which is unanimously accepted and assumed by ideologists and practitioners. There are various classification criteria and more interesting perspectives in the literature regarding the waste classification, but the most common criteria based on which specialists classify waste into several classes, categories and types are the generation source, physical and chemical features, aggregation state, origin or derivation, hazardous degree etc. The traditional classification criteria divided waste into various categories, subcategories and types; such an approach is a conjectural one because is inevitable that according to the context in which the waste classification is required the used criteria to differ significantly; hence the need to uniformizating the waste classification systems. For the first part of the article it has been used indirect observation research method by analyzing the literature and the various

  14. Medical wastes management in the south of Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In developing countries, solid wastes have not received sufficient attention. In many countries, hazardous and medical wastes are still handled and disposed together with domestic wastes, thus creating a great health risk to municipal workers, the public and the environment. Medical waste management has been evaluated at the Vacacai river basin in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. A total of 91 healthcare facilities, including hospitals (21), health centers (48) and clinical laboratories (22) were surveyed to provide information about the management, segregation, generation, storage and disposal of medical wastes. The results about management aspects indicate that practices in most healthcare facilities do not comply with the principles stated in Brazilian legislation. All facilities demonstrated a priority on segregation of infectious-biological wastes. Average generation rates of total and infectious-biological wastes in the hospitals were estimated to be 3.245 and 0.570 kg/bed-day, respectively

  15. Biological Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviena Baskaran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biology has entered a new era in distributing information based on database and this collection of database become primary in publishing information. This data publishing is done through Internet Gopher where information resources easy and affordable offered by powerful research tools. The more important thing now is the development of high quality and professionally operated electronic data publishing sites. To enhance the service and appropriate editorial and policies for electronic data publishing has been established and editors of article shoulder the responsibility.

  16. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  17. CNAEM waste processing and storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive waste in Turkey is generated from various applications. Radioactive waste management activities are carried out in a facility at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center (CNAEM). This facility has been assigned to take all low-level radioactive wastes generated by nuclear applications in Turkey. The wastes are generated from research and nuclear applications mainly in medicine, biology, agriculture, quality control in metal processing and construction industries. These wastes are classified as low- level radioactive wastes and their activities are up to 10-3 Ci/m3 (except spent sealed sources). Chemical treatment and cementation of liquid radwaste, segregation and compaction of solid wastes and conditioning of spent sources are the main processing activities of this facility. A.so, analyses, registration, quality control and interim storage of conditioned low-level wastes are the other related activities of this facility. Conditioned wastes are stored in an interim storage building. All waste management activities, which have been carried out in CNAEM, are generally described in this paper. (author)

  18. Plant Leachate Nutrient Recovery with Biological, Thermal, and Photocatalytic Pretreatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Les

    2015-01-01

    Plants are ideal for long term space travel: provide essential resources - oxygen, water, food; Water-soaked plants expel soluble nutrients in a leachate solution - toxins and wastes are also expelled and inhibit growth; biological, thermal, photocatalytic coupled with an acid digestion treatment will hopefully maximize recovery and remove wastes

  19. Biological biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge-Herrero, E. [Servicio de Cirugia Experimental. Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    There are a number of situations in which substances of biological origin are employed as biomaterials. Most of them are macromolecules derived from isolated connective tissue or the connective tissue itself in membrane form, in both cases, the tissue can be used in its natural form or be chemically treated. In other cases, certain blood vessels can be chemically pretreated and used as vascular prostheses. Proteins such as albumin, collagen and fibrinogen are employed to coat vascular prostheses. Certain polysaccharides have also been tested for use in controlled drug release systems. Likewise, a number of tissues, such as dura mater, bovine pericardium, procine valves and human valves, are used in the preparation of cardiac prostheses. We also use veins from animals or humans in arterial replacement. In none of these cases are the tissues employed dissimilar to the native tissues as they have been chemically modified, becoming a new bio material with different physical and biochemical properties. In short, we find that natural products are being utilized as biomaterials and must be considered as such; thus, it is necessary to study both their chemicobiological and physicomechanical properties. In the present report, we review the current applications, problems and future prospects of some of these biological biomaterials. (Author) 84 refs.

  20. The management of industrial wastes in hydrology; La gestion des dechets industriels en hydrologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elbaz-Seboun, V.

    1998-07-08

    The industrial wastes are made of different kind of wastes: the inert wastes, the banal wastes (municipal wastes), the special wastes containing noxious elements with respect to human health and environment, and the radioactive wastes. Each industry generates its own effluents (sludges from water treatment plants and leachates from rubbish dumps). The main water pollutions are due to the fermentescible organic matters, nitrates and heavy metals from the industrial waste waters. The aim of the public water agencies is to better protect the environment and to give help to the industrialists in the management of their wastes: reduction at the source, selective collection, valorization, transportation and processing. Non-valorizable wastes must be processed: physico-chemical and biological processing (bio-filtering, coagulation-flocculation, membranes and industrial gases), incineration (organic wastes), disposal in class 1 technical burial centres after stabilization (ultimate wastes). Since July 2002, only the ultimate wastes will be disposed off and all class 2 and 3 dumps must have been rehabilitated. This work is divided into 2 parts: part 1 gives a presentation of the different types of industrial wastes and of their management (origin of wastes, effluents, heavy metals, environmental impact, legal aspects, wastes management, valorization). The second part describes the different processes for the treatment of industrial wastes (conventional processes, physico-chemical and biological processes, incineration, tipping, processing of radioactive wastes). (J.S.)

  1. Cumulative input/output balance of a mechanical-biological waste treatment plant. Comparison of construction material requirements, operating energy expenditure, and the requirement of auxiliary materials in comparison with waste combustion; Kumulative Bilanzierung der mechanisch-biologischen Restabfallbehandlung - Baumaterialien und betrieblicher Energie- und Hilfsstoffaufwand im Vergleich zur Muellverbrennung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallmann, R.; Fricke, K. [Ingenieurgemeinschaft Witzenhausen (Germany); Vogtmann, H. [Hessisches Landesamt fuer Regionalentwicklung und Landwirtschaft, Kassel (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The study strikes a cumulative input/output balance of an existing waste conditioning plant considering not only operating energy demand but also the required construction materials for erecting the plant. In operation since 1996, the waste conditioning plant is entirely state of the art; hence the data obtained are up to date. The results are compared with relevant results for a waste processing plant and evaluated. (orig.) [Deutsch] Im Rahmen der vorliegenden Untersuchung erfolgt eine kumulative Bilanzierung einer bestehenden MBA-Anlage, wobei neben den betrieblichen Energieaufwendungen auch die Baumaterialien zur Herstellung der Anlage beruecksichtigt werden. Die seit 1996 in Betrieb befindliche Abfallbehandlungsanlage entspricht weitestgehend dem Stand der Technik der MBA, wodurch die Aktualitaet der Daten gegeben ist. Die Ergebnisse der Bilanzierung werden im Vergleich zu einer MVA dargestellt und bewertet. (orig.)

  2. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container; type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3); nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.); building concerned; details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting...

  3. Waste disposal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    We should like to remind you that you can have all commonplace, conventional waste (combustible, inert, wood, etc.) disposed of by the TS-FM Group. Requests for the removal of such waste should be made by contacting FM Support on tel. 77777 or by e-mail (Fm.Support@cern.ch). For requests to be acted upon, the following information must be communicated to FM Support: budget code to be debited for the provision and removal of the skip / container. type of skip required (1m3, 4 m3, 7 m3, 15 m3, 20 m3, 30 m3). nature of the waste to be disposed of (bulky objects, cardboard boxes, etc.). building concerned. details of requestor (name, phone number, department, group, etc.). We should also like to inform you that the TS-FM Group can arrange for waste to be removed from work-sites for firms under contract to CERN, provided that the prior authorisation of the CERN Staff Member in charge of the contract is obtained and the relevant disposal/handling charges are paid. You are reminded that the selective sorting o...

  4. Bench-scale treatability testing of biological, UV oxidation, distillation, and ion-exchange treatment of trench water from a low-level radioactive waste disposal area at West Valley, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundquist, J.A.; Gillings, J.C. [Ecology and Environment, Inc. (United States); Sonntag, T.L. [New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (United States); Denault, R.P. [Pacific Nuclear, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    Ecology and Environment, Inc. (E and E), under subcontract to Pacific Nuclear Services (PNS), conducted for the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) treatability tests to support the selection and design of a treatment system for leachate from Trench 14 of the West Valley State-Licensed, Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Area (SDA). In this paper E and E presents and discusses the treatability test results and provides recommendations for the design of the full-scale treatment system.

  5. Panel discussion on 'The need for a national classification system for radioactive wastes'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' Radioactive waste in Canada is informally classified according to its radiological hazard and mass into one of three categories: -Nuclear fuel waste - all fuel discharged from all types of reactors -Waste derived from uranium or thorium mining and milling -Low-level radioactive waste - all radioactive wastes except for nuclear fuel waste and wastes from uranium or thorium mining and milling. These categories as such do not clearly differentiate wastes based on such practical characteristics as heat generation, required shielding, half-lives of the radionuclides involved, physical state, chemical and biological toxicity, and potential for various types of disposal. Other countries do have more developed classification systems. From their experience, can one judge whether it would be useful for Canada to develop and adopt a more detailed national waste classification scheme to guide waste management programs from waste generation to waste disposal? (author)

  6. Biological effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following an introduction into the field of cellular radiation effect considering the most important experimental results, the biological significance of the colony formation ability is brought out. The inactivation concept of stem cells does not only prove to be good, according to the present results, in the interpretation of the pathogenesis of acute radiation effects on moult tissue, it also enables chronicle radiation injuries to be interpreted through changes in the fibrous part of the organs. Radiation therapy of tumours can also be explained to a large extent by the radiation effect on the unlimited reproductiveness of tumour cells. The more or less similar dose effect curves for healthy and tumour tissue in practice lead to intermittent irradiation. The dependence of the intermittent doses and intervals on factors such as Elkind recovery, synchronisation, redistribution, reoxygenation, repopulation and regeneration are reviewed. (ORU/LH)

  7. Potentially hazardous waste produced at home

    OpenAIRE

    Chaves, Loide Corina; de Campos, Ligia Mara Daros; Filipini, Rosangela; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Vitor E. Valenti; Azzalis, Ligia Ajaime; Junqueira, Virginia Berlanga Campos; Sena, Dayse F; Goulart, Flávia C; Fonseca, Fernando Luiz Affonso

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify the sources of waste generation household consisting of biological material and to investigate the knowledge presented by those responsible for the generation of waste in the home environment on the potential health risk human and environmental. Method It is a quantitative survey performed in Parque Capuava, Santo André (SP). The questionnaire was administered by the community employers and nursing students during the consultation with nurs...

  8. Membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Reij, M W

    1997-01-01

    SummaryThis thesis describes the design and testing of a membrane bioreactor (MBR) for removal of organic pollutants from air. In such a bioreactor for biological gas treatment pollutants are degraded by micro-organisms. The membrane bioreactor is an alternative to other types of bioreactors for waste gas treatment, such as compost biofilters and bioscrubbers. Propene was used as a model pollutant to study the membrane bioreactor.A membrane bioreactor for waste gas treatment consists of a gas...

  9. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems. (review)

  10. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryJoe K Rice

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic biology, discusses how biological systems naturally produce materials, and then presents examples and strategies for incorporating synthetic biology approaches in the development of new materials. In particular, strategies for using synthetic biology to produce both organic and inorganic nanomaterials are discussed. Ultimately, synthetic biology holds the potential to dramatically impact biological materials science with significant potential applications in medical systems.

  11. Treatment of radioactive mixed wastes in commercial low-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management options for three generic categories of radioactive mixed waste in commercial low-level wastes have been identified and evaluated. These wastes were characterized as part of a BNL study in which a large number of generators were surveyed for information on potentially hazardous low-level wastes. The general management targets adopted for mixed wastes are immobilization, destruction, and reclamation. It is possible that these targets may not be practical for some wastes, and for these, goals of stabilization or reduction of hazard are addressed. Solidification, absorption, incineration, acid digestion, segregation, and substitution have been considered for organic liquid wastes. Containment, segregation, and decontamination and re-use have been considered for lead metal wastes which have themselves been contaminated and are not used for purposes of waste disposal shielding, packaging, or containment. For chromium-containing wastes, solidification, incineration, containment, substitution, chemical reduction, and biological removal have been considered. For each of these wastes, the management option evaluation has necessarily included assessment/estimation of the effect of the treatment on both the radiological and potential chemical hazards present. 10 refs

  12. Material resources, energy, and nutrient recovery from waste: are waste refineries the solution for the future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Davide; Martinez-Sanchez, Veronica; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-08-01

    Waste refineries focusing on multiple outputs of material resources, energy carriers, and nutrients may potentially provide more sustainable utilization of waste resources than traditional waste technologies. This consequential life cycle assessment (LCA) evaluated the environmental performance of a Danish waste refinery solution against state-of-the-art waste technology alternatives (incineration, mechanical-biological treatment (MBT), and landfilling). In total, 252 scenarios were evaluated, including effects from source-segregation, waste composition, and energy conversion pathway efficiencies. Overall, the waste refinery provided global warming (GW) savings comparable with efficient incineration, MBT, and bioreactor landfilling technologies. The main environmental benefits from waste refining were a potential for improved phosphorus recovery (about 85%) and increased electricity production (by 15-40% compared with incineration), albeit at the potential expense of additional toxic emissions to soil. Society's need for the outputs from waste, i.e., energy products (electricity vs transport fuels) and resources (e.g., phosphorus), and the available waste composition were found decisive for the selection of future technologies. On the basis of the results, it is recommended that a narrow focus on GW aspects should be avoided as most waste technologies may allow comparable performance. Rather, other environmental aspects such as resource recovery and toxic emissions should receive attention in the future. PMID:23834059

  13. VERMICOMPOSTING AS AN ALTERNATIVE WAY OF BIODEGRADABLE WASTE MANAGEMENT FOR SMALL MUNICIPALITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandra Sosnecka; Małgorzata Kacprzak; Agnieszka Rorat

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of vermicomposting as a method of bioconversion of organic wastes, inter alia sewage sludge, biodegradable fraction of municipal solid wastes and green wastes. Vermicomposting is a biological process in which earthworms are employed to cooperate with microorganisms in order to convert organic wastes into a valuable product. It is considered as a relatively low cost and environmentally-friendly method of waste treatment. Nevertheless, as each b...

  14. Structural Biology Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Science Education > Structural Biology Fact Sheet Structural Biology Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is structural biology? Structural biology is a field of science focused ...

  15. Simulating Biological and Non-Biological Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzo, Angela; Gesierich, Benno; Wohlschlager, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the brain processes biological and non-biological movements in distinct neural circuits. Biological motion, in contrast to non-biological motion, refers to active movements of living beings. Aim of our experiment was to investigate the mechanisms underlying mental simulation of these two movement types. Subjects had to…

  16. A Brief Introduction to Chinese Biological Biological

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Chinese Biological Abstracts sponsored by the Library, the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, the Biological Documentation and Information Network, all of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, commenced publication in 1987 and was initiated to provide access to the Chinese information in the field of biology.

  17. Product specific emissions from municipal solid waste landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Exner, Stephan; Jørgensen, Anne-Mette;

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents and verifies the computer tool LCA-LAND for estimation of emissions from specific waste products disposed in municipal solid waste landfills in European countries for use in the inventory analysis of LCA. Examples of input data (e.g. distribution of the waste product in...... different countries, composition of the product and physical/chemical/biological properties of waste product components) and output data (e.g. estimated emissions to atmosphere and water) are given for a fictive waste product made of representative types of components (toluene, cellulose, polyvinylchloride...... (PVC), copper and chloride). Since waste products from different processes in the product system may be disposed at different landfills where they are mixed with waste originating outside the product system, the estimated emissions from specific waste products cannot be compared with measured emissions...

  18. Creating biological nanomaterials using synthetic biology

    OpenAIRE

    MaryJoe K Rice; Ruder, Warren C.

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is a new discipline that combines science and engineering approaches to precisely control biological networks. These signaling networks are especially important in fields such as biomedicine and biochemical engineering. Additionally, biological networks can also be critical to the production of naturally occurring biological nanomaterials, and as a result, synthetic biology holds tremendous potential in creating new materials. This review introduces the field of synthetic bi...

  19. Technical career opportunities in high-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical career opportunities in high-level radioactive waste management are briefly described in the areas of: Hydrology; geology; biological sciences; mathematics; engineering; heavy equipment operation; and skilled labor and crafts

  20. Waste Separation Press (WSP): a mechanical pretreatment option for organic waste from source separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jank, Anna; Müller, Wolfgang; Schneider, Irene; Gerke, Frederic; Bockreis, Anke

    2015-05-01

    An efficient biological treatment of source separated organic waste from household kitchens and gardens (biowaste) requires an adequate upfront mechanical preparation which possibly includes a hand sorting for the separation of contaminants. In this work untreated biowaste from households and gardens and the screen overflow >60mm of the same waste were mechanically treated by a Waste Separation Press (WSP). The WSP separates the waste into a wet fraction for biological treatment and a fraction of dry contaminants for incineration. The results show that it is possible to replace a hand sorting of contaminants, the milling and a screening of organic waste before the biological treatment by using the WSP. A special focus was put on the contaminants separation. The separation of plastic film from the untreated biowaste was 67% and the separation rate of glass was about 92%. About 90% of the organics were transferred to the fraction for further biological treatment. When treating the screen overflow >60mm with the WSP 86% of the plastic film and 88% of the glass were transferred to the contaminants fraction. 32% of the organic was transferred to the contaminants fraction and thereby lost for a further biological treatment. Additionally it was calculated that national standards for glass contaminants in compost can be met when using the WSP to mechanically treat the total biowaste. The loss of biogas by transferring biodegradable organics to the contaminants fraction was about 11% when preparing the untreated biowaste with the WSP. PMID:25761398

  1. Radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focusing on radioactive waste management and disposal policies in the United Kingdom, Sweden and the Federal Republic of Germany, this book gives a detailed historical account of the policy process in these three countries, and draws out the implications for theory and public policy. This comparative approach underlines how profoundly different the policy process has been in different countries. By comparing the evolution of policy in three countries, fundamental questions about the formation and resolution of technical decisions under uncertainty are clarified. The analysis of nuclear strategy, the politics of nuclear power, and the shifting emphasis of government regulation redefines the issue of radwaste management and sets it at the heat of the current debate about power, the environment and society. The combination of up-to-date technological assessment with an account of the social and political implications of radwaste management makes'Radioactive Waste'particularly useful to students of environmental studies, geography and public administration. (author)

  2. Wasteful Labeling

    OpenAIRE

    Mahenc, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The role of labeling is to solve the adverse selection problem caused by unsubstantiated claims from firms. The problem however is likely to remain unsolved if the labeling agency is not trustworthy.The agency can be suspected to divert the fees charged for labeling from their primary purpose of collecting information in order to raise excessive revenue. This paper addresses this issue and shows that labeling may be wasteful if the agency is likely to be untrustworthy. To award firms green la...

  3. Waste prevention action nets

    OpenAIRE

    Corvellec, Hervé; Czarniawska, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Although waste prevention is considered the best possible waste management option in the European waste hierarchy model, it is unclear what constitutes waste prevention. To address this lack of clarity, this text presents an analysis of four Swedish case studies of waste prevention: a waste management company selling waste prevention services; the possibility offered to Swedish households to opt out of receiving unaddressed promotional material; a car-sharing program; and a re-...

  4. Solid waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Golomeova, Saska; Krsteva, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Waste is unwanted or useless materials from households, industry, agriculture, hospitals. Waste materials in solid state are classified as solid waste. Increasing of the amount of solid waste and the pressure what it has on the environment, impose the need to introduce sustainable solid waste management. Advanced sustainable solid waste management involves several activities at a higher level of final disposal of the waste management hierarchy. Minimal use of material and energy resources ...

  5. Cyanide wastes treatment by bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the development of an autochthonous consortium of degrader microorganisms of the cyanide for the application in the biological treatment of the dangerous wastes of cyanide, were presented. The autochthonous microorganisms obtained were lyophilized in different protective environments, such as gelatin and lactose broth at different temperatures (-35, -45, -55 and -65). A pretreatment method in slurry was applied for the preliminary treatment of the cyanide wastes: for the preliminary leaching of the waste, with periods between 3 and 5 days and a posterior treatment, by aerated lagoons, applying the consortium of lyophilized microorganisms. Eight different lyophilized were obtained in different temperature conditions and with two lyophilization protective media that have presented excellent recovery at six months of lyophilization. The consortium of lyophilized microorganisms has presented 70 to 80 percent of viability, with cyanide removal percentages higher than 95% and it can be conserved active for a prolonged time (for years). The lyophilized microorganisms can be applied in the biodegradation of the cyanide wastes from the gold mines or any other cyanide waste such as metal electroplanting baths, as well as from jewelry manufacturing. (author)

  6. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE estimates that disposing of radioactive waste from civilian nuclear power plants and its defense-related nuclear facilities could eventually end up costing $32 billion. To pay for this, DOE collects fees from utilities on electricity generated by nuclear power plants and makes payments from its defense appropriation. This report states that unless careful attention is given to its financial condition, the nuclear waste program is susceptible to future shortfalls. Without a fee increase, the civilian-waste part of the program may already be underfunded by at least $2.4 billion (in discounted 1988 dollars). Also, DOE has not paid its share of cost-about $480 million-nor has it disclosed this liability in its financial records. Indexing the civilian fee to the inflation rate would address one major cost uncertainty. However, while DOE intends to do this at an appropriate time, it does not use a realistic rate of inflation as its most probable scenario in assessing whether that time has arrived

  7. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy plans to award a contract to Bechtel Systems Management, Inc. to manage and operate the federal government's nuclear waste repository. The proposed management and operating contract is likely to substantially affect program operations and costs. This paper reports on a GAO report. A major concern is the degree to which the selected contractor might replace, or possibly duplicate, the efforts now being carried out by DOE's current contractors. It is questionable whether the contract will result in a more efficient and effective program. DOE officials have had to divert their attention from program operations to develop the contract proposal and participate in legal proceedings related to a bid protest. GAO and the DOE inspector general have reported on problems and issues involving DOE's administration of management and operating contracts, including some companies which participate in the nuclear waste program. Many of the resulting recommendations have yet to be implemented. Implementation of these recommendations could help ensure that the nuclear waste program is operated in a more cost-effective manner

  8. Hydrogen production from agricultural waste by dark fermentation: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Xin Mei; Trably, Eric; Latrille, Eric; Carrere, Helene; Steyer, Jean-Philippe [INRA, UR050, Laboratoire de Biotechnologie de l' Environnement, F-11100 Narbonne (France)

    2010-10-15

    The degradation of the natural environment and the energy crisis are two vital issues for sustainable development worldwide. Hydrogen is considered as one of the most promising candidates as a substitute for fossil fuels. In this context, biological processes are considered as the most environmentally friendly alternatives for satisfying future hydrogen demands. In particular, biohydrogen production from agricultural waste is very advantageous since agri-wastes are abundant, cheap, renewable and highly biodegradable. Considering that such wastes are complex substrates and can be degraded biologically by complex microbial ecosystems, the present paper focuses on dark fermentation as a key technology for producing hydrogen from crop residues, livestock waste and food waste. In this review, recent findings on biohydrogen production from agricultural wastes by dark fermentation are reported. Key operational parameters such as pH, partial pressure, temperature and microbial actors are discussed to facilitate further research in this domain. (author)

  9. Making use of surplus biological sludge from waste water treatment plants by transforming it into active carbon; Valoracion de fangos biologicos excedentes de EDARs por transformacion en carbon activo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin Sanchez, M. J.; Balaguer Condom, M. D.; Rigola Lapena, M. [Universitat de Girona (Spain)

    1999-05-01

    As an alternative to classical sludge disposal methods, its transformation to activated carbon by chemical activation has been investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of an activated carbon obtained from biological sludge and to compare these properties with those of commercially available activated carbons in terms of established characterisation parameters and with respect to their removal efficiency for several dyes and heavy metals chosen. The results demonstrated sludge-based activated carbon had a removal efficiency for heavy metals and dyes superior to that of commercially available activated carbons although it is rated inferior according to standardised parameters such as specific surface area. (Author) 12 refs.

  10. Energy from waste. Vol. 10; Energie aus Abfall. Bd. 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome-Kozmiensky, Karl J.; Beckmann, Michael (eds.)

    2013-03-01

    This book reports on a further optimization of the waste incineration from different perspectives. Under this aspect, a lot of contributions to the following aspects are presented: (a) Establishment, strengthening, operation and process regulation; (b) Energy efficiency; (c) Steam generator and corrosion protection; (d) Exhaust gas after-treatment; (e) Biologic and mechanical-biologic waste treatment; (f) Utilization of substitute fuels; (g) Sewage sludge.

  11. Bio Medical Waste Management- ‘An Emerging Problem’

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Inayatulla Khan; Prasant MC; Fareedi Mukram Ali; Vinit Aher; Sanjay Kar; Imran Khalid; Mahesh Ahire

    2012-01-01

    As per Bio-Medical Waste (Management and Handling) Rules, 1998 and amendments, any waste, which is generated during the diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human beings or animals or in research activities pertaining there to or in the production of testing of biological and including categories mentioned in schedule 1 of the Rule, is the bio-medical waste The private sector accounts for more than 80% of total healthcare spending in India. Unless there is a decline in the combined federal...

  12. Municipal Solid Waste Management from a Systems Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Ola; Carlsson Reich, M.; Frostell, Björn; Björklund, Anna; Assefa, Getachew; Sundqvist, J-O; Granath, J; Baky, A; Thyselius, L

    2005-01-01

    Different waste treatment options for municipal solid waste have been studied in a systems analysis. Different combinations of incineration, materials recycling of separated plastic and cardboard containers, and biological treatment (anaerobic digestion and composting) of biodegradable waste, were studied and compared to landfilling. The evaluation covered use of energy resources, environmental impact and financial and environmental costs. In the study, a calculation model ( ) based on method...

  13. Nutrient removal at the waste water treatment plant at Wathlingen. Special aspects of the enhanced biological phosphorus removal; Naehrstoffelemination auf der Klaeranlage Wathlingen. Besonderheiten bei der erhoehten biologischen Phosphatelimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, D. [Fachhochschule Suderburg (Germany); Fladerer, F. [Fachhochschule Suderburg (Germany)

    1996-01-01

    The article describes the problem of the nutrient removal in communal wastewater treatment plants. As an example the investigations about the optimisation of the denitrification and the enhanced biological phosphorus removal on the Wathlingen Wastewater Treatment Plant are explained. In this case the most important subjects are the anaerobic P-release despite a high amount of nitrate in the return sludge entering the anerobic tank, followed by an anoxic P-uptake in the denitrification zone before entering the aerobic tank for nitrification. Furthermore there is a short description of improvement measures carried out. The obtained effluent values show the success of these improvements. The specific P-dynamic in the treatment system requires conclusions supporting the optimisation of the nutrient removal in treatment plants using enhanced biological P-elimination and denitrification before nitrification. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Artikel befasst sich mit der Problematik der Naehrstoffelimination auf kommunalen Klaeranlagen. Am Beispiel der Untersuchungen zur Optimierung der Dentrifikation und erhoehten biologischen Phosphorelimination auf der Klaeranlage Wathlingen werden Besonderheiten der biologischen P-Elimination dargestellt. Dabei geht es vor allem um eine anaerobe P-Freisetzung bei intermittierender Schlammumwaelzung im anaeroben Becken und gleichzeitigen hohen Nitrateintraegen ueber den Ruecklaufschlamm. Ebenso erfolgt die Darstellung der sich anschliessenden anoxischen P-Aufnahme im vorgeschalteten Denitrifikationsbecken. Des weiteren werden die druchgefuehrten Optimierungen kurz beschrieben und die damit erzielten Ablaufwerte aufgefuehrt. Schlussfolgerungen fuer die Prozessfuehrung bei Anlagenkonfigurationen mit biologischer P-Elimination und vorgeschalteter Denitrifikation ergeben sich aus dem Phaenomen der anoxischen Phosphataufnahme. (orig.)

  14. Waste management and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Waste Management (WM) has become an applied science. It is used at the point of generation, at the centralized treatment facilities, and at the disposal sites. In the government and private sector, much research is being done in waste by-product utilization. Some of the important factors that affect waste are sources of waste, classification of waste, waste treatment and conditioning, minimization of waste, laws and regulations governing waste and present and future issues. WM has become a career with a promising future as the cost of waste disposal increases tremendously. Scientists have started working on waste minimization and most organizations implement a formalized waste minimization program of their own. The waste disposal is approached in an analytical manner and this paper describes development in radioactive waste disposal and safe transportation practices

  15. Rethinking the waste hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, C.; Vigsoe, D. (eds.)

    2005-03-01

    There is an increasing need to couple environmental and economic considerations within waste management. Consumers and companies alike generate ever more waste. The waste-policy challenges of the future lie in decoupling growth in waste generation from growth in consumption, and in setting priorities for the waste management. This report discusses the criteria for deciding priorities for waste management methods, and questions the current principles of EU waste policies. The basis for the discussion is the so-called waste hierarchy which has dominated the waste policy in the EU since the mid-1970s. The waste hierarchy ranks possible methods of waste management. According to the waste hierarchy, the very best solution is to reduce the amount of waste. After that, reuse is preferred to recycling which, in turn, is preferred to incineration. Disposal at a landfill is the least favourable solution. (BA)

  16. Disposal of hazardous wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fifth Life Sciences Symposium entitled Hazardous Solid Wastes and Their Disposal on October 12 through 14, 1977 was summarized. The topic was the passage of the National Resources Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 will force some type of action on all hazardous solid wastes. Some major points covered were: the formulation of a definition of a hazardous solid waste, assessment of long-term risk, list of specific materials or general criteria to specify the wastes of concern, Bioethics, sources of hazardous waste, industrial and agricultural wastes, coal wastes, radioactive wastes, and disposal of wastes

  17. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    .) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow and the...... incinerated. Allowing household paint waste to be collected with ordinary household waste is expected to reduce the cost of handling household hazardous waste, since paint waste in Denmark comprises the major fraction of household hazardous waste....

  18. Other Special Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Line Kai-Sørensen; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the main types of special waste related to municipal solid waste (MSW) mentioned in the previous chapters (health care risk waste, WEEE, impregnated wood, hazardous waste) a range of other fractions of waste have in some countries been defined as special waste that must be handled...... separately from MSW. Some of these other special wastes are briefly described in this chapter with respect to their definition, quantity and composition, and management options. The special wastes mentioned here are batteries, tires, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and food waste....

  19. Investigations of biological processes in Austrian MBT plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become an important technology in waste management during the last decade. The paper compiles investigations of mechanical biological processes in Austrian MBT plants. Samples from all plants representing different stages of degradation were included in this study. The range of the relevant parameters characterizing the materials and their behavior, e.g. total organic carbon, total nitrogen, respiration activity and gas generation sum, was determined. The evolution of total carbon and nitrogen containing compounds was compared and related to process operation. The respiration activity decreases in most of the plants by about 90% of the initial values whereas the ammonium release is still ongoing at the end of the biological treatment. If the biogenic waste fraction is not separated, it favors humification in MBT materials that is not observed to such extent in MSW. The amount of organic carbon is about 15% dry matter at the end of the biological treatment.

  20. Investigations of biological processes in Austrian MBT plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tintner, J; Smidt, E; Böhm, K; Binner, E

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become an important technology in waste management during the last decade. The paper compiles investigations of mechanical biological processes in Austrian MBT plants. Samples from all plants representing different stages of degradation were included in this study. The range of the relevant parameters characterizing the materials and their behavior, e.g. total organic carbon, total nitrogen, respiration activity and gas generation sum, was determined. The evolution of total carbon and nitrogen containing compounds was compared and related to process operation. The respiration activity decreases in most of the plants by about 90% of the initial values whereas the ammonium release is still ongoing at the end of the biological treatment. If the biogenic waste fraction is not separated, it favors humification in MBT materials that is not observed to such extent in MSW. The amount of organic carbon is about 15% dry matter at the end of the biological treatment. PMID:20580543

  1. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.

  2. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 1, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation

  3. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  4. Waste remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-12-29

    A system including a steam generation system and a chamber. The steam generation system includes a complex and the steam generation system is configured to receive water, concentrate electromagnetic (EM) radiation received from an EM radiation source, apply the EM radiation to the complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, and transform, using the heat generated by the complex, the water to steam. The chamber is configured to receive the steam and an object, wherein the object is of medical waste, medical equipment, fabric, and fecal matter.

  5. Chemical oxidation combined with biological filters application in PCB waste water treatment%化学氧化结合曝气生物滤池技术在线路板废水处理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志强; 简丽萍; 张俊峰

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the process and principle of chemical oxidation combined with biological filters by introducing the upgrading of the WWTP of a PCB factory in Shenzhen, which proved that it help the WWTP of PCB reach the new standards.%通过介绍深圳某线路板有限公司废水处理改造升级工程,阐述化学氧化和曝气生物滤池相结合的工艺过程,说明在实际工程应用中可使得排放废水污染物指标达到新标准。

  6. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge

  7. Military Munitions Waste Working Group report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices

  8. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  9. 76 FR 70220 - New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of Regulated Medical Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... (PD) No. 23(RF), ``Morrisville, PA Requirements for Transportation of `Dangerous Waste,''' 66 FR 37260... Biological Waste,'' 69 FR 34715 (June 22, 2004). As explained in those decisions, DOT regulates the transportation of regulated medical waste as a Division 6.2 hazardous material. PD-23(RF), 66 FR at 37260-61;...

  10. Goodbye, Waste! What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Science Education Center.

    This module: (1) discusses the need for disposing of waste safely; (2) provides information and activities on wet and dry wastes; and (3) shows how to prepare, maintain, and study a fertilizer basket (in which fertilizer is made from wet waste). Information on the biology of the basket (including role of bacteria and fungi in the decay process) is…

  11. Household hazardous waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjelsted, Lotte; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2007-01-01

    .) comprised 15-25% and foreign items comprised 10-20%. Water-based paint was the dominant part of the paint waste. The chemical composition of the paint waste and the paint-like waste was characterized by an analysis of 27 substances in seven waste fractions. The content of critical substances was tow and the......'Paint waste', a part of the 'household hazardous waste', amounting to approximately 5 tonnes was collected from recycling stations in two Danish cities. Sorting and analyses of the waste showed paint waste comprised approximately 65% of the mass, paint-like waste (cleaners, fillers, etc...... paint waste was less contaminated with heavy metals than was the ordinary household waste. This may suggest that households no longer need to source-segregate their paint if the household waste is incinerated, since the presence of a small quantity of solvent-based paint will not be harmful when...

  12. Treatment and disposal of steam generator and heat exchanger chemical cleaning wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet air oxidation was effective in reducing the organic loading of Ontario Hydro's EDTA-based steam generator cleaning wastes and the organic acid formulation used for heat exchanger chemical cleaning. Destruction of the complexing agents resulted in direct precipitation of iron from the waste steam generator magnetite solvent and from the heat exchanger cleaning waste. The oxidized liquors contain lower molecular weight organic acids, ammonia and amines, suitable for secondary biological treatment. The oxidized copper waste requires further treatment to reduce dissolved copper levels prior to biological digestion. A preliminary evaluation of UV and ozone degradation of these wastes showed less promise than wet air oxidation. 24 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  13. Livestock waste-to-bioenergy generation opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of biological and thermochemical conversion (TCC) technologies in livestock waste-to-bioenergy treatments can provide livestock operators with multiple value-added, renewable energy products. These products can meet heating and power needs or serve as transportation fuels. The primary object...

  14. Nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While evoking the effects of radioactivity, this publication issued by religious authorities first presents the different radioactive wastes (low level, low or medium level and short life, medium level and long life, high level and long life) and indicates their respective origins. It proposes a brief overview of solutions adopted for the storage of high level-long life radioactive wastes in different countries. It presents the French political and regulatory framework for such storage, indicates the envisaged solutions (deep geological storage, separation and transmutation, packaging and long duration surface or underground warehousing), discusses the content of the debate which took place before the adoption of the law of June 2006, and evokes the notion of reversibility. The next part addresses issues related to public information, and evokes public opinion regarding this storage issue. Some other issues are then discussed within the Church's perspective: the responsibility towards future generations, the transmission of a secured heritage to future generations, the research effort, dialog and transparency

  15. Radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here are gathered 1)the decrees (99-686 and 99-687) of the 3 rd of August 1999 relative to the researches on radioactive waste management. A local committee of information and follow-up has to be established on the site of each underground facility. The composition of this committee is determined here (99-686). 3 people will from now on be jointly ordered by the Minister of Economy, Finance and Industry and by the Secretary of State of Industry to conduct a preliminary dialogue for the choice of one or several sites on which previous works should be made before the construction of an underground facility (99-687). They take the opinion of the people's representatives, the associations and the concerned population and inform the Ministers of Environment, Energy and Research of the collected information. 2)the decree of the 3 rd of August 1999 authorizing the 'Agence nationale pour la gestion des dechets radioactifs' (ANDRA) to install and exploit an underground facility located in Bure (Meuse) and intended to study the deep geological deposits where could be stored radioactive wastes. (O.M.)

  16. Effects of composting with earthworm on the chemical and biological properties of agricultural organic wastes: A principal component analysis%蚯蚓堆制处理对农业有机废弃物的化学及生物学影响的主成分分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘婷; 任宗玲; 张池; 陈旭飞; 周波; 戴军

    2012-01-01

    在实验室可控条件下,以碳氮比28.7∶1的农业有机废弃物(牛粪和稻秆)为赤子爱胜蚓(Eisenia foetida)的培养基质,研究蚯蚓的堆制作用对有机物料的化学及生物学特性的影响.结果表明:蚯蚓堆制处理30 d后,基质pH值、碳氮比显著降低,全磷显著升高,而全氮、碱解氮、可溶性碳、速效磷、微生物生物量碳、呼吸速率和微生物熵分别提高8.5%、2.6%、1.8%、6.3%、21.2%、4.4%和30.0%,有机质、呼吸熵分别降低5.0%和21.9%.蚯蚓堆制处理后物料具有较高的转化酶、酸性和碱性磷酸酶活性,较低的过氧化氢酶和脲酶活性.多元数据分析结果显示,自然堆制和蚯蚓堆制处理物料的化学和生物学特性均呈现显著的差异性.蚯蚓堆制处理优于自然堆制处理,可以明显改善有机物料的化学、生物学性质,是一种高效率处理农业有机废弃物的技术.%Taking mixed agricultural organic wastes cattle manure and rice straw (C;N = 28.7;1) as the substrate of earthworm Eisenia foetida, an experiment was conducted to study the effects of earthworm on the changes of the chemical and biological properties of wastes during vermi-compos-ting. After 30 days of vermi-composting, the substrate' s pH and C/N decreased while the total P content increased significantly, and the total N, available N, dissolved organic carbon, available P content, microbial biomass-C, respiration rate, and microbial quotient increased by 8. 5% , 2. 6% , 1. 8% , 6. 3% , 21. 2% , 4. 4% , and 30. 0% whereas the organic matter content and metabolic quotient decreased by 5.0% and 21. 9% , respectively, as compared with natural composting. Vermi-composting made the substrate have higher invertase, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phospha-tase activities but lower catalase and urease activities. Principal component analysis and discriminant analysis confirmed the significant differences in the substrate' s chemical and

  17. Supermarket food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Food waste occurs along the entire food supply chain and gives rise to great financial losses and waste of natural resources. The retail stage of the supply chain contributes significant masses of waste. Causes of this waste need to be identified before potential waste reduction measures can be designed, tested and evaluated. Therefore this thesis quantified retail food waste and evaluated selected prevention and valorisation measures, in order to determine how the carbon footprint of food ca...

  18. Waste Characterization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Naranjo, Felicia Danielle [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-02

    This report discusses ways to classify waste as outlined by LANL. Waste Generators must make a waste determination and characterize regulated waste by appropriate analytical testing or use of acceptable knowledge (AK). Use of AK for characterization requires several source documents. Waste characterization documentation must be accurate, sufficient, and current (i.e., updated); relevant and traceable to the waste stream’s generation, characterization, and management; and not merely a list of information sources.

  19. Municipal Solid Waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Mirakovski, Dejan; Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Doneva, Nikolinka

    2010-01-01

    Waste management covers newly generated waste or waste from an onging process. When steps to reduce or even eliminate waste are to be considered, it is imperative that considerations should include total oversight, technical and management services of the total process.From raw material to the final product this includes technical project management expertise, technical project review and pollution prevention technical support and advocacy.Waste management also includes handling of waste, in...

  20. Pollution profiles, health risk of VOCs and biohazards emitted from municipal solid waste transfer station and elimination by an integrated biological-photocatalytic flow system: A pilot-scale investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► VOCs and biohazards emitted during garbage compressing process were monitored. ► BTF–PC integrated reactor was employed for VOCs and biohazards removal. ► Health risk of target VOCs and biohazards were assessed before and after treatment. -- Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and biohazards air pollution in municipal solid waste transfer station were investigated. As compressor working, the concentrations of almost all quantified 14 VOCs (0.32–306.03 μg m−3) were much higher than those as compressor off (0–13.31 μg m−3). Comparatively, only 3 VOCs with extremely low concentrations could be detected at control area. Total microorganism was 7567 CFU m−3 as compressor working, which was 1.14 and 6.22 times higher than that of compressor off and control area, respectively. Bacteria were the most abundant microorganism at all three sampling places. At pilot-scale, during whole 60-day treatment, for VOCs, the average removal efficiencies were over 92% after biotrickling filter–photocatalytic (BTF–PC) treatment. Although non-cancer and cancer risks of some VOCs were over the concern level before treatment, almost all VOCs were removed substantially and both potential risks were below the concern after BTF–PC treatment. Additionally, biohazard concentrations decreased dramatically and air quality was purified from polluted to cleanness after PC treatment. All results demonstrated that the integrated technology possessed high removal capacity and long stability for the removal of VOCs and biohazards at a pilot scale

  1. Pollution profiles, health risk of VOCs and biohazards emitted from municipal solid waste transfer station and elimination by an integrated biological-photocatalytic flow system: A pilot-scale investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guiying [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhang, Zhengyong; Sun, Hongwei; Chen, Jiangyao [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); An, Taicheng, E-mail: antc99@gig.ac.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry and Guangdong Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection and Resources Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li, Bing [Experiment Medical Research Centre, Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► VOCs and biohazards emitted during garbage compressing process were monitored. ► BTF–PC integrated reactor was employed for VOCs and biohazards removal. ► Health risk of target VOCs and biohazards were assessed before and after treatment. -- Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and biohazards air pollution in municipal solid waste transfer station were investigated. As compressor working, the concentrations of almost all quantified 14 VOCs (0.32–306.03 μg m{sup −3}) were much higher than those as compressor off (0–13.31 μg m{sup −3}). Comparatively, only 3 VOCs with extremely low concentrations could be detected at control area. Total microorganism was 7567 CFU m{sup −3} as compressor working, which was 1.14 and 6.22 times higher than that of compressor off and control area, respectively. Bacteria were the most abundant microorganism at all three sampling places. At pilot-scale, during whole 60-day treatment, for VOCs, the average removal efficiencies were over 92% after biotrickling filter–photocatalytic (BTF–PC) treatment. Although non-cancer and cancer risks of some VOCs were over the concern level before treatment, almost all VOCs were removed substantially and both potential risks were below the concern after BTF–PC treatment. Additionally, biohazard concentrations decreased dramatically and air quality was purified from polluted to cleanness after PC treatment. All results demonstrated that the integrated technology possessed high removal capacity and long stability for the removal of VOCs and biohazards at a pilot scale.

  2. A study of the process control and hydrolytic characteristics in a thermophilic hydrogen fermentor fed with starch-rich kitchen waste by using molecular-biological methods and amylase assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu-Hsuan; Li, Shiue-Lin; Chen, I.-Chieh; Tseng, I.-Cheng; Cheng, Sheng-Shung [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 701 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Starch-rich kitchen waste was chosen as the feedstock in this study, and a 3-L intermittent-continuous stirred tank reactor (I-CSTR) was established. Within 240 days, the maximum average hydrogen production rate of 2.2 L-H{sup 2} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} and the highest average hydrogen yield of 2.1 mmol-H{sub 2} g-COD{sup -1} were both observed in run 3-2, which was operated at an eight-day hydraulic retention time (HRT) and 39 g-COD L{sup -1} day{sup -1} of organic loading rate. According to the analyses of amylase and reducing sugar, the maximum average amylase activity was about 11 U mL{sup -1} in run 1, but the maximum solid carbohydrate hydrolysis rate was about 45% in run 3. Some Michaealis-Menton kinetic parameters, such as K{sub M} (17 g L{sup -1}) and the maximum activity (1.5 U mL{sup -1}) of the amylase were obtained. The best amylase reacting temperature was 55 C, and the best reacting pH was 4.4 tested with acetate buffer. Twenty-seven operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were selected from this reactor by using a cloning method. According to the data of terminal restricted fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and amylase assay, the OTUs that were related to Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum and Clostridium sp. were in direct proportion to the amylase activity. (author)

  3. Solidification and storage of Savannah River Plant radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual process for solidification of SRP aqueous waste into high-integrity, low-leachable forms was developed. The process separates about 99.9 percent of the biological hazard from approximately 97 percent of the waste. The major biological hazard remaining in the residual salt is 106Ru, which has a 369-day half-life. Sludge and zeolite can be solidified into concrete or glass. Cost-risk analyses are being made to determine which of these forms is preferred for SRP waste. Also, studies on other parts of the conceptual process are in progress. (auth)

  4. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves a...... transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  5. Waste Transfer Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    tion and transport is usually the most costly part of any waste management system; and when waste is transported over a considerable distance or for a long time, transferring the waste from the collection vehicles to more efficient transportation may be economically beneficial. This involves a...... transfer station where the transfer takes place. These stations may also be accessible by private people, offering flexibility to the waste system, including facilities for bulky waste, household hazardous waste and recyclables. Waste transfer may also take place on the collection route from small...... describes the main features of waste transfer stations, including some considerations about the economical aspects on when transfer is advisable....

  6. Potential for waste reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author focuses on wastes considered hazardous under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This chapter discusses wastes that are of interest as well as the factors affecting the quantity of waste considered available for waste reduction. Estimates are provided of the quantities of wastes generated. Estimates of the potential for waste reduction are meaningful only to the extent that one can understand the amount of waste actually being generated. Estimates of waste reduction potential are summarized from a variety of government and nongovernment sources

  7. Microbiology and radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme on microbiology is based on experimental as well as theoretical work. It has concentrated on the study of how mixed, natural populations of microbes might survive and grow on the organic component of Low Level Radioactive Wastes (LLW) and PCM (Plutonium Contaminated Waste) in a cementitious waste repository. The present studies indicate that both carbon dioxide and methane will be produced by microbial action within the repository. Carbon dioxide will dissolve and react with the concrete to a limited extent so methane will be the principal component of the produced gas. The concentration of hydrogen, derived from corrosion, will be depressed by microbial action and that this will further elevate methane levels. Actual rates of production will be lower than that in a domestic landfill due to the more extreme pH. Microbial action will clearly affect the aqueous phase chemistry where organic material is present in the waste. The cellulosic fraction is the main determinant of cell growth and the appearance of soluble organics. The structure of the mathematical model which has been developed, predicts the general features which are intuitively expected in a developing microbial population. It illustrates that intermediate compounds will build up in the waste until growth of the next organism needed for sequential degradation is initiated. The soluble compounds in the pore water and the mixture of microbes present in the waste will vary with time and sustain biological activity over a prolonged period. Present estimates suggest that most microbial action in the repository will be complete after 400 years. There is scope for the model to deal with environmental factors such as temperature and pH and to introduce other energy sources such as hydrogen. (author)

  8. Microbial utilisation of natural organic wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, V. K.; Smirnov, I. A.; Soldatov, P. E.; Korniushenkova, I. N.; Grinin, A. S.; Lykov, I. N.; Safronova, S. A.

    2004-03-01

    The waste management strategy for the future should meet the benefits of humanity safety, respect principals of planet ecology, and compatibility with other habitability systems. For these purpose the waste management technologies, relevant to application of the biodegradation properties of bacteria are of great value. The biological treatment method is based upon the biodegradation of organic substances by various microorganisms. The advantage of the biodegradation waste management in general: it allows to diminish the volume of organic wastes, the biological hazard of the wastes is controlled and this system may be compatible with the other systems. The objectives of our study were: to evaluate effectiveness of microbial biodegradation of non-pretreated substrate, to construct phneumoautomatic digester for organic wastes biodegradation and to study microbial characteristics of active sludge samples used as inoculi in biodegradation experiment. The technology of vegetable wastes treatment was elaborated in IBMP and BMSTU. For this purpose the special unit was created where the degradation process is activated by enforced reinvention of portions of elaborated biogas into digester. This technology allows to save energy normally used for electromechanical agitation and to create optimal environment for anaerobic bacteria growth. The investigations were performed on waste simulator, which imitates physical and chemical content of food wastes calculated basing on the data on food wastes of moderate Russian city. The volume of created experimental sample of digester is 40 l. The basic system elements of device are digesters, gas receiver, remover of drops and valve monitoring and thermal control system. In our testing we used natural food wastes to measure basic parameters and time of biodegradation process. The diminution rate of organic gained 76% from initial mass taking part within 9 days of fermentation. The biogas production achieved 46 l per 1 kg of substrate

  9. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias;

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide emi...... removal without too much energy consumption, waste water production, green house gas emission, or suppression of the filters odor removal efficiency.......Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... nitrite oxidation only appeared in locations with minimal ammonia and nitrite levels. Nitrous oxide emission depended on anoxic microsites, and nitric oxide production was associated with nitrite accumulation. Water and biomass management appear to be the important tools for optimization of ammonia...

  10. Continuous biodegradation of waste xylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of selected microorganisms for the degradation and/or detoxification of hazardous organic compounds is gaining wide acceptance as an alternative waste treatment technology. The INEL Biotechnology Unit is developing the technology for the in-plant treatment of waste industrial solvents. The work centers around the use of microorganisms specially selected for their ability to degrade common industrial solvents such as benzene, toluene, xylene, etc. Because these waste solvents are often contaminated with other materials (heavy metals, water, detergents, etc.) they are difficult and expensive to dispose and many times are not economical to recover through recycling. Even if the disposal option is used, the generator is still faced with continued liability in the event of mishandling or improper disposal of the waste. Biological treatments offers the option of reducing these solvents into harmless by-products provided that both the requisite microorganisms and the proper processing technology are successfully brought together. Work on the optimization of a bioreactor process for the degradation of xylene will be discussed. 15 figs., 7 refs

  11. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... and chemicals, dramatically changing the types and composition of waste, and by urbanization making waste management in urban areas a complicated and costly logistic operation. This book focuses on waste that commonly appears in the municipal waste management system. This chapter gives an introduction...... to modern waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  12. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is awarding grants to the state of Nevada for the state's participation in DOE's program to investigate Yucca Mountain as a possible site for the disposal of civilian nuclear waste. This report has found that DOE's financial assistance budget request of $15 million for Nevada's fiscal year 1990 was not based on the amount the state requested but rather was derived by increasing Nevada's grant funds from the previous year in proportion to the increase that DOE requested for its own activities at the Nevada site. DOE's evaluations of Nevada's requests are performed too late to be used in DOE's budget formulation process because Nevada has been applying for financial assistance at about the same time that DOE submits its budget request to Congress

  13. Italian low-level radioactive waste management regulation, with special regard to mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wastes are produced in all human activities, and their management becomes more difficult and urgent. In fact the increase of the life standards, based on widespread production and consumption of a large variety of products, especially in the developed countries has led the problem of managing and disposing wastes to sometimes dramatic levels. In addition to, the increasing number of different production processes and of the resources used implies specific treatment for each type of waste. Therefore specific treatment technologies and regulations have to be applied to the various waste categories. A particular emphasis is devoted to the radioactive wastes, owing to their particular characteristics, i. e. the electromagnetic energy of the contained radionuclides. Low level radioactive wastes are currently produced in many research and medical activities. From a technological point of view, such wastes pose much smaller management problems than those from nuclear power plants, owing to their relatively small amounts and low radioactivity levels. However their management and disposal rise some important problems, in terms of the correct radiation protection procedure, in relation to the specific health risks and to their being often 'mixed', i. e. contaminated with other chemical, biological, toxic, noxious and even infected substances. The authors review the European and Italian regulations about the management of radioactive, chemical and biological, toxic and noxious wastes, with special emphasis on the problem of mixed wastes. Moreover the authors present a summary of the results of the recent workshop, held in Italy, about this problem. In this work the high and medium level radioactive wastes are not been taken into account

  14. Space Biology in Russia Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriev, Anatoly; Sychev, Vladimir; Ilyin, Eugene

    At present space biology research in Russia is making significant progress in several areas of high priority. Gravitational biology. In April-May 2013, a successful 30-day flight of the biological satellite (biosatellite) Bion-M1 was conducted, which carried rodents (mice and gerbils), geckos, fish, mollusks, crustaceans, microorganisms, insects, lower and higher plants, seeds, etc. The investigations were performed by Russian scientists as well as by researchers from NASA, CNES, DLR and South Korea. Foton-M4 carrying various biological specimens is scheduled to launch in 2014. Work has begun to develop science research programs to be implemented onboard Bion-M2 and Bion-M3 as well as on high apogee recoverable spacecraft. Study of the effects of microgravity on the growth and development of higher plants cultivated over several generations on the International Space Station (ISS) has been recently completed. Space radiobiology. Regular experiments aimed at investigating the effects of high-energy galactic cosmic rays on the animal central nervous system and behavior are being carried out using the Particle Accelerator in the town of Dubna. Biological (environmental) life support systems. In recent years, experiments have been performed on the ISS to upgrade technologies of plant cultivation in microgravity. Advanced greenhouse mockups have been built and are currentlyundergoing bioengineering tests. Technologies of waste utilization in space are being developed. Astrobiology experiments in orbital missions. In 2010, the Biorisk experiment on bacterial and fungal spores, seeds and dormant forms of organisms was completed. The payload containing the specimens was installed on the exterior wall of the ISS and was exposed to outer space for 31 months. In addition, Bion-M1 also carried seeds, bacterial spores and microbes that were exposed to outer space effects. The survival rate of bacterial spores incorporated into man-made meteorites, that were attached to the

  15. Global warming factors modelled for 40 generic municipal waste management scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Simion, F.; Tonini, Davide;

    2009-01-01

    Global warming factors (kg CO2-eq.-tonne—1 of waste) have been modelled for 40 different municipal waste management scenarios involving a variety of recycling systems (paper, glass, plastic and organics) and residual waste management by landfilling, incineration or mechanical—biological waste...... treatment. For average European waste composition most waste management scenarios provided negative global warming factors and hence overall savings in greenhouse gas emissions: Scenarios with landfilling saved 0—400, scenarios with incineration saved 200—700, and scenarios with mechanical......-biological treatment saved 200— 750 kg CO2-eq. tonne— 1 municipal waste depending on recycling scheme and energy recovery. Key parameters were the amount of paper recycled (it was assumed that wood made excessive by paper recycling substituted for fossil fuel), the crediting of the waste management system...

  16. Methods Used in Urban Waste Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OROIAN I.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the main options aiming the treatment of urban waste consisting mainly of the household andthose resulting from industrial activities, acordin to the present EU legislation. The aspects of the two major types ofwaste treatment, mechanical biological treatment and incineration respectively are described. Distinction is madebetween mechanical and biological treatment of aerobic and anaerobic issues being addressed and biological dryingprocess. The result of these processes is reflected in obtaining products that can be used as soil improvers. With regardto incineration, the basic components of industrial installations for the purpose, and usability of products resulting fromtheir processing, most often, various types of solid fuel are presented. The paper also highlights the importance of thesetreatments in efficient waste management planning.

  17. Management Of Solid Waste Matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is written with data from, 84 Karlsruhe symposium, which tells US general introduction of waste disposal such as actualization of waste disposal, related law and direction of waste disposal, collect and transportation of waste matter, preconditioning of waste, collect of waste and recirculation, cases of recirculation, optimal process of waste incineration of waste, composting of waste, disposal of harmful waste, RDF with pilot and operational plant and sanitary landfill method.

  18. E-beam irradiation and activated sludge system for treatment of mixed textiles and food base industrial waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of irradiation and biological technique was chosen to study COD, BOD5 and colour removal from textiles effluent in the presence of food industry waste water. Two biological treatments, the first consisting a mix of non irradiated textile and food industry waste water and the second a mix of irradiated textiles waste water and food industry waste water were operated in parallel. Reduction percentage of COD in textiles waste water increased from 29.4 % after radiation to 62.4 % after further undergoing biological treatment. After irradiation, the BOD5 of textiles waste water was reduced by 22.1 % but reverted to the original value of 36 mg/ L after undergoing biological treatment. Colour had decreased from 899.5 ADMI to 379.3 ADMI after irradiation and continued to decrease to 109.3 ADMI after passing through biological treatment. (author)

  19. BIOLOGICAL TREATING TECHNOLOGY TO REMOVE PHENOLS IN FCCU EFFLUENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Baesd on the survey in 1997 fiscal year, we have been making a further survey and study together with 中国石油(Petro China) at Liaohe Refinery since 1998 fiscal year, aiming at the transfer of Japanese waste water treating technologies to China.   Scope is as follows:   (1) Demonstration of a new waste water treating technology, a kind of biological treating methods (Fluidized bed biological treatment), to eliminate phenols in FCCU effluent.   (2) Recommendation of eliminating pollutant and reducing total effluent by improving the operation.    1 Fluidized bed biological treatment 1.1 What is fluidized bed biological treatment   Fluidized bed biological treatment is the process to treat waste water as follows:   (1) To put biologically inert granular matters (fluidized carrier) into an aeration tank;   (2) Homogeneously and entirely to fluidize the particles in the tank to form highly active biofilm on the surface of each particle;   (3) To contact organic substances with these microorganisms to purify the waste water.   The surface area of the particle per unit volume is about ten times as large as that in conventional biofilm treatment process. In addition, no blockade of the filler (carrier) may be caused. Accordingly, volumetric loading of the aeration tank can be improved to attain highly efficient treatment.

  20. Development of polymer concrete radioactive waste management containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-integrity radioactive waste container has been developed to immobilize the spent resin wastes from nuclear power plants, protect possible future, inadvertent intruders from damaging radiation. The polymer concrete container is designed to ensure safe and reliable disposal of the radioactive waste for a minimum period of 300 years. A built-in vent system for each container will permit the release of gas. An experimental evaluation of the mechanical, chemical, and biological tests of the container was carried out. The tests showed that the polymer concrete container is adequate for safe disposal of the radioactive wastes. (author)

  1. Development of polymer concrete radioactive waste management containers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.; Lee, M. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Won, H. J.; Kang, H. S.; Lee, H. S.; Lim, S.P.; Kim, Y. E.; Lee, B. O.; Lee, K. P.; Min, B. Y.; Lee, J.K.; Jang, W. S.; Sim, W. B.; Lee, J. C.; Park, M. J.; Choi, Y. J.; Shin, H. E.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, C. Y

    1999-11-01

    A high-integrity radioactive waste container has been developed to immobilize the spent resin wastes from nuclear power plants, protect possible future, inadvertent intruders from damaging radiation. The polymer concrete container is designed to ensure safe and reliable disposal of the radioactive waste for a minimum period of 300 years. A built-in vent system for each container will permit the release of gas. An experimental evaluation of the mechanical, chemical, and biological tests of the container was carried out. The tests showed that the polymer concrete container is adequate for safe disposal of the radioactive wastes. (author)

  2. Volume reduction through incineration of low-activity radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the waste treatment plant, designed by Technicatome (CEA) for an Indonesian Nuclear Research Center, is to reduce through incineration the volume of low-activity radioactive wastes such as technological solids (cotton, PVC, paper board), biological solids (animal bones) and liquids (cutting fluids...). The complete combustion is realized with a total air multi-fuel burner (liquid wastes) and flash pyrolysis-complete combustion (solid wastes). A two stage flue gas filtration system, a flue gas washing system, and an ash recovery system are used. A test platform has been built. 3 figs

  3. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 2, Generator dangerous waste report, radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, waste designation, weight, and waste designation

  4. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 4, Waste Management Facility report, Radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on radioactive mixed wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation and amount of waste

  5. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste.

  6. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 3, Part 1, Waste Management Facility report, dangerous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains information on hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, handling method and containment vessel, waste number, waste designation, and amount of waste

  7. Soil mechanical properties of MBT waste from Luxembourg, Germany and Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Pattaraporn Pimolthai; Jean-Frank Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical and biological treatments (MBT) of waste have become well known in Europe and Asia. The maximum particle size of waste is reduced by the removal of larger plastic materials from municipal solid waste during mechanical processing. The mechanical properties of the MBT waste are significantly changed by this process. An effective treatment system can lead to a better quality of output materials which do not cause environmental problems. This paper shows the comparative mec...

  8. Electrochemical oxidation of biologically treated leachate from municipal solid waste incineration plant%电化学氧化法处理垃圾焚烧发电厂沥滤液生化出水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈波; 全学军; 程治良; 朱新才; 张树汉

    2013-01-01

    垃圾焚烧发电厂储坑沥滤液是一种高污染、高氯离子和高胶体含量的废水,经过传统生化处理后仍难达标排放.根据生化出水中氯离子浓度较高的特点,面向实际工程应用,设计了板框式电化学反应器,以钛基氧化钌-氧化铱涂层电极(Ti/RuO2-IrO2)作为阳极,304钢板作为阴极,开展了电化学氧化去除废水中难生物降解有机物的研究.重点考察了电流密度、表观流速、氯离子浓度、电极极距等因素对去除废水COD的影响.结果表明:当电流密度为65.35 mA·cm-2,反应器内表观流速为2.72 cm·S-1,初始氯离子浓度为5000 mg·L-1时,废水中COD的去除具有良好的效果.研究了COD去除的动力学过程,提出了反应体系中活性氯的减少可能是第二阶段COD去除速率降低的主要机理.对几种结构电化学反应器的能耗进行了对比分析表明,极距减小50%,去除COD的平均能耗可节约25%以上,紧凑多通道小电极极距结构在设计工业电化学反应器时值得考虑.%Incineration is an effective technology for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal. However, the MSW leachate after bio-treatment still contains recalcitrant organic compounds, higher concentration of chloride ions and biogenic colloids. Their electrochemical oxidation was conducted in a newly designed filter-press electrochemical reactor. In the electrochemical oxidation process, NH3-N could be easily removed by means of electro-generated chlorine/hypochlorite. The effects of major process parameters on the removal of organic pollutants were investigated systematically. Under experimental conditions, the optimum operation parameters are current density 65.35 mA · cm-2, flow velocity 2.72 cm · s-1 in electrode gap, initial chloride ion concentration 5000 mg · L-1 The COD in the leachate could be reduced below 100 mg · L-1 after 1 h of treatment. The kinetics and mechanism of COD removal were investigated by simultaneously

  9. Central Waste Complex (CWC) Waste Analysis Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this waste analysis plan (WAP) is to document the waste acceptance process, sampling methodologies, analytical techniques, and overall processes that are undertaken for waste accepted for storage at the Central Waste Complex (CWC), which is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility, Richland, Washington. Because dangerous waste does not include the source special nuclear and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this document. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. This document has been revised to meet the interim status waste analysis plan requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173 303-300(5). When the final status permit is issued, permit conditions will be incorporated and this document will be revised accordingly

  10. Nuclear energy: biological effects and environmental impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is concerned with the large development of nuclear power plants and the recent nuclear catastrophe which has made clear how the hazards resulting from radioactivity affect public health and the environment. Environmental effects of nuclear power plants operating in normal conditions are small, but to obtain nuclear power plants of reduced radioactivity, optimization of their design, construction, operation and waste processing plays a decisive role. Biological effects of ionizing radiations and environmental impacts of Nuclear Power plants are developed

  11. Biological hydrogen formation by thermophilic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bielen, A.A.M.

    2014-01-01

      Hydrogen gas (H2) is an important chemical commodity. It is used in many industrial processes and is applicable as a fuel. However, present production processes are predominantly based on non-renewable resources. In a biological H2 (bioH2) production process, known as dark-fermentation, fermentative microorganisms are able to generate H2 from renewable resources like carbohydrate-rich plant material or industrial waste streams. Because of their favourable biomass degrading capabilities...

  12. MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS AMONG MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE WORKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mehrdad

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Waste collection is a necessary activity all around the world and the removal of municipal solid waste is a job associated with a variety of biological, chemical, mechanical, physical, and psychosocial hazards. In our country, like many developing countries, municipal solid waste is collected manually and collection of household waste is also a job which requires repeated heavy physical activity such as lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing. We performed this study to evaluate musculoskeletal disorders among municipal solid waste workers. We designed a cross sectional study. Our survey instrument for measurement of musculoskeletal symptoms was adapted from the Standardized Nordic Questionnaire that translated into Farsi language. A total of 65% (n=142 of participants reported that they had been troubled with musculoskeletal symptoms in one or more of the 9 defined body regions during the last 12 months. Prevalence of symptoms in low back, knees, shoulders, upper back and neck were 45, 29, 24, 23 and 22% respectively. Foreign workers reported more musculoskeletal symptoms in all body parts than Iranian workers. The differences between prevalence of symptoms between two groups were significant in all parts of body except knees. The study found that solid waste workers have more musculoskeletal disorders than general population. Meanwhile these symptoms were more common among foreign workers. The risk of disease was increased with the increasing years of working as solid waste worker and smoking. We didn't find relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and education or marriage status of workers.

  13. Evaluation of Green Waste Composting Possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Kliopova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In Lithuania main part of biodegradable waste (BDW from the municipal waste (MW stream, food waste from coffees and other catering companies are disposed of in landfills. Primary BDW sorting and / or secondary processing within the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT equipment is planned in Waste Management Plants (WMP in all Lithuanian regions. Lithuania has old traditions of BDW management methods, as green waste (GW composting e.g. mulching is one of the most popular, especially in rural areas. Therefore, reinstatement of composting traditions by implementing modern composters (composting bins in the territories of individual households is practically provided by all WMP. Composting of sorted BDW from MW stream and GW from public territories or green areas of companies is one of the useful BDW management methods, because, first of all, a new product – bio-compost is produced and used for agricultural purposes.This paper presents results of the research done in the Institute of Environmental Engineering (APINI of Kaunas Technological University (KTU implementing two projects: Home - composting in individual households of Tauragė region (RECO Baltic 21 Tech (RB21T project and Feasibility analysis of BDW management techniques in KTU (”KTU - Green University” project. This research work focuses on the green waste (garden and green food waste composting possibilities.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.65.3.4680

  14. Biological conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, C.D.

    A system for bioconversion of organic material comprises a primary bioreactor column wherein a biological active agent (zymomonas mobilis) converts the organic material (sugar) to a product (alcohol), a rejuvenator column wherein the biological activity of said biological active agent is enhanced, and means for circulating said biological active agent between said primary bioreactor column and said rejuvenator column.

  15. Impact Of Aerobic Biostabilisation And Biodrying Process Of Municipal Solid Waste On Minimisation Of Waste Deposited In Landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziedzic Krzysztof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses an innovative system used for aerobic biostabilisation and biological drying of solid municipal waste. A mechanical–biological process (MBT of municipal solid waste (MSW treatment were carried out and monitored in 5 bioreactors. A two-stage biological treatment process has been used in the investigation. In the first step an undersize fraction was subjected to the biological stabilisation for a period of 14 days as a result of which there was a decrease of loss on ignition, but not sufficient to fulfill the requirements of MBT technology. In the second stage of a biological treatment has been applied 7-days intensive bio-drying of MSW using sustained high temperatures in bioreactor. The article presents the results of the chemical composition analysis of the undersize fraction and waste after biological drying, and also the results of temperature changes, pH ratio, loss on ignition, moisture content, combustible and volatile matter content, heat of combustion and calorific value of wastes. The mass balance of the MBT of MSW with using the innovative aeration system showed that only 14.5% of waste need to be landfilled, 61.5% could be used for thermal treatment, and nearly 19% being lost in the process as CO2 and H2O.

  16. Introduction to Waste Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Solid waste management is as old as human civilization, although only considered an engineering discipline for about one century. The change from the previous focus on public cleansing of the cities to modern waste management was primarily driven by industrialization, which introduced new materials...... to modern waste management, including issues as waste definition, problems associated with waste, waste management criteria and approaches to waste management. Later chapters introduce aspects of engineering (Chapter 1.2), economics (Chapter 1.3) and regulation (Chapter 1.4)....

  17. A Glossary Of Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is a glossary of waste in alphabetical order which includes abbreviation, comparing of waste glossary in English-Korean, control policy of EEC waste such as basic structure of activity of EEC, guideline of structure for basic activity, progress direction of reusing, disposal and a safe collect of waste oil, limit of usage and a safe disposal of PCB and PCT, essential point for economical growth of EEC, poisonous and harmful waste as a previous question, general guide in 1978 on poisonous and harmful waste and guideline for transport of poisonous and harmful waste between Europe nations.

  18. Radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to set out the Government's current strategy for the long term in the management of radioactive wastes. It takes account of the latest developments, and will be subject to review in the light of future developments and studies. The subject is discussed under the headings: what are radioactive wastes; who is responsible; what monitoring takes place; disposal as the objective; low-level wastes; intermediate-level wastes; discharges from Sellafield; heat generating wastes; how will waste management systems and procedures be assessed; how much more waste is there going to be in future; conclusion. (U.K.)

  19. Waste Package Lifting Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the structural response of the waste package during the horizontal and vertical lifting operations in order to support the waste package lifting feature design. The scope of this calculation includes the evaluation of the 21 PWR UCF (pressurized water reactor uncanistered fuel) waste package, naval waste package, 5 DHLW/DOE SNF (defense high-level waste/Department of Energy spent nuclear fuel)--short waste package, and 44 BWR (boiling water reactor) UCF waste package. Procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 0, ICN 0, calculations, is used to develop and document this calculation

  20. Synthetic biology: insights into biological computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Romilde; Urrios, Arturo; Velazquez-Garcia, Silvia; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc

    2016-04-18

    Organisms have evolved a broad array of complex signaling mechanisms that allow them to survive in a wide range of environmental conditions. They are able to sense external inputs and produce an output response by computing the information. Synthetic biology attempts to rationally engineer biological systems in order to perform desired functions. Our increasing understanding of biological systems guides this rational design, while the huge background in electronics for building circuits defines the methodology. In this context, biocomputation is the branch of synthetic biology aimed at implementing artificial computational devices using engineered biological motifs as building blocks. Biocomputational devices are defined as biological systems that are able to integrate inputs and return outputs following pre-determined rules. Over the last decade the number of available synthetic engineered devices has increased exponentially; simple and complex circuits have been built in bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. These devices can manage and store information, take decisions based on past and present inputs, and even convert a transient signal into a sustained response. The field is experiencing a fast growth and every day it is easier to implement more complex biological functions. This is mainly due to advances in in vitro DNA synthesis, new genome editing tools, novel molecular cloning techniques, continuously growing part libraries as well as other technological advances. This allows that digital computation can now be engineered and implemented in biological systems. Simple logic gates can be implemented and connected to perform novel desired functions or to better understand and redesign biological processes. Synthetic biological digital circuits could lead to new therapeutic approaches, as well as new and efficient ways to produce complex molecules such as antibiotics, bioplastics or biofuels. Biological computation not only provides possible biomedical and

  1. Computational Systems Chemical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Oprea, Tudor I.; May, Elebeoba E.; Leitão, Andrei; Tropsha, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    There is a critical need for improving the level of chemistry awareness in systems biology. The data and information related to modulation of genes and proteins by small molecules continue to accumulate at the same time as simulation tools in systems biology and whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) continue to evolve. We called this emerging area at the interface between chemical biology and systems biology systems chemical biology, SCB (Oprea et al., 2007).

  2. Pictures of Synthetic Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Cserer, Amelie; Seiringer, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    This article is concerned with the representation of Synthetic Biology in the media and by biotechnology experts. An analysis was made of German-language media articles published between 2004 and 2008, and interviews with biotechnology-experts at the Synthetic Biology conference SB 3.0 in Zurich 2007. The results have been reflected in terms of the definition of Synthetic Biology, applications of Synthetic Biology and the perspectives of opportunities and risks. In the media, Synthetic Biolog...

  3. Industrial waste pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    The characteristics and effects of industrial waste pollution in the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of inorganic and organic pollution entering the bay are described. The four types of pollutants are defined as: (1) inorganic chemical wastes, (2) naturally occurring organic wastes, (3) synthetic organic wastes (exotics) and (4) thermal effluents. The ecological behavior of industrial wastes in the surface waters is analyzed with respect to surface film phenomena, interfacial phenomena, and benthis phenomena

  4. Characterization of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear wastes which are logical candidates for deep geologic disposal include commercial (spent fuel, reprocessing) and defense wastes. It is expected that the 5250 metric tons of spent fuel discharged through the end of 1978 would increase to about 100,000 tons by the end of 2000. The individual characteristics of each waste type (spent fuel, solidified waste, defense wastes) are described in turn

  5. Waste Generation and Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Ferrara

    2008-01-01

    There are two serious failures that arise in the management of solid waste. The first relates to the existence of negative externalities in the individual decision-making over waste generation and disposal. When individuals decide on how much to consume and what to consume, they do not take into account how much waste they produce. Because the external costs of waste generation (such as air and water pollution) are ignored by individuals, more waste is produced and disposed of than is sociall...

  6. Municipal Solid Waste Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a source of biomass material that can be utilized for bioenergy production with minimal additional inputs. MSW resources include mixed commercial and residential garbage such as yard trimmings, paper and paperboard, plastics, rubber, leather, textiles, and food wastes. Waste resources such as landfill gas, mill residues, and waste grease are already being utilized for cost-effective renewable energy generation. MSW for bioenergy also represents an opportunity to divert greater volumes of residential and commercial waste from landfills.

  7. Integrated waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Šeruga, Klaudija

    2013-01-01

    The thesis deals with the topic integrated waste from each household, all the way to the centres for waste management. Purpose of this study was to obtain information on waste separation in individual households as well as information on whether individuals are aware of the importance of a proper segregation of waste. With this research I wanted to determine whether it is possible for an individual household to collecte seperate waste and whether respondents are aware of the role and act...

  8. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of Nevada opposed DOE's development of a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As a result, disputes have arisen over how Nevada has spent financial assistance provided by DOE to pay the state's repository program costs. This report reviews Nevada's use of about $32 million in grant funds provided by DOE through June 1989 and found that Nevada improperly spent about $1 million. Nevada used as much as $683,000 for lobbying and litigation expenses that were unauthorized or were expressly prohibited by law, court decision, or grant terms; exceeded a legislative spending limit on socioeconomic studies by about $96,000; and used, contrary to grant terms, about $275,000 from one grant period to pay expenses incurred in the prior year. Also, Nevada did not always exercise adequate internal controls over grant funds, such as timely liquidation of funds advanced to contractors. A permissive approach to grant administration by DOE contributed to Nevada's inappropriate use of grant funds

  9. Plasma reactor waste management systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Robert O., Jr.; Rindt, John R.; Ness, Sumitra R.

    1992-01-01

    The University of North Dakota is developing a plasma reactor system for use in closed-loop processing that includes biological, materials, manufacturing, and waste processing. Direct-current, high-frequency, or microwave discharges will be used to produce plasmas for the treatment of materials. The plasma reactors offer several advantages over other systems, including low operating temperatures, low operating pressures, mechanical simplicity, and relatively safe operation. Human fecal material, sunflowers, oats, soybeans, and plastic were oxidized in a batch plasma reactor. Over 98 percent of the organic material was converted to gaseous products. The solids were then analyzed and a large amount of water and acid-soluble materials were detected. These materials could possibly be used as nutrients for biological systems.

  10. Product specific emissions from municipal solid waste landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Henning; Exner, Stephan; Jørgensen, Anne-Mette; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    1998-01-01

    different countries, composition of the product and physical/chemical/biological properties of waste product components) and output data (e.g. estimated emissions to atmosphere and water) are given for a fictive waste product made of representative types of components (toluene, cellulose, polyvinylchloride...... is significantly reduced in the presence of landfill top-cover, landfill gas combustion units and leachate treatment units. Generally, the sensitivity analysis shows good agreement between the relative proportions of various types of emissions (based on properties of the waste and properties of......This paper presents and verifies the computer tool LCA-LAND for estimation of emissions from specific waste products disposed in municipal solid waste landfills in European countries for use in the inventory analysis of LCA. Examples of input data (e.g. distribution of the waste product in...

  11. USDOE activities in low-level radioactive waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes current research, development and demonstration (R, D and D) programs sponsored by the US Department of Energy in the area of low-level radioactive waste treatment. The US Department of Energy Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program is directed toward a coordinated program covering the period from low-level radioactive waste generation through the decommissioning of the disposal site. This paper addresses the treatment portion of the program. The development efforts include: mechanical methods for metal and compactible waste volume reduction; incineration of trash or other combustibles through the use of controlled air, cyclone, or molten glass furnaces; ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, biological or chemical destruction of nitrates; adsorption treatment of low-concentration aqueous waste streams; combustion of organic liquids; and smelting of metal wastes to reduce their volume and conserve our natural resources. (author)

  12. Problems associated with solid wastes from energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, S.Y.; Fradkin, L.; Barisas, S.; Surles, T.; Morris, S.; Crowther, A.; DeCarlo, V.

    1980-09-01

    Waste streams from many energy-related technologies including coal, oil shale, tar sands, geothermal, oil and gas extraction, and nuclear power generation are reviewed with an emphasis on waste streams from coal and oil shale technologies. This study has two objectives. The first objective is to outline the available information on energy-related solid wastes. Data on chemical composition and hazardous biological characteristics are included, supplemented by regulatory reviews and data on legally designated hazardous waste streams. The second objective is to provide disposal and utilization options. Solid waste disposal and recovery requirements specified under the RCRA are emphasized. Information presented herein should be useful for policy, environmental control, and research and development decision making regarding solid and hazardous wastes from energy production.

  13. Biological wastewater treatment in brewhouses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronov Yuriy Viktorovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article the working principles of wastewater biological treatment for food companies is reviewed, including dairies and breweries, the waters of which are highly concentrated with dissolved organic contaminants and suspended solids. An example of successful implementation is anaerobic-aerobic treatment plants. Implementation of these treatment plants can achieve the required wastewater treatment at the lowest operational expenses and low volumes of secondary waste generated. Waste water from the food companies have high concentration of various organic contaminants (fats, proteins, starch, sugar, etc.. For such wastewater, high rates of suspended solids, grease and other contaminants are characteristic. Wastewater food industry requires effective purification flowsheets using biological treatment facilities. At the moment methods for the anaerobic-aerobic purification are applied. One of such methods is the treatment of wastewater at ASB-reactor (methane reactor and the further tertiary treatment on the OSB-reactor (aeration. Anaerobic process means water treatment processes in anoxic conditions. The anaerobic treatment of organic contamination is based on the process of methane fermentation - the process of converting substances to biogas. The role of biological effluent treatment is discussed with special attention given to combined anaerobic/aerobic treatment. Combining anaerobic pre-treatment with aerobic post-treatment integrates the advantages of both processes, amongst which there are reduced energy consumption (net energy production, reduced biological sludge production and limited space requirements. This combination allows for significant savings for operational costs as compared to complete aerobic treatment without compromising the required discharge standards. Anaerobic treatment is a proven and energy efficient method to treat industrial wastewater effluents. These days, more and more emphasis is laid on low energy use, a

  14. Treatment of liquid wastes using composite resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite ion exchange resins were prepared by coating copper ferrocyanide and hydrous manganese oxide powders on polyurethane foam. The binder used was polyvinyl acetate in alcohol/acetone medium. Studies were conducted in pilot scale using 50 L ion exchange column and treated category III radioactive liquid wastes. About 2000 to 2400 bed volumes of liquid wastes containing radioactive 137Cs and 90Sr were treated. Digestion of the resins was carried out in a 25 L column using alkaline KMnO4. The digested liquid was fixed in cement matrix and the matrices were characterized with respect to compressive strength, biological and leach resistance. (author)

  15. Management, treatment and final disposal of solid hazardous hospital wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical Waste is characterized by its high risk to human health and the environment. The main risk is biological, due to the large amount of biologically contaminated materials present in such waste. However, this does not mean that the chemical and radioactive wastes are less harmful just because they represent a smaller part of the total waste. Hazardous wastes from hospitals can be divided in 3 main categories: Solid Hazardous Hospital Wastes (S.H.H.W.), Liquid Hazardous Hospital Wastes (L.H.H.W.) and Gaseous Hazardous Hospital Wastes (G.H.H.W.) Most gaseous and liquid hazardous wastes are discharged to the environment without treatment. Since this inappropriate disposal practice, however, is not visible to society, there is no societal reaction to such problem. On the contrary, hazardous solid wastes (S.H.H.W.) are visible to society and create worries in the population. As a result, social and political pressures arise, asking for solutions to the disposal problems of such wastes. In response to such pressures and legislation approved by Costa Rica on waste handling and disposal, the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social developed a plan for the handling, treatment, and disposal of hazardous solid wastes at the hospitals and clinics of its system. The objective of the program is to reduce the risk to society of such wastes. In this thesis a cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted to determine the minimum cost at which it is possible to reach a maximum level of reduction in hazardous wastes, transferring to the environment the least possible volume of solid hazardous wastes, and therefore, reducing risk to a minimum. It was found that at the National Children's Hospital the internal handling of hazard solid wastes is conducted with a high level of effectiveness. However, once out of the hospital area, the handling is not effective, because hazardous and common wastes are all mixed together creating a larger amount of S.H.H.W. and reducing the final efficiency

  16. Hepatitis B and C in household and health services solid waste workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Paulo Gomes Mol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human contact with solid waste poses biological, chemical, and physical health risks for workers involved in waste collection, transportation, and storage. The potential risk to human health resulting from contact with health services waste or household waste still sparks considerable controversy. The aim of this study was to identify the context of scientific discussions on risk/infection from the hepatitis B and C viruses in workers that collect solid waste from health services or households. The search covered publications up to 2013 in Brazilian and international databases, and 11 articles were selected through a literature review. Of these, six conclude that there is an increased risk of infection in workers that collect household waste when compared to those unexposed to waste, three point to greater risk for workers that collect health services waste as compared to those that collect ordinary waste, and the other two found no difference between exposed and unexposed individuals.

  17. Construction and Demolition Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Andersen, L.

    Construction and demolition waste (C&D waste) is the waste generated during the building, repair, remodeling or removal of constructions. The constructions can be roads, residential housing and nonresidential buildings. C&D waste has traditionally been considered without any environmental problems...... therefore should be managed accordingly. Another reason is that it has been documented that a large fraction of C&D waste (about 90 %) can be easily recycled and thus can conserve landfill capacity. C&D waste may conveniently be divided into three subcategories: Buildings, roads and excavations. This...

  18. Predisposal Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recognition of the importance of the safe management of radioactive waste means that, over the years, many well-established and effective techniques have been developed, and the nuclear industry and governments have gained considerable experience in this field. Minimization of waste is a fundamental principle underpinning the design and operation of all nuclear operations, together with waste reuse and recycling. For the remaining radioactive waste that will be produced, it is essential that there is a well defined plan (called a waste treatment path) to ensure the safe management and ultimately the safe disposal of radioactive waste so as to guarantee the sustainable long term deployment of nuclear technologies

  19. Spray dryer waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golden, D.

    1988-03-01

    EPRI has conducted a number of studies to provide utilities with cost information on waste management for conventional wet scrubbing. Studies have characterized waste products; developed engineering designs for effective waste handling, disposal, and/or utilization; and estimated waste management costs. A study, completed in late 1986 evaluated spray dryer wastes. On a dollar-per-ton-disposed basis, spray dryer waste management costs were found to be higher than those for either conventional fly ash or scrubber sludge alone. Cost estimates for new and retrofit spray dryer applications must be revised upward from those produced earlier by EPRI.

  20. Hanford Site annual dangerous waste report: Volume 1, Part 2, Generator dangerous waste report, dangerous waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This report contains information on hazardous materials at the Hanford Site. Information consists of shipment date, physical state, chemical nature, waste description, waste number, weight, and waste designation.